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  1. Selective inhibition of TNFR1 reduces osteoclast numbers and is differentiated from anti-TNF in a LPS-driven model of inflammatory bone loss.

    PubMed

    Espirito Santo, A I; Ersek, A; Freidin, A; Feldmann, M; Stoop, A A; Horwood, N J

    2015-09-01

    The treatment of autoimmune disorders has been revolutionised by the introduction of biologics such as anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF). Although in rheumatoid arthritis patients a bone sparing effect of anti-TNF has been shown, the mechanism is not fully understood. Anti-TNF molecules block tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and prevent signalling via both TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1; p55) and TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2; p75). However, signalling via TNFR2 is reported to have protective effects in a number of cell and organ systems. Hence we set out to investigate if pharmacological inhibition of TNFR1 had differential effects compared to pan-TNF inhibition in both an in vitro cell-based model of human osteoclast activity and an in vivo mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteolysis. For the in vitro experiments the anti-human TNFR1 domain antibody (dAb) DMS5541 was used, whereas for the in vivo mouse experiments the anti-mouse TNFR1 dAb DMS5540 was used. We show that selective blocking of TNFR1 signalling reduced osteoclast formation in the presence of TNF. Subcutaneous LPS injection over the calvaria leads to the development of osteolytic lesions within days due to inflammation driven osteoclast formation. In this model, murine TNFR2 genetically fused with mouse IgG1 Fc domain (mTNFR2.Fc), an anti-TNF, did not protect from bone loss in contrast to anti-TNFR1, which significantly reduced lesion development, inflammatory infiltrate, and osteoclast number and size. These results support further exploring the use of TNFR1-selective inhibition in inflammatory bone loss disorders such as osteomyelitis and peri-prosthetic aseptic loosening. PMID:26208457

  2. Implementable strategies and exploratory considerations to reduce costs associated with anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Park, K T; Crandall, Wallace V; Fridge, Jacqueline; Leibowitz, Ian H; Tsou, Marc; Dykes, Dana M H; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Kappelman, Michael D; Colletti, Richard B

    2014-05-01

    A health care system is needed where care is based on the best available evidence and is delivered reliably, efficiently, and less expensively (best care at lower cost). In gastroenterology, anti-tumor necrosis factor agents represent the most effective medical therapeutic option for patients with moderate-to-severe inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but are very expensive and account for nearly a quarter of the cost of IBD care, representing a major area of present and future impact in direct health care costs. The ImproveCareNow Network, consisting of over 55 pediatric IBD centers, seeks ways to improve the value of care in IBD, curtailing unnecessary costs and promoting better health outcomes through systematic and incremental quality improvement initiatives. This report summarizes the key evidence to facilitate the cost-effective use of anti-tumor necrosis factor agents for patients with IBD. Our review outlines the scientific rationale for initiating cost-reducing measures in anti-tumor necrosis factor use and focuses on 3 implementable strategies and 4 exploratory considerations through practical clinical guidelines, as supported by existing evidence. Implementable strategies can be readily integrated into today's daily practice, whereas exploratory considerations can guide research to support future implementation. PMID:24451222

  3. Alternative for Anti-TNF Antibodies for Arthritis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Joseph; Henrionnet, Christel; Pinzano, Astrid; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gillet, Pierre; Netter, Patrick; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Pourel, Jacques; Grossin, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a proinflammatory cytokine, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases, including arthritis. Neutralization of this cytokine by anti-TNF-α antibodies has shown its efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is now widely used. Nevertheless, some patients currently treated with anti-TNF-α remain refractory or become nonresponder to these treatments. In this context, there is a need for new or complementary therapeutic strategies. In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory potentialities of an anti-TNF-α triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), as judged from effects on two rat arthritis models. The inhibitory activity of this TFO on articular cells (synoviocytes and chondrocytes) was verified and compared to that of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro. The use of the anti-TNF-α TFO as a preventive and local treatment in both acute and chronic arthritis models significantly reduced disease development. Furthermore, the TFO efficiently blocked synovitis and cartilage and bone destruction in the joints. The results presented here provide the first evidence that gene targeting by anti-TNF-α TFO modulates arthritis in vivo, thus providing proof-of-concept that it could be used as therapeutic tool for TNF-α-dependent inflammatory disorders. PMID:21811249

  4. Reduced numbers of mucosal DR(int) macrophages and increased numbers of CD103(+) dendritic cells during anti-TNF-α treatment in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Dige, Anders; Magnusson, Maria K; Öhman, Lena; Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Kelsen, Jens; Wick, Mary Jo; Agnholt, Jørgen

    2016-06-01

    Objective Anti-TNF-α treatment constitutes a mainstay in the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD), but its mechanisms of action are not fully understood. We aimed to investigate the effects of adalimumab, a human monoclonal TNF-α antibody, on macrophage (MQ) and dendritic cell (DC) subsets in mucosal biopsies and peripheral blood. Material and methods Intestinal biopsies and blood samples were obtained from 12 different CD patients both before and 4 weeks after the initiation of the induction of adalimumab treatment. Endoscopic disease activity was estimated by the Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease. Biopsies were obtained from inflamed and non-inflamed areas. The numbers of lamina propria CD14 (+) DR(int) and CD14 (+) DR(hi) MQs, CD141(+), CD141(-) and CD103(+ )DCs subsets, and circulating monocytes and DCs were analyzed using flow cytometry. Results At baseline, we observed higher numbers of DR(int) MQs and lower numbers of CD103(+ )DCs in inflamed versus non-inflamed mucosa [843 vs. 391/10(5) lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) (p < 0.05) and 9 vs. 19 × 10(5) LPMCs (p = 0.01), respectively]. After four weeks of adalimumab treatment, the numbers of DR(int) MQs decreased [843 to 379/10(5) LPMCs (p = 0.03)], whereas the numbers of CD103(+ )DCs increased [9-20 × 10(5) LPMCs (p = 0.003)] compared with baseline. In peripheral blood, no alterations were observed in monocyte or DC numbers between baseline and week 4. Conclusions In CD, mucosal inflammation is associated with high numbers of DR(int) MQs and low numbers of CD103(+ )DCs. This composition of intestinal myeloid subsets is reversed by anti-TNF-α treatment. These results suggest that DR(int) MQs play a pivotal role in CD inflammation. PMID:26784676

  5. Influence of Anti-TNF and Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs Therapy on Pulmonary Forced Vital Capacity Associated to Ankylosing Spondylitis: A 2-Year Follow-Up Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Vásquez-Jiménez, José Clemente; De la Cerda-Trujillo, Liliana Faviola; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Norma Alejandra; Díaz-Rizo, Valeria; Díaz-González, Viviana; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto German; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Ingrid Patricia; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo Hernan; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of anti-TNF agents plus synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) versus DMARDs alone for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) with reduced pulmonary function vital capacity (FVC%). Methods. In an observational study, we included AS who had FVC% <80% at baseline. Twenty patients were taking DMARDs and 16 received anti-TNF + DMARDs. Outcome measures: changes in FVC%, BASDAI, BASFI, 6-minute walk test (6MWT), Borg scale after 6MWT, and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire at 24 months. Results. Both DMARDs and anti-TNF + DMARDs groups had similar baseline values in FVC%. Significant improvement was achieved with anti-TNF + DMARDs in FVC%, at 24 months, when compared to DMARDs alone (P = 0.04). Similarly, patients in anti-TNF + DMARDs group had greater improvement in BASDAI, BASFI, Borg scale, and 6MWT when compared to DMARDs alone. After 2 years of follow-up, 14/16 (87.5%) in the anti-TNF + DMARDs group achieved the primary outcome: FVC% ≥80%, compared with 11/20 (55%) in the DMARDs group (P = 0.04). Conclusions. Patients with anti-TNF + DMARDs had a greater improvement in FVC% and cardiopulmonary scales at 24 months compared with DMARDs. This preliminary study supports the fact that anti-TNF agents may offer additional benefits compared to DMARDs in patients with AS who have reduced FVC%. PMID:26078986

  6. Whole cell-based surface plasmon resonance measurement to assess binding of anti-TNF agents to transmembrane target.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Takeharu; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Toyoda, Hiromu

    2016-09-01

    We developed a technique for the measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to detect interactions of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents with transmembrane TNF-α (mTNF-α) on living whole cells. The injection of a suspension of mTNF-α expressing Jurkat cells, used as an analyte, gave a clear binding response to anti-TNF agents, such as etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab, immobilized on sensorchip. The binding response of the analyte cells increased in a concentration-dependent manner and was competitively reduced by adding soluble TNF receptors to the analyte cell suspension. Treatment of analyte cells with free anti-TNF agent before injection reduced the binding response between the analyte cells and immobilized-etanercept on sensorchip, and the inhibitory effect of free anti-TNF agent was concordant with the affinity of anti-TNF agent for soluble TNF-α. These findings indicate that the SPR response arises from specific binding between anti-TNF agent and its target on cell membrane. PMID:27349512

  7. Tocilizumab: is there life beyond anti-TNF blockade?

    PubMed

    Alves, J D; Marinho, A; Serra, M J

    2011-04-01

    Anti-TNF-α therapy has become the most effective biological treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Despite having changed the prognosis of the disease establishing new targets for treatment strategy, there are several aspects that still remain unmatched. About 30% of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis have a less than satisfactory response to anti-TNF therapy, which has led the way for the pursuit of new targets and approaches to treatment. IL-6 is one of these alternative targets and data from the more recent clinical trials involving tocilizumab (an anti-IL-6 soluble receptor antibody) suggest advantages in relation to some clinical aspects which are not addressed by anti-TNF-α treatment. PMID:21272164

  8. Anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody reverses psoriasis through dual inhibition of inflammation and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Yang, Guoyou; Zhang, Junfeng; Xing, Kaiyan; Dai, Lei; Cheng, Lin; Liu, Junli; Deng, Jie; Shi, Gang; Li, Chunlei; Su, Xiaolan; Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Yang; Li, Jia; Yu, Dechao; Xiang, Rong; Wei, Yuquan; Deng, Hongxin

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) antagonists have shown remarkable efficacy in psoriasis; however, the precise mechanisms of action of TNF-α blocking agents mainly focus on their neutralizing TNF-α and its anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we generated a humanized anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody (IBI303) and suggested a potential mechanism of anti-TNF-α therapy for psoriasis. The results of SPR and ELISA indicated that IBI303 has a good affinity to TNF-α. In vitro, it could suppress TNF-α-induced cytotoxicity in WEHI164 cells. In vivo, administration of IBI303 to K14-VEGF transgenic mice led to a significant treatment efficiency in psoriasis in a dose-dependent manner. IHC staining and cytokines-ELISA indicated that TNF-α inhibition strongly reduced inflammatory cells infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokines release, accompanied by suppression of inflamed dermal blood vessels. Mechanistically, in order to explain the anti-angiogenesis effect of anti-TNF-α antibody, the production of cytokine in macrophage conditional medium was measured by ELISA. The result indicated that the massive secretion of TNF-α stimulated by LPS in RAW264.7 cell supernatant was markedly neutralized in a dose-response manner by IBI303, moreover, the expression of NF-κB p65 was down-regulated. Mouse endothelial cell tube formation assay showed that anti-TNF-α could inhibit blood vessels formation directly and indirectly. Collectively, our study suggested a kind of antipsoriatic mechanism of TNF-α inhibitors that is the dual inhibition of inflammation and angiogenesis. PMID:26263167

  9. Crowdsourced assessment of common genetic contribution to predicting anti-TNF treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sieberts, Solveig K; Zhu, Fan; García-García, Javier; Stahl, Eli; Pratap, Abhishek; Pandey, Gaurav; Pappas, Dimitrios; Aguilar, Daniel; Anton, Bernat; Bonet, Jaume; Eksi, Ridvan; Fornés, Oriol; Guney, Emre; Li, Hongdong; Marín, Manuel Alejandro; Panwar, Bharat; Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Poglayen, Daniel; Cui, Jing; Falcao, Andre O; Suver, Christine; Hoff, Bruce; Balagurusamy, Venkat S K; Dillenberger, Donna; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Norman, Thea; Aittokallio, Tero; Ammad-Ud-Din, Muhammad; Azencott, Chloe-Agathe; Bellón, Víctor; Boeva, Valentina; Bunte, Kerstin; Chheda, Himanshu; Cheng, Lu; Corander, Jukka; Dumontier, Michel; Goldenberg, Anna; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Hajiloo, Mohsen; Hidru, Daniel; Jaiswal, Alok; Kaski, Samuel; Khalfaoui, Beyrem; Khan, Suleiman Ali; Kramer, Eric R; Marttinen, Pekka; Mezlini, Aziz M; Molparia, Bhuvan; Pirinen, Matti; Saarela, Janna; Samwald, Matthias; Stoven, Véronique; Tang, Hao; Tang, Jing; Torkamani, Ali; Vert, Jean-Phillipe; Wang, Bo; Wang, Tao; Wennerberg, Krister; Wineinger, Nathan E; Xiao, Guanghua; Xie, Yang; Yeung, Rae; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhao, Cheng; Greenberg, Jeff; Kremer, Joel; Michaud, Kaleb; Barton, Anne; Coenen, Marieke; Mariette, Xavier; Miceli, Corinne; Shadick, Nancy; Weinblatt, Michael; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P; Gerlag, Danielle; Huizinga, Tom W J; Kurreeman, Fina; Allaart, Cornelia F; Louis Bridges, S; Criswell, Lindsey; Moreland, Larry; Klareskog, Lars; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Friend, Stephen; Plenge, Robert; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Oliva, Baldo; Guan, Yuanfang; Mangravite, Lara M; Bridges, S Louis; Criswell, Lindsey; Moreland, Larry; Klareskog, Lars; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K; Friend, Stephen; Plenge, Robert; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Oliva, Baldo; Guan, Yuanfang; Mangravite, Lara M

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects millions world-wide. While anti-TNF treatment is widely used to reduce disease progression, treatment fails in ∼one-third of patients. No biomarker currently exists that identifies non-responders before treatment. A rigorous community-based assessment of the utility of SNP data for predicting anti-TNF treatment efficacy in RA patients was performed in the context of a DREAM Challenge (http://www.synapse.org/RA_Challenge). An open challenge framework enabled the comparative evaluation of predictions developed by 73 research groups using the most comprehensive available data and covering a wide range of state-of-the-art modelling methodologies. Despite a significant genetic heritability estimate of treatment non-response trait (h(2)=0.18, P value=0.02), no significant genetic contribution to prediction accuracy is observed. Results formally confirm the expectations of the rheumatology community that SNP information does not significantly improve predictive performance relative to standard clinical traits, thereby justifying a refocusing of future efforts on collection of other data. PMID:27549343

  10. Mechanism of Action of Anti-TNF Therapy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Levin, Alon D; Wildenberg, Manon E; van den Brink, Gijs R

    2016-08-01

    Several anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] blocking strategies have been evaluated in patients with Crohn's disease. Compounds that have been tested included the full monoclonal IgG1 antibodies infliximab and adalimumab, the pegylated anti-TNF F[ab']2 fragment certolizumab, an IgG4 anti-TNF CDP571 with reduced affinity for the Fc receptor, the soluble TNF receptor I onercept, and the TNF receptor II-Fc fusion protein etanercept. The endpoints of these studies suggest that not all methods of blocking TNF are equal. Here we will review the differences in the clinical, biochemical, and endoscopic endpoints of the major clinical studies. Collectively the data suggest that only IgG1 monoclonal antibodies have the ability to induce complete clinical, biochemical, and endoscopic remission. We discuss the potential multiple modes of action that may contribute to the response to full IgG1 anti-TNFs, focusing on the rapid induction of lamina propria T cell apoptosis and Fc receptor-dependent induction of M2-type wound-healing macrophages. We discuss how novel insights into the mechanism of action of anti-TNFs in Crohn's disease may contribute to the development of novel anti-TNFs with improved efficacy. PMID:26896086

  11. Crowdsourced assessment of common genetic contribution to predicting anti-TNF treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sieberts, Solveig K.; Zhu, Fan; García-García, Javier; Stahl, Eli; Pratap, Abhishek; Pandey, Gaurav; Pappas, Dimitrios; Aguilar, Daniel; Anton, Bernat; Bonet, Jaume; Eksi, Ridvan; Fornés, Oriol; Guney, Emre; Li, Hongdong; Marín, Manuel Alejandro; Panwar, Bharat; Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Poglayen, Daniel; Cui, Jing; Falcao, Andre O.; Suver, Christine; Hoff, Bruce; Balagurusamy, Venkat S. K.; Dillenberger, Donna; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Norman, Thea; Aittokallio, Tero; Ammad-ud-din, Muhammad; Azencott, Chloe-Agathe; Bellón, Víctor; Boeva, Valentina; Bunte, Kerstin; Chheda, Himanshu; Cheng, Lu; Corander, Jukka; Dumontier, Michel; Goldenberg, Anna; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Hajiloo, Mohsen; Hidru, Daniel; Jaiswal, Alok; Kaski, Samuel; Khalfaoui, Beyrem; Khan, Suleiman Ali; Kramer, Eric R.; Marttinen, Pekka; Mezlini, Aziz M.; Molparia, Bhuvan; Pirinen, Matti; Saarela, Janna; Samwald, Matthias; Stoven, Véronique; Tang, Hao; Tang, Jing; Torkamani, Ali; Vert, Jean-Phillipe; Wang, Bo; Wang, Tao; Wennerberg, Krister; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Xiao, Guanghua; Xie, Yang; Yeung, Rae; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhao, Cheng; Calaza, Manuel; Elmarakeby, Haitham; Heath, Lenwood S.; Long, Quan; Moore, Jonathan D.; Opiyo, Stephen Obol; Savage, Richard S.; Zhu, Jun; Greenberg, Jeff; Kremer, Joel; Michaud, Kaleb; Barton, Anne; Coenen, Marieke; Mariette, Xavier; Miceli, Corinne; Shadick, Nancy; Weinblatt, Michael; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P.; Gerlag, Danielle; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Kurreeman, Fina; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Louis Bridges Jr., S.; Criswell, Lindsey; Moreland, Larry; Klareskog, Lars; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Friend, Stephen; Plenge, Robert; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Oliva, Baldo; Guan, Yuanfang; Mangravite, Lara M.; Bridges, S. Louis; Criswell, Lindsey; Moreland, Larry; Klareskog, Lars; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Friend, Stephen; Plenge, Robert; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Oliva, Baldo; Guan, Yuanfang; Mangravite, Lara M.

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects millions world-wide. While anti-TNF treatment is widely used to reduce disease progression, treatment fails in ∼one-third of patients. No biomarker currently exists that identifies non-responders before treatment. A rigorous community-based assessment of the utility of SNP data for predicting anti-TNF treatment efficacy in RA patients was performed in the context of a DREAM Challenge (http://www.synapse.org/RA_Challenge). An open challenge framework enabled the comparative evaluation of predictions developed by 73 research groups using the most comprehensive available data and covering a wide range of state-of-the-art modelling methodologies. Despite a significant genetic heritability estimate of treatment non-response trait (h2=0.18, P value=0.02), no significant genetic contribution to prediction accuracy is observed. Results formally confirm the expectations of the rheumatology community that SNP information does not significantly improve predictive performance relative to standard clinical traits, thereby justifying a refocusing of future efforts on collection of other data. PMID:27549343

  12. Effect of Anti-TNF Antibodies on Clinical Response in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengxu; Xian, Peifeng; Mo, Xianjie

    2016-01-01

    Background. Antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs have been applied for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatment; however, patients having anti-drug antibodies (ADAbs) do not benefit from these drugs. The meta-analysis aims to comprehensively assess the relationship between ADAb positive (ADAb+) and anti-TNF response in RA patients. Methods. Observational studies comparing different clinical response between ADAb+ and ADAb negative groups were included. Odds ratio (OR) with its corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) was used as effect size. Subgroup analyses stratified by TNF inhibitor types and assay methods for ADAb detection were performed. Results. Totally, 10 eligible studies containing 1806 subjects were included. ADAb+ was significantly associated with reduced anti-TNF response to RA at all the time points after follow-up (P < 0.001). Subgroup analysis also supported this significant association (P < 0.05), except for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) group at 3 months, infliximab (INF) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) groups at 6 months, and Immunological Multi-Parameter Chip Technology (IMPACT) group at 12 months. Conclusion. ADAb+ was significantly associated with reduced clinical response in RA patients, and other alternatives should be considered in RA patients presenting ADAb+. PMID:27556040

  13. Anti-TNF therapy: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Claudia; Nanchahal, Jagdeep; Taylor, Peter

    2015-01-01

    While for a century therapeutics has been dominated by small molecules, i.e. organic chemicals of ~400Da absorbable via the gut, this is no longer the case. There are now a plethora of important medicines which are proteins and injectable, which have dramatically improved the therapy of many inflammatory diseases and of cancer. Most of these are monoclonal antibodies, some are receptor Ig Fc fusion proteins, others are cytokines or enzymes. The key to this new aspect of therapeutics has been the filling of unmet needs, and the consequent commercial success, which promoted further research and development. The first ‘biologic’ for a common disease, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), was a monoclonal antibody, infliximab, to human tumour necrosis factor (TNF). This was based on our work, which is described in this review, summarizing how TNF was defined as a good target in RA, how it was developed is described here, as well as future indications for anti-TNF and related agents. Biologics are now the fastest growing sector of therapeutics. PMID:25411043

  14. Assessment of Anti-TNF-α Activities in Keratinocytes Expressing Inducible TNF- α: A Novel Tool for Anti-TNF-α Drug Screening

    PubMed Central

    Udommethaporn, Sutthirat; Tencomnao, Tewin; McGowan, Eileen M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine important in normal and pathological biological processes. Newly synthesized pro-TNF-α is expressed on the plasma membrane and cleaved to release soluble TNF-α protein: both are biologically active. Secreted TNF-α signals through TNF receptors and the membrane-bound TNF-α acts by cell contact-dependent signaling. Anti-TNF-α antibodies have been used effectively for treatment of chronic inflammation, however with adverse side effects. Thus, there is a need for new anti-TNF-α small molecule compounds. Anti-TNF-α activity assays involve treatment of keratinocytes with exogenous TNF-α before or after anti-TNF-α incubation. However, this model fails to address the dual signaling of TNF-α. Here we describe a Doxycycline (Dox)-inducible TNF-α (HaCaT-TNF-α) expression system in keratinocytes. Using this in-vitro model, we show cell inhibition and induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and markers, including IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, NF-κB1, and KRT-16, similar to cells treated with exogenous TNF-α. Sufficient secreted TNF-α produced also activated IL-1β and IL-8 expression in wt HaCaT cells. Importantly, stimulated expression of IL-1β and IL-8 in HaCaT-TNF-α were blocked by Quercetin, a flavanol shown to possess anti-TNF-α activities. This novel in vitro cell model provides an efficient tool to investigate the dual signaling of TNF-α. Importantly, this model provides an effective, fast, and simple screening for compounds with anti-TNF-α activities for chronic inflammatory disease therapies. PMID:27415000

  15. Expression of recombinant human anti-TNF-α scFv-Fc in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds.

    PubMed

    Yao, N; Ai, L; Dong, Y Y; Liu, X M; Wang, D Z; Wang, N; Li, X W; Wang, F W; Li, Xk; Li, H Y; Jiang, C

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant human anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α scFv-Fc was expressed in TKO mutant Arabidopsis thaliana seeds using plant-specific codons. Immunoblotting using a human IgG1 antibody detected the expression of anti-TNF-α proteins in plants. Results from qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the time of harvest significantly affected the protein yield and quality. Our results indicate that the Phaseolus vulgaris β-phaseolin promoter directed anti-TNF-α scFv-Fc expression in A. thaliana seeds, with a maximum yield obtained at 20-days of development. Although the yield of anti-TNF-α scFv-Fc protein was not very high, accumulation of recombinant proteins in seeds is an attractive and simple method that can be used to purify biologically active anti-TNF-α scFv-Fc. PMID:27420937

  16. Clinical use of anti-TNF therapy and increased risk of infections

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Tauseef; Kaitha, Sindhu; Mahmood, Sultan; Ftesi, Abdul; Stone, Jordan; Bronze, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Biologics such as antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs have emerged as important agents in the treatment of many chronic inflammatory diseases, especially in cases refractory to conventional treatment modalities. However, opportunistic infections have become a major safety concern in patients on anti-TNF therapy, and physicians who utilize these agents must understand the increased risks of infection. A literature review of the published data on the risk of bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic infections associated with anti-TNF therapy was performed and the clinical presentation, diagnostic tests, management, and prevention of opportunistic infections in patients receiving anti-TNF therapy were reviewed. Awareness of the therapeutic potential and associated adverse events is necessary for maximizing therapeutic benefits while minimizing adverse effects from anti-TNF treatments. Patients should be adequately vaccinated when possible and closely monitored for early signs of infection. When serious infections occur, withdrawal of anti-TNF therapy may be necessary until the infection has been identified and properly treated. PMID:23569399

  17. A guide to prepare patients with inflammatory bowel diseases for anti-TNF-α therapy.

    PubMed

    Chebli, Júlio Maria Fonseca; Gaburri, Pedro Duarte; Chebli, Liliana Andrade; da Rocha Ribeiro, Tarsila Campanha; Pinto, André Luiz Tavares; Ambrogini Júnior, Orlando; Damião, Adérson Omar Mourão Cintra

    2014-01-01

    Current therapy of moderate-to-severe inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often involves the use of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) agents. Although very effective, theses biologics place the patient at increased risk for developing infections and lymphomas, the latter especially when in combination with thiopurines. Appropriate patient selection, counseling, and education are all important features for the successful use of anti-TNF-α therapy. A thorough history to rule-out contraindications of this therapy and emphasis on monitoring guidelines are important steps preceding administration of anti-TNF-α agents. This therapy should only be considered if a recent evaluation has established that the patient has active IBD. In addition, it is important to exclude disease mimickers. Anti-TNF-α agents have been considered to present a globally favorable benefit/risk ratio. However, it is important that in routine practice, initiation of anti-TNF-α therapy be carefully discussed with the patient, extensively explaining the potential benefits and risks of such treatment. Prior to starting anti-TNF-α therapy, the patients need to be screened for latent tuberculosis, hepatitis B virus infection, and (usually) hepatitis C virus and HIV infection. Vaccination schedules of IBD patients should be evaluated and updated prior to the commencement of anti-TNF-α therapy. Ordinarily, immunization in adult patients with IBD should not deviate from recommended guidelines for the general population. With the exception of live vaccines, immunizations can be safely administered in patients with IBD, even those on immunosuppressants or biologics. The purpose of this review is providing an overview of appropriate steps to prepare patients with IBD for anti-TNF-α therapy. PMID:24667275

  18. Applying Pharmacokinetics to Optimize Dosing of Anti-TNF Biologics in Acute Severe Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Michael J.; Minar, Philip; Vinks, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute severe ulcerative colitis (ASUC), the most aggressive presentation ulcerative colitis (UC), occurs in 15 percent of adults and children with UC. First line therapy with intravenous corticosteroids is ineffective in half of adults and one third of children. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies against TNF (anti-TNF therapy) are emerging as a common treatment for ASUC due to their similar efficacy to calcineurin inhibitors and more favorable adverse effect profile. Aim To comprehensively review the evidence for anti-TNF therapy for ASUC in children and adults with regard to outcomes and pharmacokinetics. Methods PubMed and recent conference proceedings were searched using the terms “ulcerative colitis”, “acute severe ulcerative colitis”, “anti-TNF”, “pharmacokinetics”, and the generic names of specific anti-TNF agents. Results Outcomes after anti-TNF therapy for ASUC remain suboptimal with aboutone half of children and adults undergoing colectomy. While several randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy of anti-TNF therapy for ambulatory patients with moderate to severely active UC, patients in these studies were less ill than those with ASUC. Patients with ASUC may exhibit more rapid clearance of anti-TNF biologics due pharmacokinetic mechanisms influenced by disease severity. Conclusions Conventional weight-based dosing effective in patients with moderately to severely active UC, may not be equally effective in those with ASUC. Personalized anti-TNF dosing strategies that integratepatient factors and early measures of pharmacokinetics and response hold promise for ensuring sustained drug exposure and maximizing early mucosal healing in patients with ASUC. PMID:25809869

  19. New Onset of Dermatomyositis/Polymyositis during Anti-TNF-α Therapies: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Aberer, Werner; Massone, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    We performed a systematic search of databases from 1990 to 2013 to identify articles concerning the new onset of dermatomyositis/polymyositis (DM/PM) in patients treated with anti-TNF-α therapy. We retrieved 13 publications describing 20 patients where the new onset of DM/PM after anti-TNF-α therapy was recorded. 17 patients were affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA), one by Crohn's disease, one by ankylosing spondilytis, and one by seronegative arthritis. In 91% of the cases antinuclear autoantibodies were detected after the introduction of anti-TNF-α therapy. In 6 patients antisynthetase antibodies were detected and other clinical findings as interstitial lung disease (ILD) were recorded. Improvement of DM/PM after anti-TNF suspension (with the concomitant use of other immunosuppressors) was recorded in 94% of cases. The emergence of DM/PM and antisynthetase syndrome seem to be associated with the use of anti-TNF-α agents, especially in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases (mainly RA) with positive autoantibodies before therapy initiation. In particular, physicians should pay attention to patients affected by RA with positive antisynthetase antibodies and/or history of ILD. In those cases, the use of the TNF-α blocking agents may trigger the onset of PM/DM or antisynthetase syndrome or may aggravate/trigger the lung disease. PMID:24600322

  20. Thyroid involvement in ankylosing spondylitis and relationship of thyroid dysfunction with anti-TNF α treatment.

    PubMed

    Tarhan, Figen; Orük, Gonca; Niflioğlu, Ozgür; Ozer, Serhat

    2013-04-01

    Association between rheumatological and autoimmune thyroid disorders has been demonstrated by many studies. However, a few data exist indicating the association between thyroid disorders and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). In this study, the frequency of thyroid disorders in patients with AS and the impact of anti-TNF α therapy on this were investigated. Data of 108 patients (female/male (F/M) 27/81) were analyzed. Data on free T3, free T4, thyroid-stimulating hormone, anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO), anti-thyroglobulin antibodies, and thyroid ultrasound were assessed retrospectively. 44 (F/M 15/29) patients were receiving anti-TNF α, while 64 (F/M 12/52) were receiving other drugs [(sulfasalazine, anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs)]. Among those not receiving anti-TNF α therapy, TPO level was high in 23 patients (mean TPO value 86.69 ± 65.28 U/ml), while it was high only in nine receiving anti-TNF α (mean TPO 36.61 ± 14.02 U/ml) (p < 0.05). Investigating the data regarding gender in both populations, autoimmune thyroid disease frequency was found to be lower in the patient group receiving anti-TNF α treatment. Subclinical hyperthyroidism was discovered in three patients (one female two male), and subclinical hypothyroidism in two (two male). Thyroid nodule was detected in 29 patients. It was concluded that the frequency of thyroid autoimmune disease was higher in our study than that reported in the literature, and the frequency of thyroid disorder in patients with AS was lower in those receiving anti-TNF α compared to those not. This may arise from the role of TNF α on pathogenesis of thyroid disorders. PMID:22614219

  1. Effect of 1-year anti-TNF-α therapy on aortic stiffness, carotid atherosclerosis, and calprotectin in inflammatory arthropathies: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Background Premature arterial stiffening and atherosclerosis are increased in patients with inflammatory arthropathies such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The proinflammatory protein calprotectin is associated with inflammatory arthropathies, vascular pathology, and acute coronary events. We examined the long-term effects of treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antagonists on aortic stiffness and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) in patients with inflammatory arthropathies, and the relationships to the levels of calprotectin. Methods Fifty-five patients with RA, AS, or PsA and a clinical indication for anti-TNF-α therapy were included and followed with regular examinations for 1 year. Thirty-six patients starting with anti-TNF-α therapy were compared with a nontreatment group of 19 patients. Examinations included assessments of aortic stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity, aPWV), CIMT, and plasma calprotectin. Results After 1 year, aPWV (mean (s.d.)) was improved in the treatment group, but not in the control group (−0.54 [0.79] m/s vs. 0.06 [0.61] m/s, respectively; P = 0.004), and CIMT progression (median (quartile cut-points, 25th and 75th percentiles)) was reduced in the treatment group compared to the control group (−0.002 [–0.038, 0.030] mm vs. 0.030 [0.011, 0.043] mm, respectively; P = 0.01). In multivariable analyses, anti-TNF-α therapy over time was associated with improved aPWV (P = 0.02) and reduced CIMT progression (P = 0.04), and calprotectin was longitudinally associated with aPWV (P = 0.02). Conclusions Long-term anti-TNF-α therapy improved aortic stiffness and CIMT progression in patients with inflammatory arthropathies. Calprotectin may be a soluble biomarker reflecting aortic stiffening in these patients. PMID:22378036

  2. The influence of anti-TNF agents on hemoglobin levels of patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Koutroubakis, Ioannis E.; Ramos–Rivers, Claudia; Regueiro, Miguel; Koutroumpakis, Efstratios; Click, Benjamin; Schwartz, Marc; Swoger, Jason; Baidoo, Leonard; Hashash, Jana G.; Barrie, Arthur; Dunn, Michael A.; Binion, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are an important component of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treatment but data on their influence on anemia, a frequent complication of IBD is limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of anti-TNF agents on hemoglobin (Hb) levels in a large IBD cohort. Methods Prospectively collected demographic, clinical, laboratory and treatment data from IBD patients who started anti-TNF treatment at a tertiary referral center during the years 2010–2012 were analyzed. Follow-up data including disease activity scores (Harvey-Bradshaw Index or ulcerative colitis activity index), quality of life scores [short IBD questionnaire (SIBDQ)] completed at each visit, and laboratory data were analyzed. Data from the year of anti-TNF initiation (year 0) and the following year (year 1) were compared. Results A total of 430 IBD patients (324 with Crohn’s disease, 51.6% females) started anti-TNF treatment. The prevalence of anemia and median Hb levels did not change between year 0 and year 1. Median SIBDQ was significantly improved at year 1 (p=0.002). IBD patients with anemia had significantly higher median Hb levels at year 1 compared to year 0 (p=0.0009). Hematopoietic response (increase of Hb ≥2 g/dL) was observed in only 33.6 % of the 134 anemic IBD patients, despite iron replacement being administered in 126 anemic patients (oral 77 %). Improvement in Hb levels was independently significantly correlated with change of CRP levels (p=0.04) and immunomodulators use (p=0.03). Conclusion Anemia remains a significant manifestation of IBD one year after treatment with anti-TNF agents. PMID:25933393

  3. Do patients with active RA have differences in disease activity and perceptions if anti-TNF naïve versus anti-TNF experienced? Baseline results of the optimization of adalimumab trial

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Janet; Thorne, J. Carter; Haraoui, Boulos Paul; Psaradellis, Eliofotisti; Sampalis, John

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The chance of a good response in RA is attenuated in previous anti-TNF users who start new anti-TNF therapy compared to biologic naïve patients. In active RA, those with previous anti-TNF exposure compared to anti-TNF naïve may have different baseline disease activity and patient perceptions when starting a new anti-TNF treatment that could explain the observed response differences. Material/Methods The aim of this study was a post hoc analysis of baseline characteristics of patients enrolled in the Optimization of Adalimumab study that was a treat to target vs. routine care study in patients initiating adalimumab. As per the protocol, a maximum of 20% anti-TNF experienced patients were enrolled in the 300 patient trial. Twelve (4.0%) were excluded who previously used other biologics. Baseline characteristics including age, gender, tender and swollen joint counts, disease activity (DAS28), function (HAQ-DI), patient global assessment, patient satisfaction with current treatment, and inflammatory markers (CRP, ESR), were compared between previously anti-TNF experienced [etanercept or infliximab (EXP)], and anti-TNF naïve patients (NAÏVE). Results The mean (SD) age was 54.8 (13.3) years; 81.0% were female, and 237 (79.0%) were anti-TNF naïve while 51 (17.0%) patients were anti-TNF experienced (29 with etanercept, 16 with infliximab, and 6 for both). The mean (SD) baseline in EXP versus NAÏVE groups respectively was: CRP=21.7(32.9) vs. 17.5(20.7); ESR=28.7(22.5) vs. 29.8(20.4); SJC=10.5(6.0) vs. 10.7(5.6); TJC=12.8(7.1) vs. 12.3(7.3); and DAS28=6.0(1.2) vs. 5.8(1.1). None of the between-group differences were statistically significant, however, the HAQ-DI in EXP was 1.7(0.6) compared to 1.5(0.7) for the NAÏVE (P=0.021). Additionally, EXP patients had a higher patient global score [71.3(26.1) vs. 61.9(26.2), P=0.021]. Conclusions Although anti-TNF naïve and experienced patients who initiated adalimumab were similar, with respect to several

  4. Excess cerebral TNF causing glutamate excitotoxicity rationalizes treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and neurogenic pain by anti-TNF agents.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ian A; Vissel, Bryce

    2016-01-01

    The basic mechanism of the major neurodegenerative diseases, including neurogenic pain, needs to be agreed upon before rational treatments can be determined, but this knowledge is still in a state of flux. Most have agreed for decades that these disease states, both infectious and non-infectious, share arguments incriminating excitotoxicity induced by excessive extracellular cerebral glutamate. Excess cerebral levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) are also documented in the same group of disease states. However, no agreement exists on overarching mechanism for the harmful effects of excess TNF, nor, indeed how extracellular cerebral glutamate reaches toxic levels in these conditions. Here, we link the two, collecting and arguing the evidence that, across the range of neurodegenerative diseases, excessive TNF harms the central nervous system largely through causing extracellular glutamate to accumulate to levels high enough to inhibit synaptic activity or kill neurons and therefore their associated synapses as well. TNF can be predicted from the broader literature to cause this glutamate accumulation not only by increasing glutamate production by enhancing glutaminase, but in addition simultaneously reducing glutamate clearance by inhibiting re-uptake proteins. We also discuss the effects of a TNF receptor biological fusion protein (etanercept) and the indirect anti-TNF agents dithio-thalidomides, nilotinab, and cannabinoids on these neurological conditions. The therapeutic effects of 6-diazo-5-oxo-norleucine, ceptriaxone, and riluzole, agents unrelated to TNF but which either inhibit glutaminase or enhance re-uptake proteins, but do not do both, as would anti-TNF agents, are also discussed in this context. By pointing to excess extracellular glutamate as the target, these arguments greatly strengthen the case, put now for many years, to test appropriately delivered ant-TNF agents to treat neurodegenerative diseases in randomly controlled trials. PMID:27596607

  5. Effects of Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor α (anti-TNF) agents on Bone

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Vivian K.; Stein, C. Michael; Perrien, Daniel S.; Griffin, Marie R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the review TNF inhibitors are effective for achieving disease control in several inflammatory diseases. Although anti-TNF agents can inhibit bone loss in vitro, their role in the prevention of clinically relevant outcomes such as osteoporosis and fractures has not been clearly established. Recent findings There are many studies of the effects of TNF inhibitors on markers of bone turnover; however few have measured bone mineral density (BMD) or fractures. Most of these studies have small sample sizes and a minority had a placebo control group. Overall these studies suggest that the anti-resorptive effects of anti-TNF therapy are related to control of disease activity. Summary The antiresorptive effects of TNF inhibitors are likely related to their anti-inflammatory properties. Studies to date have not demonstrated any advantages of TNF inhibitors over traditional non biologic therapies in the prevention of bone loss and fractures. PMID:22810364

  6. Decrease of asymmetric dimethyl arginine after anti-TNF therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Di Franco, Manuela; Metere, Alessio; Conti, Fabrizio; Iannuccelli, Cristina; Agati, Luciano; Valesini, Guido

    2014-11-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular events. Asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, contributes to the impairment of endothelial function, the earlier and reversible stage of atherosclerotic plaque formation. Since tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibits enzymatic degradation of ADMA, anti-TNF agents could restore its physiological level. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of TNF inhibitors on ADMA serum levels in patients with RA. Our results suggest a possible effect of anti-TNF drugs on ADMA serum levels; longer studies would be necessary to confirm the role ADMA in assessing cardiovascular risk in RA. PMID:25381982

  7. Successful effect of tocilizumab in anti-TNF-α-induced palmoplantar pustulosis in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rueda-Gotor, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A; Blanco Alonso, Ricardo; Gonzalez-Vela, Carmen; Lopez-Obregon, Cristina; González-López, Marcos A

    2012-10-01

    Anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) agents are effective drugs used in several chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Psoriasiform lesions, including palmoplantar pustulosis, have been described following anti-TNF-α therapy. These lesions often resolve with topical therapy with or without discontinuation of these drugs. However, in some cases, psoriasiform lesions may persist despite anti-TNF-α withdrawal. We report on two RA patients treated with adalimumab (ADA) who developed palmoplantar pustular despite dermatological treatment and ADA discontinuation. Tocilizumab (TCZ) therapy was initiated because of persistence of skin lesions and flare of the disease. Following treatment with this drug, complete resolution of the dermatological lesions and induction of remission of RA was achieved. To the best of our knowledge, management of palmoplantar pustulosis due to TNF-α agents with TCZ leading to both improvement of the disease and resolution of the cutaneous lesions has not previously been reported. PMID:22857979

  8. Production and Purification of a Novel Anti-TNF-α Single Chain Fragment Variable Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Ali Akbar; Hamzeh-Mivehroud, Maryam; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: TNF-α is an inflammatory cytokine with a key role in initiation of inflammatory responses. Anti-TNF-α antibodies are being used in clinic for the purpose of diagnosis and treatment due to their high specificity. The objective of the current study was to express and purify an anti-TNF-α scFv antibody identified by phage display technology. Methods: The DNA coding sequence of the identified scFv was cloned into pET28a vector and the corresponding protein was expressed as 6×His tagged using E.coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS expression system followed by affinity purification on Ni-Sepharose affinity column. Results: The J44 scFv antibody was cloned into the expression vector and successfully expressed and purified. The purity of the scFv fraction was confirmed using SDS-PAGE analysis. Western blotting technique was used to detect expression of 6×His tagged protein. Conclusion: In the current study an anti-TNF-α scFv antibody was successfully expressed in bacterial expression system and purified on affinity column. The purified protein can be used in different in vitro and in vivo experiments in order to elucidate its functionality. PMID:26793614

  9. Paradoxical effects of anti-TNF-α agents in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Daniel; Prati, Clément

    2014-01-01

    Anti-TNF agents represent a major breakthrough in the management of inflammatory diseases. Among the side effects of these agents are the so-called paradoxical effects described in this review. They represent new onset or exacerbation of a condition (symptom/disease), usually improved with TNF blockers. These paradoxical effects are mainly psoriasiform skin reactions, uveitis and granulomatous diseases (such as sarcoidosis and Crohn's disease). Infrequent and probably underreported, they should be discussed from the viewpoint of spontaneous features of the underlying disease (e.g., uveitis or psoriasis in a case of spondyloarthritis). The causal mechanism of occurrence is still a matter of debate, but may implicate an imbalance of cytokines toward interferons, chemokines and probably IL-17. These reactions may raise differential diagnosis problems. Symptoms resolve, most of the time, due to the discontinuation of the anti-TNF agent or sometimes a switch to another TNF blocker; but in some cases, it is a class effect that could lead to the withdrawal of all anti-TNF agents. PMID:24325385

  10. Effects of hyaluronic acid conjugation on anti-TNF-α inhibition of inflammation in burns.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Emily E; Sun, Liang Tso; Natesan, Shanmugasundaram; Zamora, David O; Christy, Robert J; Washburn, Newell R

    2014-05-01

    Biomaterials capable of neutralizing specific cytokines could form the basis for treating a broad range of conditions characterized by intense, local inflammation. Severe burns, spanning partial- to full-thickness of the dermis, can result in complications due to acute inflammation that contributes to burn progression, and early mediation may be a key factor in rescuing thermally injured tissue from secondary necrosis to improve healing outcomes. In this work, we examined the effects on burn progression and influence on the inflammatory microenvironment of topical application of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) alone, mixed with hyaluronic acid (HA) or conjugated to HA. We found that non-conjugated anti-TNF-α decreased macrophage infiltration to a greater extent than that conjugated to HA; however, there was little effect on the degree of progression or IL-1β levels. A simple transport model is proposed to analyze the results, which predicts qualitative and quantitative differences between untreated burn sites and those treated with the conjugates. Our results indicate that conjugation of anti-TNF-α to high molecular weight HA provides sustained, local modulation of the post-injury inflammatory responses compared to direct administration of non-conjugated antibodies. PMID:23765644

  11. Specific immunotherapy with mugwort pollen allergoid reduce bradykinin release into the nasal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Grzanka, Alicja; Jawor, Barbara; Czecior, Eugeniusz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A pathomechanism of allergic rhinitis is complex. A neurogenic mechanism seems to play a significant role in this phenomenon. Aim The evaluation of influence of specific immunotherapy of mugwort pollen allergic patients on the bradykinin concentration in the nasal lavage fluid. Material and methods The study included 22 seasonal allergic rhinitis patients. Thirty persons with monovalent allergy to mugwort pollen, confirmed with skin prick tests and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E, underwent a 3-year-long allergen immunotherapy with the mugwort extract (Allergovit, Allergopharma, Germany). The control group was composed of 9 persons with polyvalent sensitivity to pollen, who were treated with pharmacotherapy. Before the allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) and in subsequent years before the pollen seasons, a provocation allergen test with the mugwort extract was performed, together with collection of nasal fluids, where bradykinin concentration was determined according to Proud method. Results There were similar levels of bradykinin in both groups at baseline prior to therapy (AIT group: 584.0 ±87.2 vs. controls 606.3 ±106.5 pg/ml) and changes after allergen challenge 1112.4 ±334.8 vs. 1013.3 ±305.9 pg/ml as well. The bradykinin concentration in nasal lavage fluid after mugwort challenge in 1 year was lower in the AIT group (824.1 ±184.2 pg/ml vs. 1000.4 ±411.5 pg/l; p < 005) with a further significant decrease after the 2nd and 3rd year of specific immunotherapy. Significant reduction of symptoms and medications use was observed in hyposensitized patients. Conclusions A decreased level of bradykinin as a result of AIT suggests that some of the symptomatic benefits of AIT may be related to the reduced release of bradykinin into nasal secretions. These values correlate with clinical improvement within the course of treatment. PMID:27605897

  12. CDP 571: anti-TNF monoclonal antibody, BAY 103356, BAY W 3356, Humicade.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    CDP 571 [anti-TNF monoclonal antibody, BAY 103356, BAY W 3356, Humicade] is a recombinant humanised antibody directed against tumour necrosis factor (TNF). CDP 571 has an advantage over the mouse/human chimera anti-TNF-alpha antibody, nerelimomab, in that it is suitable for multiple dosing as it is not so immunogenic. Celltech constructed CDP 571 by grafting the section of mouse antibody that recognises TNF onto a human IgG4 antibody. In the third quarter of 1999, Celltech merged with Chiroscience to form Celltech Chiroscience. In January 2000, Medeva was merged into Celltech Chiroscience, which was renamed as Celltech Group. The research division of Celltech Group is now called Celltech R&D (formerly Celltech Chiroscience Discovery) and the manufacturing and marketing division is called Celltech Pharmaceuticals (formerly Celltech Medeva Pharma). Celltech has completed two phase III trials, involving around 670 patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease; however, both these trials failed to meet their primary endpoints. Biogen and Celltech group will review the scope of their collaboration following additional analysis of the phase III data and discussions with regulatory authorities. The Celltech Group intends to devote significant resources towards enhancing the capability of Celltech Pharmaceuticals to market CDP 571 and other new drugs (such as CDP 860 and CDP 870) as specialised hospital products. Phase II trials were underway in the United Kingdom for use of the drug in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, these trials have also been discontinued. Celltech Group is no longer developing CDP 571 for septic shock, based on negative results with the related compound nerelimomab. The compound was in phase III trials for septic shock in France, Belgium, the United Kingdom, Germany and the US. Celltech also plans to investigate the use of CDP 571 in psoriasis via a collaboration with Biogen (USA). In January 2002, AFX (Agence France-Presse and

  13. [How to optimize the antiTNF alpha therapy in spondylitis?].

    PubMed

    Castro Villegas, Maria del Carmen; Escudero Contreras, Alejandro; Miranda García, Maria Dolores; Collantes Estévez, Eduardo

    2012-03-01

    TNFalpha inhibitors have been a major advance in the treatment of spondyloarthropathies, having demonstrated their safety and efficacy, with higher response and survival rates than those observed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The fact that disease modifying anti-arthritic drugs (DMARD) have shown utility in the treatment of this disease, especially in the axial forms, gives them greater importance, since it is known that up to 30%of patients do not respond to treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, we must take into account that these drugs are expensive and not without side effects, so it is necessary to optimize their use. We intend to review the use of antiTNF alpha in spondyloarthropathies and review the available evidence on strategies that can help with their rational use. PMID:22418285

  14. DISSEMINATED GRANULOMA ANNULARE: A CUTANEOUS ADVERSE EFFECT OF ANTI-TNF AGENTS

    PubMed Central

    Ratnarathorn, Mondhipa; Raychaudhuri, Siba P; Naguwa, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors, such as etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab, bind to TNF-α and thereby act as anti-inflammatory agents. This group of drugs has been approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, moderate to severe plaque psoriasis, ankylosing spodylitis, Crohn disease, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. We describe a 56-year-old woman who developed an erythematous pruritic rash on both arms—diagnosed as granuloma annulare by skin biopsy—approximately 22 months after initiating adalimumab for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. On stopping adalimumab there was total clearance of the skin lesions, but a similar rash developed again when her treatment was switched to another anti-TNF agent (etanercept). This clinical observation supports a link between TNF inhibition and the development of granuloma annulare. PMID:22345789

  15. Large Vessel Vasculitis Occurring in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient under Anti-TNF Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cestelli, Valentina; Spinella, Amelia; Campomori, Federica; Esposito, Carmela; Ciaffi, Sara; Sandri, Gilda; Ferri, Clodoveo

    2014-01-01

    Vasculitis is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the presence of necrotic inflammatory phenomena and destruction of blood vessels. Vasculitis is classified as primary (idiopathic) or secondary to infections, connective tissue diseases and drugs but can also be considered as a paraneoplastic phenomenon. Evidence shows that the increasing use of biological agents results in a growing number of reports of autoimmune diseases induced by these therapies. An inflammatory articular chronic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis may be complicated by extra-articular manifestations, such as cutaneous or systemic vasculitis. Herewith, we describe the case of a great vessels arteritis in a patient affected by rheumatoid arthritis in therapy with an anti-TNF agent (etanercept). PMID:25544845

  16. Radiation-Induced Astrogliosis and Blood-Brain Barrier Damage Can Be Abrogated Using Anti-TNF Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Christy M.; Gaber, M. Waleed Sabek, Omaima M.; Zawaski, Janice A.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: In this article, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) in the initiation of acute damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and brain tissue following radiotherapy (RT) for CNS tumors. Methods and Materials: Intravital microscopy and a closed cranial window technique were used to measure quantitatively BBB permeability to FITC-dextran 4.4-kDa molecules, leukocyte adhesion (Rhodamine-6G) and vessel diameters before and after 20-Gy cranial radiation with and without treatment with anti-TNF. Immunohistochemistry was used to quantify astrogliosis post-RT and immunofluorescence was used to visualize protein expression of TNF and ICAM-1 post-RT. Recombinant TNF (rTNF) was used to elucidate the role of TNF in leukocyte adhesion and vessel diameter. Results: Mice treated with anti-TNF showed significantly lower permeability and leukocyte adhesion at 24 and 48 h post-RT vs. RT-only animals. We observed a significant decrease in arteriole diameters at 48 h post-RT that was inhibited in TNF-treated animals. We also saw a significant increase in activated astrocytes following RT that was significantly lower in the anti-TNF-treated group. In addition, immunofluorescence showed protein expression of TNF and ICAM-1 in the cerebral cortex that was inhibited with anti-TNF treatment. Finally, administration of rTNF induced a decrease in arteriole diameter and a significant increase in leukocyte adhesion in venules and arterioles. Conclusions: TNF plays a significant role in acute changes in BBB permeability, leukocyte adhesion, arteriole diameter, and astrocyte activation following cranial radiation. Treatment with anti-TNF protects the brain's microvascular network from the acute damage following RT.

  17. Lymphoma in patients treated with anti-TNF: results of the 3-year prospective French RATIO registry

    PubMed Central

    Mariette, Xavier; Tubach, Florence; Bagheri, Haleh; Bardet, Michel; Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Gaudin, Philippe; Heresbach, Denis; Martin, Antoine; Schaeverbeke, Thierry; Salmon, Dominique; Lemann, Marc; Hermine, Olivier; Raphael, Martine; Ravaud, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Objective To describe cases of lymphoma associated with anti-TNF therapy, identify risk factors, estimate the incidence and compare risks for different anti-TNF agents. Methods We designed a national prospective registry (RATIO) from 2004 to 2006, for collecting all cases of lymphoma in French patients receiving anti-TNF therapy, whatever the indication. We conducted a case-control analysis including two controls treated with anti-TNF per case and an incidence study of lymphoma with the French population used as reference.. Results We collected 38 cases of lymphoma, 31 non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) (26 B-cell and 5 T-cell), 5 Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) and 2 Hodgkin’s-like lymphoma. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was detected in 2 of 2 Hodgkin’s-like lymphoma, 3 of 5 HL and one NHL. Patients receiving adalimumab or infliximab had a higher risk than those treated with etanercept: SIR = 4.1 (2.3–7.1) and 3.6 (2.3–5.6) versus 0.9 (0.4– 1.8). The exposure to adalimumab or infliximab versus etanercept was an independent risk factor for lymphoma in the case-control study: odds ratio=4.7 (1.3– 17.7) and 4.1 (1.4–12.5), respectively. The sex and age- adjusted incidence rate of lymphoma was 42.1 per 100,000 patient-years. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7–3.2). Conclusion Some lymphomas associated with immunosuppression may occur in patients receiving anti TNF therapy, and the risk of lymphoma is higher with monoclonal-antibody therapy than with soluble-receptor therapy. PMID:19828563

  18. Gastrointestinal stability of therapeutic anti-TNF α IgG1 monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vipul; Varum, Felipe; Bravo, Roberto; Furrer, Esther; Basit, Abdul W

    2016-04-11

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are highly effective therapeutic agents, administered exclusively by the parenteral route owing to their previously-documented instability in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract when delivered orally. To investigate the extent of the validity of this assumption, the stability of the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) neutralizing IgG1 mAbs, infliximab and adalimumab, was studied in human GI conditions. In gastric fluid, infliximab and adalimumab degraded rapidly, with complete degradation occurring within 1min. In small intestinal fluid, the molecules were shown to be more stable, but nonetheless degraded within a short time frame of 30min. Investigations into the mechanisms responsible for infliximab and adalimumab instability in the small intestine revealed that the proteolytic enzyme elastase, and to a lesser extent the enzymes trypsin and chymotrypsin, was responsible for their degradation. By contrast, in the human colon, 75% and 50% of the dose of infliximab and adalimumab, respectively, were intact after 60min, with conversion of mAbs into F(ab')2 Fab and Fc fragments detected in colonic conditions. These data indicate that therapeutic IgG1 antibodies are more stable in the colon than in the upper GI tract, therefore highlighting the potential for oral delivery of anti-TNF-α mAbs targeted to the colon. PMID:26892815

  19. Biological Treatments in Behçet's Disease: Beyond Anti-TNF Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Luisa; Caso, Paolo; Bascherini, Vittoria; Frediani, Bruno; Cimaz, Rolando; Nieves-Martín, Laura; Atteno, Mariangela; Raffaele, Carmela G. L.; Tarantino, Giusyda; Galeazzi, Mauro; Punzi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is universally recognized as a multisystemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology with chronic course and unpredictable exacerbations: its clinical spectrum varies from pure vasculitic manifestations with thrombotic complications to protean inflammatory involvement of multiple organs and tissues. Treatment has been revolutionized by the progressed knowledge in the pathogenetic mechanisms of BD, involving dysfunction and oversecretion of multiple proinflammatory molecules, chiefly tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, interleukin- (IL-) 1β, and IL-6. However, although biological treatment with anti-TNF-α agents has been largely demonstrated to be effective in BD, not all patients are definite responders, and this beneficial response might drop off over time. Therefore, additional therapies for a subset of refractory patients with BD are inevitably needed. Different agents targeting various cytokines and their receptors or cell surface molecules have been studied: the IL-1 receptor has been targeted by anakinra, the IL-1 by canakinumab and gevokizumab, the IL-6 receptor by tocilizumab, the IL12/23 receptor by ustekinumab, and the B-lymphocyte antigen CD-20 by rituximab. The aim of this review is to summarize all current experiences and the most recent evidence regarding these novel approaches with biological drugs other than TNF-α blockers in BD, providing a valuable addition to the actually available therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:25061259

  20. Diffusion of pharmaceuticals: cross-country evidence of anti-TNF drugs.

    PubMed

    Brekke, Kurt Richard; Dalen, Dag Morten; Holmås, Tor Helge

    2014-12-01

    This article studies the diffusion of biopharmaceuticals across European countries, focusing on anti-TNF drugs, which are used to treat autoimmune diseases (e.g., rheumatism, psoriasis). We use detailed sales information on the three brands Remicade, Enbrel and Humira for nine European countries covering the period from the first launch in 2000 until becoming blockbusters in 2009. Descriptive statistics reveal large variations across countries in per-capita consumption and price levels both overall and at the brand level. We explore potential sources for the cross-country consumption differences by estimating several multivariate regression models. Our results show that large parts of the cross-country variation are explained by time-invariant country-specific factors (e.g., disease prevalence, demographics, health care system). We also find that differences in income [gross domestic product (GDP) per capita] and health spending (share of GDP) explain the cross-country variation in consumption, while relative price differences seem to have limited impact. PMID:24146261

  1. Dose modifications of anti-TNF drugs in rheumatoid arthritis patients under real-world settings: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ferriols-Lisart, Rafael; Ferriols-Lisart, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Anti-TNF dose modifications in rheumatoid arthritis have implications on healthcare resource utilization. The objective was to systematically review the dose modifications, both escalations and reductions, of currently available anti-TNF drugs (adalimumab, certolizumab, etanercept, golimumab and infliximab) in the real-world setting. We performed a systematic literature search of MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, EMBASE, Indice Médico Español databases and American College of Rheumatology and European League Against Rheumatism annual congresses databases. PRISMA and MOOSE guidelines were followed. Only observational studies were included. Clinical trials were excluded since they do not reflect routine clinical practice. Dose escalations and reductions of the anti-TNF drug and their magnitude were collected. Thirty-four studies fulfill the inclusion criteria. Etanercept was associated with the lower percentage of patients under dose escalation (4.5 %; range 0-22 %), both in naïve (4.9 %) and non-naïve patients (1.3 %). Adalimumab and infliximab were associated with significantly higher percentages. Dose modification magnitude in those patients compared to basal dose was significantly different between treatments; 7.1 % (95 % CI 6.3-7.9 %) in etanercept, 30.4 % (95 % CI 28.3-32.5 %) in adalimumab and 21 % (95 % CI 20.3-21.7 %) in infliximab. Adalimumab and infliximab were associated with a higher risk of dose escalation relative to etanercept. There were no significant differences in the dose reduction percentages for the whole group of patients between treatments. In rheumatoid arthritis, etanercept is associated with a significantly lower percentage of dose-escalated patients and a lower magnitude of dose modification. Significant differences in the dose reduction between anti-TNF drugs evaluated were not observed. PMID:25638015

  2. Diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis (DSO) of the mandible in SAPHO syndrome: a novel approach with anti-TNF therapy. Systematic review.

    PubMed

    Marí, Antonio; Morla, Arnaud; Melero, Mireia; Schiavone, Rocio; Rodríguez, Jesus

    2014-12-01

    Diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible is now considered a local manifestation of SAPHO syndrome. This rare condition is thought to be of auto-inflammatory origin. The myriad of treatments shown in the literature, are basically empirical and reflect its unknown origin. We present a clinical case of refractory DSO treated with an anti-TNF drug (etanercept) with complete clinical remission. We advise against radical surgery and an interdisciplinary approach is recommended. A systematic literature review was also conducted. PMID:25441866

  3. Previous cancer and/or lymphoma in patients with refractory IBD--pro: anti-TNF or immunosuppressive treatment.

    PubMed

    Laharie, David

    2014-01-01

    Management of patients with IBD and a past or current malignancy has become more frequent in daily practice. As trends in IBD therapy are moving to more immunomodulators, administered earlier and for longer periods than ever, an increasing number of IBD patients with a prior malignancy may receive conventional immunosuppressants (IS) and/or anti-TNF. However, few data are available for managing this IBD subpopulation due to three main reasons: (1) previous cancer is usually an exclusion criterion from all clinical trials, (2) guidelines do not recommend any immunomodulator use in patients who have had a malignancy within the last 5 years, and (3) physicians are reluctant to use immunomodulators which could reactivate dormant micrometastasis. However, there is a lack of scientific evidence for avoiding immunomodulators in IBD patients with previous cancer. In a recently published cohort of patients with previous cancer, no excess incidence of incident cancer was associated with exposure to IS. Data with anti-TNF are lacking in IBD. Recently in a registry including 79 patients with refractory IBD who started an anti-TNF therapy while having had a prior malignancy within the past 5 years, survival rates without incident cancer were 96 and 72% at 1 and 5 years, respectively. Thus, evidence to not start IS and/or anti-TNF therapy in IBD patients who have had a previous cancer is weak. Pending larger studies, a case-by-case joint decision taken with the oncologist and the patient is recommended, and should take IBD and the cancer risk-benefit ratio for using immunomodulators to treat refractory disease into consideration. PMID:25531363

  4. 2010 Update of the international ASAS recommendations for the use of anti-TNF agents in patients with axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    van der Heijde, Désirée; Sieper, Joachim; Maksymowych, Walter P; Dougados, Maxime; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Landewé, Robert; Rudwaleit, Martin; Braun, Jürgen

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents the second update of the Assessment in SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) consensus statement on the use of anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA). A major change from the previous recommendations is that patients fulfilling the ASAS axial SpA criteria, which also include patients fulfilling the modified New York criteria for ankylosing spondylitis, can be treated with anti-TNF agents. This makes an earlier start in the disease process possible. A second major change is the mandatory pretreatment before anti-TNF agents can be started. All patients should have tried a minimum of two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for a minimum of 4 weeks in total. This is significantly shorter than the previous requirement of 3 months. As previously, patients with axial symptoms require no further pretreatment. Patients with symptomatic peripheral symptoms should normally have had an adequate therapeutic trial of a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, preferably sulfasalazine. Sulfasalazine is no longer mandatory in this group of patients. Finally, efficacy should be evaluated after at least 12 weeks. The remaining recommendations stayed largely unchanged. PMID:21540200

  5. Stability study of full-length antibody (anti-TNF alpha) loaded PLGA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Marquette, S; Peerboom, C; Yates, A; Denis, L; Langer, I; Amighi, K; Goole, J

    2014-08-15

    Antibodies (Abs) require the development of stable formulations and specific delivery strategies given their susceptibility to a variety of physical and chemical degradation pathways. In this study, the encapsulation of an antibody into polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) based microspheres was explored to obtain a controlled-release of the incorporated drug. In order to avoid stability issues, a solid-in-oil-in-water (s/o/w) method was preferred. The solid phase was made of anti-TNF alpha monoclonal antibody (MAb) spray-dried microparticles, and the PLGA microspheres were produced using two different polymers (i.e., Resomer(®) RG505 and Resomer(®) RG755S). The stability of the MAb incorporated into the microspheres was investigated under three conditions (5 ± 3°C, 25 ± 2°C/60% RH and 40 ± 2°C/75% RH) for 12 weeks. During this stability study, it was demonstrated that the MAb loaded PLGA microspheres were stable when stored at 5 ± 3°C and that the Resomer(®) RG755S, composed of 75%(w/w) lactic acid as PLGA, was preferred to preserve the stability of the system. Storage at temperatures higher than 5°C led to antibody stability issues such as aggregation, fragmentation and loss of activity. The release profiles were also altered. Physical ageing of the system associated with changes in the glass transition temperature and enthalpy of relaxation was noticed during the storage of the MAb loaded PLGA microspheres. PMID:24792974

  6. Genetic Variations in Pattern Recognition Receptor Loci Are Associated with Anti-TNF Response in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sode, Jacob; Vogel, Ulla; Bank, Steffen; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Hetland, Merete Lund; Locht, Henning; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Andersen, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether genetic variation within genes related to the Toll-like receptor, inflammasome and interferon-γ pathways contributes to the differences in treatment response to tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (anti-TNF) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods In a retrospective case-case study, we assessed 23 functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 15 genes. We included 538 anti-TNF naïve Danish RA patients from the nationwide DANBIO database. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to detect associations (p-value<0.05) between genotypes and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) treatment responses. False Discovery Rate corrections for multiple testing (q-value) and stratified analyses were performed to investigate association with individual therapies and IgM-rheumatoid factor (RF) status. Results Six of twenty successfully genotyped polymorphisms were nominally associated with EULAR treatment response. Three of these were in weak to moderate linkage disequilibrium with polymorphisms previously reported associated with anti-TNF treatment response. TLR5(rs5744174) variant allele carriers (odds ratio(OR) = 1.7(1.1–2.5),p = 0.010,q = 0.46) and TLR1(rs4833095) homozygous variant carriers (OR = 2.8(1.1–7.4),p = 0.037,q = 0.46) had higher odds for a positive treatment response. NLRP3(rs10754558) variant allele carriers (odds ratio(OR) = 0.6(0.4–1.0),p = 0.045,q = 0.46) were more likely to have a negative treatment response. The association in TLR5(rs5744174) remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons among patients negative for RF (OR = 6.2(2.4–16.3),p = 0.0002,q = 0.024). No other association withstood correction for multiple testing. Post hoc analyses showed that change in Patient Global score on a visual analogue scale (VAS) and change in pain VAS were the main factors responsible for the association. Conclusions We reproduced previously reported associations between

  7. Differential effects of anti-TNF-α and anti-IL-12/23 agents on human leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Navarro, Cesar; de Pablo, Carmen; Collado-Diaz, Víctor; Orden, Samuel; Blas-Garcia, Ana; Martínez-Cuesta, María Ángeles; Esplugues, Juan V; Alvarez, Angeles

    2015-10-15

    Enhanced leukocyte recruitment is an inflammatory process that occurs during early phases of the vascular dysfunction that characterises atherosclerosis. We evaluated the impact of anti-TNF-α (adalimumab, infliximab and etanercept) and anti-IL-12/23 (ustekinumab) on interactions between human leukocytes and endothelial cells in a flow chamber that reproduced in vivo conditions. Clinical concentrations of anti-TNF-α were evaluated on the leukocyte recruitment induced by a variety of endothelial (TNF-α, interleukin-1β, lymphotoxin-α and angiotensin-II) and leukocyte (PAF, IL-12 and IL-23) stimuli related to inflammation and atherosclerosis. Treatment with anti-TNF-α, even before or after establishing the inflammatory situation induced by TNF-α, diminished leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions induced by this stimuli. Our results also implicated adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin) in the actions of anti-TNF-α in terms of leukocyte adhesion to endothelium. However, anti-TNF-α drugs did not influence the actions of interleukin-1β, but prevented those of lymphotoxin-α and angiotensin-II. However, once established, inflammatory response elicited by the latter three stimuli could not be reversed. Pre-treatment with anti-TNF-α, also prevented leukocyte actions induced by IL-23 on PBMC rolling flux and rolling velocity and by IL-12 on PMN adhesion. Ustekinumab exhibited a more discreet profile, having no effect on leukocyte recruitment induced by any of the endothelial stimuli, while blocking the effects of IL-23 on leukocyte activation and those of IL-12 on PMN adhesion and PAF on PBMC rolling velocity. These findings endorse the idea that biological anti-inflammatory drugs, in particular anti-TNF-α, have the capacity to influence cardiovascular risk accompanying psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis by ameliorating vascular inflammation. PMID:26344475

  8. Candidate's single-nucleotide polymorphism predictors of treatment nonresponse to the first anti-TNF inhibitor in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Schiotis, Ruxandra; Sánchez, Alejandra; Escudero, Alejandro; Bartolomé, Nerea; Szczypiorska, Magdalena; Font, Pilar; Martínez, Antonio; Tejedor, Diego; Artieda, Marta; Mulero, Juan; Buzoianu, Anca; Collantes-Estévez, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study is to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) predictors of treatment nonresponse to the first anti-TNF-alpha agent in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Patients were classified as "nonresponders" if they failed to achieve improvement ≥50 % of the initial BASDAI. We selected candidate SNPs previously reported, associated with susceptibility or pathogenesis of AS and with other spondylarthropaties (SpAs). The predictors of nonresponse were modeled with multiple logistic regression. The predictive power of the genetic model of nonresponse to treatment was tested with AUC-ROC. One hundred and twenty-one (121) AS patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of the candidate SNPs tested for association with treatment effectiveness, five independent predictors were identified: rs917997, rs755622, rs1800896, rs3740691, and rs1061622. The genetic model of nonresponse to treatment had a predictive power of 0.77 (95 % CI 0.68-0.86). Our study identified several polymorphisms which could be the useful genetic biomarkers in predicting nonresponse to anti-TNF-alpha therapy. PMID:24337767

  9. Successful Treatment of Primary Cutaneous Mucormycosis Complicating Anti-TNF Therapy with a Combination of Surgical Debridement and Oral Posaconazole.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Jose F; Yakoub, Danny; Cho-Vega, Jeong Hee

    2015-10-01

    Lipid formulations of amphotericin B remain the first-line antifungal therapy for invasive mucormycosis. Posaconazole is an alternative for salvage therapy, but its use as primary therapy is not recommended due to the paucity of clinical data. Here we describe the case of a 57-year-old diabetic woman receiving etanercept and prednisone for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis who developed primary cutaneous mucormycosis after a minor gardening injury. Infection was successfully treated with aggressive surgical debridement followed by a 6-week course of the new delayed-release tablet formulation of posaconazole and temporary withholding of anti-TNF treatment. Primary antifungal therapy with posaconazole can be considered in selected cases of cutaneous mucormycosis. PMID:26112998

  10. Optimal Doses of Methotrexate Combined with Anti-TNF Therapy to Maintain Clinical Remission in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, David T

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Methotrexate (MTX) is sometimes used as part of combination therapy for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]; however, the optimal MTX dose for combination therapy has not been established. This study compared the efficacy of lower-dose and higher-dose MTX with anti tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF) therapy among IBD patients. Methods: Retrospective chart review was performed of 88 IBD patients at our center between 2010 and 2013. Low-dose MTX was defined as ≤ 12.5mg/week and high-dose MTX as 15–25mg/week. Patients who met the criteria for clinical remission [Harvey-Bradshaw Index ≤ 4, Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index ≤ 2] at baseline were followed for up to 42 months. Chart review occurred in 6-month intervals. The primary outcome was consecutive months in remission prior to relapse. Secondary outcomes included other indicators of worsening disease [endoscopic inflammation, steroid use, therapy escalation/addition, or surgery] and adverse events. Regression analysis and Kaplan–Meier survival analysis were completed. Results: We identified 73 [83%] dual-therapy patients, of whom 32 low-dose and 14 high-dose individuals achieved remission. When compared with high-dose patients, low-dose patients were more likely to relapse [log-rank test, p < 0.01]. Secondary indicators of worsening disease occurred during 34.4% of low-dose review periods and 31.4% of high-dose review periods [p = 0.67]; 3/52 [6%] low-dose patients and 3/21 [14%] high-dose patients [p = 0.34] discontinued MTX therapy due to adverse events. Conclusions: When combined with anti-TNF therapy, MTX at doses of >12.5mg/week was more effective at maintaining clinical remission than lower doses. These findings will guide management of combination therapy in IBD patients. PMID:25616487

  11. Impact of 24 months of anti-TNF therapy versus methotrexate on body weight in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Sfriso, Paolo; Caso, Francesco; Filardo, Giuseppe Sebastiano; Botsios, Costantino; Costa, Luisa; Scarpa, Raffaele; Todesco, Silvano; Spinella, Paolo; Oliviero, Francesca; Punzi, Leonardo

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of anti-TNF-α therapy on the body weight of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients following 24 months of treatment. Data were collected on all RA patients included in the Veneto Region's Registry of Biological Therapy from January 2007 to July 2012. Inclusion criteria were: start of monotherapy with adalimumab, etanercept, or methotrexate, no previous use of biologic therapy, and at least 24 months of treatment. At baseline, 12, and 24 months, each patient completed a questionnaire about physical activity, smoking, alcohol, and food habits. One hundred and thirty-one RA patients in monotherapy with etanercept (n = 47), adalimumab (n = 44), and methotrexate (n = 40) were enrolled for this study. After 24 months of therapy, there was an increase of weight only in patients treated with anti-TNF-α. Patients on etanercept and adalimumab therapy showed a risk to gain weight six times greater compared to those on methotrexate therapy. The results of present study show that the use of anti-TNF-α in RA patients can be associated to a significant increase of body weight. This increase is not shown in patients under treatment with methotrexate. A more careful evaluation of weight changes needs to be considered in RA patients under anti-TNF-α treatment. PMID:27048267

  12. The tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1B polymorphisms predict response to anti-TNF therapy in patients with autoimmune disease: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjuan; Xu, Hui; Wang, Xiuxiu; Gu, Junying; Xiong, Huizi; Shi, Yuling

    2015-09-01

    Numerous published data on the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1B (TNFRSF1B) gene polymorphisms are shown to be associated with response or non-response to anti-TNF therapy in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis and Crohn's Disease (CD). The aim of this study is to investigate whether the TNFRSF1B rs1061622 T/G or TNFRSF1A A/G rs767455 polymorphisms can predict the response to anti-TNF-based therapy in patients with autoimmune diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies on the association between TNFRSF1B rs1061622 T/G polymorphism or TNFRSF1A A/G rs767455 polymorphism and non-responsiveness to anti-TNF therapy in autoimmune diseases. A total of 8 studies involving 929 subjects for TNFRSF1B rs1061622 and 564 subjects for TNFRSF1A rs767455 were finally considered. These studies consisted of seven studies on the TNFRSF1B polymorphism and four studies on the TNFRSF1A polymorphism. Meta-analysis showed significant association between the TNFRSF1B rs1061622 allele and non-responders to anti-TNF therapy [T/G odds ratio (OR) 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57-0.93, p=0.01]. Stratification by disease type indicated an association between the TNFRSF1B rs1061622 allele and non-responders to TNF antagonist in RA (T/G OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.48-0.99, p<0.05) and psoriasis (T/G OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.23-0.67, p<0.001), but not in CD (T/G OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.57-0.93, p=0.57). And there was no association between TNFRSF1A rs767455 genotype and non-responders to the anti-TNF therapy (A/G OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.70-1.23, p=0.59). This meta-analysis demonstrates that TNFRSF1B T allele carriers show a better response to anti-TNF therapy, and individuals carrying TNFRSF1A A allele have no relationship with the response to anti-TNF therapy for autoimmune diseases. The genotyping of this polymorphism could help to optimize the treatment by identifying patients with a likely poor response to biological drugs. PMID:26071216

  13. Target effector role of vascular endothelium in the inflammatory response: insights from the clinical trial of anti-TNF alpha antibody in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Paleolog, E

    1997-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by chronic joint inflammation and infiltration by cells from the blood, especially activated T cells and macrophages, together with formation of new blood vessels. The overgrowth of the synovial lesion results eventually in destruction of cartilage and bone. Cytokines play a major role in RA, both in systemic inflammatory processes, such as induction of acute phase protein synthesis, and in the stimulation of new blood vessel development and recruitment of leucocytes to developing lesions. The focus for the interplay of many cytokines is the endothelium, the lining layer of the vasculature. This is the primary target for circulating mediators, and it controls the traffic of cells and molecules from the bloodstream into underlying tissues. Targeting the action of individual cytokines--for example, using antibody against tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), has been shown to be very effective in the treatment of RA. Blockade of TNF alpha activity results in deactivation of the endothelium, manifested as reduced expression of adhesion molecules and chemoattractant cytokines, leading to diminished trafficking of inflammatory cells to synovial joints. In addition anti-TNF alpha decreases circulating levels of the potent angiogenic cytokine VEGF, suggesting that new blood vessel formation, and hence the supply of nutrients to the growing synovial lesion, is also affected. These observations lend further support to the hypothesis that interruption of a component of the cytokine network in RA may modulate disease progression, and point the way towards the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease states. PMID:9497911

  14. NIR and MR imaging supported hydrogel based delivery system for anti-TNF alpha probiotic therapy of IBD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janjic, Jelena M.; Berlec, Ales; Bagia, Christina; Liu, Lu S.; Jeric, Irenej; Gach, Michael; Janjic, Bratislav M.; Strukelj, Borut

    2016-03-01

    Current treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is largely symptomatic and consists of anti-inflammatory agents, immune-suppressives or antibiotics, whereby local luminal action is preferred to minimize systemic side-effects. Recently, anti-TNFα therapy has shown considerable success and is now being routinely used. Here we present a novel approach of using perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoemulsion containing hydrogels (nanoemulgels) as imaging supported delivery systems for anti-TNF alpha probiotic delivery in IBD. To further facilitate image-guided therapy a food-grade lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis capable of TNFα-binding was engineered to incorporate infrared fluorescent protein (IRFP). This modified bacteria was then incorporated into novel PFC nanoemulgels. The nanoemulgels presented here are designed to deliver locally anti-TNFα probiotic in the lower colon and rectum and provide dual imaging signature of gel delivery (MRI) across the rectum and lower colon and bacteria release (NIR). NIR imaging data in vitro demonstrates high IRFP expressing and TNFα-binding bacteria loading in the hydrogel and complete release in 3 hours. Stability tests indicate that gels remain stable for at least 14 days showing no significant change in droplet size, zeta potential and pH. Flow cytometry analyses demonstrate the NIRF expressing bacteria L. lactis binds TNFα in vitro upon release from the gels. Magnetic resonance and near-infrared imaging in vitro demonstrates homogeneity of hydrogels and the imaging capacity of the overall formulation.

  15. Anti-TNF drives regulatory T cell expansion by paradoxically promoting membrane TNF-TNF-RII binding in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dao Xuan; Ehrenstein, Michael R

    2016-06-27

    The interplay between inflammatory and regulatory pathways orchestrates an effective immune response that provides protection from pathogens while limiting injury to host tissue. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a pivotal inflammatory cytokine, but there is conflicting evidence as to whether it boosts or inhibits regulatory T cells (T reg cells). In this study, we show that the therapeutic anti-TNF antibody adalimumab, but not the soluble TNF receptor etanercept, paradoxically promoted the interaction between monocytes and T reg cells isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Adalimumab bound to monocyte membrane TNF from RA patients and unexpectedly enhanced its expression and its binding to TNF-RII expressed on T reg cells. As a consequence, adalimumab expanded functional Foxp3(+) T reg cells equipped to suppress Th17 cells through an IL-2/STAT5-dependent mechanism. Our data not only highlight the beneficial effect of membrane TNF on T reg cell numbers during chronic inflammation, but in addition reveal how a therapeutic antibody that is thought to act by simply blocking its target can enhance the regulatory properties of this proinflammatory cytokine. PMID:27270893

  16. Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor and human leukocyte antigen-C genotypes in rheumatoid arthritis primary responders and non-responders to anti-TNF-α therapy.

    PubMed

    McGeough, Cathy M; Berrar, Daniel; Wright, Gary; Mathews, Clare; Gilmore, Paula; Cunningham, Rodat T; Bjourson, Anthony J

    2012-06-01

    The identification of patients who will respond to anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α) therapy will improve the efficacy, safety, and economic impact of these agents. We investigated whether killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes are related to response to anti-TNF-α therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Sixty-four RA patients and 100 healthy controls were genotyped for 16 KIR genes and human leukocyte antigen-C (HLA-C) group 1/2 using polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSOP). Each patient received anti-TNF-α therapy (adalimumab, etanercept, or infliximab), and clinical responses were evaluated after 3 months using the disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28). We investigated the correlations between the carriership of KIR genes, HLA-C group 1/2 genes, and clinical data with response to therapy. Patients responding to therapy showed a significantly higher frequency of KIR2DS2/KIR2DL2 (67.7% R vs. 33.3% NR; P = 0.012). A positive clinical outcome was associated with an activating KIR-HLA genotype; KIR2DS2 (+) HLA-C group 1/2 homozygous. Inversely, non-response was associated with the relatively inhibitory KIR2DS2 (-) HLA-C group 1/2 heterozygous genotype. The KIR and HLA-C genotype of an RA patient may provide predictive information for response to anti-TNF-α therapy. PMID:21373785

  17. The Effects of Infliximab on Laminin, NFκB, and Anti-TNF Expression through Its Effect on Ischemic Liver Tissue.

    PubMed

    Akdogan, Remzi Adnan; Kalkan, Yildiray; Tümkaya, Levent; Rakici, Halil; Akdogan, Elif

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective effects of infliximab on expression of laminin, anti-TNF, and NFκB in the rat hepatic cells after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). A total of 30 male Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups: Control (C), sham I/R (ISC), and I/R+ infliximab (ISC inf); each group comprised 10 animals. C group animals underwent laparotomy without I/R injury. In ISC groups after undergoing laparotomy, 1 hour of superior mesenteric artery ligation was done, which was followed by 1 hour of reperfusion. In the ISC inf group, 3 days before I/R, infliximab (3 mg/kg) was administered intravenously. All animals were killed at the end of reperfusion and hepatic tissue samples were obtained for histopathological and histochemical investigations in all groups. Laminin, anti-TNF, and NFκB immunoreactivity were performed for all groups. ISC caused severe histopathological injury including mucosal erosions, inflammatory cell infiltration, necrosis, hemorrhage, and villous congestion. Infliximab treatment significantly attenuated the severity of intestinal I/R injury and it is shown by laminin, anti-TNF, and NFκB immunoreactivity. Because of its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, infliximab pretreatment may have protective effects on hepatic cells in the experimental intestinal I/R model of rats. PMID:27143962

  18. Cost savings of anti-TNF therapy using a test-based strategy versus an empirical dose escalation in Crohn's disease patients who lose response to infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Roblin, Xavier; Attar, Alain; Lamure, Michel; Savarieau, Bernard; Brunel, Pierre; Duru, Gérard; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of pharmacokinetics is associated with cost savings in anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy, but the long-term cost savings in a large cohort of Crohn's disease (CD) patients are unknown. Aim The goal of this study was to compare the cost of anti-TNF therapy in two cohorts of CD patients losing response to infliximab, one using a test-based strategy and one an empirical dose escalation. Methods We used a selected mathematical model to describe the trajectories of CD patients based on a discrete event system. This design allowed us to track over a given period a double cohort of patients who moved randomly and asynchronously from one state to another, while keeping all the information on their entire trajectory. Both cohorts were modeled using state diagram parameters where transition probabilities from one state to another are derived from literature data. Costs were estimated based on the French health care system. Results Cost savings among the 10,000 CD patients using a test-based strategy were €131,300,293 at 5 years. At 5 years the mean cost saving was €13,130 per patient. The direct cost of the test had no impact on the results until the cost per test reached €2,000. Conclusions A test-based strategy leads to major cost savings related to anti-TNF therapy in CD. PMID:27123185

  19. The Effects of Infliximab on Laminin, NFκB, and Anti-TNF Expression through Its Effect on Ischemic Liver Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Akdogan, Remzi Adnan; Kalkan, Yildiray; Tümkaya, Levent; Rakici, Halil; Akdogan, Elif

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective effects of infliximab on expression of laminin, anti-TNF, and NFκB in the rat hepatic cells after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). A total of 30 male Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups: Control (C), sham I/R (ISC), and I/R+ infliximab (ISC inf); each group comprised 10 animals. C group animals underwent laparotomy without I/R injury. In ISC groups after undergoing laparotomy, 1 hour of superior mesenteric artery ligation was done, which was followed by 1 hour of reperfusion. In the ISC inf group, 3 days before I/R, infliximab (3 mg/kg) was administered intravenously. All animals were killed at the end of reperfusion and hepatic tissue samples were obtained for histopathological and histochemical investigations in all groups. Laminin, anti-TNF, and NFκB immunoreactivity were performed for all groups. ISC caused severe histopathological injury including mucosal erosions, inflammatory cell infiltration, necrosis, hemorrhage, and villous congestion. Infliximab treatment significantly attenuated the severity of intestinal I/R injury and it is shown by laminin, anti-TNF, and NFκB immunoreactivity. Because of its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, infliximab pretreatment may have protective effects on hepatic cells in the experimental intestinal I/R model of rats. PMID:27143962

  20. Circulating levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate are elevated in severe, but not mild psoriasis and are unresponsive to anti-TNF-α treatment

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Antonio; Xu, Ning; Sar, Daniel G.; Haeggström, Jesper Z.; Ståhle, Mona; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are bioactive molecules with a putative role in inflammation. Alterations in sphingolipids, in particular ceramides, have been consistently observed in psoriatic skin. Herein, we quantified the circulating sphingolipid profile in individuals with mild or severe psoriasis as well as healthy controls. In addition, the effects of anti-TNF-α treatment were determined. Levels of sphingoid bases, including sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), increased in severe (P < 0.001; n = 32), but not in mild (n = 32), psoriasis relative to healthy controls (n = 32). These alterations were not reversed in severe patients (n = 16) after anti-TNF-α treatment despite significant improvement in psoriasis lesions. Circulating levels of sphingomyelins and ceramides shifted in a fatty acid chain length-dependent manner. These alterations were also observed in psoriasis skin lesions and were associated with changes in mRNA levels of ceramide synthases. The lack of S1P response to treatment may have pathobiological implications due to its close relation to the vascular and immune systems. In particular, increased levels of sphingolipids and especially S1P in severe psoriasis patients requiring biological treatment may potentially be associated with cardiovascular comorbidities. The fact that shifts in S1P levels were not ameliorated by anti-TNF-α treatment, despite improvements in the skin lesions, further supports targeting S1P receptors as therapy for severe psoriasis. PMID:26174087

  1. Circulating levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate are elevated in severe, but not mild psoriasis and are unresponsive to anti-TNF-α treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checa, Antonio; Xu, Ning; Sar, Daniel G.; Haeggström, Jesper Z.; Ståhle, Mona; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2015-07-01

    Sphingolipids are bioactive molecules with a putative role in inflammation. Alterations in sphingolipids, in particular ceramides, have been consistently observed in psoriatic skin. Herein, we quantified the circulating sphingolipid profile in individuals with mild or severe psoriasis as well as healthy controls. In addition, the effects of anti-TNF-α treatment were determined. Levels of sphingoid bases, including sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), increased in severe (P < 0.001 n = 32), but not in mild (n = 32), psoriasis relative to healthy controls (n = 32). These alterations were not reversed in severe patients (n = 16) after anti-TNF-α treatment despite significant improvement in psoriasis lesions. Circulating levels of sphingomyelins and ceramides shifted in a fatty acid chain length-dependent manner. These alterations were also observed in psoriasis skin lesions and were associated with changes in mRNA levels of ceramide synthases. The lack of S1P response to treatment may have pathobiological implications due to its close relation to the vascular and immune systems. In particular, increased levels of sphingolipids and especially S1P in severe psoriasis patients requiring biological treatment may potentially be associated with cardiovascular comorbidities. The fact that shifts in S1P levels were not ameliorated by anti-TNF-α treatment, despite improvements in the skin lesions, further supports targeting S1P receptors as therapy for severe psoriasis.

  2. Convergent Random Forest predictor: methodology for predicting drug response from genome-scale data applied to anti-TNF response.

    PubMed

    Bienkowska, Jadwiga R; Dalgin, Gul S; Batliwalla, Franak; Allaire, Normand; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Gregersen, Peter K; Carulli, John P

    2009-12-01

    Biomarker development for prediction of patient response to therapy is one of the goals of molecular profiling of human tissues. Due to the large number of transcripts, relatively limited number of samples, and high variability of data, identification of predictive biomarkers is a challenge for data analysis. Furthermore, many genes may be responsible for drug response differences, but often only a few are sufficient for accurate prediction. Here we present an analysis approach, the Convergent Random Forest (CRF) method, for the identification of highly predictive biomarkers. The aim is to select from genome-wide expression data a small number of non-redundant biomarkers that could be developed into a simple and robust diagnostic tool. Our method combines the Random Forest classifier and gene expression clustering to rank and select a small number of predictive genes. We evaluated the CRF approach by analyzing four different data sets. The first set contains transcript profiles of whole blood from rheumatoid arthritis patients, collected before anti-TNF treatment, and their subsequent response to the therapy. In this set, CRF identified 8 transcripts predicting response to therapy with 89% accuracy. We also applied the CRF to the analysis of three previously published expression data sets. For all sets, we have compared the CRF and recursive support vector machines (RSVM) approaches to feature selection and classification. In all cases the CRF selects much smaller number of features, five to eight genes, while achieving similar or better performance on both training and independent testing sets of data. For both methods performance estimates using cross-validation is similar to performance on independent samples. The method has been implemented in R and is available from the authors upon request: Jadwiga.Bienkowska@biogenidec.com. PMID:19699293

  3. Similar Clinical and Surgical Outcomes Achieved with Early Compared to Late Anti-TNF Induction in Mild-to-Moderate Ulcerative Colitis: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Fedorak, Darryl K.; Dieleman, Levinus A.; Halloran, Brendan P.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Biologic agents targeting tumor necrosis factor alpha are effective in the management of ulcerative colitis (UC), but their use is often postponed until after failure of other treatment modalities. Objectives. We aim to determine if earlier treatment with infliximab or adalimumab alters clinical and surgical outcomes in UC patients. Methods. A retrospective cohort study was conducted evaluating UC outpatients treated with infliximab or adalimumab from 2003 to 2014. Patients were stratified by time to first anti-TNF exposure; early initiation was defined as starting treatment within three years of diagnosis. Primary outcomes were colectomy, UC-related hospitalization, and clinical secondary loss of response. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess time to the primary outcomes. Results. 115 patients were included (78 infliximab, 37 adalimumab). Median follow-up was 175.6 weeks (IQR 72.4–228.4 weeks). Fifty-seven (49.6%) patients received early anti-TNF therapy; median time to treatment in this group was 38.1 (23.3–91.0) weeks compared to 414.0 (254.0–561.3) weeks in the late initiator cohort (p < 0.0001). Patients treated with early anti-TNF therapy had more severe endoscopic disease at induction (mean Mayo endoscopy subscore 2.46 (SD ± 0.66) versus 1.86 (±0.67), p < 0.001) and trended towards increased risk of colectomy (17.5% versus 8.6%, p = 0.16) and UC-related hospitalization (43.9% versus 27.6%, p = 0.07). In multivariate regression analysis, early anti-TNF induction was not associated with colectomy (HR 2.02 [95% CI: 0.57–7.20]), hospitalization (HR 1.66 [0.84–3.30]), or secondary loss of response (HR 0.86 [0.52–1.42]). Conclusions. Anti-TNF therapy is initiated earlier in patients with severe UC but earlier treatment does not prevent hospitalization, colectomy, or secondary loss of response. PMID:27478817

  4. Passive immunotherapy targeting amyloid-β reduces cerebral amyloid angiopathy and improves vascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Bales, Kelly R; O'Neill, Sharon M; Pozdnyakov, Nikolay; Pan, Feng; Caouette, David; Pi, YeQing; Wood, Kathleen M; Volfson, Dmitri; Cirrito, John R; Han, Byung-Hee; Johnson, Andrew W; Zipfel, Gregory J; Samad, Tarek A

    2016-02-01

    Prominent cerebral amyloid angiopathy is often observed in the brains of elderly individuals and is almost universally found in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is characterized by accumulation of the shorter amyloid-β isoform(s) (predominantly amyloid-β40) in the walls of leptomeningeal and cortical arterioles and is likely a contributory factor to vascular dysfunction leading to stroke and dementia in the elderly. We used transgenic mice with prominent cerebral amyloid angiopathy to investigate the ability of ponezumab, an anti-amyloid-β40 selective antibody, to attenuate amyloid-β accrual in cerebral vessels and to acutely restore vascular reactivity. Chronic administration of ponezumab to transgenic mice led to a significant reduction in amyloid and amyloid-β accumulation both in leptomeningeal and brain vessels when measured by intravital multiphoton imaging and immunohistochemistry. By enriching for cerebral vascular elements, we also measured a significant reduction in the levels of soluble amyloid-β biochemically. We hypothesized that the reduction in vascular amyloid-β40 after ponezumab administration may reflect the ability of ponezumab to mobilize an interstitial fluid pool of amyloid-β40 in brain. Acutely, ponezumab triggered a significant and transient increase in interstitial fluid amyloid-β40 levels in old plaque-bearing transgenic mice but not in young animals. We also measured a beneficial effect on vascular reactivity following acute administration of ponezumab, even in vessels where there was a severe cerebral amyloid angiopathy burden. Taken together, the beneficial effects ponezumab administration has on reducing the rate of cerebral amyloid angiopathy deposition and restoring cerebral vascular health favours a mechanism that involves rapid removal and/or neutralization of amyloid-β species that may otherwise be detrimental to normal vessel function. PMID:26493635

  5. NOVEL IMMUNOTHERAPIES

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is still a fatal disease. Despite advances in high-dose chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation, and the development of novel therapeutics, relapse of the underlying disease remains the primary cause of treatment failure. Strategies for post-transplantation immunomodulation are desirable for eradication of remaining tumor cells. To this end, immunotherapy aimed at inducing myeloma-specific immunity in patients has been explored. Idiotype protein, secreted by myeloma cells, has been the primary target for immunotherapy as it is the best defined tumor-specific antigen. This chapter focuses on novel immunotherapies that are being developed to treat patients with myeloma. I will discuss potential myeloma antigens, antigen-specific T cells and their function on myeloma tumor cells, and T-cell-based and antibody-based immunotherapies for myeloma. Furthermore, clinical studies of T-cell-based immunotherapy in the form of vaccination, allogeneic stem cell transplantation and donor lymphocyte infusions, with or without donor vaccination using patient-derived idiotype, and future application of donor-derived or patient-derived, antigen-specific T-cell infusion in this disease are also discussed. Based on the specificity of the immune effector molecules and cells, immunotherapies with specific T cells or therapeutic antibodies may represent novel strategies for the treatment of multiple myeloma in the near future. PMID:20010170

  6. Lack of replication of genetic predictors for the rheumatoid arthritis response to anti-TNF treatments: a prospective case-only study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to replicate the strong associations that a recent genome wide association study (GWAS) has found between 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and response to anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) treatment in 89 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study is very important because, according to published simulations, associations as strong as the reported ones will mean that these SNPs could be used as predictors of response at the individual level. Methods Disease activity score (DAS28) was evaluated in 151 anti-TNF treated patients with RA of Spanish ancestry at baseline and every 3 months thereafter. Genotypes of the 16 putative predictor SNPs were obtained by single-base extension. Association between the relative change in DAS28 and SNP genotypes was tested by linear regression. In addition, logistic regression was applied to compare genotypes in non-responders (n = 34) versus good-responders (n = 61) following the EULAR response criteria. Results None of the analyses showed any significant association between the 16 SNPs and response to anti-TNF treatments at 3 or 6 months. Results were also negative when only patients treated with infliximab (66.9% of the total) were separately analyzed. These negative results were obtained in spite of a very good statistical power to replicate the reported strong associations. Conclusions We still do not have any sound evidence of genetic variants associated with RA response to anti-TNF treatments. In addition, the possibility we had envisaged of using the results of a recent GWAS for prediction in individual patients should be dismissed. PMID:20423481

  7. Drug Retention Rates and Treatment Discontinuation among Anti-TNF-α Agents in Psoriatic Arthritis and Ankylosing Spondylitis in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Fabbroni, Marta; Costa, Luisa; Pagano, Veronica Anna; Frediani, Bruno; Manganelli, Stefania; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The study aim was to determine treatment persistence rates and to identify causes of discontinuation in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients in clinical practice. Methods. Patients treated with adalimumab (ADA), etanercept (ETA), or infliximab (INF) were retrospectively included. Treatment persistence rates were analyzed by means of a stepwise logistic regression. Differences between therapy duration were assessed by means of an analysis of variance model (ANOVA), while a chi-square test was used to evaluate relationships between therapies and causes of treatment discontinuation and the administration of concomitant disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) among therapies and types of disease considering completed courses of therapy versus courses that were discontinued. Results. 268 patients received a total of 353 anti-TNF treatment courses (97 ADA, 180 ETA, and 76 INF). Comparison among therapies showed significant difference regarding the treatment persistence rates due to the contrast between ETA and INF (P = 0.0062). We observed that 84.7% of patients were still responding after 6 months of follow-up. Comparison among diseases showed that there were significant differences between PsA and AS (P = 0.0073) and PsA and PsA with predominant axial involvement (P = 0.0467) in terms of duration of the therapy, while there were no significant differences with regard to the persistence rate. Conclusions. In this cohort, anti-TNF-α therapy was associated with high drug persistence rates. As in rheumatoid arthritis, switching to another anti-TNF-α agent can be an effective option when, during the treatment of AS or PsA, therapy is suspended because of inefficacy or an adverse event. Combination therapy with DMARDs was associated with a better persistence rate. PMID:25110401

  8. The anti-TNF-α antibody infliximab inhibits the expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 in a selective hepatic-radiation mouse model.

    PubMed

    Martius, Gesa; Cameron, Silke; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F; Wolff, Hendrik A; Malik, Ihtzaz A

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported a radiation-induced inflammation triggering fat-accumulation through fatty-acid-translocase/cluster of differentiation protein 36 (FAT/CD36) in rat liver. Furthermore, inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36-expression by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) (infliximab) was shown in vitro. The current study investigates fat-accumulation in a mouse-model of single-dose liver-irradiation (25-Gray) and the effect of anti-TNF-α-therapy on FAT/CD36 gene-expression. Mice livers were selectively irradiated in vivo in presence or absence of infliximab. Serum- and hepatic-triglycerides, mRNA, and protein were analyzed by colorimetric assays, RT-PCR, Immunofluorescence and Western-Blot, respectively. Sudan-staining was used demonstrating fat-accumulation in tissue. In mice livers, early (1-3 h) induction of TNF-α-expression, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, was observed. It was followed by elevated hepatic-triglyceride level (6-12 h), compared to sham-irradiated controls. In contrast, serum-triglyceride level was decreased at these time points. Similar to triglyceride level in mice livers, Sudan staining of liver cryosections showed a quick (6-12 h) increase of fat-droplets after irradiation. Furthermore, expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 was increased at protein level caused by radiation or TNF-α. TNF-α-blockage by anti-TNF-α showed an early inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36 expression in mice livers. Immunohistochemistry showed basolateral and cytoplasmic expression of FAT/CD36 in hepatocytes. Moreover, co-localization of FAT/CD36 was detected with α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA+) cells and F4/80+ macrophages. In summary, hepatic-radiation triggers fat-accumulation in mice livers, involving acute-phase-processes. Accordingly, anti-TNF-α-therapy prevented early radiation-induced expression of FAT/CD36 in vivo. PMID:25739082

  9. The Anti-TNF-α Antibody Infliximab Inhibits the Expression of Fat-Transporter-Protein FAT/CD36 in a Selective Hepatic-Radiation Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Martius, Gesa; Cameron, Silke; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F.; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Malik, Ihtzaz A.

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported a radiation-induced inflammation triggering fat-accumulation through fatty-acid-translocase/cluster of differentiation protein 36 (FAT/CD36) in rat liver. Furthermore, inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36-expression by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) (infliximab) was shown in vitro. The current study investigates fat-accumulation in a mouse-model of single-dose liver-irradiation (25-Gray) and the effect of anti-TNF-α-therapy on FAT/CD36 gene-expression. Mice livers were selectively irradiated in vivo in presence or absence of infliximab. Serum- and hepatic-triglycerides, mRNA, and protein were analyzed by colorimetric assays, RT-PCR, Immunofluorescence and Western-Blot, respectively. Sudan-staining was used demonstrating fat-accumulation in tissue. In mice livers, early (1–3 h) induction of TNF-α-expression, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, was observed. It was followed by elevated hepatic-triglyceride level (6–12 h), compared to sham-irradiated controls. In contrast, serum-triglyceride level was decreased at these time points. Similar to triglyceride level in mice livers, Sudan staining of liver cryosections showed a quick (6–12 h) increase of fat-droplets after irradiation. Furthermore, expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 was increased at protein level caused by radiation or TNF-α. TNF-α-blockage by anti-TNF-α showed an early inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36 expression in mice livers. Immunohistochemistry showed basolateral and cytoplasmic expression of FAT/CD36 in hepatocytes. Moreover, co-localization of FAT/CD36 was detected with α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA+) cells and F4/80+ macrophages. In summary, hepatic-radiation triggers fat-accumulation in mice livers, involving acute-phase-processes. Accordingly, anti-TNF-α-therapy prevented early radiation-induced expression of FAT/CD36 in vivo. PMID:25739082

  10. Allergen Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rael, Efren

    2016-09-01

    Allergies affect a large proportion of the population. Allergies can adversely affect productivity, sleep, and quality of life and can lead to life-threatening reactions. Allergies can spread to affect multiple organ systems. Allergen immunotherapy is the only therapy that can change the natural history of allergic disease. PMID:27545737

  11. Effects of Environmental Factors on Soluble Expression of a Humanized Anti-TNF-α scFv Antibody in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sina, Mohammad; Farajzadeh, Davoud; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The bacterial cultivation conditions for obtaining anti-TNF-α single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody as the soluble product in E. coli was investigated. Methods: To avoid the production of inclusion bodies, the effects of lactose, IPTG, incubation time, temperature, shaking protocol, medium additives (Mg+2, sucrose), pH, osmotic and heat shocks were examined. Samples from bacterial growth conditions with promising results of soluble expression of GST-hD2 scFv were affinity purified and quantified by SDS-PAGE and image processing for further evaluation. Results: The results showed that cultivation in LB medium under induction by low concentrations of lactose and incubation at 10 °C led to partial solubilization of the expressed anti-TNF-α scFv (GST-hD2). Other variables which showed promising increase in soluble expression of GST-hD2 were osmotic shock and addition of magnesium chloride. Furthermore, addition of sucrose to medium suppressed the expression of scFv completely. The other finding was that the addition of sorbitol decreased the growth rate of bacteria. Conclusion: It can be concluded that low cultivation temperature in the presence of low amount of inducer under a long incubation time or addition of magnesium chloride are the most effective environmental factors studied for obtaining the maximum solubilization of GST-hD2 recombinant protein. PMID:26819916

  12. Peanut immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Peanut allergy is common and can be a cause of severe, life-threatening reactions. It is rarely outgrown like other food allergies, such as egg and milk. Peanut allergy has a significant effect on the quality of life of sufferers and their families, due to dietary and social restrictions, but mainly stemming from fear of accidental peanut ingestion. The current management consists of strict avoidance, education and provision of emergency medication, but a disease- modifying therapy is needed for peanut allergy. Recent developments involve the use of immunotherapy, which has shown promise as an active form of treatment. Various routes of administration are being investigated, including subcutaneous, oral, sublingual and epicutaneous routes. Other forms of treatment, such as the use of vaccines and anti-IgE molecules, are also under investigation. So far, results from immunotherapy studies have shown good efficacy in achieving desensitisation to peanut with a good safety profile. However, the issue of long-term tolerance has not been fully addressed yet and larger, phase III studies are required to further investigate safety and efficacy. An assessment of cost/benefit ratio is also required prior to implementing this form of treatment. The use of immunotherapy for peanut allergy is not currently recommended for routine clinical use and should not be attempted outside specialist allergy units. PMID:25276342

  13. Immunotherapy in all aspects.

    PubMed

    Hanci, Deniz; Şahin, Ethem; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Cingi, Cemal

    2016-06-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is a form of long-term treatment that decreases symptoms for many people with allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, conjunctivitis (eye allergy) or stinging insect allergy. In this review, we presented the important topics in immunotherapy. The important aspects of immunotherapy are considered to be "Immunologıcal responses to immunotherapy"; "The principal types of immunotherapy"; "Effectiveness"; "Indications"; "Contraindications"; "Allergen immunotherapy in children"; "Safety"; and "Anaphylactic reactions after immunotherapy". The principal types of immunotherapy are subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy. Both of them can be used in indicated cases. When using SCIT, physicians must be more careful because of reported rare fatal cases. The risks and benefits of continuing allergen immunotherapy in patients who have experienced severe systemic reactions should be carefully considered. PMID:25673026

  14. Increased Prevalence of Human Polyomavirus JC Viruria in Chronic Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases Patients in Treatment with Anti-TNF α: A 18 Month Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Rodio, Donatella Maria; Anzivino, Elena; Mischitelli, Monica; Bellizzi, Anna; Scrivo, Rossana; Scribano, Daniela; Conte, Gianlorenzo; Prezioso, Carla; Trancassini, Maria; Valesini, Guido; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Pietropaolo, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (CIRDs) are immune-mediated pathologies involving joints. To date, TNFα-blocking agents administration is the most promising therapy, although these treatments are associated with an increased Polyomavirus JC (JCPyV) reactivation, the etiological agent of the Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML). The aim of this study was the recruitment and the analysis of a CIRDs cohort in order to investigate a possible correlation between JCPyV presence and the influence of anti-TNF-α agents on viral loads. Blood and urine samples were collected from 34 CIRDs subjects prior the first anti-TNF-α infusion (T0) and after 3 (T3), 6 (T6), 12 (T12), and 18 (T18) months. Results showed persistent JC viruria significantly higher than JC viremia throughout the 18 month follow-up study (p = 0.002). In JCPyV positive samples, the non-coding control region (NCCR) was analyzed. Results evidenced archetypal structures (type II-S) in all isolates with the exception of a sequence isolated from a plasma sample, that corresponds to the type II-R found in PML subjects. Finally, the viral protein 1 (VP1) genotyping was performed and results showed the prevalence of the European genotypes 1A, 1B, and 4. Since only few studies have been carried out to understand whether there is a PML risk in CIRDs population infected by JCPyV, this study contributes to enrich literature insight on JCPyV biology in this cluster. Further investigations are necessary in order to recognize the real impact of biologics on JCPyV life cycle and to identify possible and specific viral variants related to increased virulence in CIRDs patients. PMID:27242700

  15. Increased Prevalence of Human Polyomavirus JC Viruria in Chronic Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases Patients in Treatment with Anti-TNF α: A 18 Month Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodio, Donatella Maria; Anzivino, Elena; Mischitelli, Monica; Bellizzi, Anna; Scrivo, Rossana; Scribano, Daniela; Conte, Gianlorenzo; Prezioso, Carla; Trancassini, Maria; Valesini, Guido; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Pietropaolo, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (CIRDs) are immune-mediated pathologies involving joints. To date, TNFα-blocking agents administration is the most promising therapy, although these treatments are associated with an increased Polyomavirus JC (JCPyV) reactivation, the etiological agent of the Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML). The aim of this study was the recruitment and the analysis of a CIRDs cohort in order to investigate a possible correlation between JCPyV presence and the influence of anti-TNF-α agents on viral loads. Blood and urine samples were collected from 34 CIRDs subjects prior the first anti-TNF-α infusion (T0) and after 3 (T3), 6 (T6), 12 (T12), and 18 (T18) months. Results showed persistent JC viruria significantly higher than JC viremia throughout the 18 month follow-up study (p = 0.002). In JCPyV positive samples, the non-coding control region (NCCR) was analyzed. Results evidenced archetypal structures (type II-S) in all isolates with the exception of a sequence isolated from a plasma sample, that corresponds to the type II-R found in PML subjects. Finally, the viral protein 1 (VP1) genotyping was performed and results showed the prevalence of the European genotypes 1A, 1B, and 4. Since only few studies have been carried out to understand whether there is a PML risk in CIRDs population infected by JCPyV, this study contributes to enrich literature insight on JCPyV biology in this cluster. Further investigations are necessary in order to recognize the real impact of biologics on JCPyV life cycle and to identify possible and specific viral variants related to increased virulence in CIRDs patients. PMID:27242700

  16. Increased Plasma IL-17F Levels in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Are Responsive to Methotrexate, Anti-TNF, and T Cell Costimulatory Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Manish; Attur, Mukundan; Furer, Vika; Todd, John; Ramirez, Renita; Lock, Michael; Lu, Quynh A.; Abramson, Steven B.; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study are to compare plasma levels of IL17A, A/F, and F biomarkers in RA patients versus controls, and to determine responsiveness to methotrexate (MTX), anti-TNFs, and abatacept. We selected plasma samples from RA cohorts consisting of a cross-sectional RA cohort (N=78) not receiving DMARDs at the time of sampling, as well as from longitudinal drug start cohorts (N=71 patients) with pre/post samples including anti-TNF, abatacept, and MTX-treated patients. We assayed IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL17-A/F using a highly sensitive immunoassay system. Plasma levels of IL-17A, IL-17A/F, and IL-17F were all significantly increased in RA versus controls. The difference was largest in IL-17F, with median IL-17F levels in RA patients being approximately 18-fold higher than controls (81 pg/mL in RA vs. 4.4 pg/mL in controls, p<0.001). Among the forms of IL-17, only IL-17F was decreased after therapy in the MTX cohort (p=0.006), abatacept cohort (p<0.001), and anti-TNF cohorts (p=0.02), whereas IL-17A and IL-17A/F were not significantly decreased for any of the three drug cohorts. Synovial fluid analysis demonstrated higher IL-17F levels in RA (p=0.016) than healthy controls. These results suggest a specific role for IL-17F in human RA pathogenesis and as a therapeutic target. PMID:25240765

  17. Parasites and immunotherapy: with or against?

    PubMed

    Yousofi Darani, Hossein; Yousefi, Morteza; Safari, Marzieh; Jafari, Rasool

    2016-06-01

    Immunotherapy is a sort of therapy in which antibody or antigen administrates to the patient in order to treat or reduce the severity of complications of disease. This kind of treatment practiced in a wide variety of diseases including infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders, cancers and allergy. Successful and unsuccessful immunotherapeutic strategies have been practiced in variety of parasitic infections. On the other hand parasites or parasite antigens have also been considered for immunotherapy against other diseases such as cancer, asthma and multiple sclerosis. In this paper immunotherapy against common parasitic infections, and also immunotherapy of cancer, asthma and multiple sclerosis with parasites or parasite antigens have been reviewed. PMID:27413282

  18. Gold Nanoparticle Mediated Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Joao Paulo Mattos; Figueroa, Elizabeth Raquel; Drezek, Rebekah Anna

    2013-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the field of cancer immunotherapy, where the goal is to activate or modulate the body’s immune response against cancer. However, current immunotherapy approaches exhibit limitations of safety and efficacy due to systemic delivery. In this context, the use of nanotechnology for the delivery of cancer vaccines and immune adjuvants presents a number of advantages such as targeted delivery to immune cells, enhanced therapeutic effect, and reduced adverse outcomes. Recently, gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have been explored as immunotherapy carriers, creating new AuNP applications that merit a critical overview. This review highlights recent advances in the development of AuNP mediated immunotherapies that harness AuNP biodistribution, optical properties and their ability to deliver macromolecules such as peptides and oligonucleotides. It has been demonstrated that the use of AuNP carriers can improve the delivery and safety of immunotherapy agents, and that AuNP immunotherapies are well suited for synergistic combination therapy with existing cancer therapies like photothermal ablation. PMID:24103304

  19. EFFECT OF THERAPY WITH ANTI-TNF α DRUGS AND DMARD ON DISEASE ACTIVITY AND HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE AMONG WOMEN WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS.

    PubMed

    Kopciuch, Dorota; Paczkowska, Anna; Leszczynsk, Piotr; Michalak, Michal; Nowakowskai, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the response to 16 and 52 weeks of treatment with adalimumab and etanercept and its effect on disease activity and quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients were selected from 2155 medical cards of patients of Connective Tissue Health Centre (Poznań, Poland) who were refractory to conventional treatment with disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. To assess the disease activity, Disease Activity Score (DAS28) was used and the measurement of quality of life was evaluated with the Polish version of the WHOQoL-Bref questionnaire. To assess the disability, we have used Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) and to assess the patients' pain caused by RA, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used. The results of the study show a significant decrease in inflammatory activity of the disease and, consequently, an improvement in quality of life after anti-TNF α treatment. Results obtained with TNF-blockers after 52 weeks of treatment in RA objectively show the efficacy of these drugs and also the patients' perception of the effect on their quality of life. Study results also indicate changes in disability caused by RA and patients' pain due to disease between 16 and 52 weeks of treatment. PMID:27180448

  20. Recovery of active anti TNF-α ScFv through matrix-assisted refolding of bacterial inclusion bodies using CIM monolithic support.

    PubMed

    Sushma, Krishnan; Bilgimol, Chuvappumkal Joseph; Vijayalakshmi, Mookambeswaran A; Satheeshkumar, Padikara Kutty

    2012-04-01

    Anti TNF-α molecules are important as therapeutic agents for many of the autoimmune diseases in chronic stage. Here we report the expression and purification of a recombinant single chain variable fragment (ScFv) specific to TNF-α from inclusion bodies. In contrast to the conventional on column refolding using the soft gel supports, an efficient methodology using monolithic matrix has been employed. Nickel (II) coupled to convective interaction media (CIM) support was utilized for this purpose with 6M guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) as the chaotropic agent. The protein purified after solubilization and refolding proved to be biologically active with an IC₅₀ value of 15 μg. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing the application of methacrylate based chromatographic supports for matrix-assisted refolding and purification of Escherichia coli inclusion bodies. The results are promising to elaborate the methodology further to exploit the potential positive features of monoliths in protein refolding science. PMID:22386363

  1. Redo Ileal pouch-anal anastomosis combined with anti-TNF-α maintenance therapy for Crohn's disease with pelvic fistula: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Araki, Toshimitsu; Okita, Yoshiki; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Ohi, Masaki; Tanaka, Koji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2014-10-01

    Pouch failure has been reported to occur after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis for Crohn's disease. We report two cases of patients with Crohn's disease, who underwent redo ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (redo-IPAA) combined with anti-TNF-α maintenance therapy, with good functional results. The first patient, a man with presumed ulcerative colitis, suffered pelvic fistula recurrence and anastomotic dehiscence. He underwent redo-IPAA, at which time longitudinal ulcers were found. Infliximab was started 4 days postoperatively and continued. The second patient, a woman treated for ulcerative colitis, underwent laparoscopic IPAA 8 years later. After the development of a pelvic fistula, twisted mesentery of the ileal pouch was found intraoperatively and Crohn's disease was diagnosed. Adalimumab therapy resulted in fistula closure. Redo-IPAA was performed to normalize the twisted mesentery of the ileal pouch. No complications have been observed in either patient, both of whom have experienced good functional results after closure of the covering stomas. PMID:24442570

  2. Reducing C-terminal-truncated alpha-synuclein by immunotherapy attenuates neurodegeneration and propagation in Parkinson's disease-like models.

    PubMed

    Games, Dora; Valera, Elvira; Spencer, Brian; Rockenstein, Edward; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Patrick, Christina; Ubhi, Kiren; Nuber, Silke; Sacayon, Patricia; Zago, Wagner; Seubert, Peter; Barbour, Robin; Schenk, Dale; Masliah, Eliezer

    2014-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are common neurodegenerative disorders of the aging population, characterized by progressive and abnormal accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn). Recent studies have shown that C-terminus (CT) truncation and propagation of α-syn play a role in the pathogenesis of PD/DLB. Therefore, we explored the effect of passive immunization against the CT of α-syn in the mThy1-α-syn transgenic (tg) mouse model, which resembles the striato-nigral and motor deficits of PD. Mice were immunized with the new monoclonal antibodies 1H7, 5C1, or 5D12, all directed against the CT of α-syn. CT α-syn antibodies attenuated synaptic and axonal pathology, reduced the accumulation of CT-truncated α-syn (CT-α-syn) in axons, rescued the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase fibers in striatum, and improved motor and memory deficits. Among them, 1H7 and 5C1 were most effective at decreasing levels of CT-α-syn and higher-molecular-weight aggregates. Furthermore, in vitro studies showed that preincubation of recombinant α-syn with 1H7 and 5C1 prevented CT cleavage of α-syn. In a cell-based system, CT antibodies reduced cell-to-cell propagation of full-length α-syn, but not of the CT-α-syn that lacked the 118-126 aa recognition site needed for antibody binding. Furthermore, the results obtained after lentiviral expression of α-syn suggest that antibodies might be blocking the extracellular truncation of α-syn by calpain-1. Together, these results demonstrate that antibodies against the CT of α-syn reduce levels of CT-truncated fragments of the protein and its propagation, thus ameliorating PD-like pathology and improving behavioral and motor functions in a mouse model of this disease. PMID:25009275

  3. Reducing C-Terminal-Truncated Alpha-Synuclein by Immunotherapy Attenuates Neurodegeneration and Propagation in Parkinson's Disease-Like Models

    PubMed Central

    Games, Dora; Valera, Elvira; Spencer, Brian; Rockenstein, Edward; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Patrick, Christina; Ubhi, Kiren; Nuber, Silke; Sacayon, Patricia; Zago, Wagner; Seubert, Peter; Barbour, Robin; Schenk, Dale

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are common neurodegenerative disorders of the aging population, characterized by progressive and abnormal accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn). Recent studies have shown that C-terminus (CT) truncation and propagation of α-syn play a role in the pathogenesis of PD/DLB. Therefore, we explored the effect of passive immunization against the CT of α-syn in the mThy1-α-syn transgenic (tg) mouse model, which resembles the striato-nigral and motor deficits of PD. Mice were immunized with the new monoclonal antibodies 1H7, 5C1, or 5D12, all directed against the CT of α-syn. CT α-syn antibodies attenuated synaptic and axonal pathology, reduced the accumulation of CT-truncated α-syn (CT-α-syn) in axons, rescued the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase fibers in striatum, and improved motor and memory deficits. Among them, 1H7 and 5C1 were most effective at decreasing levels of CT-α-syn and higher-molecular-weight aggregates. Furthermore, in vitro studies showed that preincubation of recombinant α-syn with 1H7 and 5C1 prevented CT cleavage of α-syn. In a cell-based system, CT antibodies reduced cell-to-cell propagation of full-length α-syn, but not of the CT-α-syn that lacked the 118–126 aa recognition site needed for antibody binding. Furthermore, the results obtained after lentiviral expression of α-syn suggest that antibodies might be blocking the extracellular truncation of α-syn by calpain-1. Together, these results demonstrate that antibodies against the CT of α-syn reduce levels of CT-truncated fragments of the protein and its propagation, thus ameliorating PD-like pathology and improving behavioral and motor functions in a mouse model of this disease. PMID:25009275

  4. The single-chain anti-TNF-α antibody DLX105 induces clinical and biomarker responses upon local administration in patients with chronic plaque-type psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Tsianakas, Athanasios; Brunner, Patrick M; Ghoreschi, Kamran; Berger, Claudia; Loser, Karin; Röcken, Martin; Stingl, Georg; Luger, Thomas; Jung, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    It is not clear whether TNF-α antagonists used in the treatment of psoriasis need to act systemically, or whether local inhibition of skin-produced TNF-α would be sufficient to silence skin inflammation. To answer this question, we conducted two multicentre, double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials with the novel single-chain anti-TNF-α-PENTRA(®) -antibody DLX105. Upon intra-dermal injection, DLX105 induced a mean local PASI decrease of 33% over baseline after 2 weeks of treatment, while the placebo response was only 12% (P = 0.001). The clinical response was accompanied by changes in biomarkers such as reductions in K16, Ki67 and epidermal thickness as well as decreased mRNA levels of IL-17, TNF-α, IL-23p19, IL-12p40 and IFN-γ. Next, we applied the drug topically twice daily in a 0.5% hydrogel formulation. While the local PASI did not change, topical DLX105 mediated significant reductions of mRNA levels of key proinflammatory cytokines when compared to placebo, and this effect was further enhanced after weekly tape stripping of plaques to increase drug penetration. These results suggest that longer treatment periods and/or increased local drug concentrations might result in better therapeutic efficacy of topically applied DLX105. In sum, we can show for the first time that local inhibition of TNF-α is sufficient to mediate a biological response in psoriasis that translates into clinical efficacy. PMID:26738450

  5. Role of the protein annexin A1 on the efficacy of anti-TNF treatment in a murine model of acute colitis.

    PubMed

    de Paula-Silva, Marina; Barrios, Bibiana Elisabeth; Macció-Maretto, Lisa; Sena, Angela Aparecida; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Correa, Silvia Graciela; Oliani, Sonia Maria

    2016-09-01

    TNF-α is involved in the mechanisms that initiate inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Anti-TNF-α drugs, such as infliximab (IFX), cause non-responsiveness and side effects, indicating the need to investigate alternative therapies for these diseases. The anti-inflammatory protein, annexin A1 (AnxA1), has been associated with the protection of the gastrointestinal mucosa. To further address the role of endogenous AnxA1 on the TNF-α blockade efficacy in a murine model, we assessed colitis induced by Dextran Sulfate Sodium (DSS) in wild-type (WT) and AnxA1(-/-) Balb/c mice treated with IFX. We consistently observed endogenous AnxA1 prevented clinical and physiological manifestations of experimental colitis treated with IFX, additionally the manifestation of the disease was observed earlier in AnxA1(-)(/-) mice. Rectal bleeding, diarrhea, histological score, epithelial damages and collagen degradation caused by DSS were prevented following IFX treatment only in WT mice. IL-6 increased during colitis in WT and AnxA1(-)(/-) mice, decreasing under IFX treatment in WT. The influx of neutrophils and TNF-α secretion were largely elevated in AnxA1(-)(/-) mice when compared to WT mice. In the group WT/DSS+IFX, phagocytes were more susceptible to apoptosis following treatment with IFX. Endogenous expression of AnxA1 increased after DSS and decreased with IFX treatment, demonstrating an attenuated inflammatory response. The data indicate that AnxA1 contributes to the establishment of intestinal homeostasis after blocking of TNF-α was used as a treatment of IBD, constituting a key molecule in the mechanism of action and a potential biomarker of therapeutic efficacy. PMID:27343762

  6. Immunotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Steven, Antonius; Fisher, Scott A; Robinson, Bruce W

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of lung cancer remains a challenge, and lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Immunotherapy has previously failed in lung cancer but has recently emerged as a very effective new therapy, and there is now growing worldwide enthusiasm in cancer immunotherapy. We summarize why immune checkpoint blockade therapies have generated efficacious and durable responses in clinical trials and why this has reignited interest in this field. Cancer vaccines have also been explored in the past with marginal success. Identification of optimal candidate neoantigens may improve cancer vaccine efficacy and may pave the way to personalized immunotherapy, alone or in combination with other immunotherapy such as immune checkpoint blockade. Understanding the steps in immune recognition and eradication of cancer cells is vital to understanding why previous immunotherapies failed and how current therapies can be used optimally. We hold an optimistic view for the future prospect in lung cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27101251

  7. Recent progress in allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nouri-Aria, Kayhan T

    2008-03-01

    The efficacy of allergen immunotherapy for the treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with or without seasonal bronchial asthma and anaphylaxis caused by the sting of the hymenoptera class of insects has been clearly demonstrated in numerous well-designed, placebo-controlled trials. Immunotherapy whether by subcutaneous injection of allergen extract or by oral/sublingual routes modifies peripheral and mucosal TH2 responses in favour of TH1 responses and augments IL-10 synthesis by TRegs both locally and by peripheral T cells. Recent researches into the cellular and molecular basis of allergic reactions have advanced our understanding of the mechanisms involved in allergic diseases. They have also helped the development of innovative approaches that are likely to further improve the control of allergic responses in the future. Novel approaches to immunotherapy that are currently being explored include the use of peptide-based allergen preparations, which do not bind IgE and therefore do not activate mast cells, but reduce both Th1 and Th2-cytokine synthesis, while increasing levels of IL-10. Alternative strategies include the use of adjuvants, such as nucleotide immunostimulatory sequences derived from bacteria CpG or monophosphoryl lipid A that potentiate Th1 responses. Blocking the effects of IgE using anti-IgE such as omalizumab, a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that selectively binds to IgE, has been shown to be a useful strategy in the treatment of allergic asthma and rhinitis. The combination of anti-IgE-monoclonal antibody omalizumab with allergen immunotherapy has proved beneficial for the treatment of allergic diseases, offering improved efficacy, limited adverse effects, and potential immune-modifying effects. This combination may also accelerate the rapidity by which immunotherapy induces TReg cells. If allergic diseases are due to a lack of allergen-specific TReg cells, then effective therapies should target the induction and the

  8. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fuge, Oliver; Vasdev, Nikhil; Allchorne, Paula; Green, James SA

    2015-01-01

    It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest benefit in metastatic disease, although the role in superficial bladder cancer remains unclear. PMID:26000263

  9. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Fuge, Oliver; Vasdev, Nikhil; Allchorne, Paula; Green, James Sa

    2015-01-01

    It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest benefit in metastatic disease, although the role in superficial bladder cancer remains unclear. PMID:26000263

  10. Multifunctional nanoparticles for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Tayebeh; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

    2016-07-01

    During the last decades significant progress has been made in the field of cancer immunotherapy. However, cancer vaccines have not been successful in clinical trials due to poor immunogenicity of antigen, limitations of safety associated with traditional systemic delivery as well as the complex regulation of the immune system in tumor microenvironment. In recent years, nanotechnology-based delivery systems have attracted great interest in the field of immunotherapy since they provide new opportunities to fight the cancer. In particular, for delivery of cancer vaccines, multifunctional nanoparticles present many advantages such as targeted delivery to immune cells, co-delivery of therapeutic agents, reduced adverse outcomes, blocked immune checkpoint molecules, and amplify immune activation via the use of stimuli-responsive or immunostimulatory materials. In this review article, we highlight recent progress and future promise of multifunctional nanoparticles that have been applied to enhance the efficiency of cancer vaccines. PMID:26901287

  11. Recombinant allergens for specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, Oliver; Häfner, Dietrich; Nandy, Andreas

    2011-04-01

    Recombinant DNA technology provides the means for producing allergens that are equivalent to their natural counterparts and also genetically engineered variants with reduced IgE-binding activity. The proteins are produced as chemically defined molecules with consistent structural and immunologic properties. Several hundred allergens have been cloned and expressed as recombinant proteins, and these provide the means for making a very detailed diagnosis of a patient's sensitization profile. Clinical development programs are now in progress to assess the suitability of recombinant allergens for both subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy. Recombinant hypoallergenic variants, which are developed with the aim of increasing the doses that can be administered while at the same time reducing the risks for therapy-associated side effects, are also in clinical trials for subcutaneous immunotherapy. Grass and birch pollen preparations have been shown to be clinically effective, and studies with various other allergens are in progress. Personalized or patient-tailored immunotherapy is still a very distant prospect, but the first recombinant products based on single allergens or defined mixtures could reach the market within the next 5 years. PMID:21377719

  12. Decreased levels of metalloproteinase-9 and angiogenic factors in skin lesions of patients with psoriatic arthritis after therapy with anti-TNF

    PubMed Central

    Cordiali-Fei, Paola; Trento, Elisabetta; D'Agosto, Giovanna; Bordignon, Valentina; Mussi, Anna; Ardigò, Marco; Mastroianni, Antonio; Vento, Antonella; Solivetti, Francesco; Berardesca, Enzo; Ensoli, Fabrizio

    2006-01-01

    Background Inflammation represents an early and key event in the development of both the cutaneous psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Compelling evidences indicate that the production of TNF-α plays a central role in psoriasis by sustaining the inflammatory process in the skin as well as in the joints. Among the multiple effects produced by TNF-α on keratinocytes, the induction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), a collagenase implicated in joint inflammatory arthritis which acts as an angiogenesis promoting factor, might represent a key mechanism in the pathogenesis of the disease. Aims of the present study were to investigate a) the role of MMP-9 in the development of psoriasis by assessing the presence of MMP-9 in lesional skin and in sera of psoriatic patients; b) the association of MMP-9 with the activity of the disease; c) the relationship between MMP-9 and TNF-α production. Methods Eleven psoriatic patients, clinically presenting joint symptoms associated to the cutaneous disease, were included in a therapeutic protocol based on the administration of anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody (Infliximab). Sera and skin biopsies were collected before treatment and after 6 weeks of therapy. Tissues were kept in short term cultures and production soluble mediators such as TNF-α, MMP-9, MMP-2, VEGF and E-Selectin, which include angiogenic molecules associated to the development of plaque psoriasis, were measured in the culture supernatants by immunoenzymatic assays (ng/ml or pg/ml per mg of tissue). MMP-9 concentrations were also measured in the sera. The cutaneous activity of disease was evaluated by the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI). Results Clinical and laboratory assessment indicated that all but one patients had a significant improvement of the PASI score after three months of therapy. The clinical amelioration was associated to a significant decrease of MMP-9 (P = 0.017), TNF-α (P = 0.005) and E-selectin (P = 0.018) levels, spontaneously released

  13. Cancer immunotherapy in children

    Cancer.gov

    More often than not, cancer immunotherapies that work in adults are used in modified ways in children. Seldom are new therapies developed just for children, primarily because of the small number of pediatric patients relative to the adult cancer patient

  14. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  15. Trends in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    Modulation of the immune system for therapeutic ends has a long history, stretching back to Edward Jenner’s use of cowpox to induce immunity to smallpox in 1796. Since then, immunotherapy, in the form of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, has enabled doctors to treat and prevent a variety of infectious diseases, including cholera, poliomyelitis, diphtheria, measles and mumps. Immunotherapy is now increasingly being applied to oncology. Cancer immunotherapy attempts to harness the power and specificity of the immune system for the treatment of malignancy. Although cancer cells are less immunogenic than pathogens, the immune system is capable of recognizing and eliminating tumor cells. However, tumors frequently interfere with the development and function of immune responses. Thus, the challenge for cancer immunotherapy is to apply advances in cellular and molecular immunology and develop strategies that effectively and safely augment antitumor responses. PMID:20703326

  16. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  17. Immunotherapy in lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moundhri, M.; O'Brien, M.; Souberbielle, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    More research and new treatment options are needed in all stages of lung cancer. To this end immunotherapy needs a revival in view of recent improved technologies and greater understanding of the underlying biology. In this review we discuss mechanisms of tumour immunotherapy, non-specific, specific and adoptive, with particular reference to a direct therapeutic action on all subtypes of lung cancer. PMID:9703271

  18. Immunotherapy to Treat Cancer.

    PubMed

    McCune, J S

    2016-09-01

    This issue of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics focuses on immunotherapy as an approach to treat cancer by generating or augmenting an immune response against it. The enthusiasm for immunotherapy has waxed and waned over the past century. Enthusiasm for immunotherapy has risen over the past decade due, in part, to data showing that cancer immunotherapy consistently improves overall survival in select patients with advanced-stage cancer. Antitumor immunotherapy has broad potential and could be used to treat many different types of advanced-stage cancer due to the durable and robust response that it elicits across a diverse spectrum of cancers. This issue covers various aspects of relevant therapeutic topics ranging from discovery of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, development of novel immunotherapies using novel pharmacokinetic/dynamic modeling tools, to the utilization of immune checkpoint therapy. Regarding utilization, this issue addresses biomarker selection strategies for personalized treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with immune checkpoint therapy and also the management of the unique immune response adverse events (irAEs). PMID:27513619

  19. Immunotherapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matsueda, Satoko; Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the majority of cases gastric cancer is advanced at diagnosis and although medical and surgical treatments have improved, survival rates remain poor. Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a powerful and promising clinical approach for treatment of cancer and has shown major success in breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Here, we provide an overview of concepts of modern cancer immunotherapy including the theory, current approaches, remaining hurdles to be overcome, and the future prospect of cancer immunotherapy in the treatment of gastric cancer. Adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, gene therapies, monoclonal antibody therapies have all been used with some initial successes in gastric cancer. However, to date the results in gastric cancer have been disappointing as current approaches often do not stimulate immunity efficiently allowing tumors continue to grow despite the presence of a measurable immune response. Here, we discuss the identification of targets for immunotherapy and the role of biomarkers in prospectively identifying appropriate subjects or immunotherapy. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms by which tumor cells escape host immunosurveillance and produce an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We show how advances have provided tools for overcoming the mechanisms of immunosuppression including the use of monoclonal antibodies to block negative regulators normally expressed on the surface of T cells which limit activation and proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. Immunotherapy has greatly improved and is becoming an important factor in such fields as medical care and welfare for human being. Progress has been rapid ensuring that the future of immunotherapy for gastric cancer is bright. PMID:24587645

  20. Synthetic biology in cellular immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Deboki; Wong, Wilson W.

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of genetically engineered T cells with cancer-targeting receptors has shown tremendous promise for eradicating tumors in clinical trials. This form of cellular immunotherapy presents a unique opportunity to incorporate advanced systems and synthetic biology approaches to create cancer therapeutics with novel functions. Here, we first review the development of synthetic receptors, switches, and circuits to control the location, duration, and strength of T cell activity against tumors. In addition, we discuss the cellular engineering and genome editing of host cells (or the chassis) to improve the efficacy of cell-based cancer therapeutics, and to reduce the time and cost of manufacturing. PMID:26088008

  1. What Is Recent in Pancreatic Cancer Immunotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Niccolai, Elena; Prisco, Domenico; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Amedei, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) represents an unresolved therapeutic challenge, due to the poor prognosis and the reduced response to currently available treatments. Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal type of digestive cancers, with a median survival of 4–6 months. Only a small proportion of PC patients is curative by surgical resection, whilst standard chemotherapy for patients in advanced disease generates only modest effects with considerable toxic damages. Thus, new therapeutic approaches, specially specific treatments such as immunotherapy, are needed. In this paper we analyze recent preclinical and clinical efforts towards immunotherapy of pancreatic cancer, including passive and active immunotherapy approaches, designed to target pancreatic-cancer-associated antigens and to elicit an antitumor response in vivo. PMID:23509731

  2. Immunotherapy: first do no harm.

    PubMed

    Moss, Mark H

    2005-05-01

    Immunotherapy continues to be a treatment modality that is used most exclusively by allergists. The acceptance of immunotherapy for treating children with allergic rhinitis or asthma has been limited by the lack of adequate numbers of pediatric double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of specific allergen immunotherapy; use of venom immunotherapy is more clearly supported by current data. Children represent a unique group of patients where allergic disease may not only be treated using immunotherapy resulting in reduction of symptoms, signs, and complications of disease, but may also hold the best potential for the evasive goal of prevention of the development of future allergic disease. PMID:15878464

  3. Active Immunotherapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chodon, Thinle; Koya, Richard C; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Clinical progress in the field of cancer immunotherapy has been slow for many years but within the last 5 years, breakthrough successes have brought immunotherapy to the forefront in cancer therapy. Promising results have been observed in a variety of cancers including solid tumors and hematological malignancies with adoptive cell therapy using natural host tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, host cells that have been genetically engineered with antitumor T-cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors, immune checkpoint inhibitors like anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1 or PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies and oncolytic virus-based immunotherapy. However, most treatment modalities have shown limited efficacy with single therapy. The complex nature of cancer with intra- and inter-tumor antigen and genomic heterogeneity coupled with the immune suppressive microenvironment emphasizes the prospect of personalized targeted immunotherapy to manipulate the patient's own immune system against cancer. For successful, robust and long-lasting cure of cancer, a multi-modal approach is essential, combining anti-tumor cell therapy with manipulation of multiple pathways in the tumor microenvironment to ameliorate tumor-induced immunosuppression. PMID:26575466

  4. Oral immunotherapy for food allergy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mimi L K

    2009-01-01

    Current management of food allergy involves strict avoidance, education on recognizing and managing allergic reactions, and carrying an adrenaline autoinjector. This approach is burdensome and associated with reduced quality of life. Patients with food allergy would benefit greatly from a treatment that could achieve desensitization or long-term tolerance. Recent studies have shown that oral immunotherapy (OIT) can induce desensitization and modulate allergen-specific immune responses; however, it remains uncertain whether OIT can induce long-term tolerance. Nevertheless, successful desensitization provides a major advance in management by reducing the risk of reaction to low amounts of allergen. Allergic reactions during OIT are common, although severe reactions are less common. Therefore, OIT should be performed in specialist centers under close medical supervision and would ideally be conducted as part of ongoing research studies. OIT holds promise as a novel approach to managing food allergy. PMID:19063824

  5. Update on Allergy Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This article summarizes and provides commentary regarding guidelines on the administration of immunotherapy (IT) for allergic airway disease. Recent investigations have provided important insights into the immunologic mechanism of IT and the prominent role of interleukin-10-producing regulatory T lymphocytes. The most important aspect of successful IT is the administration of an appropriate dose of an extract containing a sufficient concentration of the relevant allergen. This is largely possible now only with standardized extracts. When the major allergen content of successful IT extracts was quantified, efficacy was demonstrated across a surprisingly narrow concentration range (approximately 5-24 μg per injection), irrespective of the extract. This presumably reflects the concentration of an antigen that drives an immune response toward tolerance. It may be predicted that as major allergen content is quantified in currently nonstandardized extracts, effective IT will also be achieved by administering a dose in this range, in contrast to current practices involving fairly arbitrary dosing decisions. With the availability of nonsedating antihistamines, intranasal corticosteroids, and the leukotriene modifiers, inadequate pharmacologic response or intolerable side effects are less commonly the major indications for starting IT for allergic rhinitis (AR). However, with the recognition that a relatively short course (3-5 years) of IT can provide long-term immunomodulation and clinical benefit, a desire to avoid long-term pharmacotherapy and the associated high costs may be the primary indication for IT in AR cases. While evidence overwhelmingly supports the beneficial influences of IT in asthma cases, the positioning of IT for this disorder is not established. The observed prevention of asthma in children who have AR is intriguing, but further studies are required to assess the extent to which the prevalence and severity of chronic asthma will be reduced when these

  6. Immunotherapy of Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Alexandra; Zamarin, Dmitriy; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2015-01-01

    The history of immunotherapy is rooted in the treatment of melanoma and therapy with immune checkpoint-blocking agents is now a cornerstone for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. The first effective immunotherapies approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in melanoma included interleukin-2 for metastatic disease and interferon alpha in the adjuvant setting. These were followed by a group of new therapies, including checkpoint-blocking antibodies targeting cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 and programmed cell death protein 1. Therapies intended to 'reeducate' T cells, such as tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte therapy, oncolytic viruses and tumor vaccines, have yielded promising results and are under development. Finally, the integration of the above therapies as well as development of new coinhibitory and costimulatory agents, though in early stages, appear very promising and likely represent the next phase in drug development for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:26376963

  7. Immunotherapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Ilya; Thompson, R H; Dong, Haidong; Krco, Christopher; Kwon, Eugene D

    2015-06-01

    Immunotherapy for the treatment of malignant neoplasms has made significant progress over the last 20 years. Multiple molecular targets and clinical agents have been developed recently, particularly in the field of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Sipuleucel-T is currently the only FDA approved immunotherapy for prostate cancer. PSA-TRICOM (Prostvac) currently has a phase III randomized trial underway after a phase II trial showed an improvement in overall survival. Interestingly, both these agents showed improvement in overall survival with no measurable change in disease state, leading to significant controversy as the utility of these agents in prostate cancer. Ipilimumab revealed a benefit for a sub-cohort of men in a post-docetaxel group and is currently undergoing investigation in a pre-docetaxel group. There are a number of other targets such as PD-1 which have shown effectiveness in other neoplasms that will likely be investigated in the future for use in prostate cancer. PMID:25894495

  8. Immunotherapy in Peripheral Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Léger, Jean-Marc; Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Muntean, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been investigated in a small subset of peripheral neuropathies, including an acute one, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and 3 chronic forms: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and neuropathy associated with IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein. Several experimental studies and clinical data are strongly suggestive of an immune-mediated pathogenesis. Either cell-mediated mechanisms or antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin, or nodal antigens are considered to act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves. Immunomodulatory treatments used in these neuropathies aim to act at various steps of this pathogenic process. However, there are many phenotypic variants and, consequently, there is a significant difference in the response to immunotherapy between these neuropathies, as well as a need to improve our knowledge and long-term management of chronic forms. PMID:26602549

  9. Bladder cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lamm, D L; Thor, D E; Stogdill, V D; Radwin, H M

    1982-11-01

    A randomized controlled prospective evaluation of intravesical and percutaneous bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy was done in 57 patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. In addition, 9 patients at high risk for tumor recurrence were treated with bacillus Calmette-Guerin produced a self-limited cystitis and 1 complication (hydronephrosis) of immunotherapy was observed. Of the 57 randomized patients 54 were followed for 3 to 30 months. Tumor recurrence was documented in 13 of 26 controls (50 per cent) and only 6 of 28 patients (21 per cent) treated with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (p equals 0.027, chi-square). The interval free of disease was prolonged significantly with bacillus Calmette-Guerin treatment (p equals 0.014, generalized Wilcoxon test). Importantly, a simple purified protein derivative skin test distinguished those patients who responded to bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy from those who did not. Only 1 of 17 treated patients (6 per cent) whose purified protein derivative test converted from negative to positive had tumor recurrence compared to 5 recurrences (38 per cent) among the 13 patients whose test remained negative or had been positive before treatment (p equals 0.022, chi-square). Bacillus Calmette-Guerin was given to 10 patients with stage B transitional cell carcinoma who were not candidates for cystectomy and 7 are free of disease. Of 5 patients with carcinoma in situ 3 remain free of tumor after bacillus Calmette-Guerin treatment and 5 of 6 who had multiple recurrences after intravesical chemotherapy responded favorably to bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy. PMID:6757467

  10. Immunotherapy of Fungal Infections.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kausik; Hamad, Mawieh

    2015-11-01

    Fungal organisms are ubiquitous in the environment. Pathogenic fungi, although relatively few in the whole gamut of microbial pathogens, are able to cause disease with varying degrees of severity in individuals with normal or impaired immunity. The disease state is an outcome of the fungal pathogen's interactions with the host immunity, and therefore, it stands to reason that deep/invasive fungal diseases be amenable to immunotherapy. Therefore, antifungal immunotherapy continues to be attractive as an adjunct to the currently available antifungal chemotherapy options for a number of reasons, including the fact that existing antifungal drugs, albeit largely effective, are not without limitations, and that morbidity and mortality associated with invasive mycoses are still unacceptably high. For several decades, intense basic research efforts have been directed at development of fungal immunotherapies. Nevertheless, this approach suffers from a severe bench-bedside disconnect owing to several reasons: the chemical and biological peculiarities of the fungal antigens, the complexities of host-pathogen interactions, an under-appreciation of the fungal disease landscape, the requirement of considerable financial investment to bring these therapies to clinical use, as well as practical problems associated with immunizations. In this general, non-exhaustive review, we summarize the features of ongoing research efforts directed towards devising safe and effective immunotherapeutic options for mycotic diseases, encompassing work on antifungal vaccines, adoptive cell transfers, cytokines, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and other agents. PMID:26575463

  11. Discovery of Novel Orally Active Tetrahydro-Naphthyl-N-Acylhydrazones with In Vivo Anti-TNF-α Effect and Remarkable Anti-Inflammatory Properties

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Natália M.; Freitas, Rosana H. C. N.; Fraga, Carlos A. M.

    2016-01-01

    LASSBio-1524 was designed as inhibitor of the IKK-β (kappa β kinase inhibitor) enzyme, which participates in the activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) canonical pathway, and its three N-acylhydrazone new analogues, LASSBio-1760, LASSBio-1763 and LASSBio-1764 are now being tested on their anti-inflammatory potential. The activity of these compounds was evaluated with the subcutaneous air pouch induced by carrageenan and by subsequent measurement of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the acute inflammation model, the oral pretreatment with doses from 0.3 to 30 mg/kg of N-acylhydrazone derivatives was able to significantly reduce leukocyte migration to the cavity. Pretreatment with LASSBio-1524 and its analogues also decreased NO, TNF-α and ROS biosynthesis an events closely involved with NF-kB pathway. The tetrahydronaphthyl-N-acylhydrazone derivative LASSBio-1764 was the most promising compound from this series, surpassing even LASSBio-1524. Additionally, none of the compounds demonstrated myelotoxicity or cytotoxicity. Cell viability was assayed and these compounds demonstrated to be safe at different concentrations. Western blot analysis demonstrated that LASSBio-1524 and LASSBio-1760 inhibited NF-κB expression in RAW 264.7 cell lineage. Our data indicate that the tested compounds have anti-inflammatory activity, which may be related to inhibition of leukocyte migration, reducing the production of NO, TNF-α and ROS. LASSBio-1524 and LASSBio-1760, in addition to these features, also reduced p65 nuclear expression assessed by western blot in RAW 264.7 murine cells. PMID:27227468

  12. [Aβ immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenji; Yamada, Masahito

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the deposition of amyloid-β-protein (Aβ) as senile plaques in the brain parenchyma and phosphorylated-tau accumulation as neurofibrillary tangles in the neurons. Although details of the disease pathomechanisms remain unclear, Aβ likely acts as a key protein for AD initiation and progression, followed by abnormal tau phosphorylation and neuronal death (amyloid-cascade hypothesis). According to this hypothesis, Aβ immunization therapies are created to eliminate Aβ from the brain, and to prevent the neurons from damage by these pathogenic proteins. There are two methods for Aβ immunotherapies: active and passive immunization. Previous studies have shown Aβ removal and improved cognitive function in animal models of AD. Clinical trials on various drugs, including AN1792, bapineuzumab, and solanezumab, have been carried out; however, all trials have failed to demonstrate apparent clinical benefits. On the contrary, side effects emerged, such as meningoencephalitis, vasogenic edema, which are currently called amyloid related imaging abnormalities (ARIA)-E and microhemorrhage (ARIA-H). In neuropathological studies of immunized cases, Aβ was removed from the brain parenchyma and phosphorylated-tau was reduced in the neuronal processes. Moreover, deterioration of the cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and an increase of microhemorrhages and microinfarcts were described. Aβ is cleared from the brain mainly via the lymphatic drainage pathway. ARIA could stem from severe CAA due to dysfunction of the drainage pathway after immunotherapy. Aβ immunization has a potential of cure for AD patients, although the above-described problems must be overcome before applying this therapy in clinical treatment. PMID:23568994

  13. EAACI: A European Declaration on Immunotherapy. Designing the future of allergen specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Moises A; Demoly, Pascal; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Bousquet, Jean; Sheikh, Aziz; Frew, Anthony; Scadding, Glenis; Bachert, Claus; Malling, Hans J; Valenta, Rudolph; Bilo, Beatrice; Nieto, Antonio; Akdis, Cezmi; Just, Jocelyne; Vidal, Carmen; Varga, Eva M; Alvarez-Cuesta, Emilio; Bohle, Barbara; Bufe, Albrecht; Canonica, Walter G; Cardona, Victoria; Dahl, Ronald; Didier, Alain; Durham, Stephen R; Eng, Peter; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Jacobsen, Lars; Jutel, Marek; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Klimek, Ludger; Lötvall, Jan; Moreno, Carmen; Mosges, Ralph; Muraro, Antonella; Niggemann, Bodo; Pajno, Giovanni; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Pfaar, Oliver; Rak, Sabina; Senna, Gianenrico; Senti, Gabriela; Valovirta, Erkka; van Hage, Marianne; Virchow, Johannes C; Wahn, Ulrich; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Allergy today is a public health concern of pandemic proportions, affecting more than 150 million people in Europe alone. In view of epidemiological trends, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) predicts that within the next few decades, more than half of the European population may at some point in their lives experience some type of allergy.Not only do allergic patients suffer from a debilitating disease, with the potential for major impact on their quality of life, career progression, personal development and lifestyle choices, but they also constitute a significant burden on health economics and macroeconomics due to the days of lost productivity and underperformance. Given that allergy triggers, including urbanization, industrialization, pollution and climate change, are not expected to change in the foreseeable future, it is imperative that steps are taken to develop, strengthen and optimize preventive and treatment strategies.Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only currently available medical intervention that has the potential to affect the natural course of the disease. Years of basic science research, clinical trials, and systematic reviews and meta-analyses have convincingly shown that allergen specific immunotherapy can achieve substantial results for patients, improving the allergic individuals' quality of life, reducing the long-term costs and burden of allergies, and changing the course of the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy not only effectively alleviates allergy symptoms, but it has a long-term effect after conclusion of the treatment and can prevent the progression of allergic diseases.Unfortunately, allergen specific immunotherapy has not yet received adequate attention from European institutions, including research funding bodies, even though this could be a most rewarding field in terms of return on investments, translational value and European integration and, a field in which Europe is recognized as a

  14. Immunotherapies in rheumatologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anne V; Ranatunga, Sriya K M

    2012-05-01

    Over the past several decades, rheumatology has directed its focus to understanding and countering the immune dysregulation underlying autoimmune diseases with rheumatologic manifestations. Older therapies, effective though poorly understood, are being scrutinized anew and are yielding the immune-modulating mechanisms behind their efficacy. New therapies, the "biologics," are drugs tailored to address specific immune defects and imbalances. This article discusses the current standard and biologic immunotherapies of the rheumatic diseases, correlating our current understanding of their mechanisms with dysfunctions believed to be present in the major autoimmune syndromes, especially rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:22703852

  15. [Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Falkentoft, Alexander Christian; Hasselbalch, Steen Gregers

    2016-01-18

    Passive anti-beta-amyloid (Aß) immunotherapy has been shown to clear brain Aß deposits. Results from phase III clinical trials in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with two monoclonal antibodies bapineuzumab and solanezumab and intravenous immunoglobulin have been disappointing. Subsequent analysis of pooled data from both phase III trials with solanezumab showed a reduction in cognitive decline in patients with mild AD. Solanezumab and new monoclonal antibodies are being tested in patients with prodromal and preclinical AD in search for a disease-modifying treatment. PMID:26815584

  16. Prospects for immunotherapy and vaccines against Cryptosporidium

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Jan R

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp is a ubiquitous parasite that has long been recognized as a frequent cause of protozoal diarrhea in humans. While infections in immunocompetent hosts are usually self-limiting, immunocompromised individuals can develop severe, chronic, and life-threatening illness. Vaccine development or immunotherapy that prevents disease or reduces the severity of infection is a relevant option since efficacious drug treatments are lacking. In particular, children in developing countries might benefit the most from a vaccine since cryptosporidiosis in early childhood has been reported to be associated with subsequent impairment in growth, physical fitness, and intellectual capacity. In this review, immunotherapies that have been used clinically are described as well as experimental vaccines and their evaluation in vivo. PMID:24638018

  17. Active immunotherapy options for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia and a major contributor to disability and dependency among older people. AD pathogenesis is associated with the accumulation of amyloid-beta protein (Aβ) and/or hyperphosphorylated tau protein in the brain. At present, current therapies provide temporary symptomatic benefit, but do not treat the underlying disease. Recent research has thus focused on investigating the molecular and cellular pathways and processes involved in AD pathogenesis to support the development of effective disease-modifying agents. In accordance with the existing Aβ-cascade hypothesis for AD pathogenesis, immunotherapy has been the most extensively studied approach in Aβ-targeted therapy. Both passive and active immunotherapies have been shown to effectively reduce Aβ accumulation and prevent downstream pathology in preclinical models. Following AN1792, second-generation active immunotherapies have shown promising results in terms of antibody response and safety. Comparatively, tau immunotherapy is not as advanced, but preclinical data support its development into clinical trials. Results from active amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in preclinical models indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation, highlighting the importance of diagnosing AD as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. This strategy, combined with improving our understanding of the complex AD pathogenesis, is imperative to the successful development of these disease-modifying agents. This paper will review the active immunotherapies currently in development, including the benefits and challenges associated with this approach. PMID:24476230

  18. Adherence to Sublingual Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Leo, Gualtiero; Ridolo, Erminia

    2016-02-01

    Adherence is a major issue in any medical treatment. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is particularly affected by a poor adherence because a flawed application prevents the immunological effects that underlie the clinical outcome of the treatment. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1990s, and the early studies suggested that adherence and compliance to such a route of administration was better than the traditional subcutaneous route. However, the recent data from manufacturers revealed that only 13% of patients treated with SLIT reach the recommended 3-year duration. Therefore, improved adherence to SLIT is an unmet need that may be achieved by various approaches. The utility of patient education and accurate monitoring during the treatment was demonstrated by specific studies, while the success of technology-based tools, including online platforms, social media, e-mail, and a short message service by phone, is currently considered to improve the adherence. This goal is of pivotal importance to fulfill the object of SLIT that is to modify the natural history of allergy, ensuring a long-lasting clinical benefit, and a consequent pharmaco-economic advantage, when patients complete at least a 3-year course of treatment. PMID:26758865

  19. Current status of immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Susumu; Ishida, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2016-03-01

    The successful use of immune checkpoint inhibitors has been big breakthrough in the development of cancer immunotherapy. Anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibody, ipilimumab, is the first-approved immune checkpoint inhibitor and has shown durable objective responses for advanced melanoma beyond the effect of dacarbazine. Anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibodies, nivolumab and pembrolizumab, are other immune checkpoint inhibitors that have demonstrated more effective results than conventional drugs in clinical trials for a variety of advanced solid tumors including melanoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma and renal carcinoma. These studies have indicated that the enhancement of anti-cancer immunity by controlling the immune suppressive environment in cancer tissues is an important issue for the development of cancer immune-therapy. Accordingly, in recent years, the enthusiasm for research of cancer immunology has shifted to studies regarding the formation of the immune suppressive environment, immune suppression mechanisms in cancer tissues and the molecules and cells involved in these pathways. Novel findings from these studies might lead to the development of cancer immunotherapy based on control of the immune suppressive environment. PMID:26819277

  20. The Combination of Valacyclovir with an Anti-TNF Alpha Antibody Increases Survival Rate Compared to Antiviral Therapy Alone in a Murine Model of Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Nicolas; Menasria, Rafik; Piret, Jocelyne; Rivest, Serge; Boivin, Guy

    2013-10-24

    The added benefit of combining valacyclovir (VACV), an antiviral agent, with etanercept (ETA), an anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) antibody, for the treatment of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis (HSE) was evaluated in a mouse model. BALB/c mice were infected intranasally with 1.85x10(4) plaque forming units of HSV-1. Groups of mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of vehicle or ETA (400 μg/mouse) on day 3 post-infection combined or not with VACV (1 mg/ml of drinking water) from days 3 to 21 post-infection. On day 5 post-infection, groups of mice were sacrificed for determination of viral DNA load, detection of ETA in brain homogenates and for in situ hybridization. The survival rate of mice was significantly increased when VACV was administered in combination with ETA (38.5% for VACV vs 78.6% for combined treatment; P=0.04) although VACV or ETA alone had no significant effect compared to the vehicle. The benefit of combined therapy was still present when treatment was delayed until day 4 post-infection. The viral DNA load was significantly reduced in mice treated with VACV alone (P<0.01) or combined with ETA (P<0.05) compared to the uninfected group whereas ETA alone had no effect. These results reinforce the notion that both virus-induced and immune-related mechanisms participate in the pathogenesis of HSE and suggest that potent antiviral agent could be combined with immune-based therapy, such as a TNF-α inhibitor, to improve prognosis of HSE. PMID:24513309

  1. The combination of valacyclovir with an anti-TNF alpha antibody increases survival rate compared to antiviral therapy alone in a murine model of herpes simplex virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Nicolas; Menasria, Rafik; Piret, Jocelyne; Rivest, Serge; Boivin, Guy

    2013-12-01

    The added benefit of combining valacyclovir (VACV), an antiviral agent, with etanercept (ETA), an anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) antibody, for the treatment of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis (HSE) was evaluated in a mouse model. BALB/c mice were infected intranasally with 1.85 × 104 plaque forming units of HSV-1. Groups of mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of vehicle or ETA (400 μg/mouse) on day 3 post-infection combined or not with VACV (1 mg/ml of drinking water) from days 3 to 21 post-infection. On day 5 post-infection, groups of mice were sacrificed for determination of viral DNA load, detection of ETA in brain homogenates and for in situ hybridization. The survival rate of mice was significantly increased when VACV was administered in combination with ETA (38.5% for VACV vs 78.6% for combined treatment; P = 0.04) although VACV or ETA alone had no significant effect compared to the vehicle. The benefit of combined therapy was still present when treatment was delayed until day 4 post-infection. The viral DNA load was significantly reduced in mice treated with VACV alone (P < 0.01) or combined with ETA (P < 0.05) compared to the uninfected group whereas ETA alone had no effect. These results reinforce the notion that both virus-induced and immune-related mechanisms participate in the pathogenesis of HSE and suggest that potent antiviral agent could be combined with immune-based therapy, such as a TNF-α inhibitor, to improve prognosis of HSE. PMID:24416771

  2. Anti-TNF-α treatment modulates SASP and SASP-related microRNAs in endothelial cells and in circulating angiogenic cells

    PubMed Central

    Prattichizzo, Francesco; Giuliani, Angelica; Recchioni, Rina; Bonafè, Massimiliano; Marcheselli, Fiorella; De Carolis, Sabrina; Campanati, Anna; Giuliodori, Katia; Rippo, Maria Rita; Brugè, Francesca; Tiano, Luca; Micucci, Carla; Ceriello, Antonio; Offidani, Annamaria; Procopio, Antonio Domenico; Olivieri, Fabiola

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell senescence is characterized by acquisition of senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), able to promote inflammaging and cancer progression. Emerging evidence suggest that preventing SASP development could help to slow the rate of aging and the progression of age-related diseases, including cancer. Aim of this study was to evaluate whether and how adalimumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a major SASP component, can prevent the SASP. A three-pronged approach has been adopted to assess the if adalimumab is able to: i) modulate a panel of classic and novel senescence- and SASP-associated markers (interleukin [IL]-6, senescence associated-β-galactosidase, p16/Ink4a, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, miR-146a-5p/Irak1 and miR-126-3p/Spred1) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs); ii) reduce the paracrine effects of senescent HUVECs' secretome on MCF-7 breast cancer cells, through wound healing and mammosphere assay; and iii) exert significant decrease of miR-146a-5p and increase of miR-126-3p in circulating angiogenic cells (CACs) from psoriasis patients receiving adalimumab in monotherapy. TNF-α blockade associated with adalimumab induced significant reduction in released IL-6 and significant increase in eNOS and miR-126-3p expression levels in long-term HUVEC cultures. A significant reduction in miR-146a-5p expression levels both in long-term HUVEC cultures and in CACs isolated from psoriasis patients was also evident. Interestingly, conditioned medium from senescent HUVECs treated with adalimumab was less consistent than medium from untreated cells in inducing migration- and mammosphere- promoting effects on MCF-7 cells. Our findings suggest that adalimumab can induce epigenetic modifications in cells undergoing senescence, thus contributing to the attenuation of SASP tumor-promoting effects. PMID:26943583

  3. Mouse Models of Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Loi, Sherene; Thomas, David; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is now evolving into a major therapeutic option for cancer patients. Such clinical advances also promote massive interest in the search for novel immunotherapy targets, and to understand the mechanism of action of current drugs. It is projected that a series of novel immunotherapy agents will be developed and assessed for their therapeutic activity. In light of this, in vivo experimental mouse models that recapitulate human malignancies serve as valuable tools to validate the efficacy and safety profile of immunotherapy agents, before their transition into clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss the major classes of experimental mouse models of cancer commonly used for immunotherapy assessment and provide examples to guide the selection of appropriate models. We present some new data concerning the utility of a carcinogen-induced tumor model for comparing immunotherapies and combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. We will also highlight some recent advances in experimental modeling of human malignancies in mice that are leading towards personalized therapy in patients. PMID:26922998

  4. Immunotherapy for metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Charles G.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy with docetaxel is the standard treatment for men with metastatic prostate cancer, and results in statistically significant improvements in survival, as well as in quality of life. However, the response rate to single-agent docetaxel is approximately 40% to 45%, emphasizing a need for alternative approaches. More significantly, with the onset of early, PSA-based detection of prostate cancer and closer follow-up, many men present with metastatic disease that remains asymptomatic. For such patients, the side effects of chemotherapy would compromise their current performance status and, thus, a nontoxic, early treatment option that could improve overall survival would be highly desirable. Immunotherapy represents one such approach; a number of clinical trials have suggested a survival benefit for immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer and confirmed that these agents are generally well-tolerated. As is the case for chemotherapy, it is doubtful that maximal survival benefit will be achieved with single-agent immunotherapy; experimental treatments in which mechanistically distinct immunotherapy approaches are combined, as well as approaches in which immunotherapy is combined with chemotherapy or hormonal therapy are currently under investigation. This review will discuss the mechanisms of action of several immunotherapy approaches for metastatic prostate cancer, focusing on active immunotherapy as opposed to administration of anti-tumor antibodies. The relative advantages and disadvantages of current approaches will be noted, and ongoing clinical trials will be highlighted. PMID:18593624

  5. Modified immunotherapy for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Takashi; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2016-07-01

    Squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE) is a commonly used contact sensitizer in immunotherapy for alopecia areata (AA). Severe contact dermatitis is induced by the currently high recommended sensitization dose of 1%-2% SADBE, often decreasing patient compliance. We assessed a modified immunotherapy for AA using SADBE at a starting concentration of 0.01% without sensitization. After one or two weeks of initial 0.01% SADBE application, the concentration of SADBE was increased gradually to 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% until the patients felt itching or erythema at the AA lesion site. The modified immunotherapy showed a response rate of 69.4% (25/36), equivalent to conventional immunotherapy using SADBE starting at 1%-2% sensitization. Furthermore, we investigated the combination therapy of SADBE and multiple courses of steroid pulses for AA. The response rate for combination therapy was 73.7% (28/38); however, the group receiving combination therapy showed a significant prevalence of severe AA compared with the group receiving modified immunotherapy only. We reviewed the efficacy and safety of modified immunotherapy without initial sensitization and combination therapy with immunotherapy and multiple courses of pulses for AA. PMID:26932732

  6. Chapter 3: Allergen immunotherapy: definition, indication, and reactions.

    PubMed

    Georgy, Mary S; Saltoun, Carol A

    2012-01-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy is the administration of increasing amounts of specific allergens to which the patient has type I immediate hypersensitivity. It is a disease modifying therapy, indicated for the treatment of allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, and hymenoptera hypersensitivity. Specific IgE antibodies for appropriate allergens for immunotherapy must be documented. Indications for allergen immunotherapy include (1) inadequate symptom control despite pharmacotherapy and avoidance measures, (2) a desire to reduce the morbidity from allergic rhinitis and/or asthma or reduce the risk of anaphylaxis from a future insect sting, (3) when the patient experiences undesirable side effects from pharmacotherapy, and (4) when avoidance is not possible. Furthermore, patients may seek to benefit from economic savings of allergen immunotherapy compared with pharmacotherapy over time. Several studies have reported that immunotherapy in children with allergic rhinitis appears to prevent the development of new allergic sensitizations and/or new-onset asthma. Humoral, cellular, and tissue level changes occur with allergen immunotherapy including large increases in antiallergen IgG(4) antibodies, a decrease in the postseasonal rise of antiallergen IgE antibodies, reduced numbers of nasal mucosal mast cells and eosinophils, induction of Treg cells, and suppression of Th2 more than Th1 lymphocytes. There is a corresponding increase in IL-10 and transforming growth factor beta. In the United States, allergen immunotherapy is administered by the subcutaneous route in the physician's office, whereas primarily in some countries in Europe, it is administered for allergic rhinitis and asthma by the sublingual route by the patient at home. PMID:22794676

  7. Conference Scene: novelties in immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mitsias, Dimitris I; Kalogiros, Lampros A; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G

    2013-10-01

    The only method aiming to permanently cure allergic disorders is allergen immunotherapy. Over the last 20 years there has been great progress in understanding the mechanisms that govern allergen immunotherapy in order to meet three basic prerequisites: safety, effectiveness and compliance. In the present summary report from the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology-World Allergy Organization Congress held last June in Milan, we review key points concerning the main axes as diagnosis, novel modalities, routes and protocols, as well as two important immunotherapy fields: food and insect venom allergy. PMID:24088073

  8. Immunotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer-a review.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amit; Chia, Whay Kuang; Toh, Han Chong

    2016-04-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and characterized by peritumoral immune infiltrate. Advanced NPC has high lethality. Immunotherapy directed against EBV antigen targets has been previously explored in clinical trials, and is likely to be validated as an important target in NPC as randomized data emerges in the future. Cancer vaccines and adoptive T cell therapy have been explored in the clinic, with the latter showing the greatest success. Recent advances in gene sequencing technology now allow personalized tumor epitope mapping, whilst the advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis offers the opportunity to activate adaptive T cell response in vivo. Anti-PD1 antibodies have shown promising activity in early phase clinical trials, and randomized studies against chemotherapy are underway. As immunotherapy is incorporated into standard treatment paradigms, issues of optimal combinations with targeting agents, immune adjuvants, and sequence with chemotherapy and radiation therapy will need to be addressed. Effective strategies to increase tumor antigenicity, improve immunological memory and reduce immune escape, will need to be developed to improve treatment outcomes. Here we present a brief history of the evolution of immunotherapy in NPC, and highlight key concepts relevant to its further development in the clinic. PMID:27121882

  9. Laser immunotherapy of canine and feline neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, J. P.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Davidson, Ellen B.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Lehenbauer, Terry W.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    1998-07-01

    The major cause of treatment failure in human and veterinary cancer patients is tumor invasion and metastasis. The inability of local therapy (surgery, radiation, photodynamic therapy) to eradicate a metastatic cancer presents a challenge in the therapy of residual or micrometastatic disease. Because of its local therapy limitations, chromophore-enhanced selective photothermal laser treatment has been augmented with a superimposed laser-induced systemic photobiological reaction, laser immunotherapy. Laser immunotherapy is a novel cancer treatment consisting of: (1) a laser in the infrared wavelength range (i.e. 805 nm solid state laser); (2) a photosensitizer of the corresponding absorption peak [i.e. indocyanine green (ICG)]; and (3) an immunoadjuvant [i.e. glycated chitosan gel (GCG)]. The intratumor injection of the photosensitizer (ICG) and immunoadjuvant (GCG) solution is followed by noninvasive laser irradiation. The laser energy causes tumor cell destruction by photothermal interaction to reduce the tumor burden and at the same time exposes tumor antigens. The immunoadjuvant concomitantly stimulates the host to mount a systemic anti-tumor immune response against the remaining cells of the tumor and to induce a long-term, tumor-specific immunity. This study investigates the feasibility of utilizing laser immunotherapy as an adjunctive therapy for the control of feline fibrosarcoma in future.

  10. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation with reduced conditioning intensity as a novel immunotherapy and antiviral therapy for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Jun; Utsunomiya, Atae; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Uike, Naokuni; Sonoda, Shunro; Kannagi, Mari; Tomonaga, Masao; Harada, Mine; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Masuda, Masato; Kawano, Fumio; Yufu, Yuji; Hattori, Hiroyoshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Saburi, Yoshio

    2005-05-15

    Sixteen patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) who were all over 50 years of age underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation with reduced-conditioning intensity (RIST) from HLA-matched sibling donors after a conditioning regimen consisting of fludarabine (180 mg/m2), busulfan (8 mg/kg), and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (5 mg/kg). The observed regimen-related toxicities and nonhematologic toxicities were all found to be acceptable. Disease relapse was the main cause of treatment failure. Three patients who had a relapse subsequently responded to a rapid discontinuation of the immunosuppressive agent and thereafter achieved another remission. After RIST, the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral load became undetectable in 8 patients. RIST is thus considered to be a feasible treatment for ATL. Our data also suggest the presence of a possible graft-versus-ATL effect; an anti-HTLV-1 activity was also found to be associated with this procedure. PMID:15665110

  11. Imaging Biomarkers in Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Juergens, Rosalyn A.; Zukotynski, Katherine A.; Singnurkar, Amit; Snider, Denis P.; Valliant, John F.; Gulenchyn, Karen Y.

    2016-01-01

    Immune-based therapies have been in use for decades but recent work with immune checkpoint inhibitors has now changed the landscape of cancer treatment as a whole. While these advances are encouraging, clinicians still do not have a consistent biomarker they can rely on that can accurately select patients or monitor response. Molecular imaging technology provides a noninvasive mechanism to evaluate tumors and may be an ideal candidate for these purposes. This review provides an overview of the mechanism of action of varied immunotherapies and the current strategies for monitoring patients with imaging. We then describe some of the key researches in the preclinical and clinical literature on the current uses of molecular imaging of the immune system and cancer. PMID:26949344

  12. Cytokines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sylvia; Margolin, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Cytokines are molecular messengers that allow the cells of the immune system to communicate with one another to generate a coordinated, robust, but self-limited response to a target antigen. The growing interest over the past two decades in harnessing the immune system to eradicate cancer has been accompanied by heightened efforts to characterize cytokines and exploit their vast signaling networks to develop cancer treatments. The goal of this paper is to review the major cytokines involved in cancer immunotherapy and discuss their basic biology and clinical applications. The paper will also describe new cytokines in pre-clinical development, combinations of biological agents, novel delivery mechanisms, and potential directions for future investigation using cytokines. PMID:24213115

  13. Immunotherapy for Pediatric Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nirali N.; Dave, Hema; Wayne, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the treatment of leukemia in childhood. Despite this, leukemia remains a leading cause of pediatric cancer-related mortality and the prognosis is guarded for individuals with relapsed or refractory disease. Standard therapies are associated with a wide array of acute and long-term toxicities and further treatment intensification may not be tolerable or beneficial. The curative potential of allogeneic stem cell transplantation is due in part to the graft-versus-leukemia effect, which provides evidence for the therapeutic capacity of immune-based therapies. In recent years there have been significant advances in the development and application of immunotherapy in the treatment of leukemias, including the demonstration of activity in chemotherapy-resistant cases. This review summarizes immunotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of pediatric leukemia including current results and future directions. PMID:23847759

  14. Genomic determinants of cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Miao, Diana; Van Allen, Eliezer M

    2016-08-01

    Cancer immunotherapies - including therapeutic vaccines, adoptive cell transfer, oncolytic viruses, and immune checkpoint blockade - yield durable responses in many cancer types, but understanding of predictors of response is incomplete. Genomic characterization of human cancers has already contributed to the success of targeted therapies; in cancer immunotherapy, identification of tumor-specific antigens through whole-exome sequencing may be key to designing individualized, highly immunogenic therapeutic vaccines. Additionally, pre-treatment tumor mutational and gene expression signatures can predict which patients are most likely to benefit from cancer immunotherapy. Continued work in harnessing genomic, transcriptomic, and immunological data from clinical cohorts of immunotherapy-treated patients will bring the promises of precision medicine to immuno-oncology. PMID:27254251

  15. New routes for allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Pål; von Moos, Seraina; Mohanan, Deepa; Kündig, Thomas M; Senti, Gabriela

    2012-10-01

    IgE-mediated allergy is a highly prevalent disease in the industrialized world. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) should be the preferred treatment, as it has long lasting protective effects and can stop the progression of the disease. However, few allergic patients choose to undergo SIT, due to the long treatment time and potential allergic adverse events. Since the beneficial effects of SIT are mediated by antigen presenting cells inducing Th1, Treg and antibody responses, whereas the adverse events are caused by mast cells and basophils, the therapeutic window of SIT may be widened by targeting tissues rich in antigen presenting cells. Lymph nodes and the epidermis contain high density of dendritic cells and low numbers of mast cells and basophils. The epidermis has the added benefit of not being vascularised thereby reducing the chances of anaphylactic shock due to leakage of allergen. Hence, both these tissues represent highly promising routes for SIT and are the focus of discussion in this review. PMID:23095873

  16. Challenges in Clinical Design of Immunotherapy Trials for Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Rolle, Cleo E.; Sengupta, Sadhak; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary malignant brain tumor. The traditional treatments for GBM, including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, only modestly improve patient survival. Therefore, immunotherapy has emerged as a novel therapeutic modality. Immunotherapeutic strategies exploit the immune system's ability to recognize and mount a specific response against tumor cells, but not normal cells. Current immunotherapeutic approaches for glioma can be divided into three categories: immune priming (active immunotherapy), immunomodulation (passive immunotherapy), and adoptive immunotherapy. Immune priming sensitizes the patient's immune cells to tumor antigens using various vaccination protocols. In the case of immunomodulation, strategies are aimed at reducing suppressive cytokines in the tumor microenvironment or using immune molecules to specifically target tumor cells. Adoptive immunotherapy involves harvesting the patient's immune cells, followed by ex vivo activation and expansion prior to re-infusion. This review will provide an overview of the interactions between the central nervous system and the immune system and discuss the challenges facing current immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:19944979

  17. Immunotherapy of Brain Cancer.

    PubMed

    Roth, Patrick; Preusser, Matthias; Weller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The brain has long been considered an immune-privileged site precluding potent immune responses. Nevertheless, because of the failure of conventional anti-cancer treatments to achieve sustained control of intracranial neoplasms, immunotherapy has been considered as a promising strategy for decades. However, several efforts aimed at exploiting the immune system as a therapeutic weapon were largely unsuccessful. The situation only changed with the introduction of the checkpoint inhibitors, which target immune cell receptors that interfere with the activation of immune effector cells. Following the observation of striking effects of drugs that target CTLA-4 or PD-1 against melanoma and other tumor entities, it was recognized that these drugs may also be active against metastatic tumor lesions in the brain. Their therapeutic activity against primary brain tumors is currently being investigated within clinical trials. In parallel, other immunotherapeutics such as peptide vaccines are at an advanced stage of clinical development. Further immunotherapeutic strategies currently under investigation comprise adoptive immune cell transfer as well as inhibitors of metabolic pathways involved in the local immunosuppression frequently found in brain tumors. Thus, the ongoing implementation of immunotherapeutic concepts into clinical routine may represent a powerful addition to the therapeutic arsenal against various brain tumors. PMID:27260656

  18. Immunotherapy for Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Substance use disorders continue to be major medical and social problems worldwide. Current medications for substance use disorders have many limitations such as cost, availability, medication compliance, dependence, diversion of some to illicit use and relapse to addiction after discontinuing their use. Immunotherapies using either passive monoclonal antibodies or active vaccines have distinctly different mechanisms and therapeutic utility from small molecule approaches to treatment. They have great potential to help the patient achieve and sustain abstinence and have fewer of the above limitations. This review covers the cocaine vaccine development in detail and provides an overview of directions for developing anti-addiction vaccines against the abuse of other substances. The notable success of the first placebo-controlled clinical trial of a cocaine vaccine, TA-CD, has led to an ongoing multi-site, Phase IIb clinical trial in 300 subjects. The results from these trials are encouarging further development of the cocaine vacine as one of the first anti-addiction vaccines to go forward to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for review and approval for human use. PMID:22229313

  19. Immunotherapy for drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Kosten, Thomas R

    2011-12-01

    Substance use disorders continue to be major medical and social problems worldwide. Current medications for substance use disorders have many limitations such as cost, availability, medication compliance, dependence, diversion of some to illicit use and relapse to addiction after discontinuing their use. Immunotherapies using either passive monoclonal antibodies or active vaccines have distinctly different mechanisms and therapeutic utility from small molecule approaches to treatment. They have great potential to help the patient achieve and sustain abstinence and have fewer of the above limitations. This review covers the cocaine vaccine development in detail and provides an overview of directions for developing anti-addiction vaccines against the abuse of other substances. The notable success of the first placebo-controlled clinical trial of a cocaine vaccine, TA-CD, has led to an ongoing multi-site, Phase IIb clinical trial in 300 subjects. The results from these trials are encouarging further development of the cocaine vacine as one of the first anti-addiction vaccines to go forward to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for review and approval for human use. PMID:22229313

  20. Immunotherapy in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Marmé, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The importance of the tumor microenvironment including immune cell infiltrates in breast cancer has long been recognized. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are prognostic and predictive; however, their prevalence as well as their prognostic and predictive power are subtype-dependent and appear most prominent in aggressive subtypes like triple-negative and HER2-positive disease. The immune responses observed in many cancers are attracted by tumor-associated antigens and, as suggested by recent research, by neoantigens - immunogenic antigens encoded for by non-synonymous mutations. The appealing promise of cancer vaccines has been pursued in breast cancer for over 2 decades; however, despite much effort having been put into vaccine trials, their clinical benefit, with the exception of some encouraging preliminary results, remains disappointing. The main hurdles compromising the efficacy of these vaccination strategies are the difficulties to generate broad and robust immune responses as well as to overcome immune escape mechanisms. The remarkable efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitors in melanoma and lung cancer has set the ground for a race in the clinical development of numerous agents targeting these immune escape mechanisms in many tumor entities. Early clinical data in metastatic breast cancer suggests at least some clinical activity. This review discusses the current status and future perspectives of immunotherapy in breast cancer. PMID:27260697

  1. Lymphoma Immunotherapy: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Zappasodi, Roberta; de Braud, Filippo; Di Nicola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The rationale to treat lymphomas with immunotherapy comes from long-standing evidence on their distinctive immune responsiveness. Indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, in particular, establish key interactions with the immune microenvironment to ensure prosurvival signals and prevent antitumor immune activation. However, reports of spontaneous regressions indicate that, under certain circumstances, patients develop therapeutic antitumor immunity. Several immunotherapeutic approaches have been thus developed to boost these effects in all patients. To date, targeting CD20 on malignant B cells with the antibody rituximab has been the most clinically effective strategy. However, relapse and resistance prevent to cure approximately half of B-NHL patients, underscoring the need of more effective therapies. The recognition of B-cell receptor variable regions as B-NHL unique antigens promoted the development of specific vaccines to immunize patients against their own tumor. Despite initial promising results, this strategy has not yet demonstrated a sufficient clinical benefit to reach the regulatory approval. Several novel agents are now available to stimulate immune effector functions or counteract immunosuppressive mechanisms, such as engineered antitumor T cells, co-stimulatory receptor agonist, and immune checkpoint-blocking antibodies. Thus, multiple elements can now be exploited in more effective combinations to break the barriers for the induction of anti-lymphoma immunity. PMID:26388871

  2. Immunotherapy for malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Suryadevara, Carter M.; Verla, Terence; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Reap, Elizabeth A.; Choi, Bryan D.; Fecci, Peter E.; Sampson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas (MG) are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor. Most patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and malignant glial tumor, die within 12–15 months. Moreover, conventional treatment, which includes surgery followed by radiation and chemotherapy, can be highly toxic by causing nonspecific damage to healthy brain and other tissues. The shortcomings of standard-of-care have thus created a stimulus for the development of novel therapies that can target central nervous system (CNS)-based tumors specifically and efficiently, while minimizing off-target collateral damage to normal brain. Immunotherapy represents an investigational avenue with the promise of meeting this need, already having demonstrated its potential against B-cell malignancy and solid tumors in clinical trials. T-cell engineering with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is one proven approach that aims to redirect autologous patient T-cells to sites of tumor. This platform has evolved dramatically over the past two decades to include an improved construct design, and these modern CARs have only recently been translated into the clinic for brain tumors. We review here emerging immunotherapeutic platforms for the treatment of MG, focusing on the development and application of a CAR-based strategy against GBM. PMID:25722935

  3. IgE immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Josephs, Debra H; Spicer, James F; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Gould, Hannah J; Karagiannis, Sophia N

    2014-01-01

    The importance of antibodies in activating immune responses against tumors is now better appreciated with the emergence of checkpoint blockade antibodies and with engineered antibody Fc domains featuring enhanced capacity to focus potent effector cells against cancer cells. Antibodies designed with Fc regions of the IgE class can confer natural, potent, long-lived immune surveillance in tissues through tenacious engagement of high-affinity cognate Fc receptors on distinct, often tumor-resident immune effector cells, and through ability to activate these cells under tumor-induced Th2-biased conditions. Here, we review the properties that make IgE a contributor to the allergic response and a critical player in the protection against parasites, which also support IgE as a novel anti-cancer modality. We discuss IgE-based active and passive immunotherapeutic approaches in disparate in vitro and in vivo model systems, collectively suggesting the potential of IgE immunotherapies in oncology. Translation toward clinical application is now in progress. PMID:24423620

  4. The efficiency of peptide immunotherapy for respiratory allergy.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Montagni, Marcello; Ridolo, Erminia

    2016-06-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) was introduced more than a century ago and is yet the only disease-modifying treatment for allergy. AIT is currently conducted with whole allergen extracts and several studies clearly support its efficacy in the treatment of respiratory allergies, however the need for a long treatment - that affects costs and patients compliance - and possible IgE-mediated adverse events are still unresolved issues. Peptide immunotherapy is based on the use of short synthetic peptides which represent major T-cell epitopes of the allergen with markedly reduced ability to cross-link IgE and activate mast cells and basophils. Data from clinical trials confirmed the efficacy and tolerability of peptide immunotherapy in patients with cat allergy, with a sustained clinical effect after a short course treatment. Peptide therapy is a promising safe and effective new specific treatment for allergy to be developed for the most important allergens causing rhinitis or asthma. PMID:26901667

  5. Acquired resistance to immunotherapy and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Restifo, Nicholas P; Smyth, Mark J; Snyder, Alexandra

    2016-02-01

    Advances in immunotherapy have resulted in remarkable clinical responses in some patients. However, one of the biggest challenges in cancer therapeutics is the development of resistant disease and disease progression on or after therapy. Given that many patients have now received various types of immunotherapy, we asked three scientists to give their views on the current evidence for whether acquired resistance to immunotherapy exists in patients and the future challenges posed by immunotherapy. PMID:26822578

  6. Immunotherapy for tuberculosis: future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Getahun; Hoft, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major global health problem. A third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Only ~10% of infected individuals develop TB but there are 9 million TB cases with 1.5 million deaths annually. The standard prophylactic treatment regimens for latent TB infection take 3–9 months, and new cases of TB require at least 6 months of treatment with multiple drugs. The management of latent TB infection and TB has become more challenging because of the spread of multidrug-resistant and extremely drug-resistant TB. Intensified efforts to find new TB drugs and immunotherapies are needed. Immunotherapies could modulate the immune system in patients with latent TB infection or active disease, enabling better control of M. tuberculosis replication. This review describes several types of potential immunotherapies with a focus on those which have been tested in humans. PMID:27529060

  7. Immunotherapy of Childhood Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Stephen S; Chou, Alexander J; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant tumors of bone and soft tissue origin. Although more than 100 different histologic subtypes have been described, the majority of pediatric cases belong to the Ewing's family of tumors, rhabdomyosarcoma and osteosarcoma. Most patients that present with localized stage are curable with surgery and/or chemotherapy; however, those with metastatic disease at diagnosis or those who experience a relapse continue to have a very poor prognosis. New therapies for these patients are urgently needed. Immunotherapy is an established treatment modality for both liquid and solid tumors, and in pediatrics, most notably for neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma. In the past, immunomodulatory agents such as interferon, interleukin-2, and liposomal-muramyl tripeptide phosphatidyl-ethanolamine have been tried, with some activity seen in subsets of patients; additionally, various cancer vaccines have been studied with possible benefit. Monoclonal antibody therapies against tumor antigens such as disialoganglioside GD2 or immune checkpoint targets such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 are being actively explored in pediatric sarcomas. Building on the success of adoptive T cell therapy for EBV-related lymphoma, strategies to redirect T cells using chimeric antigen receptors and bispecific antibodies are rapidly evolving with potential for the treatment of sarcomas. This review will focus on recent preclinical and clinical developments in targeted agents for pediatric sarcomas with emphasis on the immunobiology of immune checkpoints, immunoediting, tumor microenvironment, antibody engineering, cell engineering, and tumor vaccines. The future integration of antibody-based and cell-based therapies into an overall treatment strategy of sarcoma will be discussed. PMID:26301204

  8. Immunotherapy of Childhood Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Stephen S.; Chou, Alexander J.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant tumors of bone and soft tissue origin. Although more than 100 different histologic subtypes have been described, the majority of pediatric cases belong to the Ewing’s family of tumors, rhabdomyosarcoma and osteosarcoma. Most patients that present with localized stage are curable with surgery and/or chemotherapy; however, those with metastatic disease at diagnosis or those who experience a relapse continue to have a very poor prognosis. New therapies for these patients are urgently needed. Immunotherapy is an established treatment modality for both liquid and solid tumors, and in pediatrics, most notably for neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma. In the past, immunomodulatory agents such as interferon, interleukin-2, and liposomal-muramyl tripeptide phosphatidyl-ethanolamine have been tried, with some activity seen in subsets of patients; additionally, various cancer vaccines have been studied with possible benefit. Monoclonal antibody therapies against tumor antigens such as disialoganglioside GD2 or immune checkpoint targets such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 are being actively explored in pediatric sarcomas. Building on the success of adoptive T cell therapy for EBV-related lymphoma, strategies to redirect T cells using chimeric antigen receptors and bispecific antibodies are rapidly evolving with potential for the treatment of sarcomas. This review will focus on recent preclinical and clinical developments in targeted agents for pediatric sarcomas with emphasis on the immunobiology of immune checkpoints, immunoediting, tumor microenvironment, antibody engineering, cell engineering, and tumor vaccines. The future integration of antibody-based and cell-based therapies into an overall treatment strategy of sarcoma will be discussed. PMID:26301204

  9. Hypoallergenic molecules for subcutaneous immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jongejan, Laurian; van Ree, Ronald; Poulsen, Lars K

    2016-01-01

    Although a large part of the population suffers from allergies, a cure is not yet available. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) offers promise for these patients. AIT has proven successful in insect and venom allergies; however, for food allergy this is still unclear. In this editorial we focus on the recent advances in a proof of concept study in food allergy, FAST (Food allergy specific immunotherapy), which may increase interest within the biomolecular and pharmaceutical industry to embark on similar projects of immunology driven precision medicine within the allergy field. PMID:26558320

  10. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Krishnadas, Deepa Kolaseri; Bai, Fanqi; Lucas, Kenneth G

    2013-01-01

    The identification of cancer testis (CT) antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1), melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3), and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1) in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy.

  11. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vacchelli, Erika; Bravo-San Pedro, José-Manuel; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V; Eggermont, Alexander M; Fearon, Douglas T; Fridman, Wolf H; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E; Pienta, Kenneth J; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J; Speiser, Daniel E; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K; Talmadge, James E; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S; Whiteside, Theresa L; Wolchok, Jedd D; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-12-30

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into "passive" and "active" based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches. PMID:25537519

  12. Immunotherapy Approaches in Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Klener, Pavel; Otáhal, Pavel; Lateckova, Lucie; Klener, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Tumor immune surveillance paradigm presumes that most pre-malignant cells or early malignant lesions can be eliminated (or at least controlled) by cells of the immune system. A critical feature that distinguishes advanced tumors from early neoplastic lesions is their capability to evade immune control. As a consequence, vast majority of clinically evident (advanced) tumors are poorly immunogenic. The principle goal of immunotherapy is thus a resurrection of the patient's inefficient or suppressed immune system so that it would once again become capable of launching sustained cytolytic attacks against tumor cells, which would ideally result in total and permanent eradication of cancer. Such activation of patient's anticancer immunity, however, can be achieved by strikingly different ways. This current review discusses diverse innovative immunotherapy approaches, which in the last 20 years achieved miraculous successes in the ever-lasting battle against cancer, including cytokine-based immunotherapy approaches, therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives, cancer vaccines, and cell-based immunotherapy approaches. PMID:26087990

  13. Engineering opportunities in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jeanbart, Laura; Swartz, Melody A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has great potential to treat cancer and prevent future relapse by activating the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells. A variety of strategies are continuing to evolve in the laboratory and in the clinic, including therapeutic noncellular (vector-based or subunit) cancer vaccines, dendritic cell vaccines, engineered T cells, and immune checkpoint blockade. Despite their promise, much more research is needed to understand how and why certain cancers fail to respond to immunotherapy and to predict which therapeutic strategies, or combinations thereof, are most appropriate for each patient. Underlying these challenges are technological needs, including methods to rapidly and thoroughly characterize the immune microenvironment of tumors, predictive tools to screen potential therapies in patient-specific ways, and sensitive, information-rich assays that allow patient monitoring of immune responses, tumor regression, and tumor dissemination during and after therapy. The newly emerging field of immunoengineering is addressing some of these challenges, and there is ample opportunity for engineers to contribute their approaches and tools to further facilitate the clinical translation of immunotherapy. Here we highlight recent technological advances in the diagnosis, therapy, and monitoring of cancer in the context of immunotherapy, as well as ongoing challenges. PMID:26598681

  14. Immunotherapy toxic in obese mice.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    New research shows immunotherapy can cause lethal inflammation in both young and aged mice that are obese. Restricting calories in aged mice protected them from toxicity, and giving young obese mice a drug for autoimmune disease prevented the fatal reactions. PMID:25583780

  15. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Pedro, José-Manuel Bravo-San; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N.; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P.; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Eggermont, Alexander M.; Fearon, Douglas T.; Fridman, Wolf H.; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M.; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E.; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Talmadge, James E.; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J.; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into “passive” and “active” based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches. PMID:25537519

  16. Future perspectives in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mountzios, Giannis; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The advent of immunotherapy has transformed the treatment paradigm of several solid tumors and is expected to influence the therapeutic algorithm even more in the future following the results of numerous ongoing clinical trials in a wide range of malignancies. Exploiting the anti-cancer effect of the immune system with the use of vaccines, viral vectors, and more lately with immune check-point inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor modification, has been proven a successful therapeutic strategy in a broad spectrum of tumors. In particular, immune check-point inhibition in melanoma, non-small-cell lung cancer and renal cancer, peptide vaccination in prostate cancer and glioblastoma, and oncolytic immunotherapy in melanoma are well-established therapeutic modalities that have obtained approval by regulatory authorities and are already in clinical use. A large number of ongoing clinical trials involving thousands of patients are currently seeking to define the appropriate tumor type, therapeutic setting, treatment combination and patient populations in order to maximize clinical benefit from immunotherapeutic agents. In this context, identification of the patients whose tumors are most likely to respond to immunotherapy by the use of appropriate biomarkers will be crucial for the optimal implementation of immunotherapy into the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:27563660

  17. A Phase I Study of Reduced-Intensity Conditioning and Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Followed by Dose Escalation of Targeted Consolidation Immunotherapy with Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Children and Adolescents with CD33(+) Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zahler, Stacey; Bhatia, Monica; Ricci, Angela; Roy, Sumith; Morris, Erin; Harrison, Lauren; van de Ven, Carmella; Fabricatore, Sandra; Wolownik, Karen; Cooney-Qualter, Erin; Baxter-Lowe, Lee Ann; Luisi, Paul; Militano, Olga; Kletzel, Morris; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2016-04-01

    Myeloablative conditioning and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (alloHSCT) in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1) may be associated with significant acute toxicity and late effects. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and alloHSCT in children is safe, feasible, and may be associated with less adverse effects. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) induces a response in 30% of patients with CD33(+) relapsed/refractory AML. The dose of GO is significantly lower when combined with chemotherapy. We examined the feasibility and toxicity of RIC alloHSCT followed by GO targeted immunotherapy in children with CD33(+) AML in CR1/CR2. Conditioning consisted of fludarabine 30 mg/m(2) × 6 days, busulfan 3.2 to 4 mg/kg × 2 days ± rabbit antithymocyte globulin 2 mg/kg × 4 days followed by alloHSCT from matched related/unrelated donors. GO was administered ≥60 days after alloHSCT in 2 doses (8 weeks apart), following a dose-escalation design (4.5, 6, 7.5, and 9 mg/m(2)). Fourteen patients with average risk AML received RIC alloHSCT and post-GO consolidation: median age 13.5 years at transplant (range, 1 to 21), male-to-female 8:6, and disease status at alloHSCT 11 CR1 and 3 CR2. Eleven patients received alloHSCT from 5-6/6 HLA-matched family donors: 8 received peripheral blood stem cells, 2 received bone marrow, and 1 received related cord blood transplantation. Three patients received an unrelated allograft (two 4-5/6 and one 9/10) from unrelated cord blood unit and bone marrow, respectively. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment was observed in all assessable patients (100%), achieved at median 15.5 days (range, 7 to 31) and 21 days (range, 10 to 52), respectively. Three patients received GO at dose level 1 (4.5 mg/m(2) per dose), 5 at dose level 2 (6 mg/m(2) per dose), 3 at dose level 3 (7.5 mg/m(2) per dose), and 3 at dose level 4 (9 mg/m(2) per dose). Three of 14 patients received only 1 dose of GO after

  18. [Cancer immunotherapy by immuno-checkpoint blockade].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    As cancer immunotherapies utilizing anti-tumor T-cell responses, immuno-checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell immunotherapy have recently achieved durable responses even in advanced cancer patients with metastases. Administration of antibodies on the T-cell surface, CTLA-4 and PD-1 (or PD-1 ligand PD-L1), resulted in tumor regression of not only melanoma and renal cell cancer which were known to be relatively sensitive to immunotherapy, but also various malignancies including lung, bladder, ovarian, gastric, and head and neck cancers, as well as hematological malignancies such as Hodgkin and B-cell malignant lymphomas. These findings have changed the status of immunotherapy in the development of cancer treatments. Currently, development of combinations employing cancer immunotherapy with immuno-checkpoint blockade, as well as personalized cancer immunotherapy based on the evaluation of pretreatment immune status, are in progress. PMID:26458459

  19. Emerging immunotherapy in pediatric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Erker, Craig; Harker-Murray, Paul; Burke, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma collectively are the third most common cancer diagnosed in children each year. For children who relapse or have refractory disease, outcomes remain poor. Immunotherapy has recently emerged as a novel approach to treat hematologic malignancies. The field has been rapidly expanding over the past few years broadening its armamentarium which now includes monoclonal antibodies, antibody-drug conjugates and cellular therapies including bispecific T-cell engagers and chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells. Many of these agents are in their infancy stages and only beginning to make their mark on lymphoma treatment while others have begun to show promising efficacy in relapsed disease. In this review, the authors provide an overview of current and emerging immunotherapies in the field of pediatric lymphoma. PMID:26616565

  20. Allergen immunotherapy in polysensitized patient.

    PubMed

    Hrubiško, M; Špičák, V

    2016-05-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is the only therapeutic method with positive impact on natural course of allergic disease - affecting clinical development (including the progression of rhinitis to asthma) and new sensitisations. The actual problem is the increasing number of patients manifesting poly-sensitivity in allergy skin tests and / or in specific IgE tests. Usually, AIT is not recommended in such individuals. The objective we are facing is that in many patients tested as poly-reactive, we have to distinguish in which cases it is a true polysensitization, and when it is due to cross-reactivity of specific IgE antibodies induced by panallergens. This may really determine when AIT may be an appropriate course of action. The article focuses on this problem in more detail, applying the long time Czech and Slovak experience with allergy testing and allergen immunotherapy. PMID:27152601

  1. Immunotherapy as a disease modifier.

    PubMed

    Martin, James G; Shalaby, Karim; Michoud, Marie-Claire

    2006-01-01

    Immunotherapy was formerly the treatment of allergic disease by repeated exposure to allergen. Other approaches to immune modulation have emerged using new knowledge of T cell function. The so-called hygiene hypothesis argues that alterations in our environment have resulted in a failure of the immune system to develop normally, such that excessive Th2 type responses to antigen exposures occur. These observations have prompted therapies designed to promote a shift from Th-2 to Th-1 responses. These therapies include bacterial vaccines and stimulation of the immune system with Toll like receptor ligands or bacterial nucleotide immunostimulatory sequences (CpG motifs). Traditional desensitization immunotherapy is being re-examined and anti-IgE therapy is also enjoying a measure of success. PMID:16798526

  2. Lentiviral vectors in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Robyn Aa; Berinstein, Elliot M; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Basic science advances in cancer immunotherapy have resulted in various treatments that have recently shown success in the clinic. Many of these therapies require the insertion of genes into cells to directly kill them or to redirect the host's cells to induce potent immune responses. Other analogous therapies work by modifying effector cells for improved targeting and enhanced killing of tumor cells. Initial studies done using γ-retroviruses were promising, but safety concerns centered on the potential for insertional mutagenesis have highlighted the desire to develop other options for gene delivery. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been identified as potentially more effective and safer alternative delivery vehicles. LVs are now in use in clinical trials for many different types of inherited and acquired disorders, including cancer. This review will discuss current knowledge of LVs and the applications of this viral vector-based delivery vehicle to cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25804479

  3. Current status of mold immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, M

    1991-05-01

    There is evidence to suggest that molds can cause IgE-mediated upper respiratory tract disorders and immunotherapy is efficacious in a select group. The environmental sampling studies show a remarkably small numbers of molds accounting for a majority of the mold load in various diverse locations. These are Cladosporium, Basidiospores, Aspergillus, and Alternaria-Penicillin families. Basidiospores have been underreported in the older studies because of difficulties in their identification. Whether the absolute mold level is the most important factor leading to IgE formation and induction of upper respiratory tract symptoms is uncertain. Certainly, the majority of the studies are based on the assumption that the absolute level of mold in the environment is the most important factor leading to the development of symptoms, but this is not based on strong evidence. A major problem in the majority of the studies is a lack of standardization of extracts which may lead to false negatives on skin testing and thus produce variable data in population evaluations comparing the prevalence of mold to its ability to induce IgE production and symptoms. The best current trials to document the efficacy of mold immunotherapy have been with the standardized Cladosporium extract. Unfortunately, these results cannot be extrapolated to the commercially available mold extracts available in the United States either for immunotherapy or for skin testing. These extracts are highly variable in their potency, prone to high false negative rates, and at best serve as poor skin testing reagents and possibly even worse immunotherapy reagents. Adequately standardized mold reagents are urgently needed to determine whether the Cladosporium data can be extrapolated to them in any meaningful way. PMID:2035901

  4. New strategies for allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Carnés, Jerónimo; Robinson, Douglas S

    2008-06-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy, consisting in the administration of increasing amounts of offending allergens into sensitive patients was first used nearly one hundred years ago and remains in use worldwide for treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma. It has been recognised as the only effective treatment for type I allergic diseases when the appropriate quantities of allergens are used. The immunological mechanisms by which specific immunotherapy is effective include the modulation of T cells and the response of B-cells and is accompanied by significant decreases of specific IgE and increases in allergen specific IgG antibodies, mainly IgG4. While specific allergen injection immunotherapy is highly effective and the most common way of administration other routes such as oral or intranasal ways have been considered as and alternative to subcutaneous injections. During the last century, allergenic vaccines have been prepared using individual allergens adsorbed to different adjuvant substances. These vaccines have demonstrated efficacy and good results in different clinical trials. However, many novel approaches to allergen immunotherapy have been developed in the last years in order to increase the safety and efficacy of allergenic vaccines. In that way, different and modern vaccines have been prepared including more purified products such as depigmented allergen extracts; allergoids, consisting on big molecules of thousands of kDa, which contain all the individual allergens and show a significant decrease in severe adverse reactions; peptides or small aminoacid sequences; recombinant allergens; hypoallergenic vaccines where the IgE binding sites have been modified; or allergen-CpG fusion molecules. New presentations are under study and new treatments will be developed in the near future with the objective that the prevention of allergic disease may become a reality. The review article also discuss recent patent related to the field. PMID:19075996

  5. Novel immunotherapies in lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Batlevi, Connie Lee; Matsuki, Eri; Brentjens, Renier J; Younes, Anas

    2016-01-01

    The success of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab in the treatment of lymphoid malignancies provided proof-of-principle for exploiting the immune system therapeutically. Since the FDA approval of rituximab in 1997, several novel strategies that harness the ability of T cells to target cancer cells have emerged. Reflecting on the promising clinical efficacy of these novel immunotherapy approaches, the FDA has recently granted 'breakthrough' designation to three novel treatments with distinct mechanisms. First, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T-cell therapy is promising for the treatment of adult and paediatric relapsed and/or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Second, blinatumomab, a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE(®)) antibody, is now approved for the treatment of adults with Philadelphia-chromosome-negative relapsed and/or refractory B-precursor ALL. Finally, the monoclonal antibody nivolumab, which targets the PD-1 immune-checkpoint receptor with high affinity, is used for the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma following treatment failure with autologous-stem-cell transplantation and brentuximab vedotin. Herein, we review the background and development of these three distinct immunotherapy platforms, address the scientific advances in understanding the mechanism of action of each therapy, and assess the current clinical knowledge of their efficacy and safety. We also discuss future strategies to improve these immunotherapies through enhanced engineering, biomarker selection, and mechanism-based combination regimens. PMID:26525683

  6. House dust allergy and immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Wayne R.

    2012-01-01

    HDM allergy is associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. In many countries childhood asthma is predominantly found in HDM-allergic children with their probability of developing disease being proportional to their IgE antibody titers and the early development of Th2 responses. While the pathogenesis is complex and increasingly linked to infection the immunologically-based allergen immunotherapy and anti-IgE antibody therapy are highly beneficial. Immunotherapy could be a short-term treatment providing lifelong relief but the current regimens depend on repeated administration of allergen over years. Immunological investigations point to a contribution of responses outside the Th2 pathway and multiple potential but unproven control mechanisms. Over half of the IgE antibodies are directed to the group 1 and 2 allergens with most of remainder to the group 4, 5, 7 and 21 allergens. This hierarchy found in high and low responders provides a platform for introducing defined allergens into immunotherapy and defined reagents for investigation. PMID:22894952

  7. The future of sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, F; Duse, M; Frati, F; Incorvaia, C; Marseglia, G L; La Rosa, M

    2009-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is currently the most prescribed form of allergen immunotherapy in many European countries. Its use has been accepted in the international consensus publications, and recently also the scepticism of USA scientists is attenuated. Still, this treatment may be improved, and the possible developments consist of modification of the materials, use of adjuvants and use of recombinant allergens. Moreover, new applications of SLIT, such as food allergy, seem promising. Concerning materials, the future form of SLIT is likely to be represented by tablets, which were already tested for efficacy and safety with grass pollen extracts, and are likely to increase the convenience for the patient by the use of no-updosing schedule. Adjuvants fitting with the characteristics of SLIT seem to be CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG), able to interact with the Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) whose activation induces a Th1-like pattern of cytokine release, combination of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 plus dexamethasone (VitD3-Dex), and Lactobacillus plantarum. The approach with recombinant allergens, named component-resolved diagnosis, offers the possibility to tailor immunotherapy, which was found to be effective in two randomized trials of subcutaneous SIT (16-17), while studies with SLIT are not yet available. Regarding food allergy, an important controlled study demonstrated that SLIT with hazelnut is able to increase patients tolerance over possible reactions from inadvertent assumption of the culprit food, and warrants for further trials with other foods. PMID:19944008

  8. Viral vectors for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Richard; Carroll, Miles W

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade, immunotherapy approaches for the treatment of cancer have been investigated with renewed vigour, perhaps catalyzed by the clinical successes seen with monoclonal antibody and cytokine based therapies. The identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) in multiple cancer types has enabled the development of targeted immunotherapies and allayed some of the safety concerns associated with the induction of deleterious autoimmune reactions. In addition to the TAA or therapeutic gene, the antigen delivery system is equally as important for the development of a successful cancer vaccine. One approach to induce a potent and targeted antitumor response is to use viruses to deliver the TAA to cells of the immune system. A diverse array of oncolytic viruses and recombinant viral vectors encoding numerous therapeutic genes or TAAs have been tested in pre-clinical studies and produced results which, in some cases, justify their clinical development as potential cancer immunotherapies. Within the last 5-10 years, many such recombinant vectors have made the transition from pre-clinical research to clinical development and it is these, which are given most weight in this review. PMID:16146772

  9. Novel immunotherapies in lymphoid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Batlevi, Connie Lee; Matsuki, Eri; Brentjens, Renier J.; Younes, Anas

    2016-01-01

    The success of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab in the treatment of lymphoid malignancies provided proof-of-principle for exploiting the immune system therapeutically. Since the FDA approval of rituximab in 1997, several novel strategies that harness the ability of T cells to target cancer cells have emerged. Reflecting on the promising clinical efficacy of these novel immunotherapy approaches, the FDA has recently granted ‘breakthrough’ designation to three novel treatments with distinct mechanisms. First, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T-cell therapy is promising for the treatment of adult and paediatric relapsed and/or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Second, blinatumomab, a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody, is now approved for the treatment of adults with Philadelphia-chromosome-negative relapsed and/or refractory B-precursor ALL. Finally, the monoclonal antibody nivolumab, which targets the PD-1 immune-checkpoint receptor with high affinity, is used for the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma following treatment failure with autologous-stem-cell transplantation and brentuximab vedotin. Herein, we review the background and development of these three distinct immunotherapy platforms, address the scientific advances in understanding the mechanism of action of each therapy, and assess the current clinical knowledge of their efficacy and safety. We also discuss future strategies to improve these immunotherapies through enhanced engineering, biomarker selection, and mechanism-based combination regimens. PMID:26525683

  10. Immunotherapy Targets in Pediatric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orentas, Rimas J.; Lee, Daniel W.; Mackall, Crystal

    2011-01-01

    Immunotherapy for cancer has shown increasing success and there is ample evidence to expect that progress gleaned in immune targeting of adult cancers can be translated to pediatric oncology. This manuscript reviews principles that guide selection of targets for immunotherapy of cancer, emphasizing the similarities and distinctions between oncogene-inhibition targets and immune targets. It follows with a detailed review of molecules expressed by pediatric tumors that are already under study as immune targets or are good candidates for future studies of immune targeting. Distinctions are made between cell surface antigens that can be targeted in an MHC independent manner using antibodies, antibody derivatives, or chimeric antigen receptors versus intracellular antigens which must be targeted with MHC restricted T cell therapies. Among the most advanced immune targets for childhood cancer are CD19 and CD22 on hematologic malignancies, GD2 on solid tumors, and NY-ESO-1 expressed by a majority of synovial sarcomas, but several other molecules reviewed here also have properties which suggest that they too could serve as effective targets for immunotherapy of childhood cancer. PMID:22645714

  11. Local and systemic immunotherapy in nasal allergy.

    PubMed

    Palma-Carlos, A G; Palma-Carlos, M L; Spínola Santos, A; Santos, C; Pedro, E; Pregal, A

    1999-10-01

    Two assays have been done to evaluate the effect of immunotherapy in nasal allergy. First, a trial of nasal immunotherapy and second, the study of mediator release after vaccines. Local immunotherapy, applied directly, triggers different response mechanisms. Specific nasal immunotherapy started before seasonal or perennial symptoms peak, has been done by increasing the doses of allergen three times a week during a 3-month period and a manutention period of a weekly nasal puff of the same allergen. Symptom scores and drug consumption have been registered. The results have been compared with the scores obtained in the same patients over the same period of the same year before immunotherapy. In perennial rhinitis blockage, rhinorrea, sneezing and itching scores all decreased. In seasonal rhinitis, a similar score decrease was obtained for blockage, rhinorrea, sneezing and itching. Pharmacological scores also decreased. These data point to a short-term effect of nasal immunotherapy. Tryptase release has been evaluated in nasal washings after nasal challenge with a Parietaria (Pellitory wall) extract before and after specific systemic immunotherapy, in order to evaluate changes in mast cells reactivity. Eight patients were studied, all allergic to Parietaria. Nasal provocation tests have been done before the season with increasing doses of 10, 100 and 1000 PNU and tryptase assayed in nasal washings at 10, 20 and 30 min after provocation. Immunotherapy decreased tryptase release after nasal challenge. The data point to the effect of systemic specific immunotherapy on mast cell reactivity. PMID:10577807

  12. Honeybee venom immunotherapy: certainties and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bilò, M Beatrice; Antonicelli, Leonardo; Bonifazi, Floriano

    2012-11-01

    The honeybee is an interesting insect because of the fundamental agricultural role it plays, together with the composition of its venom, which presents new diagnostic and immunotherapeutic challenges. This article examines various aspects of honeybee venom allergy from epidemiology to diagnosis and treatment, with special emphasis on venom immunotherapy (VIT). Honeybee venom allergy represents a risk factor for severe systemic reaction in challenged allergic patients, for the diminished effectiveness of VIT, for more frequent side effects during VIT and relapse after cessation of treatment. Some strategies are available for reducing the risk of honeybee VIT-induced side effects; however, there is considerable room for further improvement in these all-important areas. At the same time, sensitized and allergic beekeepers represent unique populations for epidemiological, venom allergy immunopathogenesis and VIT mechanism studies. PMID:23194365

  13. Inhibition of lung metastasis by adoptive immunotherapy using Iscador.

    PubMed

    Antony, S; Kuttan, R; Kuttan, G

    1999-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using spleen cells activated with Iscador was found to inhibit tumour growth significantly (P<0.001). Metastatic B16F10 tumour bearing animals treated with a single dose of spleen cells activated with Iscador (in vitro) showed 100% inhibition of tumour nodule formation on 21st day. Single injection of splenocytes isolated from mice treated with Iscador inhibited the tumour nodule formation by 93.8%. Animals treated with in vivo and in vitro activated spleen cells along with Iscador had an increase in life span of 119% and 81% respectively. Treatment of animals with low dose of Iscador after adoptive immunotherapy further augmented the life span. Animals which underwent adoptive immunotherapy showed significantly reduced lung collagen hydroxyproline (9.8 microg/mg protein) and serum sialic acid (24.61 micro/ml serum) levels compared to control tumour bearing animals with increased levels of lung hydroxyproline (26.95 microg/mg protein) and serum sialic acid levels (151.3 microg/ml serum). Serum gamma -glutamyl transpeptidase levels were found to be significantly reduced in the group of animals treated with Iscador and Iscador activated splenocytes (16.6+/-2.3 nmol P-nitroaniline released /ml serum) Group of animals treated with Iscador activated splenocytes alone also showed significantly reduced serum gamma - glutamyl transpeptidase levels (17.3+/-10 nmol P-nitroaniline released /ml serum) compared to control tumour bearing animals (91+/-12 nmol P-nitroaniline released /ml serum). PMID:10073677

  14. Neoantigen-based cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bobisse, Sara; Foukas, Periklis G; Coukos, George; Harari, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Emerging clinical evidence on the role of the antitumor activity of the immune system has generated great interest in immunotherapy in all cancer types. Recent clinical data clearly demonstrated that human tumor cells express antigenic peptides (epitopes) that can be recognized by autologous tumor-specific T cells and that enhancement of such immune reactivity can potentially lead to cancer control and cancer regression in patients with advanced disease. However, in most cases, it is unclear which tumor antigens (Ags) mediated cancer regression. Mounting evidence indicates that numerous endogenous mutated cancer proteins, a hallmark of tumor cells, can be processed into peptides and presented on the surface of tumor cells, leading to their immune recognition in vivo as "non-self" or foreign. Massively parallel sequencing has now overcome the challenge of rapidly identifying the comprehensive mutational spectrum of individual tumors (i.e., the "mutanome") and current technologies, as well as computational tools, have emerged that allow the identification of private epitopes derived from their mutanome and called neoantigens (neoAgs). On this basis, both CD4(+) and CD8(+) neoantigen-specific T cells have been identified in multiple human cancers and shown to be associated with a favorable clinical outcome. Notably, emerging data also indicate that neoantigen recognition represents a major factor in the activity of clinical immunotherapies. In the post-genome era, the mutanome holds promise as a long-awaited 'gold mine' for the discovery of unique cancer cell targets, which are exclusively tumor-specific and unlikely to drive immune tolerance, hence offering the chance for highly promising clinical programs of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27563649

  15. Mechanisms of immunotherapy to aeroallergens.

    PubMed

    Shamji, M H; Durham, S R

    2011-09-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is allergen-specific, allergen dose- and time-dependent and is associated with long-term clinical and immunological tolerance that persists for years after discontinuation. Successful immunotherapy is accompanied by the suppression of numbers of T-helper 2 (Th2) effector cells, eosinophils, basophils, c-kit+mast cells and neutrophils infiltration in target organs, induction of IL-10 and/or TGF-β+Treg cells and increases in 'protective' non-inflammatory blocking antibodies, particularly IgG4 and IgA2 subclasses with inhibitory activity. These events are accompanied by a reduction and/or a redirection of underlying antigen-specific Th2-type T cell-driven hypersensitivity to the allergen(s) used for therapy. This suppression occurs within weeks or months as a consequence of the appearance of a population of regulatory T cells that exert their effects by mechanisms involving cell-cell contact, but also by the release of cytokines such as IL-10 (increases IgG4) and TGF-β (increases specific IgA). The more delayed-in-time appearance of antigen-specific T-helper 1 responses and alternative mechanisms such as Th2 cell anergy and/or apoptosis may also be involved. The mechanisms of sublingual immunotherapy are similar to those following a subcutaneous administration of allergen, whereas it is likely that additional events following antigen presentation in the sublingual mucosa and regional lymph nodes are involved. These insights have resulted in novel approaches and portend future biomarkers that may be surrogate or predictive of the clinical response to treatment. PMID:21762223

  16. Neoantigen-based cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bobisse, Sara; Coukos, George; Harari, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Emerging clinical evidence on the role of the antitumor activity of the immune system has generated great interest in immunotherapy in all cancer types. Recent clinical data clearly demonstrated that human tumor cells express antigenic peptides (epitopes) that can be recognized by autologous tumor-specific T cells and that enhancement of such immune reactivity can potentially lead to cancer control and cancer regression in patients with advanced disease. However, in most cases, it is unclear which tumor antigens (Ags) mediated cancer regression. Mounting evidence indicates that numerous endogenous mutated cancer proteins, a hallmark of tumor cells, can be processed into peptides and presented on the surface of tumor cells, leading to their immune recognition in vivo as “non-self” or foreign. Massively parallel sequencing has now overcome the challenge of rapidly identifying the comprehensive mutational spectrum of individual tumors (i.e., the “mutanome”) and current technologies, as well as computational tools, have emerged that allow the identification of private epitopes derived from their mutanome and called neoantigens (neoAgs). On this basis, both CD4+ and CD8+ neoantigen-specific T cells have been identified in multiple human cancers and shown to be associated with a favorable clinical outcome. Notably, emerging data also indicate that neoantigen recognition represents a major factor in the activity of clinical immunotherapies. In the post-genome era, the mutanome holds promise as a long-awaited ‘gold mine’ for the discovery of unique cancer cell targets, which are exclusively tumor-specific and unlikely to drive immune tolerance, hence offering the chance for highly promising clinical programs of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27563649

  17. Oral Immunotherapy for Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Burbank, Allison J; Sood, Puja; Vickery, Brian P; Wood, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Food allergy is a potentially life-threatening condition with no approved therapies, apart from avoidance and injectable epinephrine for acute allergic reactions. Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is an experimental treatment in which food-allergic patients consume gradually increasing quantities of the food to increase their threshold for allergic reaction. This therapy carries significant risk of allergic reactions. The ability of OIT to desensitize patients to particular foods is well-documented, although the ability to induce tolerance has not been established. This review focuses on recent studies for the treatment of food allergies such as cow's milk, hen's egg, and peanut. PMID:26617227

  18. Lipid A and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ribi, E; Cantrell, J L; Takayama, K; Qureshi, N; Peterson, J; Ribi, H O

    1984-01-01

    Endotoxin isolated from Re mutants of Salmonella typhimurium or Salmonella minnesota and consisting only of 3-deoxy-D-mannooctulosonic acid (KDO) and lipid A synergistically enhances the ability of mycobacterial cell wall skeleton (CWS) to regress transplantable, line-10 tumor (hepatocellular carcinoma) in syngeneic guinea pigs. Tumor regression is rapid, and systemic tumor immunity concomitantly develops when as little as 50 micrograms of each of these two components is combined and injected intralesionally. Selective removal of KDO from endotoxin yields diphosphoryl lipid A, which retains its toxic properties. Subsequent selective removal of the phosphate moiety at the reducing end of the diphosphoryl lipid A molecule yields nontoxic, monophosphoryl lipid A (determined by lethality for chick embryos). Like the parent endotoxin or toxic diphosphoryl lipid A, monophosphoryl lipid A retains the ability to synergistically enhance the antitumor activity of mycobacterial CWS adjuvant. Both di- and monophosphoryl lipid A contain mixtures of a series of structural analogs. They can be separated chromatographically into single components that differ in number, type, and position of ester-linked fatty acids. Comparison of chromatographic fractions reveals that components of toxic and nontoxic lipid A can be paired according to structure. Each component of the pair has the same molecular structure, with the exception of an additional phosphate group in the toxic component. The toxicity of "lipid A's" liberated from endotoxin by acid hydrolysis appears to be determined by the proportion of di- and monophosphoryl lipid A in the hydrolysis mixture. Structural analogs of monophosphoryl lipid A, which differ in degree of O-acylation and type and distribution of fatty acids, have comparable antitumor activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6382555

  19. Novel immunotherapies for hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michelle H.; Paulos, Chrystal M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The immune system is designed to discriminate between self and tumor tissue. Through genetic recombination, there is fundamentally no limit to the number of tumor antigens that immune cells can recognize. Yet, tumors use a variety of immunosuppressive mechanisms to evade immunity. Insight into how the immune system interacts with tumors is expanding rapidly and has accelerated the translation of immunotherapies into medical breakthroughs. Herein, we appraise the state of the art in immunotherapy with a focus on strategies that exploit the patient’s immune system to kill cancer. We review various forms of immune-based therapies, which have shown significant promise in patients with hematological malignancies, including (i) conventional monoclonal therapies like rituximab, (ii) engineered monoclonal antibodies called bispecific T cell engagers (BiTEs), (iii) monoclonal antibodies and pharmaceutical drugs that block inhibitory T-cell pathways (i.e. PD-1, CTLA-4 and IDO), and (iv) adoptive cell transfer (ACT) therapy with T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or T-cell receptors (TCRs). We also assess the idea of using these therapies in combination and conclude by suggesting multi-prong approaches to improve treatment outcomes and curative responses in patients. PMID:25510273

  20. Sublingual immunotherapy: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Cox, Linda S; Larenas Linnemann, Désirée; Nolte, Hendrik; Weldon, David; Finegold, Ira; Nelson, Harold S

    2006-05-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has been used with increasing frequency in Europe and is viewed with increasing interest by allergists in the United States. To address this interest, a Joint Task Force of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology's Immunotherapy and Allergy Diagnostic Committees reviewed the available literature on SLIT and prepared this report. The task force concluded that despite clear evidence that SLIT is an effective treatment, many questions remained unanswered, including effective dose, treatment schedules, and overall duration of treatment. Until these have been determined, an assessment of the cost/benefit ratio of the treatment cannot be made. SLIT does appear to be associated with few serious side effects, but it has not been administered in high-risk asthmatic patients, nor in the studies reviewed has it been administered as a mixture of non-cross-reacting allergens. Furthermore, there is currently no allergy extract approved for this use in the United States, nor is there a Current Procedural Terminology code for billing purposes. All of these factors should be given careful consideration by anyone contemplating initiating SLIT treatment for their allergic patients. PMID:16675328

  1. Novel approaches in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Deepa S; Liu, Stephen V; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of tumor immunology has exploded in the past 3 decades. The complex relationships between tumor cells, the tumor microenvironment and the immune system cells, especially the cytotoxic and helper T cells and the regulatory T cells are beginning to be elucidated. In this review, we will attempt to provide a brief primer of tumor immunology. Cytokine therapy has historically been the mainstay of immunotherapy in cancers such as melanoma and kidney cancer. We will review some of the advances made with cancer vaccines, with a focus on peptide vaccines, tumor cell vaccines and immune cell vaccines. The pros and cons of nucleic acid-based vaccines including DNA and RNA vaccines will be discussed. Adoptive cell therapy has made significant progress utilizing chimeric antigen-receptor transduced T cells, especially in hematologic malignancies. We will also consider the key targets in checkpoint inhibition, and summarize some of the preclinical and clinical data with respect to checkpoint inhibition. Progress made in the novel immunotherapeutic approach of oncolytic viral therapy will be analyzed. PDL-1 expression by tumor cells and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes has been looked at as a biomarker in clinical trials. Limitations to such an approach and potential candidates for future predictive biomarkers of response to immunotherapy and biomarkers of autoimmunity and adverse reactions will be considered. PMID:27232512

  2. Adoptive immunotherapy against ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mittica, Gloria; Capellero, Sonia; Genta, Sofia; Cagnazzo, Celeste; Aglietta, Massimo; Sangiolo, Dario; Valabrega, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The standard front-line therapy for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is combination of debulking surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Nevertheless, the majority of patients experience disease recurrence. Although extensive efforts to find new therapeutic options, cancer cells invariably develop drug resistance and disease progression. New therapeutic strategies are needed to improve prognosis of patients with advanced EOC.Recently, several preclinical and clinical studies investigated feasibility and activity of adoptive immunotherapy in EOC. Our aim is to highlight prospective of adoptive immunotherapy in EOC, focusing on HLA-restricted Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs), and MHC-independent immune effectors such as natural killer (NK), and cytokine-induced killer (CIK). Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) has shown activity in several pre-clinical models. Available preclinical and clinical data suggest that adoptive cell therapy may provide the best benefit in settings of low tumor burden, minimal residual disease, or maintenance therapy. Further studies are needed to better define the optimal clinical setting. PMID:27188274

  3. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities. PMID:26486534

  4. Potentiality of immunotherapy against hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Nobuhiro; Sawada, Yu; Endo, Itaru; Uemura, Yasushi; Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the predominant form of primary liver cancer, is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Despite the high incidence, treatment options remain limited for advanced HCC, and as a result prognosis continues to be poor. Current therapeutic options, surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, have only modest efficacy. New treatment modalities to prolong survival and to minimize the risk of adverse response are desperately needed for patients with advanced HCC. Tumor immunotherapy is a promising, novel treatment strategy that may lead to improvements in both treatment-associated toxicity and outcome. The strategies have developed in part through genomic studies that have yielded candidate target molecules and in part through basic biology studies that have defined the pathways and cell types regulating immune response. Here, we summarize the various types of HCC immunotherapy and argue that the newfound field of HCC immunotherapy might provide critical advantages in the effort to improve prognosis of patients with advanced HCC. Already several immunotherapies, such as tumor-associated antigen therapy, immune checkpoint inhibitors and cell transfer immunotherapy, have demonstrated safety and feasibility in HCC patients. Unfortunately, immunotherapy currently has low efficacy in advanced stage HCC patients; overcoming this challenge will place immunotherapy at the forefront of HCC treatment, possibly in the near future. PMID:26420958

  5. Immunotherapy of Metastases Enhances Subsequent Chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Michael G.; Key, Marc E.

    1982-07-01

    In many multimodal therapies of cancer, postsurgical chemotherapy is administered before immunotherapy for treatment of micrometastatic disease. This sequence may not be the most efficacious. Experiments in which strain 2 guinea pigs bearing syngeneic L10 hepatocarcinomas were given immunotherapy showed that infiltrating immune effector cells not only were tumoricidal but disrupted the characteristically compact structure of metastatic foci. When cytotoxic drugs were administered at the peak of this inflammatory response, the survival rate of the guinea pigs increased significantly. We conclude that postsurgical immunotherapy can enhance the effect of cytotoxic drugs administered subsequently.

  6. DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guizhi; Liu, Yijing; Yang, Xiangyu; Kim, Young-Hwa; Zhang, Huimin; Jia, Rui; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Jin, Albert; Lin, Jing; Aronova, Maria; Leapman, Richard; Nie, Zhihong; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-03-01

    Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit cancer development. Unmethylated CpG dinucleotide-containing oligonucleotides (CpG), a class of potent adjuvants that activate the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) located in the endolysosome of many antigen-presenting cells (APCs), are promising for cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of synthetic CpG confronts many challenges such as suboptimal delivery into APCs, unfavorable pharmacokinetics caused by limited biostability and short in vivo half-life, and side effects associated with leaking of CpG into the systemic circulation. Here we present DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccines (hNVs) for efficient uptake into APCs, prolonged tumor retention, and potent immunostimulation and cancer immunotherapy. hNVs were self-assembled from concatemer CpG analogs and magnesium pyrophosphate (Mg2PPi). Mg2PPi renders hNVs resistant to nuclease degradation and thermal denaturation, both of which are demanding characteristics for effective vaccination and the storage and transportation of vaccines. Fluorophore-labeled hNVs were tracked to be efficiently internalized into the endolysosomes of APCs, where Mg2PPi was dissolved in an acidic environment and thus CpG analogs were exposed to hNVs. Internalized hNVs in APCs led to (1) elevated secretion of proinflammatory factors, and (2) elevated expression of co-stimulatory factors. Compared with molecular CpG, hNVs dramatically prolonged the tissue retention of CpG analogs and reduced splenomegaly, a common side effect of CpG. In a melanoma mouse model, two injections of hNVs significantly inhibited the tumor growth and outperformed the molecular CpG. These results suggest hNVs are promising for cancer immunotherapy.Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit

  7. Immunotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Specialist Financial Support Online Chats Support Groups Peer-to-Peer Support LLS Community Blogs Caregiver Support Other Helpful ... Information Specialist Financial Support Online Chats Support Groups Peer-to-Peer Support LLS Community Blogs Caregiver Support ...

  8. Targeting neoantigens for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong-Chen; Robbins, Paul F

    2016-07-01

    Studies first carried out in the 1980s have demonstrated murine T cells can recognize mutated gene products, known as neoantigens, and that these T cells are capable of mediating tumor rejection. The first human tumor antigens isolated in the early 1990s were the products of non-mutated genes expressed in a tissue-specific manner; subsequent studies have indicated that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes that are cultured in vitro frequently recognize mutated gene products. In addition, correlative studies indicate that clinical responses to therapies involving the use of antibodies directed against checkpoint inhibitors such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 may be associated with mutational burden, providing indirect evidence that these responses may primarily be mediated by neoantigen-reactive T cells. The importance of neoantigen-reactive T cells may be elucidated by the results of ongoing and future studies aimed at leveraging information gained from mutational profiling to enhance the potency of immunotherapies. PMID:27208041

  9. [Current immunotherapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Paul, F; Ruprecht, K

    2015-08-01

    Following the introduction of interferon beta 1b as the first immunomodulatory therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS) in 1993, there are currently nine substances or substance classes approved for the treatment of MS (i.e. alemtuzumab, azathioprine, dimethyl fumarate, fingolimod, glatiramer acetate, interferon beta, mitoxantrone, natalizumab and teriflunomide). Major developments during the last 5 years include the approval of orally administered medications (i.e. fingolimod, teriflunomide and dimethyl fumarate), a monoclonal antibody (alemtuzumab), as well as glatiramer acetate with an administration frequency three times a week and a pegylated formulation of interferon beta 1a. The broadened therapeutic options enable a more differentiated and individualized therapy of MS; however, evidence-based data for therapeutic decision-making relevant in clinical practice are not always available. Rare but potentially severe and even life-threatening side effects of immunotherapies for MS require continuous pharmacovigilance and adherence to risk management plans. PMID:26253589

  10. Topical Immunotherapy in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurcharan; Lavanya, MS

    2010-01-01

    Alopecia Areata (AA) is a common non-scarring alopecia directed against the anagenic hair follicle. Various treatment modalities have been used for the treatment of severe AA. Topical immunotherapy is the best documented treatment so far for severe and refractory AA. Dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE), and diphencyprone (DPCP) are the contact allergens used for this purpose. DNCB has been found to be mutagenic by the Ames test and is largely replaced by DPCP and SADBE. DPCP and SADBE are both known to be non-mutagenic compounds and have comparable efficacy results and relapse rates. SADBE requires special solvents and additives to maintain its potency and is more expensive than the rest. DPCP has a response rate varying from 60% in severe Alopecia Areata to 17% in patients with alopecia totalis or universalis, and shows about 88 to 100% high response rate in patients with patchy Alopecia Areata. PMID:21188022

  11. Oral Immunotherapy for Food Allergies.

    PubMed

    Feuille, Elizabeth; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is a promising investigational therapy for food allergy. Clinical trials in peanut, milk, egg, and wheat allergy provide evidence that OIT can effectively desensitize a majority of individuals to a food allergen. While a portion of subjects demonstrate sustained unresponsiveness, the majority regain sensitivity with allergen avoidance. The safety and tolerability of OIT continue to limit its use in some patients. Virtually all studies report adverse reactions that are more frequent during dose escalation but may also occur during maintenance therapy. Recent studies have identified adjunctive therapies (such as omalizumab) which may mitigate adverse effects. There is a paucity of data on the long-term safety and efficacy of OIT. Further study is required before OIT is ready for routine clinical practice. This review is intended to provide the reader with an up-to-date understanding of OIT, including its mechanisms, efficacy, safety profile, and potential utility in clinical practice. PMID:27355816

  12. Who Will Benefit from Cancer Immunotherapy?

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified a “genetic signature” in the tumors of patients with advanced melanoma who responded to a form of immunotherapy called checkpoint blockade. The results could be the basis for a test that identifies likely responders.

  13. Immune checkpoints and immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Preet Paul; Sharma, Piyush K.; Krishnan, Gayathri; Lockhart, A. Craig

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the major causes of death worldwide, despite steady improvement in early detection and overall survival over the past decade. Current treatment paradigms, with chemotherapy and biologics, appear to have reached their maximum benefit. Immunotherapy, especially with checkpoint inhibitors, has shown considerable clinical benefit in various cancers, including mismatch-repair-deficient CRC. This has led to the planning and initiation of several clinical trials evaluating novel immunotherapy agents—as single agents, combinations and in conjunction with chemotherapy—in patients with CRC. This article reviews biological and preclinical data for checkpoint inhibitors and discusses various immunotherapy trials in CRC, as well as current efforts in CRC immunotherapy. PMID:26510455

  14. Immunotherapy: Disrupting the Cancer Treatment World

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACS » + - Text Size Immunotherapy: Disrupting the Cancer Treatment World By Elizabeth Mendes June 16, 2014 This story ... of cancer research in depth. The cancer research world is dedicating increasing energy to a rapidly evolving ...

  15. Grass pollen immunotherapy: where are we now.

    PubMed

    Würtzen, Peter A; Gupta, Shashank; Brand, Stephanie; Andersen, Peter S

    2016-04-01

    During allergen immunotherapy (AIT), the allergic patient is exposed to the disease-inducing antigens (allergens) in order to induce clinical and immunological tolerance and obtain disease modification. Large trials of grass AIT with highly standardized subcutaneous and sublingual tablet vaccines have been conducted to document the clinical effect. Induction of blocking antibodies as well as changes in the balance between T-cell phenotypes, including induction of regulatory T-cell subtypes, have been demonstrated for both treatment types. These observations increase the understanding of the immunological mechanism behind the clinical effect and may make it possible to use the immunological changes as biomarkers of clinical effect. The current review describes the recent mechanistic findings for subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy/tablet treatment and discusses how the observed immunological changes translate into a scientific foundation for the observed clinical effects of grass pollen immunotherapy and lead to new treatment strategies for grass AIT. PMID:26973122

  16. De-Risking Immunotherapy: Report of a Consensus Workshop of the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute.

    PubMed

    Mellman, Ira; Hubbard-Lucey, Vanessa M; Tontonoz, Matthew J; Kalos, Michael D; Chen, Daniel S; Allison, James P; Drake, Charles G; Levitsky, Hy; Lonberg, Nils; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Fearon, Douglas T; Wherry, E John; Lowy, Israel; Vonderheide, Robert H; Hwu, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    With the recent FDA approvals of pembrolizumab and nivolumab, and a host of additional immunomodulatory agents entering clinical development each year, the field of cancer immunotherapy is changing rapidly. Strategies that can assist researchers in choosing the most promising drugs and drug combinations to move forward through clinical development are badly needed in order to reduce the likelihood of late-stage clinical trial failures. On October 5, 2014, the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute, a collaborative think tank composed of stakeholders from academia, industry, regulatory agencies, and patient interest groups, met to discuss strategies for de-risking immunotherapy development, with a focus on integrating preclinical and clinical studies, and conducting smarter early-phase trials, particularly for combination therapies. Several recommendations were made, including making better use of clinical data to inform preclinical research, obtaining adequate tissues for biomarker studies, and choosing appropriate clinical trial endpoints to identify promising drug candidates and combinations in nonrandomized early-phase trials. PMID:27036972

  17. Defining the critical hurdles in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Scientific discoveries that provide strong evidence of antitumor effects in preclinical models often encounter significant delays before being tested in patients with cancer. While some of these delays have a scientific basis, others do not. We need to do better. Innovative strategies need to move into early stage clinical trials as quickly as it is safe, and if successful, these therapies should efficiently obtain regulatory approval and widespread clinical application. In late 2009 and 2010 the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC), convened an "Immunotherapy Summit" with representatives from immunotherapy organizations representing Europe, Japan, China and North America to discuss collaborations to improve development and delivery of cancer immunotherapy. One of the concepts raised by SITC and defined as critical by all parties was the need to identify hurdles that impede effective translation of cancer immunotherapy. With consensus on these hurdles, international working groups could be developed to make recommendations vetted by the participating organizations. These recommendations could then be considered by regulatory bodies, governmental and private funding agencies, pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions to facilitate changes necessary to accelerate clinical translation of novel immune-based cancer therapies. The critical hurdles identified by representatives of the collaborating organizations, now organized as the World Immunotherapy Council, are presented and discussed in this report. Some of the identified hurdles impede all investigators; others hinder investigators only in certain regions or institutions or are more relevant to specific types of immunotherapy or first-in-humans studies. Each of these hurdles can significantly delay clinical translation of promising advances in immunotherapy yet if overcome, have the potential to improve outcomes of patients with cancer. PMID:22168571

  18. Cancer Immunotherapy: A Treatment for the Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattman, Joseph N.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2004-07-01

    Cancer immunotherapy attempts to harness the exquisite power and specificity of the immune system for the treatment of malignancy. Although cancer cells are less immunogenic than pathogens, the immune system is clearly capable of recognizing and eliminating tumor cells. However, tumors frequently interfere with the development and function of immune responses. Thus, the challenge for immunotherapy is to use advances in cellular and molecular immunology to develop strategies that effectively and safely augment antitumor responses.

  19. Oncolytic Immunotherapy for Treatment of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsun, A; Miao, X N; Wang, C M; Yu, D C

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy entails the treatment of disease by modulation of the immune system. As detailed in the previous chapters, the different modes of achieving immune modulation are many, including the use of small/large molecules, cellular therapy, and radiation. Oncolytic viruses that can specifically attack, replicate within, and destroy tumors represent one of the most promising classes of agents for cancer immunotherapy (recently termed as oncolytic immunotherapy). The notion of oncolytic immunotherapy is considered as the way in which virus-induced tumor cell death (known as immunogenic cancer cell death (ICD)) allows the immune system to recognize tumor cells and provide long-lasting antitumor immunity. Both immune responses toward the virus and ICD together contribute toward successful antitumor efficacy. What is now becoming increasingly clear is that monotherapies, through any of the modalities detailed in this book, are neither sufficient in eradicating tumors nor in providing long-lasting antitumor immune responses and that combination therapies may deliver enhanced efficacy. After the rise of the genetic engineering era, it has been possible to engineer viruses to harbor combination-like characteristics to enhance their potency in cancer immunotherapy. This chapter provides a historical background on oncolytic virotherapy and its future application in cancer immunotherapy, especially as a combination therapy with other treatment modalities. PMID:27240460

  20. Developments in immunotherapy for gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Diaz, J L; Wanta, S M; Fishbein, T M; Kroemer, A

    2015-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are the most commonly occurring cancer worldwide. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second and third most commonly diagnosed cancer in women and men, respectively. Despite the advent of screening and the declining incidence of CRC overall, most patients are not diagnosed at an early, localized stage. Due to resistance to chemotherapy, recurrence, and metastatic disease, those diagnosed with advanced disease have only a 12% 5-year survival rate. Given the overwhelming global impact of CRC, the need for advanced therapy is crucial. Targeted immunotherapy in addition to surgical resection, traditional chemotherapy, and radiation therapy is on the rise. For the purpose of this review, we focused on the advances of immunotherapy, particularly in CRC, with mention of research pertaining to particular advances in immunotherapy for other aspects of the GI system. We review basic immunology and the microenvironment surrounding colorectal tumors that lead to immune system evasion and poor responses to chemotherapy. We also examined the way these obstacles are proving to be the targets of tumor specific immunotherapy. We will present current FDA approved immunotherapies such as monoclonal antibodies (mAb) targeting tumor specific antigens, as well as vaccines, adoptive cell therapy, cytokines, and check-point inhibitors. A summation of prior research, current clinical trials, and prospective therapies in murine models help delineate our current status and future strategies on CRC immunotherapy. PMID:25916195

  1. Aptamers: A Feasible Technology in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, H.; Pastor, F.

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single-chained RNA or DNA oligonucleotides (ODNs) with three-dimensional folding structures which allow them to bind to their targets with high specificity. Aptamers normally show affinities comparable to or higher than that of antibodies. They are chemically synthesized and therefore less expensive to manufacture and produce. A variety of aptamers described to date have been shown to be reliable in modulating immune responses against cancer by either blocking or activating immune receptors. Some of them have been conjugated to other molecules to target the immune system and reduce off-target side effects. Despite the success of first-line treatments against cancer, the elevated number of relapsing cases and the tremendous side effects shown by the commonly used agents hinder conventional treatments against cancer. The advantages provided by aptamers could enhance the therapeutic index of a given strategy and therefore enhance the antitumor effect. Here we recapitulate the provided benefits of aptamers with immunomodulatory activity described to date in cancer therapy and the benefits that aptamer-based immunotherapy could provide either alone or combined with first-line treatments in cancer therapy. PMID:27413756

  2. Immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain suppresses peanut allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Shepley-McTaggart, Ariel; Umpierrez, Michelle; Hurlburt, Barry K; Maleki, Soheila J; Sampson, Hugh A; Mayfield, Stephen P; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated adverse reaction to a subset of proteins found in peanuts. Immunotherapy aims to desensitize allergic patients through repeated and escalating exposures for several months to years using extracts or flours. The complex mix of proteins and variability between preparations complicates immunotherapy studies. Moreover, peanut immunotherapy is associated with frequent negative side effects and patients are often at risk of allergic reactions once immunotherapy is discontinued. Allergen-specific approaches using recombinant proteins are an attractive alternative because they allow more precise dosing and the opportunity to engineer proteins with improved safety profiles. We tested whether Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, two major peanut allergens, could be produced using chloroplast of the unicellular eukaryotic alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. C. reinhardtii is novel host for producing allergens that is genetically tractable, inexpensive and easy to grow, and is able to produce more complex proteins than bacterial hosts. Compared to the native proteins, algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain and Ara h 2 have a reduced affinity for IgE from peanut-allergic patients. We further found that immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain confers protection from peanut-induced anaphylaxis in a murine model of peanut allergy. PMID:26801740

  3. Clinical and Immunological Changes of Immunotherapy in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez Caraballo, Jorge Mario; Cardona Villa, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Immunotherapy has proven to be an useful tool in the management of allergic respiratory diseases; however, little has been studied in atopic dermatitis. Objective. To evaluate the clinical and immunological impact of immunotherapy with mites allergen extracts in atopic dermatitis. Methods. Patients with atopic dermatitis were assigned with computer-generated randomization to either of the following groups: (a) controls received only topical treatment with steroids and/or tacrolimus and (b) actively treated patients received topical treatment plus immunotherapy. Levels of serum total IgE, mites-specific IgE and IgG4 were assessed at study start and after one year of immunotherapy. Results. 31 patients in the active group and 29 in the control group completed the study. Symptoms and medication scores were significantly reduced in the active group after six months. Three patients in the control group showed new sensitizations to mites, while 3 patients in the active group showed neosensitization to shrimp with negative oral food challenge. We observed significant increase of mites-specific IgG4 levels in active group. Conclusion. Specific allergen immunotherapy induced a tolerogenic IgG4 response to mite allergens associated with favorable clinical effects in atopic dermatitis patients. PMID:23724240

  4. Peptide-based allergen specific immunotherapy for the treatment of allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    El-Qutob, David; Reche, Pedro; Subiza, José L; Fernández-Caldas, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy (ASIT) and environmental control are the only etiologic treatments of allergic rhino-conjunctivitis, asthma and atopic dermatitis. The clinical benefit of ASIT relies on the selection of the patients and the identification and administration of the allergen, or allergens. Different routes of administration have been investigated, including subcutaneous, intradermal, epicutaneous, sublingual, inhaled, or intra-lymphatic. While subcutaneous and sublingual allergen specific immunotherapy may require from 3 to 5 years of treatment, clinical efficacy with intra-lymphatic treatment can be achieved after 3 injections. The most severe side effect of ASIT is anaphylaxis. Novel approaches are being investigated to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy vaccines, maintaining immunogenicity. Peptide immunotherapy has been directed mostly against autoimmune diseases, but the use of synthetic peptides for ASIT is a promising field in basic science, applied immunology and in clinical development. Short synthetic peptides bear allergen-specific CD4 T-cell epitopes which induce tolerance by stimulating regulatory (Treg) and Th1 cells. In the present patent review, we describe new trends in allergen immunotherapy using peptides, which, from a clinical point of view, are promising. PMID:25760734

  5. Melanoma immunotherapy dominates the field.

    PubMed

    Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis; Gogas, Helen

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide and despite early detection and intervention, the number of patients dying from metastatic disease continues to rise. The prognosis of advanced melanoma remains poor, with median survival between 6 and 9 months. Over the past 30 years and despite extensive clinical research, the treatment options for metastatic disease were limited and melanoma is still considered as one of the most therapy-resistant malignancies. Single-agent and combination chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biochemotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted agent therapy and combination regimens failed to show a significant improvement in overall survival (OS). Recent advances and in-depth understanding of the biology of melanoma, have contributed to the development of new agents. Based on the molecular and immunological background of the disease, these new drugs have shown benefit in overall and progression-free survival (PFS). As the picture of the disease begins to change, oncologists need to alter their approach to melanoma treatment and consider disease biology together with targeted individualized treatment. In this review the authors attempt to offer an insight in the present and past melanoma treatment options, with a focus on the recently approved immunotherapeutic agents and the clinical perspectives of these new weapons against metastatic melanoma. PMID:27563656

  6. International consensus on allergy immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Marek; Agache, Ioana; Bonini, Sergio; Burks, A Wesley; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, Walter; Cox, Linda; Demoly, Pascal; Frew, Antony J; O'Hehir, Robin; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Muraro, Antonella; Lack, Gideon; Larenas, Désirée; Levin, Michael; Nelson, Harald; Pawankar, Ruby; Pfaar, Oliver; van Ree, Ronald; Sampson, Hugh; Santos, Alexandra F; Du Toit, George; Werfel, Thomas; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Zhang, Luo; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2015-09-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been used to treat allergic disease since the early 1900s. Despite numerous clinical trials and meta-analyses proving AIT efficacious, it remains underused and is estimated to be used in less than 10% of patients with allergic rhinitis or asthma worldwide. In addition, there are large differences between regions, which are not only due to socioeconomic status. There is practically no controversy about the use of AIT in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma, but for atopic dermatitis or food allergy, the indications for AIT are not well defined. The elaboration of a wider consensus is of utmost importance because AIT is the only treatment that can change the course of allergic disease by preventing the development of asthma and new allergen sensitizations and by inducing allergen-specific immune tolerance. Safer and more effective AIT strategies are being continuously developed both through elaboration of new allergen preparations and adjuvants and alternate routes of administration. A number of guidelines, consensus documents, or both are available on both the international and national levels. The international community of allergy specialists recognizes the need to develop a comprehensive consensus report to harmonize, disseminate, and implement the best AIT practice. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology, formed by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology; the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; and the World Allergy Organization, has decided to issue an international consensus on AIT. PMID:26162571

  7. Novel immunotherapies for hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michelle H; Paulos, Chrystal M

    2015-01-01

    The immune system is designed to discriminate between self and tumor tissue. Through genetic recombination, there is fundamentally no limit to the number of tumor antigens that immune cells can recognize. Yet, tumors use a variety of immunosuppressive mechanisms to evade immunity. Insight into how the immune system interacts with tumors is expanding rapidly and has accelerated the translation of immunotherapies into medical breakthroughs. Herein, we appraise novel strategies that exploit the patient's immune system to kill cancer. We review various forms of immune-based therapies, which have shown significant promise in patients with hematologic malignancies, including (i) conventional monoclonal therapies like rituximab; (ii) engineered monoclonal antibodies called bispecific T-cell engagers; (iii) monoclonal antibodies and pharmaceutical drugs that block inhibitory T-cell pathways (i.e. PD-1, CTLA-4, and IDO); and (iv) adoptive cell transfer therapy with T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors. We also assess the idea of using these therapies in combination and conclude by suggesting multi-prong approaches to improve treatment outcomes and curative responses in patients. PMID:25510273

  8. Immunotherapy in Sarcoma: Future Horizons.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Melissa; Gorantla, Vikram; Weiss, Kurt; Tawbi, Hussein

    2015-11-01

    Immunologic approaches to cancer are over a century old. Over the years, the strategy has been fine-tuned from inciting infections in subjects to inhibiting negative regulatory signals from the innate immune system. Sarcomas are among the first tumors to be considered for immune interventions. From Coley's toxin to cytokine-based therapies to adoptive cell therapy, there have been numerous immunotherapeutic investigations in this patient population. A promising strategy includes adoptive T cell therapy which has been studied in small cohorts of synovial sarcoma, a subtype that is known to widely express the cancer testis antigen, NY-ESO-1. Additionally, recent data in metastatic melanoma and renal cell carcinoma demonstrate the utility and tremendous efficacy of immune checkpoint blockade with increased rates of durable responses compared to standard therapies. Responses in traditionally "non-immunogenic" tumors, such as lung and bladder cancers, provide ample rationale for the study of immune checkpoint inhibitors in sarcoma. While immunotherapy has induced some responses in sarcomas, further research will help clarify optimal patient selection for future clinical trials and new combinatorial immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26423769

  9. Specific Immunotherapy in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungsoo; Park, Chang Ook

    2015-01-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) using house dust mite (HDM) extracts has been performed mainly with patients of asthma and allergic rhinitis. In the meanwhile, there has been a long debate on the efficacy of SIT in atopic dermatitis (AD) with only a few double-blind placebo-controlled trials. However, several randomized controlled trials of SIT in AD revealed significant improvement of clinical symptoms and also, positive result was shown by a following meta-analysis study of these trials. In order to predict and evaluate the treatment outcome, finding a biomarker that can predict treatment responses and treatment end-points is critical but it is very challenging at the same time due to the complexity of causes and mechanisms of AD. Other considerations including standardization of the easiest and safest treatment protocol and optimizing the treatment preparations should be studied as well. This review summarizes the basics of SIT in AD including the brief mechanisms, treatment methods and schedules, and also highlights the clinical efficacy of SIT in AD along with mild, controllable adverse reactions. Immunologic effects and studies of various biomarkers are also introduced and finally, future considerations with upcoming studies on SIT were discussed. PMID:25749758

  10. Immunotherapy in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, R M

    1999-06-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma continue to present a therapeutic challenge. Current therapeutic approaches involve surgery and various types of immunotherapy. The rationale for this latter form of therapy include the observations of spontaneous tumor regression, the presence of a T-cell-mediated immune response, and the tumor responses observed in patients receiving cytokine therapy. Analysis of prognostic factors in these patients demonstrates that clinical responses occur most frequently in individuals with good performance status. The cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2, aldesleukin [Proleukin], interferon-alfa (Intron A, Roferon-A), or the combination produce responses in 15% to 20% of patients. Randomized trials suggest that administration of interferon-alfa may result in a modest improvement in median survival. Investigation of the molecular genetics of renal cell carcinoma and the presence of T-lymphocyte immune dysregulation have suggested new therapeutic strategies. Further preclinical and clinical studies investigating inhibitors of angiogenesis or pharmacologic methods to reverse immune dysregulation are ongoing. Therapeutic results in patients with renal cell carcinoma remain limited, and investigational approaches are warranted. PMID:10378218

  11. Melanoma immunotherapy dominates the field

    PubMed Central

    Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide and despite early detection and intervention, the number of patients dying from metastatic disease continues to rise. The prognosis of advanced melanoma remains poor, with median survival between 6 and 9 months. Over the past 30 years and despite extensive clinical research, the treatment options for metastatic disease were limited and melanoma is still considered as one of the most therapy-resistant malignancies. Single-agent and combination chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biochemotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted agent therapy and combination regimens failed to show a significant improvement in overall survival (OS). Recent advances and in-depth understanding of the biology of melanoma, have contributed to the development of new agents. Based on the molecular and immunological background of the disease, these new drugs have shown benefit in overall and progression-free survival (PFS). As the picture of the disease begins to change, oncologists need to alter their approach to melanoma treatment and consider disease biology together with targeted individualized treatment. In this review the authors attempt to offer an insight in the present and past melanoma treatment options, with a focus on the recently approved immunotherapeutic agents and the clinical perspectives of these new weapons against metastatic melanoma. PMID:27563656

  12. Mechanisms of subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Soyer, Ozge U; Akdis, Mubeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2011-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only curative approach in the treatment of allergic diseases defined up-to-date. Peripheral T-cell tolerance to allergens, the goal of successful allergen-SIT, is the primary mechanism in healthy immune responses to allergens. By repeated administration of increased doses of the causative allergen, allergen-SIT induces a state of immune tolerance to allergens through the constitution of T regulatory (Treg) cells, including allergen-specific interleukin (IL)-10-secreting Treg type 1 cells and CD4(+)CD25(+)Treg cells; induction of suppressive cytokines, such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor β; suppression of allergen-specific IgE and induction of IgG4 and IgA; and suppression of mast cells, basophils, eosinophils, and inflammatory dendritic cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the mechanisms of allergen-SIT with emphasis on the roles of Treg cells in allergen-SIT. PMID:21530813

  13. Immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2005-09-01

    Immunotherapeutic strategies have become part of standard cancer treatment. Chimeric and humanized antibodies have demonstrated activity against a variety of tumors. Although the humanized anti-CD33 antibody HuM195 has only modest activity against overt acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it can eliminate minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia. High-dose radioimmunotherapy with b-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45, and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of antileukemic therapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conversely, a-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213 or actinium-225 offers the possibility of selective tumor cell kill while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Targeted chemotherapy with the anti-CD33- calicheamicin construct gemtuzumab ozogamicin has produced remissions in relapsed AML and appears promising when used in combination with standard chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. T-cell recognition of peptide antigens presented on the cell surface in combination with major histocompatibility complex antigen provides another potentially promising approach for the treatment of AML. PMID:16091194

  14. Immunologic special forces: anti-pathogen cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immunotherapy following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael D; Bollard, Catherine M

    2016-01-01

    Anti-pathogen adoptive T-cell immunotherapy has been proven to be highly effective in preventing or controlling viral infections following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Recent advances in manufacturing protocols allow an increased number of targeted pathogens, eliminate the need for viral transduction, broaden the potential donor pool to include pathogen-naïve sources, and reduce the time requirement for production. Early studies suggest that anti-fungal immunotherapy may also have clinical benefit. Future advances include further broadening of the pathogens that can be targeted and development of T-cells with resistance to pharmacologic immunosuppression.

  15. Use of new technology to improve utilization and adherence to immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Smita; Dimov, Ves

    2014-01-01

    Technology and social media have dramatically altered the landscape in which we practice medicine. Clinicians have increasingly turned to technology and the internet to enhance patient care. Allergists have used these modalities to improve utilization and adherence to immunotherapy. Electronic medical records (EMRs) are being widely adopted by allergy practices and some offer allergy/immunology specific modules that aid in daily workflow. The development of specialized devices that reduce pain associated with immunotherapy administration may improve compliance with immunotherapy. Social media and other forms of electronic communication such as e-mail, Facebook, Twitter, short message service (SMS), and YouTube give clinicians multiple avenues to disseminate information and reach their patients, possibly improving patient adherence to therapy. Finally, tablet computers, online networks, and electronic surveys provide additional ways to connect patients and physicians. PMID:25709743

  16. IgE-based Immunotherapy of Cancer -A Comparative Oncology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Josef; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-based immunotherapies are important therapy options in human oncology. Although human humoral specific immunity is constituted of five different immunoglobulin classes, currently only IgG-based immunotherapies have proceeded to clinical application. This review, however, discusses the benefits and difficulties of IgE-based immunotherapy of cancer, with special emphasis on how to translate promising preclinical results into clinical studies. Pursuing the “Comparative Oncology” approach, novel drug candidates are investigated in clinical trials with veterinary cancer patients, most often dogs. By this strategy drug development could be speeded up, animal experiments could be reduced and novel therapy options could be introduced benefitting humans as well as man’s best friend. PMID:25264496

  17. Advances in the understanding of cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shore, Neal D

    2015-09-01

    The principal role of the immune system is to prevent and eradicate pathogens and infections. The key characteristics or features of an effective immune response include specificity, trafficking, antigen spread and durability (memory). The immune system is recognised to have a critical role in controlling cancer through a dynamic relationship with tumour cells. Normally, at the early stages of tumour development, the immune system is capable of eliminating tumour cells or keeping tumour growth abated; however, tumour cells may evolve multiple pathways over time to evade immune control. Immunotherapy may be viewed as a treatment designed to boost or restore the ability of the immune system to fight cancer, infections and other diseases. Immunotherapy manifests differently from traditional cancer treatments, eliciting delayed response kinetics and thus may be more effective in patients with lower tumour burden, in whom disease progression may be less rapid, thereby allowing ample time for the immunotherapy to evolve. Because immunotherapies may have a different mechanism of action from traditional cytotoxic or targeted biological agents, immunotherapy techniques have the potential to combine synergistically with traditional therapies. PMID:24612369

  18. Current Studies of Immunotherapy on Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Neena Stephanie; Miller, Rickey; Lal, Richa; Mahanti, Harshini; Dixon-Mah, Yaenette N; DeCandio, Michele L; Vandergrift, W Alex; Varma, Abhay K; Patel, Sunil J; Banik, Naren L; Lindhorst, Scott M; Giglio, Pierre; Das, Arabinda

    2014-04-01

    Glioblastoma is a form of brain tumor with a very high morbidity and mortality. Despite decades of research, the best treatments currently in clinical practice only extend survival by a number of months. A promising alternative to conventional treatment for glioblastomas is immunotherapy. Although proposed over a century ago, the field of cancer immunotherapy has historically struggled to translate it into effective clinical treatments. Better understanding is needed of the various regulatory and co-stimulatory factors in the glioblastoma patient for more efficient immunotherapy treatments. The tumor microenvironment is anatomically shielded from normal immune-surveillance by the blood-brain barrier, irregular lymphatic drainage system, and it's in a potently immunosuppressive environment. Immunotherapy can potentially manipulate these forces effectively to enhance anti-tumor immune response and clinical benefit. New treatments utilizing the immune system show promise in terms of targeting and efficacy. This review article attempts to discuss current practices in glioblastoma treatment, the theory behind immunotherapy, and current research into various clinical trials. PMID:25346943

  19. [Specific immunotherapy and relocation in occupational allergic bakers].

    PubMed

    Cirla, A M; Lorenzini, R A; Cirla, P E

    2007-01-01

    Occupational allergy to components of wheat flour is the main cause of rhinitis and asthma of workers in bakeries and similar activities. An immunological mechanism IgE-mediated is involved and the sensitising properties of some proteins of wheat where assessed. Nowadays it is possible to have an extract to be used for specific immunotherapy. The aim of this treatment should be a reduction of individual immunological reactivity and the possibility of going on the particular activity of allergic bakers, pastry makers or pizza makers. An observational crossectional retrospective study was performed on 41 sensitised workers that were diagnosed in the same occupational health unit. All underwent a subcutaneous specific immunotherapy (SCIT) with the same schedule and the same extract (Lofarma Allergeni, Milan) for 4 or more years, without avoiding their work activity. The outcome was investigated after five or ten years. Data were collected by a questionnaire. 34 subjects on 41 are still at work with an acceptable quality of life and a normal working efficiency, mainly in their small enterprises. In the "old" subgroup (19 cases), treated in the past, several bakers still at work stopped SCIT even from 4-10 years. In the "new" subgroup (15 cases), still in treatment, symptoms and drug use during the work activity resulted to be reduced or absent in the majority of cases. According to results of other immunotherapies by allergenic vaccines (pollens, mites) also for wheat flour occupational allergy a specific treatment seems to be possible and SCIT may be an useful tool to reduce and control the biological individual effects of allergy. By the occupational point of view wheat flour SCIT allows a relocation in many of cases and may be associated to other intervention of environmental prevention at workplaces, improving the relocation of occupational allergic subjects when requested. PMID:18409768

  20. Immunotherapy advances in uro-genital malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ratta, Raffaele; Zappasodi, Roberta; Raggi, Daniele; Grassi, Paolo; Verzoni, Elena; Necchi, Andrea; Di Nicola, Massimo; Salvioni, Roberto; de Braud, Filippo; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer has made significant progresses over the last 20 years. Multiple efforts have been attempted to restore immune-mediated tumor elimination, leading to the development of several targeted immunotherapies. Data from recent clinical trials suggest that these agents might improve the prognosis of patients with advanced genito-urinary (GU) malignancies. Nivolumab has been the first immune checkpoint-inhibitor approved for pre-treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Pembrolizumab and atezolizumab have shown promising results in both phase I and II trials in urothelial carcinoma. Brentuximab vedotin has demonstrated early signals of clinical activity and immunomodulatory effects in highly pre-treated patients with testicular germ cell tumors. In this review, we have summarized the major clinical achievements of immunotherapy in GU cancers, focusing on immune checkpoint blockade as well as the new immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) under clinical evaluation for these malignancies. PMID:27372200

  1. Development of Novel Immunotherapies for Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Al-Hujaily, Ensaf M; Oldham, Robyn A A; Hari, Parameswaran; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a disorder of terminally differentiated plasma cells characterized by clonal expansion in the bone marrow (BM). It is the second-most common hematologic malignancy. Despite significant advances in therapeutic strategies, MM remains a predominantly incurable disease emphasizing the need for the development of new treatment regimens. Immunotherapy is a promising treatment modality to circumvent challenges in the management of MM. Many novel immunotherapy strategies, such as adoptive cell therapy and monoclonal antibodies, are currently under investigation in clinical trials, with some already demonstrating a positive impact on patient survival. In this review, we will summarize the current standards of care and discuss major new approaches in immunotherapy for MM. PMID:27618026

  2. Hyperthermia as an immunotherapy strategy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Skitzki, Joseph J.; Repasky, Elizabeth A.; Evans, Sharon S.

    2010-01-01

    The use of hyperthermia as an adjunct to cancer immunotherapy is supported by an increasing number of research data. Both preclinical and clinical data results have demonstrated improved antitumor immune responses with the addition of mild hyperthermia. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the improved immune reactivity observed in the presence of hyperthermia include the generation of Hsps, the activation of antigen presenting cells and changes in lymphocyte trafficking. Understanding these hyperthermia-induced processes can serve as the foundation for analyzing current clinical trials, as well as designing future trials in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:19513944

  3. Improving cancer immunotherapy with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammad H; Wang, Lei; Goldberg, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Immunotherapy confers durable clinical benefit to melanoma, lung, and kidney cancer patients. Challengingly, most other solid tumors, including ovarian carcinoma, are not particularly responsive to immunotherapy, so combination with a complementary therapy may be beneficial. Recent findings suggest that epigenetic modifying drugs can prime antitumor immunity by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens, chemokines, and activating ligands by cancer cells as well as cytokines by immune cells. This review, drawing from both preclinical and clinical data, describes some of the mechanisms of action that enable DNA methyltransferase inhibitors to facilitate the establishment of antitumor immunity. PMID:26646852

  4. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Cancer or Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Maus, Marcela V.; Fraietta, Joseph A.; Levine, Bruce L.; Kalos, Michael; Zhao, Yangbing; June, Carl H.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy, or the infusion of lymphocytes, is a promising approach for the treatment of cancer and certain chronic viral infections. The application of the principles of synthetic biology to enhance T cell function has resulted in substantial increases in clinical efficacy. The primary challenge to the field is to identify tumor-specific targets to avoid off-tissue, on-target toxicity. Given recent advances in efficacy in numerous pilot trials, the next steps in clinical development will require multicenter trials in order to establish adoptive immunotherapy as a mainstream technology. PMID:24423116

  5. Human Tumor Antigens and Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vigneron, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    With the recent developments of adoptive T cell therapies and the use of new monoclonal antibodies against the immune checkpoints, immunotherapy is at a turning point. Key players for the success of these therapies are the cytolytic T lymphocytes, which are a subset of T cells able to recognize and kill tumor cells. Here, I review the nature of the antigenic peptides recognized by these T cells and the processes involved in their presentation. I discuss the importance of understanding how each antigenic peptide is processed in the context of immunotherapy and vaccine delivery. PMID:26161423

  6. Stinging insect allergy: current perspectives on venom immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ludman, Sian W; Boyle, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Systemic allergic reactions to insect stings affect up to 5% of the population during their lifetime, and up to 32% of beekeepers. Such reactions can be fatal, albeit very rarely, and fear of a further systemic reaction (SR) can lead to significant anxiety and quality of life impairment. A recent Cochrane systematic review confirmed that venom immunotherapy (VIT) is an effective treatment for people who have had a systemic allergic reaction to an insect sting. VIT reduces risk of a further SR (relative risk 0.10, 95% confidence interval 0.03-0.28), but VIT also reduces risk of a future large local reaction, and significantly improves disease-specific quality of life. However, health economic analysis showed that VIT is generally not cost effective for preventing future SRs; most people are stung infrequently, most SRs resolve without long-term consequences, and a fatal outcome is extremely rare. VIT only becomes cost effective if one is stung frequently (eg, beekeepers) or if quality of life improvement is considered. Thus, for most people with insect sting allergy, anxiety and quality of life impairment should be the overriding consideration when making treatment decisions, highlighting the importance of a patient-centered approach. Areas which need to be explored in future research include efforts to improve the safety and convenience of VIT such as the use of sublingual immunotherapy; quality of life effects of venom allergy in children and adolescents as well as their parents; and the optimal duration of treatment. PMID:26229493

  7. Stinging insect allergy: current perspectives on venom immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ludman, Sian W; Boyle, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Systemic allergic reactions to insect stings affect up to 5% of the population during their lifetime, and up to 32% of beekeepers. Such reactions can be fatal, albeit very rarely, and fear of a further systemic reaction (SR) can lead to significant anxiety and quality of life impairment. A recent Cochrane systematic review confirmed that venom immunotherapy (VIT) is an effective treatment for people who have had a systemic allergic reaction to an insect sting. VIT reduces risk of a further SR (relative risk 0.10, 95% confidence interval 0.03–0.28), but VIT also reduces risk of a future large local reaction, and significantly improves disease-specific quality of life. However, health economic analysis showed that VIT is generally not cost effective for preventing future SRs; most people are stung infrequently, most SRs resolve without long-term consequences, and a fatal outcome is extremely rare. VIT only becomes cost effective if one is stung frequently (eg, beekeepers) or if quality of life improvement is considered. Thus, for most people with insect sting allergy, anxiety and quality of life impairment should be the overriding consideration when making treatment decisions, highlighting the importance of a patient-centered approach. Areas which need to be explored in future research include efforts to improve the safety and convenience of VIT such as the use of sublingual immunotherapy; quality of life effects of venom allergy in children and adolescents as well as their parents; and the optimal duration of treatment. PMID:26229493

  8. Combined Cancer Immunotherapy Against Aurora Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Kaštánková, Iva; Poláková, Ingrid; Dušková, Martina; Šmahel, Michal

    2016-05-01

    Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is a centrosomal protein that is overexpressed in a number of human malignancies and can contribute to tumor progression. As we used this protein as a target of DNA immunization, we increased its immunogenicity by the addition of the PADRE helper epitope and decreased its potential oncogenicity by mutagenesis of the kinase domain. For in vitro analysis of induced immune responses in mice, we identified the Aurka220-228 nonapeptide representing an H-2K epitope. As DNA vaccination against the Aurka self-antigen by a gene gun did not show any antitumor effect, we combined DNA immunization with anti-CD25 treatment that depletes mainly regulatory T cells. Whereas 1 anti-CD25 dose injected before DNA vaccination did not enhance the activation of Aurka-specific splenocytes, 3 doses administered on days of immunizations augmented about 10-fold immunity against Aurka. However, an opposite effect was found for antitumor immunity-only 1 anti-CD25 dose combined with DNA vaccination reduced tumor growth. Moreover, the administration of 3 doses of anti-CD25 antibody alone accelerated tumor growth. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating cells showed that 3 anti-CD25 doses not only efficiently depleted regulatory T cells but also activated helper T cells and CD3CD25 cells. Next, we found that blockade of the PD-1 receptor initiated 1 week after the first immunization was necessary for significant inhibition of tumor growth with therapeutic DNA vaccination against Aurka combined with depletion of CD25 cells. Our results suggest that combined cancer immunotherapy should be carefully evaluated to achieve the optimal antitumor effect. PMID:27070447

  9. Novel insights into immunotherapy for hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Sheikh Mohammad Fazle; Al-Mahtab, Mamun; Jahan, Munira; Yoshida, Osamu; Hiasa, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    The possible use of immunotherapy for hepatitis B has emerged for two major reasons: (1) chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is an immune-mediated pathological condition, and (2) commercially available antiviral drugs are of limited efficacy. Although various immunomodulatory agents have been used to treat patients with CHB during the last three decades, there is currently no consensus among physicians and hepatologists regarding the suitability of immunotherapy for patients with CHB. However, new insights into immunotherapy for CHB have emerged; these may facilitate design of effective and tolerable immunotherapy regimens for these patients. This review provides a comprehensive overview of immunotherapy for CHB. PMID:26626120

  10. [Psychological aspects of immunotherapies in the treatment of malignant melanoma].

    PubMed

    Kovács, Péter; Pánczél, Gitta; Melegh, Krisztina; Balatoni, Tímea; Pörneczy, Edit; Lõrincz, Lenke; Czirbesz, Kata; Gorka, Eszter; Liszkay, Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    Psychological problems may arise in connection with oncomedical treatments in three ways: 1. acute and/or 2. chronic ways, as well as 3. co-morbid psychiatric diseases that already exist must also be taken into account. Immunotherapies have the most common and also clinically relevant psychological side effects. Fatigue, anhedonia, social isolation, psychomotor slowness is reported during treatment. Anti-CTLA-4 antibody (ipilimumab) immunotherapy can present one of the most modern opportunities for adequate treatment for patients having distant metastasis or unresectable tumour. In relation to immunotherapies, acute psychological side effects (acute stress) emerging during treatments develop in a way that can mostly be linked to environmental factors, e.g. notification of diagnosis, hospitalisation, progression, deterioration in quality of life, imminent dates of control. Crisis is a temporary and threatening condition that endangers psychological balance. In such conditions, enhanced psychological vulnerability must be taken into account and doctors play a key role in the rapid recognition of the condition. Chronic psychological problems, which may arise from the depressogenic effect of the applied treatment or originated from a pre-melanoma psychiatric condition, may exceed the diagnostic and psychotherapeutic competences of a clinical psychologist. Even in case of a well-defined depressogenic biological mechanism such as the activation of the pro-inflammatory cytokine pathway, positive environmental effects can reduce symptoms and thus increase compliance. Side effects can be treated successfully using psychotherapeutic methods and/or psychiatric medicines. The application of routinely used complex psychosocial screening packages can provide the easiest method to identify worsening psychological condition during immunotherapy and give rapid feedback to the oncologist and the patient. Team work is of particular importance in a situation like this as it requires

  11. Biomarkers for glioma immunotherapy: the next generation

    PubMed Central

    Ung, Timothy H.; Neira, Justin A.; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    The term “biomarker” historically refers to a single parameter, such as the expression level of a gene or a radiographic pattern, used to indicate a broader biological state. Molecular indicators have been applied to several aspects of cancer therapy: to describe the genotypic and phenotypic state of neoplastic tissue for prognosis, to predict susceptibility to anti-proliferative agents, to validate the presence of specific drug targets, and to evaluate responsiveness to therapy. For glioblastoma (GBM), immunohistochemical and radiographic biomarkers accessible to the clinical lab have informed traditional regimens, but while immunotherapies have emerged as potentially disruptive weapons against this diffusely infiltrating, heterogeneous tumor, biomarkers with strong predictive power have not been fully established. The cancer immunotherapy field, through the recently accelerated expansion of trials, is currently leveraging this wealth of clinical and biological data to define and revise the use of biomarkers for improving prognostic accuracy, personalization of therapy, and evaluation of responses across the wide variety of tumors. Technological advancements in DNA sequencing, cytometry, and microscopy have facilitated the exploration of more integrated, high-dimensional profiling of the disease system—incorporating both immune and tumor parameters—rather than single metrics, as biomarkers for therapeutic sensitivity. Here we discuss the utility of traditional GBM biomarkers in immunotherapy and how the impending transformation of the biomarker paradigm—from single markers to integrated profiles—may offer the key to bringing predictive, personalized immunotherapy to GBM patients. PMID:25724916

  12. Topical immunotherapy with diphenylcyclopropenone-induced vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Kutlubay, Zekayi; Engin, Burhan; Songur, Abdullah; Serdaroglu, Server; Tuzun, Yalcin

    2016-08-01

    Topical immunotherapy made by diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) is an alternative treatment that can be used safely and efficaciously in recalcitrant alopecia areata patients. DPCP-induced vitiligo is a rare, but documented, unwanted side effect. The real mechanism of DPCP-induced vitiligo is not well known. PMID:26963903

  13. Developing Strategies in the Immunotherapy of Leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Brayer, Jason B.; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background In the current treatment paradigms for leukemias, hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is considered the best option with a curative potential although more often than not it simply delays disease progression. Advances are needed, both in current therapies and in the development of new strategies. Partly from studying the nuances of the curative potential of stem cell transplant, we have come to appreciate the relevance of the immune response and the potential of immunotherapy. Methods This review article summarizes the recent advances in the field of immunology and immunotherapy for leukemia. Results In passive immunotherapy, recent progress in chimeric T-cell antigen receptor technology has been encouraging. In active immunotherapy, a cancer vaccine may potentially enhance HSCT. An overview of various clinical studies of peptide vaccination strategies focusing on molecular targets such as the Wilms’ tumor gene 1 (WT1), proteinase 3 (PR3), and receptor for hyaluronan acid-mediated motility (RHAMM) is provided. Cell-based vaccination strategies are also briefly explored. Conclusions The immune system clearly has the capacity to recognize and react to leukemic cells, and recent evidence directs our attention to the importance of mounting inflammatory and CD4 T-cell responses to complement and support the cytotoxic activity elicited by peptide vaccines. PMID:23302907

  14. Role of IL-2 in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Caicun; Ren, Shengxiang

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is one of the key cytokines with pleiotropic effects on immune system. It has been approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma and metastatic melanoma. Recent progress has been made in our understanding of IL-2 in regulating lymphocytes that has led to exciting new directions for cancer immunotherapy. While improved IL-2 formulations might be used as monotherapies, their combination with other anticancer immunotherapies, such as adoptive cell transfer regimens, antigen-specific vaccination, and blockade of immune checkpoint inhibitory molecules, for example cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) mono-antibodies, would held the promise of treating metastatic cancer. Despite the comprehensive studies of IL-2 on immune system have established the application of IL-2 for cancer immunotherapy, a number of poignant obstacles remain for future research. In the present review, we will focus on the key biological features of IL-2, current applications, limitations, and future directions of IL-2 in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27471638

  15. Adapting conventional cancer treatment for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jian; Liu, Zhida; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2016-05-01

    The efficacy of directly killing tumors by conventional cancer therapies, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, has been for several decades well established. But, a suppressed immune response might become a lethal side effect after repeated cycles of intensive treatment. Recently, achievements in immune checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive T cell-mediated immunotherapies have resulted in changes in frontline management of advanced cancer diseases. However, accumulated evidence indicates that immunotherapeutic and conventional strategies alone are often ineffective to eradicate big tumors or metastasis. To improve the outcomes of treatment for advanced cancer diseases, the combination of conventional cancer treatment with various immunotherapeutic approaches has been attempted and has shown potential synergistic effects. Recent studies have unexpectedly demonstrated that some strategies of conventional cancer treatment can regulate the immune response positively, thus the understanding of how to adapt conventional treatment for immunotherapy is crucial to the design of effective combination therapy of conventional treatment with immunotherapy. Here, we review both experimental and clinical studies on the therapeutic effect and its mechanisms of combining conventional therapy with immunotherapy in treatment of cancer. PMID:26910191

  16. Biomarkers and correlative endpoints for immunotherapy trials.

    PubMed

    Morse, Michael A; Osada, Takuya; Hobeika, Amy; Patel, Sandip; Lyerly, H Kim

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapies for lung cancer are reaching phase III clinical trial, but the ultimate success likely will depend on developing biomarkers to guide development and choosing patient populations most likely to benefit. Because the immune response to cancer involves multiple cell types and cytokines, some spatially and temporally separated, it is likely that multiple biomarkers will be required to fully characterize efficacy of the vaccine and predict eventual benefit. Peripheral blood markers of response, such as the ELISPOT assay and cytokine flow cytometry analyses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells following immunotherapy, remain the standard approach, but it is increasingly important to obtain tissue to study the immune response at the site of the tumor. Earlier clinical endpoints such as response rate and progression-free survival do not correlate with overall survival demonstrated for some immunotherapies, suggesting the need to develop other intermediary clinical endpoints. Insofar as all these biomarkers and surrogate endpoints are relevant in multiple malignancies, it may be possible to extrapolate findings to immunotherapy of lung cancer. PMID:23714525

  17. Biomarkers for Immunotherapy: Current Developments and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Kristen R; Wang, Jianfeng; Silk, Ann W; Ganesan, Shridar; Kaufman, Howard L; Mehnert, Janice M

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has revolutionized cancer therapy and has been named the cancer advance of the year for 2016. Checkpoint inhibitors have demonstrated unprecedented rates of durable responses in some of the most difficult-to-treat cancers; however, many treated patients do not respond, and the potential for serious side effects exists. There is a growing need to identify biomarkers that will improve the selection of patients who will best respond to therapy, further elucidate drug mechanisms of action, and help tailor therapy regimens. Biomarkers are being explored at the soluble, cellular, and genomic levels, and examples in immunotherapy include serum proteins, tumor-specific receptor expression patterns, factors in the tumor microenvironment, circulating immune and tumor cells, and host genomic factors. The search for reliable biomarkers is limited by our incomplete understanding of how immunotherapies modify the already complex immune response to cancer, as well as the contribution of immuno-editing to a dynamic and inducible tumor microenvironment and immune milieu. Furthermore, there has been little extension of any candidate assay into large, prospective studies, and the lack of standardization in measurement and interpretation restricts their validity. Both tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and PD-L1 expression within the tumor microenvironment have been recognized as having both prognostic and predictive value for patients treated with immunotherapy. Alternately, a larger panel of gene signatures, chemokines, and other factors that correlate with response has been proposed. In this article, we will explore the status of current biomarker candidates. PMID:27249758

  18. Emerging Opportunities and Challenges in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Theresa L; Demaria, Sandra; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Maria E; Zarour, Hassane M; Melero, Ignacio

    2016-04-15

    Immunotherapy strategies against cancer are emerging as powerful weapons for treatment of this disease. The success of checkpoint inhibitors against metastatic melanoma and adoptive T-cell therapy with chimeric antigen receptor T cells against B-cell-derived leukemias and lymphomas are only two examples of developments that are changing the paradigms of clinical cancer management. These changes are a result of many years of intense research into complex and interrelated cellular and molecular mechanisms controling immune responses. Promising advances come from the discovery of cancer mutation-encoded neoantigens, improvements in vaccine development, progress in delivery of cellular therapies, and impressive achievements in biotechnology. As a result, radical transformation of cancer treatment is taking place in which conventional cancer treatments are being integrated with immunotherapeutic agents. Many clinical trials are in progress testing potential synergistic effects of treatments combining immunotherapy with other therapies. Much remains to be learned about the selection, delivery, and off-target effects of immunotherapy used alone or in combination. The existence of numerous escape mechanisms from the host immune system that human tumors have evolved still is a barrier to success. Efforts to understand the rules of immune cell dysfunction and of cancer-associated local and systemic immune suppression are providing new insights and fuel the enthusiasm for new therapeutic strategies. In the future, it might be possible to tailor immune therapy for each cancer patient. The use of new immune biomarkers and the ability to assess responses to therapy by noninvasive monitoring promise to improve early cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Personalized immunotherapy based on individual genetic, molecular, and immune profiling is a potentially achievable future goal. The current excitement for immunotherapy is justified in view of many existing opportunities for harnessing

  19. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation. PMID:25459121

  20. Use of natural killer cells as immunotherapy for leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Grzywacz, Bartosz; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Verneris, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells potentially play a significant role in eradicating residual disease following allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation, and have been explored as tools for adoptive immunotherapy for chemotherapy-refractory patients. NK cell cytotoxicity is modulated by multiple activating and inhibitory receptors that maintain a balance between self-tolerance and providing surveillance against pathogens and malignant transformation. The functional characteristics of NK cells are dictated by the strength of inhibitory receptor signalling. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-specific inhibitory receptor acquisition occurs sequentially during NK cell development, and is determined by the nature of immunological reconstitution after allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation. Polymorphisms of inhibitory receptors [killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs)] and their ligands (MHC) contribute to interindividual variability. As a result, the functional NK cell repertoire of individual donors has variable potential for graft-vs-leukaemia reactions. Models predicting NK cell alloreactivity, including KIR ligand mismatch and missing KIR ligand strategies, are discussed as algorithms for optimal NK cell donor selection. Future modifications to improve NK cell adoptive immunotherapy by means of increasing target recognition and reducing inhibitory signalling are being explored. PMID:18790450

  1. Workshop on immunotherapy combinations. Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer annual meeting Bethesda, November 3, 2011.

    PubMed

    Martinez Forero, Ivan; Okada, Hideho; Topalian, Suzanne L; Gajewski, Thomas F; Korman, Alan J; Melero, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Although recent FDA approvals on ipilimumab and sipuleucel-T represent major milestones, the ultimate success of immunotherapy approaches will likely benefit from appropriate combinations with other immunotherapeutic and/or non-immunotherapeutic approaches. However, implementation of ideal combinations in the clinic may still face formidable challenges in regulatory, drug-availability and intellectual property aspects. The 2011 SITC annual meeting hosted a workshop on combination immunotherapy to discuss: 1) the most promising combinations found in the laboratory; 2) early success of combination immunotherapy in clinical trials; 3) industry perspectives on combination approaches, and 4) relevant regulatory issues. The integrated theme was how to accelerate the implementation of efficacious combined immunotherapies for cancer patients. Rodent animal models are providing many examples of synergistic combinations that typically include more than two agents. However, mouse and human immunology differ in a significant number of mechanisms and hence we might be missing opportunities peculiar to humans. Nonetheless, incisive animal experimentation with deep mechanistic insight remains the best compass that we can use to guide our paths in combinatorial immunotherapy. Combination immunotherapy clinical trials are already in progress and preliminary results are extremely promising. As a key to translate promising combinations into clinic, real and "perceived" business and regulatory hurdles were debated. A formidable step forward would be to be able to test combinations of investigational agents prior to individual approval. Taking together the FDA and the industrial perspective on combinatorial immunotherapy, the audience was left with the clear message that this is by no means an impossible task. The general perception is that the road ahead of us is full of combination clinical trials which hopefully will bring clinical benefit to our cancer patients at a fast pace. PMID

  2. Interstitial laser immunotherapy for treatment of metastatic mammary tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Daniel; Joshi, Chet; Wolf, Roman F.; Walla, Jonny; Goddard, Jessica; Martin, Mallory; Kosanke, Stanley D.; Broach, Fred S.; Pontius, Sean; Brown, Destiny; Li, Xiaosong; Howard, Eric; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    Thermal therapy has been used for cancer treatment for more than a century. While thermal effect can be direct, immediate, and controllable, it is not sufficient to completely eradicate tumors, particularly when tumors have metastasized locally or to the distant sites. Metastases are the major cause of treatment failure and cancer deaths. Current available therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, only have limited curative effects in patients with late-stage, metastatic cancers. Immunotherapy has been considered as the ultimate approach for cancer treatment since a systemic, anti-tumor, immunological response can be induced. Using the combination of photothermal therapy and immunotherapy, laser immunotherapy (LIT),a novel immunotherapy modality for late-stage cancer treatment, has been developed. LIT has shown great promise in pre-clinical studies and clinical breast cancer and melanoma pilot trials. However, the skin color and the depth of the tumor have been challenges for effective treatment with LIT. To induce a thermal destruction zone of appropriate size without causing thermal damage on the skin, we have developed interstitial laser immunotherapy (ILIT) using a cylindrical diffuser. To determine the effectiveness of ILIT, we treated the DMBA-4 metastatic tumors in rats. The thermal damage in tumor tissue was studied using TTC immersion and hematoxolin and eosin (H & E) staining. Also observed was the overall survival of the treated animals. Our results demonstrated that the ILIT could impact a much larger tumor area, and it significantly reduced the surface damage compared with the early version of non-invasive LIT. The survival data also indicate that ILIT has the potential to become an effective tool for the treatment of deeper, larger, and metastatic tumors, with reduced side effects.

  3. Does Immunotherapy of Viral Warts Provide Beneficial Effects When It Is Combined with Conventional Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Woo; Cho, Soyun

    2011-01-01

    Background Cryotherapy has been accepted as the mainstay in treating periunugal and palmoplantar warts. The major drawback of cryotherapy is the requirement of several unbearably painful treatment sessions. Objective This study aims to assess the efficacy of immunotherapy in viral wart treatment, as an adjunctive method to cryotherapy. Methods Retrospective chart review was performed on 124 patients visiting the hospital from January to December 2009 for the treatment of periungual and plantar warts. We analyzed the number of cryotherapy sessions necessary for treating warts and assessed the clinical benefits from the addition of other treatment modalities, by adjusting the various confounding factors. Results Of the 124 investigated patients, immunotherapy with diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) was performed in 14 patients (11%), together with cryotherapy. After adjusting the factors related to the therapeutic difficulties of wart, the average number of cryotherapy sessions for the immunotherapy-combined group was significantly lower (3.58±1.25) than that for the cryotherapy only group (5.10±0.44) (p=0.026). However, there were no differences in the number of treatment sessions of cryotherapy when topical 5-FU/salicylic acid agents were added to the treatment. Conclusion Immunotherapy may be a successful adjuvant to cryotherapy in reducing the number of agonizing cryotherapy sessions. PMID:21909196

  4. Inmunoterapias para las adicciones a las drogas Immunotherapies for Drug Addictions

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Iván D.

    2008-01-01

    Immunotherapies in the form of vaccines (active immunization) or monoclonal antibodies (passive immunization) appear safe and a promising treatment approaches for some substance-related disorders. The mechanism of action of the antibody therapy is by preventing the rapid entry of drugs of abuse into the central nervous system. In theory, immunotherapies could have several clinical applications. Monoclonal antibodies may be useful to treat drug overdoses and prevent the neurotoxic effects of drugs by blocking the access of drugs to the brain. Vaccines may help to prevent the development of addiction, initiate drug abstinence in those already addicted to drugs, or prevent drug use relapse by reducing the pharmacological effects and rewarding properties of the drugs of abuse on the brain. Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies has been investigated for cocaine, methamphetamine, nicotine, and phencyclidine (PCP). Active immunization with vaccines has been studied for cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, and nicotine. These immunotherapies seem promising therapeutic tools and are at different stages in their development before they can be approved by regulatory agencies for the treatment of substance-related disorders. The purpose of this article is to review the current immunotherapy approaches with emphasis on the risks and benefits for the treatment of these disorders. PMID:18551223

  5. A practical view of immunotherapy for food allergy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy is common and sometimes life threatening for Korean children. The current standard treatment of allergen avoidance and self-injectable epinephrine does not change the natural course of food allergy. Recently, oral, sublingual, and epicutaneous immunotherapies have been studied for their effectiveness against food allergy. While various rates of desensitization (36% to 100%) and tolerance (28% to 75%) have been induced by immunotherapies for food allergy, no single established protocol has been shown to be both effective and safe. In some studies, immunologic changes after immunotherapy for food allergy have been revealed. Adverse reactions to these immunotherapies have usually been localized, but severe systemic reactions have been observed in some cases. Although immunotherapy cannot be recommended for routine practice yet, results from recent studies demonstrate that immunotherapies are promising for the treatment of food allergy. PMID:26958062

  6. Mechanism of Anti-α-Synuclein Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Sung; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Immunization therapy targeting α-synuclein has emerged as a promising approach for Parkinson’s disease and perhaps for other synucleinopathies. Several antibodies have shown therapeutic effects in mouse models of synucleinopathies and have alleviated the pathological and behavioral phenotypes of these mice. The mechanisms through which the immunization therapy works were initially puzzling, especially given that α-synuclein is a typical cytosolic protein. Recent studies, however, suggested that extracellular α-synuclein is an important pathogenic entity, and hence, a target for immunotherapy. Here, we review the literature describing immunization therapy for synucleinopathies in mouse models and provide current thoughts on the potential mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of α-synuclein immunotherapy. PMID:26828212

  7. Immunotherapy in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia (CLL).

    PubMed

    Freeman, Ciara L; Gribben, John G

    2016-02-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is well known to generate impaired immune responses in the host, with the malignant clone residing in well-vascularized tissues and circulating in peripheral blood but also in close proximity to effector cells that are capable, if activated appropriately, of eliciting a cytotoxic response. These, combined with the fact that this is frequently a condition affecting older patients with co-morbidities often unfit for many "traditional" cytotoxic agents with their significant associated toxicities, make CLL an ideal candidate for the development of immunotherapy. The impressive results seen with the addition of a monoclonal antibody, rituximab, to a chemotherapy backbone, for example, is testament to how effective harnessing an immune-mediated response in CLL can be. This review serves to outline the available arsenal of immunotherapies-past and present-demonstrated to have potential in CLL with some perspectives on how the landscape in this disease may evolve in the future. PMID:26857283

  8. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Megan A.; Nair, Smita K.; Holl, Eda K.

    2015-01-01

    RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s) of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26665011

  9. Development of PROSTVAC immunotherapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Parminder; Pal, Sumanta K; Alex, Anitha; Agarwal, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    PROSTVAC immunotherapy is a heterologous prime-boost regimen of two different recombinant pox-virus vectors; vaccinia as the primary immunotherapy, followed by boosters employing fowlpox, to provoke immune responses against prostate-specific antigen. Both vectors contain transgenes for prostate-specific antigen and a triad of T-cell costimulatory molecules (TRICOM). In a placebo-controlled Phase II trial of men with minimally symptomatic, chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, PROSTVAC was well tolerated and associated with a 44% reduction in death. With a novel mechanism of action, and excellent tolerability, PROSTVAC has the potential to dramatically alter the treatment landscape of prostate cancer, not only as a monotherapy, but also in combination with other novel agents, such as immune check point inhibitors and novel androgen receptor blockers. A Phase III trial recently completed accrual. PMID:26235179

  10. Immunological landscape and immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Jesús; Melero, Ignacio; Sangro, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a serious therapeutic challenge and targeted therapies only provide a modest benefit in terms of overall survival. Novel approaches are urgently needed for the treatment of this prevalent malignancy. Evidence demonstrating the antigenicity of tumour cells, the discovery that immune checkpoint molecules have an essential role in immune evasion of tumour cells, and the impressive clinical results achieved by blocking these inhibitory receptors, are revolutionizing cancer immunotherapy. Here, we review the data on HCC immunogenicity, the mechanisms for HCC immune subversion and the different immunotherapies that have been tested to treat HCC. Taking into account the multiplicity of hyperadditive immunosuppressive forces acting within the HCC microenvironment, a combinatorial approach is advised. Strategies include combinations of systemic immunomodulation and gene therapy, cell therapy or virotherapy. PMID:26484443

  11. Development of PROSTVAC immunotherapy in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Parminder; Pal, Sumanta K; Alex, Anitha; Agarwal, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    PROSTVAC immunotherapy is a heterologous prime-boost regimen of two different recombinant pox-virus vectors; vaccinia as the primary immunotherapy, followed by boosters employing fowlpox, to provoke immune responses against prostate-specific antigen. Both vectors contain transgenes for prostate-specific antigen and a triad of T-cell costimulatory molecules (TRICOM). In a placebo-controlled Phase II trial of men with minimally symptomatic, chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, PROSTVAC was well tolerated and associated with a 44% reduction in death. With a novel mechanism of action, and excellent tolerability, PROSTVAC has the potential to dramatically alter the treatment landscape of prostate cancer, not only as a monotherapy, but also in combination with other novel agents, such as immune check point inhibitors and novel androgen receptor blockers. A Phase III trial recently completed accrual. PMID:26235179

  12. [Transcutaneous applications for vaccination and immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Krämer, Isabel; Zabel, Franziska; Kündig, Thomas M; Johansen, Pål

    2014-10-15

    Although Edward Jenner applied the first vaccines by scratching cow pox material into the skin, the profound immunological properties of the skin have become evident through research and discoveries only in the last 20 years. The immunological cells in the epidermis and the dermis are suitable targets for transcutaneous vaccination and immunotherapy. However, as the skin represents a natural barrier for topically administered large molecules, novel methods to overcome this barrier function have been described. There are chemical, biochemical and physical methods, many of which are pain-free and therefore especially suitable for children. Also for adults non-invasive methods of vaccination and immunotherapy are attractive as self-administration is feasible. Future products are currently undergoing clinical tests which provide promising results. PMID:25305116

  13. Novel immunotherapies for the treatment of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Gato-Cañas, Maria; Arasanz, Hugo; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Glaría, Estíbaliz; Arteta-Sanchez, Virginia; Kochan, Grazyna; Escors, David

    2016-05-01

    Immunotherapies are achieving clinical success for the treatment of many cancers. However, it has taken a long time to exploit the potential of the immune system for the treatment of human cancers. We cannot forget that this has been the consequence of very extensive work in basic research in preclinical models and in human patients. Thus, it is rather hard to compile all of it while giving a comprehensive view on this subject. Here we have attempted to give an overall perspective in immunotherapy of melanoma. A brief overview on current therapies is provided, followed by adoptive cell therapies. Gene engineering strategies to improve these therapies are also explained, finishing with therapies based on interference with immune checkpoint pathways. PMID:27140413

  14. Molecular biomarkers for grass pollen immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Florin-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Grass pollen allergy represents a significant cause of allergic morbidity worldwide. Component-resolved diagnosis biomarkers are increasingly used in allergy practice in order to evaluate the sensitization to grass pollen allergens, allowing the clinician to confirm genuine sensitization to the corresponding allergen plant sources and supporting an accurate prescription of allergy immunotherapy (AIT), an important approach in many regions of the world with great plant biodiversity and/or where pollen seasons may overlap. The search for candidate predictive biomarkers for grass pollen immunotherapy (tolerogenic dendritic cells and regulatory T cells biomarkers, serum blocking antibodies biomarkers, especially functional ones, immune activation and immune tolerance soluble biomarkers and apoptosis biomarkers) opens new opportunities for the early detection of clinical responders for AIT, for the follow-up of these patients and for the development of new allergy vaccines. PMID:25237628

  15. Strategies and developments of immunotherapies in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    WAN, JIA; ZHANG, XIANGHONG; LIU, TANG; ZHANG, XIANGSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a frequently observed primary malignant tumor. Current therapy for osteosarcoma consists of comprehensive treatment. The long-term survival rate of patients exhibiting nonmetastatic OS varies between 65–70%. However, a number of OS cases have been observed to be resistant to currently used therapies, leading to disease recurrence and lung metastases, which are the primary reasons leading to patient mortality. In the present review, a number of pieces of evidence provide support for the potential uses of immunotherapy, including immunomodulation and vaccine therapy, for the eradication of tumors via upregulation of the immune response. Adoptive T-cell therapy and oncolytic virotherapy have been used to treat OS and resulted in objective responses. Immunologic checkpoint blockade and targeted therapy are also potentially promising therapeutic tools. Immunotherapy demonstrates significant promise with regard to improving the outcomes for patients exhibiting OS. PMID:26834853

  16. Evolving Immunotherapy Strategies in Urothelial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brancato, Sam J.; Lewi, Keidren; Agarwal, Piyush K.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of nonmuscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) represents the importance of immunotherapy in the treatment of cancer. Despite its clinical efficacy, up to 30% of patients will ultimately experience progression to muscle-invasive disease. This, along with an improved understanding of the biologic pathways involved, has led to efforts to improve, enhance, or alter the immune response in the treatment of urothelial carcinoma. A number of novel therapeutic approaches currently are being pursued, including recombinant BCG to induce T helper type 1 (Th1) immune responses, nonlive Mycobacterium agents, targeted agents toward cancer-associated antigens, immune-modulating vaccines, and adoptive T-cell therapies. Here, we review the current and future immunotherapy treatment options for patients with urothelial cancer. PMID:25993187

  17. Coinhibitory Pathways in Immunotherapy for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, Susanne H; Freeman, Gordon J; Dranoff, Glenn; Sharpe, Arlene H

    2016-05-20

    The immune system is capable of recognizing tumors and eliminates many early malignant cells. However, tumors evolve to evade immune attack, and the tumor microenvironment is immunosuppressive. Immune responses are regulated by a number of immunological checkpoints that promote protective immunity and maintain tolerance. T cell coinhibitory pathways restrict the strength and duration of immune responses, thereby limiting immune-mediated tissue damage, controlling resolution of inflammation, and maintaining tolerance to prevent autoimmunity. Tumors exploit these coinhibitory pathways to evade immune eradication. Blockade of the PD-1 and CTLA-4 checkpoints is proving to be an effective and durable cancer immunotherapy in a subset of patients with a variety of tumor types, and additional combinations are further improving response rates. In this review we discuss the immunoregulatory functions of coinhibitory pathways and their translation to effective immunotherapies for cancer. PMID:26927206

  18. Adoptive T Cell Immunotherapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Perica, Karlo; Varela, Juan Carlos; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells has been the central goal of anti-cancer immunotherapy. In recent years, there has been an increased interest in optimizing this technology in order to make it a clinically feasible treatment. One of the main treatment modalities within cancer immunotherapy has been adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). Using this approach, tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells are infused into cancer patients with the goal of recognizing, targeting, and destroying tumor cells. In the current review, we revisit some of the major successes of ACT, the major hurdles that have been overcome to optimize ACT, the remaining challenges, and future approaches to make ACT widely available. PMID:25717386

  19. Prostate cancer immunotherapy: beyond immunity to curability.

    PubMed

    Simons, Jonathan W

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. It is the first prevalent cancer in which overall survival in advanced disease is modestly, but objectively, improved with outpatient delivered dendritic cell-based immunotherapy. More prostate cancer patients have enrolled through Facebook and trusted-site Internet searches in clinical trials for prostate cancer vaccine-based immunotherapy than in immunotherapy trials for lung, breast, colon, pancreas, ovarian, and bladder cancer combined in the past 7 years. Exceptional responses to anti-CTLA-4 treatment have been documented in clinics, and prostate cancer neoantigen characterization and T-cell clonotyping are in their research ascendancy. The prostate is an accessory organ; it is not required for fertility, erectile function, or urinary continence. The true evolutionary advantage of having a prostate for male mammalian physiology is a topic of speculation in seminar rooms and on bar stools, but it remains unknown. Hundreds of prostate lineage-unique proteins (PLUP) exist among the >37,000 normal human prostate lineage-unique open reading frames that can be targeted for immunologic ablation of PLUP(+) prostate cancer cells by prostate-specific autoimmunity. This bioengineered graft-versus-prostate disease is a powerful strategy that can eliminate deaths from prostate cancer. Immunologic tolerance to prostate cancer can be overcome at every clinical stage of presentation. This Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads article aims to present advances in the past two decades of basic, translational, and clinical research in prostate cancer, including bioengineering B-cell and T-cell responses, and ongoing prostate cancer immunotherapy trials. PMID:25367978

  20. ATMPs for Cancer Immunotherapy: A Regulatory Overview.

    PubMed

    Galli, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses European regulatory requirements for development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) for cancer immunotherapy approaches, describing the framework for clinical trials and for marketing authorization.Regulatory critical issues and challenges for developing ATMP are also discussed, with focus on potency determination, long-term follow-up, comparability, and insertional mutagenesis issues. Some of the most critical features of GMP application to ATMP are also described. PMID:27033211

  1. Update on the challenges and recent advances in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Baronzio, Gianfranco; Parmar, Gurdev; Shubina, Irina ZH; Cassutti, Valter; Giuli, Sergio; Ballerini, Marco; Kiselevsky, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    This overview provides an analysis of some of the immunotherapies currently in use and under investigation, with a special focus on the tumor microenvironment, which we believe is a major factor responsible for the general failure of immunotherapy to date. It is our expectation that combining immunotherapy with methods of altering the tumor microenvironment and targeting regulatory T cells and myeloid cells will yield favorable results.

  2. Cancer Immunotherapy for Gliomas: Overview and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naoya

    2016-07-15

    Immunotherapy has been highlighted because we have obtained much evidence, which includes theoretical backborn as well as favorable results from clinical trials. As immunotherapy gives an apparently different cytotoxic mechanism and a little adverse event, the promising results are getting a lot of attention. In this article, cancer immunotherapy for gliomas is reviewed thoroughly from the literature, focusing on the clinical trial results. PMID:27087194

  3. Cancer Immunotherapy for Gliomas: Overview and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    HASHIMOTO, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been highlighted because we have obtained much evidence, which includes theoretical backborn as well as favorable results from clinical trials. As immunotherapy gives an apparently different cytotoxic mechanism and a little adverse event, the promising results are getting a lot of attention. In this article, cancer immunotherapy for gliomas is reviewed thoroughly from the literature, focusing on the clinical trial results. PMID:27087194

  4. Immunotherapy for lung cancer: advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. To date, surgery is the first choice treatment, but most clinically diagnosed cases are inoperable. While chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are the next considered options for such cases, these treatment modalities have adverse effects and are sometimes lethal to patients. Thus, new effective strategies with minimal side effects are urgently needed. Cancer immunotherapy provides either active or passive immunity to target tumors. Multiple immunotherapy agents have been proposed and tested for potential therapeutic benefit against lung cancer, and some pose fewer side effects as compared to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article, we discuss studies focusing on interactions between lung cancer and the immune system, and we place an emphasis on outcome evidence in order to create a knowledge base well-grounded in clinical reality. Overall, this review highlights the need for new lung cancer treatment options, with much ground to be paved for future advances in the field. We believe that immunotherapy agents alone or with other forms of treatment can be recognized as next modality of lung cancer treatment. PMID:27168951

  5. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2011-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy has been used for 100 years as a desensitizing therapy for allergic diseases and represents the potentially curative and specific method of treatment. The mechanisms of action of allergen-specific immunotherapy include the very early desensitization effects, modulation of T-and B-cell responses and related antibody isotypes, and migration of eosinophils, basophils, and mast cells to tissues, as well as release of their mediators. Regulatory T (Treg) cells have been identified as key regulators of immunologic processes in peripheral tolerance to allergens. Skewing of allergen-specific effector T cells to a regulatory phenotype appears as a key event in the development of healthy immune response to allergens and successful outcome in patients undergoing allergen-specific immunotherapy. Naturally occurring forkhead box protein 3-positive CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells and inducible T(R)1 cells contribute to the control of allergen-specific immune responses in several major ways, which can be summarized as suppression of dendritic cells that support the generation of effector T cells; suppression of effector T(H)1, T(H)2, and T(H)17 cells; suppression of allergen-specific IgE and induction of IgG4; suppression of mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils; and suppression of effector T-cell migration to tissues. New strategies for immune intervention will likely include targeting of the molecular mechanisms of allergen tolerance and reciprocal regulation of effector and Treg cell subsets. PMID:21211639

  6. Immunotherapy with the storage mite lepidoglyphus destructor.

    PubMed

    Armentia-Medina, A; Tapias, J A; Martín, J F; Ventas, P; Fernández, A

    1995-01-01

    We carried out a double-blind clinical trial of immunotherapy on 35 patients sensitized to the storage mite Lepidoglyphus destructor (Ld). Before and after 12 months of specific hyposensitization (Abelló Lab., Spain) we performed in vivo (skin tests with Ld, methacholine and challenge tests), and in vitro tests (specific IgE, IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 to Ld and specific IgE, IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 to their major allergen Lep dI). We also monitored the efficacy and safety of the immunotherapy with clinical and analytical controls (symptoms and medication score, detection of immune complexes). After therapy we found a significant decrease in specific skin reactivity, dose of positive challenge tests, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Sputum eosinophilia decreased. Specific IgE to Ld was increased and we also observed an increase in specific IgG1 and IgG4 to Ld and Lep DI. The placebo group showed no changes in these variables. There were no severe secondary reactions after treatment with the extract. Patients-self-evaluation was favourable and their labour absence decreased. No development of circulating immune complexes was associated with this immunotherapy. PMID:8526179

  7. Sublingual or subcutaneous immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis?

    PubMed

    Durham, Stephen R; Penagos, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is effective in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and, unlike antiallergic drugs, has been shown to modify the underlying cause of the disease, with proved long-term benefits. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been the gold standard, whereas sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has emerged as an effective and safe alternative. Previous Cochrane systematic reviews and meta-analyses have confirmed that both SLIT and SCIT are effective in patients with seasonal AR, whereas evidence for their efficacy in patients with perennial disease has been less convincing. Recent large, adequately powered trials have demonstrated reductions in both symptoms and use of rescue medication in patients with seasonal and those with perennial AR. Here we appraise evidence for SCIT versus SLIT based on indirect evidence from Cochrane reviews and recent well-powered double-blind, randomized controlled trials versus placebo and the limited direct evidence available from randomized blind head-to-head comparisons. At present, based on an overall balance of efficacy and side effects, the patient is in equipoise. Pending definitive comparative trials, choice might be determined largely by the local availability of SCIT and SLIT products of proved value and personal (patient) preference. PMID:26853126

  8. Immunotherapy for lung cancer: advances and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. To date, surgery is the first choice treatment, but most clinically diagnosed cases are inoperable. While chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are the next considered options for such cases, these treatment modalities have adverse effects and are sometimes lethal to patients. Thus, new effective strategies with minimal side effects are urgently needed. Cancer immunotherapy provides either active or passive immunity to target tumors. Multiple immunotherapy agents have been proposed and tested for potential therapeutic benefit against lung cancer, and some pose fewer side effects as compared to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article, we discuss studies focusing on interactions between lung cancer and the immune system, and we place an emphasis on outcome evidence in order to create a knowledge base well-grounded in clinical reality. Overall, this review highlights the need for new lung cancer treatment options, with much ground to be paved for future advances in the field. We believe that immunotherapy agents alone or with other forms of treatment can be recognized as next modality of lung cancer treatment. PMID:27168951

  9. The problems and challenges of immunotherapy in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Nasraway, Stanley A

    2003-05-01

    Despite decades of research, the morbidity and mortality of sepsis and septic shock remain very high. To further compound the problem, results from all investigative trials (with one exception) have shown that tested immunotherapies aimed at modulating the excessive expression of key cytokines, such as the interleukins and tumor necrosis factor, have been either equivalent or inferior to placebo. While controversy prevails in terms of continuing such investigative trials, study designs can be held accountable for inherent flaws. Testing for the wrong hypothesis, errant study design, using the wrong agent, focusing on an inappropriate target group, excessive expectations, and uncontrolled variables have potentially obscured the real efficacy such agents might have to offer. By standardizing protocols and reducing uncontrolled variables, research can be more precisely targeted so as to unmask the real benefits to the patient. PMID:12740228

  10. Aluminium in allergen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy--a German perspective.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Matthias F; Heath, Matthew D

    2014-07-16

    We are living in an "aluminium age" with increasing bioavailability of the metal for approximately 125 years, contributing significantly to the aluminium body burden of humans. Over the course of life, aluminium accumulates and is stored predominantly in the lungs, bones, liver, kidneys and brain. The toxicity of aluminium in humans is briefly summarised, highlighting links and possible causal relationships between a high aluminium body burden and a number of neurological disorders and disease states. Aluminium salts have been used as depot-adjuvants successfully in essential prophylactic vaccinations for almost 100 years, with a convincing positive benefit-risk assessment which remains unchanged. However, allergen-specific immunotherapy commonly consists of administering a long-course programme of subcutaneous injections using preparations of relevant allergens. Regulatory authorities currently set aluminium limits for vaccines per dose, rather than per treatment course. Unlike prophylactic vaccinations, numerous injections with higher proportions of aluminium-adjuvant per injection are applied in subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and will significantly contribute to a higher cumulative life dose of aluminium. While the human body may cope robustly with a daily aluminium overload from the environment, regulatory cumulative threshold values in immunotherapy need further addressing. Based on the current literature, predisposing an individual to an unusually high level of aluminium, such as through subcutaneous immunotherapy, has the potential to form focal accumulations in the body with the propensity to exert forms of toxicity. Particularly in relation to longer-term health effects, the safety of aluminium adjuvants in immunotherapy remains unchallenged by health authorities - evoking the need for more consideration, guidance, and transparency on what is known and not known about its safety in long-course therapy and what measures can be taken to prevent or

  11. Sublingual Immunotherapy for Asthmatic Children Sensitized to House Dust Mite

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei; Hu, Qi; Shen, Lei-Lei; Hu, Ying; Tao, Hai-feng; Li, Hui-fan; Fan, Wen-ting

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The house dust mite is one of the most common allergens worldwide. There is good evidence that house dust mite subcutaneous immunotherapy is efficacious and has long-term benefit in children. However, the evidence of the benefit of house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is less convincing. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate that efficacy and safety of dust mite SLIT in children with asthma. Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases until February 2014 were searched. The primary outcome was mean change in asthma symptom score. Secondary outcomes included mean change in serum immunoglobulin G4 (sIgG4), specific Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels, and medication score. Safety was also assessed. We found that SLIT significantly decreased asthma symptom score (P = 0.007) and increased sIgG4 levels (P = 0.011) greater than control in children (<18 years of age) with asthma. There was no difference between SLIT and control groups in specific D pteronyssinus IgE levels (P = 0.076) and medication score (P = 0.408). The safety profile was similar between groups. Our study indicates that dust mite SLIT therapy was effective in reducing asthma symptoms and in increasing sIgG4 but did not significantly reduce medication scores or specific D pteronyssinus IgE levels. Our findings are not enough to support the use of dust mite SLIT in children with asthma.

  12. Specific allergen immunotherapy attenuates allergic airway inflammation in a rat model of Alstonia scholaris pollen induced airway allergy.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ankur; Moitra, Saibal; Hazra, Iman; Mondal, Somnath; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Chaudhuri, Suhnrita; Bhattacharya, Debanjan; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2016-01-01

    Pollen grains are well established to be an important cause of respiratory allergy. Current pharmacologic therapies for allergic asthma do not cure the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only treatment method which re-directs the immune system away from allergic response leading to a long lasting effect. The mechanism by which immunotherapy achieves this goal is an area of active research world-wide. The present experimental study was designed to develop an experimental model of allergic lung inflammation based on a relevant human allergen, Alstonia scholaris pollen, and to establish the immunological and cellular features of specific allergen immunotherapy using this same pollen extract. Our results revealed that Alstonia scholaris pollen sensitization and challenge causes eosinophilic airway inflammation with mucin hypersecretion. This is associated with increased total IgE, increased expression of FcɛRI on lung mast cells and increased levels of IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 as confirmed by ELISA, in-situ immunofluorescence and FACS assay. Allergen specific immunotherapy reduced airway inflammation and also decreased total IgE level, FcɛRI expression, IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 levels. It was further noted that the reduction of these levels was more by intra-nasal route than by intra-peritoneal route. Thus we present a novel animal model of Alstonia scholaris pollen allergic disease and specific allergen immunotherapy which will pave the way towards the development of better treatment modalities. PMID:26667977

  13. Stem cells and cancer immunotherapy: Arrowhead’s 2nd annual cancer immunotherapy conference

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Investigators from academia and industry gathered on April 4 and 5, 2013, in Washington DC at the Arrowhead’s 2nd Annual Cancer Immunotherapy Conference. Two complementary concepts were discussed: cancer “stem cells” as targets and therapeutic platforms based on stem cells.

  14. Fine-tuning anti-tumor immunotherapies via stochastic simulations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anti-tumor therapies aim at reducing to zero the number of tumor cells in a host within their end or, at least, aim at leaving the patient with a sufficiently small number of tumor cells so that the residual tumor can be eradicated by the immune system. Besides severe side-effects, a key problem of such therapies is finding a suitable scheduling of their administration to the patients. In this paper we study the effect of varying therapy-related parameters on the final outcome of the interplay between a tumor and the immune system. Results This work generalizes our previous study on hybrid models of such an interplay where interleukins are modeled as a continuous variable, and the tumor and the immune system as a discrete-state continuous-time stochastic process. The hybrid model we use is obtained by modifying the corresponding deterministic model, originally proposed by Kirschner and Panetta. We consider Adoptive Cellular Immunotherapies and Interleukin-based therapies, as well as their combination. By asymptotic and transitory analyses of the corresponding deterministic model we find conditions guaranteeing tumor eradication, and we tune the parameters of the hybrid model accordingly. We then perform stochastic simulations of the hybrid model under various therapeutic settings: constant, piece-wise constant or impulsive infusion and daily or weekly delivery schedules. Conclusions Results suggest that, in some cases, the delivery schedule may deeply impact on the therapy-induced tumor eradication time. Indeed, our model suggests that Interleukin-based therapies may not be effective for every patient, and that the piece-wise constant is the most effective delivery to stimulate the immune-response. For Adoptive Cellular Immunotherapies a metronomic delivery seems more effective, as it happens for other anti-angiogenesis therapies and chemotherapies, and the impulsive delivery seems more effective than the piece-wise constant. The expected synergistic

  15. Prolactin as an Adjunct for Type 1 Diabetes Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hyslop, Colin M; Tsai, Sue; Shrivastava, Vipul; Santamaria, Pere; Huang, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by autoimmune destruction of β-cells. Although immunotherapy can restore self-tolerance thereby halting continued immune-mediated β-cell loss, residual β-cell mass and function is often insufficient for normoglycemia. Using a growth factor to boost β-cell mass can potentially overcome this barrier and prolactin (PRL) may fill this role. Previous studies have shown that PRL can stimulate β-cell proliferation and up-regulate insulin synthesis and secretion while reducing lymphocytic infiltration of islets, suggesting that it may restore normoglycemia through complementary mechanisms. Here, we test the hypothesis that PRL can improve the efficacy of an immune modulator, the anticluster of differentiation 3 monoclonal antibody (aCD3), in inducing diabetes remission by up-regulating β-cell mass and function. Diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice were treated with a 5-day course of aCD3 with or without a concurrent 3-week course of PRL. We found that a higher proportion of diabetic mice treated with the aCD3 and PRL combined therapy achieved diabetes reversal than those treated with aCD3 alone. The aCD3 and PRL combined group had a higher β-cell proliferation rate, an increased β-cell fraction, larger islets, higher pancreatic insulin content, and greater glucose-stimulated insulin release. Lineage-tracing analysis found minimal contribution of β-cell neogenesis to the formation of new β-cells. Although we did not detect a significant difference in the number or proliferative capacity of T cells, we observed a higher proportion of insulitis-free islets in the aCD3 and PRL group. These results suggest that combining a growth factor with an immunotherapy may be an effective treatment paradigm for autoimmune diabetes. PMID:26512750

  16. Immunobiology and immunotherapy in genitourinary malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tsiatas, Marinos; Grivas, Petros

    2016-07-01

    Immunotherapy has traditionally been a critical component of the cancer treatment armamentarium in genitourinary (GU) cancers. It has an established role in the management of carefully selected patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) [e.g., high dose interleukin-2 (IL-2)] and non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) [e.g., intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)]. In 2010, the sipuleucel-T vaccine was approved by the FDA for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), based on a phase III trial showing overall survival (OS) benefit compared to placebo. The immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab (anti-PD-1) recently received FDA approval for the management of patients with advanced RCC patients previously treated with anti-angiogenic therapy, based on OS benefit compared to everolimus. Recently, large clinical trials demonstrated meaningful clinical benefit, including durable responses, as well as a good tolerability/safety profile with the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors in advanced RCC and chemotherapy-resistant advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC), while FDA just approved atezolizumab for platinum-treated advanced UC. Numerous interesting trials in different cancers are ongoing. Several combinations of immune checkpoint blockade with chemotherapeutics, vaccines, targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors & monoclonal antibodies, epigenetic modifiers, anti-angiogenic agents, tumor microenvironment & myeloid cell targeting therapies, metabolic modification strategies, radiation, and others, are being tested in clinical trials. Comprehensive understanding of the factors underlying antitumor immune responses in physiologically relevant animal models and humans will refine further the clinical benefit of immunotherapy. Discovery and validation of appropriate molecular biomarkers via coordinated translational research efforts, rational clinical trial designs with suitable endpoints and well-defined eligibility criteria

  17. Soypeptide lunasin in cytokine immunotherapy for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hua-Chen; Lewis, David; Tung, Chun-Yu; Han, Ling; Henriquez, Sarah M P; Voiles, Larry; Lupov, Ivan P; Pelloso, David; Sinn, Anthony L; Pollok, Karen E; de Lumen, Ben O; Li, Fang; Blum, Janice S; Srivastava, Shivani; Robertson, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    Immunostimulatory cytokines can enhance anti-tumor immunity and are part of the therapeutic armamentarium for cancer treatment. We have previously reported that post-transplant lymphoma patients have an acquired deficiency of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4, which results in defective IFNγ production during clinical immunotherapy. With the goal of further improving cytokine-based immunotherapy, we examined the effects of a soybean peptide called lunasin that synergistically works with cytokines on natural killer (NK) cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy donors and post-transplant lymphoma patients were stimulated with or without lunasin in the presence of IL-12 or IL-2. NK activation was evaluated, and its tumoricidal activity was assessed using in vitro and in vivo tumor models. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was performed to evaluate the histone modification of gene loci that are regulated by lunasin and cytokine. Adding lunasin to IL-12- or IL-2-stimulated NK cells demonstrated synergistic effects in the induction of IFNG and GZMB involved in cytotoxicity. The combination of lunasin and cytokines (IL-12 plus IL-2) was capable of restoring IFNγ production by NK cells from post-transplant lymphoma patients. In addition, NK cells stimulated with lunasin plus cytokines displayed higher tumoricidal activity than those stimulated with cytokines alone using in vitro and in vivo tumor models. The underlying mechanism responsible for the effects of lunasin on NK cells is likely due to epigenetic modulation on target gene loci. Lunasin represents a different class of immune modulating agent that may augment the therapeutic responses mediated by cytokine-based immunotherapy. PMID:24363024

  18. Immunobiology and immunotherapy in genitourinary malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Grivas, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has traditionally been a critical component of the cancer treatment armamentarium in genitourinary (GU) cancers. It has an established role in the management of carefully selected patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) [e.g., high dose interleukin-2 (IL-2)] and non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) [e.g., intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)]. In 2010, the sipuleucel-T vaccine was approved by the FDA for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), based on a phase III trial showing overall survival (OS) benefit compared to placebo. The immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab (anti-PD-1) recently received FDA approval for the management of patients with advanced RCC patients previously treated with anti-angiogenic therapy, based on OS benefit compared to everolimus. Recently, large clinical trials demonstrated meaningful clinical benefit, including durable responses, as well as a good tolerability/safety profile with the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors in advanced RCC and chemotherapy-resistant advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC), while FDA just approved atezolizumab for platinum-treated advanced UC. Numerous interesting trials in different cancers are ongoing. Several combinations of immune checkpoint blockade with chemotherapeutics, vaccines, targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors & monoclonal antibodies, epigenetic modifiers, anti-angiogenic agents, tumor microenvironment & myeloid cell targeting therapies, metabolic modification strategies, radiation, and others, are being tested in clinical trials. Comprehensive understanding of the factors underlying antitumor immune responses in physiologically relevant animal models and humans will refine further the clinical benefit of immunotherapy. Discovery and validation of appropriate molecular biomarkers via coordinated translational research efforts, rational clinical trial designs with suitable endpoints and well-defined eligibility criteria

  19. Specific immunotherapy in ovarian cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Soroush; Zoghi, Samaneh; Khalili, Nastaran; Hirbod-Mobarakeh, Armin; Emens, Leisha A; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-10-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynecological cancer. Several approaches of active and passive immunotherapy for EOC have been studied. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the clinical efficacy of specific immunotherapy in patients with EOC. We found 4524 references in seven databases and we included ten controlled clinical trials with 2285 patients with EOC reporting five active immunotherapeutic agents and three passive immunotherapies. Meta-analysis of six studies showed that overall there was not any significant difference in overall survival and recurrence-free survival between patients undergoing specific immunotherapy and those in control group. Most of the studies we evaluated reported a positive outcome from treatment with specific immunotherapy, although this was not significant. PMID:27605068

  20. Allergen immunotherapy: routes, safety, efficacy, and mode of action

    PubMed Central

    Hochfelder, Jillian Leigh; Ponda, Punita

    2013-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and allergic asthma have been steadily increasing in prevalence in recent years. These allergic diseases have a major impact on quality of life and are a major economic burden in the US. Although allergen avoidance and pharmacotherapy are currently the mainstays of therapy, they are not always successful in treating patients’ symptoms effectively. If a patient fails allergen avoidance and medical therapy, immunotherapy may be indicated. Furthermore, immunotherapy is the only therapy that may change the course of the disease and induce long-term remission. Though subcutaneous administration has been the standard route for immunotherapy for many decades, there are several other routes of administration that have been and are currently being studied. The goal of utilizing alternative routes of immunotherapy is to improve safety without decreasing the efficacy of treatment. This paper will review the novel routes of immunotherapy, including sublingual, oral, local nasal, epicutaneous, and intralymphatic.

  1. Immunotherapy for advanced melanoma: Current knowledge and future directions.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kenta; Okuyama, Ryuhei

    2016-08-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive cancers and is responsible for a large proportion of skin cancer-related deaths. The recent development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches has led to great advances in melanoma therapy. Because melanoma cells often express tumor-specific neo-antigens, significant therapeutic effects are mediated via immunotherapy-induced activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs); however, the effects depend on the immune status of the patient. At present, various immunotherapies have been approved and new clinical trials are progressing. These immunotherapies act in several ways, including CTL brake release, induction of CTL activation, transfer of CTLs, and modification of the tumor microenvironment to facilitate CTL activation. In the near future, patient-tailored immunotherapies and combination therapies are expected. In addition, it is important to monitor the status of the patient's immune response when selecting the most effective immunotherapy strategy. PMID:27302423

  2. Immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: From basic research to clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yu-Peng; Li, Zi-Duo; Prasoon, Pankaj; Zhang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer worldwide with a poor prognosis. Few strategies have been proven efficient in HCC treatment, particularly for those patients not indicated for curative resection or transplantation. Immunotherapy has been developed for decades for cancer control and is attaining more attention as a result of encouraging outcomes of new strategies such as chimeric antigen receptor T cells and immune checkpoint blockade. Right at the front of the new era of immunotherapy, we review the immunotherapy in HCC treatment, from basic research to clinical trials, covering anything from immunomodulators, tumor vaccines and adoptive immunotherapy. The mechanisms, efficacy and safety as well as the approach particulars are unveiled to assist readers to gain a concise but extensive understanding of immunotherapy of HCC. PMID:25954480

  3. Harnessing the Microbiome to Enhance Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michelle H.; Diven, Marshall A.; Huff, Logan W.; Paulos, Chrystal M.

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota plays a key role in regulating the innate and adaptive immune system. Herein, we review the immunological aspects of the microbiota in tumor immunity in mice and man, with a focus on toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, vaccines, checkpoint modulators, chemotherapy, and adoptive T cell transfer (ACT) therapies. We propose innovative treatments that may safely harness the microbiota to enhance T cell-based therapies in cancer patients. Finally, we highlight recent developments in tumor immunotherapy, particularly novel ways to modulate the microbiome and memory T cell responses to human malignancies. PMID:26101781

  4. Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Evan C; Desani, Jatin K; Chung, Paul K

    2016-07-01

    Targeted therapy and immunotherapy have changed the treatment paradigm of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Distinct molecular subtypes of NSCLC have been described over the past 20 years, enabling the emergence of treatments specific to that subtype. Agents targeting the driver mutations in NSCLC have revolutionized the approach to patients with metastatic disease, because oncologists now select a treatment based on the profile of that particular tumor. More recently, an understanding of immune checkpoints has led to the development of checkpoint inhibitors that enable the host immune system to better recognize tumor cells as foreign and to destroy them. PMID:27261918

  5. Fighting cancer with magnetic nanoparticles and immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, L.; Mejías, R.; Barber, D. F.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Serna, C. J.; Lázaro, F. J.; Morales, M. P.

    2012-03-01

    IFN-γ-adsorbed DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles can be used as an efficient in vivo drug delivery system for tumor immunotherapy. Magnetic nanoparticles, with adsorbed interferon-γ, were targeted to the tumor site by application of an external magnetic field. A relevant therapeutic dosage of interferon in the tumor was detected and led to a notable reduction in tumor size. In general, only 10% of the total injected nanoparticles after multiple exposures were found in tissues by AC susceptibility measurements of the corresponding resected tissues. Magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution is affected by the application of an external magnetic field.

  6. Sublingual immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization position paper 2013 update.

    PubMed

    Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Cox, Linda; Pawankar, Ruby; Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Blaiss, Michael; Bonini, Sergio; Bousquet, Jean; Calderón, Moises; Compalati, Enrico; Durham, Stephen R; van Wijk, Roy Gerth; Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée; Nelson, Harold; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Pfaar, Oliver; Rosário, Nelson; Ryan, Dermot; Rosenwasser, Lanny; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Senna, Gianenrico; Valovirta, Erkka; Van Bever, Hugo; Vichyanond, Pakit; Wahn, Ulrich; Yusuf, Osman

    2014-01-01

    We have prepared this document, "Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2013 Update", according to the evidence-based criteria, revising and updating chapters of the originally published paper, "Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2009", available at http://www.waojournal.org. Namely, these comprise: "Mechanisms of sublingual immunotherapy;" "Clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy" - reporting all the data of all controlled trials published after 2009; "Safety of sublingual immunotherapy" - with the recently published Grading System for adverse reactions; "Impact of sublingual immunotherapy on the natural history of respiratory allergy" - with the relevant evidences published since 2009; "Efficacy of SLIT in children" - with detailed analysis of all the studies; "Definition of SLIT patient selection" - reporting the criteria for eligibility to sublingual immunotherapy; "The future of immunotherapy in the community care setting"; "Methodology of clinical trials according to the current scientific and regulatory standards"; and "Guideline development: from evidence-based medicine to patients' views" - including the evolution of the methods to make clinical recommendations.Additionally, we have added new chapters to cover a few emerging crucial topics: "Practical aspects of schedules and dosages and counseling for adherence" - which is crucial in clinical practice for all treatments; "Perspectives and new approaches" - including recombinant allergens, adjuvants, modified allergens, and the concept of validity of the single products. Furthermore, "Raising public awareness about sublingual immunotherapy", as a need for our patients, and strategies to increase awareness of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) among patients, the medical community, all healthcare stakeholders, and public opinion, are also reported in detail. PMID:24679069

  7. Pancreatitis Secondary to Anti-Programmed Death Receptor 1 Immunotherapy Diagnosed by FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Alabed, Yazan Z; Aghayev, Ayaz; Sakellis, Christopher; Van den Abbeele, Annick D

    2015-11-01

    A 57-year-old man with metastatic melanoma developed colitis secondary to ipilimumab, a known immune-related adverse event (irAE). The patient then received pembrolizumab immunotherapy, an anti-programmed-death-receptor-1 (PD-1) antibody. Restaging FDG PET/CT study following 3 cycles of therapy demonstrated diffuse increased FDG uptake throughout the body of the pancreas associated with fat stranding in the peripancreatic region, suggestive of pembrolizumab-induced pancreatitis. Although the patient was clinically asymptomatic, diagnosis was biochemically confirmed with elevated amylase and lipase levels. In the era of immunotherapy, it will be critical to recognize irAEs early to allow prompt initiation of appropriate therapy and reduce the risk of long-term sequelae. PMID:26284765

  8. Preventive capacity of allergen immunotherapy on the natural history of allergy.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, C

    2013-06-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is the practice of administering gradually increasing doses of the specific causative allergen to reduce the clinical reactivity of allergic subjects. A bulk of literature demonstrates that AIT is an effective and safe treatment to reduce allergic symptoms and the use of drugs. The preventive capacity of AIT is less investigated. The studies thus far available showed that this treatment, in both forms of subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is able to prevent the development of asthma in patients with allergic rhinitis and the occurrence of new sensitizations in patients monosensitized. Such outcomes demonstrate the ability of AIT to change the natural history of respiratory allergy. Of particular importance, SCIT with Hymenoptera venom has an invaluable role in preventing potentially fatal anaphylactic reactions to the culprit sting in venom-allergic patients. Ongoing studies are aimed at evaluating the possible capacity of AIT in primary prevention of allergy. All these capabilities are related to the mechanisms of action of AIT. In fact, both SCIT and SLIT are able to modify the allergen presentation by dendritic cells that in turn modify the phenotype of allergen-specific T cells, switching from the Th2-type response, typical of allergic inflammation, to a Th1-type response. An important role is played by allergen-specific T regulatory (Treg) cells, which produce suppressive cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-beta. PMID:24396984

  9. Can PDT be potentiated by immunotherapy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd; Chaplin, David J.

    1993-03-01

    Two principal aspects of interlinkage of the immune system with photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment are discussed in detail: (1) participation of tumor associated macrophages (TAM) in tumor localization of photosensitizers, and (2) induction of an inflammatory immune response by phototoxic effects in endothelial cells, TAM and other cells in the tumor, leading to necrosis of the tumor tissue. It is illustrated how Photofrin levels in TAM, and consequently in the tumor as a whole, can be altered (increased or decreased) by specific agents that stimulate or impair physiological processes in TAM. It is suggested that the selectivity of tumor localization of some photosensitizers can be augmented by TAM targeted immunotherapy with agents that enhance the rate of tumor infiltration of these cells and stimulate their phagocytic activity. Preliminary results of ongoing studies suggest that PDT induces a massive infiltration of immune cells into the treated tumor. It is hypothesized that by combining PDT with an appropriate type of immunotherapy the immune reaction can be potentiated and directed against the surviving tumor cells. As as an example, it is shown that much better control of SCCVII tumor is achieved by combining PDT with the treatment by the immunoactivator SPG compared to PDT alone.

  10. Immunotherapy with Alternaria alternata: present and future.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cañavate Burgos, A; Valenzuela-Soria, A; Rojo-Hernández, A

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of fungal allergies is greater than previously believed; consequently, such processes have been underestimated as potential causes of respiratory tract disease. Most patients sensitized to fungi exhibit perennial symptoms, though their intensity increases in the summer and autumn months. Skin reactions to the antigens of Alternaria alternata are associated with a high risk of allergic respiratory conditions in the presence of spores of this fungus -fundamentally in children and young adults- with a special form of presentation as life-threatening asthma. Very few controlled studies have examined the efficacy and safety of fungal extract immunotherapy -the main problem being the lack of standardized extracts for the diagnosis and treatment of such patients. In the year 2005 a tolerance study was made in children in relation to a depot extract containing the predominant antigen of Alternaria, with two different regimens (short and cluster). Tolerance was found to be good, with a 0.95 % incidence of local reactions and a 0.95 % incidence of grade 2 systemic reactions. Few studies involving sublingual immunotherapy have been conducted to date. PMID:18047818

  11. Personalized cancer immunotherapy using Systems Medicine approaches.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shailendra K; Jaitly, Tanushree; Schmitz, Ulf; Schuler, Gerold; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio

    2016-05-01

    The immune system is by definition multi-scale because it involves biochemical networks that regulate cell fates across cell boundaries, but also because immune cells communicate with each other by direct contact or through the secretion of local or systemic signals. Furthermore, tumor and immune cells communicate, and this interaction is affected by the tumor microenvironment. Altogether, the tumor-immunity interaction is a complex multi-scale biological system whose analysis requires a systemic view to succeed in developing efficient immunotherapies for cancer and immune-related diseases. In this review we discuss the necessity and the structure of a systems medicine approach for the design of anticancer immunotherapies. We support the idea that the approach must be a combination of algorithms and methods from bioinformatics and patient-data-driven mathematical models conceived to investigate the role of clinical interventions in the tumor-immunity interaction. For each step of the integrative approach proposed, we review the advancement with respect to the computational tools and methods available, but also successful case studies. We particularized our idea for the case of identifying novel tumor-associated antigens and therapeutic targets by integration of patient's immune and tumor profiling in case of aggressive melanoma. PMID:26174229

  12. Immunological mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Marek; Akdis, C A

    2011-06-01

    The studies on the mechanisms of specific immunotherapy (SIT) point out its targets that decide on the efficacy of SIT and hence might be used for its further improvement. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the beneficial effects of immunotherapy. The knowledge of the mechanisms underlying allergic diseases and curative treatment possibilities has experienced exciting advances over the last three decades. Studies in several clinical trials in allergen-SIT have demonstrated that the induction of a tolerant state against allergens in many ways represents a key step in the development of a healthy immune response against allergens. Several cellular and molecular mechanisms have been demonstrated: allergen-specific suppressive capacities of both inducible subsets of CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead box P3(+) T-regulatory and IL-10-secreting type 1 T-regulatory cells increase in peripheral blood; suppression of eosinophils, mast cells, and basophils; Ab isotype change from IgE to IgG4. This review aims at the better understanding of the observed immunological changes associated with allergen SIT. PMID:21466562

  13. Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalopathies and Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Gastaldi, Matteo; Thouin, Anaïs; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 15 years it has become clear that rare but highly recognizable diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including newly identified forms of limbic encephalitis and other encephalopathies, are likely to be mediated by antibodies (Abs) to CNS proteins. The Abs are directed against membrane receptors and ion channel-associated proteins that are expressed on the surface of neurons in the CNS, such as N-methyl D-aspartate receptors and leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein and contactin-associated protein like 2, that are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels. The diseases are not invariably cancer-related and are therefore different from the classical paraneoplastic neurological diseases that are associated with, but not caused by, Abs to intracellular proteins. Most importantly, the new antibody-associated diseases almost invariably respond to immunotherapies with considerable and sometimes complete recovery, and there is convincing evidence of their pathogenicity in the relatively limited studies performed so far. Treatments include first-line steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, and plasma exchange, and second-line rituximab and cyclophosphamide, followed in many cases by steroid-sparing agents in the long-term. This review focuses mainly on N-methyl D-aspartate receptor- and voltage-gated potassium channel complex-related Abs in adults, the clinical phenotypes, and treatment responses. Pediatric cases are referred to but not reviewed in detail. As there have been very few prospective studies, the conclusions regarding immunotherapies are based on retrospective studies. PMID:26692392

  14. A stochastic model for immunotherapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baar, Martina; Coquille, Loren; Mayer, Hannah; Hölzel, Michael; Rogava, Meri; Tüting, Thomas; Bovier, Anton

    2016-01-01

    We propose an extension of a standard stochastic individual-based model in population dynamics which broadens the range of biological applications. Our primary motivation is modelling of immunotherapy of malignant tumours. In this context the different actors, T-cells, cytokines or cancer cells, are modelled as single particles (individuals) in the stochastic system. The main expansions of the model are distinguishing cancer cells by phenotype and genotype, including environment-dependent phenotypic plasticity that does not affect the genotype, taking into account the effects of therapy and introducing a competition term which lowers the reproduction rate of an individual in addition to the usual term that increases its death rate. We illustrate the new setup by using it to model various phenomena arising in immunotherapy. Our aim is twofold: on the one hand, we show that the interplay of genetic mutations and phenotypic switches on different timescales as well as the occurrence of metastability phenomena raise new mathematical challenges. On the other hand, we argue why understanding purely stochastic events (which cannot be obtained with deterministic models) may help to understand the resistance of tumours to therapeutic approaches and may have non-trivial consequences on tumour treatment protocols. This is supported through numerical simulations. PMID:27063839

  15. Tecemotide: An antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wurz, Gregory T; Kao, Chiao-Jung; Wolf, Michael; DeGregorio, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) has made possible the development of antigen-specific cancer immunotherapies such as tecemotide. One of those is mucin 1 (MUC1), a cell membrane glycoprotein expressed on some epithelial tissues such as breast and lung. In cancer, MUC1 becomes overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated, exposing the immunogenic tandem repeat units in the extracellular domain of MUC1. Designed to target tumor associated MUC1, tecemotide is being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials for treatment of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as maintenance therapy following chemoradiotherapy. Additional Phase II studies in other indications are ongoing. This review discusses the preclinical and clinical development of tecemotide, ongoing preclinical studies of tecemotide in human MUC1 transgenic mouse models of breast and lung cancer, and the potential application of these models for optimizing the timing of chemoradiotherapy and tecemotide immunotherapy to achieve the best treatment outcome for patients. PMID:25483673

  16. An update on immunotherapy for food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Scurlock, Amy M.; Jones, Stacie M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the review Recent investigation has resulted in significant advances toward definitive therapeutic options for food allergy. In this review, we will explore novel immunotherapeutic interventions for the active treatment of food allergy. Recent findings Because the injection route for allergen immunotherapy to foods has been associated with an unacceptable risk of severe anaphylactic reactions, use of mucosally targeted therapeutic strategies is of significant interest for food allergy. Allergen-specific immunotherapeutic approaches such as oral, sublingual, epicutaneous, and peptide immunotherapy have demonstrated efficacy in increasing threshold dose and inducing immunologic changes associated with both desensitization and oral tolerance in animal and human trials. More global immunomodulatory strategies, such as Traditional Chinese Medicine and anti-IgE therapy have been shown to effectively target the allergic response, and clinical trials are ongoing to determine the efficacy and safety in human food allergy. Summary The advent of therapies that target the mucosal immune response to promote oral tolerance have shown great promise in the treatment of food hypersensitivity. However, there is still significant risk of adverse reactions associated with these therapeutic strategies and further study is needed to carefully advance these therapeutic modalities toward general clinical implementation. PMID:20856110

  17. Transcutaneous immunotherapy via laser-generated micropores efficiently alleviates allergic asthma in Phl p 5–sensitized mice

    PubMed Central

    Bach, D; Weiss, R; Hessenberger, M; Kitzmueller, S; Weinberger, E E; Krautgartner, W D; Hauser-Kronberger, C; Boehler, C; Thalhamer, J; Scheiblhofer, S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Specific immunotherapy via the subcutaneous or oral route is associated with local and, in some cases, systemic side effects and suffers from low patient compliance. Due to its unique immunological features, the skin represents a promising target tissue for effective and painless treatment of type I allergy. The current study was performed to compare the efficacy of transcutaneous immunotherapy via laser-generated micropores to subcutaneous injection. Methods BALB/c mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal injection of recombinant grass pollen allergen Phl p 5 together with alum. Subsequently, lung inflammation was induced by repeated intranasal challenge. During the treatment phase, adjuvant-free Phl p 5 was applied in solution to microporated skin or was subcutaneously injected. Lung function and cellular infiltration; Phl p 5–specific serum levels of IgG1, IgG2a, and IgE; and cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids as well as in supernatants of splenocyte cultures were assessed. Results Both therapeutic approaches reduced airway hyperresponsiveness and leukocyte infiltration into the lungs. Whereas subcutaneous immunotherapy induced a systemic increase in Th2-associated cytokine secretion, transcutaneous application revealed a general downregulation of Th1/Th2/Th17 responses. Successful therapy was associated with induction of IgG2a and an increase in FOXP3+ CD4+ T cells. Conclusions Transcutaneous immunotherapy via laser microporation is equally efficient compared with conventional subcutaneous treatment but avoids therapy-associated boosting of systemic Th2 immunity. Immunotherapy via laser-microporated skin combines a painless application route with the high efficacy known from subcutaneous injections and therefore represents a promising alternative to established forms of immunotherapy. PMID:22947064

  18. Laser immunotherapy in treatment of metastatic prostate tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Bartles, Kenneth E.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-07-01

    Laser immunotherapy is a special cancer treatment modality using an intratumor injection of a special formulation consisting of a novel immunoadjuvant and a laser-absorbing dye, followed by a non-invasive near-IR laser irradiation. Our early experiments using a metastatic mammary rat tumor model showed that laser immunotherapy could cause acute selective photothermal tumor destruction and induce a systemic, long-term specific anti-tumor immunity. In the current study, laser immunotherapy was used to treat metastatic prostate tumors in Copenhagen male rats. The transplantable tumors metastasize mainly to the lung and the lung cancer is usually the cause of death. Two experimental were performed in our study. The first was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the tumor burdens, both the primary and the metastasis in the lung. The second was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the long-term survival of the tumor-bearing rats. For comparison, some rat tumors were also treated by the laser-dye combination to study the photothermal effect. Tour results showed that both the photothermal effect and the laser immunotherapy could slow the growth of primary tumors and the metastatic tumors. The laser-dye-immunoadjuvant treatment resulted in more than 20 percent long-term survival rate in tumor-bearing rats. Our experimental results indicate that the laser immunotherapy has a great potential in treating metastatic tumors.

  19. Immunotherapy for Infectious Diseases: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Akshay; Ahuja, Jasmine; Crane, John K

    2015-11-01

    Passive immunotherapy for established infections, as opposed to active immunization to prevent disease, remains a tiny niche in the world of antimicrobial therapies. Many of the passive immunotherapies currently available are directed against bacterial toxins, such as botulism, or are intended for agents of bioterrorism such as anthrax, which fortunately has remained rare. The emergence of Ebola virus and multi-drug resistant pathogens, however, may breathe new life into the immunotherapy field as researchers seek non-antibiotic interventions for infectious diseases. PMID:26575462

  20. Evolving synergistic combinations of targeted immunotherapies to combat cancer.

    PubMed

    Melero, Ignacio; Berman, David M; Aznar, M Angela; Korman, Alan J; Pérez Gracia, José Luis; Haanen, John

    2015-08-01

    Immunotherapy has now been clinically validated as an effective treatment for many cancers. There is tremendous potential for synergistic combinations of immunotherapy agents and for combining immunotherapy agents with conventional cancer treatments. Clinical trials combining blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1) may serve as a paradigm to guide future approaches to immuno-oncology combination therapy. In this Review, we discuss progress in the synergistic design of immune-targeting combination therapies and highlight the challenges involved in tailoring such strategies to provide maximal benefit to patients. PMID:26205340

  1. Talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) as cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kohlhapp, F J; Zloza, A; Kaufman, H L

    2015-09-01

    Talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC) is the first-in-class oncolytic virus immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer and was generated from an attenuated, recombinant herpes simplex virus. T-VEC has demonstrated therapeutic activity in melanoma patients and is being tested in a number of other cancers alone and in combination with standard cancer therapeutics and other immunotherapy agents. This review will discuss the current landscape of melanoma, the construction and application of T-VEC for melanoma along with other indications for T-VEC, as well as highlight some of the novel challenges with oncolytic virus immunotherapy as it enters into clinical practice. PMID:26488034

  2. Improving cancer immunotherapy by targeting the STATe of MDSCs

    PubMed Central

    de Haas, Nienke; de Koning, Coco; Spilgies, Lisanne; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.; Hato, Stanleyson V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer immunotherapy is a promising therapeutic avenue; however, in practice its efficacy is hampered by an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment that consists of suppressive cell types like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Eradication or reprogramming of MDSCs could therefore enhance clinical responses to immunotherapy. Here, we review clinically available drugs that target MDSCs, often through inhibition of STAT signaling, which is essential for MDSC accumulation and suppressive functions. Interestingly, several drugs used for non-cancerous indications and natural compounds similarly inhibit MDSCs by STAT inhibition, but have fewer side effects than anticancer drugs. Therefore, they show great potential for combination strategies with immunotherapy. PMID:27622051

  3. Immunoproteasomes and immunotherapy-a smoking gun for lung cancer?

    PubMed

    Spits, Menno; Neefjes, Jacques

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer is the second most prevalent cancer in both women and men with some 221,200 new cases and 158,040 deaths reported in 2015. Almost 90% of these are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and these patients have a very poor prognosis. Recently a new treatment option for NSCLC appeared that strongly improved treatment responses-immunotherapy. Here we review the various forms of immunotherapy and how immune modification of proteasomes in lung cancer may support the immune system in controlling NSCLC. These immunoproteasomes then support recognition of NSCLC and may act as a biomarker for selecting responding patients to immunotherapy. PMID:27501321

  4. Immunotherapy for Epstein-Barr virus-associated cancers in children.

    PubMed

    Straathof, Karin C M; Bollard, Catherine M; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E

    2003-01-01

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with several malignancies, including Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (LPD). The presence of EBV antigens in these tumors provides a target for immunotherapy approaches, and immunotherapy with EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) has proved effective in post-transplant LPDs, which are highly immunogenic tumors expressing type III latency. The malignant cells in Hodgkin's disease and nasopharyngeal carcinoma express type II latency and hence a more restricted pattern of EBV antigens. Trials with autologous EBV-specific CTL responses are under way in both of these diseases, and while some activity has been seen, no patient has yet been cured. This reduced CTL efficacy may reflect either downregulation of immunodominant EBV proteins, which are major CTL targets, or the ability of these tumors to evade the immune response by secreting inhibitory cytokines. Further improvement of EBV-specific CTL therapy for these type II latency tumors will require improved methods to activate and expand CTLs specific for the subdominant EBV genes expressed and to genetically modify the expanded CTLs to render them resistant to inhibitory cytokines. If these strategies to improve the therapeutic potential of immunotherapy for EBV-associated tumors prove successful, this type of treatment may be adapted to other tumors expressing known (viral) antigens. PMID:12604735

  5. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy: mode of action and its relationship with the safety profile.

    PubMed

    Calderón, M A; Simons, F E R; Malling, H-J; Lockey, R F; Moingeon, P; Demoly, P

    2012-03-01

    Allergen immunotherapy reorients inappropriate immune responses in allergic patients. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy (SLIT) has been approved, notably in the European Union, as an effective alternative to subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT) for allergic rhinitis patients. Compared with SCIT, SLIT has a better safety profile. This is possibly because oral antigen-presenting cells (mostly Langerhans and myeloid dendritic cells) exhibit a tolerogenic phenotype, despite constant exposure to danger signals from food and microbes. This reduces the induction of pro-inflammatory immune responses leading to systemic allergic reactions. Oral tissues contain relatively few mast cells and eosinophils (mostly located in submucosal areas) and, in comparison with subcutaneous tissue, are less likely to give rise to anaphylactic reactions. SLIT-associated immune responses include the induction of circulating, allergen-specific Th1 and regulatory CD4+ T cells, leading to clinical tolerance. Although 40-75% of patients receiving SLIT experience mild, transient local reactions in the oral mucosa, these primary reactions rarely necessitate dose reduction or treatment interruption. We discuss 11 published case reports of anaphylaxis (all nonfatal) diagnosed according to the World Allergy Organization criteria and relate this figure to the approximately 1 billion SLIT doses administered worldwide since 2000. Anaphylaxis risk factors associated with SCIT and/or SLIT should be characterized further. PMID:22150126

  6. Antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1, DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell transfer, inhibits ocular neovascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Han; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Hijioka, Kuniaki; Qiao, Hong; Oshima, Yuji; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2009-04-17

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in a wide range of ocular diseases. The exact mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of ocular NV is not yet well understood, and so there is no satisfactory therapy for ocular NV. Here, we describe a strategy targeting Flk-1, a self-antigen overexpressed on proliferating endothelial cells in ocular NV, by antiangiogenic immunotherapy-DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell therapy. An oral DNA vaccine encoding Flk-1 carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium markedly suppressed development of laser-induced choroidal NV. We further demonstrated that adoptive transfer of vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells reduced pathological preretinal NV, with a concomitant facilitation of physiological revascularization after oxygen-induced retinal vessel obliteration. However, physiological retinal vascular development was unaffected in neonatal mice transferred with vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells. These findings suggested that antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1 such as vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy may contribute to future therapies for ocular NV.

  7. Preserved antiviral adaptive immunity following polyclonal antibody immunotherapy for severe murine influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Natalie E.; Hatjopolous, Antoinette; Fraser, Cara K.; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Hayball, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy may have particular benefits for the treatment of severe influenza infection in at-risk populations, however little is known of the impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation of memory responses to the virus. Ideally, passive immunotherapy should attenuate the severity of infection while still allowing the formation of adaptive responses to confer protection from future exposure. In this study, we sought to determine if administration of influenza-specific ovine polyclonal antibodies could inhibit adaptive immune responses in a murine model of lethal influenza infection. Ovine polyclonal antibodies generated against recombinant PR8 (H1N1) hemagglutinin exhibited potent prophylactic capacity and reduced lethality in an established influenza infection, particularly when administered intranasally. Surviving mice were also protected against reinfection and generated normal antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to the virus. The longevity of ovine polyclonal antibodies was explored with a half-life of over two weeks following a single antibody administration. These findings support the development of an ovine passive polyclonal antibody therapy for treatment of severe influenza infection which does not affect the formation of subsequent acquired immunity to the virus. PMID:27380890

  8. Preserved antiviral adaptive immunity following polyclonal antibody immunotherapy for severe murine influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Natalie E; Hatjopolous, Antoinette; Fraser, Cara K; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Diener, Kerrilyn R; Hayball, John D

    2016-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy may have particular benefits for the treatment of severe influenza infection in at-risk populations, however little is known of the impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation of memory responses to the virus. Ideally, passive immunotherapy should attenuate the severity of infection while still allowing the formation of adaptive responses to confer protection from future exposure. In this study, we sought to determine if administration of influenza-specific ovine polyclonal antibodies could inhibit adaptive immune responses in a murine model of lethal influenza infection. Ovine polyclonal antibodies generated against recombinant PR8 (H1N1) hemagglutinin exhibited potent prophylactic capacity and reduced lethality in an established influenza infection, particularly when administered intranasally. Surviving mice were also protected against reinfection and generated normal antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to the virus. The longevity of ovine polyclonal antibodies was explored with a half-life of over two weeks following a single antibody administration. These findings support the development of an ovine passive polyclonal antibody therapy for treatment of severe influenza infection which does not affect the formation of subsequent acquired immunity to the virus. PMID:27380890

  9. Modeling combined chemo- and immunotherapy of high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rösch, Katja; Scholz, Markus; Hasenclever, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    Moderate, but not massive intensification of CHOP-21 improves outcome in aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Adding immunotherapy with Rituximab was a break-through, but levels differences in chemotherapy. Ongoing trials attempt to optimize R-CHOP type regimens. We present a mathematical model of chemo-immunotherapy to explain published and aiming at predicting future trials comparing R-CHOP variants. We hypothesize that, for cure, the immune system must dominate residual tumor cells at the end of treatment. Chemotherapy reduces both tumor and immune cells. Rituximab immunotherapy boosts the immune response. We translate this reasoning into a differential equations model. Model parameters are estimated using data of randomized clinical trials in elderly patients. The model explains observed hazard ratios between treatments. It explains why too intense chemotherapy could be detrimental. The model is validated predicting six published independent studies. As an application, we varied treatment schedules and predict that current R-CHOP variants have only limited optimization potential. PMID:26666299

  10. Safety of engineered allergen-specific immunotherapy vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Valenta, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of the review is to summarize and comment on recent developments regarding the safety of engineered immunotherapy vaccines. Recent findings In the last 2 years, several studies were published in which allergy vaccines were developed on the basis of chemical modification of natural allergen extracts, the engineering of allergen molecules by recombinant DNA technology and synthetic peptide chemistry, allergen genes, new application routes and conjugation with immune modulatory molecules. Several studies exemplified the general applicability of hypoallergenic vaccines on the basis of recombinant fusion proteins consisting of nonallergenic allergen-derived peptides fused to allergen-unrelated carrier molecules. These vaccines are engineered to reduce both, immunoglobulin E (IgE) as well as allergen-specific T cell epitopes in the vaccines, and thus should provoke less IgE and T-cell-mediated side-effects. They are made to induce allergen-specific IgG antibodies against the IgE-binding sites of allergens with the T-cell help of the carrier molecule. Summary Several interesting examples of allergy vaccines with potentially increased safety profiles have been published. The concept of fusion proteins consisting of allergen-derived hypoallergenic peptides fused to allergen-unrelated proteins that seems to be broadly applicable for a variety of allergens appears to be of particular interest because it promises not only to reduce side-effects but also to increase efficacy and convenience of allergy vaccines. PMID:22885888

  11. The Role of Immunotherapy in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kocoglu, Mehmet; Badros, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematologic malignancy. The treatment of this disease has changed considerably over the last two decades with the introduction to the clinical practice of novel agents such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs. Basic research efforts towards better understanding of normal and missing immune surveillence in myeloma have led to development of new strategies and therapies that require the engagement of the immune system. Many of these treatments are under clinical development and have already started providing encouraging results. We, for the second time in the last two decades, are about to witness another shift of the paradigm in the management of this ailment. This review will summarize the major approaches in myeloma immunotherapies. PMID:26784207

  12. Sublingual immunotherapy in the treatment of children.

    PubMed

    Pham-Thi, N; de Blic, J; Scheinmann, P

    2006-01-01

    Children with controlled intermittent mild-to-moderate asthma, controlled rhinitis and a single sensitivity may be appropriate candidates for sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT). Positive effects of SLIT may depend on initiation in early childhood and a long duration of treatment. To ensure optimum compliance, sociological, economic and familial factors should also be taken in to consideration when prescribing SLIT. Evidence from recent long-term trials indicates that SLIT interfered with the atopic march and the allergic progression from rhinitis to asthma without any severe adverse side effects. Local immune response has been seen to be blunted with SLIT, which suggests that treatment has an immunomodulatory effect. In addition, it may also decrease the risk of new sensitizations. Ongoing developments in SLIT, particularly advances in dosing and new indications, such as food allergies, will increase the use of this treatment modality in children. PMID:16792599

  13. Targeting natural killer cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guillerey, Camille; Huntington, Nicholas D; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-08-19

    Alteration in the expression of cell-surface proteins is a common consequence of malignant transformation. Natural killer (NK) cells use an array of germline-encoded activating and inhibitory receptors that scan for altered protein-expression patterns, but tumor evasion of detection by the immune system is now recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer. NK cells display rapid and potent immunity to metastasis or hematological cancers, and major efforts are now being undertaken to fully exploit NK cell anti-tumor properties in the clinic. Diverse approaches encompass the development of large-scale NK cell-expansion protocols for adoptive transfer, the establishment of a microenvironment favorable to NK cell activity, the redirection of NK cell activity against tumor cells and the release of inhibitory signals that limit NK cell function. In this Review we detail recent advances in NK cell-based immunotherapies and discuss the advantages and limitations of these strategies. PMID:27540992

  14. Laser Assisted Cancer Immunotherapy: Surface Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Joshua; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip

    2006-03-01

    Experiments in our laboratory incorporate a non-invasive approach to treat superficial tumors in animal models. Based on the concept of Laser Assisted Cancer Immunotherapy, surface irradiation provides good information to compare to invasive alternatives. The procedure involves injecting an immunoadjuvant (Glycated Chitosan) as well as a light absorbing dye (Indocyanine Green) directly into the tumor (5 to 7 mm in diameter). The temperature of the tumor is raised using an infrared diode laser operating at 804 nm, with a silica fiber tip placed a set distance away from the surface of the tumor. We monitor the surface temperature using non-invasive (infrared detector probe) as well as the internal temperature of the tumor using invasive (micro thermocouples) methods. This study aims at the success of the surface irradiation mode to treat solid tumors. * This work is supported by a grant from The National Institute of Health.

  15. Chemotherapy and immunotherapy: mapping the road ahead.

    PubMed

    Cook, Alistair M; Lesterhuis, W Joost; Nowak, Anna K; Lake, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    Cancer immunotherapy, and in particular checkpoint blockade, is now standard clinical care for a growing number of cancers. Cytotoxic drugs have been the primary weapon against cancer for a long time and have typically been understood because of their capacity to directly kill tumour cells. It is now clear that these drugs are potential partners for checkpoint blockade and different drugs can influence the immune response to cancer through a wide variety of mechanisms. Some of these relate to immunogenic cell death, whilst others relate to changes in antigen-presentation, tumour cell targeting, or depletion of immunosuppressive cells. Here, we review some recent advances in our understanding of the immunological changes associated with chemotherapy, discuss progress in combining chemotherapy with checkpoint blockade, and comment on the difficulties encountered in translating promising preclinical data into successful treatments for cancer patients. PMID:26724433

  16. GD2-targeted immunotherapy and radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dobrenkov, Konstantin; Cheung, Nai-Kong

    2014-01-01

    Ganglioside GD2 is a tumor-associated surface antigen found in a broad spectrum of human cancers and stem cells. They include pediatric embryonal tumors (neuroblastoma, retinoblastoma, brain tumors, osteosarcoma, Ewing’s sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma), as well as adult cancers (small cell lung cancer, melanoma, soft tissue sarcomas). Because of its restricted normal tissue distribution, GD2 has been proven safe for antibody targeting. Anti-GD2 antibody is now incorporated into the standard of care for the treatment of high risk metastatic neuroblastoma. Building on this experience, novel combinations of antibody, cytokines, cells and genetically engineered products all directed at GD2 are rapidly moving into the clinic. In the review, past and present immunotherapy trials directed at GD2 will be summarized, highlighting the lessons learned and the future directions. PMID:25440605

  17. Nonspecific plasma proteins during sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Reich, M; Zwacka, G; Markert, U R

    2003-01-01

    Usually, specific allergy-related plasma proteins such as immunoglobulin E (IgE) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) are used for estimating the grade of sensitization and follow-up of immunotherapy. In recent years, several nonspecific inflammatory markers, such as sICAM-1 and sIL-2R, have been shown as being suitable for therapy control in allergy. In our investigation of patients under sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), plasma from 42 healthy controls and 133 children with single inhalation allergies to grass pollen, birch pollen or house dust mites was obtained during the symptom-free period. Patients showed symptoms including allergic rhinitis, dermatitis and allergic asthma with one single RAST class 3 or higher. Plasma concentrations of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R), sE-selectin, interleukin-12 (IL-12) and specific IgG4 were analyzed with the ELISA technique. After 1 year of SLIT, concentrations of sICAM-1, sIL-2R and sE-selectin declined significantly when results from all patients were taken as one group. Regarding the single allergen groups, the sICAM-1 and sIL-2R decrease was significant in the grass and mite group, but not in the birch group, while the sE-selectin decline was only significant in the birch group after 1 year of SLIT, but not in the grass and the mite group. No difference was observed in IL-12 and IgG4 expression. In two groups of controls with a mean age of 9.5 versus 17.5 years, the analyzed parameters were not age-dependent. The increased proteins may be useful as additional markers for the evaluation of immunological effects and follow-up investigations of allergy therapies. PMID:12947996

  18. Toxicities of Immunotherapy for the Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey S.; Yang, James C.; Atkins, Michael B.; Disis, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicities of immunotherapy for cancer are as diverse as the type of treatments that have been devised. These range from cytokine therapies that induce capillary leakage to vaccines associated with low levels of autoimmunity to cell therapies that can induce damaging cross-reactivity with normal tissue to checkpoint protein inhibitors that induce immune-related adverse events that are autoinflammatory in nature. The thread that ties these toxicities together is their mechanism-based immune nature and the T-cell–mediated adverse events seen. The basis for the majority of these adverse events is a hyperactivated T-cell response with reactivity directed against normal tissue, resulting in the generation of high levels of CD4 T-helper cell cytokines or increased migration of cytolytic CD8 T cells within normal tissues. The T-cell immune response is not tissue specific and may reflect a diffuse expansion of the T-cell repertoire that induces cross-reactivity with normal tissue, effectively breaking tolerance that is active with cytokines, vaccines, and checkpoint protein inhibitors and passive in the case of adoptive cell therapy. Cytokines seem to generate diffuse and nonspecific T-cell reactivity, whereas checkpoint protein inhibition, vaccines, and adoptive cell therapy seem to activate more specific T cells that interact directly with normal tissues, potentially causing specific organ damage. In this review, we summarize the toxicities that are unique to immunotherapies, emphasizing the need to familiarize the oncology practitioner with the spectrum of adverse events seen with newly approved and emerging modalities. PMID:25918278

  19. [Immune checkpoint‑targeted cancer immunotherapies].

    PubMed

    Swatler, Julian; Kozłowska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells may express on their surface various characteristic antigens that can induce antitumor immunity. However, cancer in human body may induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment that limits immune response to its antigens. For many years scientists have tried to develop an immunotherapy which would induce a potent antitumor immune response and lead to an elimination of the disease. One of the most promising immunotherapies is blockade of immune checkpoints, i.e. a group of costimulatory molecules negatively regulating the immune system. Their blockade would overcome immune tolerance in the tumor microenvironment and amplify antitumor immunity. What's more, immune checkpoint blockade may turn out even more profitable, as some of immune checkpoints and their ligands are expressed on tumor surface and on tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, contributing to the immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment. Phase III clinical trials have confirmed efficacy of an anti‑CTLA‑4 antibody ipilimumab, thereby leading to its acceptance for the treatment of advanced melanoma. Thanks to promising results of the phase I clinical trials, a breakthrough therapy designation and an early approval for the treatment have been granted to anti‑PD‑1 antibodies ‑ nivolumab (for the treatment of advanced melanoma and advanced non‑small cell lung cancer) and pembrolizumab (for the treatment of advanced melanoma) and, in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer, an anti‑PD‑L1 antibody ‑ MPDL3280A as well. Other immune checkpoints, such as LAG‑3, TIM‑3, BTLA, B7‑H3 and B7‑H4, are also under early evaluation. PMID:26864062

  20. Brain Tumor Immunotherapy: What have We Learned so Far?

    PubMed Central

    Van Gool, Stefaan Willy

    2015-01-01

    High grade glioma is a rare brain cancer, incurable in spite of modern neurosurgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Novel approaches are in research, and immunotherapy emerges as a promising strategy. Clinical experiences with active specific immunotherapy demonstrate feasibility, safety and most importantly, but incompletely understood, prolonged long-term survival in a fraction of the patients. In relapsed patients, we developed an immunotherapy schedule and we categorized patients into clinically defined risk profiles. We learned how to combine immunotherapy with standard multimodal treatment strategies for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme patients. The developmental program allows further improvements related to newest scientific insights. Finally, we developed a mode of care within academic centers to organize cell-based therapies for experimental clinical trials in a large number of patients. PMID:26137448

  1. Optimizing Dendritic Cell-Based Approaches for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Jashodeep; Terhune, Julia H.; Lowenfeld, Lea; Cintolo, Jessica A.; Xu, Shuwen; Roses, Robert E.; Czerniecki, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells uniquely suited for cancer immunotherapy. They induce primary immune responses, potentiate the effector functions of previously primed T-lymphocytes, and orchestrate communication between innate and adaptive immunity. The remarkable diversity of cytokine activation regimens, DC maturation states, and antigen-loading strategies employed in current DC-based vaccine design reflect an evolving, but incomplete, understanding of optimal DC immunobiology. In the clinical realm, existing DC-based cancer immunotherapy efforts have yielded encouraging but inconsistent results. Despite recent U.S. Federal and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of DC-based sipuleucel-T for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, clinically effective DC immunotherapy as monotherapy for a majority of tumors remains a distant goal. Recent work has identified strategies that may allow for more potent “next-generation” DC vaccines. Additionally, multimodality approaches incorporating DC-based immunotherapy may improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25506283

  2. Challenges in Immunotherapy Presented by the Glioblastoma Multiforme Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Christopher; Ruzevick, Jacob; Phallen, Jillian; Belcaid, Zineb; Lim, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. Despite intensive treatment, the prognosis for patients with GBM remains grim with a median survival of only 14.6 months. Immunotherapy has emerged as a promising approach for treating many cancers and affords the advantages of cellular-level specificity and the potential to generate durable immune surveillance. The complexity of the tumor microenvironment poses a significant challenge to the development of immunotherapy for GBM, as multiple signaling pathways, cytokines, and cell types are intricately coordinated to generate an immunosuppressive milieu. The development of new immunotherapy approaches frequently uncovers new mechanisms of tumor-mediated immunosuppression. In this review, we discuss many of the current approaches to immunotherapy and focus on the challenges presented by the tumor microenvironment. PMID:22190972

  3. Cancer immunotherapy: harnessing the immune system to battle cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiping

    2015-09-01

    The recent clinical successes of immune checkpoint blockade and chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapies represent a turning point in cancer immunotherapy. These successes also underscore the importance of understanding basic tumor immunology for successful clinical translation in treating patients with cancer. The Reviews in this Review Series focus on current developments in cancer immunotherapy, highlight recent advances in our understanding of basic aspects of tumor immunology, and suggest how these insights can lead to the development of new immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26325031

  4. Immunotherapy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: an overview of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Alessandro; Merkow, Justin; Edil, Barish H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and current therapeutic strategies are often unsatisfactory. Identification and development of more efficacious therapies is urgently needed. Immunotherapy offered encouraging results in preclinical models during the last decades, and several clinical trials have explored its therapeutic application in PDAC. The aim of this review is to summarize the results of clinical trials conducted to evaluate the future perspective of immunotherapy in the treatment of PDAC. PMID:26361407

  5. Recent advances in the field of anti-cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Henrique; Kwok, Hang Fai

    2015-01-01

    Background The main goal of anti-cancer therapy is to specifically inhibit the malignant activity of cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. As such, for every proposed therapy, it is important to keep in mind the therapeutic index — the ratio of the toxic dose over the therapeutic dose. The use of immunotherapy has allowed a means to both specifically block protein–protein interaction and deliver cytotoxic events to a tumor-specific antigen. Review scope It is the objective of this review to give an overview on current immunotherapy treatment for cancers using monoclonal antibodies. We demonstrate three exciting targets for immunotherapy, TNF-α Converting Enzyme (TACE), Cathepsin S and Urokinase Plasmogen Activator and go over the advances made with one of the most used monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy, Rituximab; as well as Herceptin, which is used for breast cancer therapy. Furthermore, we touch on other venues of immunotherapy, such as adaptive cell transfer, the use of nucleic acids and the use of dendritic cells. Finally, we summarize some ongoing studies that spell tentative advancements for anti-cancer immunotherapy. General significance Immunotherapy is at the forefront of anti-cancer therapies, allying both a high degree of specificity to general high effectiveness and fewer side-effects. PMID:26673349

  6. Thyroid dysfunction associated with immunotherapy for patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwartzentruber, D J; White, D E; Zweig, M H; Weintraub, B D; Rosenberg, S A

    1991-12-01

    The authors performed a prospective study to evaluate thyroid dysfunction in 130 patients with cancer who were receiving interleukin-2 (IL-2)-based immunotherapy. Primary hypothyroidism was the most common abnormality, occurring in 12% of patients before, 38% during, and 23% after immunotherapy. Hyperthyroidism occurred in 1%, 4%, and 7% of patients at those time intervals. Among patients initially euthyroid (n = 111), primary hypothyroidism developed in 32% during and 14% after immunotherapy, persisting a median of 54 days. Three patients required levothyroxine. Hyperthyroidism developed in 2% of patients during immunotherapy and 6% after. Thyroid dysfunction was not a function of sex, diagnosis, type of treatment, or response to immunotherapy. Elevated titers of antithyroglobulin and antithyroid microsomal antibodies were detected after treatment in 9% and 7%, respectively, of all patients without prior antibody abnormalities and did not correlate with response to therapy. The high incidence of therapy-induced thyroid dysfunction suggests that thyroid function should be carefully monitored in all patients receiving IL-2-based immunotherapy. PMID:1933775

  7. Cancer immunotherapy: accomplishments to date and future promise.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Karim Y; Patel, Shyam A; Nahas, George R; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2013-10-01

    Cancer remains a devastating disease as existing therapies are too often ineffective and toxicities remain unacceptably high. Immunotherapies for cancer offer the promise of the specificity and memory of the immune system against malignant cells to achieve durable cure with minimal toxicity. Beginning with the success of bone marrow transplantation for blood-borne cancers, and the more recent development of monoclonal antibody therapeutics for a variety of tumors, immunotherapies are already among the most successful class of treatments for cancer. Greater understanding of immunoregulatory mechanisms and improved techniques for immune cell manipulation and engineering have led to new immunomodulatory approaches and cell-based therapies for cancer that have generated great excitement within the biomedical community. As these technologies continue to improve, and as new approaches for harnessing the power and specificity of the immune system are developed, immunotherapies will play an increasingly important role in the treatment of cancer. Here, we review the history of immunotherapies for cancer and discuss existing and emerging immunotherapy technologies that hope to translate the promise of immunotherapy into clinical reality. PMID:24116914

  8. Allergen hybrids – next generation vaccines for Fagales pollen immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, U; Hauser, M; Hofer, H; Himly, M; Hoflehner, E; Steiner, M; Mutschlechner, S; Hufnagl, K; Ebner, C; Mari, A; Briza, P; Bohle, B; Wiedermann, U; Ferreira, F; Wallner, M

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Trees belonging to the order of Fagales show a distinct geographical distribution. While alder and birch are endemic in the temperate zones of the Northern Hemisphere, hazel, hornbeam and oak prefer a warmer climate. However, specific immunotherapy of Fagales pollen-allergic patients is mainly performed using birch pollen extracts, thus limiting the success of this intervention in birch-free areas. Objectives T cells are considered key players in the modification of an allergic immune response during specific immunotherapy (SIT), therefore we thought to combine linear T cell epitope-containing stretches of the five most important Fagales allergens from birch, hazel, alder, oak and hornbeam resulting in a Fagales pollen hybrid (FPH) molecule applicable for SIT. Methods A Fagales pollen hybrid was generated by PCR-based recombination of low IgE-binding allergen epitopes. Moreover, a structural-variant FPH4 was calculated by in silico mutagenesis, rendering the protein unable to adopt the Bet v 1-like fold. Both molecules were produced in Escherichia coli, characterized physico-chemically as well as immunologically, and tested in mouse models of allergic sensitization as well as allergy prophylaxis. Results Using spectroscopic analyses, both proteins were monomeric, and the secondary structure elements of FPH resemble the ones typical for Bet v 1-like proteins, whereas FPH4 showed increased amounts of unordered structure. Both molecules displayed reduced binding capacities of Bet v 1-specific IgE antibodies. However, in a mouse model, the proteins were able to induce high IgG titres cross-reactive with all parental allergens. Moreover, prophylactic treatment with the hybrid proteins prevented pollen extract-induced allergic lung inflammation in vivo. Conclusion The hybrid molecules showed a more efficient uptake and processing by dendritic cells resulting in a modified T cell response. The proteins had a lower IgE-binding capacity compared with the

  9. A mouse model for HBV immunotolerance and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan; Liu, Longchao; Zhu, Danming; Peng, Hua; Su, Lishan; Fu, Yang-Xin; Zhang, Liguo

    2014-01-01

    Lack of an appropriate small animal model remains a major hurdle for studying the immunotolerance and immunopathogenesis induced by hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In this study, we report a mouse model with sustained HBV viremia after infection with a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) carrying a replicable HBV genome (AAV/HBV). Similar to the clinical HBV carriers, the mice infected with AAV/HBV were sero-negative for antibodies against HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). Immunization with the conventional HBV vaccine in the presence of aluminum adjuvant failed to elicit an immune response against HBV in these mice. To identify a vaccine that can potentially circumvent this tolerance, the TLR9 agonist CpG was added to HBsAg as an adjuvant. Vaccination of mice with HBsAg/CpG induced not only clearance of viremia, but also strong antibody production and T-cell responses. Furthermore, both the DNA replication and protein expression of HBV were significantly reduced in the livers of AAV/HBV-infected mice. Accordingly, AAV/HBV-infected mice may be used as a robust model for investigating the underlying mechanism(s) of HBV immunotolerance and for developing novel immunotherapies to eradicate HBV infections. PMID:24076617

  10. Mechanisms of immunotherapy to wasp and bee venom.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, C; Kucuksezer, U C; Akdis, M; Akdis, C A

    2011-09-01

    Hymenoptera venoms are important allergens that can elicit both local and systemic allergic reactions, including life-threatening anaphylaxis. Venom immunotherapy (VIT) remains the most effective treatment, reducing the risk of systemic reactions in individuals with Hymenoptera venom allergy. VIT can restore normal immunity against venom allergens and provide patients with a lifetime of tolerance to venoms. During VIT, peripheral tolerance is induced by the generation of allergen-specific regulatory T (Treg) cells, which suppress proliferative and cytokine responses against the venom allergens. Treg cells are characterized by IL-10 secretion that directly or indirectly influence effector cells of allergic inflammation, such as mast cells, basophils and eosinophils. Treg cells also have influence on B cells, suppressing IgE production and inducing the production of blocking type IgG4 antibodies against venom allergens. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that Treg cells may affect allergen sensitization and methods for enhancing this cell population may eventually improve the efficacy of VIT. In this article, immune mechanisms enrolled in bee and wasp VIT are reviewed. PMID:21729181

  11. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin immunotherapy of superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Lamm, D L; Thor, D E; Harris, S C; Reyna, J A; Stogdill, V D; Radwin, H M

    1980-07-01

    Thirty-seven patients were enrolled in a randomized prospective study to compare standard surgical therapy for superficial bladder cancer to standard therapy plus bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). Side effects of BCG have been tolerated well and include dysuria in 95 per cent of the patients, urinary frequency in 83 per cent, hematuria in 39 per cent, fever in 22 per cent and nausea in 22 per cent. Of 19 control patients 8 (42 per cent) had recurrent tumors in the followup period, compared to 3 of 18 patients (17 per cent) treated with BCG. One patient treated wih BCG had 2 recurrences, yielding a recurrence rate of 22 per cent in the group receiving BCG compared to 42 per cent in controls. When the incidence of recurrent tumors in matched intervals before and after entry into the protocol is compared, no change in the rate of tumor recurrence (p equals 0.726 chi-square) occurred in controls, whereas tumor recurrences were reduced significantly in the group treated with BCG (p equals 0.010 chi-square). The reduction in tumor recurrence in patients treated with BCG compared to controls is statistically significant (p equals 0.029 chi-square). Of 4 patients who presented with new bladder tumors remain free of tumor after BCG therapy, while 2 of 5 comparable control patients developed recurrent tumors. Intravesical and percutaneous BCG immunotherapy appears to decrease the rate of tumor recurrence in patients followed for 1 year. PMID:6997513

  12. Clinical and histopathological evaluation of the effect of addition of immunotherapy with Mw vaccine to standard chemotherapy in borderline leprosy.

    PubMed

    Kamal, R; Natrajan, M; Katoch, K; Arora, M

    2012-01-01

    increase in the epithelioid cells population in this group. This suggests a possible immunoactivation of the macrophages especially in BB/BL immunotherapy group. Overall comparison of regression induced by chemotherapy alone with that induced by combined chemotherapy and immunotherapy shows a greater reduction in clinical parameters as well as granuloma fraction in BT cases as well as in BB/BL cases. This trial shows the potential usefulness of this approach of addition of immunotherapy to standard chemotherapy in borderline leprosy cases which leads to in faster recovery from disease reduced chances of reactions and faster granuloma clearance. Such information is expected to be useful in improving the immunotherapeutic approaches for treatinggranulomatous conditions in general and in leprosy in particular. PMID:23720894

  13. Sublingual immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization position paper 2013 update

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have prepared this document, “Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2013 Update”, according to the evidence-based criteria, revising and updating chapters of the originally published paper, “Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2009”, available at http://www.waojournal.org. Namely, these comprise: “Mechanisms of sublingual immunotherapy;” “Clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy” – reporting all the data of all controlled trials published after 2009; “Safety of sublingual immunotherapy” – with the recently published Grading System for adverse reactions; “Impact of sublingual immunotherapy on the natural history of respiratory allergy” – with the relevant evidences published since 2009; “Efficacy of SLIT in children” – with detailed analysis of all the studies; “Definition of SLIT patient selection” – reporting the criteria for eligibility to sublingual immunotherapy; “The future of immunotherapy in the community care setting”; “Methodology of clinical trials according to the current scientific and regulatory standards”; and “Guideline development: from evidence-based medicine to patients' views” – including the evolution of the methods to make clinical recommendations. Additionally, we have added new chapters to cover a few emerging crucial topics: “Practical aspects of schedules and dosages and counseling for adherence” – which is crucial in clinical practice for all treatments; “Perspectives and new approaches” – including recombinant allergens, adjuvants, modified allergens, and the concept of validity of the single products. Furthermore, “Raising public awareness about sublingual immunotherapy”, as a need for our patients, and strategies to increase awareness of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) among patients, the medical community, all healthcare stakeholders, and public opinion, are also reported in detail. PMID:24679069

  14. Statins are Associated with Reduced Use of Steroids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: a Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Crockett, Seth D.; Hansen, Richard A.; Stürmer, Til; Schectman, Robin; Darter, Jane; Sandler, Robert S.; Kappelman, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Statin medications have anti-inflammatory effects. We sought to determine whether statin use in persons with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was associated with reduced rates of steroid use or other markers of disease activity. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study using administrative data. Statin users with IBD were compared to statin-unexposed IBD subjects. The primary outcome was an oral steroid prescription; secondary outcomes included anti-TNF initiation, hospitalization, or abdominal surgery. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for potential confounders. Results The study cohort included 1,986 statin-exposed and 9,871 unexposed subjects. Statin use was associated with an 18% reduction in the rate of steroid initiation [HR 0.82 (95% CI 0.71, 0.94)]. A statistically significant result was seen with atorvastatin only [HR 0.76 (95% CI 0.60, 0.96)]. Statins were associated with a reduced rate of steroids in ulcerative colitis [HRs 0.75 (95% CI 0.62, 0.91)], but not in Crohn’s disease [HR 0.91 (95% CI 0.74, 1.12)]. Statin use was associated with reduced hazard of anti-TNF use [HR 0.72 (95% CI 0.46, 1.11)], abdominal surgery [HR 0.80 (95% CI 0.63, 1.02)], and hospitalization [HR 0.88 (95% CI 0.74, 1.05)], but these results did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion In this large retrospective cohort study, statin use amongst persons with IBD was associated with reduced use of oral steroids, particularly for UC. Prospective clinical trials are needed to confirm whether adjuvant treatment of IBD with statin drugs may spare immunosuppressant therapy or ameliorate flares. PMID:21826766

  15. Cellular immunotherapy for pediatric solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    HEGDE, MEENAKSHI; MOLL, ALEXANDER; BYRD, TIARA T.; LOUIS, CHRYSTAL U.; AHMED, NABIL

    2015-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the treatment of pediatric solid tumors over the past 4 decades. However, children with metastatic and or recurrent disease continue to do poorly despite the aggressive multi-modality conventional therapies. The increasing understanding of the tumor biology and the interaction between the tumor and the immune system over the recent years have led to the development of novel immune-based therapies as alternative options for some of these high-risk malignancies. The safety and anti-tumor efficacy of various tumor vaccines and tumor-antigen specific immune cells are currently being investigated for various solid tumors. In early clinical trials, most of these cellular therapies have been well tolerated and have shown promising clinical responses. Although substantial work is being done in this field, the available knowledge for pediatric tumors remains limited. We review the contemporary early phase cell-based immunotherapy efforts for pediatric solid tumors and discuss the rationale and the challenges thereof. PMID:25082406

  16. Combining radiotherapy and immunotherapy: A revived partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Demaria, Sandra; Bhardwaj, Nina; McBride, William H.; Formenti, Silvia C. . E-mail: silvia.formenti@med.nyu.edu

    2005-11-01

    Ionizing radiation therapy (RT) is an important local modality for the treatment of cancer. The current rationale for its use is based largely on the ability of RT to kill the cancer cells by a direct cytotoxic effect. Nevertheless, considerable evidence indicates that RT effects extend beyond the mere elimination of the more radiosensitive fraction of cancer cells present within a tumor at the time of radiation exposure. For instance, a large body of evidence is accumulating on the ability of RT to modify the tumor microenvironment and generate inflammation. This might have far-reaching consequences regarding the response of a patient to treatment, especially if radiation-induced tumor cell kill were to translate into the generation of effective antitumor immunity. Although much remains to be learned about how radiation can impact tumor immunogenicity, data from preclinical studies provide the proof of principle that different immunotherapeutic strategies can be combined with RT to enhance antitumor effects. Conversely, RT could be a useful tool to combine with immunotherapy. This article will briefly summarize what is known about the impact of RT on tumor immunity, including tumor-associated antigens, antigen-presenting cells, and effector mechanisms. In addition, the experimental evidence supporting the contention that RT can be used as a tool to induce antitumor immunity is discussed, and a new approach to radioimmunotherapy of cancer is proposed.

  17. Biomarkers for immunotherapy in genitourinary malignancies.

    PubMed

    Slovin, Susan F

    2016-04-01

    Immunotherapy for genitourinary malignancies such as prostate, renal, and bladder cancers has experienced a resurgence since the development of 3 novel strategies: the autologous cellular product therapy, Sipuleucel-T for prostate cancer, the checkpoint inhibitors, anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (anti-CTLA-4), anti-programmed cell death ligand 1 (anti-PD1), and anti-programmed cell death ligand 1), respectively. These agents have led to strikingly durable responses in several of these solid tumors, but their efficacy has been inconsistent. Why all solid tumors are not equal in their response to these therapies is unclear. More importantly, changes in humoral or cellular responses which may reflect changes in a tumor's biology have been limited due to differences in immune monitoring and lack of consistency in established reliable immunologic endpoints. How to design immunologic end points that reflect a meaningful effect on the cancer remains a challenge for clinical trial development. The issues faced by clinical investigators and the current state of immune monitoring are discussed. PMID:25791754

  18. Allergen Immunotherapy: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Kosowska, Anna; Smolinska, Sylwia

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT), although in clinical use for more than a century, is still the only causal treatment of allergic diseases. The safety and efficacy of AIT has been demonstrated in a large number of clinical trials. In addition to allergy symptom reduction AIT plays an essential role in preventing new allergies and asthma and shows long-term effects after discontinuation of treatment. Ideally, it is capable of curing allergy. However, AIT is not effective in all allergic individuals and is not equally effective in the treatment of various hypersensitivities to different allergens. For many years, the route of administration and the vaccine compositions have been evolving. Still there is a strong need for research in the field of new AIT modalities to increase its effectiveness and safety. Growing evidence on immunological effects of AIT, especially new T cell subsets involved in antigen/allergen tolerance, provides novel concepts for safer and more effective vaccination. Pharmacoeconomic studies have demonstrated a clear advantage of AIT over pharmacologic therapies. PMID:26922928

  19. Effects of laser immunotherapy on tumor microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Wood, Ethan W.; Hasanjee, Aamr; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2014-02-01

    The microenvironments of tumors are involved in a complex and reciprocal dialog with surrounding cancer cells. Any novel treatment must consider the impact of the therapy on the microenvironment. Recently, clinical trials with laser immunotherapy (LIT) have proven to effectively treat patients with late-stage, metastatic breast cancer and melanoma. LIT is the synergistic combination of phototherapy (laser irradiation) and immunological stimulation. One prominent cell type found in the tumor stroma is the fibroblast. Fibroblast cells can secrete different growth factors and extracellular matrix modifying molecules. Furthermore, fibroblast cells found in the tumor stroma often express alpha smooth muscle actin. These particular fibroblasts are coined cancer-associated fibroblast cells (CAFs). CAFs are known to facilitate the malignant progression of tumors. A collagen lattice assay with human fibroblast cells is used to elucidate the effects LIT has on the microenvironment of tumors. Changes in the contraction of the lattice, the differentiation of the fibroblast cells, as well as the proliferation of the fibroblast cells will be determined.

  20. Driving an improved CAR for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaopei; Yang, Yiping

    2016-08-01

    The recent clinical success of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy for B cell malignancies represents a paradigm shift in cancer immunotherapy. Unfortunately, application of CAR T cell-mediated therapy for solid tumors has so far been disappointing, and the reasons for this poor response in solid tumors remain unknown. In this issue of the JCI, Cherkassky and colleagues report on their use of a murine model of human pleural mesothelioma to explore potential factors that limit CAR T cell efficacy. Their studies have uncovered the importance of the tumor microenvironment in the inhibition of CAR T cell functions, revealed a critical role for the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway in CAR T cell exhaustion within the tumor microenvironment, and demonstrated improved antitumor effects with a CAR T cell-intrinsic PD-1 blockade strategy using a dominant negative form of PD-1. Together, the results of this study lay the groundwork for further evaluation of mechanisms underlying CAR T cell immune evasion within the tumor microenvironment for the improvement of CAR T cell-mediated therapy for solid tumors. PMID:27454296

  1. [Immunotherapies for multiple sclerosis : review and update].

    PubMed

    Havla, J; Kümpfel, T; Hohlfeld, R

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, presumably autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system. Early stages of the disease are characterized by conspicuous inflammation of the white and grey matter. During later stages, presumably secondary neurodegeneration leads to physical disability progression. Over the last decade increasingly effective therapeutic options have been approved. Currently 11 immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive therapies targeting relapse rate, disease progression and paraclinical disease activity are available, mostly for relapsing forms of MS. However, the ideal of "precision medicine" is still in the distant future since biomarkers for individualized treatment are lacking. For implementation of risk-management plans to minimize the risk of severe side effects, interdisciplinary collaboration between neurologists and internists is essential. In this review article we summarize practical aspects of the implemented risk-management plans, and discuss possible side effects and special caveats of the three new immunotherapies teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, and alemtuzumab. This article is based on, among others, the recently updated guidelines of the German Society of Neurology. Particular attention is given to the risks of new therapies, monitoring, and on special aspects needing attention when changing treatments. Teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, and alemtuzumab expand treatment options for relapsing-remitting MS. Treatment selection should take into consideration the safety profile of the substance, previous and concomitant diseases, and other individual factors. This requires in-depth consultation and individual assessment of current disease activity, the potential efficacy of the therapy, and the possible risks and side effects. PMID:25720530

  2. Optimal vaccine scheduling in cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccoli, B.; Castiglione, F.

    2006-10-01

    Cancer immunotherapy aims at stimulating the immune system to react against cancer stealth capabilities. It consists of repeatedly injecting small doses of a tumor-associated molecule one wants the immune system to recognize, until a consistent immune response directed against the tumor cells is observed. We have applied the theory of optimal control to the problem of finding the optimal schedule of injections of an immunotherapeutic agent against cancer. The method employed works for a general ODE system and can be applied to find the optimal protocol in a variety of clinical problems where the kinetics of the drug or treatment and its influence on the normal physiologic functions have been described by a mathematical model. We show that the choice of the cost function has dramatic effects on the kind of solution the optimization algorithm is able to find. This provides evidence that a careful ODE model and optimization schema must be designed by mathematicians and clinicians using their proper different perspectives.

  3. Allergen Immunotherapy: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Marek; Kosowska, Anna; Smolinska, Sylwia

    2016-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT), although in clinical use for more than a century, is still the only causal treatment of allergic diseases. The safety and efficacy of AIT has been demonstrated in a large number of clinical trials. In addition to allergy symptom reduction AIT plays an essential role in preventing new allergies and asthma and shows long-term effects after discontinuation of treatment. Ideally, it is capable of curing allergy. However, AIT is not effective in all allergic individuals and is not equally effective in the treatment of various hypersensitivities to different allergens. For many years, the route of administration and the vaccine compositions have been evolving. Still there is a strong need for research in the field of new AIT modalities to increase its effectiveness and safety. Growing evidence on immunological effects of AIT, especially new T cell subsets involved in antigen/allergen tolerance, provides novel concepts for safer and more effective vaccination. Pharmacoeconomic studies have demonstrated a clear advantage of AIT over pharmacologic therapies. PMID:26922928

  4. Toll-like Receptors in Tumor Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Paulos, Chrystal M.; Kaiser, Andrew; Wrzesinski, Claudia; Hinrichs, Christian S.; Cassard, Lydie; Boni, Andrea; Muranski, Pawel; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Palmer, Douglas C.; Yu, Zhiya; Antony, Paul A.; Gattinoni, Luca; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2007-01-01

    Lymphodepletion with chemotherapeutic agents or total body irradiation (TBI) before adoptive transfer of tumor-specific T cells is a critical advancement in the treatment of patients with melanoma. More than 50% of patients that are refractory to other treatments experience an objective or curative response with this approach. Emerging data indicate that the key mechanisms underlying how TBI augments the functions of adoptively transferred T cells include (a) the depletion of regulatory Tcells (Treg) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells that limit the function and proliferation of adoptively transferred cells; (b) the removal of immune cells that act as “sinks” for homeostatic cytokines, whose levels increase after lymphodepletion; and (c) the activation of the innate immune system via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling, which is engaged by microbial lipopolysaccharide that translocated across the radiation-injured gut. Here, we review these mechanisms and focus on the effect of Toll-like receptor agonists in adoptive immunotherapy. We also discuss alternate regimens to chemotherapy or TBI, which might be used to safely treat patients with advanced disease and promote tumor regression. PMID:17875756

  5. Sarcoma Immunotherapy: Past Approaches and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, S. P.; Tap, W. D.; Schwartz, G. K.; Carvajal, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas are heterogeneous malignant tumors of mesenchymal origin characterized by more than 100 distinct subtypes. Unfortunately, 25–50% of patients treated with initial curative intent will develop metastatic disease. In the metastatic setting, chemotherapy rarely leads to complete and durable responses; therefore, there is a dire need for more effective therapies. Exploring immunotherapeutic strategies may be warranted. In the past, agents that stimulate the immune system such as interferon and interleukin-2 have been explored and there has been evidence of some clinical activity in selected patients. In addition, many cancer vaccines have been explored with suggestion of benefit in some patients. Building on the advancements made in other solid tumors as well as a better understanding of cancer immunology provides hope for the development of new and exciting therapies in the treatment of sarcoma. There remains promise with immunologic checkpoint blockade antibodies. Further, building on the success of autologous cell transfer in hematologic malignancies, designing chimeric antigen receptors that target antigens that are over-expressed in sarcoma provides a great deal of optimism. Exploring these avenues has the potential to make immunotherapy a real therapeutic option in this orphan disease. PMID:24778572

  6. Oral immunotherapy and tolerance induction in childhood.

    PubMed

    Tang, M L K; Martino, D J

    2013-09-01

    Prevalence rates of food allergy have increased rapidly in recent decades. Of concern, rates of increase are greatest among children under 5 yrs of age and for those food allergies that persist into adulthood such as peanut or tree nut allergy and shellfish allergy. Given these trends, the overall prevalence of food allergy will compound over time as the number of children affected by food allergy soars and a greater proportion of food-allergic children are left with persistent disease into adulthood. It is therefore vital to identify novel curative treatment approaches for food allergy. Acquisition of oral tolerance to the diverse array of ingested food antigens and intestinal microbiota is an active immunologic process that is successfully established in the majority of individuals. In subjects who develop food allergy, there is a failure or loss of oral tolerance acquisition to a limited number of food allergens. Oral immunotherapy (OIT) offers a promising approach to induce specific oral tolerance to selected food allergens and represents a potential strategy for long-term curative treatment of food allergy. This review will summarize the current understanding of oral tolerance and clinical trials of OIT for the treatment of food allergy. PMID:23905867

  7. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Soyka, Michael B; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2012-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (allergen-SIT) is a potentially curative treatment approach in allergic diseases. It has been used for almost 100 years as a desensitizing therapy. The induction of peripheral T cell tolerance and promotion of the formation of regulatory T-cells are key mechanisms in allergen-SIT. Both FOXP3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and inducible IL-10- and TGF-β-producing type 1 Treg (Tr1) cells may prevent the development of allergic diseases and play a role in successful allergen-SIT and healthy immune response via several mechanisms. The mechanisms of suppression of different pro-inflammatory cells, such as eosinophils, mast cells and basophils and the development of allergen tolerance also directly or indirectly involves Treg cells. Furthermore, the formation of non-inflammatory antibodies particularly IgG4 is induced by IL-10. Knowledge of these molecular basis is crucial in the understanding the regulation of immune responses and their possible therapeutic targets in allergic diseases. PMID:22409879

  8. Advances in cancer immunology and cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Voena, Claudia; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    After decades of setbacks, cancer immunology is living its Golden Age. Recent advances in cancer immunology have provided new therapeutic approaches to treat cancer. The objective clinical response observed in patients treated with antibodies that block the immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1)/programmed cell-death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathways, has led to their FDA approval for the treatment of melanoma in 2011 and in 2014, respectively. The anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab has received the FDA-approval in March 2015 for squamous lung cancer treatment. In addition, antibodies targeting PD-1 or PD-L1 have demonstrated their efficacy and safety in additional tumors, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer, and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Almost at the same time, the field of adoptive cell transfer has exploded. The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T technology has provided strong evidence of efficacy in the treatment of B cell malignancies, and different T cell based treatments are currently under investigation for different types of tumors. In this review we will discuss the latest advances in cancer immunology and immunotherapy as well as new treatments now under development in the clinic and potential strategies that have shown promising results in preclinical models. PMID:27011048

  9. Effect of laser immunotherapy and surgery on the treatment of mouse mammary tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Vivian A.; Le, Henry; Li, Xiaosong; Wolf, Roman F.; Ferguson, Halie; Sarkar, Akhee; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-02-01

    Laser immunotherapy using laser photothermal therapy and immunological stimulation could achieve tumor-specific immune responses, as indicated by our previous pre-clinical and preliminary clinical studies. To further study the effect of laser immunotherapy, we conducted an investigation combining laser immunotherapy and surgery. After laser immunotherapy, treated tumors were surgically removed at different time points. The survival rates of treated mice were compared among different groups. Furthermore, the cured mice were rechallenged to test the immunity induced by laser immunotherapy. Our results showed that the mice treated with surgical removal one week after laser immunotherapy had the highest survival rate (77%). When the tumors were removed immediately after laser immunotherapy treatment, the survival rate was 57%. Most cured mice withstood tumor rechallenges, indicating an induction of tumor immunity by laser immunotherapy. The differentiations between different surgery groups indicate that the treated tumors have contributed to the immunological responses of the hosts.

  10. Immunotherapy in colorectal cancer: What have we learned so far?

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Castañón, María; Er, Tze-Kiong; Bujanda, Luis; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta

    2016-09-01

    After decades of progress based on chemotherapy and targeted agents, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer still have low long-term survival, with more than 500,000 deaths occurring worldwide every year. Recent results showing clinical evidence of efficacy using immunotherapy in other types of tumors, such as melanoma and lung cancer, have also made this a viable therapy for evaluation in colorectal cancer in clinical trials. The development of cancer immunotherapies is progressing quickly, with a variety of technological approaches. This review summarizes the current status of clinical trials testing immunotherapy in colorectal cancer and discusses what has been learned based on previous results. Immunotherapy strategies, such as various models of vaccines, effector-cell therapy and checkpoint inhibitor antibodies, provide protection against progression for a limited subset of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. A better understanding of particular immune cell types and pathways in each patient is still needed. These findings will enable the development of novel biomarkers to select the appropriate subset of patients to be treated with a particular immunotherapy, and the tendencies determined from recent results can guide clinical practice for oncologists in this new therapeutic area and in the design of the next round of clinical trials. PMID:27350293

  11. Immune-Checkpoint Blockade and Active Immunotherapy for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Brian J.; Pollack, Ian F.; Okada, Hideho

    2013-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has made tremendous progress, including promising results in patients with malignant gliomas. Nonetheless, the immunological microenvironment of the brain and tumors arising therein is still believed to be suboptimal for sufficient antitumor immune responses for a variety of reasons, including the operation of “immune-checkpoint” mechanisms. While these mechanisms prevent autoimmunity in physiological conditions, malignant tumors, including brain tumors, actively employ these mechanisms to evade from immunological attacks. Development of agents designed to unblock these checkpoint steps is currently one of the most active areas of cancer research. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the field of brain tumor immunology with particular foci in the area of immune-checkpoint mechanisms and development of active immunotherapy strategies. In the last decade, a number of specific monoclonal antibodies designed to block immune-checkpoint mechanisms have been developed and show efficacy in other cancers, such as melanoma. On the other hand, active immunotherapy approaches, such as vaccines, have shown encouraging outcomes. We believe that development of effective immunotherapy approaches should ultimately integrate those checkpoint-blockade agents to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic approaches. With these agents available, it is going to be quite an exciting time in the field. The eventual success of immunotherapies for brain tumors will be dependent upon not only an in-depth understanding of immunology behind the brain and brain tumors, but also collaboration and teamwork for the development of novel trials that address multiple layers of immunological challenges in gliomas. PMID:24202450

  12. Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT): a prototype of Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Canonica, G W; Bachert, C; Hellings, P; Ryan, D; Valovirta, E; Wickman, M; De Beaumont, O; Bousquet, J

    2015-01-01

    Precision medicine is a medical model aiming to deliver customised healthcare - with medical decisions, practices, and/or products tailored to the individual patient informed but not directed by guidelines. Allergen immunotherapy has unique immunological rationale, since the approach is tailored to the specific IgE spectrum of an individual and modifies the natural course of the disease as it has a persistent efficacy after completion of treatment. In this perspective Allergen Immunotherapy - AIT has to be presently considered a prototype of Precision Medicine. Precise information and biomarkers provided by systems medicine and network medicine will address the discovery of Allergen immunotherapy biomarkers for (i) identification of the causes, (ii) stratification of eligible patients for AIT and (iii) the assessment of AIT efficacy. This area of medical technology is evolving rapidly and, compelemented by e-health, will change the way we practice medicine. It will help to monitor patients' disease control and data for (i) patient stratification, (ii) clinical trials, (iii) monitoring the efficacy and safety of targeted therapies which are critical for reaching an appropriate reimbursement. Biomarkers associated with e-health combined with a clinical decision support system (CDSS) will change the scope of Allergen immunotherapy. The cost/effectiveness of Allergen immunotherapy is a key issue for successful implementation. It should include the long-term benefits in the pharmaco-economic evaluation, since no other allergy treatment has this specific characteristic. AIT is the prototype of current and future precision medicine. PMID:26594303

  13. Sublingual Immunotherapy: A Useful Tool for the Allergist in Private Practice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of the author's experience with Sublingual Immunotherapy in a private office setting. Sublingual Immunotherapy should be considered by any allergy practitioner as a useful tool. Sublingual Immunotherapy is safe while at the same time it is effective. It enables the practitioner to treat asthmatics and young children without the concerns implicit with allergy injections. PMID:27340673

  14. Current status of immunotherapy for the treatment of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murala, Sanjay; Alli, Vamsi; Kreisel, Daniel; Gelman, Andrew E; Krupnick, Alexander S

    2010-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a novel approach for the treatment of systemic malignancies. Passive and adaptive immunotherapy have been applied to the treatment of a wide variety of solid tumors such as malignant melanoma (1), renal cell carcinoma (2) and ovarian cancer (3). Several early clinical trials of immune based therapy for both non-small (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) have demonstrated limited or no success (3),(4) but recent trials of antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy have shown early therapeutic potential and are now being rigorously evaluated on a larger scale (5). In this communication we briefly review the historic aspects of immune based therapy for solid cancer, describe therapeutic strategies aimed at targeting lung cancer, and discuss limitations of current therapy and future directions of this field. PMID:22263052

  15. Recent advances in cancer immunotherapy with an emphasis on vaccines.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Federica; Forni, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Recent Advances in Cancer Immunotherapy with an Emphasis on Vaccines was the first meeting organized by the European Society of Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy and Progress in Vaccine against Cancer, in collaboration with the Institute of Biological Research and Biotechnology of the National Hellenic Research Foundation, in a joint effort towards the setting up of a new generation of cancer vaccines. The main topics of the meeting included: the role of the tumor microenvironment in protecting the tumor from immune attack; differences in immunotherapy outcome in hematological malignancies versus solid tumors; rationale of multi-epitope vaccines; Treg cell elimination/inactivation, tumor stroma destruction, angiogenesis inhibition and the potentiality of 'preventive' vaccination in breast, colon, prostate and ovarian cancer in the early stages and during the 'wait-and-see' period. The ninth Progress in Vaccines against Cancer meeting will be held in Sofia, Bulgaria, 8-10 October 2009, at the Hilton Hotel. PMID:19093768

  16. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases. PMID:26264195

  17. Harnessing immunosurveillance: current developments and future directions in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Drakes, Maureen L; Stiff, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    Despite improved methods of cancer detection and disease management over the last few decades, cancer remains a major public health problem in many societies. Conventional therapies, such as chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery, are not usually sufficient to prevent disease recurrence. Therefore, efforts have been focused on developing novel therapies to manage metastatic disease and to prolong disease-free and overall survival, by modulating the immune system to alleviate immunosuppression, and to enhance antitumor immunity. This review discusses protumor mechanisms in patients that circumvent host immunosurveillance, and addresses current immunotherapy modalities designed to target these mechanisms. Given the complexity of cancer immunosuppressive mechanisms, we propose that identification of novel disease biomarkers will drive the development of more targeted immunotherapy. Finally, administration of different classes of immunotherapy in combination regimens, will be the ultimate route to impact low survival rates in advanced cancer patients. PMID:27471706

  18. Immunotherapy updates in pancreatic cancer: are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    Gunturu, Krishna Soujanya; Rossi, Gabriela R.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease and remains one of the most resistant cancers to traditional therapies. Historically, chemotherapy or radiotherapy did not provide meaningful survival benefit in advanced pancreatic cancer. Gemcitabine and recently FOLFIRINOX (5-flourouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin and irinotecan) have provided some limited survival advantage in advanced pancreatic cancer. Targeted agents in combination with gemcitabine had not shown significant improvement in the survival. Current therapies for pancreatic cancer have their limitations; thus, we are in dire need of newer treatment options. Immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer works by recruiting and activating T cells that recognize tumor-specific antigens which is a different mechanism compared with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Preclinical models have shown that immunotherapy and targeted therapies like vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor inhibitors work synergistically. Hence, new immunotherapy and targeted therapies represent a viable option for pancreatic cancer. In this article, we review the vaccine therapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:23323149

  19. Cellular and Antibody Based Approaches for Pediatric Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Michael A.; Krishnadas, Deepa K.; Lucas, Kenneth G.

    2015-01-01

    Progress in the use of traditional chemotherapy and radiation-based strategies for the treatment of pediatric malignancies has plateaued in the past decade, particularly for patients with relapsing or therapy refractory disease. As a result, cellular and humoral immunotherapy approaches have been investigated for several childhood cancers. Several monoclonal antibodies are now FDA approved and commercially available, some of which are currently considered standard of practice. There are also several new cellular immunotherapy approaches under investigation, including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells, cancer vaccines and adjuvants, and natural killer (NK) cell therapies. In this review, we will discuss previous studies on pediatric cancer immunotherapy and new approaches that are currently being investigated in clinical trials. PMID:26587548

  20. Strategies to genetically engineer T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Spear, Timothy T; Nagato, Kaoru; Nishimura, Michael I

    2016-06-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most promising and innovative approaches to treat cancer, viral infections, and other immune-modulated diseases. Adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified T cells is an exciting and rapidly evolving field. Exploiting knowledge of basic T cell biology and immune cell receptor function has fostered innovative approaches to modify immune cell function. Highly translatable clinical technologies have been developed to redirect T cell specificity by introducing designed receptors. The ability to engineer T cells to manifest desired phenotypes and functions is now a thrilling reality. In this review, we focus on outlining different varieties of genetically engineered T cells, their respective advantages and disadvantages as tools for immunotherapy, and their promise and drawbacks in the clinic. PMID:27138532

  1. Adapting Cancer Immunotherapy Models for the Real World.

    PubMed

    Klevorn, Lauryn E; Teague, Ryan M

    2016-06-01

    Early experiments in mice predicted the success of checkpoint blockade immunotherapy in cancer patients. However, these same animal studies failed to accurately predict many of the limitations and toxicities of treatment. One of the likely reasons for this discrepancy is the nearly universal use of young healthy mice, which stand in stark contrast to diverse patient populations varying in age, weight, diet, and hygiene. Because these variables impact immunity and metabolism, they also influence outcomes during immunotherapy and should be incorporated into the study design of preclinical experiments. Here, we discuss recent findings that highlight how efficacy and toxicity of cancer immunotherapy are affected by patient variation, and how distinct host environments can be better modeled in animal studies. PMID:27105824

  2. Immunotherapy in human colorectal cancer: Challenges and prospective

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuan; Suo, Jian; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Human colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed malignancies and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although new chemotherapeutic regimen improves survival rates, therapy with better efficacy and less adverse effects is drastically needed. Immunotherapy has been investigated in human CRC for decades with limited success. However, recent developments of immunotherapy, particularly immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy, have achieved promising clinical benefits in many types of cancer and revived the hope for utilizing such therapy in human CRC. In this review, we will discuss important immunological landscape within the CRC microenvironment and introduce immunoscore system to better describe immunophenotyping in CRC. We will also discuss different immunotherapeutic approaches currently utilized in different phases of clinical trials. Some of those completed or ongoing trials are summarized. Finally, we provide a brief prospective on the future human CRC immunotherapy. PMID:27605872

  3. Immunotherapy following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: potential for synergistic effects

    PubMed Central

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Redelman, Doug; Murphy, William J

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a particularly important treatment for hematologic malignancies. Unfortunately, following allogeneic HSCT, graft-versus-host disease, immunosuppression and susceptibility to opportunistic infections remain among the most substantial problems restricting the efficacy and use of this procedure, particularly for cancer. Adoptive immunotherapy and/or manipulation of the graft offer ways to attack residual cancer as well as other transplant-related complications. Recent exciting discoveries have demonstrated that HSCT could be expanded to solid tissue cancers with profound effects on the effectiveness of adoptive immunotherapy. This review will provide a background regarding HSCT, discuss the complications that make it such a complex treatment procedure following up with current immunotherapeutic strategies and discuss emerging approaches in applying immunotherapy in HSCT for cancer. PMID:20635904

  4. Cancer Immunotherapy: Selected Targets and Small-Molecule Modulators.

    PubMed

    Weinmann, Hilmar

    2016-03-01

    There is a significant amount of excitement in the scientific community around cancer immunotherapy, as this approach has renewed hope for many cancer patients owing to some recent successes in the clinic. Currently available immuno-oncology therapeutics under clinical development and on the market are mostly biologics (antibodies, proteins, engineered cells, and oncolytic viruses). However, modulation of the immune system with small molecules offers several advantages that may be complementary and potentially synergistic to the use of large biologicals. Therefore, the discovery and development of novel small-molecule modulators is a rapidly growing research area for medicinal chemists working in cancer immunotherapy. This review provides a brief introduction into recent trends related to selected targets and pathways for cancer immunotherapy and their small-molecule pharmacological modulators. PMID:26836578

  5. The Role of Surgical Pathology in Guiding Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lovitch, Scott B; Rodig, Scott J

    2016-05-23

    The recognition that the immune system can identify and destroy tumor cells has driven a paradigm shift in our understanding of human cancer. Therapies designed to enhance this capacity, including cancer vaccines and coinhibitory receptor blockade, have demonstrated clinical efficacy in treating tumors refractory to conventional therapy. In this review, we discuss how the analysis of the immune microenvironment in primary tissue biopsy samples can be used to stratify patients according to clinical outcome, identify patients likely to benefit from specific immunotherapies, and tailor combination immunotherapy to individual patients and tumor types. As immunotherapy gains in complexity and is used in combination with agents that target oncogenic, intracellular signaling pathways, diagnostic pathologists will play an increasingly important part in identifying and quantifying cellular and molecular biomarkers in tissue samples that reflect the nature and magnitude of the antitumor immune response. PMID:27193453

  6. Immunotherapy in human colorectal cancer: Challenges and prospective.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuan; Suo, Jian; Yan, Jun

    2016-07-28

    Human colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed malignancies and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although new chemotherapeutic regimen improves survival rates, therapy with better efficacy and less adverse effects is drastically needed. Immunotherapy has been investigated in human CRC for decades with limited success. However, recent developments of immunotherapy, particularly immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy, have achieved promising clinical benefits in many types of cancer and revived the hope for utilizing such therapy in human CRC. In this review, we will discuss important immunological landscape within the CRC microenvironment and introduce immunoscore system to better describe immunophenotyping in CRC. We will also discuss different immunotherapeutic approaches currently utilized in different phases of clinical trials. Some of those completed or ongoing trials are summarized. Finally, we provide a brief prospective on the future human CRC immunotherapy. PMID:27605872

  7. Prostate cancer as a model for tumour immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Charles G.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in basic immunology have led to an improved understanding of the interactions between the immune system and tumours, generating renewed interest in approaches that aim to treat cancer immunologically. As clinical and preclinical studies of tumour immunotherapy illustrate several immunological principles, a review of these data is broadly instructive and is particularly timely now that several agents are beginning to show evidence of efficacy. This is especially relevant in the case of prostate cancer, as recent approval of sipuleucel-T by the US Food and Drug Administration marks the first antigen-specific immunotherapy approved for cancer treatment. Although this Review focuses on immunotherapy for prostate cancer, the principles discussed are applicable to many tumour types, and the approaches discussed are highlighted in that context. PMID:20651745

  8. Antigen-based immunotherapy for autoimmune disease: current status

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Darren Lowell; Ponda, Punita

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are common chronic disorders that not only have a major impact on the quality of life but are also potentially life-threatening. Treatment modalities that are currently favored have conferred significant clinical benefits, but they may have considerable side effects. An optimal treatment strategy for autoimmune disease would specifically target disease-associated antigens and limit systemic side effects. Similar to allergen-specific immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis, antigen-specific immunotherapy for autoimmune disease aims to induce immune deviation and promote tolerance to specific antigens. In this review, we present the current status of studies and clinical trials in both human and animal hosts that use antigen-based immunotherapy for autoimmune disease. PMID:27471707

  9. Treatment planning for radio-immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdi, Alev K.; Erdi, Yusuf E.; Yorke, Ellen D.; Wessels, Barry W.

    1996-10-01

    To foster the success of clinical trials in radio-immunotherapy (RIT), one needs to determine (i) the quantity and spatial distribution of the administered radionuclide carrier in the patient over time, (ii) the absorbed dose in the tumour sites and critical organs based on this distribution and (iii) the volume of tumour mass(es) and normal organs from computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging and appropriately correlated with nuclear medicine imaging techniques (such as planar, single-photon emission computerized tomography or positron-emission tomography). Treatment planning for RIT has become an important tool in predicting the relative benefit of therapy based on individualized dosimetry as derived from diagnostic, pre-therapy administration of the radiolabelled antibody. This allows the investigator to pre-select those patients who have `favourable' dosimetry characteristics (high time-averaged target: non-target ratios) so that the chances for treatment success may be more accurately quantified before placing the patient at risk for treatment-related organ toxicities. The future prospects for RIT treatment planning may yield a more accurate correlation of response and critical organ toxicity with computed absorbed dose, and the compilation of dose - volume histogram information for tumour(s) and normal organ(s) such that computing tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities becomes possible for heterogeneous distributions of the radiolabelled antibody. Additionally, radiobiological consequences of depositing absorbed doses from exponentially decaying sources must be factored into the interpretation when trying to compute the effects of standard external beam isodose display patterns combined with those associated with RIT.

  10. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2007-04-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) has been used for almost a century as a desensitizing therapy for allergic diseases and represents the only curative and specific method of treatment. Administration of appropriate concentrations of allergen extracts has been shown to be reproducibly effective when patients are carefully selected. The mechanisms by which allergen-SIT has its effects include the modulation of T-cell and B-cell responses and related antibody isotypes as well as effector cells of allergic inflammation, such as eosinophils, basophils, and mast cells. The balance between allergen-specific T-regulatory (Treg) and T(H)2 cells appears to be decisive in the development of allergic and healthy immune responses against allergens. Treg cells consistently represent the dominant subset specific for common environmental allergens in sensitized healthy individuals. In contrast, there is a high frequency of allergen-specific T(H)2 cells in patients with allergy. The induction of a tolerant state in peripheral T cells represents an essential step in allergen-SIT. Peripheral T-cell tolerance is characterized mainly by generation of allergen-specific Treg cells leading to suppressed T-cell proliferation and T(H)1 and T(H)2 cytokine responses against the allergen. This is accompanied by a significant increase in allergen-specific IgG(4), and also IgG(1) and IgA, and a decrease in IgE in the late stage of the disease. In addition, decreased tissue infiltration of mast cells and eosinophils and their mediator release including circulating basophils takes place. Current understanding of mechanisms of allergen-SIT, particularly the role of Treg cells in peripheral tolerance, may enable novel treatment strategies. PMID:17321578

  11. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  12. Universes Collide: Combining Immunotherapy with Targeted Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wargo, Jennifer A.; Cooper, Zachary A.; Flaherty, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    There have been significant advances in the past several years with regard to targeted therapy and immunotherapy for cancer. This is highlighted in melanoma, where treatment with targeted therapy (against the BRAF oncogene) results in responses in the majority of patients, though duration of response is limited. In contrast, treatment with immunotherapy results in a lower response rate, but ones that tend to be more durable. Insights regarding mechanisms of response and potential synergy between these treatment strategies for melanoma are a focus of this review, with opportunities to extend these insights to the treatment of other cancers. PMID:25395294

  13. Vaccines versus immunotherapy: Overview of approaches in deciding between options

    PubMed Central

    Dalgleish, Angus G

    2015-01-01

    This review compares the optimal use of vaccines vs. other forms of immunotherapy, which includes cytokines, such as IL-2, monoclonal antibodies, such as the ‘checkpoint inhibitors’, against CTLA-4 and PD-1. The review includes both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines using a variety of technologies. It is already established that vaccines can be enhanced by other immunotherapies, such as cytokines (IL-2) and there is scope for combining both of these with the ‘checkpoint’ antibodies. Moreover, both can be enhanced with other modalities, such as radiotherapy, ablative therapy and both high and low dose chemotherapies. PMID:25625932

  14. Porous silicon advances in drug delivery and immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Savage, D; Liu, X; Curley, S; Ferrari, M; Serda, RE

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical applications of porous silicon include drug delivery, imaging, diagnostics and immunotherapy. This review summarizes new silicon particle fabrication techniques, dynamics of cellular transport, advances in the multistage vector approach to drug delivery, and the use of porous silicon as immune adjuvants. Recent findings support superior therapeutic efficacy of the multistage vector approach over single particle drug delivery systems in mouse models of ovarian and breast cancer. With respect to vaccine development, multivalent presentation of pathogen-associated molecular patterns on the particle surface creates powerful platforms for immunotherapy, with the porous matrix able to carry both antigens and immune modulators. PMID:23845260

  15. Gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Sarah; De Oliveira, Satiro N

    2014-01-01

    The rapid expansion of available cancer immunotherapies has resulted in favorable early outcomes. Specifically the use of gene therapy to introduce chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and T cell receptors (TCRs) in T cells creates new immunotherapy options for patients. While showing early success with these approaches, limitations remain that can be overcome by the use of modification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to express CARs and TCRs. With modern gene therapy technologies, increased safety and control of the modification of the HSCs can be achieved through the use of a suicide gene. PMID:24398603

  16. The oncolytic peptide LTX-315 overcomes resistance of cancers to immunotherapy with CTLA4 checkpoint blockade.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, T; Pitt, J M; Vétizou, M; Marabelle, A; Flores, C; Rekdal, Ø; Kroemer, G; Zitvogel, L

    2016-06-01

    Intratumoral immunotherapies aim at reducing local immunosuppression, as well as reinstating and enhancing systemic anticancer T-cell functions, without inducing side effects. LTX-315 is a first-in-class oncolytic peptide-based local immunotherapy that meets these criteria by inducing a type of malignant cell death that elicits anticancer immune responses. Here, we show that LTX-315 rapidly reprograms the tumor microenvironment by decreasing the local abundance of immunosuppressive Tregs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells and by increasing the frequency of polyfunctional T helper type 1/type 1 cytotoxic T cells with a concomitant increase in cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4) and drop in PD-1 expression levels. Logically, in tumors that were resistant to intratumoral or systemic CTLA4 blockade, subsequent local inoculation of LTX-315 cured the animals or caused tumor regressions with abscopal effects. This synergistic interaction between CTLA4 blockade and LTX-315 was reduced upon blockade of the β-chain of the interleukin-2 receptor (CD122). This preclinical study provides a strong rationale for administering the oncolytic peptide LTX-315 to patients who are receiving treatment with the CTLA4 blocking antibody ipilimumab. PMID:27082453

  17. CD22 as a target of passive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cesano, Alessandra; Gayko, Urte

    2003-04-01

    CD22 is a 135-kd B-cell restricted sialoglycoprotein present in the cytoplasm of virtually all B-lineage cells but expressed on the B-cell surface only at mature stages of differentiation. In humans, the vast majority of IgM(+)IgD(+) B cells express cell-surface CD22, while in lymphoid tissues CD22 expression is high in follicular mantle and marginal zone B cells and weak in germinal center B cells. In B-cell malignancies, CD22 expression ranges from 60% to 80% depending on the histological type and on the assays used. The function of the CD22 molecule is uncertain, although recent studies have suggested roles for the molecule both as a component of the B-cell activation complex and as an adhesion molecule. CD22-deficient mice have a reduced number of mature B cells in the bone marrow and circulation; the B cells have a shorter lifespan and enhanced apoptosis, thus indicating a key role of this antigen in B-cell development/survival. After binding with its natural ligand(s) or antibodies, CD22 is rapidly internalized; this provides a potent costimulatory signal in primary B-cell and proapoptotic signals in neoplastic B cells. Preclinically CD22 has been shown to be an effective target for immunotherapy of B-cell malignancies using either "naked" or toxin-labeled or radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Clinical trials in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) (both indolent and aggressive disease) are now ongoing with a humanized naked anti-CD22 antibody (epratuzumab, Amgen Inc, thousand Oaks, CA and Immunomedics Inc, Morris Plains, NJ) used as single agent or in combination with other monclonal antibodies (ie, rituximab) and/or chemotherapy. Preliminary data from these studies showed these approaches to be effective and well-tolerated. PMID:12720147

  18. Effectiveness evaluation of dendritic cell immunotherapy for osteosarcoma on survival rate and in vitro immune response.

    PubMed

    Fang, X; Jiang, C; Xia, Q

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dendritic cell (DC) therapy in osteosarcoma. Bone marrow DCs from Wistar (allograft group) and Sprague Dawley (SD) (homograft group) rats were electrically fused with the SD-derived osteosarcoma cell line UMR106 to generate a DC-osteosarcoma fusion (DOF) tumor vaccine, which was co-incubated with SD T lymphocytes to stimulate T cell proliferation. CD8+ and CD4+ cell percentages were measured by flow cytometry; tumor-cytotoxic effects of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were measured by the MTT assay. Active immunotherapy was applied to SD osteosarcoma model rats via subcutaneous injection of the tumor vaccine. Significant potentiation of T lymphocyte proliferation was observed in both groups. In the homograft group, the CD8+/CD4+ ratio was elevated to 78.2 from 55.1% after stimulation (P < 0.05) whereas the CD4+ cell percentage was reduced from 61.3 to 21.2% (P < 0.05). Similarly, in the allograft group the CD8+ and CD4+ cell percentages significantly increased (33.8 to 69.6%) or decreased (61.3 to 28.1%) after stimulation, respectively (P < 0.05). The preferential homograft group response was not significant (P > 0.05). Induced UMR106- specific CTLs showed a significantly higher tumor-cytotoxic effect after stimulation (P < 0.05). After DOF active immunotherapy, tumor bodies displayed atrophy or disappearance, leading to higher survival times and rates (60 and 70% in the allograft and homograft groups) (P < 0.05). This study demonstrated that osteosarcoma immunotherapy using a DC-fused tumor vaccine can effectively stimulate T lymphocyte proliferation and induce the tumor-cytotoxic activity of CTLs. PMID:26436501

  19. Neoadjuvant immunotherapy with chitosan and interleukin-12 to control breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Jimmy LN; Yang, Lirong; Kurtz, Samantha L; Smith, Sean G; Koppolu, Bhanu prasanth; Ravindranathan, Sruthi; Zaharoff, David A

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis accounts for approximately 90% of breast cancer-related deaths. Therefore, novel approaches which prevent or control breast cancer metastases are of significant clinical interest. Interleukin-12 (IL-12)-based immunotherapies have shown promise in controlling metastatic disease, yet modest responses and severe toxicities due to systemic administration of IL-12 in early trials have hindered clinical application. We hypothesized that localized delivery of IL-12 co-formulated with chitosan (chitosan/IL-12) could elicit tumor-specific immunity and provide systemic protection against metastatic breast cancer while minimizing systemic toxicity. Chitosan is a biocompatible polysaccharide derived primarily from the exoskeletons of crustaceans. In a clinically relevant resection model, mice bearing spontaneously metastatic 4T1 mammary adenocarcinomas received intratumoral injections of chitosan/IL-12, or appropriate controls, prior to tumor resection. Neoadjuvant chitosan/IL-12 immunotherapy resulted in long-term tumor-free survival in 67% of mice compared to only 24% or 0% of mice treated with IL-12 alone or chitosan alone, respectively. Antitumor responses following chitosan/IL-12 treatment were durable and provided complete protection against rechallenge with 4T1, but not RENCA renal adenocarcinoma, cells. Lymphocytes from chitosan/IL-12-treated mice demonstrated robust tumor-specific lytic activity and interferon-γ production. Cell-mediated immune memory was confirmed in vivo via clinically relevant delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) assays. Comprehensive hematology and toxicology analyses revealed that chitosan/IL-12 induced transient, reversible leukopenia with no changes in critical organ function. Results of this study suggest that neoadjuvant chitosan/IL-12 immunotherapy prior to breast tumor resection is a promising translatable strategy capable of safely inducing to tumor-specific immunity and, in the long term, reducing breast cancer mortality due to

  20. Immune consequences of tyrosine kinase inhibitors that synergize with cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kwilas, Anna R.; Donahue, Renee N.; Tsang, Kwong Y.; Hodge, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Combination therapy for the treatment of cancer is becoming increasingly essential as we gain improved understanding of the complexity of cancer progression and the mechanisms by which cancer cells become resistant to single-agent therapy. Recent studies, both clinical and preclinical, have suggested that immunotherapy is a promising approach to the treatment of cancer; however, strategies to improve its clinical efficacy are still needed. A number of recent studies have indicated that antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) target multiple components of the tumor microenvironment and are an ideal class of agents for synergizing with cancer immunotherapy. TKIs are well known to modulate tumor endothelial cells, leading to vascular normalization; however, these agents have also been recently shown to decrease tumor compactness and tight junctions, thereby reducing solid tumor pressure and allowing for improved perfusion of collapsed vessels and increased tumor oxygenation. In addition, some TKIs are capable of inducing immunogenic modulation, whereby tumor cells are sensitized to killing by T lymphocytes. Moreover, a number of TKIs have been shown to be involved in immune subset conditioning, increasing the frequency and function of effector immune elements, while decreasing the number and function of immune suppressor cells. The alteration of the immune landscape, direct modification of tumor cells, and improved vascular perfusion leads to improved antitumor efficacy when antiangiogenic TKIs are combined with immunotherapy. Collectively, the data presented in this review support the clinical combination of multi-targeted antiangiogenic TKIs, including but not limited to cabozantinib, sunitinib, and sorafenib, as well as to other antiangiogenic therapies, such as the anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab, with cancer vaccines for improved treatment of solid tumors. PMID:26005708

  1. HLA ligandomics identifies histone deacetylase 1 as target for ovarian cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peper, Janet Kerstin; Bösmüller, Hans-Christian; Schuster, Heiko; Gückel, Brigitte; Hörzer, Helen; Roehle, Kevin; Schäfer, Richard; Wagner, Philipp; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan; Fend, Falko; Staebler, Annette

    2016-01-01

    abstract The recent approval of clincially effective immune checkpoint inhibitors illustrates the potential of cancer immunotherapy. A challenging task remains the identification of specific targets guiding immunotherapy. Facilitated by technical advances, the direct identification of physiologically relevant targets is enabled by analyzing the HLA ligandome of cancer cells. Since recent publications demonstrate the immunogenicity of ovarian cancer (OvCa), immunotherapies, including peptide-based cancer vaccines, represent a promising treatment approach. To identify vaccine peptides, we employed a combined strategy of HLA ligandomics in high-grade serous OvCa samples and immunogenicity analysis. Only few proteins were naturally presented as HLA ligands on all samples analyzed, including histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 and 2. In vitro priming of CD8+ T cells demonstrated that two HDAC1/2-derived HLA ligands can induce T-cell responses, capable of killing HLA-matched tumor cells. High HDAC1 expression shown by immunohistochemistry in 136 high-grade serous OvCa patients associated with significantly reduced overall survival (OS), whereas patients with high numbers of CD3+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in the tumor epithelium and CD8+ TILs in the tumor stroma showed improved OS. However, correlating HDAC1 expression with TILs, high levels of TILs abrogated the impact of HDAC1 on OS. This study strengthens the role of HDAC1/2 as an important tumor antigen in OvCa, demonstrating its impact on OS in a large cohort of OvCa patients. We further identified two immunogenic HDAC1-derived peptides, which frequently induce multi-functional T-cell responses in many donors, suitable for future multi-peptide vaccine trials in OvCa patients.

  2. Advances in the Treatment of Food Allergy: Sublingual and Epicutaneous Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sindher, Sayantani; Fleischer, David M; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2016-02-01

    Food allergies continue to increase in prevalence. Standard care is a strict elimination diet, but life-threatening reactions still occur. Allergen immunotherapy has the most potential in treating food allergy. Subcutaneous immunotherapy has not been adopted into food allergy therapy. Oral immunotherapy has a high rate of adverse reactions. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) uses the tolerogenic environment of the oral mucosa and epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT) uses the immune cells of the epidermis to transport antigens to afferent lymph nodes to activate immune responses. SLIT and EPIT can successfully desensitize patients. More research is needed to define optimal doses and administration protocols. PMID:26617226

  3. Review on immunotherapy in airway allergen sensitised patients.

    PubMed

    van der Valk, J P M; de Jong, N W; Gerth van Wijk, R

    2015-07-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is a more than 100-year-old treatment in particular for birch pollen, grass pollen, house dust mite and cat dander sensitised allergic patients. The mechanism of allergen-specific immunotherapy is complex. Different hypotheses have been postulated to explain the mode of action, such as a decrease of the number of tissue mast cells, eosinophils and basophils, an increase of IgG4 and IgA synthesis, a shift from Th2 to Th1 cells and an increase in the number and function of IL-10 producing T-regulatory cells (T-reg). All these immunological effects may contribute to immune tolerance and long-term changes in the immune system. The efficacy and safety of subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with pollen and house dust mite have been investigated in many trials, meta-analyses and reviews. Nowadays grass pollen SLIT and SCIT, and birch pollen and house dust mite SCIT are implemented in clinical practice to treat therapy-resistant patients. However, the treatment is not effective for all patients and often not without side effects. Therefore, the development of new, safer and more effective immunotherapies is needed. These are approached along novel routes, including improved administration, combined treatment with immune response modifiers, fusion with immune response modifiers, allergen coupled to adjuvants and reconstruction of natural extracts with multiple recombinant allergens or with modified allergens. These developments are promising, but more research is required to implement them in clinical practice. PMID:26228190

  4. Cancer immunotherapy: the beginning of the end of cancer?

    PubMed

    Farkona, Sofia; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Blasutig, Ivan M

    2016-01-01

    These are exciting times for cancer immunotherapy. After many years of disappointing results, the tide has finally changed and immunotherapy has become a clinically validated treatment for many cancers. Immunotherapeutic strategies include cancer vaccines, oncolytic viruses, adoptive transfer of ex vivo activated T and natural killer cells, and administration of antibodies or recombinant proteins that either costimulate cells or block the so-called immune checkpoint pathways. The recent success of several immunotherapeutic regimes, such as monoclonal antibody blocking of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1), has boosted the development of this treatment modality, with the consequence that new therapeutic targets and schemes which combine various immunological agents are now being described at a breathtaking pace. In this review, we outline some of the main strategies in cancer immunotherapy (cancer vaccines, adoptive cellular immunotherapy, immune checkpoint blockade, and oncolytic viruses) and discuss the progress in the synergistic design of immune-targeting combination therapies. PMID:27151159

  5. Novel technologies and emerging biomarkers for personalized cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jianda; Hegde, Priti S; Clynes, Raphael; Foukas, Periklis G; Harari, Alexandre; Kleen, Thomas O; Kvistborg, Pia; Maccalli, Cristina; Maecker, Holden T; Page, David B; Robins, Harlan; Song, Wenru; Stack, Edward C; Wang, Ena; Whiteside, Theresa L; Zhao, Yingdong; Zwierzina, Heinz; Butterfield, Lisa H; Fox, Bernard A

    2016-01-01

    The culmination of over a century's work to understand the role of the immune system in tumor control has led to the recent advances in cancer immunotherapies that have resulted in durable clinical responses in patients with a variety of malignancies. Cancer immunotherapies are rapidly changing traditional treatment paradigms and expanding the therapeutic landscape for cancer patients. However, despite the current success of these therapies, not all patients respond to immunotherapy and even those that do often experience toxicities. Thus, there is a growing need to identify predictive and prognostic biomarkers that enhance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the complex interactions between the immune system and cancer. Therefore, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) reconvened an Immune Biomarkers Task Force to review state of the art technologies, identify current hurdlers, and make recommendations for the field. As a product of this task force, Working Group 2 (WG2), consisting of international experts from academia and industry, assembled to identify and discuss promising technologies for biomarker discovery and validation. Thus, this WG2 consensus paper will focus on the current status of emerging biomarkers for immune checkpoint blockade therapy and discuss novel technologies as well as high dimensional data analysis platforms that will be pivotal for future biomarker research. In addition, this paper will include a brief overview of the current challenges with recommendations for future biomarker discovery. PMID:26788324

  6. Big Data Offers Novel Insights for Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Swift, Stephanie L; Stojdl, David F

    2016-02-01

    Large-scale assays, such as microarrays, next-generation sequencing and various "omics" technologies, have explored multiple aspects of the immune response following virus infection, often from a public health perspective. Yet a lack of similar data exists for monitoring immune engagement during oncolytic virus immunotherapy (OVIT) in the cancer setting. Tracking immune signatures at the tumour site can create a snapshot or longitudinally analyse immune cell activation, infiltration and functionality within global populations or individual cells. Mapping immune changes over the course of oncolytic biotherapy-from initial infection to tumour stabilisation/regression through to long-term cure or escape/relapse-has the potential to generate important therapeutic insights around virus-host interactions. Further, correlating such immune signatures with specific tumour outcomes has significant value for guiding the development of novel oncolytic virus immunotherapy strategies. Here, we provide insights for OVIT from large-scale analyses of immune populations in the infection, vaccination and immunotherapy setting. We analyse several approaches to manipulating immune engagement during OVIT. We further explore immunocentric changes in the tumour tissue following immunotherapy, and compile several immune signatures of therapeutic success. Ultimately, we highlight clinically relevant large-scale approaches with the potential to strengthen future oncolytic strategies to optimally engage the immune system. PMID:26861383

  7. [Scleroderma related to specific immunotherapy. A report of a case].

    PubMed

    Morfín Maciel, Blanca María; Castillo Morfín, Blanca María

    2009-01-01

    It has been described two main phenotypes of helper T cells. On activation, the immune system develops the most effective Th response. Whereas Th1 cells promote cell-mediate immunity against intracellular pathogens and an over expression could favor autoimmune diseases; Th2 cells develop humoral immunity against extracellular pathogens promoting allergic response. Normally, the two profiles coexist in the same individual with different grades of expression. Recently, it has been described a new subset: Th17, which is related to tissue injury in autoimmune diseases. Then, allergic and autoimmune diseases result from an unbalanced response of the immune system. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only curative treatment of a specific allergy, which leads to a life-long tolerance against allergens. There are no controlled studies about the effectiveness or risks associated with allergen-specific immunotherapy in patients with autoimmune disorders. On the other hand, scleroderma is an autoimmune chronic systemic disorder of unknown etiology characterized by excess collagen deposition in the skin and viscera, along with vascular injury. We report a girl with allergic asthma and with a second degree family history of systemic sclerosis who developed localized scleroderma during allergen specific immunotherapy. Because allergy vaccination alter the balance between effector and regulatory T-cell populations, which regulate immune tolerance, a positive family history of autoimmunity in first or second degree, could be a contraindication for allergen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:19768975

  8. [Development of Nucleic Acid-Based Adjuvant for Cancer Immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Ishii, Ken J

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery of the human T cell-defined tumor antigen, the cancer immunotherapy field has rapidly progressed, with the research and development of cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, being conducted actively. However, the disadvantages of most cancer vaccines include relatively weak immunogenicity and immune escape or exhaustion. Adjuvants with innate immunostimulatory activities have been used to overcome these issues, and these agents have been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines and to act as mono-therapeutic anti-tumor agents. CpG ODN, an agonist for TLR9, is one of the promising nucleic acid-based adjuvants, and it is a potent inducer of innate immune effector functions. CpG ODN suppresses tumor growth in the absence of tumor antigens and peptide administration. Therefore, CpG ODN is expected to be useful as a cancer vaccine adjuvant as well as a cancer immunotherapy agent. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic applications and mechanisms of CpG ODN for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26469159

  9. Seasonal versus perennial immunotherapy: evaluation after three years of treatment.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Lejarazu, D; Bernaola, G; Fernández, E; Audícana, M; Ventas, P; Martín, S; Fernández de Corres, L

    1993-01-01

    We have performed a comparative study to evaluate seasonal and perennial schedules after 3 years of immunotherapy. Sixty patients suffering from rhinitis and/or asthma due to grass pollen sensitization were randomly allocated to receive a semi-depot extract of Phleum pratense according to a perennial or seasonal schedule. The last year of the study, 14 patients were recruited as a control group without immunotherapy. The cumulative dose was 602 BU in the perennial group and 372 BU in the seasonal group. The frequency and severity of side-effects were similar and very low in both treated groups. The IgE level was significantly lower after perennial immunotherapy at the end of the first 2 years. A seasonal decrease in specific IgG levels was observed in patients who interrupted immunotherapy, while this was not observed in patients under the perennial schedule. Symptoms and medication scores did not show differences between groups. Nevertheless, we found a significant difference between treated patients and the control group. PMID:8281355

  10. Nanocarrier-based immunotherapy in cancer management and research

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manu Smriti; Bhaskar, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Research in cancer immunotherapy has gained momentum in the last two decades, with many studies and clinical trials showing positive therapeutic outcomes. Immunotherapy can elicit not only a strong anticancer immune response which could even control metastases, but could also induce immunological memory, resulting in long-lasting protection in the prophylactic setting and protection against possible recurrence. Nanocarriers offer an attractive means for delivery of a multitude of therapeutic immunomodulators which are readily taken up by immune cells and can initiate a particular arm of an immunostimulatory cascade leading to tumor cell killing. This review focuses on recent advances in nanocarrier-mediated immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer. Both in vitro and in vivo studies as well as clinical progress are discussed in various sections. Description of the specific role of nanoparticle technology in immunotherapy highlights the way particles can be tailor-made in terms of size, structure, payload, and surface properties for active targeting to antigen-presenting cells and/or enhanced accumulation in the solid tumor. PMID:27471704

  11. Improving the clinical impact of biomaterials in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gammon, Joshua M.; Dold, Neil M.; Jewell, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapies for cancer have progressed enormously over the past few decades, and hold great promise for the future. The successes of these therapies, with some patients showing durable and complete remission, demonstrate the power of harnessing the immune system to eradicate tumors. However, the effectiveness of current immunotherapies is limited by hurdles ranging from immunosuppressive strategies employed by tumors, to inadequate specificity of existing therapies, to heterogeneity of disease. Further, the vast majority of approved immunotherapies employ systemic delivery of immunomodulators or cells that make addressing some of these challenges more difficult. Natural and synthetic biomaterials–such as biocompatible polymers, self-assembled lipid particles, and implantable biodegradable devices–offer unique potential to address these hurdles by harnessing the benefits of therapeutic targeting, tissue engineering, co-delivery, controlled release, and sensing. However, despite the enormous investment in new materials and nanotechnology, translation of these ideas to the clinic is still an uncommon outcome. Here we review the major challenges facing immunotherapies and discuss how the newest biomaterials and nanotechnologies could help overcome these challenges to create new clinical options for patients. PMID:26871948

  12. NK Cell-based Immunotherapies in Pediatric Oncology

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Kimberly A.; Hank, Jacquelyn A.; DeSantes, Kenneth B.; Capitini, Christian M.; Otto, Mario; Sondel, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen several anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies transition from “promising preclinical models” to treatments with proven clinical activity or benefit. In 2013, the journal Science selected the field of Cancer Immunotherapy as the overall number-1 breakthrough for the year in all of scientific research. In the setting of cancer immunotherapy for adult malignancies, many of these immunotherapy strategies have relied on the cancer patient’s endogenous anti-tumor T cell response. While much promising research in pediatric oncology is similarly focused on T cell reactivity, several pediatric malignancies themselves, or the chemo-radiotherapy used to achieve initial responses, can be associated with profound immune suppression, particularly of the T cell system. A separate component of the immune system, also able to mediate anti-tumor effects and less suppressed by conventional cancer treatment, is the NK cell system. In recent years, several distinct immunotherapeutic approaches that rely on the activity of NK cells have moved from preclinical development into clinical testing, and some have shown clear antitumor benefit. This review provides an overview of NK cell-based immunotherapy efforts that are directed towards childhood malignancies, with an emphasis on protocols that are already in clinical testing. PMID:25590232

  13. Immunotherapy for multiple myeloma: Current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Ayed, Ayed O; Chang, Lung-Ji; Moreb, Jan S

    2015-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell neoplasm which constitutes about 10% of all hematologic malignancies and has been in the limelight of fast-track development of novel drugs that have contributed to the transformation of a rapidly lethal disease into a chronic illness with significant improvement in quality of life. Nonetheless, MM remains an incurable disease in many patients. Immunotherapy has been one of the approaches that had the highest hope for curing this disease. More than two decades of research and clinical trials in immunotherapy for MM have however resulted in very little impact on patient survival. The various immunotherapy approaches that have been attempted over the last two decades but were fraught with failure have already been extensively summarized in many published reviews. Nevertheless, in view of better understanding of the immune checkpoints, the innate immune system, and improved biotechnology, there is renewed hope. In this review, we will briefly discuss the unsuccessful approaches and emphasize the lessons learned, highlight the challenges that lie ahead, and discuss the more promising approaches, that already exist or being developed such as use of allogeneic stem cell transplants (allo-SCT) as a form of cellular immunotherapy, new monoclonal antibodies, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell adoptive therapy, and NK cell therapy. PMID:26153389

  14. One-Shot Immunomodulatory Nanodiamond Agents for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Cui, Zhifen; Kong, Huating; Xia, Kai; Pan, Liang; Li, Jiang; Sun, Yanhong; Shi, Jiye; Wang, Lihua; Zhu, Ying; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-04-01

    The use of functional nanodiamonds (fNDs) to deliver CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs) for sustained immunostimulation is reported. It is demonstrated that monotherapy using this immunostimulatory agent significantly suppresses the tumor growth in two murine tumor models. This fND-based nanoagent opens new opportunities for immunotherapy, as well as clinical applications of various types of therapeutic nucleic acids. PMID:26833992

  15. Big Data Offers Novel Insights for Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Stephanie L.; Stojdl, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale assays, such as microarrays, next-generation sequencing and various “omics” technologies, have explored multiple aspects of the immune response following virus infection, often from a public health perspective. Yet a lack of similar data exists for monitoring immune engagement during oncolytic virus immunotherapy (OVIT) in the cancer setting. Tracking immune signatures at the tumour site can create a snapshot or longitudinally analyse immune cell activation, infiltration and functionality within global populations or individual cells. Mapping immune changes over the course of oncolytic biotherapy—from initial infection to tumour stabilisation/regression through to long-term cure or escape/relapse—has the potential to generate important therapeutic insights around virus-host interactions. Further, correlating such immune signatures with specific tumour outcomes has significant value for guiding the development of novel oncolytic virus immunotherapy strategies. Here, we provide insights for OVIT from large-scale analyses of immune populations in the infection, vaccination and immunotherapy setting. We analyse several approaches to manipulating immune engagement during OVIT. We further explore immunocentric changes in the tumour tissue following immunotherapy, and compile several immune signatures of therapeutic success. Ultimately, we highlight clinically relevant large-scale approaches with the potential to strengthen future oncolytic strategies to optimally engage the immune system. PMID:26861383

  16. Oral Immunotherapy for Treatment of Egg Allergy in Children

    PubMed Central

    Burks, A. Wesley; Jones, Stacie M.; Wood, Robert A.; Fleischer, David M.; Sicherer, Scott H.; Lindblad, Robert W.; Stablein, Donald; Henning, Alice K.; Vickery, Brian P.; Liu, Andrew H.; Scurlock, Amy M.; Shreffler, Wayne G.; Plaut, Marshall; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND For egg allergy, dietary avoidance is the only currently approved treatment. We evaluated oral immunotherapy using egg-white powder for the treatment of children with egg allergy. METHODS In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, 55 children, 5 to 11 years of age, with egg allergy received oral immunotherapy (40 children) or placebo (15). Initial dose-escalation, build-up, and maintenance phases were followed by an oral food challenge with egg-white powder at 10 months and at 22 months. Children who successfully passed the challenge at 22 months discontinued oral immunotherapy and avoided all egg consumption for 4 to 6 weeks. At 24 months, these children underwent an oral food challenge with egg-white powder and a cooked egg to test for sustained unresponsiveness. Children who passed this challenge at 24 months were placed on a diet with ad libitum egg consumption and were evaluated for continuation of sustained unresponsiveness at 30 months and 36 months. RESULTS After 10 months of therapy, none of the children who received placebo and 55% of those who received oral immunotherapy passed the oral food challenge and were considered to be desensitized; after 22 months, 75% of children in the oral-immunotherapy group were desensitized. In the oral-immunotherapy group, 28% (11 of 40 children) passed the oral food challenge at 24 months and were considered to have sustained unresponsiveness. At 30 months and 36 months, all children who had passed the oral food challenge at 24 months were consuming egg. Of the immune markers measured, small wheal diameters on skin-prick testing and increases in egg-specific IgG4 antibody levels were associated with passing the oral food challenge at 24 months. CONCLUSIONS These results show that oral immunotherapy can desensitize a high proportion of children with egg allergy and induce sustained unresponsiveness in a clinically significant subset. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health; Clinical

  17. Loss of PTEN promotes resistance to T cell-mediated immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Weiyi; Chen, Jie Qing; Liu, Chengwen; Malu, Shruti; Creasy, Caitlin; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Xu, Chunyu; McKenzie, Jodi A; Zhang, Chunlei; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Williams, Leila J; Deng, Wanleng; Chen, Guo; Mbofung, Rina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Cooper, Zachary A; Chen, Pei-Ling; Tieu, Trang N; Spranger, Stefani; Yu, Xiaoxing; Bernatchez, Chantale; Forget, Marie-Andree; Haymaker, Cara; Amaria, Rodabe; McQuade, Jennifer L; Glitza, Isabella C; Cascone, Tina; Li, Haiyan S; Kwong, Lawrence N; Heffernan, Timothy P; Hu, Jianhua; Bassett, Roland L; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Woodman, Scott E; Overwijk, Willem W; Lizée, Gregory; Roszik, Jason; Gajewski, Thomas F; Wargo, Jennifer A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Radvanyi, Laszlo; Davies, Michael A; Hwu, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    T cell-mediated immunotherapies are promising cancer treatments. However, most patients still fail to respond to these therapies. The molecular determinants of immune resistance are poorly understood. We show that loss of PTEN in tumor cells in preclinical models of melanoma inhibits T cell-mediated tumor killing and decreases T cell trafficking into tumors. In patients, PTEN loss correlates with decreased T cell infiltration at tumor sites, reduced likelihood of successful T cell expansion from resected tumors, and inferior outcomes with PD-1 inhibitor therapy. PTEN loss in tumor cells increased the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, resulting in decreased T cell infiltration in tumors, and inhibited autophagy, which decreased T cell-mediated cell death. Treatment with a selective PI3Kβ inhibitor improved the efficacy of both anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA4 antibodies in murine models. Together these findings demonstrate that PTEN loss promotes immune resistance and support the rationale to explore combinations of immunotherapies and PI3K-AKT pathway inhibitors. PMID:26645196

  18. CD8+ T-cell Immune Evasion Enables Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pourchet, Aldo; Fuhrmann, Steven R.; Pilones, Karsten A.; Demaria, Sandra; Frey, Alan B.; Mulvey, Matthew; Mohr, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Although counteracting innate defenses allows oncolytic viruses (OVs) to better replicate and spread within tumors, CD8+ T-cells restrict their capacity to trigger systemic anti-tumor immune responses. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) evades CD8+ T-cells by producing ICP47, which limits immune recognition of infected cells by inhibiting the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). Surprisingly, removing ICP47 was assumed to benefit OV immuno-therapy, but the impact of inhibiting TAP remains unknown because human HSV-1 ICP47 is not effective in rodents. Here, we engineer an HSV-1 OV to produce bovine herpesvirus UL49.5, which unlike ICP47, antagonizes rodent and human TAP. Significantly, UL49.5-expressing OVs showed superior efficacy treating bladder and breast cancer in murine models that was dependent upon CD8+ T-cells. Besides injected subcutaneous tumors, UL49.5-OV reduced untreated, contralateral tumor size and metastases. These findings establish TAP inhibitor-armed OVs that evade CD8+ T-cells as an immunotherapy strategy to elicit potent local and systemic anti-tumor responses. PMID:27077112

  19. Evaluation of new sensitizations in asthmatic children monosensitized to house dust mite by specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Harmanci, Koray; Razi, Cem H; Toyran, Muge; Kanmaz, Gozde; Cengizlier, Mehmet R

    2010-03-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) is one of the treatment modalities recomended for the management of asthma and allergic rhinitis by international guidelines. A potential benefit of immunotherapy (IT) is to prevent the development of sensitisation to new allergens. There is stil no conclusion on this subject. One hundred twenty-two children 8-18 years old with intermittent asthma, with or without allergic rhinitis, all of whom were monosensitised to house dust mite (HDM) were selected. Sixty two of these children accepted to receive SIT with HDM extract for 4 years and the remaining 60 did not accept SIT and were treated with asthma medications only. This second group of children served as the control group. At the end of the 4-year study period, 36 of the 53 patients (67.9%) in the SIT group showed no new sensitizations, compared to 38 of 52 (73.0%) in the control group (p = 0.141). The most frequent new sensitizations at the end of the study were pollens, grasses and olive polen, followed by animal dander, alternaria and cockroach. In conclusion, SIT may not prevent the onset of new sensitizations in asthmatic children monosensitized to house dust mites. Further investigation is required to clarify the immunologic mechanisms and other factors by which SIT reduces or not the development of new sensitizations in monosensitized children. PMID:20527510

  20. Cytokine gene polymorphisms are associated with risk of urinary bladder cancer and recurrence after BCG immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ahirwar, Dinesh K; Agrahari, Anita; Mandhani, Anil; Mittal, Rama D

    2009-06-01

    The association of interleukin-1beta (IL-1B) -511C > T and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RN) VNTR, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-B1) +28C > T and interferon-gamma (IFN-G) + 874T>A polymorphisms with bladder cancer (CaB) susceptibility and risk of recurrence in Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-treated patients was analyzed in 287 controls and 213 CaB patients (73 BCG treated). Increased risk was observed with the IL-1RN*2 allele (odds ratio (OR) 5.01) and the IFN-G +874 A allele (OR 1.78). TGF-B TT and IFN-G +874 A carriers were associated with reduced (hazard ratio (HR) 0.37) and enhanced (HR 2.24) risk of recurrence after BCG immunotherapy, respectively. The study suggests that cytokine gene variants may modulate CaB susceptibility and risk of recurrence after BCG immunotherapy. PMID:19489682

  1. Passive Immunotherapy Protects against Enteric Invasion and Lethal Sepsis in a Murine Model of Gastrointestinal Anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bruce; Xie, Tao; Rotstein, David; Fang, Hui; Frucht, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The principal portal for anthrax infection in natural animal outbreaks is the digestive tract. Enteric exposure to anthrax, which is difficult to detect or prevent in a timely manner, could be exploited as an act of terror through contamination of human or animal food. Our group has developed a novel animal model of gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax for evaluation of disease pathogenesis and experimental therapeutics, utilizing vegetative Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain) administered to A/J mice (a complement-deficient strain) by oral gavage. We hypothesized that a humanized recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) * that neutralizes the protective antigen (PA) component of B. anthracis lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin (ET) could be an effective treatment. Although the efficacy of this anti-anthrax PA mAb has been shown in animal models of inhalational anthrax, its activity in GI infection had not yet been ascertained. We hereby demonstrate that passive immunotherapy with anti-anthrax PA mAb, administered at the same time as gastrointestinal exposure to B. anthracis, prevents lethal sepsis in nearly all cases (>90%), while a delay of up to forty-eight hours in treatment still greatly reduces mortality following exposure (65%). Moreover, passive immunotherapy protects against enteric invasion, associated mucosal injury and subsequent dissemination by gastrointestinal B. anthracis, indicating that it acts to prevent the initial stages of infection. * Expired raxibacumab being cycled off the Strategic National Stockpile; biological activity confirmed by in vitro assay. PMID:26426050

  2. Adoptive immunotherapy for cancer: the next generation of gene-engineered immune cells.

    PubMed

    Berry, L J; Moeller, M; Darcy, P K

    2009-10-01

    Adoptive cellular immunotherapy involving transfer of tumor-reactive T cells has shown some notable antitumor responses in a minority of cancer patients. In particular, transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes has resulted in long-term objective responses in patients with advanced melanoma. However, the inability to isolate sufficient numbers of tumor-specific T cells from most malignancies has restricted the broad utility of this approach. An emerging approach to circumvent this limitation involves the genetic modification of effector cells with T cell receptor (TCR) transgenes or chimeric single-chain variable fragment (scFv) receptors that can specifically redirect T cells to tumor. There has been much progress in the design of TCR and scFv receptors to enhance the antigen-specific activation of effector cells and their trafficking and persistence in vivo. Considerable effort has been directed toward improving the safety of this approach and reducing the immunogenicity of the receptor. This review discusses the latest developments in the field of adoptive immunotherapy using genetically modified immune cells that have been transduced with either TCR or scFv receptor transgenes and used in preclinical and clinical settings as anticancer agents. PMID:19775368

  3. Sugar-carrying Polystyrenes Facilitate Harvesting of APCs from MLRs: Possible Application of Sugar-carrying Polystyrenes to Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Akira; Onishi, Hideya; Yamasaki, Akio; Kawamoto, Makoto; Morisaki, Takashi; Goto, Mitsuaki; Iwama, Masamichi; Akaike, Toshihiro; Hasumi, Kenichiro

    2016-02-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) play a pivotal role in cancer immunotherapy. APCs in conventionally used flasks are harvested by enzymatic digestion or cell scraping for application to cancer immunotherapy. However, these methods may impair functional molecules expressed on the APC surface and reduce their effects in cancer immunotherapy. Recently, we found that APCs could be harvested by shaking at 4°C in flasks coated with poly[N-p-vinylbenzyl-O-2-acetoamide-2-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-2-acetoamide-2-deoxy-β-D-gluconamide] (PVGlcNAc) or a copolymer consisting of sulfonylurea (SU) linked to poly[N-p-vinyl-benzyl-4-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-D-gluconamide] [P(VLA-co-SU)]. In the present study, we compared the functions of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) induced by APCs generated in PVGlcNAc- or P(VLA-co-SU)-coated flasks and conventional flasks. APCs from PVGlcNAc- or P(VLA-co-SU)-coated flasks showed higher expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)80/86, CD11c, and major histocompatibility complex class II alloantigen I-A(d), and higher cytotoxicity than APCs from conventional flasks. These results suggest that the use of PVGlcNAc- or P(VLA-co-SU)-coated flasks is optimal for harvesting APCs. The generated APCs also have a higher antigen-presenting ability compared to those generated in conventional flasks. Our results may contribute to the development of effective cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26851023

  4. Can we reduce the dosage of biologics in spondyloarthritis?

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Ignazio; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Padula, Angela; Leccese, Pietro; Nigro, Angelo; Palazzi, Carlo

    2013-05-01

    TNF blockers have revolutionized the management of spondyloarthritis (SpA). To date, four anti-TNFα agents (etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab) have been approved for the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The first objective in the management of AS and PsA with TNF inhibitors is to reduce disease activity to clinical remission or low disease activity. After remission has been achieved, this state should be maintained as long as possible. However, the financial burden associated with the cost of anti-TNF agents as well as concerns about their long-term safety suggest reducing the dosage of the drug or discontinuing the therapy in the hopes of drug-free remission. The aim of this review is to examine what has, till now, been published on this topic in axial SpA, which includes AS and non-radiographic axial SpA (nr-axSpA), peripheral SpA and PsA. Discontinuation of therapy in axial SpA is not possible in the majority of patients, while on the contrary, reducing the dosage often is. In some patients with peripheral SpA and PsA it is also possible to discontinue therapy and to achieve drug-free remission. PMID:22940233

  5. [Hymenoptera venom allergy. Analysis of double sensitization to wasp and bee venom in own material--diagnosis and classification for immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Stobiecki, Marcin; Dyga, Wojciech; Czarnobilska, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    According to scientific societies guidelines the indication for venom immunotherapy is based on the clinical history of the patient. Diagnostic tests, like skin prick test or specific IgE serum estimation are conduct to prove IgE dependent mechanism of allergy and insect identification. Recent guidelines indicates for group of patients with severe systemic reactions as a candidates for diagnostic testing and in consequence for immunotherapy. In some countries diagnostic tests are also performed in patient who have a history of large local reactions, if they are considered as a candidates for immunotherapy. Double sensitization in cases of patients unable to identify the culprit insect is a diagnostic and therapeutic problem. In our group of patients (n = 113) we confirmed the double sensitization in 30% cases. The addition of a major allergen labeling reduced the number of people actually double-sensitized to 8.84%. It was observed that in patients who are not able to identify insect double sensitization phenomenon is particularly frequent as much as 45.5% and in the determination of the major allergens in 18.2%. Such patients needed detailed diagnosis and in many cases the use of two vaccines to conduct immunotherapy. PMID:24720122

  6. Immunotherapy of acute radiation syndromes with antiradiation gamma G globulin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav; Casey, Rachael; Jones, Jeffrey; Kedar, Prasad

    Introduction: If an immunotherapy treatment approach to treatment of acute radiation syndromes (ARS) were to be developed; consideration could be given to neutralization of radiation toxins (Specific Radiation Determinants- SRD) by specific antiradiation antibodies. To accomplish this objective, irradiated animals were injected with a preparation of antiradiation immunoglobulin G (IgG) obtained from hyperimmune donors. Radiation-indeced toxins that we call Specific Radiation Determinants (SRD) possess toxic (neurotoxic, haemotoxic and enterotoxic) characteristics as well as specific antigenic properties that combined with the direct physiochemical direct radiation damage, induce the development of many of the pathological processes associated with ARS. We tested several specific hyperimmune IgG preparations against these radiation toxins and observed that their toxic properties were neutralized by specific antiradiation IgGs. Material and Methods: Rabbits were inoculated with SRD radiation toxins to induce hyperimmune serum. The hyperimmune serum was pooled from several animals, purified, and concentrated. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays of the hyperimmune serum revealed high titers of IgG with specific binding to radiation toxins. The antiradiation IgG preparation was injected into laboratory animals one hour before and three hours after irradiation, and was evaluated for its ability to protect inoculated animals against the development of acute radiation syndromes. Results: Animals that were inoculated with specific antiradiation antibodies before receiving lethal irradiation at LD 100/30 exhibited 60-75% survival rate at 30 days, whereas all control animals expired by 30 days following exposure. These inoculated animals also exhibited markedly reduced clinical symptoms of ARS, even those that did not survive irradiation. Discussion: The results of our experiments demonstrate that rabbit hyperimmune serum directed against SRD toxins afford significant, albeit

  7. An Examination of Clinical and Immunologic Outcomes in Food Allergen Immunotherapy by Route of Administration.

    PubMed

    Chiang, David; Berin, M Cecilia

    2015-06-01

    Allergen immunotherapy for the treatment of food allergy has been a subject of intensive study within the last 10 years. After an unsuccessful attempt with subcutaneous immunotherapy for peanut allergy, other routes with varying degrees of safety and efficacy have been tested for peanut, milk, and egg allergies. In this review, we summarize the results to date with oral immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy, and epicutaneous immunotherapy for the treatment of food allergy. While results of immunotherapy trials are promising, increases in efficacy are commonly associated with an increased side effect profile. There is a need for additional research beginning at the preclinical level to develop safe and effective treatments for food allergy. PMID:26141581

  8. Bacterial vectors for active immunotherapy reach clinical and industrial stages

    PubMed Central

    Le Gouëllec, Audrey; Chauchet, Xavier; Polack, Benoit; Buffat, Laurent; Toussaint, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Active immunotherapy based on live attenuated bacterial vectors has matured in terms of industrial development and develops through a combination of three phenomena. First, active immunotherapy that stimulates an antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell immune response has become a reality after several years of work. Second, there is still a need to identify vectors that can deliver antigens to the cytosol of antigen-presenting cells in vivo. Third, the recent progress in the understanding of bacterial lifestyle and in developing genetic engineering tools has enabled the design of bioengineered bugs that are capable of delivering antigens. Here, we review the mechanisms by which clinical bacterial vectors deliver antigens into the cytosol of antigen-presenting cells and summarize the development strategy of the three identified firms in this field. PMID:22894945

  9. Targeting CD8+ T-cell tolerance for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Stephanie R; Yuan, Jinyun; Teague, Ryan M

    2014-01-01

    In the final issue of Science in 2013, the American Association of Science recognized progress in the field of cancer immunotherapy as the ‘Breakthrough of the Year.’ The achievements were actually twofold, owing to the early success of genetically engineered chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) and to the mounting clinical triumphs achieved with checkpoint blockade antibodies. While fundamentally very different, the common thread of these independent strategies is the ability to prevent or overcome mechanisms of CD8+ T-cell tolerance for improved tumor immunity. Here we discuss how circumventing T-cell tolerance has provided experimental insights that have guided the field of clinical cancer immunotherapy to a place where real breakthroughs can finally be claimed. PMID:25290416

  10. Immunotherapy in endometrial cancer - an evolving therapeutic paradigm.

    PubMed

    Longoria, Teresa C; Eskander, Ramez N

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the only gynecologic malignancy with a rising incidence and mortality. While cure is routinely achieved with surgery alone or in combination with adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy when disease is confined to the uterus, patients with metastatic or recurrent disease exhibit limited response rates to cytotoxic chemotherapy, targeted agents, or hormonal therapy. Given the unmet clinical need in this patient population, exploration of novel therapeutic approaches is warranted, and attention is turning to immunomodulation of the tumor microenvironment. Existing evidence suggests that endometrial cancer is sufficiently immunogenic to be a reasonable candidate for active and/or passive immunotherapy. In this review, we critically examine what is known about the microenvironment in endometrial cancer and what has been learned from preliminary immunotherapy trials that enrolled endometrial cancer patients, encouraging further attempts at immunomodulation in the treatment of aggressive forms of this disease. PMID:27231571

  11. CD40 ligand immunotherapy in cancer: an efficient approach.

    PubMed

    Kuwashima, N; Kageyama, S; Eto, Y; Urashima, M

    2001-01-01

    Cancer cells do not elicit a clinically sufficient anti-tumor immune response that results in tumor rejection. Recently, many investigators have been trying to enhance anti-tumor immunity and encouraging results have been reported. This review will discuss current anti-cancer immunotherapy; interleukin-2 therapy, tumor vaccine secreting Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, dendritic cells fused with tumor cells, and CD40 ligand immunotherapy. Moreover, we introduce our two kinds of CD40 ligand immuno-genetherapy; (1) oral CD40 ligand gene therapy against lymphoma using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (published in BLOOD 2000), (2) cancer vaccine transfected with CD40 ligand ex vivo for neuroblastoma (unpublished). Both approaches resulted in a high degree of protection against the tumor progression and they are simple and safe in the murine system. PMID:11911421

  12. Current advances in T-cell-based cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingjun; Yin, Bingnan; Wang, Helen Y; Wang, Rong-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide; due to the lack of ideal cancer biomarkers for early detection or diagnosis, most patients present with late-stage disease at the time of diagnosis, thus limiting the potential for successful treatment. Traditional cancer treatments, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, have demonstrated very limited efficacy for patients with late-stage disease. Therefore, innovative and effective cancer treatments are urgently needed for cancer patients with late-stage and refractory disease. Cancer immunotherapy, particularly adoptive cell transfer, has shown great promise in the treatment of patients with late-stage disease, including those who are refractory to standard therapies. In this review, we will highlight recent advances and discuss future directions in adoptive cell transfer based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25524383

  13. Novel targets for natural killer/T-cell lymphoma immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kumai, Takumi; Kobayashi, Hiroya; Harabuchi, Yasuaki

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (NKTL) is a rare but highly aggressive Epstein-Barr virus-related malignancy, which mainly occurs in nasopharyngeal and nasal/paranasal areas. In addition to its high prevalence in Asian, Central American and South American populations, its incidence rate has been gradually increasing in Western countries. The current mainstay of treatment is a combination of multiple chemotherapies and irradiation. Although chemoradiotherapy can cure NKTL, it often causes severe and fatal adverse events. Because a growing body of evidence suggests that immunotherapy is effective against hematological malignancies, this treatment could provide an alternative to chemoradiotherapy for treatment of NKTL. In this review, we focus on how recent findings could be used to develop efficient immunotherapies against NKTL. PMID:26642249

  14. The Interplay of Immunotherapy and Chemotherapy: Harnessing Potential Synergies

    PubMed Central

    Emens, Leisha A.; Middleton, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Although cancer chemotherapy has historically been considered immune suppressive, it is now accepted that certain chemotherapies can augment tumor immunity. The recent success of immune checkpoint inhibitors has renewed interest in immunotherapies, and in combining them with chemotherapy to achieve additive or synergistic clinical activity. Two major ways that chemotherapy promotes tumor immunity are by inducing immunogenic cell death as part of its intended therapeutic effect, and by disrupting strategies that tumors use to evade immune recognition. This second strategy in particular is dependent on the drug, its dose, and the schedule of chemotherapy administration in relation to antigen exposure or release. In this Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads article we focus on cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint blockade as a forum for reviewing preclinical and clinical data demonstrating the interplay between immunotherapy and chemotherapy. PMID:25941355

  15. Novel Anti-Melanoma Immunotherapies: Disarming Tumor Escape Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sapoznik, Sivan; Hammer, Ohad; Ortenberg, Rona; Besser, Michal J.; Ben-Moshe, Tehila; Schachter, Jacob; Markel, Gal

    2012-01-01

    The immune system fights cancer and sometimes temporarily eliminates it or reaches an equilibrium stage of tumor growth. However, continuous immunological pressure also selects poorly immunogenic tumor variants that eventually escape the immune control system. Here, we focus on metastatic melanoma, a highly immunogenic tumor, and on anti-melanoma immunotherapies, which recently, especially following the FDA approval of Ipilimumab, gained interest from drug development companies. We describe new immunomodulatory approaches currently in the development pipeline, focus on the novel CEACAM1 immune checkpoint, and compare its potential to the extensively described targets, CTLA4 and PD1. This paper combines multi-disciplinary approaches and describes anti-melanoma immunotherapies from molecular, medical, and business angles. PMID:22778766

  16. Monitoring Regulatory Immune Responses in Tumor Immunotherapy Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Brian M.; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2013-01-01

    While immune monitoring of tumor immunotherapy often focuses on the generation of productive Th1-type inflammatory immune responses, the importance of regulatory immune responses is often overlooked, despite the well-documented effects of regulatory immune responses in suppressing anti-tumor immunity. In a variety of malignancies, the frequency of regulatory cell populations has been shown to correlate with disease progression and a poor prognosis, further emphasizing the importance of characterizing the effects of immunotherapy on these populations. This review focuses on the role of suppressive immune populations (regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and tumor-associated macrophages) in inhibiting anti-tumor immunity, how these populations have been used in the immune monitoring of clinical trials, the prognostic value of these responses, and how the monitoring of these regulatory responses can be improved in the future. PMID:23653893

  17. Exosomes as nanocarriers for immunotherapy of cancer and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thanh-Huyen; Mattheolabakis, George; Aldawsari, Hibah; Amiji, Mansoor

    2015-09-01

    Cell secreted exosomes (30-100nm vesicles) play a major role in intercellular communication due to their ability to transfer proteins and nucleic acids from one cell to another. Depending on the originating cell type and the cargo, exosomes can have immunosuppressive or immunostimulatory effects, which have potential application as immunotherapies for cancer and autoimmune diseases. Cellular components shed from tumor cells or antigen presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells, macrophages and B cells, have been shown to be efficiently packaged in exosomes. In this review, we focus on the application of exosomes as nanocarriers and immunological agents for cancer and autoimmune immunotherapy. APC-derived exosomes demonstrate effective therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of cancer and experimental autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and multiple sclerosis. In addition to their intrinsic immunomodulating activity, exosomes have many advantages over conventional nanocarriers for drug and gene delivery. PMID:25842185

  18. Immune surveillance and immunotherapy: lessons from carbohydrate mimotopes.

    PubMed

    Pashov, Anastas; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2009-05-26

    The immune system plays an intricate role in tumorigenesis, therefore cancer immunotherapy borrows concepts both from autoimmunity and vaccinology. Due to tumor-induced immune suppression, the adjuvant setting seems most suitable for immunotherapy, which optimally targets multiple tumor associated antigens after removal of the bulk of the tumor. The responses elicited need not match the intensity of those against pathogens. Retrospective studies suggest that cancer patients' survival correlates with low-titer anti-tumor IgM antibodies. Carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) prove instrumental as immunogens by boosting similar persistent IgM anti-tumor responses, engaging the innate/adaptive immunity interface and promoting cytotoxic responses and epitope spreading. PMID:19200843

  19. Immunotherapy targeting pyroglutamate-3 Aβ: prospects and challenges.

    PubMed

    Cynis, Holger; Frost, Jeffrey L; Crehan, Helen; Lemere, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    Immunization against amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides deposited in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has shown considerable therapeutic effect in animal models however, the translation into human Alzheimer's patients is challenging. In recent years, a number of promising Aβ immunotherapy trials failed to reach primary study endpoints. Aside from uncertainties in the selection of patients and the start and duration of treatment, these results also suggest that the mechanisms underlying AD are still not fully understood. Thorough characterizations of protein aggregates in AD brain have revealed a conspicuous heterogeneity of Aβ peptides enabling the study of the toxic potential of each of the major forms. One such form, amino-terminally truncated and modified pyroglutamate (pGlu)-3 Aβ peptide appears to play a seminal role for disease initiation, qualifying it as novel target for immunotherapy approaches. PMID:27363697

  20. Epigenetic modifiers in immunotherapy: a focus on checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Terranova-Barberio, Manuela; Thomas, Scott; Munster, Pamela N

    2016-06-01

    Immune surveillance should be directed to suppress tumor development and progression, involving a balance of coinhibitory and costimulatory signals that amplify immune response without overwhelming the host. Immunotherapy confers durable clinical benefit in 'immunogenic tumors', whereas in other tumors the responses are modest. Thus, immune checkpoint inhibitors may need to be combined with strategies to boost immune response or increase the tumor immune profile. Epigenetic aberrations contribute significantly to carcinogenesis. Recent findings suggest that epigenetic drugs prime the immune response by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens and immune-related genes, as well as modulating chemokines and cytokines involved in immune system activation. This review describes our current understanding regarding epigenetic and immunotherapy combination, focusing on immune response priming to checkpoint blockade. PMID:27197539

  1. Management of polysensitized patient: from molecular diagnostics to biomolecular immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ciprandi, Giorgio; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Frati, Franco

    2015-01-01

    A panel of Italian allergists gathered to discuss the issue concerning the management of polysensitized patients. The main conclusions were as follows: polysensitization is a relevant clinical characteristic as it affects about 70-80% of the global allergic population; the diagnostic pathway needs the use of an adequate and thorough methodology, based on the demonstration of consistency between history and documented sensitization; polysensitization and polyallergy are not synonymous: true allergy should always be demonstrated; polysensitization does not constitute a limitation to allergen immunotherapy prescription, as 1-2 allergen extracts could be effective in polysensitized patients; the allergen immunotherapy product characteristics should include the following: high efficacy and optimal safety profile, standardized production, and documented presence and titration of the major allergen. PMID:26144241

  2. Allergen immunotherapy for birch pollen-allergic patients: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Moingeon, Philippe; Floch, Véronique Bordas-Le; Airouche, Sabi; Baron-Bodo, Véronique; Nony, Emmanuel; Mascarell, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    As of today, allergen immunotherapy is performed with aqueous natural allergen extracts. Recombinant allergen vaccines are not yet commercially available, although they could provide patients with well-defined and highly consistent drug substances. As Bet v 1 is the major allergen involved in birch pollen allergy, with more than 95% of patients sensitized to this allergen, pharmaceutical-grade recombinant Bet v 1-based vaccines were produced and clinically tested. Herein, we compare the clinical results and modes of action of treatments based on either a birch pollen extract or recombinant Bet v 1 expressed as hypoallergenic or natural-like molecules. We also discuss the future of allergen immunotherapy with improved drugs intended for birch pollen-allergic patients suffering from rhinoconjunctivitis. PMID:27140409

  3. Role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Martin, François; Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are immature myeloid cells that infiltrate human and experimental tumors and strongly inhibit anticancer immune response directly or by inducing regulatory T-lymphocyte activity. Consequently, MDSCs are important actors of cancer-induced immune tolerance and a major obstacle to efficiency of cancer immunotherapy. Several means of preventing MDSCs accumulation or inhibiting their immunosuppressive effect were recently discovered in cancer-bearing hosts, contributing to restoring antitumor immunity and consequently to control of tumor growth. In experimental tumor models, targeting MDSCs can enhance the effects of active or passive immunotherapy. While similar effects have not yet been noted in cancer-bearing patients, recent preclinical findings demonstrating that the selective toxicity of conventional chemotherapies such as gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil on MDSCs might contribute to their anticancer effect provide impetus to pursue investigations to unravel novel therapeutics that target MDSCs in humans. PMID:22150000

  4. Is immunotherapy an opportunity for effective treatment of drug addiction?

    PubMed

    Zalewska-Kaszubska, Jadwiga

    2015-11-27

    Immunotherapy has a great potential of becoming a new therapeutic strategy in the treatment of addiction to psychoactive drugs. It may be used to treat addiction but also to prevent neurotoxic complications of drug overdose. In preclinical studies two immunological methods have been tested; active immunization, which relies on the administration of vaccines and passive immunization, which relies on the administration of monoclonal antibodies. Until now researchers have succeeded in developing vaccines and/or antibodies against addiction to heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine, nicotine and phencyclidine. Their effectiveness has been confirmed in preclinical studies. At present, clinical studies are being conducted for vaccines against nicotine and cocaine and also anti-methamphetamine monoclonal antibody. These preclinical and clinical studies suggest that immunotherapy may be useful in the treatment of addiction and drug overdose. However, there are a few problems to be solved. One of them is controlling the level of antibodies due to variability between subjects. But even obtaining a suitable antibody titer does not guarantee the effectiveness of the vaccine. Additionally, there is a risk of intentional or unintentional overdose. As vaccines prevent passing of drugs through the blood/brain barrier and thereby prevent their positive reinforcement, some addicted patients may erroneously seek higher doses of psychoactive substances to get "high". Consequently, vaccination should be targeted at persons who have a strong motivation to free themselves from drug dependency. It seems that immunotherapy may be an opportunity for effective treatment of drug addiction if directed to adequate candidates for treatment. For other addicts, immunotherapy may be a very important element supporting psycho- and pharmacotherapy. PMID:26432911

  5. Autoimmune myasthenia gravis, immunotherapy and thymectomy in children.

    PubMed

    Ware, Tyson L; Ryan, Monique M; Kornberg, Andrew J

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune myasthenia gravis is a rare condition in children. Identifying antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor is helpful in making the diagnosis. However, seronegative cases do exist and need to be distinguished from congenital forms of myasthenia. There is little published experience to inform the judicious management of autoimmune myasthenia gravis in children. In this article, we report our experience in the management of 12 cases of autoimmune myasthenia gravis in children in the modern era of medical immunotherapy and thymectomy. PMID:21911294

  6. Self-Assembly Protein Nanogels for Safer Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Purwada, Alberto; Tian, Ye F; Huang, Weishan; Rohrbach, Kathleen M; Deol, Simrita; August, Avery; Singh, Ankur

    2016-06-01

    Soluble antigen-based cancer vaccines have poor retention in tissues along with suboptimal antigen processing by dendritic cells. Multiple booster doses are often needed, leading to dose-limiting systemic toxicity. A versatile, immunomodulatory, self-assembly protein nanogel vaccine is reported that induces robust immune cell response at lower antigen doses than soluble antigens, an important step towards biomaterials-based safer immunotherapy approaches. PMID:27100566

  7. Advances in chimeric antigen receptor immunotherapy for neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Heczey, Andras; Louis, Chrystal U

    2013-12-01

    Neuroblastoma (NBL) is the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor and has heterogeneous biology and behavior. Patients with high-risk disease have poor prognosis despite complex multimodal therapy; therefore, novel curative approaches are needed. Immunotherapy is a novel therapeutic approach that harnesses the inherent activity of the immune system to control and eliminate malignant cells. One form of immunotherapy uses chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) to target tumor-associated antigens. CARs are derived from the antigen-binding domain of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) coupled with the intracellular signaling portion of the T cell receptor. CARs can combine the specificity and effectiveness of MAbs with the active bio-distribution, direct cytotoxicity, and long-term persistence of T cells. NBL provides an attractive target for CAR immunotherapy as many of its tumor-associated antigens are not expressed at significant levels on normal tissues, thus decreasing potential treatment related toxicity. Two previous clinical trials utilizing L1-cell adhesion molecule (L1-CAM) and disialoganglioside (GD2) specific CARs (GD2-CAR) have demonstrated safety and anti-tumor efficacy in heavily pretreated relapsed/refractory neuroblastoma patients. Based on these promising results and on improved techniques that can further potentiate CAR therapies, two clinical trials are currently investigating the use of GD2-CARs in children with NBL. Several approaches may further enhance anti-tumor activity and persistence of CAR modified cells, and if these can be safely translated into the clinic, CAR-based immunotherapy could become a viable adjunct or potential alternative to conventional treatment options for patients with NBL. PMID:24333408

  8. Immunomonitoring in glioma immunotherapy: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lamano, Jonathan B.; Ampie, Leonel; Choy, Winward; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; DiDomenico, Joseph David; Oyon, Daniel E.; Parsa, Andrew T.; Bloch, Orin

    2016-01-01

    Given the continued poor clinical outcomes and refractory nature of glioblastoma multiforme to traditional interventions, immunotherapy is gaining traction due to its potential for specific tumor-targeting and long-term antitumor protective surveillance. Currently, development of glioma immunotherapy relies on overall survival as an endpoint in clinical trials. However, the identification of surrogate immunologic biomarkers can accelerate the development of successful immunotherapeutic strategies. Immunomonitoring techniques possess the potential to elucidate immunological mechanisms of antitumor responses, monitor disease progression, evaluate therapeutic effect, identify candidates for immunotherapy, and serve as prognostic markers of clinical outcome. Current immunomonitoring assays assess delayed-type hypersensitivity, T-cell proliferation, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte function, cytokine secretion profiles, antibody titers, and lymphocyte phenotypes. Yet, no single immunomonitoring technique can reliably predict outcomes, relegating immunological markers to exploratory endpoints. In response, the most recent immunomonitoring assays are incorporating emerging technologies and novel analysis techniques to approach the goal of identifying a competent immunological biomarker which predicts therapy responsiveness and clinical outcome. This review addresses the current status of immunomonitoring in glioma vaccine clinical trials with emphasis on correlations with clinical response. PMID:26638171

  9. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer – Recent Developments and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Michael T.; Drake, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    Since the approval of sipuleucel-T for men with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer in 2010, great strides in the development of anti-cancer immunotherapies have been made. Current drug development in this area has focused primarily on antigen specific [i.e. cancer vaccines and antibody based therapies)] or checkpoint inhibitor therapies, with the checkpoint inhibitors perhaps gaining the most attention as of late. Indeed, drugs blocking the inhibitory signal generated by the engagement of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) found on T-cells has emerged as potent means to combat the immunosuppressive milieu. The anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibody ipilimumab has already been approved in advanced melanoma and two phase III trials evaluating ipilimumab in men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer are underway. A phase III trial evaluating ProstVac-VF, a poxvirus-based therapeutic prostate cancer vaccine, is also underway. While there has been reason for encouragement over the past few years, many questions regarding the use of immunotherapies remain. Namely it is unclear what stage of disease is most likely to benefit from these approaches, how best to incorporate said treatments with each other and into our current treatment regimens and which therapy is most appropriate for which disease. Herein we review some of the recent advances in immunotherapy as related to the treatment of prostate cancer and outline some of the challenges that lie ahead. PMID:24477411

  10. Recent advances in immunotherapy and vaccine development for peanut allergy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Peanut allergy is a common problem and can be the cause of severe, life-threatening allergic reactions. It rarely resolves, with the majority of patients carrying the disease onto adulthood. Peanut allergy poses a significant burden on the quality of life of sufferers and their families, which results mainly from the fear of accidental peanut ingestion, but is also due to dietary and social restrictions. Current standard management involves avoidance, patient education and provision of emergency medication, for use in allergic reactions, when they occur. Efforts have been made to develop a vaccine for peanut allergy. Recent developments have also highlighted the use of immunotherapy, which has shown promise as an active form of treatment and may present a disease-modifying therapy for peanut allergy. So far, results, especially from oral immunotherapy studies, have shown good efficacy in achieving desensitization to peanut with a good safety profile. However, the capacity to induce long-term tolerance has not been demonstrated conclusively yet and larger, phase III studies are required to further investigate safety and efficacy of this intervention. Peanut immunotherapy is not currently recommended for routine clinical use or outside specialist allergy units. PMID:26288733

  11. The Immune Response to Tumors as a Tool toward Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pandolfi, F.; Cianci, R.; Pagliari, D.; Casciano, F.; Bagalà, C.; Astone, A.; Landolfi, R.; Barone, C.

    2011-01-01

    Until recently cancer medical therapy was limited to chemotherapy that could not differentiate cancer cells from normal cells. More recently with the remarkable mushroom of immunology, newer tools became available, resulting in the novel possibility to attack cancer with the specificity of the immune system. Herein we will review some of the recent achievement of immunotherapy in such aggressive cancers as melanoma, prostatic cancer, colorectal carcinoma, and hematologic malignancies. Immunotherapy of tumors has developed several techniques: immune cell transfer, vaccines, immunobiological molecules such as monoclonal antibodies that improve the immune responses to tumors. This can be achieved by blocking pathways limiting the immune response, such as CTLA-4 or Tregs. Immunotherapy may also use cytokines especially proinflammatory cytokines to enhance the activity of cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) derived from tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). The role of newly discovered cytokines remains to be investigated. Alternatively, an other mechanism consists in enhancing the expression of TAAs on tumor cells. Finally, monoclonal antibodies may be used to target oncogenes. PMID:22190975

  12. Laser immunotherapy: a novel approach for metastatic tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Korbelik, Mladen; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2004-08-01

    The ideal treatment modality for tumors, particularly for those that metastasize to multiple remote sites, should eradicate the primary tumor and elicit a systemic, tumor-specific response leading to elimination of metastases and to long-term tumor immunity. Using the selective photothermal interaction as a precursor, laser immunotherapy was developed by introducing a novel immunoadjuvant administered in conjunction with the laser-absorbing dye. Specifically, an 805-nm laser and indocyanine green (ICG) was used for the selective photothermal interaction, and a novel immunoadjuvant, glycated chitosan (GC), was used as the immunological stimulant. The laser-ICG-GC combinations has been resulted in the following results in animal studies. (1) Selective destruction of deep target tumor target has been achieved; (2) Eradication of treated primary tumors and regression and disappearance of untreated distant metastases have been observed; (3) Long-term survival of tumor-bearing rats have been resulted; (4) Long-term immunity for resistance to repeated, dose-escalated subsequent tumor challenges has been induced; (5) Tumor-specific immunological responses, after laser immunotherapy treatment, have been detected at cellular and molecular levels. The procedure of laser immunotherapy and major results in animal studies will be summarized and some new results using the immunological enhancement for photodynamic therapy treatment will be presented.

  13. Immunotherapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Rachna; Vaena, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is often curable by surgery alone. However, metastatic RCC is generally incurable. In the 1990s, immunotherapy in the form of cytokines was the mainstay of treatment for metastatic RCC. However, responses were seen in only a minority of highly selected patients with substantial treatment-related toxicities. The advent of targeted agents such as vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase inhibitors VEGF-TKIs and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors led to a change in this paradigm due to improved response rates and progression-free survival, a better safety profile, and the convenience of oral administration. However, most patients ultimately progress with about 12% being alive at 5 years. In contrast, durable responses lasting 10 years or more are noted in a minority of those treated with cytokines. More recently, an improved overall survival with newer forms of immunotherapy in other malignancies (such as melanoma and prostate cancer) has led to a resurgence of interest in immune therapies in metastatic RCC. In this review we discuss the rationale for immunotherapy and recent developments in immunotherapeutic strategies for treating metastatic RCC. PMID:26161397

  14. IgE-based immunotherapy of cancer: challenges and chances

    PubMed Central

    Singer, J; Jensen-Jarolim, E

    2014-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies is an indispensable cornerstone of clinical oncology. Notably, all FDA-approved antibodies comprise the IgG class, although numerous research articles proposed monoclonal antibodies of the IgM, IgG, IgA and IgE classes directed specifically against tumor-associated antigens. In particular, for the IgE isotype class, several recent studies could demonstrate high tumoricidic efficacy. Therefore, this review specifically highlights the latest developments toward IgE-based immunotherapy of cancer. Possible mechanisms and safety aspects of IgE-mediated tumor cell death are discussed with special focus on the attracted immune cells. An outlook is given on how especially comparative oncology could contribute to further developments. Humans and dogs have a highly comparable IgE biology, suggesting that translational AllergoOncology studies in patients with canine cancer could have predictive value for the potential of IgE-based anticancer immunotherapy in human clinical oncology. PMID:24117861

  15. Immunotherapy in Multiple Myeloma Using Cancer-Testis Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Seifi-Alan, Mahnaz; Shamsi, Roshanak; Esfandiary, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Context: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B-cell malignancy characterized by monoclonal expansion of abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow. It accounts for 10% of hematological malignancies. Although patients respond to a wide range of anticancer modalities, relapse occurs in a significant number of the cases. Immunotherapeutic approaches have been evolved to tackle this problem. Cancer-testis antigens CTAs as a group of tumor-associated antigens are appropriate targets for cancer immunotherapy as they have restricted expression pattern in normal tissues except for testis which is an immune-privileged site. Expression of these antigens has been assessed in different malignancies including MM. Evidence Acquisition: We performed a computerized search of the MEDLINE/PubMed databases with key words: multiple myeloma, cancer-testis antigen, and cancer stem cell and immunotherapy. Results: Several CTAs including NY-ESO-1, MAGE and GAGE family have been shown to be expressed in MM patients. Cellular and humoral immune responses against these antigens have been detected in MM patients. Conclusions: The frequent and high expression level of CTAs in MM patients shows that these antigens can be applied as cancer biomarkers as well as targets for immunotherapy in these patients. PMID:26634107

  16. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Iemoli, E; Borgonovo, L; Fusi, A; Magni, C; Ricci, E D; Rizzardini, G; Piconi, S

    2016-03-01

    HIV infection is a relative contraindication for allergic immunotherapy (AIT). In the last decade, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has improved the immune function and life expectancy in HIV-infected patients whose respiratory allergic incidence is similar to the general population. We evaluated the safety and clinical effectiveness of sublingual immunotherapy in a group of grass pollen-allergic HAART-treated HIV-positive patients. Thirteen patients received sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablet (Oralair, Stallergenes©) and symptomatic therapy and were compared with nine patients receiving symptomatic therapy alone. Clinical benefits were evaluated by the analysis of total combined score (TCS), sum of symptom-medication score, and a quality of life (QoL) questionnaire. HIV viral load and peripheral TCD4 lymphocytes were analyzed at the beginning and at the end of the study. Clinical efficacy data showed a significant improvement in SLIT-treated patients compared to controls (TCS: P = 0.0001; QoL: P = 0.03). We did not observe any significant alteration of TCD4 cell counts and viral load (VL) in both groups. Our preliminary data showed that SLIT therapy in viro-immunological controlled HAART treated HIV positive patients was efficacious, safe and well tolerated. PMID:26228482

  17. Recent advances in immunotherapy and vaccine development for peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Anagnostou, Katherine

    2015-05-01

    Peanut allergy is a common problem and can be the cause of severe, life-threatening allergic reactions. It rarely resolves, with the majority of patients carrying the disease onto adulthood. Peanut allergy poses a significant burden on the quality of life of sufferers and their families, which results mainly from the fear of accidental peanut ingestion, but is also due to dietary and social restrictions. Current standard management involves avoidance, patient education and provision of emergency medication, for use in allergic reactions, when they occur. Efforts have been made to develop a vaccine for peanut allergy. Recent developments have also highlighted the use of immunotherapy, which has shown promise as an active form of treatment and may present a disease-modifying therapy for peanut allergy. So far, results, especially from oral immunotherapy studies, have shown good efficacy in achieving desensitization to peanut with a good safety profile. However, the capacity to induce long-term tolerance has not been demonstrated conclusively yet and larger, phase III studies are required to further investigate safety and efficacy of this intervention. Peanut immunotherapy is not currently recommended for routine clinical use or outside specialist allergy units. PMID:26288733

  18. Tumour immunogenicity, antigen presentation and immunological barriers in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Escors, David

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20(th) century, scientists have tried to stimulate the anti-tumour activities of the immune system to fight against cancer. However, the scientific effort devoted on the development of cancer immunotherapy has not been translated into the expected clinical success. On the contrary, classical anti-neoplastic treatments such as surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are the first line of treatment. Nevertheless, there is compelling evidence on the immunogenicity of cancer cells, and the capacity of the immune system to expand cancer-specific effector cytotoxic T cells. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses strongly depends on efficient tumour antigen presentation from professional antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Several strategies have been used to boost DC antigen presenting functions, but at the end cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as would be expected according to preclinical models. In this review we comment on these discrepancies, focusing our attention on the contribution of regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells to the lack of therapeutic success of DC-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24634791

  19. Possible role of laser phototherapy in laser immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hode, Tomas; Hode, Lars

    2009-02-01

    Laser immunotherapy is a promising cancer treatment method that induces antitumor immunity and appears to be effective both locally and systemically. In this context, an important factor is the overall state of the immune system, both locally and systemically. The success of any immunotherapy treatment depends on the balance between the local immunosuppressive forces induced by the tumor and the immune response of the host organism. Factors that influence this balance include heat-shock proteins (for example HSP70), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukins, and more. Laser phototherapy, which is based on non-thermal photobiological processes, has been shown to modulate the body's own immune response, both locally and systemically, with a strong influence on for example cytokine production and heat-shock protein synthesis. Laser phototherapy may therefore be an important component in the overall efficacy of laser immunotherapy, and may tip the balance between the immunosuppressive and immunostimulatory forces in favor of immunostimulation.

  20. Targeting NK Cells for Anticancer Immunotherapy: Clinical and Preclinical Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Carotta, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. Although the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer (NK) cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells, as they kill target cells in an antigen-independent manner. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the active role of NK cells in cancer immune surveillance, only few clinically approved therapies currently exist that harness their potential. Our increased understanding of NK cell biology over the past few years has renewed the interest in NK cell-based anticancer therapies, which has lead to a steady increase of NK cell-based clinical and preclinical trials. Here, the role of NK cells in cancer immune surveillance is summarized, and several novel approaches to enhance NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer are discussed. PMID:27148271

  1. Therapeutic cancer vaccines and combination immunotherapies involving vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang; Urban, Julie; Kalinski, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    Recent US Food and Drug Administration approvals of Provenge® (sipuleucel-T) as the first cell-based cancer therapeutic factor and ipilimumab (Yervoy®/anticytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4) as the first “checkpoint blocker” highlight recent advances in cancer immunotherapy. Positive results of the clinical trials evaluating additional checkpoint blocking agents (blockade of programmed death [PD]-1, and its ligands, PD-1 ligand 1 and 2) and of several types of cancer vaccines suggest that cancer immunotherapy may soon enter the center stage of comprehensive cancer care, supplementing surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. This review discusses the current status of the clinical evaluation of different classes of therapeutic cancer vaccines and possible avenues for future development, focusing on enhancing the magnitude and quality of cancer-specific immunity by either the functional reprogramming of patients’ endogenous dendritic cells or the use of ex vivo-manipulated dendritic cells as autologous cellular transplants. This review further discusses the available strategies aimed at promoting the entry of vaccination-induced T-cells into tumor tissues and prolonging their local antitumor activity. Finally, the recent improvements to the above three modalities for cancer immunotherapy (inducing tumor-specific T-cells, prolonging their persistence and functionality, and enhancing tumor homing of effector T-cells) and rationale for their combined application in order to achieve clinically effective anticancer responses are addressed. PMID:27471705

  2. Immunomonitoring in glioma immunotherapy: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lamano, Jonathan B; Ampie, Leonel; Choy, Winward; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; DiDomenico, Joseph D; Oyon, Daniel E; Parsa, Andrew T; Bloch, Orin

    2016-03-01

    Given the continued poor clinical outcomes and refractory nature of glioblastoma multiforme to traditional interventions, immunotherapy is gaining traction due to its potential for specific tumor-targeting and long-term antitumor protective surveillance. Currently, development of glioma immunotherapy relies on overall survival as an endpoint in clinical trials. However, the identification of surrogate immunologic biomarkers can accelerate the development of successful immunotherapeutic strategies. Immunomonitoring techniques possess the potential to elucidate immunological mechanisms of antitumor responses, monitor disease progression, evaluate therapeutic effect, identify candidates for immunotherapy, and serve as prognostic markers of clinical outcome. Current immunomonitoring assays assess delayed-type hypersensitivity, T cell proliferation, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte function, cytokine secretion profiles, antibody titers, and lymphocyte phenotypes. Yet, no single immunomonitoring technique can reliably predict outcomes, relegating immunological markers to exploratory endpoints. In response, the most recent immunomonitoring assays are incorporating emerging technologies and novel analysis techniques to approach the goal of identifying a competent immunological biomarker which predicts therapy responsiveness and clinical outcome. This review addresses the current status of immunomonitoring in glioma vaccine clinical trials with emphasis on correlations with clinical response. PMID:26638171

  3. A review of allergy and allergen specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bidad, Katayoon; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein; Farid, Reza

    2011-03-01

    Since 20th century, when allergy was defined, an ongoing attempt for discovering the mechanisms underlying it and its treatment began. Defining allergens as well as cells such as regulatory T-cells and characterizing the antibodies involved in the pathogenesis (including blocking antibodies) have helped very much towards a better understanding of the immunologic process. However, allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT), as a specific curative treatment for allergy also dates back to the beginning of the previous century and has progressed considerably during these years. SIT similar to natural immunomodulation, directs the immune response towards tolerance. New strategies in this field, such as using recombinant allergens, T- and B-cell-epitope-containing peptides, and DNA vaccination have shown promising results. Sublingual immunotherapy, although not yet FDA-approved, as an alternative strategy in SIT has demonstrated efficacy as well as safety. Furthermore, allergen extracts, their standardization and their modification have also been the focus of much research. Undoubtedly, specific immunotherapy is proven to be an efficacious method to treat allergy, so its cost-effectiveness should be estimated in developing countries in order to include it in the country's health priorities. Informing physicians about the new anti-vaccination movement is also crucial. PMID:21358009

  4. Can Alzheimer disease be prevented by amyloid-β immunotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Lemere, Cynthia A.; Masliah, Eliezer

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide has become a major therapeutic target in AD on the basis of pathological, biochemical and genetic evidence that supports a role for this molecule in the disease process. Active and passive Aβ immunotherapies have been shown to lower cerebral Aβ levels and improve cognition in animal models of AD. In humans, dosing in the phase II clinical trial of the AN1792 Aβ vaccine was stopped when ~6% of the immunized patients developed meningoencephalitis. However, some plaque clearance and modest clinical improvements were observed in patients following immunization. As a result of this study, at least seven passive Aβ immunotherapies are now in clinical trials in patients with mild to moderate AD. Several second-generation active Aβ vaccines are also in early clinical trials. On the basis of preclinical studies and the limited data from clinical trials, Aβ immunotherapy might be most effective in preventing or slowing the progression of AD when patients are immunized before or in the very earliest stages of disease onset. Biomarkers for AD and imaging technology have improved greatly over the past 10 years and, in the future, might be used to identify presymptomatic, at-risk individuals who might benefit from Aβ immunization. PMID:20140000

  5. Successful immunotherapy induces previously unidentified allergen-specific CD4+ T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Ryan, John F; Hovde, Rachel; Glanville, Jacob; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Ji, Xuhuai; Gupta, Sheena; Tibshirani, Robert J; Jay, David C; Boyd, Scott D; Chinthrajah, R Sharon; Davis, Mark M; Galli, Stephen J; Maecker, Holden T; Nadeau, Kari C

    2016-03-01

    Allergen immunotherapy can desensitize even subjects with potentially lethal allergies, but the changes induced in T cells that underpin successful immunotherapy remain poorly understood. In a cohort of peanut-allergic participants, we used allergen-specific T-cell sorting and single-cell gene expression to trace the transcriptional "roadmap" of individual CD4+ T cells throughout immunotherapy. We found that successful immunotherapy induces allergen-specific CD4+ T cells to expand and shift toward an "anergic" Th2 T-cell phenotype largely absent in both pretreatment participants and healthy controls. These findings show that sustained success, even after immunotherapy is withdrawn, is associated with the induction, expansion, and maintenance of immunotherapy-specific memory and naive T-cell phenotypes as early as 3 mo into immunotherapy. These results suggest an approach for immune monitoring participants undergoing immunotherapy to predict the success of future treatment and could have implications for immunotherapy targets in other diseases like cancer, autoimmune disease, and transplantation. PMID:26811452

  6. Successful immunotherapy induces previously unidentified allergen-specific CD4+ T-cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, John F.; Hovde, Rachel; Glanville, Jacob; Lyu, Shu-Chen; Ji, Xuhuai; Gupta, Sheena; Tibshirani, Robert J.; Jay, David C.; Boyd, Scott D.; Chinthrajah, R. Sharon; Davis, Mark M.; Galli, Stephen J.; Maecker, Holden T.; Nadeau, Kari C.

    2016-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy can desensitize even subjects with potentially lethal allergies, but the changes induced in T cells that underpin successful immunotherapy remain poorly understood. In a cohort of peanut-allergic participants, we used allergen-specific T-cell sorting and single-cell gene expression to trace the transcriptional “roadmap” of individual CD4+ T cells throughout immunotherapy. We found that successful immunotherapy induces allergen-specific CD4+ T cells to expand and shift toward an “anergic” Th2 T-cell phenotype largely absent in both pretreatment participants and healthy controls. These findings show that sustained success, even after immunotherapy is withdrawn, is associated with the induction, expansion, and maintenance of immunotherapy-specific memory and naive T-cell phenotypes as early as 3 mo into immunotherapy. These results suggest an approach for immune monitoring participants undergoing immunotherapy to predict the success of future treatment and could have implications for immunotherapy targets in other diseases like cancer, autoimmune disease, and transplantation. PMID:26811452

  7. Perspectives on future Alzheimer therapies: amyloid-β protofibrils - a new target for immunotherapy with BAN2401 in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lannfelt, Lars; Möller, Christer; Basun, Hans; Osswald, Gunilla; Sehlin, Dag; Satlin, Andrew; Logovinsky, Veronika; Gellerfors, Pär

    2014-01-01

    The symptomatic drugs currently on the market for Alzheimer's disease (AD) have no effect on disease progression, and this creates a large unmet medical need. The type of drug that has developed most rapidly in the last decade is immunotherapy: vaccines and, especially, passive vaccination with monoclonal antibodies. Antibodies are attractive drugs as they can be made highly specific for their target and often with few side effects. Data from recent clinical AD trials indicate that a treatment effect by immunotherapy is possible, providing hope for a new generation of drugs. The first anti-amyloid-beta (anti-Aβ) vaccine developed by Elan, AN1792, was halted in phase 2 because of aseptic meningoencephalitis. However, in a follow-up study, patients with antibody response to the vaccine demonstrated reduced cognitive decline, supporting the hypothesis that Aβ immunotherapy may have clinically relevant effects. Bapineuzumab (Elan/Pfizer Inc./Johnson & Johnson), a monoclonal antibody targeting fibrillar Aβ, was stopped because the desired clinical effect was not seen. Solanezumab (Eli Lilly and Company) was developed to target soluble, monomeric Aβ. In two phase 3 studies, Solanezumab did not meet primary endpoints. When data from the two studies were pooled, a positive pattern emerged, revealing a significant slowing of cognitive decline in the subgroup of mild AD. The Arctic mutation has been shown to specifically increase the formation of soluble Aβ protofibrils, an Aβ species shown to be toxic to neurons and likely to be present in all cases of AD. A monoclonal antibody, mAb158, was developed to target Aβ protofibrils with high selectivity. It has at least a 1,000-fold higher selectivity for protofibrils as compared with monomers of Aβ, thus targeting the toxic species of the peptide. A humanized version of mAb158, BAN2401, has now entered a clinical phase 2b trial in a collaboration between BioArctic Neuroscience and Eisai without the safety concerns seen

  8. Optimal control on bladder cancer growth model with BCG immunotherapy and chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewi, C.; Trisilowati

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, an optimal control model of the growth of bladder cancer with BCG (Basil Calmate Guerin) immunotherapy and chemotherapy is discussed. The purpose of this optimal control is to determine the number of BCG vaccine and drug should be given during treatment such that the growth of bladder cancer cells can be suppressed. Optimal control is obtained by applying Pontryagin principle. Furthermore, the optimal control problem is solved numerically using Forward-Backward Sweep method. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the vaccine and drug in controlling the growth of cancer cells. Hence, it can reduce the number of cancer cells that is not infected with BCG as well as minimize the cost of the treatment.

  9. Optimization of Folate-Targeted Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Experimental Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Bindu; Paulos, Chrystal; Low, Philip S

    2016-08-01

    Folate-targeted immunotherapy constitutes a powerful method for the treatment of established arthritis in multiple animal models of the disease. The therapy involves immunization of the animal against a hapten to induce anti-hapten antibodies, followed by injection with a folate-hapten conjugate to decorate the surface of folate receptor-positive (activated) macrophages with the antigenic hapten. The hapten-marked macrophages are then recognized by the anti-hapten antibodies and eliminated by immune mechanisms, leading to attenuation of disease symptoms. In the following paper, we optimize the therapy for elimination of inflammatory macrophages and suppression of rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. We also demonstrate a tight correlation between folate receptor-positive macrophage abundance in the liver and inflammation of affected joints. The results suggest that therapies that reduce folate receptor-positive macrophage populations in the body should constitute effective treatments for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27206918

  10. Prevention and Immunotherapy of Secondary Murine Alveolar Echinococcosis Employing Recombinant EmP29 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Boubaker, Ghalia; Hemphill, Andrew; Huber, Cristina Olivia; Spiliotis, Markus; Babba, Hamouda; Gottstein, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is caused by infection with the larval stage of the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis. An increasing understanding of immunological events that account for the metacestode survival in human and murine AE infection prompted us to undertake explorative experiments tackling the potential of novel preventive and/or immunotherapeutic measures. In this study, the immunoprotective and immunotherapeutic ability of recombinant EmP29 antigen (rEmP29) was assessed in mice that were intraperitoneally infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes. For vaccination, three intraperitoneal injections with 20μg rEmP29 emulsified in saponin adjuvants were applied over 6 weeks. 2 weeks after the last boost, mice were infected, and at 90 days post-infection, rEmP29-vaccinated mice exhibited a median parasite weight that was reduced by 75% and 59% when compared to NaCl- or saponin–treated control mice, respectively. For immunotherapeutical application, the rEmP29 (20μg) vaccine was administered to experimentally infected mice, starting at 1 month post-infection, three times with 2 weeks intervals. Mice undergoing rEmP29 immunotherapy exhibited a median parasite load that was reduced by 53% and 49% when compared to NaCl- and saponin–treated control mice, respectively. Upon analysis of spleen cells, both, vaccination and treatment with rEmP29, resulted in low ratios of Th2/Th1 (IL-4/IFN-γ) cytokine mRNA and low levels of mRNA coding for IL-10 and IL-2. These results suggest that reduction of the immunosuppressive environment takes place in vaccinated as well as immunotreated mice, and a shift towards a Th1 type of immune response may be responsible for the observed increased restriction of parasite growth. The present study provides the first evidence that active immunotherapy may present a sustainable route for the control of AE. PMID:26053794

  11. Effect of Pollen-Specific Sublingual Immunotherapy on Oral Allergy Syndrome: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) triggered by fruit and vegetables often occurs in patients with pollen-induced rhinoconjunctivitis because of cross-reactive epitopes in pollen and associated foods. This open observational study examined the effect of pollen-specific sublingual immunotherapy ([SLIT] B. U. Pangramin or SLITone involving birch/alder/hazel, grasses/rye, and/or mugwort) on OAS triggered by several foods in patients treated in standard practice. Very few studies have examined SLIT use in this situation. Methods Patients (n = 102) had pollen-induced rhinoconjunctivitis and OAS and were followed for up to 12 months. Baseline OAS (triggers, symptoms, and symptom severity) was assessed by questionnaire and patient history. Change in OAS was assessed using oral challenge test with 1 or 2 dominant food triggers (and compared with the sum score calculated from the OAS questionnaire at baseline) and clinician ratings of change. Pollen-induced rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms and medication use were also measured. Results In the oral challenge test, 77.0% of patients were considered responders (decrease in sum score of ≥ 50%; no difference in patients receiving B. U. Pangramin or SLITone). At baseline, investigators rated OAS severity as at least moderate in 94.9% of patients compared with 36.9% after 12 months of treatment. After 12 months, OAS was rated as much or very much improved in 72.9% of patients. Sublingual immunotherapy significantly reduced rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms and medication use. Only 10% of patients experienced adverse drug reactions. Conclusion This study supplements the sparse literature on this topic and suggests that pollen-specific SLIT can reduce OAS triggered by pollen-associated foods in patients with pollen-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. PMID:23282323

  12. Effect on quality of life of the mixed house dust mite/weed pollen extract immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lisha

    2016-01-01

    Background Although many patients with allergic rhinitis have symptoms due to sensitization to more than one kind of allergens, and mixed allergen extracts are widely used for immunotherapy, there are few published trials. Objective Our study aimed to evaluate the effect of multiple-allergen immunotherapy on improving the symptoms and quality of life of allergic rhinitis patients. Methods We performed a 1-year single-center observation study of subcutaneous immunotherapy using house dust mite extract (n = 12), weed pollen extract (n = 21), or mixed house dust mite/weed pollen extract (n = 11) in 44 allergic rhinitis patients. All the allergens responsible for the symptom of each patient were included in his immunotherapy. Symptom score, medication score, and quality of life of the patients were evaluated before and after 1-year immunotherapy. Quality of life was evaluated with the Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire. Results In all 3 groups receiving subcutaneous immunotherapy, significant improvement of symptom score, medication score, and quality of life was found vs. baseline at 1 year, irrespective of the allergen used. In the weed pollen season, the changes of quality of life questionnaire score after 1-year treatment were not significantly different between the weed pollen group (1.55 ± 1.24) and the mixed house dust mite/weed pollen group (1.14 ± 1.01). The same happened in the nonpollen seasons, during which dust mite immunotherapy (1.23 ± 1.63) and mixed immunotherapy (0.60 ± 0.47) did not show significantly different effect on the quality of life. Conclusion The multiple-allergen immunotherapy might be effective in polysensitized allergic rhinitis patients, and could improve their quality of life. Our result did not show significant difference between the effects of multiple-allergen immunotherapy and mono-allergen immunotherapy. PMID:27489789

  13. Effects of histamine type-2 receptor antagonists on indomethacin and IL-2 immunotherapy of metastasis.

    PubMed

    Saarloos, M N; Khoo, N K; Lala, P K

    1993-05-01

    Histamine type-2 receptor antagonists (H-2RA) have been used chronically to prevent dyspepsia in cancer patients subjected to immunotherapy with chronic indomethacin (Indo) and intermittent IL-2 in our cancer centre. We tested the effects of these agents during immunotherapy of C3H/HeJ mice transplanted s.c. with 5 x 10(5) C3L5 mammary adenocarcinoma cells. Tumor-transplanted mice were divided into groups receiving: (1) Indo (14 micrograms/ml); (2) H-2RA, i.e. (a) ranitidine at 28.6 micrograms/ml (Ran-lo) or 143 micrograms/ml (Ran-hi), or (b) famotidine (Fam) at 4.3 micrograms/ml, or (c) cimetidine (Cim) at 107 micrograms/ml, all in the drinking water on days 5-24; (3) IL-2 (1.5 x 10(3) Cetus U i.p. every 8 h on days 10-14 and 20-24); (4) combinations of H-2RA + Indo; or (5) combinations of H-2RA + Indo + IL-2. Animals were killed on day 24 for examination of primary s.c. tumor growth, secondary lung metastasis and splenocyte cytotoxicity against YAC-1 lymphoma cells (51Cr release assay). Results revealed: (1) primary tumor growth was reduced in mice treated with Fam + Indo, Indo + IL-2 and any of the H-2RA + Indo + IL-2 (no difference observed within the last two groups); (2) lung metastases decreased in mice treated with IL-2 alone, Indo + IL-2, and Indo + IL-2 + Ran-hi; (3) splenic cytotoxicity was suppressed in tumor-bearing controls, with partial restoration seen in Ran (both doses), Ran-lo + Indo, Ran-lo + Indo + IL-2, and Cim + Indo + IL-2 treated groups. Nearly complete restoration was seen in Cim, Cim + Indo, Indo + IL-2, Ran-hi + Indo + IL-2, and Fam + Indo + IL-2 groups. Thus, addition of H-2RA did not alter the overall therapeutic efficacy of the standard Indo + IL-2 tumor immunotherapy. PMID:8097142

  14. Does immunotherapy protect equines from reinfection by the oomycete Pythium insidiosum?

    PubMed

    Santos, Carlos E P; Marques, Luiz C; Zanette, Régis A; Jesus, Francielli P K; Santurio, Janio M

    2011-08-01

    A cutaneous Pythium insidiosum reinfection was diagnosed in an equine in Brazil. Lesions with focal presentation appeared 2 years apart. The first infection and even immunotherapy were not likely to develop enough immune response to prevent reinfection. The use of adjuvants should be considered in the immunotherapy of pythiosis. PMID:21715582

  15. Does Immunotherapy Protect Equines from Reinfection by the Oomycete Pythium insidiosum?▿

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Carlos E. P.; Marques, Luiz C.; Zanette, Régis A.; Jesus, Francielli P. K.; Santurio, Janio M.

    2011-01-01

    A cutaneous Pythium insidiosum reinfection was diagnosed in an equine in Brazil. Lesions with focal presentation appeared 2 years apart. The first infection and even immunotherapy were not likely to develop enough immune response to prevent reinfection. The use of adjuvants should be considered in the immunotherapy of pythiosis. PMID:21715582

  16. Exploiting the Immunomodulatory Properties of Chemotherapeutic Drugs to Improve the Success of Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Kelly; Salvagno, Camilla; de Visser, Karin E.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is gaining momentum in the clinic. The current challenge is to understand why a proportion of cancer patients do not respond to cancer immunotherapy, and how this can be translated into the rational design of combinatorial cancer immunotherapy strategies aimed at maximizing success of immunotherapy. Here, we discuss how tumors orchestrate an immunosuppressive microenvironment, which contributes to their escape from immune attack. Relieving the immunosuppressive networks in cancer patients is an attractive strategy to extend the clinical success of cancer immunotherapy. Since the clinical availability of drugs specifically targeting immunosuppressive cells or mediators is still limited, an alternative strategy is to use conventional chemotherapy drugs with immunomodulatory properties to improve cancer immunotherapy. We summarize the preclinical and clinical studies that illustrate how the anti-tumor T cell response can be enhanced by chemotherapy-induced relief of immunosuppressive networks. Treatment strategies aimed at combining chemotherapy-induced relief of immunosuppression and T cell-boosting checkpoint inhibitors provide an attractive and clinically feasible approach to overcome intrinsic and acquired resistance to cancer immunotherapy, and to extend the clinical success of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26500653

  17. Tasquinimod modulates suppressive myeloid cells and enhances cancer immunotherapies in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li; Sundstedt, Anette; Ciesielski, Michael; Miles, Kiersten Marie; Celander, Mona; Adelaiye, Remi; Orillion, Ashley; Ciamporcero, Eric; Ramakrishnan, Swathi; Ellis, Leigh; Fenstermaker, Robert; Abrams, Scott I.; Eriksson, Helena; Leanderson, Tomas; Olsson, Anders; Pili, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    A major barrier for cancer immunotherapy is the presence of suppressive cell populations in cancer patients, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), which contribute to the immunosuppressive microenvironment that promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Tasquinimod is a novel antitumor agent that is currently at an advanced stage of clinical development for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. A target of tasquinimod is the inflammatory protein S100A9, which has been demonstrated to affect the accumulation and function of tumor-suppressive myeloid cells. Here, we report that tasquinimod provided a significant enhancement to the antitumor effects of two different immunotherapeutics in mouse models of cancer: a tumor vaccine (SurVaxM) for prostate cancer and a tumor-targeted superantigen (TTS) for melanoma. In the combination strategies, tasquinimod inhibited distinct MDSC populations and TAMs of the M2-polarized phenotype (CD206+). CD11b+ myeloid cells isolated from tumors of treated mice expressed lower levels of arginase-1 and higher levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and were less immunosuppressive ex vivo, which translated into a significantly reduced tumor-promoting capacity in vivo when these cells were co-injected with tumor cells. Tumor-specific CD8+ T cells were increased markedly in the circulation and in tumors. Furthermore, T-cell effector functions, including cell-mediated cytotoxicity and IFNγ production, were potentiated. Taken together, these data suggest that pharmacologic targeting of suppressive myeloid cells by tasquinimod induces therapeutic benefit and provide the rationale for clinical testing of tasquinimod in combination with cancer immunotherapies. PMID:25370534

  18. Oral and sublingual peanut immunotherapy is not ready for general use.

    PubMed

    Greenhawt, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Food oral immunotherapy (OIT) is an investigational peanut allergy treatment aimed to achieve specific oral tolerance induction. Allergic children are given titrated oral (or sublingual) doses of their allergen on a daily basis, unlike in subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). OIT is theorized to cause a shift from a Th2 to a Th1 regulatory environment, reflected by increases in food-specific IgG4/IgE, and the production of FoxP3. Peanut OIT holds special promise because peanut allergy has an unfavorable natural history and is rarely outgrown. A high percentage of the participants experience symptoms during peanut OIT, including anaphylaxis, warranting epinephrine and/or discontinuation of therapy. This is a concerning fact given that the studies have mostly targeted only older children, with less historical reactivity for enrollment. The handful of peanut OIT studies have shown that some participants can be desensitized to peanut, but none have shown that long-term tolerance can be reestablished. Factors predictive of which patients are most likely to succeed and become desensitized through OIT are unknown. Some private practices have begun offering peanut OIT as a therapy. Such practice is potentially dangerous given the safety and efficacy of OIT in randomized controlled clinical trials is still not well established. Therefore, until further investigation emerges that conclusively demonstrates OIT is safe, intermediate and long-term outcomes are better established, the number of participants that experience symptoms is reduced, and proof of concept established in patients of all ages, (irrespective of past reaction severity), OIT is not ready for use in the general allergy practice. PMID:23676568

  19. A mathematical prognosis model for pancreatic cancer patients receiving immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuefang; Xu, Jian-Xin

    2016-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly types of cancer since it typically spreads rapidly and can seldom be detected in its early stage. Pancreatic cancer therapy is thus a challenging task, and appropriate prognosis or assessment for pancreatic cancer therapy is of critical importance. In this work, based on available clinical data in Niu et al. (2013) we develop a mathematical prognosis model that can predict the overall survival of pancreatic cancer patients who receive immunotherapy. The mathematical model incorporates pancreatic cancer cells, pancreatic stellate cells, three major classes of immune effector cells CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells, helper T cells, and two major classes of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). The proposed model describes the dynamic interaction between tumor and immune cells. In order for the model to be able to generate appropriate prognostic results for disease progression, the distribution and stability properties of equilibria in the mathematical model are computed and analysed in absence of treatments. In addition, numerical simulations for disease progression with or without treatments are performed. It turns out that the median overall survival associated with CIK immunotherapy is prolonged from 7 to 13months compared with the survival without treatment, this is consistent with the clinical data observed in Niu et al. (2013). The validity of the proposed mathematical prognosis model is thus verified. Our study confirms that immunotherapy offers a better prognosis for pancreatic cancer patients. As a direct extension of this work, various new therapy methods that are under exploration and clinical trials could be assessed or evaluated using the newly developed mathematical prognosis model. PMID:27338302

  20. Subcutaneous Immunotherapy Improves the Symptomatology of Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Edmir Américo; Caldeira, Eduardo José; Carvalho, César Alexandre Fabrega; Cunha, Marcelo Rodriques; Carvalho, Marcus Vinícius Henriques; Passos, Saulo Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The relevance of allergic rhinitis is unquestionable. This condition affects people's quality of life and its incidence has increased over the last years. Objective Thus, this study aims to analyze the effectiveness of subcutaneous injectable immunotherapy in cases of nasal itching, sneeze, rhinorrhea and nasal congestion in allergic rhinitis patients. Methods In the present study, the same researcher analyzed the records of 281 patients. Furthermore, the researchers identified allergens through puncture cutaneous tests using standardized extracts containing acari, fungi, pet hair, flower pollen, and feathers. Then, the patients underwent treatment with subcutaneous specific immunotherapy, using four vaccine vials for desensitization, associated with environmental hygiene. The authors analyzed conditions of nasal itching, sneeze, rhinorrhea, and nasal congestion throughout the treatment, and assigned them with a score ranging from zero (0), meaning absence of these symptoms to three (3), for severe cases. The symptoms were statistically compared in the beginning, during, and after treatment. Results In this study, authors analyzed the cases distribution according to age and the evolution of symptomatology according to the scores, comparing all phases of treatment. The average score for the entire population studied was 2.08 before treatment and 0.44 at the end. These results represent an overall improvement of ∼79% in symptomatology of allergic rhinitis in the studied population. Conclusion The subcutaneous immunotherapy as treatment of allergic rhinitis led to a reduction in all symptoms studied, improving the quality of life of patients, proving itself as an important therapeutic tool for these pathological conditions. PMID:26722338

  1. Cancer immunotherapy: nanodelivery approaches for immune cell targeting and tracking

    PubMed Central

    Conniot, João; Silva, Joana M.; Fernandes, Joana G.; Silva, Liana C.; Gaspar, Rogério; Brocchini, Steve; Florindo, Helena F.; Barata, Teresa S.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most common diseases afflicting people globally. New therapeutic approaches are needed due to the complexity of cancer as a disease. Many current treatments are very toxic and have modest efficacy at best. Increased understanding of tumor biology and immunology has allowed the development of specific immunotherapies with minimal toxicity. It is important to highlight the performance of monoclonal antibodies, immune adjuvants, vaccines and cell-based treatments. Although these approaches have shown varying degrees of clinical efficacy, they illustrate the potential to develop new strategies. Targeted immunotherapy is being explored to overcome the heterogeneity of malignant cells and the immune suppression induced by both the tumor and its microenvironment. Nanodelivery strategies seek to minimize systemic exposure to target therapy to malignant tissue and cells. Intracellular penetration has been examined through the use of functionalized particulates. These nano-particulate associated medicines are being developed for use in imaging, diagnostics and cancer targeting. Although nano-particulates are inherently complex medicines, the ability to confer, at least in principle, different types of functionality allows for the plausible consideration these nanodelivery strategies can be exploited for use as combination medicines. The development of targeted nanodelivery systems in which therapeutic and imaging agents are merged into a single platform is an attractive strategy. Currently, several nanoplatform-based formulations, such as polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, liposomes and dendrimers are in preclinical and clinical stages of development. Herein, nanodelivery strategies presently investigated for cancer immunotherapy, cancer targeting mechanisms and nanocarrier functionalization methods will be described. We also intend to discuss the emerging nano-based approaches suitable to be used as imaging techniques and as cancer treatment options

  2. Targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G; Rosenblat, Todd L

    2014-01-01

    Because alpha-particles have a shorter range and a higher linear energy transfer (LET) compared with beta-particles, targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy offers the potential for more efficient tumor cell killing while sparing surrounding normal cells. To date, clinical studies of alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have focused on the myeloid cell surface antigen CD33 as a target using the humanized monoclonal antibody lintuzumab. An initial phase I study demonstrated the safety, feasibility, and antileukemic effects of bismuth-213 ((213)Bi)-labeled lintuzumab. In a subsequent study, (213)Bi-lintuzumab produced remissions in some patients with AML after partial cytoreduction with cytarabine, suggesting the utility of targeted alpha-particle therapy for small-volume disease. The widespread use of (213)Bi, however, is limited by its short half-life. Therefore, a second-generation construct containing actinium-225 ((225)Ac), a radiometal that generates four alpha-particle emissions, was developed. A phase I trial demonstrated that (225)Ac-lintuzumab is safe at doses of 3 μCi/kg or less and has antileukemic activity across all dose levels studied. Fractionated-dose (225)Ac-lintuzumab in combination with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) is now under investigation for the management of older patients with untreated AML in a multicenter trial. Preclinical studies using (213)Bi- and astatine-211 ((211)At)-labeled anti-CD45 antibodies have shown that alpha-particle immunotherapy may be useful as part conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation. The use of novel pretargeting strategies may further improve target-to-normal organ dose ratios. PMID:24857092

  3. Subcutaneous Immunotherapy Improves the Symptomatology of Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Edmir Américo; Caldeira, Eduardo José; Carvalho, César Alexandre Fabrega; Cunha, Marcelo Rodriques; Carvalho, Marcus Vinícius Henriques; Passos, Saulo Duarte

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The relevance of allergic rhinitis is unquestionable. This condition affects people's quality of life and its incidence has increased over the last years. Objective Thus, this study aims to analyze the effectiveness of subcutaneous injectable immunotherapy in cases of nasal itching, sneeze, rhinorrhea and nasal congestion in allergic rhinitis patients. Methods In the present study, the same researcher analyzed the records of 281 patients. Furthermore, the researchers identified allergens through puncture cutaneous tests using standardized extracts containing acari, fungi, pet hair, flower pollen, and feathers. Then, the patients underwent treatment with subcutaneous specific immunotherapy, using four vaccine vials for desensitization, associated with environmental hygiene. The authors analyzed conditions of nasal itching, sneeze, rhinorrhea, and nasal congestion throughout the treatment, and assigned them with a score ranging from zero (0), meaning absence of these symptoms to three (3), for severe cases. The symptoms were statistically compared in the beginning, during, and after treatment. Results In this study, authors analyzed the cases distribution according to age and the evolution of symptomatology according to the scores, comparing all phases of treatment. The average score for the entire population studied was 2.08 before treatment and 0.44 at the end. These results represent an overall improvement of ∼79% in symptomatology of allergic rhinitis in the studied population. Conclusion The subcutaneous immunotherapy as treatment of allergic rhinitis led to a reduction in all symptoms studied, improving the quality of life of patients, proving itself as an important therapeutic tool for these pathological conditions. PMID:26722338

  4. Plasma Onco-Immunotherapy: Novel Approach to Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Presentation is reviewing the newest results obtained by researchers of A.J. Drexel Plasma Institute on direct application of non-thermal plasma for direct treatment of different types of cancer by means of specific stimulation of immune system in the frameworks of the so-called onco-immunotherapy. Especial attention is paid to analysis of depth of penetration of different plasma-medical effects, from ROS, RNS, and ions to special biological signaling and immune system related processes. General aspects of the plasma-stimulation of immune system are discussed, pointing out specific medical applications. Most of experiments have been carried out using nanosecond pulsed DBD at low power and relatively low level of treatment doses, guaranteeing non-damage no-toxicity treatment regime. The nanosecond pulsed DBD physics is discussed mostly regarding its space uniformity and control of plasma parameters relevant to plasma medical treatment, and especially relevant to depth of penetration of different plasma medical effects. Detailed mechanism of the plasma-induced onco-immunotherapy has been suggested based upon preliminary in-vitro experiments with DBD treatment of different cancer cells. Sub-elements of this mechanism related to activation of macrophages and dendritic cells, specific stressing of cancer cells and the immunogenic cell death (ICD) are to be discussed based on results of corresponding in-vitro experiments. In-vivo experiments focused on the plasma-induced onco-immunotherapy were carried out in collaboration with medical doctors from Jefferson University hospital of Philadelphia. Todays achievements and nearest future prospective of clinical test focused on plasma-controlled cancer treatment are discussed in conclusion.

  5. Cancer immunotherapy: nanodelivery approaches for immune cell targeting and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conniot, João; Silva, Joana; Fernandes, Joana; Silva, Liana; Gaspar, Rogério; Brocchini, Steve; Florindo, Helena; Barata, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Cancer is one of the most common diseases afflicting people globally. New therapeutic approaches are needed due to the complexity of cancer as a disease. Many current treatments are very toxic and have modest efficacy at best. Increased understanding of tumor biology and immunology has allowed the development of specific immunotherapies with minimal toxicity. It is important to highlight the performance of monoclonal antibodies, immune adjuvants, vaccines and cell-based treatments. Although these approaches have shown varying degrees of clinical efficacy, they illustrate the potential to develop new strategies. Targeted immunotherapy is being explored to overcome the heterogeneity of malignant cells and the immune suppression induced by both the tumor and its microenvironment. Nanodelivery strategies seek to minimize systemic exposure to target therapy to malignant tissue and cells. Intracellular penetration has been examined through the use of functionalized particulates. These nano-particulate associated medicines are being developed for use in imaging, diagnostics and cancer targeting. Although nano-particulates are inherently complex medicines, the ability to confer, at least in principle, different types of functionality allows for the plausible consideration these nanodelivery strategies can be exploited for use as combination medicines. The development of targeted nanodelivery systems in which therapeutic and imaging agents are merged into a single platform is an attractive strategy. Currently, several nanoplatform-based formulations, such as polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, liposomes and dendrimers are in preclinical and clinical stages of development. Herein, nanodelivery strategies presently investigated for cancer immunotherapy, cancer targeting mechanisms and nanocarrier functionalization methods will be described. We also intend to discuss the emerging nano-based approaches suitable to be used as imaging techniques and as cancer treatment options.

  6. NK cell-based immunotherapy for malignant diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Min; Chen, Yongyan; Xiao, Weihua; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in host immunity against cancer. In response, cancers develop mechanisms to escape NK cell attack or induce defective NK cells. Current NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy aims to overcome NK cell paralysis using several approaches. One approach uses expanded allogeneic NK cells, which are not inhibited by self histocompatibility antigens like autologous NK cells, for adoptive cellular immunotherapy. Another adoptive transfer approach uses stable allogeneic NK cell lines, which is more practical for quality control and large-scale production. A third approach is genetic modification of fresh NK cells or NK cell lines to highly express cytokines, Fc receptors and/or chimeric tumor-antigen receptors. Therapeutic NK cells can be derived from various sources, including peripheral or cord blood cells, stem cells or even induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and a variety of stimulators can be used for large-scale production in laboratories or good manufacturing practice (GMP) facilities, including soluble growth factors, immobilized molecules or antibodies, and other cellular activators. A list of NK cell therapies to treat several types of cancer in clinical trials is reviewed here. Several different approaches to NK-based immunotherapy, such as tissue-specific NK cells, killer receptor-oriented NK cells and chemically treated NK cells, are discussed. A few new techniques or strategies to monitor NK cell therapy by non-invasive imaging, predetermine the efficiency of NK cell therapy by in vivo experiments and evaluate NK cell therapy approaches in clinical trials are also introduced. PMID:23604045

  7. Directing dendritic cell immunotherapy towards successful cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sabado, Rachel Lubong; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2010-01-01

    The use of dendritic cells (DCs) for tumor immunotherapy represents a powerful approach for harnessing the patient's own immune system to eliminate tumor cells. However, suboptimal conditions for generating potent immunostimulatory DCs, as well as the induction of tolerance and suppression mediated by the tumors and its microenvironment have contributed to limited success. Combining DC vaccines with new approaches that enhance immunogenicity and overcome the regulatory mechanisms underlying peripheral tolerance may be the key to achieving effective and durable anti-tumor immune responses that translate to better clinical outcomes. PMID:20473346

  8. Evidence-based practice: sublingual immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Wise, Sarah K; Schlosser, Rodney J

    2012-10-01

    In this article, the authors review the current evidence regarding the public health and economic impact of allergic rhinitis. Diagnostic methods for allergic disease are discussed as well as certain nuances of allergy skin testing protocols. In addition, the evidence supporting sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for allergic rhinitis is reviewed, with subsequent attention to certain subgroups, such as adults and children, seasonal versus perennial allergens, and SLIT efficacy for individual antigens. The authors consider the evidence supporting appropriate SLIT dosing as well as the existing data on SLIT safety. PMID:22980684

  9. Chemotherapy and immunotherapy: A close interplay to fight cancer?

    PubMed

    Hanoteau, Aurélie; Moser, Muriel

    2016-07-01

    In theory, the immunotherapy of cancer should induce the selective destruction of cancer cells and a long-term specific protection, based on the specificity and memory of immunity. This contrasts with the collateral damages of conventional therapies and their toxic effects on host tissues. However, recent data suggest that chemotherapy may potentiate ongoing immune responses, through homeostatic mechanisms. Massive tumor death, empty "immune" niches and selected cytokines may act as a danger signal, alerting the immune system and amplifying pre-existing antitumor reactivity. PMID:27622046

  10. Checkmate: kidney injury associated with targeted cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Perazella, Mark A

    2016-09-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are a class of drugs that utilizes immunotherapy to target various cancers. Included are the anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 receptor antibodies. By reprogramming the immune system, these agents provide a therapy that destroys cancer cells. However, this approach runs the risk of allowing pathologic autoimmunity and organ injury to develop. Unsurprisingly, immune-related adverse effects are described including pneumonitis, colitis, and various endocrinopathies. Now added to this list is AKI, primarily due to ATIN. PMID:27521108

  11. Immunotherapy in a rare case of primary pelvic retroperitoneal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Talag, Maria Monica; Alsharedi, Mohamed; Bou Zgheib, Nadim; Lebowicz, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in novel immunotherapeutic and targeted therapeutic agents have increased treatment options in patients with advanced metastatic melanoma. However, evidence in the literature on whether or not extracutaneous melanoma will acquire an equivalent advantage from these therapies is very scarce. In general, extracutaneous melanomas are rare and aggressive melanomas, which are clinically and biologically unique, with higher incidence of metastatic disease and poor prognosis. In this case report, we present a very rare case of a 54-year-old woman with primary pelvic retroperitoneal melanoma treated with an anti-PD-1 antibody, pembrolizumab. Furthermore, we explore the role of novel immunotherapies in the treatment of advanced melanoma. PMID:27624447

  12. Irradiated Cerastes cerastes venom as a novel tool for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oussedik-Oumehdi, Habiba; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima

    2008-01-01

    Immunotherapy is the most effective treatment for the snake bites. The antivenoms are commonly obtained by hyperimmunization of animals that suffer from venom toxicity. The present report describes gamma irradiation effects on Cerastes cerastes venom. Doses of 1 kGy and 2 kGy gamma radiations were used for venom detoxification. These treated venoms did not have any residual lethal effects until 10 LD(50). Immunological analysis of sera raised against native and irradiated venoms, showed that elicited antibodies to irradiated venoms were able to recognize native venom. Anti-2 kGy irradiated venom had more protective ability than anti-native venom, as tested in mice. PMID:18306103

  13. Production of Monoclonal Antibodies in Plants for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Moussavou, Ghislain; Ko, Kisung; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Choo, Young-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Plants are considered as an alternative platform for recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) production due to the improvement and diversification of transgenic techniques. The diversity of plant species offers a multitude of possibilities for the valorization of genetic resources. Moreover, plants can be propagated indefinitely, providing cheap biomass production on a large scale in controlled conditions. Thus, recent studies have shown the successful development of plant systems for the production of mAbs for cancer immunotherapy. However, their several limitations have to be resolved for efficient antibody production in plants. PMID:26550566

  14. Combination immunotherapy and photodynamic therapy for cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Castano, Ana P.; Mroz, Pawel

    2006-02-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death among modern people largely due to metastatic disease. The ideal cancer treatment should target both the primary tumor and the metastases with minimal toxicity towards normal tissue. This is best accomplished by priming the body's immune system to recognize the tumor antigens so that after the primary tumor is destroyed, distant metastases will also be eradicated. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the IV administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species leading to vascular shutdown and tumor cell death. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, generation of tumor-specific antigens, and induction of heat-shock proteins. Combination regimens using PDT and immunostimulating treatments are likely to even further enhance post-PDT immunity. These immunostimulants are likely to include products derived from pathogenic microorganisms that are effectively recognized by Toll-like receptors and lead to upregulation of transcription factors for cytokines and inflammatory mediators. The following cascade of events causes activation of macrophages, dendritic and natural killer cells. Exogenous cytokine administration can be another way to increase PDT-induced immunity as well as treatment with a low dose of cyclophosphamide that selectively reduces T-regulatory cells. Although so far these combination therapies have only been used in animal models, their use in clinical trials should receive careful consideration.

  15. Immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ronan J.; Gulley, James L.; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Developing effective immunotherapy for lung cancer is a daunting but hugely attractive challenge. Until recently, non-small cell lung cancer was thought of as a non-immunogenic tumor, but there is now evidence highlighting the integral role played by both inflammatory and immunological responses in lung carcinogenesis. Despite recent encouraging preclinical and phase I/II data, there is a paucity of phase III trials showing a clear clinical benefit for vaccines in lung cancer. There are many difficulties to overcome prior to the development of a successful therapy. Perhaps a measurable immune response may not translate into a clinically meaningful or radiological response. Patient selection may also be a problem for ongoing clinical studies. The majority of trials for lung cancer vaccines are focused on patients with advanced-stage disease, while the ideal candidates may be patients with a lower tumor burden stage I or II disease. Selecting the exact antigens to target is also difficult. It will likely require multiple epitopes of a diverse set of genes restricted to multiple haplotypes to generate a truly effective vaccine that is able to overcome the various immunologic escape mechanisms that tumors employ. This review discusses active immunotherapy employing protein/peptide vaccines, whole cell vaccines, and dendritic cell vaccines and examines the current data on some novel immunomodulating agents. PMID:20630824

  16. Immunotherapy for Lung Cancer: Has it Finally Arrived?

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Ahmed A.; Morris, Don G.

    2014-01-01

    The possible link between infection/inflammation/immune activation and a cancer patient’s outcome from both a causative and outcome point of view has long been postulated. Substantial progress in the understanding of tumor-associated antigens/epitopes, immune cellular subpopulations, cytokine pathways/expression, the tumor microenvironment, and the balance between tumor-immune suppression and stimulation have been made over the past decade. This knowledge has heralded a new era of tumor immunotherapy utilizing vaccines, immune checkpoint inhibition, and oncolytic viruses. Despite significant progress in the molecular era now with targeted therapeutics such as EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and ALK fusion protein inhibitors that have significantly improved the outcome of these specific lung cancer subpopulations, the overall 5 year survival for all non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still <20%. Unlike malignancies such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and neuroblastoma given their documented spontaneous remission rates lung cancer historically has been felt to be resistant to immune approaches likely related to an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment and/or lack of immune recognition. Defining responding populations, understanding the mechanism(s) underlying durable immune responses, and the role of chemotherapy, radiation, oncolytic viruses, and other tumor disrupting agents in augmenting immune responses have led to improved optimization of immune therapeutic strategies. The purpose of this review is to focus on the recent advances in lung immunotherapy with an emphasis on recent clinical trials in the last 5 years in NSCLC. PMID:25374843

  17. Molecular Recognition of Gangliosides and Their Potential for Cancer Immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Krengel, Ute; Bousquet, Paula A.

    2014-01-01

    Gangliosides are sialic-acid-containing glycosphingolipids expressed on all vertebrate cells. They are primarily positioned in the plasma membrane with the ceramide part anchored in the membrane and the glycan part exposed on the surface of the cell. These lipids have highly diverse structures, not the least with respect to their carbohydrate chains, with N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NeuGc) being the two most common sialic-acid residues in mammalian cells. Generally, human healthy tissue is deficient in NeuGc, but this molecule is expressed in tumors and in human fetal tissues, and was hence classified as an onco-fetal antigen. Gangliosides perform important functions through carbohydrate-specific interactions with proteins, for example, as receptors in cell–cell recognition, which can be exploited by viruses and other pathogens, and also by regulating signaling proteins, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), through lateral interaction in the membrane. Through both mechanisms, tumor-associated gangliosides may affect malignant progression, which makes them attractive targets for cancer immunotherapies. In this review, we describe how proteins recognize gangliosides, focusing on the molecular recognition of gangliosides associated with cancer immunotherapy, and discuss the importance of these molecules in cancer research. PMID:25101077

  18. Irradiation and immunotherapy: From concept to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Salama, April K S; Postow, Michael A; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, an increased understanding of T-cell-regulatory mechanisms has led to the development of a novel class of immune-checkpoint inhibitors that have robust clinical activity against a broad array of malignancies-even those that historically were not believed to be sensitive to immune therapy. With this, there has been renewed interest in the potential for synergy with more traditional forms of anticancer therapy like radiation therapy (RT). The role of RT in palliation or as definitive treatment for certain malignancies has been well established. Yet, in recent years, the concept has come to light that RT could be an attractive partner for use in combination with other immunotherapies. The effects of RT include not only control of an irradiated tumor but also multiple immunomodulatory effects on both the tumor and the microenvironment, priming tumors for an immune-mediated response. Herein, the authors summarize relevant preclinical data and rationale supporting the synergy of combined RT and immunotherapy and highlight recent clinical work on promising combination strategies. Cancer 2016;122:1659-71. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26914620

  19. Gastric cancer and the epoch of immunotherapy approaches

    PubMed Central

    Niccolai, Elena; Taddei, Antonio; Prisco, Domenico; Amedei, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of gastric cancer (GC) fell dramatically over the last 50 years, but according to IARC-Globocan 2008, it is the third most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths with a case fatality GC ratio higher than other common malignancies. Surgical resection is the primary curative treatment for GC though the overall 5-year survival rate remains poor (approximately 20%-25%). To improve the outcome of resectable gastric cancer, different treatment strategies have been evaluated such as adjuvant or perioperative chemotherapy. In resected gastric cancer, the addition of radiotherapy to chemotherapy does not appear to provide any additional benefit. Moreover, in metastatic patients, chemotherapy is the mainstay of palliative therapy with a median overall survival of 8-10 mo and objective response rates of merely 20%-40%. Therefore, the potential for making key beneficial progress is to investigate the GC molecular biology to realize innovative therapeutic strategies, such as specific immunotherapy. In this review, we provide a panoramic view of the different immune-based strategies used for gastric cancer treatment and the results obtained in the most significant clinical trials. In detail, firstly we describe the therapeutic approaches that utilize the monoclonal antibodies while in the second part we analyze the cell-based immunotherapies. PMID:26019442

  20. Pilot Trial of FANG Immunotherapy in Ewing's Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghisoli, Maurizio; Barve, Minal; Schneider, Reva; Mennel, Robert; Lenarsky, Carl; Wallraven, Gladice; Pappen, Beena O; LaNoue, John; Kumar, Padmasini; Nemunaitis, Derek; Roth, Alyssa; Nemunaitis, James; Whiting, Sam; Senzer, Neil; Fletcher, Frederick A; Nemunaitis, John

    2015-01-01

    We report on 12 consecutive patients with advanced/metastatic Ewing's sarcoma who were treated as a separate cohort of a phase 1 trial of FANG autologous immunotherapy (1 × 106–2.5 × 107 cells/intradermal injection each month for minimum 4 months). Safety and clinical response were monitored. Patient immune response to unmodified autologous tumor cells was assessed by gamma interferon-enzyme-linked immunospot (γIFN-ELISPOT) assay using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from baseline (pretreatment) and multiple postvaccination time points. None of the 12 patients (47 vaccinations) developed grade 2/3/4 drug-related toxicity. Median product release granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor expression was 1,941 pg/106 cells, and TGFβ1and TGFβ2 knockdown were 99 and 100%, respectively. Eight patients were assessed for ELISPOT response to autologous tumor cells at baseline and all (100%) were negative. In contrast, follow-up ELISPOT response at month 1 or month 4 (one patient) after FANG was positive in all eight patients. One patient achieved a partial tumor response (38% tumor reduction, RECIST 1.1). The Kaplan–Meier estimated survival of these 12 patients at 1 year was 75%. In this phase 1 study in patients with Ewing's sarcoma, FANG immunotherapy was well tolerated, elicited a tumor-specific systemic immune response in all patients, and was associated with favorable 1-year survival. Further clinical testing is indicated. PMID:25917459

  1. New approaches for the immunotherapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Terrence L.; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a set of related diseases characterized by the immortalization and uncontrolled expansion of myeloid precursors. Core therapy for AML has remained unchanged for nearly 30 years, and survival rates remain unsatisfactory. However, advances in the immunotherapy of AML have created opportunities for improved outcomes. Enforcing a tumor-specific immune response through the re-direction of the adaptive immune system, which links remarkable specificity with potent cytotoxic effector functions, has proven particularly compelling. This may be coupled with immune checkpoint blockade and conventional therapies for optimal effect. Engineered antibodies are currently in use in AML and the repertoire of available therapeutics will expand. NK cells have shown effectiveness in this disease. New methods to optimize the targeting and activation of AML cells show potential. Most significantly, adoptive immunotherapy with tumor-specific T cells, and particularly T cells re-directed using genetically introduced TCR or chimeric antigen receptors, have particular promise. Each of these approaches has unique benefits and challenges that we explore in this review. PMID:25977190

  2. Current Clinical Trials Testing Combinations of Immunotherapy and Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, M.; Kohrt, H.; Levy, R.; Jones, J.; Camphausen, K.; Dicker, A.; Demaria, S.; Formenti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical evidence of successful combinations of ionizing radiation with immunotherapy has inspired testing the translation of these results to the clinic. Interestingly, the preclinical work has consistently predicted the responses encountered in clinical trials. The first example came from a proof-of-principle trial started in 2001 that tested the concept that growth factors acting on antigen-presenting cells improve presentation of tumor antigens released by radiation and induce an abscopal effect. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was administered during radiotherapy to a metastatic site in patients with metastatic solid tumors to translate evidence obtained in a murine model of syngeneic mammary carcinoma treated with cytokine FLT-3L and radiation. Subsequent clinical availability of vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has triggered a wave of enthusiasm for testing them in combination with radiotherapy. Examples of ongoing clinical trials are described in this report. Importantly, these trials include careful immune monitoring of the patients enrolled and will generate important data about the proimmunogenic effects of radiation in combination with a variety of immune modulators in different disease settings. Results of these studies are building a platform of evidence for radiotherapy as an adjuvant to immunotherapy and encourage the growth of this novel field of radiation oncology. PMID:25481267

  3. The promising alliance of anti-cancer electrochemotherapy with immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Calvet, Christophe Y; Mir, Lluis M

    2016-06-01

    Anti-tumor electrochemotherapy, which consists in increasing anti-cancer drug uptake by means of electroporation, is now implanted in about 140 cancer treatment centers in Europe. Its use is supported by the English National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for the palliative treatment of skin metastases, and about 13,000 cancer patients were treated by this technology by the end of 2015. Efforts are now focused on turning this local anti-tumor treatment into a systemic one. Electrogenetherapy, that is the electroporation-mediated transfer of therapeutic genes, is currently under clinical evaluation and has brought excitement to enlarge the anti-cancer armamentarium. Among the promising electrogenetherapy strategies, DNA vaccination and cytokine-based immunotherapy aim at stimulating anti-tumor immunity. We review here the interests and state of development of both electrochemotherapy and electrogenetherapy. We then emphasize the potent beneficial outcome of the combination of electrochemotherapy with immunotherapy, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors or strategies based on electrogenetherapy, to simultaneously achieve excellent local debulking anti-tumor responses and systemic anti-metastatic effects. PMID:26993326

  4. Potentiating Cancer Immunotherapy Using Papaya Mosaic Virus-Derived Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Marie-Ève; Chartrand, Karine; Tarrab, Esther; Savard, Pierre; Leclerc, Denis; Lamarre, Alain

    2016-03-01

    The recent development of novel immunotherapies is revolutionizing cancer treatment. These include, for example, immune checkpoint blockade, immunomodulation, or therapeutic vaccination. Although effective on their own, combining multiple approaches will most likely be required in order to achieve the maximal therapeutic benefit. In this regard, the papaya mosaic virus nanoparticle (PapMV) has shown tremendous potential as (i) an immunostimulatory molecule, (ii) an adjuvant, and (iii) a vaccine platform through its intrinsic capacity to activate the innate immune response in an IFN-α-dependent manner. Here, we demonstrate that intratumor administration of PapMV significantly slows down melanoma progression and prolongs survival. This correlates with enhanced chemokine and pro-inflammatory-cytokine production in the tumor and increased immune-cell infiltration. Proportions of total and tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells dramatically increase following PapMV treatment whereas those of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) concomitantly decrease. Moreover, systemic PapMV administration prevents metastatic tumor-implantation in the lungs. Importantly, PapMV also synergistically improves the therapeutic benefit of dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccination and PD-1 blockade by potentiating antitumor immune responses. This study illustrates the immunostimulatory potential of a plant virus-derived nanoparticle for cancer therapy either alone or in conjunction with other promising immunotherapies in clinical development. PMID:26891174

  5. Adherence issues related to sublingual immunotherapy as perceived by allergists

    PubMed Central

    Scurati, Silvia; Frati, Franco; Passalacqua, Gianni; Puccinelli, Paola; Hilaire, Cecile; Incorvaia, Cristoforo

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is a viable alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy to treat allergic rhinitis and asthma, and is widely used in clinical practice in many European countries. The clinical efficacy of SLIT has been established in a number of clinical trials and meta-analyses. However, because SLIT is self-administered by patients without medical supervision, the degree of patient adherence with treatment is still a concern. The objective of this study was to evaluate the perception by allergists of issues related to SLIT adherence. Methods: We performed a questionnaire-based survey of 296 Italian allergists, based on the adherence issues known from previous studies. The perception of importance of each item was assessed by a VAS scale ranging from 0 to 10. Results: Patient perception of clinical efficacy was considered the most important factor (ranked 1 by 54% of allergists), followed by the possibility of reimbursement (ranked 1 by 34%), and by the absence of side effects (ranked 1 by 21%). Patient education, regular follow-up, and ease of use of SLIT were ranked first by less than 20% of allergists. Conclusion: These findings indicate that clinical efficacy, cost, and side effects are perceived as the major issues influencing patient adherence to SLIT, and that further improvement of adherence is likely to be achieved by improving the patient information provided by prescribers. PMID:20622914

  6. Sublingual immunotherapy for pediatric allergic rhinitis: The clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Licari, Amelia; Caimmi, Silvia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is estimated to affect 10%-20% of pediatric population and it is caused by the IgE-sensitization to environmental allergens, most importantly grass pollens and house dust mites. Allergic rhinitis can influence patient’s daily activity severely and may precede the development of asthma, especially if it is not diagnosed and treated correctly. In addition to subcutaneous immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) represents the only treatment being potentially able to cure allergic respiratory diseases, by modulating the immune system activity. This review clearly summarizes and analyzes the available randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials, which aimed at evaluating the effectiveness and the safety of grass pollen and house dust mite SLIT for the specific treatment of pediatric allergic rhinitis. Our analysis demonstrates the good evidence supporting the efficacy of SLIT for allergic rhinitis to grass pollens in children, whereas trials regarding pediatric allergic rhinitis to house dust mites present lower quality, although several studies supported its usefulness. PMID:26862501

  7. Clinical contraindications to allergen immunotherapy: an EAACI position paper.

    PubMed

    Pitsios, C; Demoly, P; Bilò, M B; Gerth van Wijk, R; Pfaar, O; Sturm, G J; Rodriguez del Rio, P; Tsoumani, M; Gawlik, R; Paraskevopoulos, G; Ruëff, F; Valovirta, E; Papadopoulos, N G; Calderón, M A

    2015-08-01

    Clinical indications for allergen immunotherapy (AIT) in respiratory and Hymenoptera venom allergy are well established; however, clinical contraindications to AIT are not always well documented. There are some discrepancies when classifying clinical contraindications for different forms of AIT as 'absolute' or 'relative'. EAACI Task Force on 'Contraindications to AIT' was created to evaluate and review current literature on clinical contraindications, and to update recommendations for both sublingual and subcutaneous AIT for respiratory and venom immunotherapy. An extensive review of the literature was performed on the use of AIT in asthma, autoimmune disorders, malignant neoplasias, cardiovascular diseases, acquired immunodeficiencies and other chronic diseases (including mental disorders), in patients treated with β-blockers, ACE inhibitors or monoamine oxidase inhibitors, in children under 5 years of age, during pregnancy and in patients with poor compliance. Each topic was addressed by the following three questions: (1) Are there any negative effects of AIT on this concomitant condition/disease? (2) Are more frequent or more severe AIT-related side-effects expected? and (3) Is AIT expected to be less efficacious? The evidence, for the evaluation of these clinical conditions as contraindications, was limited, and most of the conclusions were based on case reports. Based on an extended literature research, recommendations for each medical condition assessed are provided. The final decision on the administration of AIT should be based on individual evaluation of any medical condition and a risk/benefit assessment for each patient. PMID:25913519

  8. Immunotherapy and complexity: overcoming barriers to control of advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Lage, Agustin

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in fundamental immunology are changing paradigms for management of advanced cancer, now acknowledged as a chronic disease whose prevalence will increase, and one whose complexity makes it difficult to control. Immunotherapy is emerging as an alternative, with new monoclonal antibodies, therapeutic vaccines and deeper understanding of fundamental phenomena in the interaction between tumor and immune system. These novel insights concern mechanisms of programmed contraction of the immune response, characterization of molecular and cellular markers of immunosenescence, the dual role of inflammation, characterization of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and cancer stem cells, and the phenomena of immunogenic apoptosis and oncogene addiction. Additionally, new data drive a deeper understanding of four barriers to overcome in control of advanced cancer: the complexity of biological systems, tumor heterogeneity, tumor mutation rates, and human genome-environment mismatch. The new landscape points to six main strategies: manage advanced cancer as a chronic disease, find relevant molecular markers for patient stratification, develop a rationale for therapeutic combinations, target regulatory control loops in the immune system, expand mathematical modeling capacity, and evaluate complex health intervention packages in real-world conditions. These transitions in cancer immunotherapy research are illustrated in this paper through description of ongoing projects at Cuba's Molecular Immunology Center. PMID:25208123

  9. Mesothelin, a novel immunotherapy target for triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tchou, Julia; Wang, Liang-Chuan; Selven, Ben; Zhang, Hongtao; Conejo-Garcia, Jose; Borghaei, Hossein; Vondeheide, Robert H; Albelda, Steven M.; June, Carl H; Zhang, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Mesothelin is a cell-surface glycoprotein present on mesothelial cells and elicits T-cell responses in a variety of cancers including pancreatic and ovarian cancer. Breast cancer is not known to express mesothelin. We postulated that mesothelin may be a unique tumor associated antigen in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), a less common breast cancer subtype which may have been underrepresented in prior studies that characterized mesothelin expression. Therefore, we screened 99 primary breast cancer samples by immunohistochemistry analysis using formalin fixed paraffin embedded archival tumor tissues subtypes and confirmed that mesothelin was overexpressed in the majority of TNBC (67%) but only rarely in < 5% ER(+) or Her2-neu (+) breast cancer respectively. To determine whether mesothelin may be exploited as a novel immunotherapy target in breast cancer, an in vitro cell killing assay was performed to compare the ability of genetically modified T cells expressing a chimeric antibody receptor (CAR) specific for mesothelin (mesoCAR T-cells) or non-transduced T-cells to kill mesothelin-expressing primary breast cancer cells. A significantly higher anti-tumor cytotoxicity by mesoCAR T-cells was observed (31.7% vs. 8.7%, p<0.001). Our results suggest that mesothelin has promise as a novel immunotherapy target for TNBC for which effective targeted therapy is lacking to date. PMID:22418702

  10. Observations in immunotherapy of lymphoma and melanoma patients.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J W; Plenderleith, I H; Clements, D V; Landi, S

    1975-01-01

    Maintenance of remission solely by repeated BCG vaccinations in seven patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who had achieved a complete clinical remission with initial standard therapy has provided sufficient encouragement to begin a randomized clinical trial. In vitro lymphocyte responses to mitogens and PPD used as parameters of cell-mediated immunity have not proved to be of value in predicting early or late recurrence in six pre-trial and trial patients. Eight out of twenty-one patients with malignant melanoma have shown a satisfactory clinical response (10-34 months) to immunotherapy. Those who respond must show immunological reactivity to the stimulating agent, however the best clinical responses were not associated with the highest degrees of in vivo and in vitro sensitization. The skin reactivity and the in vitro lymphocyte response to PPD as well as a 2-3-fold increase in the appearance of colony-forming units in the peripheral blood following the intratumour injection of BCG or PPD are helpful in prognosis and management of these patients. All patients with malignant melanoma who presented with a PHA response less than 40% of normal made a poor response to immunotherapy. Autopsies performed on seven patients dying with extensive melanocarcinomatous disease failed to show any serious adverse toxic reactions or infections from oral and intratumour injections of BCG. PMID:1102163

  11. Immunologic testing and immunotherapy in recurrent spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, J A; Faulk, W P; Nichols-Johnson, V R; Taylor, C G

    1986-02-01

    One hundred sixty-one couples with clinical histories of unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortions were analyzed in part for human leukocyte antigens, antibodies to paternal lymphocytes, and mixed lymphocyte culture reactions. All sera with antipaternal antibodies were investigated on a cell panel and absorbed with various tissues and heparin to help define antigenic specificities, and the couples were categorized as primary or secondary aborters. Primary but not secondary aborters were found to share more human leukocyte antigens with their mates than did 103 control fertile couples. Lymphocytotoxins were rarely identified in primary but were commonly present in secondary aborter sera. Results of mixed lymphocyte culture reactions with primary aborting couples showed an intrinsic cellular inability for the wives to recognize their husbands' cells. Secondary aborting couples' mixed lymphocyte culture reactions also were depressed but as a result of an inhibiting substance in the wives' sera. Thirty-three primary aborting women were treated by immunotherapy with leukocyte infusions as a prophylactic source of trophoblast-lymphocyte cross reactive antigen stimulation to immunologically protect their pregnancies. Eighty-nine percent of primary aborting patients delivered successfully. Six secondary aborting women were treated with heparin therapy; two of these delivered normal infants, two are pregnant, and two have aborted. Clinical implications for immunologic testing and immunotherapy in pregnancy failures are discussed. PMID:2935759

  12. Immunotherapy for neurodegenerative diseases: focus on α-synucleinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Elvira; Masliah, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy is currently being intensively explored as much-needed disease-modifying treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. While Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been the focus of numerous immunotherapeutic studies, less attention has been paid to Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. The reason for this difference is that the amyloid beta (Aβ) protein in AD is a secreted molecule that circulates in blood and is readably recognized by antibodies. In contrast, α-synuclein (α-syn), tau, huntingtin and other proteins involved in neurodegenerative diseases have been considered to be exclusively of intracellular nature. However, the recent discovery that toxic oligomeric versions of α-syn and tau accumulate in the membrane and can be excreted to the extracellular environment has provided a rationale for the development of immunotherapeutic approaches for PD, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia, and other neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the abnormal accumulation of these proteins. Active immunization, passive immunization, and T cell-mediated cellular immunotherapeutic approaches have been developed targeting Aβ, α-syn and tau. Most advanced studies, including results from phase III clinical trials for passive immunization in AD, have been recently reported. Results suggest that immunotherapy might be a promising therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases that progress with the accumulation and propagation of toxic protein aggregates. In this manuscript we provide an overview on immunotherapeutic advances for neurodegenerative disorders, with special emphasis on α-synucleinopathies. PMID:23384597

  13. Advances in immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Reckamp, Karen L

    2015-12-01

    In most patients, lung cancer presents as advanced disease with metastases to lymph nodes and/or distant organs, and survival is poor. Lung cancer is also a highly immune-suppressing malignancy with numerous methods to evade antitumor immune responses, including deficiencies in antigen processing and presentation, release of immunomodulatory cytokines, and inhibition of T-cell activation. Advances in understanding the complex interactions of the immune system and cancer have led to novel therapies that promote T-cell activation at the tumor site, resulting in prolonged clinical benefit. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, specifically programmed death receptor 1 pathway antibodies, have demonstrated impressively durable responses and improved survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. This article will review the recent progress made in immunotherapy for lung cancer with data from trials evaluating programmed death receptor 1 and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 monoclonal antibodies in addition to cancer vaccines. The review will focus on studies that have been published and the latest randomized trials exploring immune therapy in lung cancer. These results form the framework for a new direction in the treatment of lung cancer toward immunotherapy. PMID:27058851

  14. Rationale for anti-CD137 cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Makkouk, Amani; Chester, Cariad; Kohrt, Holbrook E

    2016-02-01

    The consideration of the complex interplay between the tumour microenvironment (TME) and the immune response is the key for designing effective immunotherapies. Therapeutic strategies that harness co-stimulatory receptors have recently gained momentum in the clinic. One such strategy with promising clinical applications is the targeting of CD137, a member of the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily. Its expression on both innate and adaptive immune cells, coupled with its unique ability to potentiate antitumour responses through modulating the TME and to ameliorate autoimmune responses, has established it as an appealing target. In this review, we will discuss the various CD137-targeted immunotherapeutics that have reached clinical development, with a focus on recent advances and novel modalities such as CD137 chimeric antigen receptors and CD137 bispecific antibodies. We will also highlight the effect of CD137 targeting on the TME and discuss the importance of probing TME changes for predicting and testing the efficacy of CD137-mediated immunotherapy. PMID:26751393

  15. [Biotherapies, immunotherapies, targeted therapies, biopharmaceuticals… which word should be used?].

    PubMed

    Watier, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    The ability to accurately describe and name medical advances is a prerequisite to foster public debates with scientists and physicians, and favour faith over fear among patients and citizens. Therapeutic antibodies are a good example of a medical breakthrough which has met with considerable clinical success, and which terminology has changed over the years. If the appellation serotherapy was appropriate a century ago, it has become obsolete. Recent names such as biotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted therapy, biopharmaceuticals have been introduced and are now commonly used, each of those can apply to therapeutic antibodies. It is thus interesting to question the real meaning of these different appellations. Our goal in this manuscript is to analyse the genesis of these terms but also to suggest how to simplify the terminology: biotherapy or targeted therapy need to be eliminated, as well as immunotherapy when communicating with non scientific public. It is recommended to favour the term biopharmaceuticals (biomédicaments in French), which clearly indicates the origin of these molecules, intermediate between chemical drugs and living biologics, whose borders need to be accurately defined also. PMID:24939545

  16. Current clinical trials testing combinations of immunotherapy and radiation.

    PubMed

    Crittenden, Marka; Kohrt, Holbrook; Levy, Ronald; Jones, Jennifer; Camphausen, Kevin; Dicker, Adam; Demaria, Sandra; Formenti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical evidence of successful combinations of ionizing radiation with immunotherapy has inspired testing the translation of these results to the clinic. Interestingly, the preclinical work has consistently predicted the responses encountered in clinical trials. The first example came from a proof-of-principle trial started in 2001 that tested the concept that growth factors acting on antigen-presenting cells improve presentation of tumor antigens released by radiation and induce an abscopal effect. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was administered during radiotherapy to a metastatic site in patients with metastatic solid tumors to translate evidence obtained in a murine model of syngeneic mammary carcinoma treated with cytokine FLT-3L and radiation. Subsequent clinical availability of vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has triggered a wave of enthusiasm for testing them in combination with radiotherapy. Examples of ongoing clinical trials are described in this report. Importantly, most of these trials include careful immune monitoring of the patients enrolled and will generate important data about the proimmunogenic effects of radiation in combination with a variety of immune modulators, in different disease settings. Results of these studies are building a platform of evidence for radiotherapy as an adjuvant to immunotherapy and encourage the growth of this novel field of radiation oncology. PMID:25481267

  17. Immunotherapy of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Prevailing Challenges and New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Zumwalt, Timothy J; Goel, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Patients with recurring or metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) have strikingly low long-term survival, while conventional treatments such as chemotherapeutic intervention and radiation therapy marginally improve longevity. Although, many factors involving immunosurveillance and immunosuppression were recently validated as important for patient prognosis and care, a multitude of experimental immunotherapies designed to combat unresectable mCRC have, in few cases, successfully mobilized antitumor immune cells against malignancies, nor conclusively or consistently granted protection, complete remission, and/or stable disease from immunotherapy – of which benefit less than 10% of those receiving therapy. After decades of progress, however, new insights into the mechanisms of immunosuppression, tolerance, and mutation profiling established novel therapies that circumvent these immunological barriers. This review underlines the most exciting methods to date that manipulate immune cells to curb mCRC, including adoptive cell therapy, dendritic cell vaccines, and checkpoint inhibitor antibodies – of which hint at effective and enduring protection against disease progression and undetected micrometastases. PMID:26441489

  18. Current and future immunotherapy targets in autoimmune neurology.

    PubMed

    Hu, Melody Y; Stathopoulos, Panos; O'connor, Kevin C; Pittock, Sean J; Nowak, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled treatment trials of autoimmune neurologic disorders are generally lacking and data pertaining to treatment are mostly derived from expert opinion, large case series, and anecdotal reports. The treatment of autoimmune neurologic disorders comprises oncologic therapy (where appropriate) and immunotherapy. In this chapter, we first describe the standard acute and chronic immunotherapies and provide a practical overview of their use in the clinic (mechanisms of action, dosing, monitoring, and side effects). Novel approaches to treatment of autoimmune neurologic disorders, through new drug discovery or repurposing, are dependent on improved mechanistic understanding of immunopathology. Such approaches, with emphasis on monoclonal antibodies, are discussed using the paradigm of three autoimmune neurologic disorders whose immunopathogenesis is better understood, specifically myasthenia gravis, neuromyelitis optica, and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. It is important to realize that the treatment strategy and management plan must be individualized for each patient. In general these are influenced by the following: clinical severity, antibody type, presence or absence of cancer, and prior treatment response, if known. PMID:27112694

  19. Effects of sublingual immunotherapy on allergic inflammation: an update.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Mona-Rita; Colombo, Giselda; Marcucci, Francesco; Caminati, Marco; Sensi, Laura; Di Cara, Giuseppe; Frati, Franco; Incorvaia, Cristoforo

    2012-08-01

    The most common allergic diseases, and especially the respiratory disorders such as rhinitis and asthma, are closely related to the allergic inflammation elicited by the causative allergen. This makes inflammation the main target of anti-allergic therapies. Among the available treatments, allergen specific immunotherapy (AIT) has a patent effect on allergic inflammation, which persists also after its discontinuation, and is the only therapy able to modify the natural history of allergy. The traditional, subcutaneous route of administration was demonstrated to modify the allergen presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) that in turn correct the phenotype of allergen-specific T cells, switching from the Th2-type response, typical of allergic inflammation and characterized by the production of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-17, and IL-32 cytokines to a Th1-type response. This immune deviation is related to an increased IFN-gamma and IL-2 production as well as to the anergy of Th2 or to tolerance, the latter being related to the generation of allergen-specific T regulatory (Treg) cells, which produce cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-beta. Anti-inflammatory mechanisms observed during sublingual AIT with high allergen doses proved to be similar to subcutaneous immunotherapy. Data obtained from biopsies clearly indicate that the pathophysiology of the oral mucosa, with particular importance for mucosal DCs, plays a crucial role in inducing tolerance to the administered allergen. PMID:22506880

  20. Sublingual immunotherapy for pediatric allergic rhinitis: The clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Licari, Amelia; Caimmi, Silvia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Allergic rhinitis is estimated to affect 10%-20% of pediatric population and it is caused by the IgE-sensitization to environmental allergens, most importantly grass pollens and house dust mites. Allergic rhinitis can influence patient's daily activity severely and may precede the development of asthma, especially if it is not diagnosed and treated correctly. In addition to subcutaneous immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) represents the only treatment being potentially able to cure allergic respiratory diseases, by modulating the immune system activity. This review clearly summarizes and analyzes the available randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials, which aimed at evaluating the effectiveness and the safety of grass pollen and house dust mite SLIT for the specific treatment of pediatric allergic rhinitis. Our analysis demonstrates the good evidence supporting the efficacy of SLIT for allergic rhinitis to grass pollens in children, whereas trials regarding pediatric allergic rhinitis to house dust mites present lower quality, although several studies supported its usefulness. PMID:26862501