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Sample records for anti-tnf immunotherapy reduces

  1. Anti-TNF-α therapy reduces endothelial cell activation in non-diabetic ankylosing spondylitis patients.

    PubMed

    Genre, Fernanda; López-Mejías, Raquel; Miranda-Filloy, José A; Ubilla, Begoña; Mijares, Verónica; Carnero-López, Beatriz; Gómez-Acebo, Inés; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Blanco, Ricardo; Pina, Trinitario; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction can be detected by the presence of elevated levels of biomarkers of endothelial cell activation. In this study, we aimed to establish whether correlations of these biomarkers with characteristics of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) exist. We also studied the effect of anti-TNF-α therapy on these biomarkers. Serum sE-selectin, MCP-1 and sVCAM-1 levels were measured by ELISA in 30 non-diabetic AS patients undergoing anti-TNF-α therapy, immediately before and after an infusion of infliximab. Correlations of these biomarkers with clinical features, systemic inflammation, metabolic syndrome and other serum and plasma biomarkers of cardiovascular risk were studied. Potential changes in the concentration of these biomarkers following an infliximab infusion were also assessed. sE-selectin showed a positive correlation with CRP (p = 0.02) and with other endothelial cell activation biomarkers such as sVCAM-1 (p = 0.019) and apelin (p = 0.008). sVCAM-1 negatively correlated with BMI (p = 0.018), diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.008) and serum glucose (p = 0.04). sVCAM-1 also showed a positive correlation with VAS spinal pain (p = 0.014) and apelin (p < 0.001). MCP-1 had a negative correlation with LDL cholesterol (p = 0.026) and ESR (p = 0.017). Patients with hip involvement and synovitis and/or enthesitis in other peripheral joints showed higher levels of MCP-1 (p = 0.004 and 0.02, respectively). A single infliximab infusion led to a significant reduction in sE-selectin (p = 0.0015) and sVCAM-1 (p = 0.04). Endothelial dysfunction correlates with inflammation and metabolic syndrome features in patients with AS. A beneficial effect of the anti-TNF-α blockade on endothelial dysfunction, manifested by a reduction in levels of biomarkers of endothelial cell activation, was observed. PMID:26143161

  2. Selective inhibition of TNFR1 reduces osteoclast numbers and is differentiated from anti-TNF in a LPS-driven model of inflammatory bone loss.

    PubMed

    Espirito Santo, A I; Ersek, A; Freidin, A; Feldmann, M; Stoop, A A; Horwood, N J

    2015-09-01

    The treatment of autoimmune disorders has been revolutionised by the introduction of biologics such as anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF). Although in rheumatoid arthritis patients a bone sparing effect of anti-TNF has been shown, the mechanism is not fully understood. Anti-TNF molecules block tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and prevent signalling via both TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1; p55) and TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2; p75). However, signalling via TNFR2 is reported to have protective effects in a number of cell and organ systems. Hence we set out to investigate if pharmacological inhibition of TNFR1 had differential effects compared to pan-TNF inhibition in both an in vitro cell-based model of human osteoclast activity and an in vivo mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteolysis. For the in vitro experiments the anti-human TNFR1 domain antibody (dAb) DMS5541 was used, whereas for the in vivo mouse experiments the anti-mouse TNFR1 dAb DMS5540 was used. We show that selective blocking of TNFR1 signalling reduced osteoclast formation in the presence of TNF. Subcutaneous LPS injection over the calvaria leads to the development of osteolytic lesions within days due to inflammation driven osteoclast formation. In this model, murine TNFR2 genetically fused with mouse IgG1 Fc domain (mTNFR2.Fc), an anti-TNF, did not protect from bone loss in contrast to anti-TNFR1, which significantly reduced lesion development, inflammatory infiltrate, and osteoclast number and size. These results support further exploring the use of TNFR1-selective inhibition in inflammatory bone loss disorders such as osteomyelitis and peri-prosthetic aseptic loosening. PMID:26208457

  3. Implementable strategies and exploratory considerations to reduce costs associated with anti-TNF therapy in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Park, K T; Crandall, Wallace V; Fridge, Jacqueline; Leibowitz, Ian H; Tsou, Marc; Dykes, Dana M H; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Kappelman, Michael D; Colletti, Richard B

    2014-05-01

    A health care system is needed where care is based on the best available evidence and is delivered reliably, efficiently, and less expensively (best care at lower cost). In gastroenterology, anti-tumor necrosis factor agents represent the most effective medical therapeutic option for patients with moderate-to-severe inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but are very expensive and account for nearly a quarter of the cost of IBD care, representing a major area of present and future impact in direct health care costs. The ImproveCareNow Network, consisting of over 55 pediatric IBD centers, seeks ways to improve the value of care in IBD, curtailing unnecessary costs and promoting better health outcomes through systematic and incremental quality improvement initiatives. This report summarizes the key evidence to facilitate the cost-effective use of anti-tumor necrosis factor agents for patients with IBD. Our review outlines the scientific rationale for initiating cost-reducing measures in anti-tumor necrosis factor use and focuses on 3 implementable strategies and 4 exploratory considerations through practical clinical guidelines, as supported by existing evidence. Implementable strategies can be readily integrated into today's daily practice, whereas exploratory considerations can guide research to support future implementation. PMID:24451222

  4. Reduced numbers of mucosal DR(int) macrophages and increased numbers of CD103(+) dendritic cells during anti-TNF-α treatment in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Dige, Anders; Magnusson, Maria K; Öhman, Lena; Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Kelsen, Jens; Wick, Mary Jo; Agnholt, Jørgen

    2016-06-01

    Objective Anti-TNF-α treatment constitutes a mainstay in the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD), but its mechanisms of action are not fully understood. We aimed to investigate the effects of adalimumab, a human monoclonal TNF-α antibody, on macrophage (MQ) and dendritic cell (DC) subsets in mucosal biopsies and peripheral blood. Material and methods Intestinal biopsies and blood samples were obtained from 12 different CD patients both before and 4 weeks after the initiation of the induction of adalimumab treatment. Endoscopic disease activity was estimated by the Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease. Biopsies were obtained from inflamed and non-inflamed areas. The numbers of lamina propria CD14 (+) DR(int) and CD14 (+) DR(hi) MQs, CD141(+), CD141(-) and CD103(+ )DCs subsets, and circulating monocytes and DCs were analyzed using flow cytometry. Results At baseline, we observed higher numbers of DR(int) MQs and lower numbers of CD103(+ )DCs in inflamed versus non-inflamed mucosa [843 vs. 391/10(5) lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) (p < 0.05) and 9 vs. 19 × 10(5) LPMCs (p = 0.01), respectively]. After four weeks of adalimumab treatment, the numbers of DR(int) MQs decreased [843 to 379/10(5) LPMCs (p = 0.03)], whereas the numbers of CD103(+ )DCs increased [9-20 × 10(5) LPMCs (p = 0.003)] compared with baseline. In peripheral blood, no alterations were observed in monocyte or DC numbers between baseline and week 4. Conclusions In CD, mucosal inflammation is associated with high numbers of DR(int) MQs and low numbers of CD103(+ )DCs. This composition of intestinal myeloid subsets is reversed by anti-TNF-α treatment. These results suggest that DR(int) MQs play a pivotal role in CD inflammation. PMID:26784676

  5. Risk of tuberculosis infection in anti-TNF-α biological therapy: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xi; Li, Fen; Chen, Jin-Wei; Wang, Jia

    2014-08-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) biological agents, including soluble TNF-α receptors and anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibodies, bring new hope for treating rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, but also increase the risk of infection, especially tuberculosis (TB) infection. Recent findings have shown that the physiological TNF-mediated signaling was somehow impaired by TNF antagonists, leading to the exacerbation of chronic infection associated with aberrant granuloma formation and maintenance. Although both receptor and antibody agents appear to pose an equally high risk in causing development of new TB infections, monoclonal anti-TNF-α antibody seems more inclined to reactivate latent TB infection. This review is focused on the underlying mechanisms that cause the TB risk in the anti-TNF-α therapy and also the strategies to deal with it, with the aim of reducing the TB incidence during anti-TNF-α biological therapies. PMID:23727394

  6. Optimization of anti-TNF therapy in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Strik, A S; Bots, S J A; D'Haens, G; Lwenberg, M

    2016-03-01

    After the introduction of anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents, the clinical outcome of patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) has improved significantly. However, use of anti-TNF therapy is complicated by loss of response. In order to maintain remission, adequate serum levels are required. Hence, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is important in order to optimize serum drug levels, especially in patients with loss of response to these agents. Optimization of anti-TNF therapy by applying TDM enables clinicians to regain response to TNF blockers in a significant proportion of patients. It is important to use anti-TNF agents in their most optimal way, since these therapeutic agents are expensive and the medical options after failing anti-TNF therapy are limited. Here, we will discuss how to optimize treatment with anti-TNF agents in IBD patients in order to improve treatment efficacy, prevent anti-drug antibody formation, reduce side effects, discontinue unnecessary treatment and manage costs. PMID:26681400

  7. [Anti-TNF alpha in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Mahe, E; Descamps, V

    2002-12-01

    The discovery of the major role of TNF alpha in the physiopathology of certain inflammatory diseases and notably in rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease has led to the development of anti-TNF alpha drugs. These new therapeutic arms issued from bio-technology have rapidly demonstrated their efficacy in the treatment of these two diseases. The anti-TNF alpha arsenal is currently dominated by etanercept, a fusion protein composed of a soluble TNF alpha receptor, and infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody. However, new molecules will soon enrich this arsenal. TNF alpha is a major cytokine of inflammatory diseases of the skin. Many dermatological diseases will probably benefit from these new treatments. Two studies have already demonstrated their interest in cutaneous and articular psoriasis. Encouraging sporadic results suggest other potential indications (Behcet's disease, bullous dermatitis, neutrophilic dermatitis, toxic epidermal necrolysis, systemic vascularitis,.). These promising new treatments, although expensive, and with yet unknown long term side effects, justify rigorous assessment of their efficacy and tolerance in each indication. Here again the dermatologist has a major role to play in post-marketing pharmacovigilance. PMID:12536174

  8. Influence of Anti-TNF and Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs Therapy on Pulmonary Forced Vital Capacity Associated to Ankylosing Spondylitis: A 2-Year Follow-Up Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Vásquez-Jiménez, José Clemente; De la Cerda-Trujillo, Liliana Faviola; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Norma Alejandra; Díaz-Rizo, Valeria; Díaz-González, Viviana; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto German; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Ingrid Patricia; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo Hernan; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of anti-TNF agents plus synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) versus DMARDs alone for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) with reduced pulmonary function vital capacity (FVC%). Methods. In an observational study, we included AS who had FVC% <80% at baseline. Twenty patients were taking DMARDs and 16 received anti-TNF + DMARDs. Outcome measures: changes in FVC%, BASDAI, BASFI, 6-minute walk test (6MWT), Borg scale after 6MWT, and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire at 24 months. Results. Both DMARDs and anti-TNF + DMARDs groups had similar baseline values in FVC%. Significant improvement was achieved with anti-TNF + DMARDs in FVC%, at 24 months, when compared to DMARDs alone (P = 0.04). Similarly, patients in anti-TNF + DMARDs group had greater improvement in BASDAI, BASFI, Borg scale, and 6MWT when compared to DMARDs alone. After 2 years of follow-up, 14/16 (87.5%) in the anti-TNF + DMARDs group achieved the primary outcome: FVC% ≥80%, compared with 11/20 (55%) in the DMARDs group (P = 0.04). Conclusions. Patients with anti-TNF + DMARDs had a greater improvement in FVC% and cardiopulmonary scales at 24 months compared with DMARDs. This preliminary study supports the fact that anti-TNF agents may offer additional benefits compared to DMARDs in patients with AS who have reduced FVC%. PMID:26078986

  9. Distinctive histopathologic phenotype in resection specimens from patients with Crohn's disease receiving anti-TNF-α therapy.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, David F; Walsh, Joanna C; Kirsch, Richard; Waterman, Matti; Silverberg, Mark S; Riddell, Robert H

    2014-09-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor α (anti-TNF-α) therapy can result in endoscopic healing, reduction of symptoms, and reduced need for surgery and hospitalization in many patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Earlier data suggested that anti-TNF-α therapy may be associated with fibrosis and stricturing. We sought to determine whether anti-TNF-α therapy affects histologic inflammation, fibrosis, and granuloma formation. Hematoxylin and eosin sections from 62 patients with CD treated with either infliximab or adalimumab and 80 controls undergoing the same surgery but without prior exposure to anti-TNF-α therapy were compared. All patients with CD had undergone surgery within 6 months of therapy; CD controls were matched for steroid exposure, procedure, and indication for surgery and were subcategorized and case matched. Blinded histologic assessment of all slides was performed using a semiquantitative scoring system to assess inflammatory changes and fibrosis in all bowel layers. Compared with controls, the group treated with anti-TNF-α showed a reduction in mucosal and submucosal inflammation (P < .05), a decrease in granuloma formation (P < .05), and an increase in duplication of the muscularis mucosae (P < .05). A notable feature was a distinct pattern of hyalinizing submucosal fibrosis that was often devoid of inflammatory cells and that started directly below the muscularis mucosae; this pattern was not observed in the control group (P < .05). Resection specimens from patients with CD treated with anti-TNF-α therapy showed (a) reduced mucosal and submucosal inflammation; (b) a decrease in granuloma formation; and (c) a distinct pattern of submucosal hyaline fibrosis, with increased fibrosis in the muscularis mucosae and muscularis propria. PMID:25022570

  10. Anti-TNF-Alpha Therapy and Systemic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaplanski, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    TNF-α is a pleiotropic cytokine, which plays a major role in the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune and/or inflammatory systemic diseases. Systemic vasculitis constitutes a group of rare diseases, characterized by inflammation of the arterial or venous vessel wall, causing stenosis and thrombosis. Treatment of the different type of vasculitis mainly relies on steroids and immunosuppressive drugs. In case of refractory or relapsing diseases, however, a second line of treatment may be required. Anti-TNF-α drugs have been used in this setting during the last 15 years with inconsistent results. We reviewed herein the use of anti-TNF-α therapy in different kind of vasculitis and concluded that, except for Behcet's disease, this therapeutic option has not demonstrated significant improvement in the treatment of vasculitis. PMID:24719524

  11. Aldehyde modification and alum coadjuvancy enhance anti-TNF-α autovaccination and mitigate arthritis in rat.

    PubMed

    Bavoso, Alfonso; Ostuni, Angela; De Vendel, Jolanda; Bracalello, Angelo; Shcheglova, Tatiana; Makker, Sudesh; Tramontano, Alfonso

    2015-05-01

    Experimental vaccination to induce antibodies (Abs) capable of cytokine antagonism shows promise as a novel immunotherapy for chronic inflammatory disease. We prepared a hybrid antigen consisting of residues 141-235 of rat TNF-α fused to the C-terminus of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), chemically modified to incorporate aldehyde residues, for development of an auto-vaccine eliciting anti-rTNF-α Abs. In rat immunization the soluble aldehyde-modified fusion protein did not generate observable Ab responses. By contrast, vaccination with the aldehyde-modified fusion protein adsorbed on alum induced anti-TNF-α autoAbs with high titer and neutralizing activity. Induction of adjuvant arthritis in rats pre-immunized with unmodified fusion protein or a control protein in alum resulted in severe inflammation and joint damage, whereas the disease induced in rats immunized with the aldehyde-bearing fusion protein in alum was markedly attenuated. Similar results were obtained in a collagen-induced rat arthritis model. Anti-collagen II IgG Ab titers did not deviate significantly in groups pre-immunized with modified fusion protein and control protein, suggesting that anti-TNF vaccination did not skew the immune response related to disease induction. This study demonstrates synergy between particulate alum and protein bound carbonyl residues for enhancement of protein immunogenicity. The antigen-specific co-adjuvant system could prove advantageous for breaking tolerance in emerging auto-vaccination therapies targeting inflammatory cytokines as well as for enhancing a broader category of subunit vaccines. Aldehyde adduction introduces a minimal modification which, together with the established use of alum as a safe adjuvant for human use, could be favorable for further vaccine development. PMID:25424319

  12. Anti-TNF-α and hydralazine drug-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Quaresma, Maria Victória; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Oliveira, Fernanda Brandão de; Pockstaller, Mercedes Prates; Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Azulay, David Rubem

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced lupus is a rare drug reaction featuring the same symptoms as idiopathic lupus erythematosus. Recently, with the introduction of new medicines in clinical practice, an increase in the number of illness-triggering implicated drugs has been reported, with special emphasis on anti-TNF-α drugs. In the up-to-date list, almost one hundred medications have been associated with the occurrence of drug-induced lupus. The authors present two case reports of the illness induced respectively by hydralazine and infliximab, addressing the clinical and laboratorial characteristics, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:26312694

  13. Anti-TNF-α and hydralazine drug-induced lupus*

    PubMed Central

    Quaresma, Maria Victória; Bernardes Filho, Fred; de Oliveira, Fernanda Brandão; Pockstaller, Mercedes Prates; Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Azulay, David Rubem

    2015-01-01

    Drug-induced lupus is a rare drug reaction featuring the same symptoms as idiopathic lupus erythematosus. Recently, with the introduction of new medicines in clinical practice, an increase in the number of illness-triggering implicated drugs has been reported, with special emphasis on anti-TNF-α drugs. In the up-to-date list, almost one hundred medications have been associated with the occurrence of drug-induced lupus. The authors present two case reports of the illness induced respectively by hydralazine and infliximab, addressing the clinical and laboratorial characteristics, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:26312694

  14. DADS neuropathy associated with anti-TNF-α therapy.

    PubMed

    McGinty, Ronan Niall; McNamara, Brian; Moore, Helena

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old man with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and severe rheumatoid arthritis presented with a 1-year history of progressively worsening limb paraesthesia. Examination showed sensory loss in a glove and stocking distribution, absent reflexes and unsteady tandem gait. Nerve conduction studies suggested an acquired peripheral neuropathy with distal demyelination, which-together with the clinical phenotype-was consistent with a Distal Acquired Demyelinating Symmetric (DADS) neuropathy pattern. This was attributed to therapy with adalimumab, an antitumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α agent, which the patient had been taking for 2 years for rheumatoid arthritis. One month after discontinuing adalimumab, the limb paraesthesia had resolved completely and the patient had a normal tandem gait. Demyelinating disorders may rarely occur as complications of anti-TNF-α agents and therefore have implications for pretreatment counselling and ongoing monitoring. DADS neuropathy is a subtype of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, which responds poorly to standard therapy and has not previously been described with anti-TNF-α therapy. PMID:26607186

  15. Cutaneous histoplasmosis as a complication after anti-TNF use - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Zattar, Gabrielle Aline; Cardoso, Fernanda; Nakandakari, Sadamitsu; Soares, Cleverson Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Anti-TNF agents are effective in the treatment of psoriasis. However, they render individuals more susceptible to infections. We report an atypical case of histoplasmosis in an immunosuppressed patient due to anti- TNF therapy. A patient who used anti-TNF for the treatment of psoriasis had had a lesion on the right eyebrow since discontinuation of the medication. The diagnostic hypothesis was basal cell carcinoma, but the histopathological examination was compatible with histoplasmosis. PMID:26312688

  16. Anti-TNF therapy: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Claudia; Nanchahal, Jagdeep; Taylor, Peter

    2015-01-01

    While for a century therapeutics has been dominated by small molecules, i.e. organic chemicals of ~400Da absorbable via the gut, this is no longer the case. There are now a plethora of important medicines which are proteins and injectable, which have dramatically improved the therapy of many inflammatory diseases and of cancer. Most of these are monoclonal antibodies, some are receptor Ig Fc fusion proteins, others are cytokines or enzymes. The key to this new aspect of therapeutics has been the filling of unmet needs, and the consequent commercial success, which promoted further research and development. The first ‘biologic’ for a common disease, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), was a monoclonal antibody, infliximab, to human tumour necrosis factor (TNF). This was based on our work, which is described in this review, summarizing how TNF was defined as a good target in RA, how it was developed is described here, as well as future indications for anti-TNF and related agents. Biologics are now the fastest growing sector of therapeutics. PMID:25411043

  17. Successful anti-TNF-? treatment in a girl with LAD-1 disease and autoimmune manifestations.

    PubMed

    Marsili, Manuela; Lougaris, Vassilios; Lucantoni, Marta; Di Marzio, Daniele; Baronio, Manuela; Vitali, Massimiliano; Lombardi, Giuliano; Chiarelli, Francesco; Breda, Luciana

    2014-10-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD-1) is an autosomal recessive disorder, caused by the absence or reduced expression of the beta-2 integrins on granulocytes, and characterized by the inability of these cells to emigrate from the bloodstream towards the sites of tissue inflammation. A twelve-year-old girl with a diagnosis of LAD-1 syndrome and recurrent skin and mucosal infections since birth, presented with a two week history of fever, abdominal pain, vomiting, weight loss and polyarthralgia. She underwent an exploratory laparotomy with the finding of inflamed terminal ileum and colon and a normal appendix. Colonoscopy and videocapsule endoscopy showed multiple ileal and colonic mucosal ulcerations, which were compatible with inflammatory bowel disease, confirmed on histological examination. Given the lack of response to conventional therapy (prednisone and mesalamine), a monoclonal anti-TNF-? antibody was started at a dosage of 5 mg/kg at weeks 0,2,4,6 and then every 8 weeks. We observed a significant improvement of all clinical and laboratory parameters after the first weeks of therapy. Five months later, we anticipated the drug's administration every 5 weeks because of a precocious recurrence of symptoms. After 30 months of treatment no relapse nor any relevant side effects have been observed, and corticosteroids were withdrawn. Interestingly, our patient presented a small subset of CD18+ T cells, similarly to previously reported LAD-1 patients with mild phenotype, inflammatory bowel disease and CD18+ somatic revertant T cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first LAD-1 pediatric patient with inflammatory autoimmune complications who experienced a positive response to anti-TNF-? treatment. PMID:25135596

  18. Clinical use of anti-TNF therapy and increased risk of infections

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Tauseef; Kaitha, Sindhu; Mahmood, Sultan; Ftesi, Abdul; Stone, Jordan; Bronze, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Biologics such as antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs have emerged as important agents in the treatment of many chronic inflammatory diseases, especially in cases refractory to conventional treatment modalities. However, opportunistic infections have become a major safety concern in patients on anti-TNF therapy, and physicians who utilize these agents must understand the increased risks of infection. A literature review of the published data on the risk of bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic infections associated with anti-TNF therapy was performed and the clinical presentation, diagnostic tests, management, and prevention of opportunistic infections in patients receiving anti-TNF therapy were reviewed. Awareness of the therapeutic potential and associated adverse events is necessary for maximizing therapeutic benefits while minimizing adverse effects from anti-TNF treatments. Patients should be adequately vaccinated when possible and closely monitored for early signs of infection. When serious infections occur, withdrawal of anti-TNF therapy may be necessary until the infection has been identified and properly treated. PMID:23569399

  19. A guide to preparation of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases for anti-TNF-α therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chebli, Júlio Maria Fonseca; Gaburri, Pedro Duarte; Chebli, Liliana Andrade; da Rocha Ribeiro, Tarsila Campanha; Pinto, André Luiz Tavares; Ambrogini, Orlando; Damião, Adérson Omar Mourão Cintra

    2014-01-01

    Current therapy of moderate-to-severe inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often involves the use of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) agents. Although very effective, theses biologics place the patient at increased risk for developing infections and lymphomas, the latter especially when in combination with thiopurines. Appropriate patient selection, counseling, and education are all important features for the successful use of anti-TNF-α therapy. A thorough history to rule-out contraindications of this therapy and emphasis on monitoring guidelines are important steps preceding administration of anti-TNF-α agents. This therapy should only be considered if a recent evaluation has established that the patient has active IBD. In addition, it is important to exclude disease mimickers. Anti-TNF-α agents have been considered to present a globally favorable benefit/risk ratio. However, it is important that in routine practice, initiation of anti-TNF-α therapy be carefully discussed with the patient, extensively explaining the potential benefits and risks of such treatment. Prior to starting anti-TNF-α therapy, the patients need to be screened for latent tuberculosis, hepatitis B virus infection, and (usually) hepatitis C virus and HIV infection. Vaccination schedules of IBD patients should be evaluated and updated prior to the commencement of anti-TNF-α therapy. Ordinarily, immunization in adult patients with IBD should not deviate from recommended guidelines for the general population. With the exception of live vaccines, immunizations can be safely administered in patients with IBD, even those on immunosuppressants or biologics. The purpose of this review is providing an overview of appropriate steps to prepare patients with IBD for anti-TNF-α therapy. PMID:24667275

  20. Association Between Anti-TNF-α Therapy and Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Herrinton, Lisa J.; Harrold, Leslie R.; Liu, Liyan; Raebel, Marsha A.; Taharka, Ananse; Winthrop, Kevin L.; Solomon, Daniel H.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Lewis, James D.; Saag, Kenneth G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anti-TNF-α agents have been hypothesized to increase the risk of interstitial lung disease (ILD), including its most severe manifestation, pulmonary fibrosis. Methods We conducted a cohort study among autoimmune disease patients who were members of Kaiser Permanente Northern California, 1998–2007. We obtained therapies from pharmacy data and diagnoses of ILD from review of X-ray and computed tomography reports. We compared new users of anti-TNF-α agents to new users of non-biologic therapies using Cox proportional hazards analysis to adjust for baseline propensity scores and time-varying use of glucocorticoids. We also made head-to-head comparisons between anti-TNF-α agents. Results Among the 8,417 persons included in the analysis, 38 (0.4%) received a diagnostic code for ILD by the end of follow-up, including 23 of 4,200 (0.5%) who used anti-TNF-α during study follow-up, and 15 of 5,423 (0.3%) who used only non-biologic therapies. The age- and gender-standardized incidence rate of ILD, per 100 person-years, was 0.21 (95% CI 0–0.43) for rheumatoid arthritis and appreciably lower for other autoimmune diseases. Compared to use of non-biologic therapies, use of anti-TNF-α therapy was not associated with a diagnosis of ILD among RA patients (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI 0.51–2.07). Nor did head-to-head comparisons across anti-TNF-α agents suggest important differences in risk, although the number of cases available for analysis was limited. Conclusion The study provides evidence that compared to non-biologic therapies anti-TNF-α therapy does not increase the occurrence of ILD among patients with autoimmune diseases, and informs research design of future safety studies of ILD. PMID:23359391

  1. Diagnosis and Treatment of Latent Tuberculosis Infection due to Initiation of Anti-TNF Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) are increasingly being treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents and are at increased risk of developing tuberculosis (TB). Therefore, diagnosis and treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI) is recommended in these patients due to the initiation of anti-TNF therapy. Traditionally, LTBI has been diagnosed on the basis of clinical factors and a tuberculin skin test. Recently, interferon-gamma releasing assays (IGRAs) that can detect TB infection have become available. Considering the high-risk of developing TB in patients on anti-TNF therapy, the use of both a tuberculin skin test and an IGRA should be considered to detect and treat LTBI in patients with IMIDs. The traditional LTBI treatment regimen consisted of isoniazid monotherapy for 9 months. However, shorter regimens such as 4 months of rifampicin or 3 months of isoniazid/rifampicin are increasingly being used to improve treatment completion rates. In this review, the screening methods for diagnosing latent and active TB before anti-TNF therapy in patients with IMIDs will be briefly described, as well as the current LTBI treatment regimens, the recommendations for managing TB that develops during anti-TNF therapy, the necessity of regular monitoring to detect new TB infection, and the re-initiation of anti-TNF therapy in patients who develop TB. PMID:25024719

  2. How to manage the infectious risk under anti-TNF in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Culver, Emma L; Travis, Simon P L

    2010-02-01

    The advent of biological therapy has had a significant impact on the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Nevertheless, anti-TNF-alpha agents are still used with caution, driven by concerns about the risk of infection. Stringent post-marketing surveillance programmes and registries have allowed early recognition of problems, highlighting an increased risk of infectious complications. Although the focus is on biological drugs, other immunomodulators have been less well scrutinised and similarly carry considerable risks of infection. It remains unclear whether the risk of infection from anti-TNF therapy is any different from conventional immunomodulators such as azathioprine or methotrexate, although it appears to be less than that ascribed to corticosteroids. The majority of patients on anti-TNF agents are on concomitant immunosuppressive medication, which makes ascribing risk to a specific drug more difficult. The risk of life-threatening opportunistic infections associated with anti-TNF therapy has obliged us to re-consider methods of prevention of infection and to develop guidelines for risk-stratification of patients with a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. This encompasses vaccination and chemoprevention, appropriate treatment of underlying infection, patient education, travel advice and careful monitoring whilst on anti-TNF therapy. Contingency planning is essential. Implementing these preventative strategies will have an appreciable impact on the organisation of care and on current clinical practice. PMID:20210768

  3. Autoimmunogenicity during anti-TNF therapy in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Goździalska, Anna; Lipko-Godlewska, Sylwia; Obtułowicz, Aleksander; Sułowicz, Joanna; Podolec, Katarzyna; Wojas-Pelc, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) was initially described as lymphotoxin or cachectin. The discovery of therapies blocking the action of TNF-α, in 1988, started a new era in the therapy. One of often reported adverse effects related to the use of TNF-α antagonists is induction of the formation of autologous antibodies and antibodies neutralizing anti-TNF drugs. The development of anti-TNF-induced lupus or classical drug-induced lupus is more rarely reported. Aim To evaluate the presence and the level of anti-nuclear antibodies in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and the influence of anti-TNF therapy used on the concentration of antinuclear antibody (ANA). Material and methods A total of 28 subjects were included in the study. 71.4% of subjects were diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis and 28.6% with plaque psoriasis. Results Among the patients with plaque psoriasis, the antinuclear antibodies were found in 25% of subjects and in 80% of patients with psoriatic arthritis. After the treatment an increase in the titer or appearance of antibodies was found in 66.7% in the infliximab group, 18.2% in the etanercept group and 54.7% in the adalimumab group. No subjects developed symptoms of drug-induced systemic lupus. Conclusions Our findings have shown that all anti-TNF therapies induced ANA in psoriatic arthritis and psoriatic patients. Considering a mild course of lupus induced by anti-TNF treatment and, usually intrinsic, resolution of symptoms, the biological therapy still appears as a safe treatment for patients. PMID:26366147

  4. [Rhumatology. The rheumatoid arthritis patient who does not respond to anti-TNF].

    PubMed

    So, A

    2007-01-10

    Anti-TNF treatments have given patients with rheumatoid arthritis considerable hope and relief. However, 20-30% of patients do not respond sufficiently to a given anti-TNF drug. In this situation, current strategies include switching to an alternative agent, increasing the dose of the current agent or to return to conventional DMARDs. The arrival of new biologics, which target different molecules than TNF, opens the perspective to other pathways of immunomodulation in RA. These drugs include rituximab (anti-CD20), abatacept (CTLA4Ig) and tocilizumab (anti- IL6R). Comparative studies are urgently needed to assess the efficacy of the different treatment options in order to provide the best therapeutic strategy for our patients. PMID:17354663

  5. Immunogenicity of Anti-TNF-α Biotherapies: I. Individualized Medicine Based on Immunopharmacological Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Specific inhibition of the cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), has revolutionized the treatment of patients with several autoimmune diseases, and genetically engineered anti-TNF antibody constructs now constitute a heavy medicinal expenditure in many countries. Unfortunately, up to 30% of patients do not respond and about 50% of those who do loose response with time. Furthermore, safety may be compromised by immunogenicity with the induction of anti-drug-antibodies (ADA). Assessment of drug pharmacokinetics and ADA is increasingly recognized as a requirement for safe and rational use of protein drugs. The use of therapeutic strategies based on anti-TNF drug levels and ADA rather than dose-escalation has also proven to be cost-effective, as this allows individualized patient-tailored strategies rather than the current universal approach to loss of response. The objective of the present article – and the accompanying article – is to discuss the reasons for recommending assessments of circulating drug and ADA levels in patients treated with anti-TNF biopharmaceuticals and to detail some of the methodological issues that obscure cost-effective and safer therapies. PMID:25904915

  6. Effects of hyaluronic acid conjugation on anti-TNF-α inhibition of inflammation in burns

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Emily E.; Sun, Liang Tso; Natesan, Shanmugasundaram; Zamora, David O.; Christy, Robert J.; Washburn, Newell R.

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials capable of neutralizing specific cytokines could form the basis for treating a broad range of conditions characterized by intense, local inflammation. Severe burns, spanning partial- to full-thickness of the dermis, can result in complications due to acute inflammation that contributes to burn progression, and early mediation may be a key factor in rescuing thermally injured tissue from secondary necrosis in order to improve healing outcomes. In this work we examined the effects on burn progression and influence on the inflammatory microenvironment of topical application of anti-TNF-α alone, mixed with hyaluronic acid or conjugated to hyaluronic acid. We found that non-conjugated anti-TNF-α decreased macrophage infiltration to a greater extent than that conjugated to hyaluronic acid; however there was little effect on the degree of progression or IL-1β levels. A simple transport model is proposed to analyze the results, which predicts qualitative and quantitative differences between untreated burn sites and those treated with the conjugates. Our results indicate that conjugation of anti-TNF-α to high molecular weight hyaluronic acid provides sustained, local modulation of the post-injury inflammatory responses compared to direct administration of non-conjugated antibodies. PMID:23765644

  7. Production and Purification of a Novel Anti-TNF-α Single Chain Fragment Variable Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Ali Akbar; Hamzeh-Mivehroud, Maryam; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: TNF-α is an inflammatory cytokine with a key role in initiation of inflammatory responses. Anti-TNF-α antibodies are being used in clinic for the purpose of diagnosis and treatment due to their high specificity. The objective of the current study was to express and purify an anti-TNF-α scFv antibody identified by phage display technology. Methods: The DNA coding sequence of the identified scFv was cloned into pET28a vector and the corresponding protein was expressed as 6×His tagged using E.coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS expression system followed by affinity purification on Ni-Sepharose affinity column. Results: The J44 scFv antibody was cloned into the expression vector and successfully expressed and purified. The purity of the scFv fraction was confirmed using SDS-PAGE analysis. Western blotting technique was used to detect expression of 6×His tagged protein. Conclusion: In the current study an anti-TNF-α scFv antibody was successfully expressed in bacterial expression system and purified on affinity column. The purified protein can be used in different in vitro and in vivo experiments in order to elucidate its functionality. PMID:26793614

  8. Safety of Anti-TNF Therapies in Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases: Focus on Infections and Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rui; Lago, Paula; Faria, Raquel; Torres, Tiago

    2015-12-01

    Preclinical Research The efficacy of anti-TNF agents in the treatment of multiple immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) has increased their daily use. However, concerns remain regarding their long-term safety profile. Using a literature-based review of the infectious and malignant complications of anti-TNF biologics in IMIDs including psoriasis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease, this review presents current evidence relative to the safety of anti-TNF agents in the context infections and malignancy in adults with IMIDs. Treatment with anti-TNF biologics is an effective treatment option with known risks that can be mitigated by appreciating the safety aspects and via a thorough screening and continuous monitoring of the patient. Drug Dev Res 76 : 419-427, 2015. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26482111

  9. Immunotherapy Reduces Allergen-Mediated CD66b Expression and Myeloperoxidase Levels on Human Neutrophils from Allergic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Inmaculada; Gómez, Elisa; Pérez-Cano, Ramón; Blanca, Miguel; Monteseirín, Javier

    2014-01-01

    CD66b is a member of the carcinoembryonic antigen family, which mediates the adhesion between neutrophils and to endothelial cells. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is widely used to treat allergic diseases, and the molecular mechanisms underlying this therapy are poorly understood. The present work was undertaken to analyze A) the in vitro effect of allergens and immunotherapy on cell-surface CD66b expression of neutrophils from patients with allergic asthma and rhinitis and B) the in vivo effect of immunotherapy on cell-surface CD66b expression of neutrophils from nasal lavage fluid during the spring season. Myeloperoxidase expression and activity was also analyzed in nasal lavage fluid as a general marker of neutrophil activation. Results CD66b cell-surface expression is upregulated in vitro in response to allergens, and significantly reduced by immunotherapy (p<0.001). Myeloperoxidase activity in nasal lavage fluid was also significantly reduced by immunotherapy, as were the neutrophil cell-surface expression of CD66b and myeloperoxidase (p<0.001). Interestingly, CD66b expression was higher in neutrophils from nasal lavage fluid than those from peripheral blood, and immunotherapy reduced the number of CD66+MPO+ cells in nasal lavage fluid. Thus, immunotherapy positive effects might, at least in part, be mediated by the negative regulation of the CD66b and myeloperoxidase activity in human neutrophils. PMID:24740105

  10. Transmembrane TNF-α: structure, function and interaction with anti-TNF agents

    PubMed Central

    Mitoma, Hiroki; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Shimoda, Terufumi

    2010-01-01

    Transmembrane TNF-α, a precursor of the soluble form of TNF-α, is expressed on activated macrophages and lymphocytes as well as other cell types. After processing by TNF-α-converting enzyme (TACE), the soluble form of TNF-α is cleaved from transmembrane TNF-α and mediates its biological activities through binding to Types 1 and 2 TNF receptors (TNF-R1 and -R2) of remote tissues. Accumulating evidence suggests that not only soluble TNF-α, but also transmembrane TNF-α is involved in the inflammatory response. Transmembrane TNF-α acts as a bipolar molecule that transmits signals both as a ligand and as a receptor in a cell-to-cell contact fashion. Transmembrane TNF-α on TNF-α-producing cells binds to TNF-R1 and -R2, and transmits signals to the target cells as a ligand, whereas transmembrane TNF-α also acts as a receptor that transmits outside-to-inside (reverse) signals back to the cells after binding to its native receptors. Anti-TNF agents infliximab, adalimumab and etanercept bind to and neutralize soluble TNF-α, but exert different effects on transmembrane TNF-α-expressing cells (TNF-α-producing cells). In the clinical settings, these three anti-TNF agents are equally effective for RA, but etanercept is not effective for granulomatous diseases. Moreover, infliximab induces granulomatous infections more frequently than etanercept. Considering the important role of transmembrane TNF-α in granulomatous inflammation, reviewing the biology of transmembrane TNF-α and its interaction with anti-TNF agents will contribute to understanding the bases of differential clinical efficacy of these promising treatment modalities. PMID:20194223

  11. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with anti-TNF-alpha agents: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Caporali, Roberto; Pallavicini, Francesca Bobbio; Filippini, Matteo; Gorla, Roberto; Marchesoni, Antonio; Favalli, Ennio Giulio; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Atzeni, Fabiola; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio

    2009-01-01

    It has been found that tumour necrosis factor(TNF)-alpha plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and the development of drugs targeting this molecule has extended the therapeutical approaches to RA patients. A number of observational studies of large patient series have also been published over the last few years, many of which have been based on national registries designed to monitor the efficacy and safety of anti-TNF agents, and allow healthcare institutions to control expenditure. Registry data can also help in identifying clinical and laboratory findings capable of predicting response. It has been suggested that the percentage of responding patients is lower in everyday clinical practice than that observed in RCTs, possibly because of patient selection, the use of a washout period before inclusion (which may artificially increase disease activity), and differences in doses, co-morbidities and adherence to therapy. A number of safety concerns have been raised since the introduction of anti-TNF agents, and they are now contraindicated in patients with advanced heart failure; however, the most widely debated current issues regard infections and neoplastic diseases. Moreover, the marketing of new and expensive biological agents has made strictly necessary to create systems capable of monitoring their safety and effectiveness in everyday practice, including the use of longitudinal observational studies. As the first published registry of anti-TNFalpha-treated patients in Italy, Lombardy Rheumatology Network (LORHEN) is already making its contribution in this direction. PMID:19017546

  12. [Preventive immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Boquete, M; Carballada, F; Expósito, F; González, A

    2000-01-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy has been shown to be effective in rigorous double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trials in both children and adults A recent WHO position paper stated that immunotherapy is an effective treatment for patients with allergic rhinitis/conjunctivitis, allergic asthma and allergic reactions from stinging insects and is thought to be more effective in children than in adults. When speaking about children there are several questions that are important regarding the natural course of the disease. One of the most important is whether immunotherapy can prevent asthma, either by preventing sensitisation to allergens related to the development of asthma or by preventing the inflammation in the lungs caused by allergen exposure. Another point could be to establish the differences in the long term outcome of those patients treated with immunotherapy and medication during childhood, compared to the long term outcome of those with comparable asthma features who received only antiasthmatic medication The PAT study is a European multi-center study. The end-point is to show in what capacity allergen specific subcutaneous immunotherapy can prevent the development of asthma in children who only have rhinoconjunctivitis secondary to grass or birch pollen sensitisation. Two hundred and ten children aged from 5 to 13 years were included in the study. Children were randomised to the active treatment group receiving allergen specific immunotherapy with birch and/or timothy pollen allergen extract or to the control group receiving only pharmacotherapy. It is important to highlight that the main criteria to be included was that the children should never have had any asthmatic symptom. Immunotherapy has been effective in terms of decreasing significantly the amount of symptoms in the active group compared to the control one. It was safe with no serious adverse reactions and reduced the risk of the onset of asthma. After two years of treatment more children in the control group developed clinical asthma than in the active group: p = 0.004. Des Roches et al reported the results of a prospective non randomised trial of immunotherapy with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus in 44 asthmatic children younger than six years of age who were sensitive only to dust mites. The purpose of the study was to assess whether immunotherapy could reduce the development of new sensitisation during a period of three years of follow up. Specific immunotherapy was given with only D. Pteronyssinus extract. All 22 children in the control group developed new sensitivities as determined by skin testing and in vitro tests, while 10 (45%) of 22 children who received mite immunotherapy did not develop additional sensitivities. The findings of this study suggests that immunotherapy may alter the natural course of the allergic sensitisation reducing the risk of developing new sensitisation in mono sensitive children. A limited number of studies have examined the long terms effects of immunotherapy on the clinical presentation of asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis, and have shown a long lasting efficacy decreasing the amount of symptoms 6-10 years after termination. In a retrospective study of children treated with immunotherapy during childhood for at least three years, that were re-evaluated in early adulthood, the control patients who were treated with medication and no immunotherapy suffered almost 3.5 times more symptoms than the active group treated with immunotherapy. The current findings suggest that immunotherapy should be considered earlier in the course of allergic disease to prevent progression or to prevent the development of new sensitisation. Further studies with long term follow up particularly in children could address this possibility. PMID:10867376

  13. DISSEMINATED GRANULOMA ANNULARE: A CUTANEOUS ADVERSE EFFECT OF ANTI-TNF AGENTS

    PubMed Central

    Ratnarathorn, Mondhipa; Raychaudhuri, Siba P; Naguwa, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors, such as etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab, bind to TNF-α and thereby act as anti-inflammatory agents. This group of drugs has been approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, moderate to severe plaque psoriasis, ankylosing spodylitis, Crohn disease, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. We describe a 56-year-old woman who developed an erythematous pruritic rash on both arms—diagnosed as granuloma annulare by skin biopsy—approximately 22 months after initiating adalimumab for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. On stopping adalimumab there was total clearance of the skin lesions, but a similar rash developed again when her treatment was switched to another anti-TNF agent (etanercept). This clinical observation supports a link between TNF inhibition and the development of granuloma annulare. PMID:22345789

  14. The relationship between body weight and inflammation: Lesson from anti-TNF-α antibody therapy.

    PubMed

    Peluso, Ilaria; Palmery, Maura

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with many pathological conditions. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) is one of the key mediators of inflammation involved in the obesity-related insulin resistance development. We aim to review the human evidence useful to clarify the relationship between inflammation and body weight, with particular reference to TNF-α. Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic factors, such as diet, could affect TNF-α activity. TNF-α is associated with obesity, but also with anorexia and cachexia. Despite the role of TNF-α in obesity-related diseases, anti-TNF-α antibody therapy is associated with an increase in adiposity. In conclusion the reviewed results suggest that inflammation is more likely a consequence rather than a cause of obesity. PMID:26472017

  15. Radiation-Induced Astrogliosis and Blood-Brain Barrier Damage Can Be Abrogated Using Anti-TNF Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Christy M.; Gaber, M. Waleed Sabek, Omaima M.; Zawaski, Janice A.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: In this article, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) in the initiation of acute damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and brain tissue following radiotherapy (RT) for CNS tumors. Methods and Materials: Intravital microscopy and a closed cranial window technique were used to measure quantitatively BBB permeability to FITC-dextran 4.4-kDa molecules, leukocyte adhesion (Rhodamine-6G) and vessel diameters before and after 20-Gy cranial radiation with and without treatment with anti-TNF. Immunohistochemistry was used to quantify astrogliosis post-RT and immunofluorescence was used to visualize protein expression of TNF and ICAM-1 post-RT. Recombinant TNF (rTNF) was used to elucidate the role of TNF in leukocyte adhesion and vessel diameter. Results: Mice treated with anti-TNF showed significantly lower permeability and leukocyte adhesion at 24 and 48 h post-RT vs. RT-only animals. We observed a significant decrease in arteriole diameters at 48 h post-RT that was inhibited in TNF-treated animals. We also saw a significant increase in activated astrocytes following RT that was significantly lower in the anti-TNF-treated group. In addition, immunofluorescence showed protein expression of TNF and ICAM-1 in the cerebral cortex that was inhibited with anti-TNF treatment. Finally, administration of rTNF induced a decrease in arteriole diameter and a significant increase in leukocyte adhesion in venules and arterioles. Conclusions: TNF plays a significant role in acute changes in BBB permeability, leukocyte adhesion, arteriole diameter, and astrocyte activation following cranial radiation. Treatment with anti-TNF protects the brain's microvascular network from the acute damage following RT.

  16. Lymphoma in patients treated with anti-TNF: results of the 3-year prospective French RATIO registry

    PubMed Central

    Mariette, Xavier; Tubach, Florence; Bagheri, Haleh; Bardet, Michel; Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Gaudin, Philippe; Heresbach, Denis; Martin, Antoine; Schaeverbeke, Thierry; Salmon, Dominique; Lemann, Marc; Hermine, Olivier; Raphael, Martine; Ravaud, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Objective To describe cases of lymphoma associated with anti-TNF therapy, identify risk factors, estimate the incidence and compare risks for different anti-TNF agents. Methods We designed a national prospective registry (RATIO) from 2004 to 2006, for collecting all cases of lymphoma in French patients receiving anti-TNF therapy, whatever the indication. We conducted a case-control analysis including two controls treated with anti-TNF per case and an incidence study of lymphoma with the French population used as reference.. Results We collected 38 cases of lymphoma, 31 non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) (26 B-cell and 5 T-cell), 5 Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) and 2 Hodgkin’s-like lymphoma. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was detected in 2 of 2 Hodgkin’s-like lymphoma, 3 of 5 HL and one NHL. Patients receiving adalimumab or infliximab had a higher risk than those treated with etanercept: SIR = 4.1 (2.3–7.1) and 3.6 (2.3–5.6) versus 0.9 (0.4– 1.8). The exposure to adalimumab or infliximab versus etanercept was an independent risk factor for lymphoma in the case-control study: odds ratio=4.7 (1.3– 17.7) and 4.1 (1.4–12.5), respectively. The sex and age- adjusted incidence rate of lymphoma was 42.1 per 100,000 patient-years. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7–3.2). Conclusion Some lymphomas associated with immunosuppression may occur in patients receiving anti TNF therapy, and the risk of lymphoma is higher with monoclonal-antibody therapy than with soluble-receptor therapy. PMID:19828563

  17. Gastrointestinal stability of therapeutic anti-TNF α IgG1 monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vipul; Varum, Felipe; Bravo, Roberto; Furrer, Esther; Basit, Abdul W

    2016-04-11

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are highly effective therapeutic agents, administered exclusively by the parenteral route owing to their previously-documented instability in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract when delivered orally. To investigate the extent of the validity of this assumption, the stability of the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) neutralizing IgG1 mAbs, infliximab and adalimumab, was studied in human GI conditions. In gastric fluid, infliximab and adalimumab degraded rapidly, with complete degradation occurring within 1min. In small intestinal fluid, the molecules were shown to be more stable, but nonetheless degraded within a short time frame of 30min. Investigations into the mechanisms responsible for infliximab and adalimumab instability in the small intestine revealed that the proteolytic enzyme elastase, and to a lesser extent the enzymes trypsin and chymotrypsin, was responsible for their degradation. By contrast, in the human colon, 75% and 50% of the dose of infliximab and adalimumab, respectively, were intact after 60min, with conversion of mAbs into F(ab')2 Fab and Fc fragments detected in colonic conditions. These data indicate that therapeutic IgG1 antibodies are more stable in the colon than in the upper GI tract, therefore highlighting the potential for oral delivery of anti-TNF-α mAbs targeted to the colon. PMID:26892815

  18. Biological Treatments in Behçet's Disease: Beyond Anti-TNF Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Luisa; Caso, Paolo; Bascherini, Vittoria; Frediani, Bruno; Cimaz, Rolando; Nieves-Martín, Laura; Atteno, Mariangela; Raffaele, Carmela G. L.; Tarantino, Giusyda; Galeazzi, Mauro; Punzi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is universally recognized as a multisystemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology with chronic course and unpredictable exacerbations: its clinical spectrum varies from pure vasculitic manifestations with thrombotic complications to protean inflammatory involvement of multiple organs and tissues. Treatment has been revolutionized by the progressed knowledge in the pathogenetic mechanisms of BD, involving dysfunction and oversecretion of multiple proinflammatory molecules, chiefly tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, interleukin- (IL-) 1β, and IL-6. However, although biological treatment with anti-TNF-α agents has been largely demonstrated to be effective in BD, not all patients are definite responders, and this beneficial response might drop off over time. Therefore, additional therapies for a subset of refractory patients with BD are inevitably needed. Different agents targeting various cytokines and their receptors or cell surface molecules have been studied: the IL-1 receptor has been targeted by anakinra, the IL-1 by canakinumab and gevokizumab, the IL-6 receptor by tocilizumab, the IL12/23 receptor by ustekinumab, and the B-lymphocyte antigen CD-20 by rituximab. The aim of this review is to summarize all current experiences and the most recent evidence regarding these novel approaches with biological drugs other than TNF-α blockers in BD, providing a valuable addition to the actually available therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:25061259

  19. Diffusion of pharmaceuticals: cross-country evidence of anti-TNF drugs.

    PubMed

    Brekke, Kurt Richard; Dalen, Dag Morten; Holmås, Tor Helge

    2014-12-01

    This article studies the diffusion of biopharmaceuticals across European countries, focusing on anti-TNF drugs, which are used to treat autoimmune diseases (e.g., rheumatism, psoriasis). We use detailed sales information on the three brands Remicade, Enbrel and Humira for nine European countries covering the period from the first launch in 2000 until becoming blockbusters in 2009. Descriptive statistics reveal large variations across countries in per-capita consumption and price levels both overall and at the brand level. We explore potential sources for the cross-country consumption differences by estimating several multivariate regression models. Our results show that large parts of the cross-country variation are explained by time-invariant country-specific factors (e.g., disease prevalence, demographics, health care system). We also find that differences in income [gross domestic product (GDP) per capita] and health spending (share of GDP) explain the cross-country variation in consumption, while relative price differences seem to have limited impact. PMID:24146261

  20. Dose modifications of anti-TNF drugs in rheumatoid arthritis patients under real-world settings: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ferriols-Lisart, Rafael; Ferriols-Lisart, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Anti-TNF dose modifications in rheumatoid arthritis have implications on healthcare resource utilization. The objective was to systematically review the dose modifications, both escalations and reductions, of currently available anti-TNF drugs (adalimumab, certolizumab, etanercept, golimumab and infliximab) in the real-world setting. We performed a systematic literature search of MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, EMBASE, Indice Médico Español databases and American College of Rheumatology and European League Against Rheumatism annual congresses databases. PRISMA and MOOSE guidelines were followed. Only observational studies were included. Clinical trials were excluded since they do not reflect routine clinical practice. Dose escalations and reductions of the anti-TNF drug and their magnitude were collected. Thirty-four studies fulfill the inclusion criteria. Etanercept was associated with the lower percentage of patients under dose escalation (4.5 %; range 0-22 %), both in naïve (4.9 %) and non-naïve patients (1.3 %). Adalimumab and infliximab were associated with significantly higher percentages. Dose modification magnitude in those patients compared to basal dose was significantly different between treatments; 7.1 % (95 % CI 6.3-7.9 %) in etanercept, 30.4 % (95 % CI 28.3-32.5 %) in adalimumab and 21 % (95 % CI 20.3-21.7 %) in infliximab. Adalimumab and infliximab were associated with a higher risk of dose escalation relative to etanercept. There were no significant differences in the dose reduction percentages for the whole group of patients between treatments. In rheumatoid arthritis, etanercept is associated with a significantly lower percentage of dose-escalated patients and a lower magnitude of dose modification. Significant differences in the dose reduction between anti-TNF drugs evaluated were not observed. PMID:25638015

  1. 2010 Update of the international ASAS recommendations for the use of anti-TNF agents in patients with axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    van der Heijde, Désirée; Sieper, Joachim; Maksymowych, Walter P; Dougados, Maxime; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Landewé, Robert; Rudwaleit, Martin; Braun, Jürgen

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents the second update of the Assessment in SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) consensus statement on the use of anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA). A major change from the previous recommendations is that patients fulfilling the ASAS axial SpA criteria, which also include patients fulfilling the modified New York criteria for ankylosing spondylitis, can be treated with anti-TNF agents. This makes an earlier start in the disease process possible. A second major change is the mandatory pretreatment before anti-TNF agents can be started. All patients should have tried a minimum of two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for a minimum of 4 weeks in total. This is significantly shorter than the previous requirement of 3 months. As previously, patients with axial symptoms require no further pretreatment. Patients with symptomatic peripheral symptoms should normally have had an adequate therapeutic trial of a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug, preferably sulfasalazine. Sulfasalazine is no longer mandatory in this group of patients. Finally, efficacy should be evaluated after at least 12 weeks. The remaining recommendations stayed largely unchanged. PMID:21540200

  2. Therapeutic effect of anti-TNF-alpha antibody and levofloxacin (LVFX) in a mouse model of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157 infection.

    PubMed

    Isogai, E; Isogai, H; Hirose, K; Kubota, T; Kimura, K; Fujii, N; Hayashi, S; Takeshi, K; Oguma, K

    2001-10-01

    The ability of an anti-TNF-alpha antibody to confer protection against enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157 was investigated in germfree IQI mice. The use of an antibiotic levofloxacin (LVFX) alone or with the antibody was also studied. Protection included an increase in survival rate. Treatment with the anti-TNF-alpha antibody inhibited the histological signs associated with EHEC infection but did not prevent the colonization of EHEC or production of Shiga toxin (Stx). No clinical signs were observed and EHEC was completely eliminated in the mouse model receiving both anti-TNF-alpha antibody and LVFX. Anti-TNF-alpha antibody suppressed inflammatory cytokine response in the mouse kidney and brain by EHEC infection. PMID:11561957

  3. Genetic Variations in Pattern Recognition Receptor Loci Are Associated with Anti-TNF Response in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sode, Jacob; Vogel, Ulla; Bank, Steffen; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Hetland, Merete Lund; Locht, Henning; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Andersen, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether genetic variation within genes related to the Toll-like receptor, inflammasome and interferon-γ pathways contributes to the differences in treatment response to tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (anti-TNF) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods In a retrospective case-case study, we assessed 23 functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 15 genes. We included 538 anti-TNF naïve Danish RA patients from the nationwide DANBIO database. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to detect associations (p-value<0.05) between genotypes and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) treatment responses. False Discovery Rate corrections for multiple testing (q-value) and stratified analyses were performed to investigate association with individual therapies and IgM-rheumatoid factor (RF) status. Results Six of twenty successfully genotyped polymorphisms were nominally associated with EULAR treatment response. Three of these were in weak to moderate linkage disequilibrium with polymorphisms previously reported associated with anti-TNF treatment response. TLR5(rs5744174) variant allele carriers (odds ratio(OR) = 1.7(1.1–2.5),p = 0.010,q = 0.46) and TLR1(rs4833095) homozygous variant carriers (OR = 2.8(1.1–7.4),p = 0.037,q = 0.46) had higher odds for a positive treatment response. NLRP3(rs10754558) variant allele carriers (odds ratio(OR) = 0.6(0.4–1.0),p = 0.045,q = 0.46) were more likely to have a negative treatment response. The association in TLR5(rs5744174) remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons among patients negative for RF (OR = 6.2(2.4–16.3),p = 0.0002,q = 0.024). No other association withstood correction for multiple testing. Post hoc analyses showed that change in Patient Global score on a visual analogue scale (VAS) and change in pain VAS were the main factors responsible for the association. Conclusions We reproduced previously reported associations between genetic variation in the TLR10/1/6 gene cluster, TLR5, and NLRP3 loci and response to anti-TNF treatment in RA. Changes in VAS pain and patient global scores were the main contributors to the association found for TLR5. Furthermore, we identified other candidate genes that require replication in independent cohorts. PMID:26440629

  4. Anti-TNF?-therapy as an evidence-based treatment option for different clinical manifestations of psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Khm, Michaela; Burkhardt, Harald; Behrens, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The development programmes of different TNF-blocking agents in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) not only provided substantial evidence for the therapeutic benefits of the specific treatment options, but also enabled new insights into the differential treatment effects on distinct disease manifestations. For the first time, specific robust evidence for distinctive effects on different manifestations of PsA, as a distinct entity separate from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has been generated in a standardized way. The clearest evidence was shown for an effect on peripheral arthritis (polyarticular) with ACR20 response rates from 45 up to 58% (vs. 9-24% for placebo), and an inhibition of radiographic progression demonstrated for the first time for a treatment principle in PsA. However, as PsA does not remain confined to the peripheral joints, it was necessary to address diverse patterns of PsA-subtypes in the outcome measurements of the anti-TNF trials. Accordingly, the results of the clinical studies on anti-TNF treatment also have demonstrated efficacy on enthesitis, dactylitis and skin psoriasis, either in sub analysis of results from phase III RCTs, or in additional prospective studies. PMID:26472504

  5. Candidate's single-nucleotide polymorphism predictors of treatment nonresponse to the first anti-TNF inhibitor in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Schiotis, Ruxandra; Sánchez, Alejandra; Escudero, Alejandro; Bartolomé, Nerea; Szczypiorska, Magdalena; Font, Pilar; Martínez, Antonio; Tejedor, Diego; Artieda, Marta; Mulero, Juan; Buzoianu, Anca; Collantes-Estévez, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study is to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) predictors of treatment nonresponse to the first anti-TNF-alpha agent in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Patients were classified as "nonresponders" if they failed to achieve improvement ≥50 % of the initial BASDAI. We selected candidate SNPs previously reported, associated with susceptibility or pathogenesis of AS and with other spondylarthropaties (SpAs). The predictors of nonresponse were modeled with multiple logistic regression. The predictive power of the genetic model of nonresponse to treatment was tested with AUC-ROC. One hundred and twenty-one (121) AS patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of the candidate SNPs tested for association with treatment effectiveness, five independent predictors were identified: rs917997, rs755622, rs1800896, rs3740691, and rs1061622. The genetic model of nonresponse to treatment had a predictive power of 0.77 (95 % CI 0.68-0.86). Our study identified several polymorphisms which could be the useful genetic biomarkers in predicting nonresponse to anti-TNF-alpha therapy. PMID:24337767

  6. Contrasting effects of TNF and anti-TNF on the activation of effector T cells and regulatory T cells in autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Oppenheim, Joost J.

    2011-01-01

    Anti-TNF treatment is effective in a majority of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however, this treatment can unexpectedly trigger the onset or exacerbate multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent progress in cellular immunology research provides a new framework to analyze the possible mechanism underlying these puzzling contradictory effects. The delicate balance of protective CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and pathogenic CD4+FoxP3− effector T cells (Teffs) is crucial for the outcome of anti-TNF treatment of autoimmune disease. There is convincing evidence that TNF, in addition to stimulating Teffs, is able to activate and expand Tregs through TNFR2, which is preferentially expressed by Tregs. Therefore, the contrasting effects of TNF on Tregs and Teffs are likely to determine the therapeutic effect of anti-TNF treatment. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the general effect of TNF on the activation of T cells, and the impact of TNF on the function of Teffs and Tregs. Understanding the differential effects of TNF on Teffs and Tregs is fundamentally required for the design of more effective and safer anti-TNF or anti-TNF receptor(s) therapeutic strategy for autoimmune diseases. PMID:21513711

  7. Successful Treatment of Primary Cutaneous Mucormycosis Complicating Anti-TNF Therapy with a Combination of Surgical Debridement and Oral Posaconazole.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Jose F; Yakoub, Danny; Cho-Vega, Jeong Hee

    2015-10-01

    Lipid formulations of amphotericin B remain the first-line antifungal therapy for invasive mucormycosis. Posaconazole is an alternative for salvage therapy, but its use as primary therapy is not recommended due to the paucity of clinical data. Here we describe the case of a 57-year-old diabetic woman receiving etanercept and prednisone for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis who developed primary cutaneous mucormycosis after a minor gardening injury. Infection was successfully treated with aggressive surgical debridement followed by a 6-week course of the new delayed-release tablet formulation of posaconazole and temporary withholding of anti-TNF treatment. Primary antifungal therapy with posaconazole can be considered in selected cases of cutaneous mucormycosis. PMID:26112998

  8. Optimal Doses of Methotrexate Combined with Anti-TNF Therapy to Maintain Clinical Remission in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, David T

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Methotrexate (MTX) is sometimes used as part of combination therapy for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]; however, the optimal MTX dose for combination therapy has not been established. This study compared the efficacy of lower-dose and higher-dose MTX with anti tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF) therapy among IBD patients. Methods: Retrospective chart review was performed of 88 IBD patients at our center between 2010 and 2013. Low-dose MTX was defined as ≤ 12.5mg/week and high-dose MTX as 15–25mg/week. Patients who met the criteria for clinical remission [Harvey-Bradshaw Index ≤ 4, Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index ≤ 2] at baseline were followed for up to 42 months. Chart review occurred in 6-month intervals. The primary outcome was consecutive months in remission prior to relapse. Secondary outcomes included other indicators of worsening disease [endoscopic inflammation, steroid use, therapy escalation/addition, or surgery] and adverse events. Regression analysis and Kaplan–Meier survival analysis were completed. Results: We identified 73 [83%] dual-therapy patients, of whom 32 low-dose and 14 high-dose individuals achieved remission. When compared with high-dose patients, low-dose patients were more likely to relapse [log-rank test, p < 0.01]. Secondary indicators of worsening disease occurred during 34.4% of low-dose review periods and 31.4% of high-dose review periods [p = 0.67]; 3/52 [6%] low-dose patients and 3/21 [14%] high-dose patients [p = 0.34] discontinued MTX therapy due to adverse events. Conclusions: When combined with anti-TNF therapy, MTX at doses of >12.5mg/week was more effective at maintaining clinical remission than lower doses. These findings will guide management of combination therapy in IBD patients. PMID:25616487

  9. A genome-wide association study identifies a new locus associated with the response to anti-TNF therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Julià, A; Fernandez-Nebro, A; Blanco, F; Ortiz, A; Cañete, J D; Maymó, J; Alperi-López, M; Fernández-Gutierrez, B; Olivè, A; Corominas, H; Erra, A; Acosta-Colman, I; Alonso, A; López-Lasanta, M; Tortosa, R; Tornero, J; Marsal, S

    2016-04-01

    Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor (anti-TNF) drugs are biologic agents commonly used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, anti-TNFs are not effective in approximately one out of four treated patients. We conducted a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) to identify the genetic variation associated with the response to anti-TNF therapy in RA. In the discovery stage, 372 RA patients treated with an anti-TNF agent (infliximab, adalimumab or etanercept) were analyzed and treatment response was defined at 12 weeks of therapy. We found a genome-wide significant association in the MED15 gene with the response to etanercept (P<1.5e-8). Using an independent cohort of 245 RA patients, we performed a replication study of the most significant GWAS associations. We replicated the association at the MED15 locus and found suggestive evidence of association in the previously associated MAFB locus. The results of this study suggest novel mechanisms associated with the response to anti-TNF therapies. PMID:25896534

  10. Impact of 24 months of anti-TNF therapy versus methotrexate on body weight in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Sfriso, Paolo; Caso, Francesco; Filardo, Giuseppe Sebastiano; Botsios, Costantino; Costa, Luisa; Scarpa, Raffaele; Todesco, Silvano; Spinella, Paolo; Oliviero, Francesca; Punzi, Leonardo

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of anti-TNF-α therapy on the body weight of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients following 24 months of treatment. Data were collected on all RA patients included in the Veneto Region's Registry of Biological Therapy from January 2007 to July 2012. Inclusion criteria were: start of monotherapy with adalimumab, etanercept, or methotrexate, no previous use of biologic therapy, and at least 24 months of treatment. At baseline, 12, and 24 months, each patient completed a questionnaire about physical activity, smoking, alcohol, and food habits. One hundred and thirty-one RA patients in monotherapy with etanercept (n = 47), adalimumab (n = 44), and methotrexate (n = 40) were enrolled for this study. After 24 months of therapy, there was an increase of weight only in patients treated with anti-TNF-α. Patients on etanercept and adalimumab therapy showed a risk to gain weight six times greater compared to those on methotrexate therapy. The results of present study show that the use of anti-TNF-α in RA patients can be associated to a significant increase of body weight. This increase is not shown in patients under treatment with methotrexate. A more careful evaluation of weight changes needs to be considered in RA patients under anti-TNF-α treatment. PMID:27048267

  11. Significant risk and associated factors of active tuberculosis infection in Korean patients with inflammatory bowel disease using anti-TNF agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Soo; Song, Geun Am; Cho, Kwang Bum; Park, Kyung Sik; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Jang, Byung Ik; Kim, Eun Young; Jeon, Seong Woo; Lee, Hyun Seok; Yang, Chang Heon; Lee, Yong Kook; Lee, Dong Wook; Kim, Sung Kook; Kim, Tae Oh; Lee, Jonghun; Kim, Hyung Wook; Jee, Sam Ryong; Park, Seun Ja; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the incidence and risk factors of Korean tuberculosis (TB) infection in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) undergoing anti-TNF treatment. METHODS: The data of IBD patients treated with anti-TNFs in 13 tertiary referral hospitals located in the southeastern region of Korea were collected retrospectively. They failed to show response or were intolerant to conventional treatments, including steroids or immunomodulators. Screening measures for latent TB infection (LTBI) and the incidence and risk factors of active TB infection after treatment with anti-TNFs were identified. RESULTS: Overall, 376 IBD patients treated with anti-TNF agents were recruited (male 255, mean age of anti-TNF therapy 32.5 ± 13.0 years); 277 had Crohn’s disease, 99 had ulcerative colitis, 294 used infliximab, and 82 used adalimumab. Before anti-TNF treatment, screening tests for LTBI including an interferon gamma release assay or a tuberculin skin test were performed in 82.2% of patients. Thirty patients (8%) had LTBI. Sixteen cases of active TB infection including one TB-related mortality occurred during 801 person-years (PY) follow-up (1997.4 cases per 100000 PY) after anti-TNF treatment. LTBI (OR = 5.76, 95%CI: 1.57-21.20, P = 0.008) and WBC count < 5000 mm3 (OR = 4.5, 95%CI: 1.51-13.44, P = 0.007) during follow-up were identified as independently associated risk factors. CONCLUSION: Anti-TNFs significantly increase the risk of TB infection in Korean patients with IBD. The considerable burden of TB and marked immunosuppression might be attributed to this risk. PMID:25805938

  12. Target effector role of vascular endothelium in the inflammatory response: insights from the clinical trial of anti-TNF alpha antibody in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Paleolog, E

    1997-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by chronic joint inflammation and infiltration by cells from the blood, especially activated T cells and macrophages, together with formation of new blood vessels. The overgrowth of the synovial lesion results eventually in destruction of cartilage and bone. Cytokines play a major role in RA, both in systemic inflammatory processes, such as induction of acute phase protein synthesis, and in the stimulation of new blood vessel development and recruitment of leucocytes to developing lesions. The focus for the interplay of many cytokines is the endothelium, the lining layer of the vasculature. This is the primary target for circulating mediators, and it controls the traffic of cells and molecules from the bloodstream into underlying tissues. Targeting the action of individual cytokines--for example, using antibody against tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), has been shown to be very effective in the treatment of RA. Blockade of TNF alpha activity results in deactivation of the endothelium, manifested as reduced expression of adhesion molecules and chemoattractant cytokines, leading to diminished trafficking of inflammatory cells to synovial joints. In addition anti-TNF alpha decreases circulating levels of the potent angiogenic cytokine VEGF, suggesting that new blood vessel formation, and hence the supply of nutrients to the growing synovial lesion, is also affected. These observations lend further support to the hypothesis that interruption of a component of the cytokine network in RA may modulate disease progression, and point the way towards the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease states. PMID:9497911

  13. 99mTc-anti-TNF-α antibody for the imaging of disease activity in pulmonary sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Vis, Roeland; Malviya, Gaurav; Signore, Alberto; Grutters, Jan C; Meek, Bob; van de Garde, Ewoudt M W; Keijsers, Ruth G M

    2016-04-01

    Infliximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, is used in the treatment of refractory sarcoidosis. However, the clinical response is variable and a tool to select responders beforehand is highly desirable. In this study we evaluated scintigraphy with technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-labelled infliximab for the imaging of disease activity in patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis.10 patients were studied using single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (CT) 6 h and 20 h after intravenous administration of 370 MBq of(99m)Tc-infliximab. Correlation analysis was performed between tissue accumulation of(99m)Tc-infliximab and laboratory parameters (including soluble interleukin-2 receptor and angiotensin-converting enzyme), lung function parameters (including forced expiratory volume in 1 s and the diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide) and(18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT.Analysis showed selective and variable accumulation of(99m)Tc-infliximab in the target tissue. Accumulation correlated positively with all four laboratory parameters and negatively with all four lung function parameters, yielding better correlations than serum TNF-α levels or(18)F-FDG PET/CT.(99m)Tc-infliximab accumulation reflects thein situTNF-α expression in an individual patient and therefore provides valuable information on the presence of the biological target for anti-TNF-α therapy. PMID:26797030

  14. Variation at FCGR2A and Functionally Related Genes Is Associated with the Response to Anti-TNF Therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Avila-Pedretti, Gabriela; Tornero, Jesús; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Blanco, Francisco; González-Alvaro, Isidoro; Cañete, Juan D.; Maymó, Joan; Alperiz, Mercedes; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Olivé, Alex; Corominas, Héctor; Erra, Alba; Aterido, Adrià; López Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; Julià, Antonio; Marsal, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Objective Anti-TNF therapies have been highly efficacious in the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but 25–30% of patients do not show a significant clinical response. There is increasing evidence that genetic variation at the Fc receptor FCGR2A is associated with the response to anti-TNF therapy. We aimed to validate this genetic association in a patient cohort from the Spanish population, and also to identify new genes functionally related to FCGR2A that are also associated with anti-TNF response. Methods A total of 348 RA patients treated with an anti-TNF therapy were included and genotyped for FCGR2A polymorphism rs1081274. Response to therapy was determined at 12 weeks, and was tested for association globally and independently for each anti-TNF drug (infliximab, etanercept and adalimumab). Using gene expression profiles from macrophages obtained from synovial fluid of RA patients, we searched for genes highly correlated with FCGR2A expression. Tag SNPs were selected from each candidate gene and tested for association with the response to therapy. Results We found a significant association between FCGR2A and the response to adalimumab (P=0.022). Analyzing the subset of anti-CCP positive RA patients (78%), we also found a significant association between FCGR2A and the response to infliximab (P=0.035). DHX32 and RGS12 were the most consistently correlated genes with FCGR2A expression in RA synovial fluid macrophages (P<0.001). We found a significant association between the genetic variation at DHX32 (rs12356233, corrected P=0.019) and a nominally significant association between RGS12 and the response to adalimumab (rs4690093, uncorrected P=0.040). In the anti-CCP positive group of patients, we also found a nominally significant association between RGS12 and the response to infliximab (rs2857859, uncorrected P=0.042). Conclusions In the present study we have validated the FCGR2A association in an independent population, and we have identified new genes associated with the response to anti-TNF therapy in RA. PMID:25848939

  15. Patient experiences, attitudes and expectations towards receiving information about anti-TNF medication – “It could give me two heads and I’d still try it!”

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapies are an important recent development in the treatment of autoimmune disease. Despite important side effects relating to immune suppression, there is lack of research into patient experiences, attitudes and expectations about the information they receive prior to starting anti-TNF therapy. Methods In May 2011 participants were purposively sampled to form two focus groups varying in age, anti-TNF agent and pre-therapy disease activity. A semi-structured topic guide was used to explore patients’ experiences regarding the information they received prior to commencing anti-TNF therapy. The focus groups were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using content analysis. Results Four key themes were identified. Firstly, weighing the risks and benefits of anti-TNF therapy. However, most participants attached limited importance to side effects, saying their strong desire for RA symptom control was overriding. Two reported deliberately concealing illness in order to continue their medication. Secondly, the desire for information. They suggested that counselling should occur at an early stage and not during a severe RA flare-up. Thirdly, the process of starting anti-TNF. Many identified that their biggest worry was whether they would be eligible for the new medication. They remembered little about the investigations they underwent, and none said they would have objected to being tested for blood borne viruses. Finally, the experience of being on anti-TNF. Most were positive, describing effects on quality of life as well as symptoms. Conclusions The use of qualitative methodology in this study has enabled an understanding of patients’ attitudes towards receiving information about anti-TNF therapy. The results may be useful to health professionals in terms of the timing and content of the information given to patients prior to commencing anti-TNF therapy. PMID:23663548

  16. Hidradenitis suppurativa: guidelines of the Italian Society of Dermatology and Venereology (SIDeMaST) for the use of anti-TNF-α agents.

    PubMed

    Megna, M; Bettoli, V; Chimenti, S; Chiricozzi, A; Naldi, L; Virgili, A; Girolomoni, G; Monfrecola, G

    2015-12-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by nodules, abscesses and sinus tracts, primarily affecting the intertriginous areas. The occlusion of the upper part of the folliculopilosebaceous unit, leading to rupture of the sebofollicular canal with the consequent development of perifollicular lympho-histiocytic inflammation, is believed to be the initial pathogenic event in HS. Giving the chronic nature of HS, its destructive impact on social, working and daily life of patients, its management is often frustrating both for patients and physicians. The HS treatment choices are influenced by disease severity and its individual subjective impact. In this article, the Board of the Italian Society of Dermatology and Venereology (SIDeMaST) on HS has prepared a document focusing on the role of biologic drugs (anti-TNF-α) in HS management, providing also a flow-chart for HS handling and the inclusion and exclusion criteria for HS treatment with anti-TNF-α. PMID:26513043

  17. Clinical manifestation of selective IgA deficiency evidence after anti-TNF-α treatment in a psoriatic arthritis patient: case report.

    PubMed

    Iervolino, S; Lofrano, M; Di Minno, M N D; Foglia, F; Scarpa, R; Peluso, R

    2012-01-01

    It is known that the use of anti-TNF-α drugs is related to an increased incidence of infective diseases. This therapy can not be administered to patients having active infections and it has to be considered with caution in case of acquired or congenital immunodeficiency diseases. We report the case of a 28-years-old man affected by psoriatic arthritis; he developed some infections during treatment with TNF-α blockers. The infections were caused by a selective IgA deficiency, that was not evident before the anti-TNF-α blockers administration and disappeared after withdrawing the biological therapy. This case-report draws our attention to the possibility of cases of subclinical immunodeficiency, unknown by the patients, but important in the prognosis and in the therapeutic approach to these diseases. Therefore, it is important to evaluate carefully the immunologic status of patients during the pre-therapeutic screening for TNF-α blocking therapy. PMID:22472782

  18. Anti-TNF-α Activity of Brazilian Medicinal Plants and Compounds from Ouratea semiserrata.

    PubMed

    Campana, Priscilla R V; Mansur, Daniel S; Gusman, Grasielle S; Ferreira, Daneel; Teixeira, Mauro M; Braga, Fernão C

    2015-10-01

    Several plant species are used in Brazil to treat inflammatory diseases and associated conditions. TNF-α plays a pivotal role on inflammation, and several plant extracts have been assayed against this target, both in vitro and in vivo. The effect of 11 Brazilian medicinal plants on TNF-α release by LPS-activated THP-1 cells was evaluated. The plant materials were percolated with different solvents to afford 15 crude extracts, whose effect on TNF-α release was determined by ELISA. Among the evaluated extracts, only Jacaranda caroba (Bignoniaceae) presented strong toxicity to THP-1 cells. Considering the 14 non-toxic extracts, TNF-α release was significantly reduced by seven of them (inhibition > 80%), originating from six plants, namely Cuphea carthagenensis (Lythraceae), Echinodorus grandiflorus (Alismataceae), Mansoa hirsuta (Bignoniaceae), Ouratea semiserrata (Ochnaceae), Ouratea spectabilis and Remijia ferruginea (Rubiaceae). The ethanol extract from O. semiserrata leaves was fractionated over Sephadex LH-20 and RP-HPLC to give three compounds previously reported for the species, along with agathisflavone and epicatechin, here described for the first time in the plant. Epicatechin and lanceoloside A elicited significant inhibition of TNF-α release, indicating that they may account for the effect produced by O. semiserrata crude extract. PMID:26094613

  19. Cost savings of anti-TNF therapy using a test-based strategy versus an empirical dose escalation in Crohn's disease patients who lose response to infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Roblin, Xavier; Attar, Alain; Lamure, Michel; Savarieau, Bernard; Brunel, Pierre; Duru, Gérard; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of pharmacokinetics is associated with cost savings in anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy, but the long-term cost savings in a large cohort of Crohn's disease (CD) patients are unknown. Aim The goal of this study was to compare the cost of anti-TNF therapy in two cohorts of CD patients losing response to infliximab, one using a test-based strategy and one an empirical dose escalation. Methods We used a selected mathematical model to describe the trajectories of CD patients based on a discrete event system. This design allowed us to track over a given period a double cohort of patients who moved randomly and asynchronously from one state to another, while keeping all the information on their entire trajectory. Both cohorts were modeled using state diagram parameters where transition probabilities from one state to another are derived from literature data. Costs were estimated based on the French health care system. Results Cost savings among the 10,000 CD patients using a test-based strategy were €131,300,293 at 5 years. At 5 years the mean cost saving was €13,130 per patient. The direct cost of the test had no impact on the results until the cost per test reached €2,000. Conclusions A test-based strategy leads to major cost savings related to anti-TNF therapy in CD. PMID:27123185

  20. The Effects of Infliximab on Laminin, NFκB, and Anti-TNF Expression through Its Effect on Ischemic Liver Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Akdogan, Remzi Adnan; Kalkan, Yildiray; Tümkaya, Levent; Rakici, Halil; Akdogan, Elif

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective effects of infliximab on expression of laminin, anti-TNF, and NFκB in the rat hepatic cells after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). A total of 30 male Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups: Control (C), sham I/R (ISC), and I/R+ infliximab (ISC inf); each group comprised 10 animals. C group animals underwent laparotomy without I/R injury. In ISC groups after undergoing laparotomy, 1 hour of superior mesenteric artery ligation was done, which was followed by 1 hour of reperfusion. In the ISC inf group, 3 days before I/R, infliximab (3 mg/kg) was administered intravenously. All animals were killed at the end of reperfusion and hepatic tissue samples were obtained for histopathological and histochemical investigations in all groups. Laminin, anti-TNF, and NFκB immunoreactivity were performed for all groups. ISC caused severe histopathological injury including mucosal erosions, inflammatory cell infiltration, necrosis, hemorrhage, and villous congestion. Infliximab treatment significantly attenuated the severity of intestinal I/R injury and it is shown by laminin, anti-TNF, and NFκB immunoreactivity. Because of its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, infliximab pretreatment may have protective effects on hepatic cells in the experimental intestinal I/R model of rats. PMID:27143962

  1. Circulating levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate are elevated in severe, but not mild psoriasis and are unresponsive to anti-TNF-α treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checa, Antonio; Xu, Ning; Sar, Daniel G.; Haeggström, Jesper Z.; Ståhle, Mona; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2015-07-01

    Sphingolipids are bioactive molecules with a putative role in inflammation. Alterations in sphingolipids, in particular ceramides, have been consistently observed in psoriatic skin. Herein, we quantified the circulating sphingolipid profile in individuals with mild or severe psoriasis as well as healthy controls. In addition, the effects of anti-TNF-α treatment were determined. Levels of sphingoid bases, including sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), increased in severe (P < 0.001 n = 32), but not in mild (n = 32), psoriasis relative to healthy controls (n = 32). These alterations were not reversed in severe patients (n = 16) after anti-TNF-α treatment despite significant improvement in psoriasis lesions. Circulating levels of sphingomyelins and ceramides shifted in a fatty acid chain length-dependent manner. These alterations were also observed in psoriasis skin lesions and were associated with changes in mRNA levels of ceramide synthases. The lack of S1P response to treatment may have pathobiological implications due to its close relation to the vascular and immune systems. In particular, increased levels of sphingolipids and especially S1P in severe psoriasis patients requiring biological treatment may potentially be associated with cardiovascular comorbidities. The fact that shifts in S1P levels were not ameliorated by anti-TNF-α treatment, despite improvements in the skin lesions, further supports targeting S1P receptors as therapy for severe psoriasis.

  2. Production of anti TNF-α antibodies in eukaryotic cells using different combinations of vectors carrying heavy and light chains.

    PubMed

    Balabashin, Dmitriy; Kovalenko, Elena; Toporova, Viktoria; Aliev, Teimur; Panina, Anna; Svirshchevskaya, Elena; Dolgikh, Dmitry; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays a key role in rheumatoid arthritis and some other autoimmune diseases. Therapy with anti-TNF-α recombinant antibodies (Ab) appears to be highly effective. Production of new hyper-producing eukaryotic cell lines can decrease the treatment cost, which currently is very high. However, due to the complexity of protein transcription, translation, processing, and secretion in mammalian cells, the stages at which antibody expression is affected are still poorly determined. The aim of this work was to compare the productivity of two cell lines developed in CHO DG44 cells, deficient in dihydrofolate reductase, transfected with vectors carrying either heavy (H) or light (L) chains of chimeric antibody under different combinations of selective elements. Both H and L chains were cloned either in pOptiVEC or pcDNA3.3 vectors and different combinations were used to produce HL and LH cell lines. We have shown that Ab production has been low and comparable between HL and LH cells until selection on methotrexate (MTX) when LH but not HL cells have responded with 3.5 times increased productivity. Flow cytometry analysis has demonstrated that intracellular concentration of full size Abs in LH cells was 5.6 times higher than in HL ones due to higher amount of H chain synthesis. No differences in viability between HL and LH cells have been found. We have concluded that the expression of H chain in the pOptiVEC vector, which is responsible for MTX resistance, has led to the suppression of H chain synthesis and limitation in full Ab assembly. PMID:24939591

  3. The Anti-TNF-α Antibody Infliximab Inhibits the Expression of Fat-Transporter-Protein FAT/CD36 in a Selective Hepatic-Radiation Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Martius, Gesa; Cameron, Silke; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F.; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Malik, Ihtzaz A.

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported a radiation-induced inflammation triggering fat-accumulation through fatty-acid-translocase/cluster of differentiation protein 36 (FAT/CD36) in rat liver. Furthermore, inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36-expression by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) (infliximab) was shown in vitro. The current study investigates fat-accumulation in a mouse-model of single-dose liver-irradiation (25-Gray) and the effect of anti-TNF-α-therapy on FAT/CD36 gene-expression. Mice livers were selectively irradiated in vivo in presence or absence of infliximab. Serum- and hepatic-triglycerides, mRNA, and protein were analyzed by colorimetric assays, RT-PCR, Immunofluorescence and Western-Blot, respectively. Sudan-staining was used demonstrating fat-accumulation in tissue. In mice livers, early (1–3 h) induction of TNF-α-expression, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, was observed. It was followed by elevated hepatic-triglyceride level (6–12 h), compared to sham-irradiated controls. In contrast, serum-triglyceride level was decreased at these time points. Similar to triglyceride level in mice livers, Sudan staining of liver cryosections showed a quick (6–12 h) increase of fat-droplets after irradiation. Furthermore, expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 was increased at protein level caused by radiation or TNF-α. TNF-α-blockage by anti-TNF-α showed an early inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36 expression in mice livers. Immunohistochemistry showed basolateral and cytoplasmic expression of FAT/CD36 in hepatocytes. Moreover, co-localization of FAT/CD36 was detected with α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA+) cells and F4/80+ macrophages. In summary, hepatic-radiation triggers fat-accumulation in mice livers, involving acute-phase-processes. Accordingly, anti-TNF-α-therapy prevented early radiation-induced expression of FAT/CD36 in vivo. PMID:25739082

  4. Effects of Environmental Factors on Soluble Expression of a Humanized Anti-TNF-α scFv Antibody in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sina, Mohammad; Farajzadeh, Davoud; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The bacterial cultivation conditions for obtaining anti-TNF-α single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody as the soluble product in E. coli was investigated. Methods: To avoid the production of inclusion bodies, the effects of lactose, IPTG, incubation time, temperature, shaking protocol, medium additives (Mg+2, sucrose), pH, osmotic and heat shocks were examined. Samples from bacterial growth conditions with promising results of soluble expression of GST-hD2 scFv were affinity purified and quantified by SDS-PAGE and image processing for further evaluation. Results: The results showed that cultivation in LB medium under induction by low concentrations of lactose and incubation at 10 °C led to partial solubilization of the expressed anti-TNF-α scFv (GST-hD2). Other variables which showed promising increase in soluble expression of GST-hD2 were osmotic shock and addition of magnesium chloride. Furthermore, addition of sucrose to medium suppressed the expression of scFv completely. The other finding was that the addition of sorbitol decreased the growth rate of bacteria. Conclusion: It can be concluded that low cultivation temperature in the presence of low amount of inducer under a long incubation time or addition of magnesium chloride are the most effective environmental factors studied for obtaining the maximum solubilization of GST-hD2 recombinant protein. PMID:26819916

  5. Combination of IgG N-glycomics and corresponding transcriptomics data to identify anti-TNF-α treatment responders in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Váradi, Csaba; Holló, Zsolt; Póliska, Szilárd; Nagy, László; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Váncsa, Andrea; Palatka, Károly; Guttman, András

    2015-06-01

    Prediction of responsiveness in biological therapies is an important and challenging issue in different diseases. Analyzing glycosylation pattern changes of key serum glycoproteins is one of the possible avenues to follow disease remission. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes of serum IgG glycoforms in Crohn's disease (CD) and rheumatoid arthritis patients in response to antitumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α) treatment. IgG was isolated from patient serum samples using Protein A affinity pull-down, followed by the release of N-glycans with peptide-N-glycosidase F. The released glycans were fluorescently tagged with 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate and analyzed by CGE with laser-induced fluorescent detection. Significant alterations were detected between responders and nonresponders in both disease groups. In CD patients, disease-specific alteration was found in response to anti-TNF-α therapy, which was also confirmed by transcriptomics data analysis of the corresponding glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. PMID:25639738

  6. Mucosal healing with thalidomide in refractory Crohn's disease patients intolerant of anti-TNF-α drugs: report of 3 cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Scribano, Maria Lia; Cantoro, Laura; Marrollo, Marzia; Cosintino, Rocco; Kohn, Anna

    2014-07-01

    Thalidomide is an oral immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory drug with antitumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) activity. Several case reports and some clinical trials have demonstrated its efficacy in the treatment of refractory Crohn's disease (CD). We report the effect and tolerability of thalidomide in 3 patients with moderate-to-severe CD who were not responsive to anti-TNF-α therapies, and review the relevant literature. The first case is of a 28-year-old female affected by Crohn's colitis complicated by a severe fistulizing perianal disease; she was treated with infliximab, adalimumab, and certolizumab pegol, which were stopped because of intolerance. The second case is of a 39-year-old female with fistulizing ileocolitis complicated by severe arthralgias and perianal disease with loss of response to infliximab and intolerance of certolizumab pegol. The third case is of a 39-year-old male with gastric and ileocolonic CD refractory to immunosuppressors and intolerant of infliximab. All the 3 cases achieved complete clinical remission and endoscopic healing of mucosal lesions at a low dose of thalidomide (50 to 150 mg/d). In our CD patients who experienced loss of response or were unable to tolerate anti-TNF-α drugs, thalidomide was an effective and well-tolerated therapy for inducing and maintaining long-term remission. PMID:24667589

  7. Anti-TNF-α Treatment for Post-Anastomotic Ulcers and Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Crohn’s-Like Pathologic Changes Following Intestinal Surgery in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jennifer J.; Rabah, Raja; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Maspons, Aldo; Meier, Donald; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report a previously poorly recognized process of secondary formation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-like process, specifically Crohn’s-like (CD) changes in pediatric surgery patients who underwent major small bowel and colorectal surgery. We describe potential etiologies, presenting symptoms and treatment approaches. Methods Retrospective chart review of patients with history of either chronic, partial gastrointestinal (GI) obstruction or Hirschsprung disease (HD) and subsequent histopathologic findings similar to IBD. Pathology and case histories were reviewed and treatments were compared. Results Over the last 20 years, a total of nine patients were identified that had the diagnoses of either HD (n=3) or chronic GI partial obstruction (n=6) with subsequent development of histopathologic changes similar to those seen in IBD. Overall mean time to diagnosis of IBD-like changes after intestinal resection was 7.70 ±5.6 years. Half of the patients were also being managed for short bowel syndrome (SBS), and associated GI symptoms may have prolonged the time to indentifying these IBD-like changes. When SBS patients were excluded, mean time to IBD changes after pull-through for HD was 2.4±0.24 years and after chronic GI partial obstruction was 6.3±2.1 years. Two of the nine patients who underwent a resection of this IBD-like lesion developed a recurrence of this lesion. Anti-TNF-α treatment was used in 3 of the GI partial obstruction cases: 2 with complete relief and 1 with partial response that was supplemented with steroids. Two HD patients were treated with anti-TNF-α and both had marked improvement of symptoms. Conclusion We describe IBD-like intestinal changes following intestinal resection in the pediatric age group. We also present the novel finding that these lesions are responsive to anti-IBD treatment, including anti-TNF-α, and recommend it as part of the medical treatment regiment offered for such patients. PMID:25348881

  8. Increased Prevalence of Human Polyomavirus JC Viruria in Chronic Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases Patients in Treatment with Anti-TNF α: A 18 Month Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodio, Donatella Maria; Anzivino, Elena; Mischitelli, Monica; Bellizzi, Anna; Scrivo, Rossana; Scribano, Daniela; Conte, Gianlorenzo; Prezioso, Carla; Trancassini, Maria; Valesini, Guido; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Pietropaolo, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (CIRDs) are immune-mediated pathologies involving joints. To date, TNFα-blocking agents administration is the most promising therapy, although these treatments are associated with an increased Polyomavirus JC (JCPyV) reactivation, the etiological agent of the Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML). The aim of this study was the recruitment and the analysis of a CIRDs cohort in order to investigate a possible correlation between JCPyV presence and the influence of anti-TNF-α agents on viral loads. Blood and urine samples were collected from 34 CIRDs subjects prior the first anti-TNF-α infusion (T0) and after 3 (T3), 6 (T6), 12 (T12), and 18 (T18) months. Results showed persistent JC viruria significantly higher than JC viremia throughout the 18 month follow-up study (p = 0.002). In JCPyV positive samples, the non-coding control region (NCCR) was analyzed. Results evidenced archetypal structures (type II-S) in all isolates with the exception of a sequence isolated from a plasma sample, that corresponds to the type II-R found in PML subjects. Finally, the viral protein 1 (VP1) genotyping was performed and results showed the prevalence of the European genotypes 1A, 1B, and 4. Since only few studies have been carried out to understand whether there is a PML risk in CIRDs population infected by JCPyV, this study contributes to enrich literature insight on JCPyV biology in this cluster. Further investigations are necessary in order to recognize the real impact of biologics on JCPyV life cycle and to identify possible and specific viral variants related to increased virulence in CIRDs patients.

  9. Immunotherapy in all aspects.

    PubMed

    Hanci, Deniz; Şahin, Ethem; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Cingi, Cemal

    2016-06-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is a form of long-term treatment that decreases symptoms for many people with allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, conjunctivitis (eye allergy) or stinging insect allergy. In this review, we presented the important topics in immunotherapy. The important aspects of immunotherapy are considered to be "Immunologıcal responses to immunotherapy"; "The principal types of immunotherapy"; "Effectiveness"; "Indications"; "Contraindications"; "Allergen immunotherapy in children"; "Safety"; and "Anaphylactic reactions after immunotherapy". The principal types of immunotherapy are subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy. Both of them can be used in indicated cases. When using SCIT, physicians must be more careful because of reported rare fatal cases. The risks and benefits of continuing allergen immunotherapy in patients who have experienced severe systemic reactions should be carefully considered. PMID:25673026

  10. Measurements in the Blood of BDNF for RA Patients and in Response to Anti-TNF Treatment Help Us to Clarify the Magnitude of Centrally Related Pain and to Explain the Relief of This Pain upon Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Forsgren, Sture; Grimsholm, Ola; Daln, Tore; Rantap-Dahlqvist, Solbritt

    2011-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin with functions related to neuronal survival/proliferation processes and inflammation. BDNF is also an important central pain mediator. The levels of BDNF have been found to be high for RA patients with severe disease and to become lowered in response to anti-TNF treatment. New information says that the levels of BDNF in the blood parallel the BDNF concentrations in the brain and that BDNF can pass the blood-brain barrier. Furthermore, most of the circulating BDNF is produced in the brain. Habitual and regular exercise, in contrast to temporary exercise, does also lead to a lowering of BDNF blood levels. Both anti-TNF treatment and habitual and regular exercise do have pain-relieving effects. It might be that the pain-relieving effect of anti-TNF treatment is related to an affection of central neuronal regions, hereby influencing BDNF production. Measurements of BDNF in the blood help us to clarify the magnitude of centrally related pain for RA patients and help us to explain the relief of this pain in response to anti-TNF treatment. PMID:21755028

  11. Allergen-specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is a potentially disease-modifying therapy that is effective for the treatment of allergic rhinitis/conjunctivitis, allergic asthma and stinging insect hypersensitivity. However, despite its proven efficacy in these conditions, it is frequently underutilized in Canada. The decision to proceed with allergen-specific immunotherapy should be made on a case-by-case basis, taking into account individual patient factors such as the degree to which symptoms can be reduced by avoidance measures and pharmacological therapy, the amount and type of medication required to control symptoms, the adverse effects of pharmacological treatment, and patient preferences. Since this form of therapy carries the risk of anaphylactic reactions, it should only be prescribed by physicians who are adequately trained in the treatment of allergy. Furthermore, injections must be given under medical supervision in clinics that are equipped to manage anaphylaxis. In this article, the authors review the indications and contraindications, patient selection criteria, and the administration, safety and efficacy of allergen-specific immunotherapy. PMID:22166078

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated severity of idiopathic retinal periphlebitis in young adults (Eales’ disease): implication for anti-TNF-α therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Aditya B.; Khanna, Vinay K.; Singh, Kamlesh; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Meyer, Carsten H.; Singh, Vijay K.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a pleiotropic inflammatory cytokine. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha was evaluated in the serum samples of patients with idiopathic retinal periphlebitis in young adults (Eales’ disease). Retinal periphlebitis was graded according to a new grading system based on severity of inflammation (grade 1–4). Quantification of the TNF-α levels was carried out using ELISA kit in the serum samples of young adults with idiopathic retinal periphlebitis (n = 17) and healthy controls (n = 17) of similar age. Tumor necrosis factor-α level was found to be significantly raised in cases with retinal periphlebitis as compared with controls (p < 0.001). Higher levels of TNF-α were found to be associated with increased severity of retinal periphlebitis. Tumor necrosis factor-α represents a novel target for controlling inflammatory activity in idiopathic retinal periphlebitis. Higher levels of TNF-α, in association with the increased severity of retinal periphlebitis, have implications for early anti-TNF-α therapy. PMID:21139707

  13. Subcutaneous Immunotherapy and Sublingual Immunotherapy: Comparative Efficacy, Current and Potential Indications, and Warnings--United States Versus Europe.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Harold S; Makatsori, Melina; Calderon, Moises A

    2016-02-01

    Subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy are effective for allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma and with some support for use in selected patients with atopic dermatitis. The sequence of immunologic responses is the same, irrespective of the route of administration, and similar disease modification has been demonstrated. However, there are differences between the two approaches. The most important is the greatly reduced likelihood of sublingual immunotherapy producing systemic reactions. There are major drawbacks for sublingual immunotherapy in regard to dosing. Finally, there is the question of relative clinical efficacy, with the currently available data favoring subcutaneous immunotherapy. PMID:26617224

  14. Chronic exposure to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in vitro impairs the activation of T cells through the T cell receptor/CD3 complex; reversal in vivo by anti-TNF antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Cope, A P; Londei, M; Chu, N R; Cohen, S B; Elliott, M J; Brennan, F M; Maini, R N; Feldmann, M

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that chronic exposure to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) alters the function of activated T lymphocytes. Pretreatment of tetanus toxoid-specific T cell clones with TNF for up to 16 d impaired rechallenge proliferative responses to antigen in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. IL-2 and PHA responses were preserved. Prolonged treatment with TNF impaired production of IL-2, IL-10, IFN gamma, TNF, and lymphotoxin (LT) following stimulation with immobilized OKT3, and resulted in suboptimal expression of the IL-2R alpha chain (Tac) but not CD3, CD4, or HLA-DR antigens, when compared to untreated control cells. By contrast, pretreatment of T cells for prolonged periods in vitro with neutralizing anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies (mAb) enhanced proliferative responses, increased lymphokine production, and upregulated Tac expression following stimulation with OKT3. To determine whether TNF exerts immunosuppressive effects on T cells in vivo, we studied cell-mediated immunity in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA), before and after treatment with a chimeric anti-TNF mAb. Treatment with anti-TNF restored the diminished proliferative responses of PBMC to mitogens and recall antigens towards normal in all patients tested. These data demonstrate that persistent expression of TNF in vitro and in vivo impairs cell-mediated immune responses. Images PMID:8040330

  15. Reducing C-Terminal-Truncated Alpha-Synuclein by Immunotherapy Attenuates Neurodegeneration and Propagation in Parkinson's Disease-Like Models

    PubMed Central

    Games, Dora; Valera, Elvira; Spencer, Brian; Rockenstein, Edward; Mante, Michael; Adame, Anthony; Patrick, Christina; Ubhi, Kiren; Nuber, Silke; Sacayon, Patricia; Zago, Wagner; Seubert, Peter; Barbour, Robin; Schenk, Dale

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are common neurodegenerative disorders of the aging population, characterized by progressive and abnormal accumulation of ?-synuclein (?-syn). Recent studies have shown that C-terminus (CT) truncation and propagation of ?-syn play a role in the pathogenesis of PD/DLB. Therefore, we explored the effect of passive immunization against the CT of ?-syn in the mThy1-?-syn transgenic (tg) mouse model, which resembles the striato-nigral and motor deficits of PD. Mice were immunized with the new monoclonal antibodies 1H7, 5C1, or 5D12, all directed against the CT of ?-syn. CT ?-syn antibodies attenuated synaptic and axonal pathology, reduced the accumulation of CT-truncated ?-syn (CT-?-syn) in axons, rescued the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase fibers in striatum, and improved motor and memory deficits. Among them, 1H7 and 5C1 were most effective at decreasing levels of CT-?-syn and higher-molecular-weight aggregates. Furthermore, in vitro studies showed that preincubation of recombinant ?-syn with 1H7 and 5C1 prevented CT cleavage of ?-syn. In a cell-based system, CT antibodies reduced cell-to-cell propagation of full-length ?-syn, but not of the CT-?-syn that lacked the 118126 aa recognition site needed for antibody binding. Furthermore, the results obtained after lentiviral expression of ?-syn suggest that antibodies might be blocking the extracellular truncation of ?-syn by calpain-1. Together, these results demonstrate that antibodies against the CT of ?-syn reduce levels of CT-truncated fragments of the protein and its propagation, thus ameliorating PD-like pathology and improving behavioral and motor functions in a mouse model of this disease. PMID:25009275

  16. Measuring patients’ satisfaction with their anti-TNF treatment in severe Crohn’s disease: scoring and psychometric validation of the Satisfaction for PAtients in Crohn’s diseasE Questionnaire (SPACE-Q©)

    PubMed Central

    Gilet, Hélène; Arnould, Benoit; Fofana, Fatoumata; Clerson, Pierre; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; D’Hondt, Olivier; Faure, Patrick; Hagège, Hervé; Nachury, Maria; Nahon, Stéphane; Tucat, Gilbert; Vandromme, Luc; Cazala-Telinge, Ines; Thibout, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe Crohn’s disease management includes anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs that differ from early-stage treatments regarding efficacy, safety, and convenience. This study aimed to finalize and psychometrically validate the Satisfaction for PAtients in Crohn’s diseasE Questionnaire (SPACE-Q©), developed to measure satisfaction with anti-TNF treatment in patients with severe Crohn’s disease. Methods A total of 279 patients with severe Crohn’s disease receiving anti-TNF therapy completed the SPACE-Q 62-item pilot version at inclusion and 12 and 13 weeks after first anti-TNF injection. The final SPACE-Q scoring was defined using multitrait and regression analyses and clinical relevance considerations. Psychometric validation included clinical validity against Harvey–Bradshaw score, concurrent validity against Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM), internal consistency reliability, test–retest reliability, and responsiveness against the patient global impression of change (PGIC). Results Quality of completion was good (55%–67% of patients completed all items). Four items were removed from the questionnaire. Eleven scores were defined within the final 58-item SPACE-Q: disease control; symptoms, anal symptoms, and quality of life transition scales; tolerability; convenience; expectation confirmation toward efficacy, side effects, and convenience; satisfaction with treatment; and motivation. Scores met standards for concurrent validity (correlation between SPACE-Q satisfaction with treatment and TSQM satisfaction scores =0.59), internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s α=0.67–0.93), test–retest reliability (intraclass correlations =0.62–0.91), and responsiveness (improvement in treatment experience assessed by the SPACE-Q for patients reporting improvement on the PGIC). Significantly different mean scores were observed between groups of patients with different Harvey–Bradshaw disease severity scores. Conclusion The SPACE-Q is a valid, reliable, and responsive instrument to measure satisfaction with anti-TNF treatment in patients with severe Crohn’s disease and for use in future studies. PMID:25525343

  17. The nitric oxide radical scavenger carboxy-PTIO reduces the immunosuppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and potentiates the antitumor activity of adoptive cytotoxic T lymphocyte immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Kosuke; Hosoi, Akihiro; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Iino, Tamaki; Ueha, Satoshi; Matsushima, Kouji; Seto, Yasuyuki; Kakimi, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can result in robust and durable antitumor responses. Tumor-infiltrating CTLs produce IFNγ and mediate antitumor activity, but they simultaneously induce counter-regulatory immunosuppressive mechanisms in the tumor by recruiting monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that limit their proliferation and effector function. Using a murine model of adoptive immunotherapy for B16 melanoma, we developed a strategy to augment CTL activity by downregulating immunosuppression by MDSCs. Intravenous injection of transgenic pmel-1 CTLs into tumor-bearing mice, resulted in their infiltration into the tumor, but this was accompanied by the accumulation of large numbers of monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs). These cells hampered CTL function and reduced their numbers in the tumor. We determined that one mechanism responsible for this immunosuppression was the production of nitric oxide (NO) by MDSCs in the tumor. Therefore, mice were given the NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO (C-PTIO) on the day after CTL transfer. This led to the restoration of impaired proliferative capacity and function of the CTLs, resulting in sustained suppression of tumor growth. Thus, we conclude that CTL therapy can be improved by counter-acting immunosuppression. Targeting NO, one mediator of the immunosuppressive activity of M-MDSCs, may be an appropriate strategy to restore impaired CTL function and improve the efficacy of immunotherapy. PMID:26405569

  18. Immunotherapy for mold allergy.

    PubMed

    Coop, Christopher A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this article is to review the available studies regarding mold immunotherapy. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE to identify peer-reviewed articles related to mold immunotherapy using the following keywords: mold, allergy, asthma, and immunotherapy. In addition, references cited within these articles were also reviewed. Articles were selected based on their relevance to the topic. Allergic responses to inhaled mold antigens are a recognized factor in allergic rhinitis and asthma. There are significant problems with respect to the production of relevant allergen material for the diagnosis and treatment of mold allergy with immunotherapy. Mold allergens contain proteases and should not be mixed with other allergens for immunotherapy. Most of the immunotherapy studies focus on two molds, Alternaria and Cladosporium. There is a lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials when evaluating the efficacy of mold immunotherapy with trials only focusing on immunotherapy to Alternaria and Cladosporium. Additional studies are needed regarding mold allergy and immunotherapy focusing on which molds are important for causing allergic disease. PMID:24057512

  19. Cancer immunotherapy products

    PubMed Central

    Camarero, Jorge; Ruiz, Sol

    2012-01-01

    Active immunotherapy products (widely known as “cancer vaccines”) are products intended to stimulate an immune response to mediate tumor destruction or reduce the progression of disease in patients where cancer has been diagnosed. Some quality attributes of these products are very difficult to characterize or present a high variability (especially if they are for autologous use), further complicating the interpretation of some of the clinical data. Furthermore, questions arise in the evaluation of efficacy and safety data in comparison with current chemical or biological treatments for the same indications. Some of these aspects are discussed in this paper in relationship with the regulatory requirements in the European Union and as applied to two recently assessed medicinal products, Oncophage and Provenge, both considered therapeutic “cancer vaccines” for renal cell carcinoma and prostate cancer, respectively. PMID:22863755

  20. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fuge, Oliver; Vasdev, Nikhil; Allchorne, Paula; Green, James SA

    2015-01-01

    It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest benefit in metastatic disease, although the role in superficial bladder cancer remains unclear. PMID:26000263

  1. Colorectal Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Bo; Snook, Adam E.; Magee, Michael S.; Waldman, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Antitumor immunotherapy for colorectal cancer has been studied at the bench and bedside for decades. Some clinical trials of cancer immunotherapy have demonstrated a potential benefit for patients with colorectal cancer, yet immunotherapy remains only an experimental option for this disease. Here, we review the major immunotherapeutic approaches currently under investigation for colorectal cancer, including cancer vaccines and adoptive cell therapy. Weakness and advantages of each strategy and progress in clinical trials will be described. Examination of previous and ongoing research in colorectal cancer therapy should define a path towards identification, approval and mainstream adoption of colorectal cancer immunotherapeutics. PMID:23725603

  2. Using macrophage activation to augment immunotherapy of established tumours

    PubMed Central

    Fridlender, Z G; Jassar, A; Mishalian, I; Wang, L-CS; Kapoor, V; Cheng, G; Sun, J; Singhal, S; Levy, L; Albelda, S M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Successful immunotherapy will require alteration of the tumour microenvironment and/or decreased immune suppression. Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) are one major factor affecting tumour microenvironment. We hypothesised that altering TAM phenotype would augment the efficacy of immunotherapy. Methods: We and others have reported that 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic-acid (DMXAA, Vadimezan) has the ability to change TAM phenotypes, inducing a tumour microenvironment conducive to antitumour immune responses. We therefore combined DMXAA with active immunotherapies, and evaluated anti-tumour efficacy, immune cell phenotypes (flow cytometry), and tumour microenvironment (RT–PCR). Results: In several different murine models of immunotherapy for lung cancer, DMXAA-induced macrophage activation significantly augmented the therapeutic effects of immunotherapy. By increasing influx of neutrophils and anti-tumour (M1) macrophages to the tumour, DMXAA altered myeloid cell phenotypes, thus changing the intratumoural M2/non-M2 TAM immunoinhibitory ratio. It also altered the tumour microenvironment to be more pro-inflammatory. Modulating macrophages during immunotherapy resulted in increased numbers, activity, and antigen-specificity of intratumoural CD8+ T cells. Macrophage depletion reduced the effect of combining immunotherapy with macrophage activation, supporting the importance of TAMs in the combined effect. Conclusion: Modulating intratumoural macrophages dramatically augmented the effect of immunotherapy. Our observations suggest that addition of agents that activate TAMs to immunotherapy should be considered in future trials. PMID:23481183

  3. Trends in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    Modulation of the immune system for therapeutic ends has a long history, stretching back to Edward Jenners use of cowpox to induce immunity to smallpox in 1796. Since then, immunotherapy, in the form of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, has enabled doctors to treat and prevent a variety of infectious diseases, including cholera, poliomyelitis, diphtheria, measles and mumps. Immunotherapy is now increasingly being applied to oncology. Cancer immunotherapy attempts to harness the power and specificity of the immune system for the treatment of malignancy. Although cancer cells are less immunogenic than pathogens, the immune system is capable of recognizing and eliminating tumor cells. However, tumors frequently interfere with the development and function of immune responses. Thus, the challenge for cancer immunotherapy is to apply advances in cellular and molecular immunology and develop strategies that effectively and safely augment antitumor responses. PMID:20703326

  4. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  5. Cancer immunotherapy in children

    Cancer.gov

    More often than not, cancer immunotherapies that work in adults are used in modified ways in children. Seldom are new therapies developed just for children, primarily because of the small number of pediatric patients relative to the adult cancer patient

  6. Immunotherapy in lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moundhri, M.; O'Brien, M.; Souberbielle, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    More research and new treatment options are needed in all stages of lung cancer. To this end immunotherapy needs a revival in view of recent improved technologies and greater understanding of the underlying biology. In this review we discuss mechanisms of tumour immunotherapy, non-specific, specific and adoptive, with particular reference to a direct therapeutic action on all subtypes of lung cancer. PMID:9703271

  7. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  8. Immunotherapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsueda, Satoko; Graham, David Y

    2014-02-21

    Gastric cancer is the second most common of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the majority of cases gastric cancer is advanced at diagnosis and although medical and surgical treatments have improved, survival rates remain poor. Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a powerful and promising clinical approach for treatment of cancer and has shown major success in breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Here, we provide an overview of concepts of modern cancer immunotherapy including the theory, current approaches, remaining hurdles to be overcome, and the future prospect of cancer immunotherapy in the treatment of gastric cancer. Adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, gene therapies, monoclonal antibody therapies have all been used with some initial successes in gastric cancer. However, to date the results in gastric cancer have been disappointing as current approaches often do not stimulate immunity efficiently allowing tumors continue to grow despite the presence of a measurable immune response. Here, we discuss the identification of targets for immunotherapy and the role of biomarkers in prospectively identifying appropriate subjects or immunotherapy. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms by which tumor cells escape host immunosurveillance and produce an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We show how advances have provided tools for overcoming the mechanisms of immunosuppression including the use of monoclonal antibodies to block negative regulators normally expressed on the surface of T cells which limit activation and proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. Immunotherapy has greatly improved and is becoming an important factor in such fields as medical care and welfare for human being. Progress has been rapid ensuring that the future of immunotherapy for gastric cancer is bright. PMID:24587645

  9. Immunotherapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matsueda, Satoko; Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the majority of cases gastric cancer is advanced at diagnosis and although medical and surgical treatments have improved, survival rates remain poor. Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a powerful and promising clinical approach for treatment of cancer and has shown major success in breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Here, we provide an overview of concepts of modern cancer immunotherapy including the theory, current approaches, remaining hurdles to be overcome, and the future prospect of cancer immunotherapy in the treatment of gastric cancer. Adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, gene therapies, monoclonal antibody therapies have all been used with some initial successes in gastric cancer. However, to date the results in gastric cancer have been disappointing as current approaches often do not stimulate immunity efficiently allowing tumors continue to grow despite the presence of a measurable immune response. Here, we discuss the identification of targets for immunotherapy and the role of biomarkers in prospectively identifying appropriate subjects or immunotherapy. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms by which tumor cells escape host immunosurveillance and produce an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We show how advances have provided tools for overcoming the mechanisms of immunosuppression including the use of monoclonal antibodies to block negative regulators normally expressed on the surface of T cells which limit activation and proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. Immunotherapy has greatly improved and is becoming an important factor in such fields as medical care and welfare for human being. Progress has been rapid ensuring that the future of immunotherapy for gastric cancer is bright. PMID:24587645

  10. Environmental control and immunotherapy for allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Evans, R

    1992-09-01

    Treatment for allergic disease can help prevent recurrent sinusitis. Removal of carpeting and feather bedding and use of acaricides can significantly improve symptoms caused by house dust mites or animal dander. To kill mites, wash-water temperature must be at least 58 degrees C. Patients with severe allergy should use an air-filtering vacuum cleaner and an air cleaner with a HEPA filter. Humidity should be kept at under 50%. If other measures fail, pets may have to be removed. Subcutaneous immunotherapy is effective for patients with anaphylactic reactions to insect stings, allergic rhinitis, and allergic asthma. It is ineffective for food allergy or nonallergic rhinitis or asthma. In children, immunotherapy is reserved for generalized life-threatening airway reactions. Relative indications for immunotherapy include inability to avoid the allergen and poor results or significant side effects from pharmacologic treatment. Efficacy depends on dosage, duration of treatment, and allergen selection. Low initial doses are increased at a set rate until the dose induces appropriate antibody response without significant reactions. Patients should be much improved or symptom-free for 1 to 2 years before immunotherapy is discontinued. Pollen, house dust mite, cat, and some mold spore extracts reduce symptoms and sensitivity to nasal or bronchial provocation. When used appropriately, immunotherapy is safe and effective. PMID:1527338

  11. Recent advances in immunotherapy for allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    El-Qutob, David; Mencia, Gemma; Fernandez-Caldas, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Allergic diseases are a major health problem worldwide. The therapeutic approaches to treat allergic rhinitis (AR) and allergic asthma (AA) fall in three major categories. The first step is allergen avoidance, or reduction of exposure to the offending allergen(s). The second and most widely used therapeutic practice is the prescription of relevant medication to reduce symptoms. The third therapeutic element is specific allergy vaccination, also known as allergen specific immunotherapy. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only etiologic treatment of allergic disorders that can alter the natural course of the disease. In this review, recent advances in immunotherapy and relevant patents are presented. General vaccine modifications could be applied for any type of allergen. New specific modifications in allergic vaccines have been developed for a variety of allergies such as house dust mites, horse, cat, parvalbumin and from birch, ragweed and parietaria pollen. PMID:24237114

  12. What Is Recent in Pancreatic Cancer Immunotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Niccolai, Elena; Prisco, Domenico; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Amedei, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) represents an unresolved therapeutic challenge, due to the poor prognosis and the reduced response to currently available treatments. Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal type of digestive cancers, with a median survival of 4–6 months. Only a small proportion of PC patients is curative by surgical resection, whilst standard chemotherapy for patients in advanced disease generates only modest effects with considerable toxic damages. Thus, new therapeutic approaches, specially specific treatments such as immunotherapy, are needed. In this paper we analyze recent preclinical and clinical efforts towards immunotherapy of pancreatic cancer, including passive and active immunotherapy approaches, designed to target pancreatic-cancer-associated antigens and to elicit an antitumor response in vivo. PMID:23509731

  13. [ALLERGEN IMMUNOTHERAPY IN CHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Takao

    2015-06-01

    Children are thought to have high plasticity in the immune system. Thus, it is expected that allergen immunotherapy for children may have higher efficacy than adults and has real disease-modifying potential to allergic diseases. For clinical efficacy in ameliorating allergic symptoms, however, current systematic reviews have not shown any superior effect in children, partly because of less number of studies in this age group. On the other hand, preventive effects against asthma inception in children with allergic rhinitis and sensitization "spreading" to new allergens have been reported, implicating that allergen immunotherapy has a potential to stop "allergy march" in children. To make the therapy more effective, it is preferable to start it as early as possible, hopefully in infancy. But it is still difficult at present because of relatively frequent adverse events and invasive manner of administering allergen extracts for young children. We need safer and more effective methods in performing immunotherapy for children. PMID:26380908

  14. Immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koido, Shigeo; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Homma, Sadamu; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Takakura, Kazuki; Saito, Keisuke; Ito, Zensho; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Kajihara, Mikio; Uchiyama, Kan; Arihiro, Seiji; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Masato; Gong, Jianlin; Tajiri, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is on the rise, and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although chemotherapy and radiation therapy can improve survival rates, it is imperative to integrate alternative strategies such as immunotherapy to improve outcomes for patients with advanced CRC. In this review, we will discuss the effect of immunotherapy for inducing cytotoxic T lymphocytes and the major immunotherapeutic approaches for CRC that are currently in clinical trials, including peptide vaccines, dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines, whole tumor cell vaccines, viral vector-based cancer vaccines, adoptive cell transfer therapy, antibody-based cancer immunotherapy, and cytokine therapy. The possibility of combination therapies will also be discussed along with the challenges presented by tumor escape mechanisms. PMID:24379570

  15. Passive Immunotherapies Protect WRvFire and IHD-J-Luc Vaccinia Virus-Infected Mice from Lethality by Reducing Viral Loads in the Upper Respiratory Tract and Internal Organs▿

    PubMed Central

    Zaitseva, Marina; Kapnick, Senta M.; Meseda, Clement A.; Shotwell, Elisabeth; King, Lisa R.; Manischewitz, Jody; Scott, John; Kodihalli, Shantha; Merchlinsky, Michael; Nielsen, Henriette; Lantto, Johan; Weir, Jerry P.; Golding, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Whole-body bioimaging was employed to study the effects of passive immunotherapies on lethality and viral dissemination in BALB/c mice challenged with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing luciferase. WRvFire and IHD-J-Luc vaccinia viruses induced lethality with similar times to death following intranasal infection, but WRvFire replicated at higher levels than IHD-J-Luc in the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Three types of therapies were tested: licensed human anti-vaccinia virus immunoglobulin intravenous (VIGIV); recombinant anti-vaccinia virus immunoglobulin (rVIG; Symphogen, Denmark), an investigational product containing a mixture of 26 human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) against mature virion (MV) and enveloped virion (EV); and HuMAb compositions targeting subsets of MV or EV proteins. Bioluminescence recorded daily showed that pretreatment with VIGIV (30 mg) or with rVIG (100 μg) on day −2 protected mice from death but did not prevent viral replication at the site of inoculation and dissemination to internal organs. Compositions containing HuMAbs against MV or EV proteins were protective in both infection models at 100 μg per animal, but at 30 μg, only anti-EV antibodies conferred protection. Importantly, the t statistic of the mean total fluxes revealed that viral loads in surviving mice were significantly reduced in at least 3 sites for 3 consecutive days (days 3 to 5) postchallenge, while significant reduction for 1 or 2 days in any individual site did not confer protection. Our data suggest that reduction of viral replication at multiple sites, including respiratory tract, spleen, and liver, as monitored by whole-body bioluminescence can be used to predict the effectiveness of passive immunotherapies in mouse models. PMID:21715493

  16. Oral immunotherapy for allergic conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Waka; Fukuda, Ken; Harada, Yosuke; Yagita, Hideo; Fukushima, Atsuki

    2014-11-01

    Antigen-specific immunotherapy is expected to be a desirable treatment for allergic diseases. Currently, antigen-specific immunotherapy is performed by administering disease-causing antigens subcutaneously or sublingually. These approaches induce long-term remission in patients with allergic rhinitis or asthma. The oral route is an alternative to subcutaneous and sublingual routes, and can also induce long-term remission, a phenomenon known as "oral tolerance." The effectiveness of oral tolerance has been reported in the context of autoimmune diseases, food allergies, asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis in both human patients and animal models. However, few studies have examined its efficacy in animal models of allergic conjunctivitis. Previously, we showed that ovalbumin feeding suppressed ovalbumin-induced experimental allergic conjunctivitis, indicating the induction of oral tolerance is effective in treating experimental allergic conjunctivitis. In recent years, transgenic rice has been developed that can induce oral tolerance and reduce the severity of anaphylaxis. The major Japanese cedar pollen antigens in transgenic rice, Cryptomeria japonica 1 and C. japonica 2, were deconstructed by molecular shuffling, fragmentation, and changes in the oligomeric structure. Thus, transgenic rice may be an effective treatment for allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:25289722

  17. Advances in upper airway diseases and allergen immunotherapy in 2007.

    PubMed

    Saltoun, Carol; Avila, Pedro C

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight important articles on upper airway diseases and immunotherapy that appeared in 2007. Advances in rhinitis include the realization that allergic rhinitis might be caused by local nasal IgE sensitization to aeroallergens in the absence of systemic evidence of IgE sensitization. After inhalation, allergens might reach systemic circulation. Epidemiologic studies continue to show that allergic rhinitis impairs school performance and is a risk factor for future asthma. New pathways are being identified in chronic sinusitis, as well as in different types of allergic ocular diseases. New treatments for patients with allergic rhinitis include use of beta-1,3-glucan, a mushroom product that can reduce allergic symptoms by inducing T(H)1 response, and olopatadine nasal spray. Studies on immunotherapy in 2007 suggest that sublingual immunotherapy induces similar immunologic alterations as those induced by subcutaneous immunotherapy, although to a lesser degree. Among allergists in the United States, there is a sizable variation in clinical practice, particularly related to concomitant administration of immunotherapy and beta-blockers, to administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and to patients with HIV or autoimmune diseases. The combination of omalizumab with allergen subcutaneous immunotherapy can enhance clinical efficacy. Recombinant technology can modify allergen structure to prevent binding to IgE (allergenicity) while enhancing immunogenicity (stimulation of T cells), which might improve the safety and efficacy of immunotherapy. PMID:18694591

  18. [Cancer immunotherapy--current status].

    PubMed

    Kundig, T M; Renner, Ch; Knuth, A

    2006-04-01

    Cancer immunotherapy includes passive and active strategies. Passive immunotherapy such as the use of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, and in a broader sense also of other immunological effector molecules, such as interferon-alpha is clinically established. The efficacy of passive immunotherapy attests to the fact that the immune system can successfully fight cancer. The logical next step is therefore to develop strategies for active immunotherapy, i.e. "vaccines against cancer". This review focuses on the current status of active immunotherapy with respect to clinical application. Although active immunotherapy is still in the experimental stage, the data are highly encouraging and it is expected that vaccination will soon become part of cancer management. PMID:16689457

  19. Oral and sublingual immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Wesley

    2014-01-01

    Allergic diseases have continued to increase throughout the developed world. Subcutaneous immunotherapy has been a mainstay of treatment for allergic rhinitis and asthma, however, some patients are precluded from treatment. On the other hand, in the case of food allergy, treatments simply do not exist. Oral and sublingual immunotherapy, with its superior safety and ease of administration, offers an alternative for patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma and has also been promising as a potential treatment for food allergy. The review summarizes significant advances from the past year including further data on the effectiveness of existing treatments, preliminary data on novel treatments, and further understanding of the mechanisms of these new therapies. PMID:25133094

  20. Neoantigens in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Ton N; Schreiber, Robert D

    2015-04-01

    The clinical relevance of T cells in the control of a diverse set of human cancers is now beyond doubt. However, the nature of the antigens that allow the immune system to distinguish cancer cells from noncancer cells has long remained obscure. Recent technological innovations have made it possible to dissect the immune response to patient-specific neoantigens that arise as a consequence of tumor-specific mutations, and emerging data suggest that recognition of such neoantigens is a major factor in the activity of clinical immunotherapies. These observations indicate that neoantigen load may form a biomarker in cancer immunotherapy and provide an incentive for the development of novel therapeutic approaches that selectively enhance T cell reactivity against this class of antigens. PMID:25838375

  1. Nanoparticulate immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Chintan H; Perry, Jillian L; Tian, Shaomin; Luft, J Christopher; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2015-12-10

    Although surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have significantly improved as treatments for cancer, they can rarely control metastatic disease and cures remain scarce. Promising recent developments suggest that cancer immunotherapy may become a powerful new therapy that clinicians can offer cancer patients. The opportunity to orchestrate the body's own immune system to target, fight, and eradicate cancer cells without destroying healthy cells makes this an extremely attractive treatment modality. Our increased knowledge in anti-tumor immunity and the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME) has provided many therapeutic strategies to battle cancer. That combined with advancements in the field of particulate delivery systems provide a mechanism to deliver these immunotherapeutics to their specific targeted cells and the TME. In this review we will focus on the current status of immunotherapy and the potential advantages of utilizing nanocarriers within the field. PMID:26432555

  2. Immunotherapy in Peripheral Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Léger, Jean-Marc; Guimarães-Costa, Raquel; Muntean, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been investigated in a small subset of peripheral neuropathies, including an acute one, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and 3 chronic forms: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and neuropathy associated with IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein. Several experimental studies and clinical data are strongly suggestive of an immune-mediated pathogenesis. Either cell-mediated mechanisms or antibody responses to Schwann cell, compact myelin, or nodal antigens are considered to act together in an aberrant immune response to cause damage to peripheral nerves. Immunomodulatory treatments used in these neuropathies aim to act at various steps of this pathogenic process. However, there are many phenotypic variants and, consequently, there is a significant difference in the response to immunotherapy between these neuropathies, as well as a need to improve our knowledge and long-term management of chronic forms. PMID:26602549

  3. Immunotherapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Ilya; Thompson, R H; Dong, Haidong; Krco, Christopher; Kwon, Eugene D

    2015-06-01

    Immunotherapy for the treatment of malignant neoplasms has made significant progress over the last 20 years. Multiple molecular targets and clinical agents have been developed recently, particularly in the field of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Sipuleucel-T is currently the only FDA approved immunotherapy for prostate cancer. PSA-TRICOM (Prostvac) currently has a phase III randomized trial underway after a phase II trial showed an improvement in overall survival. Interestingly, both these agents showed improvement in overall survival with no measurable change in disease state, leading to significant controversy as the utility of these agents in prostate cancer. Ipilimumab revealed a benefit for a sub-cohort of men in a post-docetaxel group and is currently undergoing investigation in a pre-docetaxel group. There are a number of other targets such as PD-1 which have shown effectiveness in other neoplasms that will likely be investigated in the future for use in prostate cancer. PMID:25894495

  4. Immunotherapy of Cancer in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, John M.; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Zarour, Hassane; Kalinski, Pawel; Ferrone, Soldano

    2012-01-01

    The immunotherapy of cancer has made significant strides in the past few years due to improved understanding of the underlying principles of tumor biology and immunology. These principles have been critical in the development of immunotherapy in the laboratory and in the implementation of immunotherapy in the clinic. This improved understanding of immunotherapy, enhanced by increased insights into the mechanism of tumor immune response and its evasion by tumors, now permits manipulation of this interaction and elucidates the therapeutic role of immunity in cancer. Also important, this improved understanding of immunotherapy and the mechanisms underlying immunity in cancer has fueled an expanding array of new therapeutic agents for a variety of cancers. Pegylated interferon-α2b as an adjuvant therapy and ipilimumab as therapy for advanced disease, both of which were approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for melanoma in March 2011, are 2 prime examples of how an increased understanding of the principles of tumor biology and immunology have been translated successfully from the laboratory to the clinical setting. Principles that guide the development and application of immunotherapy include antibodies, cytokines, vaccines, and cellular therapies. The identification and further elucidation of the role of immunotherapy in different tumor types, and the development of strategies for combining immunotherapy with cytotoxic and molecularly targeted agents for future multimodal therapy for cancer will enable even greater progress and ultimately lead to improved outcomes for patients receiving cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22576456

  5. EAACI: A European Declaration on Immunotherapy. Designing the future of allergen specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Allergy today is a public health concern of pandemic proportions, affecting more than 150 million people in Europe alone. In view of epidemiological trends, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) predicts that within the next few decades, more than half of the European population may at some point in their lives experience some type of allergy. Not only do allergic patients suffer from a debilitating disease, with the potential for major impact on their quality of life, career progression, personal development and lifestyle choices, but they also constitute a significant burden on health economics and macroeconomics due to the days of lost productivity and underperformance. Given that allergy triggers, including urbanization, industrialization, pollution and climate change, are not expected to change in the foreseeable future, it is imperative that steps are taken to develop, strengthen and optimize preventive and treatment strategies. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only currently available medical intervention that has the potential to affect the natural course of the disease. Years of basic science research, clinical trials, and systematic reviews and meta-analyses have convincingly shown that allergen specific immunotherapy can achieve substantial results for patients, improving the allergic individuals’ quality of life, reducing the long-term costs and burden of allergies, and changing the course of the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy not only effectively alleviates allergy symptoms, but it has a long-term effect after conclusion of the treatment and can prevent the progression of allergic diseases. Unfortunately, allergen specific immunotherapy has not yet received adequate attention from European institutions, including research funding bodies, even though this could be a most rewarding field in terms of return on investments, translational value and European integration and, a field in which Europe is recognized as a worldwide leader. Evaluation and surveillance of the full cost of allergic diseases is still lacking and further progress is being stifled by the variety of health systems across Europe. This means that the general population remains unaware of the potential use of allergen specific immunotherapy and its potential benefits. We call upon Europe’s policy-makers to coordinate actions and improve individual and public health in allergy by: Promoting awareness of the effectiveness of allergen specific immunotherapy Updating national healthcare policies to support allergen specific immunotherapy Prioritising funding for allergen specific immunotherapy research Monitoring the macroeconomic and health economic parameters of allergy Reinforcing allergy teaching in medical disciplines and specialties The effective implementation of the above policies has the potential for a major positive impact on European health and well-being in the next decade. PMID:23110958

  6. EAACI: A European Declaration on Immunotherapy. Designing the future of allergen specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Moises A; Demoly, Pascal; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Bousquet, Jean; Sheikh, Aziz; Frew, Anthony; Scadding, Glenis; Bachert, Claus; Malling, Hans J; Valenta, Rudolph; Bilo, Beatrice; Nieto, Antonio; Akdis, Cezmi; Just, Jocelyne; Vidal, Carmen; Varga, Eva M; Alvarez-Cuesta, Emilio; Bohle, Barbara; Bufe, Albrecht; Canonica, Walter G; Cardona, Victoria; Dahl, Ronald; Didier, Alain; Durham, Stephen R; Eng, Peter; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Jacobsen, Lars; Jutel, Marek; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Klimek, Ludger; Lötvall, Jan; Moreno, Carmen; Mosges, Ralph; Muraro, Antonella; Niggemann, Bodo; Pajno, Giovanni; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Pfaar, Oliver; Rak, Sabina; Senna, Gianenrico; Senti, Gabriela; Valovirta, Erkka; van Hage, Marianne; Virchow, Johannes C; Wahn, Ulrich; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Allergy today is a public health concern of pandemic proportions, affecting more than 150 million people in Europe alone. In view of epidemiological trends, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) predicts that within the next few decades, more than half of the European population may at some point in their lives experience some type of allergy.Not only do allergic patients suffer from a debilitating disease, with the potential for major impact on their quality of life, career progression, personal development and lifestyle choices, but they also constitute a significant burden on health economics and macroeconomics due to the days of lost productivity and underperformance. Given that allergy triggers, including urbanization, industrialization, pollution and climate change, are not expected to change in the foreseeable future, it is imperative that steps are taken to develop, strengthen and optimize preventive and treatment strategies.Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only currently available medical intervention that has the potential to affect the natural course of the disease. Years of basic science research, clinical trials, and systematic reviews and meta-analyses have convincingly shown that allergen specific immunotherapy can achieve substantial results for patients, improving the allergic individuals' quality of life, reducing the long-term costs and burden of allergies, and changing the course of the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy not only effectively alleviates allergy symptoms, but it has a long-term effect after conclusion of the treatment and can prevent the progression of allergic diseases.Unfortunately, allergen specific immunotherapy has not yet received adequate attention from European institutions, including research funding bodies, even though this could be a most rewarding field in terms of return on investments, translational value and European integration and, a field in which Europe is recognized as a worldwide leader. Evaluation and surveillance of the full cost of allergic diseases is still lacking and further progress is being stifled by the variety of health systems across Europe. This means that the general population remains unaware of the potential use of allergen specific immunotherapy and its potential benefits.We call upon Europe's policy-makers to coordinate actions and improve individual and public health in allergy by:Promoting awareness of the effectiveness of allergen specific immunotherapyUpdating national healthcare policies to support allergen specific immunotherapyPrioritising funding for allergen specific immunotherapy researchMonitoring the macroeconomic and health economic parameters of allergyReinforcing allergy teaching in medical disciplines and specialtiesThe effective implementation of the above policies has the potential for a major positive impact on European health and well-being in the next decade. PMID:23110958

  7. Regulatory T Cells as Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Benjamin D.; King, Landon S.; DAlessio, Franco R.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress exuberant immune system activation and promote immunologic tolerance. Because Tregs modulate both innate and adaptive immunity, the biomedical community has developed an intense interest in using Tregs for immunotherapy. Conditions that require clinical tolerance to improve outcomes autoimmune disease, solid organ transplantation, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may benefit from Treg immunotherapy. Investigators have designed ex vivo strategies to isolate, preserve, expand, and infuse Tregs. Protocols to manipulate Treg populations in vivo have also been considered. Barriers to clinically feasible Treg immunotherapy include Treg stability, off-cell effects, and demonstration of cell preparation purity and potency. Clinical trials involving Treg adoptive transfer to treat graft versus host disease preliminarily demonstrated the safety and efficacy of Treg immunotherapy in humans. Future work will need to confirm the safety of Treg immunotherapy and establish the efficacy of specific Treg subsets for the treatment of immune-mediated disease. PMID:24575095

  8. Sublingual immunotherapy in allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Doo Hee

    2011-01-01

    Current treatment options for allergic rhinitis (AR) include allergen avoidance and environmental control, pharmacotherapy, nasal surgery and immunotherapy. Among these, immunotherapy is the only therapeutic option that modifies fundamental immunologic mechanism by inducing desensitization. Specific allergen immunotherapy has been used for 1 century since 1911 and subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been demonstrated to be effective in asthma and AR. However, SCIT has several disadvantages such as inconvenience, invasiveness and potentially severe systemic reactions. Thus, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has recently received much attention around the world as a treatment for AR and is now widely used to replace the subcutaneous route. SLIT has recently been introduced in Korea and is now available for AR treatment in the Asia-Pacific region. This review offers better understanding of SLIT for AR by summarizing published articles and our previous works regarding proposed mechanisms, indication and efficacy, safety and adverse events, and compliance. PMID:22053308

  9. LASSBio-1135: A Dual TRPV1 Antagonist and Anti-TNF-Alpha Compound Orally Effective in Models of Inflammatory and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Cleverton K. F.; Silva, Rafael M.; Lacerda, Renata B.; Santos, Bruna L. R.; Silva, Rafaela V.; Amaral, Luciana S.; Quintas, Luís E. M.; Fraga, Carlos A. M.; Barreiro, Eliezer J.; Guimaraes, Marília Z. P.; Miranda, Ana L. P.

    2014-01-01

    LASSBio-1135 is an imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine derivative with high efficacy in screening models of nociception and inflammation, presumed as a weak COX-2 inhibitor. In order to tease out its mechanism of action, we investigated others possible target for LASSBio-1135, such as TNF-α and TRPV1, to better characterize it as a multitarget compound useful in the treatment of chronic pain. TRPV1 modulation was assessed in TRPV1-expressing Xenopus oocytes against capsaicin and low pH-induced current. Modulation of TNF-α production was evaluated in culture of macrophages stimulated with LPS. In vivo efficacy of LASSBio-1135 was investigated in carrageenan and partial sciatic ligation-induced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Corroborating its previous demonstration of efficacy in a model of capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia, LASSBio-1135 blocks capsaicin-elicited currents in a non-competitive way with an IC50 of 580 nM as well as low pH-induced current at 50 µM. As an additional action, LASSBio-1135 inhibited TNF-α release in these cells stimulated by LPS with an IC50 of 546 nM by reducing p38 MAPK phosphorilation. Oral administration of 100 µmol.Kg−1 LASSBio-1135 markedly reduced thermal hyperalgesia induced by carrageenan, however at 10 µmol.Kg−1 only a partial reduction was observed at the 4th h. Neutrophil recruitment and TNF-α production after carrageenan stimulus was also inhibited by the treatment with LASSBio-1135. Modulating TRPV1 and TNF-α production, two key therapeutic targets of neuropathic pain, 100 µmol.Kg−1 LASSBio-1135 was orally efficacious in reversing thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia produced by partial sciatic ligation 7–11 days after surgery without provoking hyperthermia, a common side effect of TRPV1 antagonists. In conclusion LASSBio-1135, besides being a weak COX-2 inhibitor, is a non-competitive TRPV1 antagonist and a TNF-α inhibitor. As a multitarget compound, LASSBio-1135 is orally efficacious in a model of neuropathic pain without presenting hyperthermia. PMID:24941071

  10. CCL21 Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuan; Sharma, Sherven; John, Maie St.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer, a major health problem, affects 12 million people worldwide every year. With surgery and chemo-radiation the long term survival rate for the majority of cancer patients is dismal. Thus novel treatments are urgently needed. Immunotherapy, the harnessing of the immune system to destroy cancer cells is an attractive option with potential for long term anti-tumor benefit. Cytokines are biological response modifiers that stimulate anti-tumor immune responses. In this review, we discuss the anti-tumor efficacy of the chemotactic cytokine CCL21 and its pre-clinical and clinical application in cancer. PMID:24810425

  11. Combinatorial Cancer Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Matthew D; Friedman, Claire F; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2016-01-01

    T cell checkpoint blockade therapies are revolutionizing the treatment of patients with cancer. Highlighted by the recent success of PD-1 plus CTLA-4 blockade in patients with melanomas, synergistic immunotherapy combinations of modalities represent an important opportunity to improve responses and outcomes for patients. We review the rationale and experience with T cell checkpoint blockade in combination with targeting of other coinhibitory or costimulatory checkpoints, immunomodulatory molecules in the tumor microenvironment, and other anticancer modalities such as vaccines, chemotherapy, and radiation. PMID:26923003

  12. The Combination of Valacyclovir with an Anti-TNF Alpha Antibody Increases Survival Rate Compared to Antiviral Therapy Alone in a Murine Model of Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Nicolas; Menasria, Rafik; Piret, Jocelyne; Rivest, Serge; Boivin, Guy

    2013-10-24

    The added benefit of combining valacyclovir (VACV), an antiviral agent, with etanercept (ETA), an anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) antibody, for the treatment of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis (HSE) was evaluated in a mouse model. BALB/c mice were infected intranasally with 1.85x10(4) plaque forming units of HSV-1. Groups of mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of vehicle or ETA (400 μg/mouse) on day 3 post-infection combined or not with VACV (1 mg/ml of drinking water) from days 3 to 21 post-infection. On day 5 post-infection, groups of mice were sacrificed for determination of viral DNA load, detection of ETA in brain homogenates and for in situ hybridization. The survival rate of mice was significantly increased when VACV was administered in combination with ETA (38.5% for VACV vs 78.6% for combined treatment; P=0.04) although VACV or ETA alone had no significant effect compared to the vehicle. The benefit of combined therapy was still present when treatment was delayed until day 4 post-infection. The viral DNA load was significantly reduced in mice treated with VACV alone (P<0.01) or combined with ETA (P<0.05) compared to the uninfected group whereas ETA alone had no effect. These results reinforce the notion that both virus-induced and immune-related mechanisms participate in the pathogenesis of HSE and suggest that potent antiviral agent could be combined with immune-based therapy, such as a TNF-α inhibitor, to improve prognosis of HSE. PMID:24513309

  13. The combination of valacyclovir with an anti-TNF alpha antibody increases survival rate compared to antiviral therapy alone in a murine model of herpes simplex virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Nicolas; Menasria, Rafik; Piret, Jocelyne; Rivest, Serge; Boivin, Guy

    2013-12-01

    The added benefit of combining valacyclovir (VACV), an antiviral agent, with etanercept (ETA), an anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) antibody, for the treatment of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis (HSE) was evaluated in a mouse model. BALB/c mice were infected intranasally with 1.85 × 104 plaque forming units of HSV-1. Groups of mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of vehicle or ETA (400 μg/mouse) on day 3 post-infection combined or not with VACV (1 mg/ml of drinking water) from days 3 to 21 post-infection. On day 5 post-infection, groups of mice were sacrificed for determination of viral DNA load, detection of ETA in brain homogenates and for in situ hybridization. The survival rate of mice was significantly increased when VACV was administered in combination with ETA (38.5% for VACV vs 78.6% for combined treatment; P = 0.04) although VACV or ETA alone had no significant effect compared to the vehicle. The benefit of combined therapy was still present when treatment was delayed until day 4 post-infection. The viral DNA load was significantly reduced in mice treated with VACV alone (P < 0.01) or combined with ETA (P < 0.05) compared to the uninfected group whereas ETA alone had no effect. These results reinforce the notion that both virus-induced and immune-related mechanisms participate in the pathogenesis of HSE and suggest that potent antiviral agent could be combined with immune-based therapy, such as a TNF-α inhibitor, to improve prognosis of HSE. PMID:24416771

  14. Prospects for immunotherapy and vaccines against Cryptosporidium.

    PubMed

    Mead, Jan R

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp is a ubiquitous parasite that has long been recognized as a frequent cause of protozoal diarrhea in humans. While infections in immunocompetent hosts are usually self-limiting, immunocompromised individuals can develop severe, chronic, and life-threatening illness. Vaccine development or immunotherapy that prevents disease or reduces the severity of infection is a relevant option since efficacious drug treatments are lacking. In particular, children in developing countries might benefit the most from a vaccine since cryptosporidiosis in early childhood has been reported to be associated with subsequent impairment in growth, physical fitness, and intellectual capacity. In this review, immunotherapies that have been used clinically are described as well as experimental vaccines and their evaluation in vivo. PMID:24638018

  15. Prospects for immunotherapy and vaccines against Cryptosporidium

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Jan R

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp is a ubiquitous parasite that has long been recognized as a frequent cause of protozoal diarrhea in humans. While infections in immunocompetent hosts are usually self-limiting, immunocompromised individuals can develop severe, chronic, and life-threatening illness. Vaccine development or immunotherapy that prevents disease or reduces the severity of infection is a relevant option since efficacious drug treatments are lacking. In particular, children in developing countries might benefit the most from a vaccine since cryptosporidiosis in early childhood has been reported to be associated with subsequent impairment in growth, physical fitness, and intellectual capacity. In this review, immunotherapies that have been used clinically are described as well as experimental vaccines and their evaluation in vivo. PMID:24638018

  16. Adherence to Sublingual Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Leo, Gualtiero; Ridolo, Erminia

    2016-02-01

    Adherence is a major issue in any medical treatment. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is particularly affected by a poor adherence because a flawed application prevents the immunological effects that underlie the clinical outcome of the treatment. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1990s, and the early studies suggested that adherence and compliance to such a route of administration was better than the traditional subcutaneous route. However, the recent data from manufacturers revealed that only 13% of patients treated with SLIT reach the recommended 3-year duration. Therefore, improved adherence to SLIT is an unmet need that may be achieved by various approaches. The utility of patient education and accurate monitoring during the treatment was demonstrated by specific studies, while the success of technology-based tools, including online platforms, social media, e-mail, and a short message service by phone, is currently considered to improve the adherence. This goal is of pivotal importance to fulfill the object of SLIT that is to modify the natural history of allergy, ensuring a long-lasting clinical benefit, and a consequent pharmaco-economic advantage, when patients complete at least a 3-year course of treatment. PMID:26758865

  17. Immunotherapy of Cryptococcus infections.

    PubMed

    Antachopoulos, C; Walsh, T J

    2012-02-01

    Despite appropriate antifungal treatment, the management of cryptococcal disease remains challenging, especially in immunocompromised patients, such as human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals and solid organ transplant recipients. During the past two decades, our knowledge of host immune responses against Cryptococcus spp. has been greatly advanced, and the role of immunomodulation in augmenting the response to infection has been investigated. In particular, the role of 'protective' Th1 (tumour necrosis factor-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-12, and IL-18) and Th17 (IL-23 and IL-17) and 'non-protective' Th2 (IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13) cytokines has been extensively studied in vitro and in animal models of cryptococcal infection. Immunomodulation with monoclonal antibodies against the capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan, glucosylceramides, melanin and β-glucan and, lately, with radioimmunotherapy has also yielded promising results in animal models. As a balance between sufficiently protective Th1 responses and excessive inflammation is important for optimal outcome, the effect of immunotherapy may range from beneficial to deleterious, depending on factors related to the host, the infecting organism, and the immunomodulatory regimen. Clinical evidence supporting immunomodulation in patients with cryptococcal infection remains too limited to allow firm recommendations. Limited human data suggest a role for IFN-γ. Identification of surrogate markers characterizing patients' immunological status could possibly suggest candidate patients for immunotherapy and the type of immunomodulation to be administered. PMID:22264261

  18. Current status of immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Susumu; Ishida, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2016-03-01

    The successful use of immune checkpoint inhibitors has been big breakthrough in the development of cancer immunotherapy. Anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibody, ipilimumab, is the first-approved immune checkpoint inhibitor and has shown durable objective responses for advanced melanoma beyond the effect of dacarbazine. Anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibodies, nivolumab and pembrolizumab, are other immune checkpoint inhibitors that have demonstrated more effective results than conventional drugs in clinical trials for a variety of advanced solid tumors including melanoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma and renal carcinoma. These studies have indicated that the enhancement of anti-cancer immunity by controlling the immune suppressive environment in cancer tissues is an important issue for the development of cancer immune-therapy. Accordingly, in recent years, the enthusiasm for research of cancer immunology has shifted to studies regarding the formation of the immune suppressive environment, immune suppression mechanisms in cancer tissues and the molecules and cells involved in these pathways. Novel findings from these studies might lead to the development of cancer immunotherapy based on control of the immune suppressive environment. PMID:26819277

  19. Modified immunotherapy for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Takashi; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2016-07-01

    Squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE) is a commonly used contact sensitizer in immunotherapy for alopecia areata (AA). Severe contact dermatitis is induced by the currently high recommended sensitization dose of 1%-2% SADBE, often decreasing patient compliance. We assessed a modified immunotherapy for AA using SADBE at a starting concentration of 0.01% without sensitization. After one or two weeks of initial 0.01% SADBE application, the concentration of SADBE was increased gradually to 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% until the patients felt itching or erythema at the AA lesion site. The modified immunotherapy showed a response rate of 69.4% (25/36), equivalent to conventional immunotherapy using SADBE starting at 1%-2% sensitization. Furthermore, we investigated the combination therapy of SADBE and multiple courses of steroid pulses for AA. The response rate for combination therapy was 73.7% (28/38); however, the group receiving combination therapy showed a significant prevalence of severe AA compared with the group receiving modified immunotherapy only. We reviewed the efficacy and safety of modified immunotherapy without initial sensitization and combination therapy with immunotherapy and multiple courses of pulses for AA. PMID:26932732

  20. Laser immunotherapy of canine and feline neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, J. P.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Davidson, Ellen B.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Lehenbauer, Terry W.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    1998-07-01

    The major cause of treatment failure in human and veterinary cancer patients is tumor invasion and metastasis. The inability of local therapy (surgery, radiation, photodynamic therapy) to eradicate a metastatic cancer presents a challenge in the therapy of residual or micrometastatic disease. Because of its local therapy limitations, chromophore-enhanced selective photothermal laser treatment has been augmented with a superimposed laser-induced systemic photobiological reaction, laser immunotherapy. Laser immunotherapy is a novel cancer treatment consisting of: (1) a laser in the infrared wavelength range (i.e. 805 nm solid state laser); (2) a photosensitizer of the corresponding absorption peak [i.e. indocyanine green (ICG)]; and (3) an immunoadjuvant [i.e. glycated chitosan gel (GCG)]. The intratumor injection of the photosensitizer (ICG) and immunoadjuvant (GCG) solution is followed by noninvasive laser irradiation. The laser energy causes tumor cell destruction by photothermal interaction to reduce the tumor burden and at the same time exposes tumor antigens. The immunoadjuvant concomitantly stimulates the host to mount a systemic anti-tumor immune response against the remaining cells of the tumor and to induce a long-term, tumor-specific immunity. This study investigates the feasibility of utilizing laser immunotherapy as an adjunctive therapy for the control of feline fibrosarcoma in future.

  1. Immunotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer-a review.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amit; Chia, Whay Kuang; Toh, Han Chong

    2016-04-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and characterized by peritumoral immune infiltrate. Advanced NPC has high lethality. Immunotherapy directed against EBV antigen targets has been previously explored in clinical trials, and is likely to be validated as an important target in NPC as randomized data emerges in the future. Cancer vaccines and adoptive T cell therapy have been explored in the clinic, with the latter showing the greatest success. Recent advances in gene sequencing technology now allow personalized tumor epitope mapping, whilst the advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis offers the opportunity to activate adaptive T cell response in vivo. Anti-PD1 antibodies have shown promising activity in early phase clinical trials, and randomized studies against chemotherapy are underway. As immunotherapy is incorporated into standard treatment paradigms, issues of optimal combinations with targeting agents, immune adjuvants, and sequence with chemotherapy and radiation therapy will need to be addressed. Effective strategies to increase tumor antigenicity, improve immunological memory and reduce immune escape, will need to be developed to improve treatment outcomes. Here we present a brief history of the evolution of immunotherapy in NPC, and highlight key concepts relevant to its further development in the clinic. PMID:27121882

  2. Immunotherapy for Pediatric Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nirali N.; Dave, Hema; Wayne, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the treatment of leukemia in childhood. Despite this, leukemia remains a leading cause of pediatric cancer-related mortality and the prognosis is guarded for individuals with relapsed or refractory disease. Standard therapies are associated with a wide array of acute and long-term toxicities and further treatment intensification may not be tolerable or beneficial. The curative potential of allogeneic stem cell transplantation is due in part to the graft-versus-leukemia effect, which provides evidence for the therapeutic capacity of immune-based therapies. In recent years there have been significant advances in the development and application of immunotherapy in the treatment of leukemias, including the demonstration of activity in chemotherapy-resistant cases. This review summarizes immunotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of pediatric leukemia including current results and future directions. PMID:23847759

  3. Mutanome directed cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vormehr, Mathias; Diken, Mustafa; Boegel, Sebastian; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-04-01

    Somatic mutations are important drivers of cancer development. Accumulating evidence suggests that a significant subset of mutations result in neo-epitopes recognized by autologous T cells and thus may constitute the Achilles' heel of tumor cells. T cells directed against mutations have been shown to have a key role in clinical efficacy of potent cancer immunotherapy modalities, such as adoptive transfer of autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Whereas these findings strengthen the idea of a prominent role of neo-epitopes in tumor rejection, the systematic therapeutic exploitation of mutations was hampered until recently by the uniqueness of the repertoire of mutations ('the mutanome') in every patient's tumor. This review highlights insights into immune recognition of neo-epitopes and novel concepts for comprehensive identification and immunotherapeutic exploitation of individual mutations. PMID:26716729

  4. Immunotherapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Borghaei, Hossein; Smith, Mitchell R.; Campbell, Kerry S.

    2009-01-01

    Major advances have been made in the field of immunology in the past two decades. A better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling the immune system, has opened the door to many innovative and promising new cancer therapies that manipulate the immune response. For instance, toll-like receptor agonists have been shown to boost immune responses toward tumors. Also, a wide array of cell-based immunotherapies utilizing T cells, NK cells, and dendritic cells have been established. Furthermore, a rapidly expanding repertoire of monoclonal antibodies is being developed to treat tumors, and many of the available antibodies have demonstrated impressive clinical responses. Here, we examine some of these immunotherapeutic approaches currently in use or testing to treat cancer, and we examine available evidence with regards to mechanism and efficacy of these treatments. PMID:19837059

  5. Principles of immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liebelt, Brandon D; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Heimberger, Amy B

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors of the central nervous system, and carry a grim prognosis. Novel approaches utilizing the immune system as adjuvant therapy are quickly emerging as viable and effective options. Immunotherapeutic strategies being investigated to treat glioblastoma include: vaccination therapy targeted against either specific tumor antigens or whole tumor lysate, adoptive cellular therapy with cytotoxic T lymphocytes, chimeric antigen receptors and bi-specific T-cell engaging antibodies allowing circumvention of major histocompatibility complex restriction, aptamer therapy with aims for more efficient target delivery, and checkpoint blockade in order to release the tumor-mediated inhibition of the immune system. Given the heterogeneity of glioblastoma and its ability to gain mutations throughout the disease course, multifaceted treatment strategies utilizing multiple forms of immunotherapy in combination with conventional therapy will be most likely to succeed moving forward. PMID:26948354

  6. Imaging Biomarkers in Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Juergens, Rosalyn A.; Zukotynski, Katherine A.; Singnurkar, Amit; Snider, Denis P.; Valliant, John F.; Gulenchyn, Karen Y.

    2016-01-01

    Immune-based therapies have been in use for decades but recent work with immune checkpoint inhibitors has now changed the landscape of cancer treatment as a whole. While these advances are encouraging, clinicians still do not have a consistent biomarker they can rely on that can accurately select patients or monitor response. Molecular imaging technology provides a noninvasive mechanism to evaluate tumors and may be an ideal candidate for these purposes. This review provides an overview of the mechanism of action of varied immunotherapies and the current strategies for monitoring patients with imaging. We then describe some of the key researches in the preclinical and clinical literature on the current uses of molecular imaging of the immune system and cancer. PMID:26949344

  7. Systemic reaction rates to field stings among imported fire ant-sensitive patients receiving >3 years of immunotherapy versus <3 years of immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Forester, Joseph P; Johnson, Thomas L; Arora, Rajiv; Quinn, James M

    2007-01-01

    As imported fire ants (IFAs) expand their range, hypersensitivity reactions to their stings are becoming a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Currently, IFAs whole body extract (WBE) immunotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for IFA hypersensitivity but the optimal duration of treatment is unknown. A questionnaire was administered to patients diagnosed with IFA venom hypersensitivity based on history and the presence of IFA venom-specific IgE who had been offered immunotherapy. The patients were grouped into those who received > or =3 years of immunotherapy and those who received <3 years of immunotherapy. Forty of the 272 patients initially identified were successfully contacted (14%) with 6 patients being excluded. Of these patients, 19 reported having received <3 years of IFA immunotherapy (reduced course) and 15 stated they had been given >3 years of immunotherapy (complete course). Subsequent field stings were reported by 18 (95%) of the reduced course groups and 14 (93%) of the complete course group with 1 person from each group (6 and 7%, respectively) experiencing a systemic reaction. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the number of patients with subsequent field stings or systemic reactions after subsequent IFA stings. Less than 3 years of IFA immunotherapy may offer long-term protection against IFA hypersensitivity reactions although additional studies with more subjects and controls are necessary before definitive conclusions may be made. PMID:17883920

  8. Challenges in Clinical Design of Immunotherapy Trials for Malignant Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Rolle, Cleo E.; Sengupta, Sadhak; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary malignant brain tumor. The traditional treatments for GBM, including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, only modestly improve patient survival. Therefore, immunotherapy has emerged as a novel therapeutic modality. Immunotherapeutic strategies exploit the immune system's ability to recognize and mount a specific response against tumor cells, but not normal cells. Current immunotherapeutic approaches for glioma can be divided into three categories: immune priming (active immunotherapy), immunomodulation (passive immunotherapy), and adoptive immunotherapy. Immune priming sensitizes the patient's immune cells to tumor antigens using various vaccination protocols. In the case of immunomodulation, strategies are aimed at reducing suppressive cytokines in the tumor microenvironment or using immune molecules to specifically target tumor cells. Adoptive immunotherapy involves harvesting the patient's immune cells, followed by ex vivo activation and expansion prior to re-infusion. This review will provide an overview of the interactions between the central nervous system and the immune system and discuss the challenges facing current immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:19944979

  9. Lymphoma Immunotherapy: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Zappasodi, Roberta; de Braud, Filippo; Di Nicola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The rationale to treat lymphomas with immunotherapy comes from long-standing evidence on their distinctive immune responsiveness. Indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, in particular, establish key interactions with the immune microenvironment to ensure prosurvival signals and prevent antitumor immune activation. However, reports of spontaneous regressions indicate that, under certain circumstances, patients develop therapeutic antitumor immunity. Several immunotherapeutic approaches have been thus developed to boost these effects in all patients. To date, targeting CD20 on malignant B cells with the antibody rituximab has been the most clinically effective strategy. However, relapse and resistance prevent to cure approximately half of B-NHL patients, underscoring the need of more effective therapies. The recognition of B-cell receptor variable regions as B-NHL unique antigens promoted the development of specific vaccines to immunize patients against their own tumor. Despite initial promising results, this strategy has not yet demonstrated a sufficient clinical benefit to reach the regulatory approval. Several novel agents are now available to stimulate immune effector functions or counteract immunosuppressive mechanisms, such as engineered antitumor T cells, co-stimulatory receptor agonist, and immune checkpoint-blocking antibodies. Thus, multiple elements can now be exploited in more effective combinations to break the barriers for the induction of anti-lymphoma immunity. PMID:26388871

  10. IgE immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Josephs, Debra H; Spicer, James F; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Gould, Hannah J; Karagiannis, Sophia N

    2014-01-01

    The importance of antibodies in activating immune responses against tumors is now better appreciated with the emergence of checkpoint blockade antibodies and with engineered antibody Fc domains featuring enhanced capacity to focus potent effector cells against cancer cells. Antibodies designed with Fc regions of the IgE class can confer natural, potent, long-lived immune surveillance in tissues through tenacious engagement of high-affinity cognate Fc receptors on distinct, often tumor-resident immune effector cells, and through ability to activate these cells under tumor-induced Th2-biased conditions. Here, we review the properties that make IgE a contributor to the allergic response and a critical player in the protection against parasites, which also support IgE as a novel anti-cancer modality. We discuss IgE-based active and passive immunotherapeutic approaches in disparate in vitro and in vivo model systems, collectively suggesting the potential of IgE immunotherapies in oncology. Translation toward clinical application is now in progress. PMID:24423620

  11. Immunotherapy for malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Suryadevara, Carter M.; Verla, Terence; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Reap, Elizabeth A.; Choi, Bryan D.; Fecci, Peter E.; Sampson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas (MG) are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor. Most patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and malignant glial tumor, die within 12–15 months. Moreover, conventional treatment, which includes surgery followed by radiation and chemotherapy, can be highly toxic by causing nonspecific damage to healthy brain and other tissues. The shortcomings of standard-of-care have thus created a stimulus for the development of novel therapies that can target central nervous system (CNS)-based tumors specifically and efficiently, while minimizing off-target collateral damage to normal brain. Immunotherapy represents an investigational avenue with the promise of meeting this need, already having demonstrated its potential against B-cell malignancy and solid tumors in clinical trials. T-cell engineering with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is one proven approach that aims to redirect autologous patient T-cells to sites of tumor. This platform has evolved dramatically over the past two decades to include an improved construct design, and these modern CARs have only recently been translated into the clinic for brain tumors. We review here emerging immunotherapeutic platforms for the treatment of MG, focusing on the development and application of a CAR-based strategy against GBM. PMID:25722935

  12. Immunotherapy advances for glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Reardon, David A.; Freeman, Gordon; Wu, Catherine; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Fritsch, Edward F.; Curry, William T.; Sampson, John H.; Dranoff, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Survival for patients with glioblastoma, the most common high-grade primary CNS tumor, remains poor despite multiple therapeutic interventions including intensifying cytotoxic therapy, targeting dysregulated cell signaling pathways, and blocking angiogenesis. Exciting, durable clinical benefits have recently been demonstrated for a number of other challenging cancers using a variety of immunotherapeutic approaches. Much modern research confirms that the CNS is immunoactive rather than immunoprivileged. Preliminary results of clinical studies demonstrate that varied vaccine strategies have achieved encouraging evidence of clinical benefit for glioblastoma patients, although multiple variables will likely require systematic investigation before optimal outcomes are realized. Initial preclinical studies have also revealed promising results with other immunotherapies including cell-based approaches and immune checkpoint blockade. Clinical studies to evaluate a wide array of immune therapies for malignant glioma patients are being rapidly developed. Important considerations going forward include optimizing response assessment and identifiying correlative biomarkers for predict therapeutic benefit. Finally, the potential of complementary combinatorial immunotherapeutic regimens is highly exciting and warrants expedited investigation. PMID:25190673

  13. The efficiency of peptide immunotherapy for respiratory allergy.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Montagni, Marcello; Ridolo, Erminia

    2016-06-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) was introduced more than a century ago and is yet the only disease-modifying treatment for allergy. AIT is currently conducted with whole allergen extracts and several studies clearly support its efficacy in the treatment of respiratory allergies, however the need for a long treatment - that affects costs and patients compliance - and possible IgE-mediated adverse events are still unresolved issues. Peptide immunotherapy is based on the use of short synthetic peptides which represent major T-cell epitopes of the allergen with markedly reduced ability to cross-link IgE and activate mast cells and basophils. Data from clinical trials confirmed the efficacy and tolerability of peptide immunotherapy in patients with cat allergy, with a sustained clinical effect after a short course treatment. Peptide therapy is a promising safe and effective new specific treatment for allergy to be developed for the most important allergens causing rhinitis or asthma. PMID:26901667

  14. Immunotherapy of Childhood Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Stephen S.; Chou, Alexander J.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant tumors of bone and soft tissue origin. Although more than 100 different histologic subtypes have been described, the majority of pediatric cases belong to the Ewing’s family of tumors, rhabdomyosarcoma and osteosarcoma. Most patients that present with localized stage are curable with surgery and/or chemotherapy; however, those with metastatic disease at diagnosis or those who experience a relapse continue to have a very poor prognosis. New therapies for these patients are urgently needed. Immunotherapy is an established treatment modality for both liquid and solid tumors, and in pediatrics, most notably for neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma. In the past, immunomodulatory agents such as interferon, interleukin-2, and liposomal-muramyl tripeptide phosphatidyl-ethanolamine have been tried, with some activity seen in subsets of patients; additionally, various cancer vaccines have been studied with possible benefit. Monoclonal antibody therapies against tumor antigens such as disialoganglioside GD2 or immune checkpoint targets such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 are being actively explored in pediatric sarcomas. Building on the success of adoptive T cell therapy for EBV-related lymphoma, strategies to redirect T cells using chimeric antigen receptors and bispecific antibodies are rapidly evolving with potential for the treatment of sarcomas. This review will focus on recent preclinical and clinical developments in targeted agents for pediatric sarcomas with emphasis on the immunobiology of immune checkpoints, immunoediting, tumor microenvironment, antibody engineering, cell engineering, and tumor vaccines. The future integration of antibody-based and cell-based therapies into an overall treatment strategy of sarcoma will be discussed. PMID:26301204

  15. Hypoallergenic molecules for subcutaneous immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jongejan, Laurian; van Ree, Ronald; Poulsen, Lars K

    2016-01-01

    Although a large part of the population suffers from allergies, a cure is not yet available. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) offers promise for these patients. AIT has proven successful in insect and venom allergies; however, for food allergy this is still unclear. In this editorial we focus on the recent advances in a proof of concept study in food allergy, FAST (Food allergy specific immunotherapy), which may increase interest within the biomolecular and pharmaceutical industry to embark on similar projects of immunology driven precision medicine within the allergy field. PMID:26558320

  16. Venom immunotherapy: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Antolín-Amérigo, Darío; Moreno Aguilar, Carmen; Vega, Arantza; Alvarez-Mon, Melchor

    2014-07-01

    Venom immunotherapy (VIT) is the most effective form of specific immunotherapy to date. Hitherto, several relevant queries remain unanswered, namely optimal doses, duration, and means of assessment. Important progress has been lately made in terms of diagnosis by means of component-resolved diagnosis. Moreover, basophil activation test results in patients with negative serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) and skin prick test confer this technique a promising future, although these outcomes shall be considered with caution. This review aims to unravel the important advances made on diagnosis, management, and prognosis and also focuses on several undetermined aspects of VIT. PMID:24934908

  17. CCL2 Blockade Augments Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fridlender, Zvi G.; Buchlis, George; Kapoor, Veena; Cheng, Guanjun; Sun, Jing; Singhal, Sunil; Crisanti, Cecilia; Wang, Liang-Chuan S; Heitjan, Daniel; Snyder, Linda A.; Albelda, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Since an immuno-inhibitory environment exists within tumors, successful vaccines will likely require additional approaches to alter the tumor microenvironment. Monocyte chemoattractant proteins (such as CCL2) are produced by many tumors and have both direct and indirect immuno-inhibitory effects. We hypothesized that CCL2 blockade would reduce immunosuppression and augment vaccine immunotherapy. Anti-murine-CCL2/CCL12 monoclonal antibodies were administered in three immunotherapy models: one aimed at the HPV-E7 antigen expressed by a non-small cell lung cancer line, one targeted to mesothelin expressed by a mesothelioma cell line, and one using an adenovirus expressing Interferon-? to treat a non-immunogenic, non-small cell lung cancer line. We evaluated the effect of the combination treatment on tumor growth and assessed the mechanism of these changes by evaluating cytotoxic T cells, immunosuppressive cells, and the tumor microenvironment. Administration of anti-CCL2/CCL12 antibodies along with the vaccines markedly augmented efficacy with enhanced reduction in tumor volume and cures of approximately half of the tumors. The combined treatment generated more total intra-tumoral CD8+ T-cells that were more activated and more anti-tumor antigen specific, as measured by tetramer evaluation. Another important potential mechanism was reduction in intratumoral T-regulatory (T-reg) cells. CCL2 appears to be a key proximal cytokine mediating immunosuppression in tumors. Its blockade augments CD8+ T cell immune response to tumors elicited by vaccines via multifactorial mechanisms. These observations suggest that combining CCL2 neutralization with vaccines should be considered in future immunotherapy trials. PMID:20028856

  18. Cancer Immunotherapy Comes of Age

    PubMed Central

    Topalian, Suzanne L.; Weiner, George J.; Pardoll, Drew M.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy comprises a variety of treatment approaches, incorporating the tremendous specificity of the adaptive immune system (T cells and antibodies) as well as the diverse and potent cytotoxic weaponry of both adaptive and innate immunity. Immunotherapy strategies include antitumor monoclonal antibodies, cancer vaccines, adoptive transfer of ex vivo activated T and natural killer cells, and administration of antibodies or recombinant proteins that either costimulate immune cells or block immune inhibitory pathways (so-called immune checkpoints). Although clear clinical efficacy has been demonstrated with antitumor antibodies since the late 1990s, other immunotherapies had not been shown to be effective until recently, when a spate of successes established the broad potential of this therapeutic modality. These successes are based on fundamental scientific advances demonstrating the toleragenic nature of cancer and the pivotal role of the tumor immune microenvironment in suppressing antitumor immunity. New therapies based on a sophisticated knowledge of immune-suppressive cells, soluble factors, and signaling pathways are designed to break tolerance and reactivate antitumor immunity to induce potent, long-lasting responses. Preclinical models indicate the importance of a complex integrated immune response in eliminating established tumors and validate the exploration of combinatorial treatment regimens, which are anticipated to be far more effective than monotherapies. Unlike conventional cancer therapies, most immunotherapies are active and dynamic, capable of inducing immune memory to propagate a successful rebalancing of the equilibrium between tumor and host. PMID:22042955

  19. Immunotherapy Approaches in Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Klener, Pavel; Otáhal, Pavel; Lateckova, Lucie; Klener, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Tumor immune surveillance paradigm presumes that most pre-malignant cells or early malignant lesions can be eliminated (or at least controlled) by cells of the immune system. A critical feature that distinguishes advanced tumors from early neoplastic lesions is their capability to evade immune control. As a consequence, vast majority of clinically evident (advanced) tumors are poorly immunogenic. The principle goal of immunotherapy is thus a resurrection of the patient's inefficient or suppressed immune system so that it would once again become capable of launching sustained cytolytic attacks against tumor cells, which would ideally result in total and permanent eradication of cancer. Such activation of patient's anticancer immunity, however, can be achieved by strikingly different ways. This current review discusses diverse innovative immunotherapy approaches, which in the last 20 years achieved miraculous successes in the ever-lasting battle against cancer, including cytokine-based immunotherapy approaches, therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives, cancer vaccines, and cell-based immunotherapy approaches. PMID:26087990

  20. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Pedro, José-Manuel Bravo-San; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N.; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P.; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Eggermont, Alexander M.; Fearon, Douglas T.; Fridman, Wolf H.; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M.; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E.; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Talmadge, James E.; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J.; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into “passive” and “active” based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches. PMID:25537519

  1. Neoepitope Vaccines Next Immunotherapy Frontier.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center has teamed up with biotechnology company Advaxis to explore development of neoepitope-based immunotherapies. The partnership is just one of several such ventures in a promising area of research that uses advanced sequencing technology to customize vaccines based on altered proteins in individual patients' tumors. PMID:26712929

  2. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vacchelli, Erika; Bravo-San Pedro, Jos-Manuel; Buqu, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V; Eggermont, Alexander M; Fearon, Douglas T; Fridman, Wolf H; Fu?kov, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Galon, Jrme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, Franois; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Krre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E; Pienta, Kenneth J; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sauts-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J; Speiser, Daniel E; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K; Talmadge, James E; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H; Van Den Eynde, Benot J; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S; Whiteside, Theresa L; Wolchok, Jedd D; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-12-30

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into "passive" and "active" based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches. PMID:25537519

  3. Engineering opportunities in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jeanbart, Laura; Swartz, Melody A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has great potential to treat cancer and prevent future relapse by activating the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells. A variety of strategies are continuing to evolve in the laboratory and in the clinic, including therapeutic noncellular (vector-based or subunit) cancer vaccines, dendritic cell vaccines, engineered T cells, and immune checkpoint blockade. Despite their promise, much more research is needed to understand how and why certain cancers fail to respond to immunotherapy and to predict which therapeutic strategies, or combinations thereof, are most appropriate for each patient. Underlying these challenges are technological needs, including methods to rapidly and thoroughly characterize the immune microenvironment of tumors, predictive tools to screen potential therapies in patient-specific ways, and sensitive, information-rich assays that allow patient monitoring of immune responses, tumor regression, and tumor dissemination during and after therapy. The newly emerging field of immunoengineering is addressing some of these challenges, and there is ample opportunity for engineers to contribute their approaches and tools to further facilitate the clinical translation of immunotherapy. Here we highlight recent technological advances in the diagnosis, therapy, and monitoring of cancer in the context of immunotherapy, as well as ongoing challenges. PMID:26598681

  4. Engineering opportunities in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jeanbart, Laura; Swartz, Melody A

    2015-11-24

    Immunotherapy has great potential to treat cancer and prevent future relapse by activating the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells. A variety of strategies are continuing to evolve in the laboratory and in the clinic, including therapeutic noncellular (vector-based or subunit) cancer vaccines, dendritic cell vaccines, engineered T cells, and immune checkpoint blockade. Despite their promise, much more research is needed to understand how and why certain cancers fail to respond to immunotherapy and to predict which therapeutic strategies, or combinations thereof, are most appropriate for each patient. Underlying these challenges are technological needs, including methods to rapidly and thoroughly characterize the immune microenvironment of tumors, predictive tools to screen potential therapies in patient-specific ways, and sensitive, information-rich assays that allow patient monitoring of immune responses, tumor regression, and tumor dissemination during and after therapy. The newly emerging field of immunoengineering is addressing some of these challenges, and there is ample opportunity for engineers to contribute their approaches and tools to further facilitate the clinical translation of immunotherapy. Here we highlight recent technological advances in the diagnosis, therapy, and monitoring of cancer in the context of immunotherapy, as well as ongoing challenges. PMID:26598681

  5. A Phase I Study of Reduced-Intensity Conditioning and Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Followed by Dose Escalation of Targeted Consolidation Immunotherapy with Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Children and Adolescents with CD33(+) Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zahler, Stacey; Bhatia, Monica; Ricci, Angela; Roy, Sumith; Morris, Erin; Harrison, Lauren; van de Ven, Carmella; Fabricatore, Sandra; Wolownik, Karen; Cooney-Qualter, Erin; Baxter-Lowe, Lee Ann; Luisi, Paul; Militano, Olga; Kletzel, Morris; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2016-04-01

    Myeloablative conditioning and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (alloHSCT) in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1) may be associated with significant acute toxicity and late effects. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and alloHSCT in children is safe, feasible, and may be associated with less adverse effects. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) induces a response in 30% of patients with CD33(+) relapsed/refractory AML. The dose of GO is significantly lower when combined with chemotherapy. We examined the feasibility and toxicity of RIC alloHSCT followed by GO targeted immunotherapy in children with CD33(+) AML in CR1/CR2. Conditioning consisted of fludarabine 30 mg/m(2) × 6 days, busulfan 3.2 to 4 mg/kg × 2 days ± rabbit antithymocyte globulin 2 mg/kg × 4 days followed by alloHSCT from matched related/unrelated donors. GO was administered ≥60 days after alloHSCT in 2 doses (8 weeks apart), following a dose-escalation design (4.5, 6, 7.5, and 9 mg/m(2)). Fourteen patients with average risk AML received RIC alloHSCT and post-GO consolidation: median age 13.5 years at transplant (range, 1 to 21), male-to-female 8:6, and disease status at alloHSCT 11 CR1 and 3 CR2. Eleven patients received alloHSCT from 5-6/6 HLA-matched family donors: 8 received peripheral blood stem cells, 2 received bone marrow, and 1 received related cord blood transplantation. Three patients received an unrelated allograft (two 4-5/6 and one 9/10) from unrelated cord blood unit and bone marrow, respectively. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment was observed in all assessable patients (100%), achieved at median 15.5 days (range, 7 to 31) and 21 days (range, 10 to 52), respectively. Three patients received GO at dose level 1 (4.5 mg/m(2) per dose), 5 at dose level 2 (6 mg/m(2) per dose), 3 at dose level 3 (7.5 mg/m(2) per dose), and 3 at dose level 4 (9 mg/m(2) per dose). Three of 14 patients received only 1 dose of GO after alloHSCT. One patient experienced grade III transaminitis, which resolved; no grade IV transaminitis, no grade III/IV hyperbilirubinemia, or sinusoidal obstructive syndrome were observed. The second dose of GO was given at median of 143 days (range, 120 to 209) after alloHSCT. Probability of grades II to IV acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease were 21% and 33.5%, respectively. Probability of overall survival after RIC alloHSCT and GO consolidation at 1 and 5 years was 78% and 61%, respectively. Probability of 5-year event-free survival after RIC alloHSCT and GO consolidation in patients in CR1 was 78%. No dose-limiting toxicities probably or directly related to GO were observed in this cohort. This preliminary data demonstrate that RIC followed by alloHSCT and consolidation with GO appears to be safe in children and adolescents with CD33(+) AML in CR1/CR2. A phase II trial is currently underway investigating this approach with a GO dose of 9 mg/m(2) per dose. PMID:26785332

  6. Will sublingual immunotherapy offer benefit for asthma?

    PubMed

    Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée; Teijeiro, Alvaro; Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Passalacqua, Giovanni

    2013-12-01

    Evidence shows that sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is indicated in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR). In this article we discuss whether SLIT could offer benefit for children and adults with asthma.We reviewed individual trials on SLIT in asthmatic patients, but also asthma data reported in some SLIT trials conducted in AR patients. Findings were complemented with data from systematic reviews and metaanalysis on the subject since 2000 and some guidelines that mention immunotherapy for asthma treatment. In AR patients with concomitant persistent asthma, SLIT reduces medication needs while maintaining symptom control. This holds especially true for house dust mite SLIT. Data on pollen SLIT and lung symptom improvement with SLIT, however, are less convincing. Therefore, we suggest SLIT should be added as an optional add-on therapy for patients with asthma whenever a causative allergen has been demonstrated and AR is associated with asthma. For the future, SLIT should be studied in specifically designed asthma studies in allergic asthmatics without AR. PMID:24022465

  7. Role of immunotherapy in the treatment of allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yukselen, Ayfer; Kendirli, Seval Guneser

    2014-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) induces clinical and immunological tolerance as defined by persistence of clinical benefit and associated long-term immunological parameters after cessation of treatment. Although the efficacy of SIT has been shown in terms of reducing symptoms, medication consumption and ameliorating quality of life in both allergic rhinitis and asthma, there has long been some controversies about effectiveness of SIT in the treatment of allergic asthma. The type of allergen, the dose and protocol of immunotherapy, patient selection criteria, the severity and control of asthma, all are significant contributors to the power of efficacy in allergic asthma. The initiation of SIT in allergic asthma should be considered in case of coexisting of other allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, unacceptable adverse effects of medications, patient’s preference to avoid long-term pharmacotherapy. Steroid sparing effect of SIT in allergic asthma is also an important benefit particularly in patients who have to use these drugs in high doses for a long-time. Symptomatic asthma is a risk factor for systemic reactions and asthma should be controlled at the time of administration of SIT. Both subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) have been found to be effective in patients with allergic asthma. Although the safety profile of SLIT seems to be better than SCIT, the results of some studies and meta-analyses suggest that the efficacy of SCIT may appear better and earlier than SLIT in children with allergic asthma. PMID:25516861

  8. Dropouts in sublingual allergen immunotherapy trials - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Makatsori, M; Scadding, G W; Lombardo, C; Bisoffi, G; Ridolo, E; Durham, S R; Senna, G

    2014-05-01

    Participant dropouts can reduce the power of allergen immunotherapy clinical trials. Evaluation of the dropout rate and reasons for dropout are important not only in the planning of clinical studies but are also relevant for adherence to immunotherapy in daily clinical practice. A systematic review was carried out in order to establish the overall dropout rate among published double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials of sublingual immunotherapy for respiratory allergic diseases. Dropouts were analysed in regards to allergen, formulation, treatment schedule, participant age, study size, number of centres and type of allergic disease. Relative dropout rates in placebo and active groups as well as reasons for dropout were also assessed. A total of 81 studies, comprising 9998 patients, were included. Dropout rates in sublingual immunotherapy controlled studies do not appear to be a major problem with a composite dropout percentage of 14% (95% CI:11.9-16). Furthermore, they are not different for active compared to placebo-treated participants. This lends support to the positive clinical outcomes seen in meta-analyses of these trials. PMID:24673502

  9. Nanoparticulate Adjuvants and Delivery Systems for Allergen Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    De Souza Rebouas, Juliana; Esparza, Irene; Ferrer, Marta; Sanz, Mara Luisa; Irache, Juan Manuel; Gamazo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In the last decades, significant progress in research and clinics has been made to offer possible innovative therapeutics for the management of allergic diseases. However, current allergen immunotherapy shows limitations concerning the long-term efficacy and safety due to local side effects and risk of anaphylaxis. Thus, effective and safe vaccines with reduced dose of allergen have been developed using adjuvants. Nevertheless, the use of adjuvants still has several disadvantages, which limits its use in human vaccines. In this context, several novel adjuvants for allergen immunotherapy are currently being investigated and developed. Currently, nanoparticles-based allergen-delivery systems have received much interest as potential adjuvants for allergen immunotherapy. It has been demonstrated that the incorporation of allergens into a delivery system plays an important role in the efficacy of allergy vaccines. Several nanoparticles-based delivery systems have been described, including biodegradable and nondegradable polymeric carriers. Therefore, this paper provides an overview of the current adjuvants used for allergen immunotherapy. Furthermore, nanoparticles-based allergen-delivery systems are focused as a novel and promising strategy for allergy vaccines. PMID:22496608

  10. [Cancer immunotherapy by immuno-checkpoint blockade].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    As cancer immunotherapies utilizing anti-tumor T-cell responses, immuno-checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell immunotherapy have recently achieved durable responses even in advanced cancer patients with metastases. Administration of antibodies on the T-cell surface, CTLA-4 and PD-1 (or PD-1 ligand PD-L1), resulted in tumor regression of not only melanoma and renal cell cancer which were known to be relatively sensitive to immunotherapy, but also various malignancies including lung, bladder, ovarian, gastric, and head and neck cancers, as well as hematological malignancies such as Hodgkin and B-cell malignant lymphomas. These findings have changed the status of immunotherapy in the development of cancer treatments. Currently, development of combinations employing cancer immunotherapy with immuno-checkpoint blockade, as well as personalized cancer immunotherapy based on the evaluation of pretreatment immune status, are in progress. PMID:26458459

  11. Immunotherapy Targets in Pediatric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orentas, Rimas J.; Lee, Daniel W.; Mackall, Crystal

    2011-01-01

    Immunotherapy for cancer has shown increasing success and there is ample evidence to expect that progress gleaned in immune targeting of adult cancers can be translated to pediatric oncology. This manuscript reviews principles that guide selection of targets for immunotherapy of cancer, emphasizing the similarities and distinctions between oncogene-inhibition targets and immune targets. It follows with a detailed review of molecules expressed by pediatric tumors that are already under study as immune targets or are good candidates for future studies of immune targeting. Distinctions are made between cell surface antigens that can be targeted in an MHC independent manner using antibodies, antibody derivatives, or chimeric antigen receptors versus intracellular antigens which must be targeted with MHC restricted T cell therapies. Among the most advanced immune targets for childhood cancer are CD19 and CD22 on hematologic malignancies, GD2 on solid tumors, and NY-ESO-1 expressed by a majority of synovial sarcomas, but several other molecules reviewed here also have properties which suggest that they too could serve as effective targets for immunotherapy of childhood cancer. PMID:22645714

  12. Novel immunotherapies in lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Batlevi, Connie Lee; Matsuki, Eri; Brentjens, Renier J; Younes, Anas

    2016-01-01

    The success of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab in the treatment of lymphoid malignancies provided proof-of-principle for exploiting the immune system therapeutically. Since the FDA approval of rituximab in 1997, several novel strategies that harness the ability of T cells to target cancer cells have emerged. Reflecting on the promising clinical efficacy of these novel immunotherapy approaches, the FDA has recently granted 'breakthrough' designation to three novel treatments with distinct mechanisms. First, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T-cell therapy is promising for the treatment of adult and paediatric relapsed and/or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Second, blinatumomab, a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE(®)) antibody, is now approved for the treatment of adults with Philadelphia-chromosome-negative relapsed and/or refractory B-precursor ALL. Finally, the monoclonal antibody nivolumab, which targets the PD-1 immune-checkpoint receptor with high affinity, is used for the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma following treatment failure with autologous-stem-cell transplantation and brentuximab vedotin. Herein, we review the background and development of these three distinct immunotherapy platforms, address the scientific advances in understanding the mechanism of action of each therapy, and assess the current clinical knowledge of their efficacy and safety. We also discuss future strategies to improve these immunotherapies through enhanced engineering, biomarker selection, and mechanism-based combination regimens. PMID:26525683

  13. House dust allergy and immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Wayne R.

    2012-01-01

    HDM allergy is associated with asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. In many countries childhood asthma is predominantly found in HDM-allergic children with their probability of developing disease being proportional to their IgE antibody titers and the early development of Th2 responses. While the pathogenesis is complex and increasingly linked to infection the immunologically-based allergen immunotherapy and anti-IgE antibody therapy are highly beneficial. Immunotherapy could be a short-term treatment providing lifelong relief but the current regimens depend on repeated administration of allergen over years. Immunological investigations point to a contribution of responses outside the Th2 pathway and multiple potential but unproven control mechanisms. Over half of the IgE antibodies are directed to the group 1 and 2 allergens with most of remainder to the group 4, 5, 7 and 21 allergens. This hierarchy found in high and low responders provides a platform for introducing defined allergens into immunotherapy and defined reagents for investigation. PMID:22894952

  14. Immunotherapy Not Working? Check Your Microbiota.

    PubMed

    West, Nathan R; Powrie, Fiona

    2015-12-14

    Gut microbes have ascended to prominence as key modulators of host immunity, raising the possibility that they could influence the outcome of cancer immunotherapy. Two recent studies address this question by identifying specific gut-resident bacteria as drivers of checkpoint blockade immunotherapy in pre-clinical tumor models. PMID:26678336

  15. Cancer immune contexture and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Becht, Etienne; Giraldo, Nicolas A; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Fridman, Wolf Herman

    2016-04-01

    The immune contexture that characterizes the density, the location, the organization and the functional orientation of tumor-infiltrating immune cells in cancers has a clinical impact on patient's outcome. It is, in great part, shaped by the malignant cells, as in a given cancer type, tumors presenting different oncogenic processes have different immune contextures. Moreover, the immune contexture in metastatic sites reflects that of the corresponding primary tumors. Finally, the components forming the immune contexture represent targets and markers of efficient anti-cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26708937

  16. Immunotherapy: It Takes a Village

    PubMed Central

    Pardoll, Drew

    2016-01-01

    We in the cancer immunology and immunotherapy community are thrilled that Science named “Cancer immunotherapy” as 2013’s Breakthrough of the Year (J. Couzin-Frankel, 20 December 2013, p. 1432). The rapid succession of clinical successes by blocking antibodies to two immune checkpoints, CTLA-4 and PD-1, and by chimeric antigen-receptor-transduced T cells, shows the power of basic immunology when translated to therapy. As such, I write to acknowledge some of the key scientists whose basic discoveries paved the way for the clinical successes outlined in the Breakthrough issue. PMID:24723594

  17. Oral Immunotherapy for Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Burbank, Allison J; Sood, Puja; Vickery, Brian P; Wood, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Food allergy is a potentially life-threatening condition with no approved therapies, apart from avoidance and injectable epinephrine for acute allergic reactions. Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is an experimental treatment in which food-allergic patients consume gradually increasing quantities of the food to increase their threshold for allergic reaction. This therapy carries significant risk of allergic reactions. The ability of OIT to desensitize patients to particular foods is well-documented, although the ability to induce tolerance has not been established. This review focuses on recent studies for the treatment of food allergies such as cow's milk, hen's egg, and peanut. PMID:26617227

  18. Lipid A and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ribi, E; Cantrell, J L; Takayama, K; Qureshi, N; Peterson, J; Ribi, H O

    1984-01-01

    Endotoxin isolated from Re mutants of Salmonella typhimurium or Salmonella minnesota and consisting only of 3-deoxy-D-mannooctulosonic acid (KDO) and lipid A synergistically enhances the ability of mycobacterial cell wall skeleton (CWS) to regress transplantable, line-10 tumor (hepatocellular carcinoma) in syngeneic guinea pigs. Tumor regression is rapid, and systemic tumor immunity concomitantly develops when as little as 50 micrograms of each of these two components is combined and injected intralesionally. Selective removal of KDO from endotoxin yields diphosphoryl lipid A, which retains its toxic properties. Subsequent selective removal of the phosphate moiety at the reducing end of the diphosphoryl lipid A molecule yields nontoxic, monophosphoryl lipid A (determined by lethality for chick embryos). Like the parent endotoxin or toxic diphosphoryl lipid A, monophosphoryl lipid A retains the ability to synergistically enhance the antitumor activity of mycobacterial CWS adjuvant. Both di- and monophosphoryl lipid A contain mixtures of a series of structural analogs. They can be separated chromatographically into single components that differ in number, type, and position of ester-linked fatty acids. Comparison of chromatographic fractions reveals that components of toxic and nontoxic lipid A can be paired according to structure. Each component of the pair has the same molecular structure, with the exception of an additional phosphate group in the toxic component. The toxicity of "lipid A's" liberated from endotoxin by acid hydrolysis appears to be determined by the proportion of di- and monophosphoryl lipid A in the hydrolysis mixture. Structural analogs of monophosphoryl lipid A, which differ in degree of O-acylation and type and distribution of fatty acids, have comparable antitumor activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6382555

  19. Novel Delivery Routes for Allergy Immunotherapy: Intralymphatic, Epicutaneous, and Intradermal.

    PubMed

    Senti, Gabriela; Kndig, Thomas M

    2016-02-01

    Current allergy immunotherapy protocols suffer from two main problems: long treatment duration and systemic allergic side effects of the allergen administrations. The immunologic effects of allergen administration could be enhanced and the number of allergen administrations and treatment duration reduced by choosing a tissue for administration that contains a high density of antigen-presenting cells. Local side effects could be reduced by choosing a route characterized by a low density of mast cells, and systemic side effects could be reduced by administration to nonvascularized tissues, so that inadvertent systemic distribution of the allergen and consequent systemic allergic side effects are minimized. PMID:26617225

  20. Adoptive immunotherapy against ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mittica, Gloria; Capellero, Sonia; Genta, Sofia; Cagnazzo, Celeste; Aglietta, Massimo; Sangiolo, Dario; Valabrega, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The standard front-line therapy for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is combination of debulking surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Nevertheless, the majority of patients experience disease recurrence. Although extensive efforts to find new therapeutic options, cancer cells invariably develop drug resistance and disease progression. New therapeutic strategies are needed to improve prognosis of patients with advanced EOC.Recently, several preclinical and clinical studies investigated feasibility and activity of adoptive immunotherapy in EOC. Our aim is to highlight prospective of adoptive immunotherapy in EOC, focusing on HLA-restricted Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs), and MHC-independent immune effectors such as natural killer (NK), and cytokine-induced killer (CIK). Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) has shown activity in several pre-clinical models. Available preclinical and clinical data suggest that adoptive cell therapy may provide the best benefit in settings of low tumor burden, minimal residual disease, or maintenance therapy. Further studies are needed to better define the optimal clinical setting. PMID:27188274

  1. Immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Dolores A; Hess, Rosemary C; Weiss, Mark A

    2015-08-15

    Despite the remarkable progress made in some leukemias such as CML and CLL, cytotoxic treatment for AML remains essentially unchanged over the last 4 decades. Several lines of evidence, including the graft versus leukemia effect associated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), suggest that immunotherapy is an active modality in AML. Given the lack of progress for chemotherapy in this disease, many novel immunologic treatment approaches have been explored. The goals of non-transplant-based immune approaches have largely consisted of the stimulation or restoration of endogenous immune responses or the targeting of specific tumor antigens by immune cells. These strategies have been associated with less toxicity than allogeneic HSCT but typically have inferior efficacy. Allogeneic HSCT exploits major and minor histocompatibility differences between the donor and recipient in order to recognize and eradicate malignancy. With the recognition that the immune system itself provides a basis for treating AML, immunotherapy continues to be an attractive modality to exploit in the treatment of this disease. PMID:26095886

  2. Novel immunotherapies for hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michelle H.; Paulos, Chrystal M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The immune system is designed to discriminate between self and tumor tissue. Through genetic recombination, there is fundamentally no limit to the number of tumor antigens that immune cells can recognize. Yet, tumors use a variety of immunosuppressive mechanisms to evade immunity. Insight into how the immune system interacts with tumors is expanding rapidly and has accelerated the translation of immunotherapies into medical breakthroughs. Herein, we appraise the state of the art in immunotherapy with a focus on strategies that exploit the patient’s immune system to kill cancer. We review various forms of immune-based therapies, which have shown significant promise in patients with hematological malignancies, including (i) conventional monoclonal therapies like rituximab, (ii) engineered monoclonal antibodies called bispecific T cell engagers (BiTEs), (iii) monoclonal antibodies and pharmaceutical drugs that block inhibitory T-cell pathways (i.e. PD-1, CTLA-4 and IDO), and (iv) adoptive cell transfer (ACT) therapy with T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or T-cell receptors (TCRs). We also assess the idea of using these therapies in combination and conclude by suggesting multi-prong approaches to improve treatment outcomes and curative responses in patients. PMID:25510273

  3. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities. PMID:26486534

  4. Potentiality of immunotherapy against hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Nobuhiro; Sawada, Yu; Endo, Itaru; Uemura, Yasushi; Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the predominant form of primary liver cancer, is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Despite the high incidence, treatment options remain limited for advanced HCC, and as a result prognosis continues to be poor. Current therapeutic options, surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, have only modest efficacy. New treatment modalities to prolong survival and to minimize the risk of adverse response are desperately needed for patients with advanced HCC. Tumor immunotherapy is a promising, novel treatment strategy that may lead to improvements in both treatment-associated toxicity and outcome. The strategies have developed in part through genomic studies that have yielded candidate target molecules and in part through basic biology studies that have defined the pathways and cell types regulating immune response. Here, we summarize the various types of HCC immunotherapy and argue that the newfound field of HCC immunotherapy might provide critical advantages in the effort to improve prognosis of patients with advanced HCC. Already several immunotherapies, such as tumor-associated antigen therapy, immune checkpoint inhibitors and cell transfer immunotherapy, have demonstrated safety and feasibility in HCC patients. Unfortunately, immunotherapy currently has low efficacy in advanced stage HCC patients; overcoming this challenge will place immunotherapy at the forefront of HCC treatment, possibly in the near future. PMID:26420958

  5. Immunotherapy of Metastases Enhances Subsequent Chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Michael G.; Key, Marc E.

    1982-07-01

    In many multimodal therapies of cancer, postsurgical chemotherapy is administered before immunotherapy for treatment of micrometastatic disease. This sequence may not be the most efficacious. Experiments in which strain 2 guinea pigs bearing syngeneic L10 hepatocarcinomas were given immunotherapy showed that infiltrating immune effector cells not only were tumoricidal but disrupted the characteristically compact structure of metastatic foci. When cytotoxic drugs were administered at the peak of this inflammatory response, the survival rate of the guinea pigs increased significantly. We conclude that postsurgical immunotherapy can enhance the effect of cytotoxic drugs administered subsequently.

  6. DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guizhi; Liu, Yijing; Yang, Xiangyu; Kim, Young-Hwa; Zhang, Huimin; Jia, Rui; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Jin, Albert; Lin, Jing; Aronova, Maria; Leapman, Richard; Nie, Zhihong; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-03-01

    Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit cancer development. Unmethylated CpG dinucleotide-containing oligonucleotides (CpG), a class of potent adjuvants that activate the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) located in the endolysosome of many antigen-presenting cells (APCs), are promising for cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of synthetic CpG confronts many challenges such as suboptimal delivery into APCs, unfavorable pharmacokinetics caused by limited biostability and short in vivo half-life, and side effects associated with leaking of CpG into the systemic circulation. Here we present DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccines (hNVs) for efficient uptake into APCs, prolonged tumor retention, and potent immunostimulation and cancer immunotherapy. hNVs were self-assembled from concatemer CpG analogs and magnesium pyrophosphate (Mg2PPi). Mg2PPi renders hNVs resistant to nuclease degradation and thermal denaturation, both of which are demanding characteristics for effective vaccination and the storage and transportation of vaccines. Fluorophore-labeled hNVs were tracked to be efficiently internalized into the endolysosomes of APCs, where Mg2PPi was dissolved in an acidic environment and thus CpG analogs were exposed to hNVs. Internalized hNVs in APCs led to (1) elevated secretion of proinflammatory factors, and (2) elevated expression of co-stimulatory factors. Compared with molecular CpG, hNVs dramatically prolonged the tissue retention of CpG analogs and reduced splenomegaly, a common side effect of CpG. In a melanoma mouse model, two injections of hNVs significantly inhibited the tumor growth and outperformed the molecular CpG. These results suggest hNVs are promising for cancer immunotherapy.Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit cancer development. Unmethylated CpG dinucleotide-containing oligonucleotides (CpG), a class of potent adjuvants that activate the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) located in the endolysosome of many antigen-presenting cells (APCs), are promising for cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of synthetic CpG confronts many challenges such as suboptimal delivery into APCs, unfavorable pharmacokinetics caused by limited biostability and short in vivo half-life, and side effects associated with leaking of CpG into the systemic circulation. Here we present DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccines (hNVs) for efficient uptake into APCs, prolonged tumor retention, and potent immunostimulation and cancer immunotherapy. hNVs were self-assembled from concatemer CpG analogs and magnesium pyrophosphate (Mg2PPi). Mg2PPi renders hNVs resistant to nuclease degradation and thermal denaturation, both of which are demanding characteristics for effective vaccination and the storage and transportation of vaccines. Fluorophore-labeled hNVs were tracked to be efficiently internalized into the endolysosomes of APCs, where Mg2PPi was dissolved in an acidic environment and thus CpG analogs were exposed to hNVs. Internalized hNVs in APCs led to (1) elevated secretion of proinflammatory factors, and (2) elevated expression of co-stimulatory factors. Compared with molecular CpG, hNVs dramatically prolonged the tissue retention of CpG analogs and reduced splenomegaly, a common side effect of CpG. In a melanoma mouse model, two injections of hNVs significantly inhibited the tumor growth and outperformed the molecular CpG. These results suggest hNVs are promising for cancer immunotherapy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: ESI materials and methods, characterization of hNVs. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08821f

  7. DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guizhi; Liu, Yijing; Yang, Xiangyu; Kim, Young-Hwa; Zhang, Huimin; Jia, Rui; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Jin, Albert; Lin, Jing; Aronova, Maria; Leapman, Richard; Nie, Zhihong; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-03-17

    Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit cancer development. Unmethylated CpG dinucleotide-containing oligonucleotides (CpG), a class of potent adjuvants that activate the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) located in the endolysosome of many antigen-presenting cells (APCs), are promising for cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of synthetic CpG confronts many challenges such as suboptimal delivery into APCs, unfavorable pharmacokinetics caused by limited biostability and short in vivo half-life, and side effects associated with leaking of CpG into the systemic circulation. Here we present DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccines (hNVs) for efficient uptake into APCs, prolonged tumor retention, and potent immunostimulation and cancer immunotherapy. hNVs were self-assembled from concatemer CpG analogs and magnesium pyrophosphate (Mg2PPi). Mg2PPi renders hNVs resistant to nuclease degradation and thermal denaturation, both of which are demanding characteristics for effective vaccination and the storage and transportation of vaccines. Fluorophore-labeled hNVs were tracked to be efficiently internalized into the endolysosomes of APCs, where Mg2PPi was dissolved in an acidic environment and thus CpG analogs were exposed to hNVs. Internalized hNVs in APCs led to (1) elevated secretion of proinflammatory factors, and (2) elevated expression of co-stimulatory factors. Compared with molecular CpG, hNVs dramatically prolonged the tissue retention of CpG analogs and reduced splenomegaly, a common side effect of CpG. In a melanoma mouse model, two injections of hNVs significantly inhibited the tumor growth and outperformed the molecular CpG. These results suggest hNVs are promising for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26947116

  8. Immunotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... chemotherapy As a single agent Cancer and the Immune System The body’s immune system helps protect us against disease and infection. It ... the antigens. In most circumstances, the body's natural immune system seems unable to identify cancer as a foreign ...

  9. Advances in immunotherapy for melanoma.

    PubMed

    Redman, Jason M; Gibney, Geoffrey T; Atkins, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the introduction and Federal Drug Administration approval of immune checkpoint inhibitor antibodies has dramatically improved the clinical outcomes for patients with advanced melanoma. These antagonist monoclonal antibodies are capable of unleashing dormant or exhausted antitumor immunity, which has led to durable complete and partial responses in a large number of patients. Ipilimumab targets the cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) receptor. Nivolumab and pembrolizumab target programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) receptors and have proven to be superior to ipilimumab alone. The combination of ipilimumab and nivolumab has yielded higher response rates, greater tumor shrinkage, and longer progression-free survival than either monotherapy alone. As other promising immunotherapies for melanoma proceed through clinical trials, future goals include defining the role of immune checkpoint inhibitors as adjuvant therapy, identifying optimal combination strategies, and developing reliable predictive biomarkers to guide treatment selection for individual patients. PMID:26850630

  10. Dendritic cell immunotherapy: clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Pietersz, Geoffrey A; Tsibanis, Anastasios; Tsikkinis, Annivas; Stojanovska, Lily; McKenzie, Ian FC; Vassilaros, Stamatis

    2014-01-01

    The use of tumour-associated antigens for cancer immunotherapy studies is exacerbated by tolerance to these self-antigens. Tolerance may be broken by using ex vivo monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with self-antigens. Targeting tumour-associated antigens directly to DCs in vivo is an alternative and simpler strategy. The identification of cell surface receptors on DCs, and targeting antigens to DC receptors, has become a popular approach for inducing effective immune responses against cancer antigens. Many years ago, we demonstrated that targeting the mannose receptor on macrophages using the carbohydrate mannan to DCs led to appropriate immune responses and tumour protection in animal models. We conducted Phase I, I/II and II, clinical trials demonstrating the effectiveness of oxidised mannan-MUC1 in patients with adenocarcinomas. Here we summarise DC targeting approaches and their efficacy in human clinical trials. PMID:25505969

  11. Cancer immunotherapy comes of age

    PubMed Central

    Mellman, Ira; Coukos, George; Dranoff, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Activating the immune system for therapeutic benefit in cancer has long been a dream of some immunologists, and even a few oncologists. After decades of disappointment, the tide has finally changed due to the success of recent proof-of-concept clinical trials. Most notable has been the ability of the anti-CTLA4 antibody ipilimumab to achieve significant increases in survival of patients with metastatic melanoma, an indication where conventional therapies have failed. Viewed in the context of advances in understanding of how tolerance, immunity, and immunosuppression regulate anti-tumor immune responses together with the advent of targeted therapies, these successes suggest that active immunotherapy represents a path forward to obtaining durable, long-lasting responses in cancer patients. PMID:22193102

  12. [Current immunotherapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Paul, F; Ruprecht, K

    2015-08-01

    Following the introduction of interferon beta 1b as the first immunomodulatory therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS) in 1993, there are currently nine substances or substance classes approved for the treatment of MS (i.e. alemtuzumab, azathioprine, dimethyl fumarate, fingolimod, glatiramer acetate, interferon beta, mitoxantrone, natalizumab and teriflunomide). Major developments during the last 5 years include the approval of orally administered medications (i.e. fingolimod, teriflunomide and dimethyl fumarate), a monoclonal antibody (alemtuzumab), as well as glatiramer acetate with an administration frequency three times a week and a pegylated formulation of interferon beta 1a. The broadened therapeutic options enable a more differentiated and individualized therapy of MS; however, evidence-based data for therapeutic decision-making relevant in clinical practice are not always available. Rare but potentially severe and even life-threatening side effects of immunotherapies for MS require continuous pharmacovigilance and adherence to risk management plans. PMID:26253589

  13. De-Risking Immunotherapy: Report of a Consensus Workshop of the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute.

    PubMed

    Mellman, Ira; Hubbard-Lucey, Vanessa M; Tontonoz, Matthew J; Kalos, Michael D; Chen, Daniel S; Allison, James P; Drake, Charles G; Levitsky, Hy; Lonberg, Nils; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Fearon, Douglas T; Wherry, E John; Lowy, Israel; Vonderheide, Robert H; Hwu, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    With the recent FDA approvals of pembrolizumab and nivolumab, and a host of additional immunomodulatory agents entering clinical development each year, the field of cancer immunotherapy is changing rapidly. Strategies that can assist researchers in choosing the most promising drugs and drug combinations to move forward through clinical development are badly needed in order to reduce the likelihood of late-stage clinical trial failures. On October 5, 2014, the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute, a collaborative think tank composed of stakeholders from academia, industry, regulatory agencies, and patient interest groups, met to discuss strategies for de-risking immunotherapy development, with a focus on integrating preclinical and clinical studies, and conducting smarter early-phase trials, particularly for combination therapies. Several recommendations were made, including making better use of clinical data to inform preclinical research, obtaining adequate tissues for biomarker studies, and choosing appropriate clinical trial endpoints to identify promising drug candidates and combinations in nonrandomized early-phase trials.Cancer Immunol Res; 4(4); 279-88. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27036972

  14. Immune checkpoints and immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Preet Paul; Sharma, Piyush K; Krishnan, Gayathri; Lockhart, A Craig

    2015-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the major causes of death worldwide, despite steady improvement in early detection and overall survival over the past decade. Current treatment paradigms, with chemotherapy and biologics, appear to have reached their maximum benefit. Immunotherapy, especially with checkpoint inhibitors, has shown considerable clinical benefit in various cancers, including mismatch-repair-deficient CRC. This has led to the planning and initiation of several clinical trials evaluating novel immunotherapy agents-as single agents, combinations and in conjunction with chemotherapy-in patients with CRC. This article reviews biological and preclinical data for checkpoint inhibitors and discusses various immunotherapy trials in CRC, as well as current efforts in CRC immunotherapy. PMID:26510455

  15. Who Will Benefit from Cancer Immunotherapy?

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified a “genetic signature” in the tumors of patients with advanced melanoma who responded to a form of immunotherapy called checkpoint blockade. The results could be the basis for a test that identifies likely responders.

  16. Grass pollen immunotherapy: where are we now.

    PubMed

    Würtzen, Peter A; Gupta, Shashank; Brand, Stephanie; Andersen, Peter S

    2016-04-01

    During allergen immunotherapy (AIT), the allergic patient is exposed to the disease-inducing antigens (allergens) in order to induce clinical and immunological tolerance and obtain disease modification. Large trials of grass AIT with highly standardized subcutaneous and sublingual tablet vaccines have been conducted to document the clinical effect. Induction of blocking antibodies as well as changes in the balance between T-cell phenotypes, including induction of regulatory T-cell subtypes, have been demonstrated for both treatment types. These observations increase the understanding of the immunological mechanism behind the clinical effect and may make it possible to use the immunological changes as biomarkers of clinical effect. The current review describes the recent mechanistic findings for subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy/tablet treatment and discusses how the observed immunological changes translate into a scientific foundation for the observed clinical effects of grass pollen immunotherapy and lead to new treatment strategies for grass AIT. PMID:26973122

  17. Immune checkpoints and immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Preet Paul; Sharma, Piyush K.; Krishnan, Gayathri; Lockhart, A. Craig

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the major causes of death worldwide, despite steady improvement in early detection and overall survival over the past decade. Current treatment paradigms, with chemotherapy and biologics, appear to have reached their maximum benefit. Immunotherapy, especially with checkpoint inhibitors, has shown considerable clinical benefit in various cancers, including mismatch-repair-deficient CRC. This has led to the planning and initiation of several clinical trials evaluating novel immunotherapy agents—as single agents, combinations and in conjunction with chemotherapy—in patients with CRC. This article reviews biological and preclinical data for checkpoint inhibitors and discusses various immunotherapy trials in CRC, as well as current efforts in CRC immunotherapy. PMID:26510455

  18. Immunotherapy: Disrupting the Cancer Treatment World

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACS » + - Text Size Immunotherapy: Disrupting the Cancer Treatment World By Elizabeth Mendes June 16, 2014 This story ... of cancer research in depth. The cancer research world is dedicating increasing energy to a rapidly evolving ...

  19. Defining the critical hurdles in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Scientific discoveries that provide strong evidence of antitumor effects in preclinical models often encounter significant delays before being tested in patients with cancer. While some of these delays have a scientific basis, others do not. We need to do better. Innovative strategies need to move into early stage clinical trials as quickly as it is safe, and if successful, these therapies should efficiently obtain regulatory approval and widespread clinical application. In late 2009 and 2010 the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC), convened an "Immunotherapy Summit" with representatives from immunotherapy organizations representing Europe, Japan, China and North America to discuss collaborations to improve development and delivery of cancer immunotherapy. One of the concepts raised by SITC and defined as critical by all parties was the need to identify hurdles that impede effective translation of cancer immunotherapy. With consensus on these hurdles, international working groups could be developed to make recommendations vetted by the participating organizations. These recommendations could then be considered by regulatory bodies, governmental and private funding agencies, pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions to facilitate changes necessary to accelerate clinical translation of novel immune-based cancer therapies. The critical hurdles identified by representatives of the collaborating organizations, now organized as the World Immunotherapy Council, are presented and discussed in this report. Some of the identified hurdles impede all investigators; others hinder investigators only in certain regions or institutions or are more relevant to specific types of immunotherapy or first-in-humans studies. Each of these hurdles can significantly delay clinical translation of promising advances in immunotherapy yet if overcome, have the potential to improve outcomes of patients with cancer. PMID:22168571

  20. Cancer Immunotherapy: A Treatment for the Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattman, Joseph N.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2004-07-01

    Cancer immunotherapy attempts to harness the exquisite power and specificity of the immune system for the treatment of malignancy. Although cancer cells are less immunogenic than pathogens, the immune system is clearly capable of recognizing and eliminating tumor cells. However, tumors frequently interfere with the development and function of immune responses. Thus, the challenge for immunotherapy is to use advances in cellular and molecular immunology to develop strategies that effectively and safely augment antitumor responses.

  1. Advances in immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer: 2013.

    PubMed

    DeVito, Nicholas C; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the more difficult malignancies to treat, and there is a great need for less toxic, effective regimens. Immunotherapy has shown potential in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, and at ASCO 2013 there were several progressive advances in its clinical application. Abstracts #3067, #3049, #3007, #4040, #LBA4004, and #3090 will be discussed. New developments in the field of immunotherapy are promising novel treatments for pancreatic neoplasms with tolerable side effect profiles. PMID:23846925

  2. Mannan-mediated gene delivery for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Choon K; Lodding, Jodie; Minigo, Gabriela; Pouniotis, Dodie S; Plebanski, Magdalena; Scholzen, Anja; McKenzie, Ian F C; Pietersz, Geoffrey A; Apostolopoulos, Vasso

    2007-01-01

    Recent years have seen a resurgence in interest in the development of efficient non-viral delivery systems for DNA vaccines and gene therapy. We have previously used oxidized and reduced mannan as carriers for protein delivery to antigen-presenting cells by targeting the receptors that bind mannose, resulting in efficient induction of cellular responses. In the present study, oxidized mannan and reduced mannan were used as receptor-mediated gene transfer ligands for cancer immunotherapy. In vivo studies in C57BL/6 mice showed that injection of DNA encoding ovalbumin (OVA) complexed to oxidized or reduced mannan-poly-L-lysine induced CD8 and CD4 T-cell responses as well as antibody responses leading to protection of mice from OVA+ tumours. Both oxidized and reduced mannan delivery was superior to DNA alone or DNA-poly-L-lysine. These studies demonstrate the potential of oxidized and reduced mannan for efficient receptor-mediated gene delivery in vivo, particularly as DNA vaccines for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:17328786

  3. Cancer immunotherapy out of the gate: the 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute International Immunotherapy Symposium.

    PubMed

    Tontonoz, Matthew; Gee, Connie E

    2015-05-01

    The 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute (CRI) International Immunotherapy Symposium was held from October 5-8, 2014, in New York City. Titled "Cancer Immunotherapy: Out of the Gate," the symposium began with a Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium satellite meeting focused on issues in immunotherapy drug development, followed by five speaker sessions and a poster session devoted to basic and clinical cancer immunology research. The second annual William B. Coley lecture was delivered by Lieping Chen, one of the four recipients of the 2014 William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Tumor Immunology; the other three recipients were Gordon Freeman, Tasuku Honjo, and Arlene Sharpe. Prominent themes of the conference were the use of genomic technologies to identify neoantigens and the emergence of new immune modulatory molecules, beyond CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1, as new therapeutic targets for immunotherapy. PMID:25941356

  4. Clinical and Immunological Changes of Immunotherapy in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez Caraballo, Jorge Mario; Cardona Villa, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Immunotherapy has proven to be an useful tool in the management of allergic respiratory diseases; however, little has been studied in atopic dermatitis. Objective. To evaluate the clinical and immunological impact of immunotherapy with mites allergen extracts in atopic dermatitis. Methods. Patients with atopic dermatitis were assigned with computer-generated randomization to either of the following groups: (a) controls received only topical treatment with steroids and/or tacrolimus and (b) actively treated patients received topical treatment plus immunotherapy. Levels of serum total IgE, mites-specific IgE and IgG4 were assessed at study start and after one year of immunotherapy. Results. 31 patients in the active group and 29 in the control group completed the study. Symptoms and medication scores were significantly reduced in the active group after six months. Three patients in the control group showed new sensitizations to mites, while 3 patients in the active group showed neosensitization to shrimp with negative oral food challenge. We observed significant increase of mites-specific IgG4 levels in active group. Conclusion. Specific allergen immunotherapy induced a tolerogenic IgG4 response to mite allergens associated with favorable clinical effects in atopic dermatitis patients. PMID:23724240

  5. Synthetic biology in cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Deboki; Wong, Wilson W

    2015-08-01

    The adoptive transfer of genetically engineered T cells with cancer-targeting receptors has shown tremendous promise for eradicating tumors in clinical trials. This form of cellular immunotherapy presents a unique opportunity to incorporate advanced systems and synthetic biology approaches to create cancer therapeutics with novel functions. We first review the development of synthetic receptors, switches, and circuits to control the location, duration, and strength of T cell activity against tumors. In addition, we discuss the cellular engineering and genome editing of host cells (or the chassis) to improve the efficacy of cell-based cancer therapeutics, and to reduce the time and cost of manufacturing. PMID:26088008

  6. Immunotherapy in Sarcoma: Future Horizons.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Melissa; Gorantla, Vikram; Weiss, Kurt; Tawbi, Hussein

    2015-11-01

    Immunologic approaches to cancer are over a century old. Over the years, the strategy has been fine-tuned from inciting infections in subjects to inhibiting negative regulatory signals from the innate immune system. Sarcomas are among the first tumors to be considered for immune interventions. From Coley's toxin to cytokine-based therapies to adoptive cell therapy, there have been numerous immunotherapeutic investigations in this patient population. A promising strategy includes adoptive T cell therapy which has been studied in small cohorts of synovial sarcoma, a subtype that is known to widely express the cancer testis antigen, NY-ESO-1. Additionally, recent data in metastatic melanoma and renal cell carcinoma demonstrate the utility and tremendous efficacy of immune checkpoint blockade with increased rates of durable responses compared to standard therapies. Responses in traditionally "non-immunogenic" tumors, such as lung and bladder cancers, provide ample rationale for the study of immune checkpoint inhibitors in sarcoma. While immunotherapy has induced some responses in sarcomas, further research will help clarify optimal patient selection for future clinical trials and new combinatorial immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26423769

  7. International consensus on allergy immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Marek; Agache, Ioana; Bonini, Sergio; Burks, A Wesley; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, Walter; Cox, Linda; Demoly, Pascal; Frew, Antony J; O'Hehir, Robin; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Muraro, Antonella; Lack, Gideon; Larenas, Désirée; Levin, Michael; Nelson, Harald; Pawankar, Ruby; Pfaar, Oliver; van Ree, Ronald; Sampson, Hugh; Santos, Alexandra F; Du Toit, George; Werfel, Thomas; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Zhang, Luo; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2015-09-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been used to treat allergic disease since the early 1900s. Despite numerous clinical trials and meta-analyses proving AIT efficacious, it remains underused and is estimated to be used in less than 10% of patients with allergic rhinitis or asthma worldwide. In addition, there are large differences between regions, which are not only due to socioeconomic status. There is practically no controversy about the use of AIT in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma, but for atopic dermatitis or food allergy, the indications for AIT are not well defined. The elaboration of a wider consensus is of utmost importance because AIT is the only treatment that can change the course of allergic disease by preventing the development of asthma and new allergen sensitizations and by inducing allergen-specific immune tolerance. Safer and more effective AIT strategies are being continuously developed both through elaboration of new allergen preparations and adjuvants and alternate routes of administration. A number of guidelines, consensus documents, or both are available on both the international and national levels. The international community of allergy specialists recognizes the need to develop a comprehensive consensus report to harmonize, disseminate, and implement the best AIT practice. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology, formed by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology; the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; and the World Allergy Organization, has decided to issue an international consensus on AIT. PMID:26162571

  8. Checkpoint blockade in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Korman, Alan J; Peggs, Karl S; Allison, James P

    2006-01-01

    The progression of a productive immune response requires that a number of immunological checkpoints be passed. Passage may require the presence of excitatory costimulatory signals or the avoidance of negative or coinhibitory signals, which act to dampen or terminate immune activity. The immunoglobulin superfamily occupies a central importance in this coordination of immune responses, and the CD28/cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4):B7.1/B7.2 receptor/ligand grouping represents the archetypal example of these immune regulators. In part the role of these checkpoints is to guard against the possibility of unwanted and harmful self-directed activities. While this is a necessary function, aiding in the prevention of autoimmunity, it may act as a barrier to successful immunotherapies aimed at targeting malignant self-cells that largely display the same array of surface molecules as the cells from which they derive. Therapies aimed at overcoming these mechanisms of peripheral tolerance, in particular by blocking the inhibitory checkpoints, offer the potential to generate antitumor activity, either as monotherapies or in synergism with other therapies that directly or indirectly enhance presentation of tumor epitopes to the immune system. Such immunological molecular adjuvants are showing promise in early clinical trials. This review focuses on the results of the archetypal example of checkpoint blockade, anti-CTLA-4, in preclinical tumor models and clinical trials, while also highlighting other possible targets for immunological checkpoint blockade. PMID:16730267

  9. Immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2005-09-01

    Immunotherapeutic strategies have become part of standard cancer treatment. Chimeric and humanized antibodies have demonstrated activity against a variety of tumors. Although the humanized anti-CD33 antibody HuM195 has only modest activity against overt acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it can eliminate minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia. High-dose radioimmunotherapy with b-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45, and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of antileukemic therapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conversely, a-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213 or actinium-225 offers the possibility of selective tumor cell kill while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Targeted chemotherapy with the anti-CD33- calicheamicin construct gemtuzumab ozogamicin has produced remissions in relapsed AML and appears promising when used in combination with standard chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. T-cell recognition of peptide antigens presented on the cell surface in combination with major histocompatibility complex antigen provides another potentially promising approach for the treatment of AML. PMID:16091194

  10. IgE-based Immunotherapy of Cancer -A Comparative Oncology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Josef; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-based immunotherapies are important therapy options in human oncology. Although human humoral specific immunity is constituted of five different immunoglobulin classes, currently only IgG-based immunotherapies have proceeded to clinical application. This review, however, discusses the benefits and difficulties of IgE-based immunotherapy of cancer, with special emphasis on how to translate promising preclinical results into clinical studies. Pursuing the “Comparative Oncology” approach, novel drug candidates are investigated in clinical trials with veterinary cancer patients, most often dogs. By this strategy drug development could be speeded up, animal experiments could be reduced and novel therapy options could be introduced benefitting humans as well as man’s best friend. PMID:25264496

  11. Improving clinical benefit for prostate cancer patients through the combination of androgen deprivation and immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kwilas, Anna R; Gameiro, Sofia R; Kim, Peter S; Malamas, Anthony S; Hodge, James W

    2015-01-01

    Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) induces prostate cancer immunogenic modulation (IM) by reducing human tumor cell expression of anti-apoptotic genes thus facilitating increased sensitivity to immune-mediated lysis. Through its stimulation of IM, ADT has been shown to synergize with active immunotherapy thereby significantly improving overall survival in a mouse model of prostate cancer. PMID:26155431

  12. Immune escape mechanisms as a guide for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Gregory L.; Gladney, Whitney L.

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapy has demonstrated impressive outcomes for some patients with cancer. However, selecting patients who are most likely to respond to immunotherapy remains a clinical challenge. Here, we discuss immune escape mechanisms exploited by cancer and present strategies for applying this knowledge to improving the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25501578

  13. Combinatorial immunotherapy strategies for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tagliamonte, Maria; Petrizzo, Annacarmen; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Buonaguro, Franco M; Buonaguro, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common liver malignancy. The prognosis for HCC patients greatly varies according to the stage at diagnosis. Overall it is poor, with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 5-6%. Immunotherapeutic interventions represent a novel and effective therapeutic tool. However, only few immunotherapy trials for HCC have been conducted so far with contrasting results, suggesting that significant improvements are needed. Indeed, the liver is characterized by a strong intrinsic immune suppressive microenvironment which needs to be counterbalanced with immune stimulatory approaches. Therefore, the implementation of combinatorial protocols combining immune stimulatory strategies with specific immunotherapy approaches could result in a dramatic improvement of efficacy and clinical outcome in HCC patients. The present review aims at describing the state of the art in immunotherapy strategies for HCC and future perspectives. PMID:26851637

  14. Cellular mucins: targets for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Apostolopoulos, V; McKenzie, I F

    1994-01-01

    Mucins are attracting great interest as potential targets for immunotherapy in the development of vaccines for cancers expressing Mucin 1 (MUC1) (e.g., breast, pancreas, ovary, and others) as there is (1) a 10-fold increase in the amount in adenocarcinomas; (2) an alteration in expression where they become ubiquitous, and (3) due to altered glycosylation, new epitopes appear on the cell surface that are absent in normal tissues. These new epitopes can be carbohydrate; others are peptide in nature. The cloning of the cDNAs from mucins, particularly MUC1, has led to rapid advances being made, and it is clear that a highly immunogenic peptide exists within the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) found in all mucins. This peptide is immunogenic in mice, giving rise to strong antibody production, and most monoclonal antibodies made to breast cancer, which react with the protein core, react with the peptide APDTR. It is now also clear that humans with breast cancer have, in their draining lymph nodes, precursors of cytotoxic T cells that can be stimulated in vitro to react against breast cancer and indeed against the APDTR or a closely related peptide--shown from antibody-blocking studies. These CTLs are unique in that they are non-MHC restricted. The identification of suitable targets, coupled with the known immunogenicity of both the peptide and neo-carbohydrate epitopes, has led to the development of several different programs to immunize humans against breast cancer using either synthetic carbohydrates or peptides conjugated with adjuvants, and clinical trials are now in progress to evaluate their immunogenicity and anti-cancer effects. PMID:7538768

  15. Practice parameters for sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ortolani, C; Agostinis, F; Amoroso, S; Ariano, R; Barbato, A; Bassi, M; Cadario, G; Campi, P; Cardinale, F; Ciprandi, G; D'Anneo, R; Di Gioacchino, M; Di Rienzo, V; Fiocchi, A; Galimberti, M; Galli, E; Giovannini, M; Incorvaia, C; La Grutta, S; Lombardi, C; Marcucci, F; Marseglia, G; Minelli, M; Musarra, A; Nettis, E; Novembre, E; Pajno, G; Patriarca, G; Pezzuto, F; Piras, P; Pucci, S; Romano, A; Romano, C; Quercia, O; Scala, G; Schiavino, D; Senna, G; Sforza, G; Tosca, M; Tripodi, S; Frati, F

    2006-03-01

    The efficacy and safety of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) are currently supported by clinical trials, meta-analysis and post-marketing surveys. Practice parameters for clinical use of SLIT are proposed here by a panel of Italian specialists, with reference to evidence based criteria. Indications to SLIT include allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, asthma, and isolated conjunctivitis (strength of recommendation: grade A). As to severity of the disease, SLIT is indicated in moderate/severe intermittent rhinitis, persistent rhinitis and mild to moderate asthma (grade D). SLIT may be safely prescribed also in children aged three to five years (grade B), and its use in subjects aged more than 60 years is not prevented when the indications and contraindication are ascertained (grade D). The choice of the allergen to be employed for SLIT should be made in accordance with the combination of clinical history and results of skin prick tests (grade D). Polysensitisation, i.e. the occurrence of multiple positive response does not exclude SLIT, which may be done with the clinically most important allergens (grade D). As to practical administration, co-seasonal, pre co-seasonal, and continuous schedules are available, being the latter recommended for perennial allergens or for pollens with particularly prolonged pollination, such as Parietaria (grade D). For pollens with relatively short pollination, such as grasses and trees (cypress, birch, alder, hazelnut, olive) the pre co-seasonal and perennial schedules are preferred (grade C). The build-up phases suggested by manufacturers can be safely used (grade A), but they can be modified according to the patient's tolerance (grade C). A duration of SLIT of 3-5 years is recommended to ensure a long-lasting clinical effect after the treatment has been terminated (grade C). PMID:16700194

  16. Strategies of mucosal immunotherapy for allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yi-Ling; Chuang, Ya-Hui; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2011-11-01

    Incidences of allergic disease have recently increased worldwide. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) has long been a controversial treatment for allergic diseases. Although beneficial effects on clinically relevant outcomes have been demonstrated in clinical trials by subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT), there remains a risk of severe and sometimes fatal anaphylaxis. Mucosal immunotherapy is one advantageous choice because of its non-injection routes of administration and lower side-effect profile. This study reviews recent progress in mucosal immunotherapy for allergic diseases. Administration routes, antigen quality and quantity, and adjuvants used are major considerations in this field. Also, direct uses of unique probiotics, or specific cytokines, have been discussed. Furthermore, some researchers have reported new therapeutic ideas that combine two or more strategies. The most important strategy for development of mucosal therapies for allergic diseases is the improvement of antigen formulation, which includes continuous searching for efficient adjuvants, collecting more information about dominant T-cell epitopes of allergens, and having the proper combination of each. In clinics, when compared to other mucosal routes, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is a preferred choice for therapeutic administration, although local and systemic side effects have been reported. Additionally, not every allergen has the same beneficial effect. Further studies are needed to determine the benefits of mucosal immunotherapy for different allergic diseases after comparison of the different administration routes in children and adults. Data collected from large, well-designed, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and randomized trials, with post-treatment follow-up, can provide robust substantiation of current evidence. PMID:21666705

  17. Emerging Opportunities and Challenges in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Theresa L; Demaria, Sandra; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Maria E; Zarour, Hassane M; Melero, Ignacio

    2016-04-15

    Immunotherapy strategies against cancer are emerging as powerful weapons for treatment of this disease. The success of checkpoint inhibitors against metastatic melanoma and adoptive T-cell therapy with chimeric antigen receptor T cells against B-cell-derived leukemias and lymphomas are only two examples of developments that are changing the paradigms of clinical cancer management. These changes are a result of many years of intense research into complex and interrelated cellular and molecular mechanisms controling immune responses. Promising advances come from the discovery of cancer mutation-encoded neoantigens, improvements in vaccine development, progress in delivery of cellular therapies, and impressive achievements in biotechnology. As a result, radical transformation of cancer treatment is taking place in which conventional cancer treatments are being integrated with immunotherapeutic agents. Many clinical trials are in progress testing potential synergistic effects of treatments combining immunotherapy with other therapies. Much remains to be learned about the selection, delivery, and off-target effects of immunotherapy used alone or in combination. The existence of numerous escape mechanisms from the host immune system that human tumors have evolved still is a barrier to success. Efforts to understand the rules of immune cell dysfunction and of cancer-associated local and systemic immune suppression are providing new insights and fuel the enthusiasm for new therapeutic strategies. In the future, it might be possible to tailor immune therapy for each cancer patient. The use of new immune biomarkers and the ability to assess responses to therapy by noninvasive monitoring promise to improve early cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Personalized immunotherapy based on individual genetic, molecular, and immune profiling is a potentially achievable future goal. The current excitement for immunotherapy is justified in view of many existing opportunities for harnessing the immune system to treat cancer.Clin Cancer Res; 22(8); 1845-55. ©2016 AACR SEE ALL ARTICLES IN THIS CCR FOCUS SECTION, "OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES IN CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY". PMID:27084738

  18. Strategies of mucosal immunotherapy for allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yi-Ling; Chuang, Ya-Hui; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2011-01-01

    Incidences of allergic disease have recently increased worldwide. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) has long been a controversial treatment for allergic diseases. Although beneficial effects on clinically relevant outcomes have been demonstrated in clinical trials by subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT), there remains a risk of severe and sometimes fatal anaphylaxis. Mucosal immunotherapy is one advantageous choice because of its non-injection routes of administration and lower side-effect profile. This study reviews recent progress in mucosal immunotherapy for allergic diseases. Administration routes, antigen quality and quantity, and adjuvants used are major considerations in this field. Also, direct uses of unique probiotics, or specific cytokines, have been discussed. Furthermore, some researchers have reported new therapeutic ideas that combine two or more strategies. The most important strategy for development of mucosal therapies for allergic diseases is the improvement of antigen formulation, which includes continuous searching for efficient adjuvants, collecting more information about dominant T-cell epitopes of allergens, and having the proper combination of each. In clinics, when compared to other mucosal routes, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is a preferred choice for therapeutic administration, although local and systemic side effects have been reported. Additionally, not every allergen has the same beneficial effect. Further studies are needed to determine the benefits of mucosal immunotherapy for different allergic diseases after comparison of the different administration routes in children and adults. Data collected from large, well-designed, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and randomized trials, with post-treatment follow-up, can provide robust substantiation of current evidence. PMID:21666705

  19. Bacillus Calmette-Gurin immunotherapy for genitourinary cancer.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Nilay M; Morales, Alvaro; Lamm, Donald L

    2013-08-01

    WHAT'S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: The administration of Bacillus Calmette-Gurin (BCG) immunotherapy has become the standard of care for high-grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and carcinoma in-situ (CIS) in terms of prevention of recurrence and progression. While most agree on a 6 week induction cycle, various maintenance schedules (if any at all) have been implemented without a unifying consensus. This review assesses the historical emergence of BCG immunotherapy, beginning with its discovery as a vaccinatin for tuberculosis to its effect on the host immune system and potential therapeutic benefits for various oncologic conditions. The data establishing BCG immunotherapy as the standard of care for high-grade NMIBC and CIS over other bladder instillation modalities is presented in addition to the effect maintenance BCG therapy has on sustaining the immuno-protective effect. Bacillus Calmette-Gurin (BCG) immunotherapy is currently the most effective treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer and one of the most successful applications of immunotherapy to the treatment of cancer. This review summarises the history and development of BCG as a modern cancer treatment, appraises current optimal application of BCG immunotherapy in bladder cancer, discusses promising new therapies closely related to BCG, and briefly explores the possibility that BCG or related treatments may have an application in other urological malignancies. BCG is a nonspecific stimulant to the reticuloendothelial system and induces a local inflammatory response with the infiltration of granulocytes followed by macrophages and lymphocytes, particularly helper T cells. The initial BCG controlled trial showed a statistically significant reduction in tumour recurrence and found the advantage increased with duration of follow-up. Similar results were reported in much higher risk patients in an independent concurrent study. Follow-up suggested that a single 6-week course of intravesical BCG provided long-term protection (up to 10 years) from tumour recurrence and even reduced disease progression. While induction BCG (six weekly instillations) reduced recurrence, progression and mortality at 10 years, this advantage was lost by 15 years, and patients remained at high risk for progression without the use of maintenance BCG. In a meta-analysis by the Cochrane group, induction BCG was found to be markedly superior to mitomycin C in high-risk patients but not in low-risk patients. Additionally, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines lists the use of intravesical BCG as preferred therapy, citing Category 1 data for high-grade Ta, all T1, and any Tis tumours. Maintenance BCG therapy may be the most important advance in BCG treatment of bladder cancer since the initial introduction. The risk of tumour recurrence and disease progression is life-long in most patients, but the immune stimulation induced by BCG wanes with time. Logarithmic dose reduction of BCG in patients with increasing side-effects will typically prevent escalation of toxicity. Simple dose reduction, appropriate antibiotics, and understanding treatment contraindications have greatly increased the safety of BCG. The 3-week maintenance schedule for 3 years has been evaluated in randomised clinical trials and appears to be the current optimal treatment. With the success achieved in bladder cancer and the relative safety and economy of BCG, consideration should be given to further research for its effectiveness in other genitourinary malignancies. PMID:23517232

  20. Human Tumor Antigens and Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vigneron, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    With the recent developments of adoptive T cell therapies and the use of new monoclonal antibodies against the immune checkpoints, immunotherapy is at a turning point. Key players for the success of these therapies are the cytolytic T lymphocytes, which are a subset of T cells able to recognize and kill tumor cells. Here, I review the nature of the antigenic peptides recognized by these T cells and the processes involved in their presentation. I discuss the importance of understanding how each antigenic peptide is processed in the context of immunotherapy and vaccine delivery. PMID:26161423

  1. Novel avenues in immunotherapies for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Pardieck, Iris N; Jawahier, Priscilla A; Swets, Marloes; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Kuppen, Peter J K

    2016-04-01

    Since it is known that the immune system affects tumor growth, it has been studied if immunotherapy can be developed to combat cancer. While some successes have been claimed, the increasing knowledge on tumor-immune interactions has, however, also shown the limitations of this approach. Tumors may show selective outgrowth of cells escaped from immune control. Escape variants arise spontaneously due to the genetically instable nature of tumor cells. This is one of the most obvious limitations of cancer immunotherapy. However, new therapies are becoming available, designed to respond to tumor-immune escape. PMID:26582071

  2. Allergen Immunotherapy: History and Future Developments.

    PubMed

    Passalacqua, Giovanni; Canonica, Giorgio Walter

    2016-02-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) was introduced in clinical practice more than 100 years ago. The clinical effectiveness in allergic rhinitis (and asthma) and in hymenoptera allergy was apparent early on but it was not until the mid-1900s that randomized placebo-controlled trials proved its efficacy. In the 1980s, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was accepted in official guidelines. The availability of safer routes, such as SLIT, prompted increasing investigation of AIT for food allergy. The introduction of molecular-based diagnosis introduced the possibility of better targeted prescription of AIT. Other approaches are being explored, such as immunogenic peptides, recombinant allergens, and adjuvants. PMID:26617223

  3. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Cancer or Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Maus, Marcela V.; Fraietta, Joseph A.; Levine, Bruce L.; Kalos, Michael; Zhao, Yangbing; June, Carl H.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy, or the infusion of lymphocytes, is a promising approach for the treatment of cancer and certain chronic viral infections. The application of the principles of synthetic biology to enhance T cell function has resulted in substantial increases in clinical efficacy. The primary challenge to the field is to identify tumor-specific targets to avoid off-tissue, on-target toxicity. Given recent advances in efficacy in numerous pilot trials, the next steps in clinical development will require multicenter trials in order to establish adoptive immunotherapy as a mainstream technology. PMID:24423116

  4. Stinging insect allergy: current perspectives on venom immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ludman, Sian W; Boyle, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Systemic allergic reactions to insect stings affect up to 5% of the population during their lifetime, and up to 32% of beekeepers. Such reactions can be fatal, albeit very rarely, and fear of a further systemic reaction (SR) can lead to significant anxiety and quality of life impairment. A recent Cochrane systematic review confirmed that venom immunotherapy (VIT) is an effective treatment for people who have had a systemic allergic reaction to an insect sting. VIT reduces risk of a further SR (relative risk 0.10, 95% confidence interval 0.03–0.28), but VIT also reduces risk of a future large local reaction, and significantly improves disease-specific quality of life. However, health economic analysis showed that VIT is generally not cost effective for preventing future SRs; most people are stung infrequently, most SRs resolve without long-term consequences, and a fatal outcome is extremely rare. VIT only becomes cost effective if one is stung frequently (eg, beekeepers) or if quality of life improvement is considered. Thus, for most people with insect sting allergy, anxiety and quality of life impairment should be the overriding consideration when making treatment decisions, highlighting the importance of a patient-centered approach. Areas which need to be explored in future research include efforts to improve the safety and convenience of VIT such as the use of sublingual immunotherapy; quality of life effects of venom allergy in children and adolescents as well as their parents; and the optimal duration of treatment. PMID:26229493

  5. Combined Cancer Immunotherapy Against Aurora Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Kaštánková, Iva; Poláková, Ingrid; Dušková, Martina; Šmahel, Michal

    2016-05-01

    Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is a centrosomal protein that is overexpressed in a number of human malignancies and can contribute to tumor progression. As we used this protein as a target of DNA immunization, we increased its immunogenicity by the addition of the PADRE helper epitope and decreased its potential oncogenicity by mutagenesis of the kinase domain. For in vitro analysis of induced immune responses in mice, we identified the Aurka220-228 nonapeptide representing an H-2K epitope. As DNA vaccination against the Aurka self-antigen by a gene gun did not show any antitumor effect, we combined DNA immunization with anti-CD25 treatment that depletes mainly regulatory T cells. Whereas 1 anti-CD25 dose injected before DNA vaccination did not enhance the activation of Aurka-specific splenocytes, 3 doses administered on days of immunizations augmented about 10-fold immunity against Aurka. However, an opposite effect was found for antitumor immunity-only 1 anti-CD25 dose combined with DNA vaccination reduced tumor growth. Moreover, the administration of 3 doses of anti-CD25 antibody alone accelerated tumor growth. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating cells showed that 3 anti-CD25 doses not only efficiently depleted regulatory T cells but also activated helper T cells and CD3CD25 cells. Next, we found that blockade of the PD-1 receptor initiated 1 week after the first immunization was necessary for significant inhibition of tumor growth with therapeutic DNA vaccination against Aurka combined with depletion of CD25 cells. Our results suggest that combined cancer immunotherapy should be carefully evaluated to achieve the optimal antitumor effect. PMID:27070447

  6. Novel insights into immunotherapy for hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Sheikh Mohammad Fazle; Al-Mahtab, Mamun; Jahan, Munira; Yoshida, Osamu; Hiasa, Yoichi

    2016-02-01

    The possible use of immunotherapy for hepatitis B has emerged for two major reasons: (1) chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is an immune-mediated pathological condition, and (2) commercially available antiviral drugs are of limited efficacy. Although various immunomodulatory agents have been used to treat patients with CHB during the last three decades, there is currently no consensus among physicians and hepatologists regarding the suitability of immunotherapy for patients with CHB. However, new insights into immunotherapy for CHB have emerged; these may facilitate design of effective and tolerable immunotherapy regimens for these patients. This review provides a comprehensive overview of immunotherapy for CHB. PMID:26626120

  7. [Psychological aspects of immunotherapies in the treatment of malignant melanoma].

    PubMed

    Kovács, Péter; Pánczél, Gitta; Melegh, Krisztina; Balatoni, Tímea; Pörneczy, Edit; Lõrincz, Lenke; Czirbesz, Kata; Gorka, Eszter; Liszkay, Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    Psychological problems may arise in connection with oncomedical treatments in three ways: 1. acute and/or 2. chronic ways, as well as 3. co-morbid psychiatric diseases that already exist must also be taken into account. Immunotherapies have the most common and also clinically relevant psychological side effects. Fatigue, anhedonia, social isolation, psychomotor slowness is reported during treatment. Anti-CTLA-4 antibody (ipilimumab) immunotherapy can present one of the most modern opportunities for adequate treatment for patients having distant metastasis or unresectable tumour. In relation to immunotherapies, acute psychological side effects (acute stress) emerging during treatments develop in a way that can mostly be linked to environmental factors, e.g. notification of diagnosis, hospitalisation, progression, deterioration in quality of life, imminent dates of control. Crisis is a temporary and threatening condition that endangers psychological balance. In such conditions, enhanced psychological vulnerability must be taken into account and doctors play a key role in the rapid recognition of the condition. Chronic psychological problems, which may arise from the depressogenic effect of the applied treatment or originated from a pre-melanoma psychiatric condition, may exceed the diagnostic and psychotherapeutic competences of a clinical psychologist. Even in case of a well-defined depressogenic biological mechanism such as the activation of the pro-inflammatory cytokine pathway, positive environmental effects can reduce symptoms and thus increase compliance. Side effects can be treated successfully using psychotherapeutic methods and/or psychiatric medicines. The application of routinely used complex psychosocial screening packages can provide the easiest method to identify worsening psychological condition during immunotherapy and give rapid feedback to the oncologist and the patient. Team work is of particular importance in a situation like this as it requires complex, interdisciplinary and high-level professional collaboration. Multidisciplinarity is the basic framework for modern tumour therapy where, under the guidance of oncologists, the work of specialist nurses, social workers, physiotherapists, dieticians and last but not least psychiatrists/psychologists are indispensable and play a significant role. PMID:26934347

  8. Adapting conventional cancer treatment for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jian; Liu, Zhida; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2016-05-01

    The efficacy of directly killing tumors by conventional cancer therapies, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, has been for several decades well established. But, a suppressed immune response might become a lethal side effect after repeated cycles of intensive treatment. Recently, achievements in immune checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive T cell-mediated immunotherapies have resulted in changes in frontline management of advanced cancer diseases. However, accumulated evidence indicates that immunotherapeutic and conventional strategies alone are often ineffective to eradicate big tumors or metastasis. To improve the outcomes of treatment for advanced cancer diseases, the combination of conventional cancer treatment with various immunotherapeutic approaches has been attempted and has shown potential synergistic effects. Recent studies have unexpectedly demonstrated that some strategies of conventional cancer treatment can regulate the immune response positively, thus the understanding of how to adapt conventional treatment for immunotherapy is crucial to the design of effective combination therapy of conventional treatment with immunotherapy. Here, we review both experimental and clinical studies on the therapeutic effect and its mechanisms of combining conventional therapy with immunotherapy in treatment of cancer. PMID:26910191

  9. Biomarkers for glioma immunotherapy: the next generation.

    PubMed

    Sims, Jennifer S; Ung, Timothy H; Neira, Justin A; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey N

    2015-07-01

    The term "biomarker" historically refers to a single parameter, such as the expression level of a gene or a radiographic pattern, used to indicate a broader biological state. Molecular indicators have been applied to several aspects of cancer therapy: to describe the genotypic and phenotypic state of neoplastic tissue for prognosis, to predict susceptibility to anti-proliferative agents, to validate the presence of specific drug targets, and to evaluate responsiveness to therapy. For glioblastoma (GBM), immunohistochemical and radiographic biomarkers accessible to the clinical lab have informed traditional regimens, but while immunotherapies have emerged as potentially disruptive weapons against this diffusely infiltrating, heterogeneous tumor, biomarkers with strong predictive power have not been fully established. The cancer immunotherapy field, through the recently accelerated expansion of trials, is currently leveraging this wealth of clinical and biological data to define and revise the use of biomarkers for improving prognostic accuracy, personalization of therapy, and evaluation of responses across the wide variety of tumors. Technological advancements in DNA sequencing, cytometry, and microscopy have facilitated the exploration of more integrated, high-dimensional profiling of the disease system-incorporating both immune and tumor parameters-rather than single metrics, as biomarkers for therapeutic sensitivity. Here we discuss the utility of traditional GBM biomarkers in immunotherapy and how the impending transformation of the biomarker paradigm-from single markers to integrated profiles-may offer the key to bringing predictive, personalized immunotherapy to GBM patients. PMID:25724916

  10. Developing Strategies in the Immunotherapy of Leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Brayer, Jason B.; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background In the current treatment paradigms for leukemias, hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is considered the best option with a curative potential although more often than not it simply delays disease progression. Advances are needed, both in current therapies and in the development of new strategies. Partly from studying the nuances of the curative potential of stem cell transplant, we have come to appreciate the relevance of the immune response and the potential of immunotherapy. Methods This review article summarizes the recent advances in the field of immunology and immunotherapy for leukemia. Results In passive immunotherapy, recent progress in chimeric T-cell antigen receptor technology has been encouraging. In active immunotherapy, a cancer vaccine may potentially enhance HSCT. An overview of various clinical studies of peptide vaccination strategies focusing on molecular targets such as the Wilms’ tumor gene 1 (WT1), proteinase 3 (PR3), and receptor for hyaluronan acid-mediated motility (RHAMM) is provided. Cell-based vaccination strategies are also briefly explored. Conclusions The immune system clearly has the capacity to recognize and react to leukemic cells, and recent evidence directs our attention to the importance of mounting inflammatory and CD4 T-cell responses to complement and support the cytotoxic activity elicited by peptide vaccines. PMID:23302907

  11. Sublingual Immunotherapy for Allergic Fungal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Jonathan M; Driskill, Brent R; Clenney, Timothy L; Gessler, Eric M

    2015-10-01

    Allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) is a condition that has an allergic basis caused by exposure to fungi in the sinonasal tract leading to chronic inflammation. Despite standard treatment modalities, which typically include surgery and medical management of allergies, patients still have a high rate of recurrence. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been used as adjuvant treatment for AFS. Evidence exists to support the use of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) as a safe and efficacious method of treating allergies, but no studies have assessed the utility of SLIT in the management of allergic fungal sinusitis. A record review of cases of AFS that are currently or previously treated with sublingual immunotherapy from 2007 to 2011 was performed. Parameters of interest included serum IgE levels, changes in symptoms, Lund-McKay scores, decreased sensitization to fungal allergens associated with AFS, and serum IgE levels. Ten patients with diagnosed AFS were treated with SLIT. No adverse effects related to the use of SLIT therapy were identified. Decreases in subjective complaints, exam findings, Lund-McKay scores, and serum IgE levels were observed. Thus, sublingual immunotherapy appears to be a safe adjunct to the management of AFS that may improve patient outcomes. PMID:25902841

  12. Short-term efficacy of nasal immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Palma-Carlos, A G; Santos, A S; Pregal, A

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of nasal immunotherapy in the management of allergic rhinitis. Sixteen patients (10 Female; 6 Male) aged 15-60 years (mean age--31.9) were selected on the bases of clinical history, skin prick tests and RAST positivity. Allergen extract is a "macronized" powder form (Allerkin), it was supplied by Laboratorio Farmaceutico Lofarma (Milano Italy) and administered for 12 months to 8 patients with perennial rhinitis (Dermatophagoides extract) and for 6 months to 8 patients with seasonal rhinitis (grass or Parietaria pollens extract). This treatment was carried out by self administration in two phases: the first one (3 months) consisted of administration of increasing doses; the second phase (maintenance period) was carried out 3 months in seasonal rhinitis and 9 months in perennial rhinitis. All the patients were evaluated before and after immunotherapy and scores from 0 to 3 were attributed according to the symptoms presented and need of drugs for symptomatic relief. Scores before and after immunotherapy were compared using the Wilcoxon Matched-Pairs Signed-Ranks Test and a significant decrease was observed for every symptom in seasonal and perennial rhinitis (p < 0.05). In conclusion, this trial shows that nasal immunotherapy in powder form can be a valuable short-term option in patients with allergic rhinitis. PMID:9503098

  13. Lymphocutaneous Sporotrichosis during Treatment with Anti-TNF-Alpha Monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ursini, Francesco; Russo, Emilio; Leporini, Christian; Calabria, Marilena; Bruno, Caterina; Tripolino, Cesare; Naty, Saverio; Grembiale, Rosa Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is an infectious disease caused by Sporothrix schenckii, a dimorphic fungus isolated for the first time in 1896 by Benjamin Schenck from a 36-year-old male patient presenting lesions on the right hand and arm. The infection generally occurs by traumatic inoculation of soil, plants, and organic matter contaminated with the fungus. Different clinical syndromes are described as a direct consequence of S. schenckii infection, including lymphocutaneous and disseminated forms, although extracutaneous presentations are reported most frequently in AIDS patients. Here we describe the case of a 57-year-old Caucasian male diagnosed in 2004 with ankylosing spondylitis under stable treatment with adalimumab monotherapy (40?mg every other week). During a routine follow-up visit in March 2013, he presented with multiple nodular lesions arranged in a linear fashion along the left hand and forearm. After diagnostic aspiration of the lesions, lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis was diagnosed and appropriate therapy started. PMID:25755904

  14. Use of natural killer cells as immunotherapy for leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Grzywacz, Bartosz; Miller, Jeffrey S; Verneris, Michael R

    2008-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells potentially play a significant role in eradicating residual disease following allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation, and have been explored as tools for adoptive immunotherapy for chemotherapy-refractory patients. NK cell cytotoxicity is modulated by multiple activating and inhibitory receptors that maintain a balance between self-tolerance and providing surveillance against pathogens and malignant transformation. The functional characteristics of NK cells are dictated by the strength of inhibitory receptor signalling. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-specific inhibitory receptor acquisition occurs sequentially during NK cell development, and is determined by the nature of immunological reconstitution after allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation. Polymorphisms of inhibitory receptors [killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs)] and their ligands (MHC) contribute to interindividual variability. As a result, the functional NK cell repertoire of individual donors has variable potential for graft-vs-leukaemia reactions. Models predicting NK cell alloreactivity, including KIR ligand mismatch and missing KIR ligand strategies, are discussed as algorithms for optimal NK cell donor selection. Future modifications to improve NK cell adoptive immunotherapy by means of increasing target recognition and reducing inhibitory signalling are being explored. PMID:18790450

  15. Interstitial laser immunotherapy for treatment of metastatic mammary tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Daniel; Joshi, Chet; Wolf, Roman F.; Walla, Jonny; Goddard, Jessica; Martin, Mallory; Kosanke, Stanley D.; Broach, Fred S.; Pontius, Sean; Brown, Destiny; Li, Xiaosong; Howard, Eric; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    Thermal therapy has been used for cancer treatment for more than a century. While thermal effect can be direct, immediate, and controllable, it is not sufficient to completely eradicate tumors, particularly when tumors have metastasized locally or to the distant sites. Metastases are the major cause of treatment failure and cancer deaths. Current available therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, only have limited curative effects in patients with late-stage, metastatic cancers. Immunotherapy has been considered as the ultimate approach for cancer treatment since a systemic, anti-tumor, immunological response can be induced. Using the combination of photothermal therapy and immunotherapy, laser immunotherapy (LIT),a novel immunotherapy modality for late-stage cancer treatment, has been developed. LIT has shown great promise in pre-clinical studies and clinical breast cancer and melanoma pilot trials. However, the skin color and the depth of the tumor have been challenges for effective treatment with LIT. To induce a thermal destruction zone of appropriate size without causing thermal damage on the skin, we have developed interstitial laser immunotherapy (ILIT) using a cylindrical diffuser. To determine the effectiveness of ILIT, we treated the DMBA-4 metastatic tumors in rats. The thermal damage in tumor tissue was studied using TTC immersion and hematoxolin and eosin (H & E) staining. Also observed was the overall survival of the treated animals. Our results demonstrated that the ILIT could impact a much larger tumor area, and it significantly reduced the surface damage compared with the early version of non-invasive LIT. The survival data also indicate that ILIT has the potential to become an effective tool for the treatment of deeper, larger, and metastatic tumors, with reduced side effects.

  16. A practical view of immunotherapy for food allergy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy is common and sometimes life threatening for Korean children. The current standard treatment of allergen avoidance and self-injectable epinephrine does not change the natural course of food allergy. Recently, oral, sublingual, and epicutaneous immunotherapies have been studied for their effectiveness against food allergy. While various rates of desensitization (36% to 100%) and tolerance (28% to 75%) have been induced by immunotherapies for food allergy, no single established protocol has been shown to be both effective and safe. In some studies, immunologic changes after immunotherapy for food allergy have been revealed. Adverse reactions to these immunotherapies have usually been localized, but severe systemic reactions have been observed in some cases. Although immunotherapy cannot be recommended for routine practice yet, results from recent studies demonstrate that immunotherapies are promising for the treatment of food allergy. PMID:26958062

  17. Adoptive T Cell Immunotherapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Perica, Karlo; Varela, Juan Carlos; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells has been the central goal of anti-cancer immunotherapy. In recent years, there has been an increased interest in optimizing this technology in order to make it a clinically feasible treatment. One of the main treatment modalities within cancer immunotherapy has been adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). Using this approach, tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells are infused into cancer patients with the goal of recognizing, targeting, and destroying tumor cells. In the current review, we revisit some of the major successes of ACT, the major hurdles that have been overcome to optimize ACT, the remaining challenges, and future approaches to make ACT widely available. PMID:25717386

  18. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Megan A.; Nair, Smita K.; Holl, Eda K.

    2015-01-01

    RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s) of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26665011

  19. Advances in the Development of Cancer Immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jianjun; Bernatchez, Chantale; Sharma, Padmanee; Radvanyi, Laszlo G.; Hwu, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Manipulating the immune system in order to induce clinically relevant responses against cancer is a longstanding goal. Interventions to enhance tumor specific immunity through vaccination, sustaining effector T cell activation, or increasing the numbers of tumor specific T cells using ex vivo expansion, have all resulted in clinical successes. Here we examine recent clinical advances and major ongoing studies in the field of cancer immunotherapy. Single agents have so far benefited a limited proportion of patients and future studies combining different types of immunotherapies and other therapeutic modalities, such as drugs against specific signaling pathways driving cancer cell growth, are needed to hopefully pave the way for the development of effective anti-cancer treatments causing durable responses. PMID:23031830

  20. Mechanism of Anti-α-Synuclein Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Sung; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Immunization therapy targeting α-synuclein has emerged as a promising approach for Parkinson's disease and perhaps for other synucleinopathies. Several antibodies have shown therapeutic effects in mouse models of synucleinopathies and have alleviated the pathological and behavioral phenotypes of these mice. The mechanisms through which the immunization therapy works were initially puzzling, especially given that α-synuclein is a typical cytosolic protein. Recent studies, however, suggested that extracellular α-synuclein is an important pathogenic entity, and hence, a target for immunotherapy. Here, we review the literature describing immunization therapy for synucleinopathies in mouse models and provide current thoughts on the potential mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of α-synuclein immunotherapy. PMID:26828212

  1. Novel immunotherapies for the treatment of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Gato-Cañas, Maria; Arasanz, Hugo; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Glaría, Estíbaliz; Arteta-Sanchez, Virginia; Kochan, Grazyna; Escors, David

    2016-05-01

    Immunotherapies are achieving clinical success for the treatment of many cancers. However, it has taken a long time to exploit the potential of the immune system for the treatment of human cancers. We cannot forget that this has been the consequence of very extensive work in basic research in preclinical models and in human patients. Thus, it is rather hard to compile all of it while giving a comprehensive view on this subject. Here we have attempted to give an overall perspective in immunotherapy of melanoma. A brief overview on current therapies is provided, followed by adoptive cell therapies. Gene engineering strategies to improve these therapies are also explained, finishing with therapies based on interference with immune checkpoint pathways. PMID:27140413

  2. Cancer Neoantigens and Applications for Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Desrichard, Alexis; Snyder, Alexandra; Chan, Timothy A

    2016-02-15

    Recent advances in immune checkpoint blockade therapy have revolutionized the treatment of cancer. Tumor-specific antigens that are generated by somatic mutation, neoantigens, can influence patient response to immunotherapy and contribute to tumor shrinkage. Recent evidence demonstrating the success of checkpoint blockade immunotherapy in boosting T-cell reactivity against patient-specific neoantigens constitutes a strong rationale for the development of personalized vaccines against these nonself peptides. With the decreasing cost of next-generation sequencing, peptide manufacturing, and improvement of in silico prediction of peptide immunogenicity, it is increasingly important to evaluate the potential use of neoantigens in both diagnosis and treatment. Specifically, these neoantigens could be useful both as predictors of immune checkpoint blockade therapy response and/or incorporated in therapeutic vaccination strategies. Clin Cancer Res; 22(4); 807-12. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26515495

  3. Personalized dendritic cell-based tumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Janikashvili, Nona; Larmonier, Nicolas; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Advances in the understanding of the immunoregulatory functions of dendritic cells (DCs) in animal models and humans have led to their exploitation as anticancer vaccines. Although DC-based immunotherapy has proven clinically safe and efficient to induce tumor-specific immune responses, only a limited number of objective clinical responses have been reported in cancer patients. These relatively disappointing results have prompted the evaluation of multiple approaches to improve the efficacy of DC vaccines. The topic of this review focuses on personalized DC-based anticancer vaccines, which in theory have the potential to present to the host immune system the entire repertoire of antigens harbored by autologous tumor cells. We also discuss the implementation of these vaccines in cancer therapeutic strategies, their limitations and the future challenges for effective immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:20161666

  4. [Transcutaneous applications for vaccination and immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Krämer, Isabel; Zabel, Franziska; Kündig, Thomas M; Johansen, Pål

    2014-10-15

    Although Edward Jenner applied the first vaccines by scratching cow pox material into the skin, the profound immunological properties of the skin have become evident through research and discoveries only in the last 20 years. The immunological cells in the epidermis and the dermis are suitable targets for transcutaneous vaccination and immunotherapy. However, as the skin represents a natural barrier for topically administered large molecules, novel methods to overcome this barrier function have been described. There are chemical, biochemical and physical methods, many of which are pain-free and therefore especially suitable for children. Also for adults non-invasive methods of vaccination and immunotherapy are attractive as self-administration is feasible. Future products are currently undergoing clinical tests which provide promising results. PMID:25305116

  5. Strategies and developments of immunotherapies in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    WAN, JIA; ZHANG, XIANGHONG; LIU, TANG; ZHANG, XIANGSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a frequently observed primary malignant tumor. Current therapy for osteosarcoma consists of comprehensive treatment. The long-term survival rate of patients exhibiting nonmetastatic OS varies between 65–70%. However, a number of OS cases have been observed to be resistant to currently used therapies, leading to disease recurrence and lung metastases, which are the primary reasons leading to patient mortality. In the present review, a number of pieces of evidence provide support for the potential uses of immunotherapy, including immunomodulation and vaccine therapy, for the eradication of tumors via upregulation of the immune response. Adoptive T-cell therapy and oncolytic virotherapy have been used to treat OS and resulted in objective responses. Immunologic checkpoint blockade and targeted therapy are also potentially promising therapeutic tools. Immunotherapy demonstrates significant promise with regard to improving the outcomes for patients exhibiting OS. PMID:26834853

  6. Molecular biomarkers for grass pollen immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Florin-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Grass pollen allergy represents a significant cause of allergic morbidity worldwide. Component-resolved diagnosis biomarkers are increasingly used in allergy practice in order to evaluate the sensitization to grass pollen allergens, allowing the clinician to confirm genuine sensitization to the corresponding allergen plant sources and supporting an accurate prescription of allergy immunotherapy (AIT), an important approach in many regions of the world with great plant biodiversity and/or where pollen seasons may overlap. The search for candidate predictive biomarkers for grass pollen immunotherapy (tolerogenic dendritic cells and regulatory T cells biomarkers, serum blocking antibodies biomarkers, especially functional ones, immune activation and immune tolerance soluble biomarkers and apoptosis biomarkers) opens new opportunities for the early detection of clinical responders for AIT, for the follow-up of these patients and for the development of new allergy vaccines. PMID:25237628

  7. Coinhibitory Pathways in Immunotherapy for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, Susanne H; Freeman, Gordon J; Dranoff, Glenn; Sharpe, Arlene H

    2016-05-20

    The immune system is capable of recognizing tumors and eliminates many early malignant cells. However, tumors evolve to evade immune attack, and the tumor microenvironment is immunosuppressive. Immune responses are regulated by a number of immunological checkpoints that promote protective immunity and maintain tolerance. T cell coinhibitory pathways restrict the strength and duration of immune responses, thereby limiting immune-mediated tissue damage, controlling resolution of inflammation, and maintaining tolerance to prevent autoimmunity. Tumors exploit these coinhibitory pathways to evade immune eradication. Blockade of the PD-1 and CTLA-4 checkpoints is proving to be an effective and durable cancer immunotherapy in a subset of patients with a variety of tumor types, and additional combinations are further improving response rates. In this review we discuss the immunoregulatory functions of coinhibitory pathways and their translation to effective immunotherapies for cancer. PMID:26927206

  8. Mechanism of Anti-α-Synuclein Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Sung; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Immunization therapy targeting α-synuclein has emerged as a promising approach for Parkinson’s disease and perhaps for other synucleinopathies. Several antibodies have shown therapeutic effects in mouse models of synucleinopathies and have alleviated the pathological and behavioral phenotypes of these mice. The mechanisms through which the immunization therapy works were initially puzzling, especially given that α-synuclein is a typical cytosolic protein. Recent studies, however, suggested that extracellular α-synuclein is an important pathogenic entity, and hence, a target for immunotherapy. Here, we review the literature describing immunization therapy for synucleinopathies in mouse models and provide current thoughts on the potential mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of α-synuclein immunotherapy. PMID:26828212

  9. Immunity to visceral leishmaniasis: implications for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Khadem, Forough; Uzonna, Jude E

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis, caused by Leishmania donovani, L. infantum (syn. Leishmania chagasi), is a globally widespread disease with a burden of about 400,000 new infections reported annually. It is the most dangerous form of human leishmaniasis in terms of mortality and morbidity and is spreading to several nonendemic areas because of migration, global traveling and military conflicts. The emergence of Leishmania-HIV co-infection and increased prevalence of drug-resistant strains have worsened the impact of the disease. The traditional low-cost drugs are often toxic with several adverse effects, highlighting the need for development of new therapeutic and prophylactic strategies. Therefore, a detailed understanding of mechanisms of protective immunity is extremely important in order to develop new therapeutics in the form of vaccines or immunotherapies. This review gives an overview of visceral leishmaniasis, with particular emphasis on the innate and adaptive immune responses, vaccine and vaccination strategies and their potentials for immunotherapy against the disease. PMID:25156379

  10. ATMPs for Cancer Immunotherapy: A Regulatory Overview.

    PubMed

    Galli, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses European regulatory requirements for development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) for cancer immunotherapy approaches, describing the framework for clinical trials and for marketing authorization.Regulatory critical issues and challenges for developing ATMP are also discussed, with focus on potency determination, long-term follow-up, comparability, and insertional mutagenesis issues. Some of the most critical features of GMP application to ATMP are also described. PMID:27033211

  11. Prostate cancer immunotherapy: beyond immunity to curability.

    PubMed

    Simons, Jonathan W

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. It is the first prevalent cancer in which overall survival in advanced disease is modestly, but objectively, improved with outpatient delivered dendritic cell-based immunotherapy. More prostate cancer patients have enrolled through Facebook and trusted-site Internet searches in clinical trials for prostate cancer vaccine-based immunotherapy than in immunotherapy trials for lung, breast, colon, pancreas, ovarian, and bladder cancer combined in the past 7 years. Exceptional responses to anti-CTLA-4 treatment have been documented in clinics, and prostate cancer neoantigen characterization and T-cell clonotyping are in their research ascendancy. The prostate is an accessory organ; it is not required for fertility, erectile function, or urinary continence. The true evolutionary advantage of having a prostate for male mammalian physiology is a topic of speculation in seminar rooms and on bar stools, but it remains unknown. Hundreds of prostate lineage-unique proteins (PLUP) exist among the >37,000 normal human prostate lineage-unique open reading frames that can be targeted for immunologic ablation of PLUP(+) prostate cancer cells by prostate-specific autoimmunity. This bioengineered graft-versus-prostate disease is a powerful strategy that can eliminate deaths from prostate cancer. Immunologic tolerance to prostate cancer can be overcome at every clinical stage of presentation. This Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads article aims to present advances in the past two decades of basic, translational, and clinical research in prostate cancer, including bioengineering B-cell and T-cell responses, and ongoing prostate cancer immunotherapy trials. PMID:25367978

  12. Bioinformatics for cancer immunology and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Charoentong, Pornpimol; Angelova, Mihaela; Efremova, Mirjana; Gallasch, Ralf; Hackl, Hubert; Galon, Jerome; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2012-11-01

    Recent mechanistic insights obtained from preclinical studies and the approval of the first immunotherapies has motivated increasing number of academic investigators and pharmaceutical/biotech companies to further elucidate the role of immunity in tumor pathogenesis and to reconsider the role of immunotherapy. Additionally, technological advances (e.g., next-generation sequencing) are providing unprecedented opportunities to draw a comprehensive picture of the tumor genomics landscape and ultimately enable individualized treatment. However, the increasing complexity of the generated data and the plethora of bioinformatics methods and tools pose considerable challenges to both tumor immunologists and clinical oncologists. In this review, we describe current concepts and future challenges for the management and analysis of data for cancer immunology and immunotherapy. We first highlight publicly available databases with specific focus on cancer immunology including databases for somatic mutations and epitope databases. We then give an overview of the bioinformatics methods for the analysis of next-generation sequencing data (whole-genome and exome sequencing), epitope prediction tools as well as methods for integrative data analysis and network modeling. Mathematical models are powerful tools that can predict and explain important patterns in the genetic and clinical progression of cancer. Therefore, a survey of mathematical models for tumor evolution and tumor-immune cell interaction is included. Finally, we discuss future challenges for individualized immunotherapy and suggest how a combined computational/experimental approaches can lead to new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cancer, improved diagnosis, and prognosis of the disease and pinpoint novel therapeutic targets. PMID:22986455

  13. Predictive factors for immunotherapy in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    González-Cao, Maria; Karachaliou, Niki; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has emerged as an exciting strategy for cancer treatment. Therapeutic blockade of immune checkpoint regulators favors the ability of T cell responses to increase anti-tumor immunity. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) are two T cell-inhibitory receptors with independent mechanisms of action. Immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting either CTLA-4, PD-1 or its ligand PD-L1 are currently yielding promising results in terms of efficacy in several clinical studies with melanoma patients and are being developed and tested as immunotherapy agents for multiple cancer types. To date, no reliable predictors of activity and efficacy of immunotherapy have yet been identified or validated. Even so, determining which patients derive clinical benefit from immune checkpoint agents remains an important clinical question and efforts to identify predictive markers of response are ongoing. This article reviews the current potential predictive factors for CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoints inhibitors in melanoma. PMID:26488004

  14. Immunotherapy for Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Takenori; Fujiwara, Tomohiro; Takeda, Ken; Kunisada, Toshiyuki; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Udono, Heiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Although multimodal therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy have improved clinical outcomes of patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas, the prognosis of patients has plateaued over these 20 years. Immunotherapies have shown the effectiveness for several types of advanced tumors. Immunotherapies, such as cytokine therapies, vaccinations, and adoptive cell transfers, have also been investigated for bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Cytokine therapies with interleukin-2 or interferons have limited efficacy because of their cytotoxicities. Liposomal muramyl tripeptide phosphatidylethanolamine (L-MTP-PE), an activator of the innate immune system, has been approved as adjuvant therapeutics in combination with conventional chemotherapy in Europe, which has improved the 5-year overall survival of patients. Vaccinations and transfer of T cells transduced to express chimeric antigen receptors have shown some efficacy for sarcomas. Ipilimumab and nivolumab are monoclonal antibodies designed to inhibit immune checkpoint mechanisms. These antibodies have recently been shown to be effective for patients with melanoma and also investigated for patients with sarcomas. In this review, we provide an overview of various trials of immunotherapies for bone and soft tissue sarcomas, and discuss their potential as adjuvant therapies in combination with conventional therapies. PMID:26167500

  15. Sublingual or subcutaneous immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis?

    PubMed

    Durham, Stephen R; Penagos, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is effective in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and, unlike antiallergic drugs, has been shown to modify the underlying cause of the disease, with proved long-term benefits. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been the gold standard, whereas sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has emerged as an effective and safe alternative. Previous Cochrane systematic reviews and meta-analyses have confirmed that both SLIT and SCIT are effective in patients with seasonal AR, whereas evidence for their efficacy in patients with perennial disease has been less convincing. Recent large, adequately powered trials have demonstrated reductions in both symptoms and use of rescue medication in patients with seasonal and those with perennial AR. Here we appraise evidence for SCIT versus SLIT based on indirect evidence from Cochrane reviews and recent well-powered double-blind, randomized controlled trials versus placebo and the limited direct evidence available from randomized blind head-to-head comparisons. At present, based on an overall balance of efficacy and side effects, the patient is in equipoise. Pending definitive comparative trials, choice might be determined largely by the local availability of SCIT and SLIT products of proved value and personal (patient) preference. PMID:26853126

  16. Immunotherapy for lung cancer: advances and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. To date, surgery is the first choice treatment, but most clinically diagnosed cases are inoperable. While chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are the next considered options for such cases, these treatment modalities have adverse effects and are sometimes lethal to patients. Thus, new effective strategies with minimal side effects are urgently needed. Cancer immunotherapy provides either active or passive immunity to target tumors. Multiple immunotherapy agents have been proposed and tested for potential therapeutic benefit against lung cancer, and some pose fewer side effects as compared to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article, we discuss studies focusing on interactions between lung cancer and the immune system, and we place an emphasis on outcome evidence in order to create a knowledge base well-grounded in clinical reality. Overall, this review highlights the need for new lung cancer treatment options, with much ground to be paved for future advances in the field. We believe that immunotherapy agents alone or with other forms of treatment can be recognized as next modality of lung cancer treatment. PMID:27168951

  17. Crescentic glomerulonephritis associated with renal cell carcinoma after cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kai, H; Yamagata, K; Usui, J; Shimizu, Y; Hirayama, A; Yoh, K; Mase, K; Hirayama, K; Nagase, S; Nagata, M; Kawai, K; Akaza, H; Koyama, A

    2005-01-01

    A 59 year-old woman showed rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis during immunotherapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. She received unilateral nephrectomy and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) therapy for the treatment of retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis of renal cell carcinoma. With CTL therapy, her retroperitoneal lymph node mass decreased in size. One year after the third round of CTL therapy, her serum creatinine was increased and massive proteinuria occurred. Her renal biopsy specimen revealed necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition. Her retroperitoneal lymph node mass continued to decrease in size. Consequently, for the purpose of avoiding interfering with the CTL therapy, we performed double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) monotherapy for removal of immune complexes without using immunosuppressive drugs or prednisolone. After 24 sessions of DFPP, her serum IgG was reduced from 3,942 mg/dL to 2,400 mg/dL, and proteinuria (from 9.0 g/day to 0.9 g/day) and renal function (serum creatinine; from 5.6 mg/dL to 2.2 mg/dL) also improved. However, 3 months after the final DFPP, she expired due to perforation of the colon. The autopsy sample of the kidney showed that most of the glomeruli were obsolescent, but immunoglobulin depositions were reduced and necrotizing lesions were diminished. In the patients with RPGN associated with renal cell carcinoma, renal functional recovery has not been observed upon immunosuppressive treatment. Consequently, plasmapheresis is considered to be one of the effective and safe methods for patients with this association. We also discuss previous reports of RPGN associated with renal cell carcinoma, or RPGN after cancer immunotherapy. PMID:16245250

  18. Stem cells and cancer immunotherapy: Arrowhead’s 2nd annual cancer immunotherapy conference

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Investigators from academia and industry gathered on April 4 and 5, 2013, in Washington DC at the Arrowhead’s 2nd Annual Cancer Immunotherapy Conference. Two complementary concepts were discussed: cancer “stem cells” as targets and therapeutic platforms based on stem cells.

  19. RIPK3—a predictive marker for personalized immunotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Smola, Sigrun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer immunotherapy is an attractive therapeutic option but it is currently unclear which patient may benefit from such approaches. Using the model of cervical cancer, we have demonstrated that PolyIC-driven immunogenicity strictly depends on the necroptosis regulator RIPK3 in the neoplastic cells. This proposes RIPK3 as a novel predictive marker for personalization of cancer immunotherapy

  20. Immunologic Suppression To Peanut During Immunotherapy Is Often Transient

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, M.; Narisety, S.D.; Guerrerio, A.L.; Chichester, K.; Keet, C.A.; Bieneman, A.P.; Hamilton, R. G.; Wood, R.A; Schroeder, J.T.; Frischmeyer-Guerrerio, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that oral (OIT) and sublingual (SLIT) immunotherapy for food allergy hold promise; however, the immunologic mechanisms underlying these therapies are not well understood. Objective To generate insights into the mechanisms and duration of immunologic suppression to peanut during immunotherapy (IT). Methods Blood was obtained from subjects at baseline and at multiple timepoints during a placebo-controlled trial of peanut OIT and SLIT. Immunologic outcomes included spontaneous and stimulated basophil activity by automated fluorometry (histamine) and flow cytometry (activation markers, IL-4), allergen-induced cytokine expression in dendritic cell (DC)-T cell co-cultures by multiplexing technology, and expression of MHC II and costimulatory molecules on DCs by flow cytometry. Results Spontaneous and allergen-induced basophil reactivity (histamine release, CD63 expression, and IL-4 production) were suppressed during dose escalation and after 6 months of maintenance dosing. Peanut- and dust mite-induced expression of TH2 cytokines was reduced in DC-T cell co-cultures during IT. This was associated with decreased levels of CD40, HLA-DR, and CD86 expression on DCs, and increased expression of CD80. These effects were most striking in myeloid DC-T cell co-cultures from subjects receiving OIT. Many markers of immunologic suppression reversed following withdrawal from IT, and in some cases during ongoing maintenance therapy. Conclusion OIT and SLIT for peanut allergy induce rapid suppression of basophil effector functions, dendritic cell activation, and Th2 cytokine responses during the initial phases of IT in an antigen non-specific manner. While there was some inter-individual variation, in many patients, suppression appeared to be temporary. PMID:25542883

  1. The past, present and future of immunotherapy against tumor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Tumor is one of the most common lethal diseases in the world. Current progress of therapy remains insufficient survival benefit. Tumor immunotherapies have been proposed for more than a century. With the improvement in the understanding of the role of the immune system in the tumorigenesis and immune response to tumor, immunotherapy has obtained a rapid development and plays the significant role in tumor therapy nowadays. This review designs to provide a general overview of immunotherapy in tumors. We will introduce the landmark events in the past research of immunotherapy and elaborate a range of strategies using different immune response mechanism, which have been demonstrated successfully and even some of them have been approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to certain tumor therapy. Finally, we will discuss the future direction of immunotherapy so that we can predict the possible and valuable strategies for future tumor therapy. PMID:26207213

  2. Immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: From basic research to clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yu-Peng; Li, Zi-Duo; Prasoon, Pankaj; Zhang, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer worldwide with a poor prognosis. Few strategies have been proven efficient in HCC treatment, particularly for those patients not indicated for curative resection or transplantation. Immunotherapy has been developed for decades for cancer control and is attaining more attention as a result of encouraging outcomes of new strategies such as chimeric antigen receptor T cells and immune checkpoint blockade. Right at the front of the new era of immunotherapy, we review the immunotherapy in HCC treatment, from basic research to clinical trials, covering anything from immunomodulators, tumor vaccines and adoptive immunotherapy. The mechanisms, efficacy and safety as well as the approach particulars are unveiled to assist readers to gain a concise but extensive understanding of immunotherapy of HCC. PMID:25954480

  3. Immunotherapy for Melanoma: Current Status and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrescu, Doru T.; Ichim, Thomas E.; Riordan, Neil H.; Marincola, Francesco M.; Nardo, Anna Di; Kabigting, Filamer D.; Dasanu, Constantin A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Immunotherapy is an important modality in the therapy of patients with malignant melanoma. As our knowledge about this disease continues to expand, so does the immunotherapeutic armamentarium. Nevertheless, successful preclinical models do not always translate into clinically meaningful results. The authors give a comprehensive analysis of most recent advances in the immune anti-melanoma therapy, including interleukins, interferons, other cytokines, adoptive immunotherapy, biochemotherapy, as well as the use of different vaccines. We also present the fundamental concepts behind various immune enhancement strategies, passive immunotherapy, as well as the use of immune adjuvants. This review brings into discussion the results of newer and older clinical trials, as well as potential limitations and drawbacks seen with the utilization of various immune therapies in malignant melanoma. Development of novel therapeutic approaches, along with optimization of existing therapies, continues to hold a great promise in the field of melanoma therapy research. Use of anti-CTLA4 and anti-PD1 antibodies, realization of the importance of co-stimulatory signals, which translated into the use of agonist CD40 monoclonal antibodies, as well as activation of innate immunity through enhanced expression of co-stimulatory molecules on the surface of dendritic cells by TLR agonists are only a few items on the list of recent advances in the treatment of melanoma. The need to engineer better immune interactions and to boost positive feedback loops appear crucial for the future of melanoma therapy, which ultimately resides in our understanding of the complexity of immune responses in this disease. PMID:20551839

  4. Soypeptide lunasin in cytokine immunotherapy for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hua-Chen; Lewis, David; Tung, Chun-Yu; Han, Ling; Henriquez, Sarah M P; Voiles, Larry; Lupov, Ivan P; Pelloso, David; Sinn, Anthony L; Pollok, Karen E; de Lumen, Ben O; Li, Fang; Blum, Janice S; Srivastava, Shivani; Robertson, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    Immunostimulatory cytokines can enhance anti-tumor immunity and are part of the therapeutic armamentarium for cancer treatment. We have previously reported that post-transplant lymphoma patients have an acquired deficiency of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4, which results in defective IFNγ production during clinical immunotherapy. With the goal of further improving cytokine-based immunotherapy, we examined the effects of a soybean peptide called lunasin that synergistically works with cytokines on natural killer (NK) cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy donors and post-transplant lymphoma patients were stimulated with or without lunasin in the presence of IL-12 or IL-2. NK activation was evaluated, and its tumoricidal activity was assessed using in vitro and in vivo tumor models. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was performed to evaluate the histone modification of gene loci that are regulated by lunasin and cytokine. Adding lunasin to IL-12- or IL-2-stimulated NK cells demonstrated synergistic effects in the induction of IFNG and GZMB involved in cytotoxicity. The combination of lunasin and cytokines (IL-12 plus IL-2) was capable of restoring IFNγ production by NK cells from post-transplant lymphoma patients. In addition, NK cells stimulated with lunasin plus cytokines displayed higher tumoricidal activity than those stimulated with cytokines alone using in vitro and in vivo tumor models. The underlying mechanism responsible for the effects of lunasin on NK cells is likely due to epigenetic modulation on target gene loci. Lunasin represents a different class of immune modulating agent that may augment the therapeutic responses mediated by cytokine-based immunotherapy. PMID:24363024

  5. Novel approaches to antiviral and anticancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Trnková, K; Pastoreková, S; Petrik, J

    2012-01-01

    In this review we discuss existing as well as new approaches to immunotherapy directed against infected or cancerous cells. These approaches traditionally exploit either natural components of immune system (such as cytokines, chemokines, co-stimulatory molecules and adjuvants), or monoclonal antibodies designed to target foreign agents and/or diseased cells through their molecular markers. Additional strategies in development include therapeutic vaccines, oncolytic viruses and T-cell therapies. In addition, we briefly describe a novel strategy called ReDIT (Re-Directed ImmunoTherapy), based on re-orienting the existing long-lasting immune responses (e.g. induced by measles vaccination or natural infection) towards new target molecules on the surface of infected or malignant cells. This can be principally achieved by using bi-functional protein constructs that contain an antigen carrier component and a re-directing component. The antigen carrier component can consist of the ectodomain of the measles hemagglutinin that can be recognized by antibodies and memory cells generated during previous infection or vaccination. The re-directing component consists of the specific virus- or tumor antigen-binding molecule. The fusion constructs are expected to boost existing anti-measles immunity and re-direct it against a new target, engaging the existing anti-measles immunity as an effector mechanism. Thus, ReDIT is a promising novel approach that may represent a valuable addition to immunotherapy of difficult to treat infections and tumors, as it exploits a mechanism distinct from other available therapies. PMID:23237083

  6. Tregs and rethinking cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Curiel, Tyler J.

    2007-01-01

    Tumors express antigens that should induce immune-mediated rejection, but spontaneous rejection of established tumors is rare. Recent work demonstrates that one reason for the lack of tumor rejection is that tumors actively defeat host immunity. This concept forces us to rethink current approaches to harnessing potent, specific host immunity to battle cancer, most of which are based on the paradigm that inducing more antitumor immune cells alone is therapeutic. However, as I discuss in this Personal Perspective, a newer paradigm predicts that reducing tumor-driven immune suppression will be clinically beneficial. CD4+CD25+ Tregs are one mechanism of tumor-driven immune evasion that provide prototypical targets for testing novel anticancer treatment strategies within the newer paradigm. PMID:17476346

  7. Harnessing the Microbiome to Enhance Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michelle H.; Diven, Marshall A.; Huff, Logan W.; Paulos, Chrystal M.

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota plays a key role in regulating the innate and adaptive immune system. Herein, we review the immunological aspects of the microbiota in tumor immunity in mice and man, with a focus on toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, vaccines, checkpoint modulators, chemotherapy, and adoptive T cell transfer (ACT) therapies. We propose innovative treatments that may safely harness the microbiota to enhance T cell-based therapies in cancer patients. Finally, we highlight recent developments in tumor immunotherapy, particularly novel ways to modulate the microbiome and memory T cell responses to human malignancies. PMID:26101781

  8. Fighting cancer with magnetic nanoparticles and immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, L.; Mejías, R.; Barber, D. F.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Serna, C. J.; Lázaro, F. J.; Morales, M. P.

    2012-03-01

    IFN-γ-adsorbed DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles can be used as an efficient in vivo drug delivery system for tumor immunotherapy. Magnetic nanoparticles, with adsorbed interferon-γ, were targeted to the tumor site by application of an external magnetic field. A relevant therapeutic dosage of interferon in the tumor was detected and led to a notable reduction in tumor size. In general, only 10% of the total injected nanoparticles after multiple exposures were found in tissues by AC susceptibility measurements of the corresponding resected tissues. Magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution is affected by the application of an external magnetic field.

  9. Solving the Problem of Nonadherence to Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G; Lockey, Richard F

    2016-02-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) can improve allergic response by modifying the underlying disease. Many patients are nonadherent, and do not achieve full benefit. Numerous studies reveal that fewer than 10% of patients complete a full course and that most abandon treatment in the first year. The development and testing of interventions to improve AIT are emerging. Data from adherence interventions in other chronic conditions provide guidance to allergists/immunologists. Evidence-based communication strategies-patient-centered care, motivational interviewing, and shared-decision making-underscore the importance of taking time to establish trust, understand patient concerns and priorities, and involve the patient in decisions regarding AIT. PMID:26617236

  10. [Immunotherapy in the treatment of genitourinary cancers].

    PubMed

    Gczi, Lajos; Ladnyi, Andrea; Vajdics, Tmea; Kronya, Zsfia; Br, Krisztina; Gyergyay, Fruzsina; Martin, Tams; Nagyivnyi, Krisztin

    2016-03-01

    In this clinical review we provide information regarding advance and main achievements in the immunotherapy of genitourinary, particularly renal cell and prostate cancer. Nivolumab treatment became the new standard of care in locally advanced or metastatic renal cell cancer after failure on tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. Sipuleucel-T prolonged survival in patients with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer but had no effect on progression-free survival. Based on the results of phase I/II trials anti-PD-1/PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies are a new hope in the treatment of urothelial bladder cancer. Regarding germ cell tumors basic research is ongoing. PMID:26934350

  11. Immunotherapy strategies for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Tang; Lu, Xiu-Min; Chen, Kai-Ting; Shu, Ya-Hai; Qiu, Chun-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) of adult mammalian after traumatic injury is limited, which often causes permanent functional motor and sensory loss. After spinal cord injury (SCI), the lack of regeneration is mainly attributed to the presence of a hostile microenvironment, glial scarring, and cavitation. Besides, inflammation has also been proved to play a crucial role in secondary degeneration following SCI. The more prominent treatment strategies in experimental models focus mainly on drugs and cell therapies, however, only a few strategies applied in clinical studies and therapies still have only limited effects on the repair of SCI. Recently, the interests in immunotherapy strategies for CNS are increasing in number and breadth. Immunotherapy strategies have made good progresses in treating many CNS degenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), stroke, and multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the strategies begin to be considered to the treatment of SCI and other neurological disorders in recent years. Besides anti-inflamatory therapy, immunization with protein vaccines and DNA vaccines has emerged as a novel therapy strategy because of the simplicity of preparation and application. An inflammatory response followed by spinal cord injury, and is controled by specific signaling molecules, such as some cytokines playing a crucial role. As a result, appropriate immunoregulation, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokines may be an effective therapy strategy for earlier injury of spinal cord. In addition, myelinassociated inhibitors (MAIs) in the injured spinal cord, such as Nogo, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and oligodendrocyte- myelin glycoprotein (OMgp) are known to prevent axonal regeneration through their co-receptors, and to trigger demyelinating autoimmunity through T cell-mediated harmful autoimmune response. The antagonism of the MAIs through vaccinating with protein or DNA vaccines targeting Nogo, MAG, OMgp, and their co-receptors, may be an effective strategy for the treatment of SCI. However, immunotherapy such as anti-inflammtory therapy or vaccine targeting MAIs or their receptors, accompanied with the potential in risking autoimmune diseases. As a result, in order to optimize the anti-inflammtory therapy and design of protein or DNA vaccines for their use in the future clinical application, we need to further understand the possible mechanisms of neuroprotective immunity. This review presents recent advances in the development of immunotherapy strategies for the treatment of axonal degeneration and demyelination, and improvement of motor function after SCI. PMID:25860061

  12. Pancreatitis Secondary to Anti-Programmed Death Receptor 1 Immunotherapy Diagnosed by FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Alabed, Yazan Z; Aghayev, Ayaz; Sakellis, Christopher; Van den Abbeele, Annick D

    2015-11-01

    A 57-year-old man with metastatic melanoma developed colitis secondary to ipilimumab, a known immune-related adverse event (irAE). The patient then received pembrolizumab immunotherapy, an anti-programmed-death-receptor-1 (PD-1) antibody. Restaging FDG PET/CT study following 3 cycles of therapy demonstrated diffuse increased FDG uptake throughout the body of the pancreas associated with fat stranding in the peripancreatic region, suggestive of pembrolizumab-induced pancreatitis. Although the patient was clinically asymptomatic, diagnosis was biochemically confirmed with elevated amylase and lipase levels. In the era of immunotherapy, it will be critical to recognize irAEs early to allow prompt initiation of appropriate therapy and reduce the risk of long-term sequelae. PMID:26284765

  13. The CD28-B7 Family in Anti-Tumor Immunity: Emerging Concepts in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between B7 molecules and CD28-family receptors are crucial in the regulation of adaptive cellular immunity. In cancer, the aberrant expression of co-inhibitory B7 molecules has been attributed to reduced anti-tumor immunity and cancer immune evasion, prompting the development of cancer therapeutics that can restore T cell function. Murine tumor models have provided significant support for the targeting of multiple immune checkpoints involving CTLA-4, PD-1, ICOS, B7-H3 and B7-H4 during tumor growth, and clinical studies investigating the therapeutic effects of CTLA-4 and PD-1 blockade have shown exceptionally promising results in patients with advanced melanoma and other cancers. The expression pattern of co-inhibitory B7 ligands in the tumor microenvironment has also been largely correlated with poor patient prognosis, and recent evidence suggests that the presence of several B7 molecules may predict the responsiveness of immunotherapies that rely on pre-existing tumor-associated immune responses. While monotherapies blocking T cell co-inhibition have beneficial effects in reducing tumor burden, combinatorial immunotherapy targeting multiple immune checkpoints involved in various stages of the anti-tumor response has led to the most substantial impact on tumor reduction. In this review, we will examine the contributions of B7- and CD28-family members in the context of cancer development, and discuss the implications of current human findings in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25550693

  14. Alternatively Activated Macrophages Boost Induced Regulatory T and Th17 Cell Responses during Immunotherapy for Colitis.

    PubMed

    Haribhai, Dipica; Ziegelbauer, Jennifer; Jia, Shuang; Upchurch, Kyle; Yan, Ke; Schmitt, Erica G; Salzman, Nita H; Simpson, Pippa; Hessner, Martin J; Chatila, Talal A; Williams, Calvin B

    2016-04-15

    Induced regulatory T (iTreg) and Th17 cells promote mucosal homeostasis. We used a T cell transfer model of colitis to compare the capacity of iTreg and Th17 cells to develop in situ following the transfer of naive CD4(+)CD45RB(hi)T cells intoRag1(-/-)C57BL/6 or BALB/c mice, the prototypical Th1/M1- and Th2/M2-prone strains. We found that the frequency and number of Foxp3(+)iTreg cells and Th17 cells were significantly reduced in C57BL/6 mice compared with the BALB/c strain. C57BL/6 mice with colitis were also resistant to natural Treg cell immunotherapy. Pretreatment of C57BL/6Rag1(-/-)mice with IL-4 plus IL-13, or with M2a but not M1 macrophages, dramatically increased the generation of iTreg and Th17 cells. Importantly, M2a transfers, either as a pretreatment or in mice with established colitis, allowed successful immunotherapy with natural Treg cells. M2a macrophages also reduced the generation of pathogenic iTreg cells that lost Foxp3 expression, suggesting that they stabilize the expression of Foxp3. Thus, polarized M2a macrophages drive a directionally concordant expansion of the iTreg-Th17 cell axis and can be exploited as a therapeutic adjuvant in cell-transfer immunotherapy to re-establish mucosal tolerance. PMID:26927797

  15. Rationale for Peptide and DNA Based Epitope Vaccines for Alzheimers Disease Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghochikyan, Anahit

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (A?) immunotherapy has received considerable attention as a promising approach for reducing the level of A? in the CNS of Alzheimers disease patients. However, the first Phase II clinical trial, for the immune therapy AN1792, was halted when a subset of those immunized with A?42 developed adverse events in the central nervous system. In addition, data from the trial indicated that there was a low percentage of responders and generally low to moderate titers in the patients mat received the vaccine. Generated antibodies reduced ?-amyloid deposits in the parenchyma of patients brains, but no reduction in soluble A? or significant improvements in cognitive function of patients were observed. These data and data from pre-clinical studies suggest that reduction in the most toxic oligomeric forms of A? is important for prevention or slowing down of the progression of cognitive decline, and that vaccination should be started prior to irreversible accumulation of the oligomeric A?, at the early stages of AD. Protective immunotherapy requires a development of safe and effective strategy for A? immunotherapy. In this review, the rationale for developing epitope vaccines for the treatment of AD will be discussed. We believe that an epitope vaccine will induce an adequate anti-A? antibody response in the absence of potentially adverse self T cell-mediated events, making it possible to start immunization at the early stages of AD. PMID:19355933

  16. A stochastic model for immunotherapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Baar, Martina; Coquille, Loren; Mayer, Hannah; Hölzel, Michael; Rogava, Meri; Tüting, Thomas; Bovier, Anton

    2016-01-01

    We propose an extension of a standard stochastic individual-based model in population dynamics which broadens the range of biological applications. Our primary motivation is modelling of immunotherapy of malignant tumours. In this context the different actors, T-cells, cytokines or cancer cells, are modelled as single particles (individuals) in the stochastic system. The main expansions of the model are distinguishing cancer cells by phenotype and genotype, including environment-dependent phenotypic plasticity that does not affect the genotype, taking into account the effects of therapy and introducing a competition term which lowers the reproduction rate of an individual in addition to the usual term that increases its death rate. We illustrate the new setup by using it to model various phenomena arising in immunotherapy. Our aim is twofold: on the one hand, we show that the interplay of genetic mutations and phenotypic switches on different timescales as well as the occurrence of metastability phenomena raise new mathematical challenges. On the other hand, we argue why understanding purely stochastic events (which cannot be obtained with deterministic models) may help to understand the resistance of tumours to therapeutic approaches and may have non-trivial consequences on tumour treatment protocols. This is supported through numerical simulations. PMID:27063839

  17. A stochastic model for immunotherapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baar, Martina; Coquille, Loren; Mayer, Hannah; Hölzel, Michael; Rogava, Meri; Tüting, Thomas; Bovier, Anton

    2016-01-01

    We propose an extension of a standard stochastic individual-based model in population dynamics which broadens the range of biological applications. Our primary motivation is modelling of immunotherapy of malignant tumours. In this context the different actors, T-cells, cytokines or cancer cells, are modelled as single particles (individuals) in the stochastic system. The main expansions of the model are distinguishing cancer cells by phenotype and genotype, including environment-dependent phenotypic plasticity that does not affect the genotype, taking into account the effects of therapy and introducing a competition term which lowers the reproduction rate of an individual in addition to the usual term that increases its death rate. We illustrate the new setup by using it to model various phenomena arising in immunotherapy. Our aim is twofold: on the one hand, we show that the interplay of genetic mutations and phenotypic switches on different timescales as well as the occurrence of metastability phenomena raise new mathematical challenges. On the other hand, we argue why understanding purely stochastic events (which cannot be obtained with deterministic models) may help to understand the resistance of tumours to therapeutic approaches and may have non-trivial consequences on tumour treatment protocols. This is supported through numerical simulations. PMID:27063839

  18. [Progression of immunotherapy in gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoli; Xu, Ruihua

    2016-02-25

    Gastric cancer is a malignant disease with high incidence and mortality. The therapeutic methods for advanced gastric cancer, including chemotherapy and targeted therapy are very limited. Immunotherapy is a new method for cancer treatment. The immune checkpoint inhibitors developed for cancer treatment mainly target the CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L pathways. There have already been several inhibitors approved for the treatment of melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer by the FDA, including Ipilimumab (fully human antibody against CTLA-4), Pembrolizumab (fully human antibody against PD-1) and Nivolumab (fully human antibody against PD-1). There are also many on-going clinical trials investigating the value of immune checkpoint inhibitors in treating various malignancies, including advanced gastric cancer. In KEYNOTE-012 trial, for advanced gastric and esophagogastric junction cancer anti-PD-1 therapy seemed to be safe and effective for advanced gastric cancer with PD-L1 positivity. Moreover, studies of adoptive cell therapy and tumor vaccine in gastric cancer are underway. Here the latest developments in immunotherapy for gastric cancer will be illustrated. PMID:26831889

  19. Personalized approaches to active immunotherapy in cancer.

    PubMed

    Ophir, Eran; Bobisse, Sara; Coukos, George; Harari, Alexandre; Kandalaft, Lana E

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is emerging as a promising anti-cancer curative modality. However, in contrast to recent advances obtained employing checkpoint blockade agents and T cell therapies, clinical efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still limited. Most vaccination attempts in the clinic represent "off-the shelf" approaches since they target common "self" tumor antigens, shared among different patients. In contrast, personalized approaches of vaccination are tailor-made for each patient and in spite being laborious, hold great potential. Recent technical advancement enabled the first steps in the clinic of personalized vaccines that target patient-specific mutated neo-antigens. Such vaccines could induce enhanced tumor-specific immune response since neo-antigens are mutation-derived antigens that can be recognized by high affinity T cells, not limited by central tolerance. Alternatively, the use of personalized vaccines based on whole autologous tumor cells, overcome the need for the identification of specific tumor antigens. Whole autologous tumor cells could be administered alone, pulsed on dendritic cells as lysate, DNA, RNA or delivered to dendritic cells in-vivo through encapsulation in nanoparticle vehicles. Such vaccines may provide a source for the full repertoire of the patient-specific tumor antigens, including its private neo-antigens. Furthermore, combining next-generation personalized vaccination with other immunotherapy modalities might be the key for achieving significant therapeutic outcome. PMID:26241169

  20. Immune checkpoint?targeted cancer immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Swatler, Julian; Koz?owska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells may express on their surface various characteristic antigens that can induce antitumor immunity. However, cancer in human body may induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment that limits immune response to its antigens. For many years scientists have tried to develop an immunotherapy which would induce a potent antitumor immune response and lead to an elimination of the disease. One of the most promising immunotherapies is blockade of immune checkpoints, i.e. a group of costimulatory molecules negatively regulating the immune system. Their blockade would overcome immune tolerance in the tumor microenvironment and amplify antitumor immunity. What's more, immune checkpoint blockade may turn out even more profitable, as some of immune checkpoints and their ligands are expressed on tumor surface and on tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, contributing to the immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment. Phase III clinical trials have confirmed efficacy of an anti?CTLA?4 antibody ipilimumab, thereby leading to its acceptance for the treatment of advanced melanoma. Thanks to promising results of the phase I clinical trials, a breakthrough therapy designation and an early approval for the treatment have been granted to anti?PD?1 antibodies ? nivolumab (for the treatment of advanced melanoma and advanced non?small cell lung cancer) and pembrolizumab (for the treatment of advanced melanoma) and, in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer, an anti?PD?L1 antibody ? MPDL3280A as well. Other immune checkpoints, such as LAG?3, TIM?3, BTLA, B7?H3 and B7?H4, are also under early evaluation. PMID:26864062

  1. Tecemotide: An antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wurz, Gregory T; Kao, Chiao-Jung; Wolf, Michael; DeGregorio, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) has made possible the development of antigen-specific cancer immunotherapies such as tecemotide. One of those is mucin 1 (MUC1), a cell membrane glycoprotein expressed on some epithelial tissues such as breast and lung. In cancer, MUC1 becomes overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated, exposing the immunogenic tandem repeat units in the extracellular domain of MUC1. Designed to target tumor associated MUC1, tecemotide is being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials for treatment of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as maintenance therapy following chemoradiotherapy. Additional Phase II studies in other indications are ongoing. This review discusses the preclinical and clinical development of tecemotide, ongoing preclinical studies of tecemotide in human MUC1 transgenic mouse models of breast and lung cancer, and the potential application of these models for optimizing the timing of chemoradiotherapy and tecemotide immunotherapy to achieve the best treatment outcome for patients. PMID:25483673

  2. Laser immunotherapy in treatment of metastatic prostate tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Bartles, Kenneth E.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-07-01

    Laser immunotherapy is a special cancer treatment modality using an intratumor injection of a special formulation consisting of a novel immunoadjuvant and a laser-absorbing dye, followed by a non-invasive near-IR laser irradiation. Our early experiments using a metastatic mammary rat tumor model showed that laser immunotherapy could cause acute selective photothermal tumor destruction and induce a systemic, long-term specific anti-tumor immunity. In the current study, laser immunotherapy was used to treat metastatic prostate tumors in Copenhagen male rats. The transplantable tumors metastasize mainly to the lung and the lung cancer is usually the cause of death. Two experimental were performed in our study. The first was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the tumor burdens, both the primary and the metastasis in the lung. The second was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the long-term survival of the tumor-bearing rats. For comparison, some rat tumors were also treated by the laser-dye combination to study the photothermal effect. Tour results showed that both the photothermal effect and the laser immunotherapy could slow the growth of primary tumors and the metastatic tumors. The laser-dye-immunoadjuvant treatment resulted in more than 20 percent long-term survival rate in tumor-bearing rats. Our experimental results indicate that the laser immunotherapy has a great potential in treating metastatic tumors.

  3. Allogeneic GM-CSF-secreting tumor cell immunotherapies generate potent anti-tumor responses comparable to autologous tumor cell immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Li, Betty; Simmons, Andrew; Du, Thomas; Lin, Carol; Moskalenko, Marina; Gonzalez-Edick, Melissa; VanRoey, Melinda; Jooss, Karin

    2009-11-01

    Clinical studies of cell-based immunotherapies have included both patient-specific (autologous) and non-patient-specific (allogeneic) approaches. Major concerns in using allogeneic immunotherapies are that the induced immune responses may be predominantly directed against the allogeneic HLA molecules of the cellular immunotherapy and not against its potential tumor antigens and that only the allogeneic responses will be enhanced when the immunotherapies are combined with immune checkpoint regulators in an effort to enhance overall immunotherapy potency. To evaluate these possibilities, studies were performed using the GM-CSF-secreting B16F1 cell line as autologous immunotherapy (Auto) and the same cell line modified to over-express the MHC molecule K(d) to generate an immunotherapy that expresses an allogeneic component (Allo) when injected into C57/Bl6 mice. The goal was to compare the specific anti-tumor immune responses induced by these two immunotherapies, which share an identical antigen repertoire, with the exception of the allogeneic MHC class I molecule expressed by the Allo cells, and have identical GM-CSF-secretion levels. Both immunotherapies provided similar therapeutic benefit to tumor-bearing animals with a trend towards a more pronounced tumor growth delay in animals injected with the Allo immunotherapy. This correlated with a significant increase in the number of activated DCs and T-cells in the DLN of Allo-treated animals. In addition, persistent infiltration of effector CD8(+) T-cells was detected in the tumors of animals treated with the Allo immunotherapy, which correlated with a trend towards a greater antigen-specific T-cell response in these animals. When combined with the immune checkpoint regulator anti-PD-1, tumor-specific and allogeneic immune responses were equally enhanced. Thus, the ability of an allogeneic tumor cell immunotherapy to induce a therapeutic anti-tumor immune response is comparable, if not superior, to an autologous tumor cell immunotherapy and its anti-tumor potency can be enhanced when combined with immunomodulatory compounds. PMID:19664962

  4. Cellular immunotherapy in multiple myeloma: lessons from preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Binsfeld, M; Fostier, K; Muller, J; Baron, F; Schots, R; Beguin, Y; Heusschen, R; Caers, J

    2014-12-01

    The majority of multiple myeloma patients relapse with the current treatment strategies, raising the need for alternative therapeutic approaches. Cellular immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving field and currently being translated into clinical trials with encouraging results in several cancer types, including multiple myeloma. Murine multiple myeloma models are of critical importance for the development and refinement of cellular immunotherapy. In this review, we summarize the immune cell changes that occur in multiple myeloma patients and we discuss the cell-based immunotherapies that have been tested in multiple myeloma, with a focus on murine models. PMID:25109893

  5. Evolving synergistic combinations of targeted immunotherapies to combat cancer.

    PubMed

    Melero, Ignacio; Berman, David M; Aznar, M Angela; Korman, Alan J; Prez Gracia, Jos Luis; Haanen, John

    2015-08-01

    Immunotherapy has now been clinically validated as an effective treatment for many cancers. There is tremendous potential for synergistic combinations of immunotherapy agents and for combining immunotherapy agents with conventional cancer treatments. Clinical trials combining blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1) may serve as a paradigm to guide future approaches to immuno-oncology combination therapy. In this Review, we discuss progress in the synergistic design of immune-targeting combination therapies and highlight the challenges involved in tailoring such strategies to provide maximal benefit to patients. PMID:26205340

  6. Immunotherapy for Infectious Diseases: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Akshay; Ahuja, Jasmine; Crane, John K

    2015-11-01

    Passive immunotherapy for established infections, as opposed to active immunization to prevent disease, remains a tiny niche in the world of antimicrobial therapies. Many of the passive immunotherapies currently available are directed against bacterial toxins, such as botulism, or are intended for agents of bioterrorism such as anthrax, which fortunately has remained rare. The emergence of Ebola virus and multi-drug resistant pathogens, however, may breathe new life into the immunotherapy field as researchers seek non-antibiotic interventions for infectious diseases. PMID:26575462

  7. Antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1, DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell transfer, inhibits ocular neovascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Han; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Hijioka, Kuniaki; Qiao, Hong; Oshima, Yuji; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2009-04-17

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in a wide range of ocular diseases. The exact mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of ocular NV is not yet well understood, and so there is no satisfactory therapy for ocular NV. Here, we describe a strategy targeting Flk-1, a self-antigen overexpressed on proliferating endothelial cells in ocular NV, by antiangiogenic immunotherapy-DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell therapy. An oral DNA vaccine encoding Flk-1 carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium markedly suppressed development of laser-induced choroidal NV. We further demonstrated that adoptive transfer of vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells reduced pathological preretinal NV, with a concomitant facilitation of physiological revascularization after oxygen-induced retinal vessel obliteration. However, physiological retinal vascular development was unaffected in neonatal mice transferred with vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells. These findings suggested that antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1 such as vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy may contribute to future therapies for ocular NV.

  8. Treatment with a combination of omalizumab and specific immunotherapy for severe anaphylaxis after a wasp sting.

    PubMed

    Palgan, K; Bartuzi, Z; Gotz-Zbikowska, M

    2014-01-01

    Hymenoptera venom anaphylaxis after bee or wasp sting is a common problem that affects about 1.2 percent to 3.5 percent of the general population. Venom-specific immunotherapy (VIT) is an established mode of treatment for immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated Hymenoptera venom allergy. However, VIT may often be associated with immediate anaphylaxis which can lead to treatment withdrawal. Several cases published in recent years suggest that omalizumab, used as add-on therapy may be able to prevent anaphylaxis during VIT. We report the case of a 30-year-old woman, suffering from mild persistent asthma, who had a history of severe anaphylactic reactions after yellow jacket sting, and after eating peanuts, contact with guinea pig hair, and i.v. administration of dexamethasone natrium phosphate. Initial specific immunotherapy had to be stopped due to severe anaphylaxis (hypotension, dyspnea, and angioedema). The immunotherapy was reintroduced accompanied by the anti-immunoglobulin (Ig) E monoclonal antibody omalizumab. Subcutaneous omalizumab 150 mg was initiated 4 weeks after the anaphylaxis incident and 1 day before the resumption of VIT. Rush treatment was uneventful, and the usual cumulative dose of 111.1 microg was successfully reached. The combination of omalizumab and VIT is a valid option of therapy for these patients and could reduce asthma and food allergy symptoms. PMID:24674685

  9. Safety of engineered allergen-specific immunotherapy vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Valenta, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of the review is to summarize and comment on recent developments regarding the safety of engineered immunotherapy vaccines. Recent findings In the last 2 years, several studies were published in which allergy vaccines were developed on the basis of chemical modification of natural allergen extracts, the engineering of allergen molecules by recombinant DNA technology and synthetic peptide chemistry, allergen genes, new application routes and conjugation with immune modulatory molecules. Several studies exemplified the general applicability of hypoallergenic vaccines on the basis of recombinant fusion proteins consisting of nonallergenic allergen-derived peptides fused to allergen-unrelated carrier molecules. These vaccines are engineered to reduce both, immunoglobulin E (IgE) as well as allergen-specific T cell epitopes in the vaccines, and thus should provoke less IgE and T-cell-mediated side-effects. They are made to induce allergen-specific IgG antibodies against the IgE-binding sites of allergens with the T-cell help of the carrier molecule. Summary Several interesting examples of allergy vaccines with potentially increased safety profiles have been published. The concept of fusion proteins consisting of allergen-derived hypoallergenic peptides fused to allergen-unrelated proteins that seems to be broadly applicable for a variety of allergens appears to be of particular interest because it promises not only to reduce side-effects but also to increase efficacy and convenience of allergy vaccines. PMID:22885888

  10. The delicate balance of melanoma immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gyorki, David E; Callahan, Margaret; Wolchok, Jedd D; Ariyan, Charlotte E

    2013-01-01

    The strategy of immune modulation for the treatment of cancer is being refined with the introduction of multiple new therapeutic agents into the clinic. Melanoma is a disease where many of these agents have demonstrated efficacy. The mechanisms of action of these agents exploit the counter-regulatory mechanisms of the immune response. However, these agents are also associated with immune-related adverse events (IRAEs), which represent tissue-specific inflammatory responses. These IRAEs highlight the delicate balance of immunologic homeostasis and, with some interventions, may occur more frequently in patients who sustain a therapeutic response. This review will discuss melanoma immunogenicity and immunotherapy. Furthermore, the spectrum and distinction between a reversible immune adverse event and autoimmunity will be highlighted. PMID:25505953

  11. Oncolytic viruses: a novel form of immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Prestwich, Robin J; Harrington, Kevin J; Pandha, Hardev S; Vile, Richard G; Melcher, Alan A; Errington, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are novel anticancer agents, currently under investigation in Phase I–III clinical trials. Until recently, most studies have focused on the direct antitumor properties of these viruses, although there is now an increasing body of evidence that the host immune response may be critical to the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy. This may be mediated via innate immune effectors, adaptive antiviral immune responses eliminating infected cells or adaptive antitumor immune responses. This report summarizes preclinical and clinical evidence for the importance of immune interactions, which may be finely balanced between viral and tumor elimination. On this basis, oncolytic viruses represent a promising novel immunotherapy strategy, which may be optimally combined with existing therapeutic modalities. PMID:18925850

  12. Laser Assisted Cancer Immunotherapy: Surface Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Joshua; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip

    2006-03-01

    Experiments in our laboratory incorporate a non-invasive approach to treat superficial tumors in animal models. Based on the concept of Laser Assisted Cancer Immunotherapy, surface irradiation provides good information to compare to invasive alternatives. The procedure involves injecting an immunoadjuvant (Glycated Chitosan) as well as a light absorbing dye (Indocyanine Green) directly into the tumor (5 to 7 mm in diameter). The temperature of the tumor is raised using an infrared diode laser operating at 804 nm, with a silica fiber tip placed a set distance away from the surface of the tumor. We monitor the surface temperature using non-invasive (infrared detector probe) as well as the internal temperature of the tumor using invasive (micro thermocouples) methods. This study aims at the success of the surface irradiation mode to treat solid tumors. * This work is supported by a grant from The National Institute of Health.

  13. The Role of Immunotherapy in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kocoglu, Mehmet; Badros, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematologic malignancy. The treatment of this disease has changed considerably over the last two decades with the introduction to the clinical practice of novel agents such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs. Basic research efforts towards better understanding of normal and missing immune surveillence in myeloma have led to development of new strategies and therapies that require the engagement of the immune system. Many of these treatments are under clinical development and have already started providing encouraging results. We, for the second time in the last two decades, are about to witness another shift of the paradigm in the management of this ailment. This review will summarize the major approaches in myeloma immunotherapies. PMID:26784207

  14. The Role of Immunotherapy in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kocoglu, Mehmet; Badros, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematologic malignancy. The treatment of this disease has changed considerably over the last two decades with the introduction to the clinical practice of novel agents such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs. Basic research efforts towards better understanding of normal and missing immune surveillence in myeloma have led to development of new strategies and therapies that require the engagement of the immune system. Many of these treatments are under clinical development and have already started providing encouraging results. We, for the second time in the last two decades, are about to witness another shift of the paradigm in the management of this ailment. This review will summarize the major approaches in myeloma immunotherapies. PMID:26784207

  15. Dendritic cells: emerging roles in tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Buchsel, Patricia C; DeMeyer, Elaine S

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the use of myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) as immunotherapy in the treatment of cancer. DCs can be stimulated either from circulating blood or bone marrow progenitor cells using cytokines, particularly granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (e.g., sargramostim, Leukine). GM-CSF has been shown to promote maturation, mobilization, and antigen presentation of DCs in vivo or ex vivo as a therapeutic cancer vaccine. Once stimulated, DCs can present tumor antigen to naive T cells to initiate an immune response. In addition to myeloid-related DC stimulation, antitumor properties of GM-CSF include direct cytotoxicity, antiangiogenesis properties, and potential upregulation of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Oncology nurses need to be knowledgeable regarding new therapies. Using knowledge gained through reading professional journals and self-education, nurses can inform patients of new therapies, which may increase patients' hope. PMID:17063617

  16. GD2-targeted immunotherapy and radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dobrenkov, Konstantin; Cheung, Nai-Kong

    2014-01-01

    Ganglioside GD2 is a tumor-associated surface antigen found in a broad spectrum of human cancers and stem cells. They include pediatric embryonal tumors (neuroblastoma, retinoblastoma, brain tumors, osteosarcoma, Ewing’s sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma), as well as adult cancers (small cell lung cancer, melanoma, soft tissue sarcomas). Because of its restricted normal tissue distribution, GD2 has been proven safe for antibody targeting. Anti-GD2 antibody is now incorporated into the standard of care for the treatment of high risk metastatic neuroblastoma. Building on this experience, novel combinations of antibody, cytokines, cells and genetically engineered products all directed at GD2 are rapidly moving into the clinic. In the review, past and present immunotherapy trials directed at GD2 will be summarized, highlighting the lessons learned and the future directions. PMID:25440605

  17. Chemotherapy and immunotherapy: mapping the road ahead.

    PubMed

    Cook, Alistair M; Lesterhuis, W Joost; Nowak, Anna K; Lake, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    Cancer immunotherapy, and in particular checkpoint blockade, is now standard clinical care for a growing number of cancers. Cytotoxic drugs have been the primary weapon against cancer for a long time and have typically been understood because of their capacity to directly kill tumour cells. It is now clear that these drugs are potential partners for checkpoint blockade and different drugs can influence the immune response to cancer through a wide variety of mechanisms. Some of these relate to immunogenic cell death, whilst others relate to changes in antigen-presentation, tumour cell targeting, or depletion of immunosuppressive cells. Here, we review some recent advances in our understanding of the immunological changes associated with chemotherapy, discuss progress in combining chemotherapy with checkpoint blockade, and comment on the difficulties encountered in translating promising preclinical data into successful treatments for cancer patients. PMID:26724433

  18. Development of Passive Immunotherapies for Synucleinopathies.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Ann-Louise; Kallunki, Pekka; Fog, Karina

    2016-02-01

    Immunotherapy using antibodies targeting alpha-synuclein has proven to be an effective strategy for ameliorating pathological and behavioral deficits induced by excess pathogenic alpha-synuclein in various animal and/or cellular models. However, the process of selecting the anti-alpha-synuclein antibody with the best potential to treat synucleinopathies in humans is not trivial. Critical to this process is a better understanding of the pathological processes involved in the synucleinopathies and how antibodies are able to influence these. We will give an overview of the first proof-of-concept studies in rodent disease models and discuss challenges associated with developing antibodies against alpha-synuclein resulting from the distribution and structural characteristics of the protein. We will also provide a status on the passive immunization approaches targeting alpha-synuclein that have entered, or are expected to enter, clinical evaluation. © 2015 Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26704735

  19. Engineering better immunotherapies via RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Sioud, Mouldy

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of dendritic cell (DC) cancer vaccines has gained momentum in recent years. However, clinical data indicate that antitumor immune responses generally fail to translate into measurable tumor regression. This has been ascribed to a variety of tolerance mechanisms, one of which is the expression of immunosuppressive factors by DCs and T cells. With respect to cancer immunotherapies, these factors antagonise the ability to induce robust and sustained immunity required for tumor cell eradication. Gene silencing of immunosuppressive factors in either DCs or adoptive transferred T cells enhanced anti-tumor immune responses and significantly inhibited tumor growth. Therefore, engineered next generation of DC vaccines or adoptive T-cell therapy should include immunomodulatory siRNAs to release the “brakes” imposed by the immune system. Moreover, the combination of gene silencing, antigen targeting to DCs and cytoplasmic cargo delivery will improve clinical benefits. PMID:25483669

  20. Immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Howard L; Di Vito, Joseph; Hrig, Heidi

    2002-02-01

    Despite advances in chemotherapy and surgical technique, patients with pancreatic cancer often succumb to local recurrence or metastatic spread. The need for new therapeutic strategies for this disease coupled with a better understanding of basic immunology have led to the development of novel anti-tumor vaccines. This review focuses on the historical development of tumor vaccines emphasizing the identification of potential pancreatic tumor antigens. The role of both B-cell and T-cell responses in tumor rejection will be reviewed. Methods for antigen presentation, including peptides, recombinant viral and bacterial vectors, dendritic cells, and whole cell approaches will be discussed. The use of immune adjuvants and improved methods of vaccine delivery will also be explored. The full potential for the immunotherapy of pancreatic cancer awaits the results of early phase clinical trials. The development of pancreatic cancer vaccines represents a useful paradigm for the translation of basic research into the clinical arena. PMID:12063825

  1. Aluminium in Allergies and Allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium is a hot topic in the current debate. Exposure occurs due to environmental, dietary and intentional exposure to aluminium, such as in vaccines where it was introduced in 1926. In spite of the fact that it is a typical Th2 adjuvant, aluminium redirects the immune response in systemic allergen immunotherapy (SIT) upon prolonged immunization. SIT in the US, and SLIT in general, are at present non-adjuvanted therapies, but in Europe aluminium is used as adjuvant in most SIT preparations. It enhances the safety of SIT by local deposition of the allergen. Undesired properties of aluminium adjuvants comprise acute and chronic inflammation at the injection site, its Th2 immune stimulatory capacity, its accumulation besides biodistribution in the body. The adjuvant and safety profile of aluminium adjuvants in allergy vaccines are discussed, as well as the need for putting modern delivery systems and adjuvants on the fast track. PMID:25780491

  2. Targeting nanoparticles to dendritic cells for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Luis J; Tacken, Paul J; Rueda, Felix; Domingo, Joan Carles; Albericio, Fernando; Figdor, Carl G

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key players in the initiation of adaptive immune responses and are currently exploited in immunotherapy for treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. Development of targeted nanodelivery systems carrying vaccine components, including antigens and adjuvants, to DCs in vivo represents a promising strategy to enhance immune responses. Delivering particulate vaccines specifically to DCs and preventing nonspecific uptake by other endocytotic cells are challenging. Size represents a critical parameter determining whether particulate vaccines can penetrate lymph nodes and reach resident DCs. Specific delivery is further enhanced by actively targeting DC-specific receptors. This chapter discusses the rationale for the use of particle-based vaccines and provides an overview of antigen-delivery vehicles currently under investigation. In addition, we discuss how vaccine delivery systems may be developed, focusing on liposomes, PLGA polymers, and gold nanoparticles, to obtain safe and efficacious vaccines. PMID:22568905

  3. Biomarkers for Allergen Immunotherapy: A "Panoromic" View.

    PubMed

    Moingeon, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Biomarkers (BMKs) are biological parameters that can be measured to predict or monitor disease severity or treatment efficacy. The induction of regulatory dendritic cells (DCs) concomitantly with a downregulation of proallergic DC2s (ie, DCs supporting the differentiation of T-helper lymphocyte type 2 cells) in the blood of patients allergic to grass pollen has been correlated with the early onset of allergen immunotherapy efficacy. The combined use of omics technologies to compare biological samples from clinical responders and nonresponders is being implemented in the context of nonhypothesis-driven approaches. Such comprehensive "panoromic" strategies help identify completely novel candidate BMKs, to be subsequently validated as companion diagnostics in large-scale clinical trials. PMID:26617233

  4. Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalopathies and Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Gastaldi, Matteo; Thouin, Anaïs; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 15 years it has become clear that rare but highly recognizable diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including newly identified forms of limbic encephalitis and other encephalopathies, are likely to be mediated by antibodies (Abs) to CNS proteins. The Abs are directed against membrane receptors and ion channel-associated proteins that are expressed on the surface of neurons in the CNS, such as N-methyl D-aspartate receptors and leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein and contactin-associated protein like 2, that are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels. The diseases are not invariably cancer-related and are therefore different from the classical paraneoplastic neurological diseases that are associated with, but not caused by, Abs to intracellular proteins. Most importantly, the new antibody-associated diseases almost invariably respond to immunotherapies with considerable and sometimes complete recovery, and there is convincing evidence of their pathogenicity in the relatively limited studies performed so far. Treatments include first-line steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, and plasma exchange, and second-line rituximab and cyclophosphamide, followed in many cases by steroid-sparing agents in the long-term. This review focuses mainly on N-methyl D-aspartate receptor- and voltage-gated potassium channel complex-related Abs in adults, the clinical phenotypes, and treatment responses. Pediatric cases are referred to but not reviewed in detail. As there have been very few prospective studies, the conclusions regarding immunotherapies are based on retrospective studies. PMID:26692392

  5. Bacteria and their toxins tamed for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Irena; Holubova, Jana; Kosova, Martina; Sadilkova, Lenka

    2012-06-01

    Bacterial toxins share the ability to enter host cells to target various intracellular proteins and to modulate host immune responses. Over the last 20 years, toxins and their mutated variants, as well as live attenuated bacteria, have been exploited for vaccination and immunotherapy of various infectious, malignant and autoimmune diseases. The ability of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin to translocate its adenylate cyclase domain across the host cell membrane, as well as the pathways of intracellular trafficking of Bacillus anthracis lethal and edema toxins, Shigella dysenteriae shiga toxin or Escherichia coli shiga-like toxin, have been repeatedly exploited for the delivery of antigenic epitopes into host cells and for stimulation of antigen-specific T cell responses. Similarly, E. coli α-hemolysin, or effector proteins of Yersinia and Salmonella secreted by the type III secretion systems, were used to facilitate the delivery of fused heterologous proteins or peptides for antigenic presentation. Vibrio cholerae cholera toxin, E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin, B. pertussis pertussis toxin or the Cry1A protein of Bacillus thuringiensis have shown a great potential to act as adjuvants and to stimulate mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. The immunotherapeutic potential of some toxins, like Clostridium perfringens perfringolysin O, Streptococcus intermedius intermedilysin, or Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumolysin needs to be evaluated further. The Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxoid used as a vaccine delivery tool, or Corynebacterium diphtheriae diphtheria toxin and Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A-based immunotoxins, are currently in various phases of clinical trials for cancer immunotherapy, as are some antigen-delivering Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes strains. PMID:22339216

  6. [Recent advances in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Gold, R; Rieckmann, P

    2007-09-01

    In this article recent advances in research on the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) are summarized. New evidence from molecular histopathology is discussed focussing on neurodegenerative aspects. In addition findings with a direct effect on therapeutic decisions are presented which have contributed to improved immunotherapy. During the last decade important advances in immunotherapy have proven especially useful for patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Escalating algorithms are available for both relapses and long-term immunotherapy. Novel therapeutic approaches with monoclonal antibodies have increasing importance, yet side effects are not completely understood. The pathogenetic insights presented here may open new avenues for novel immunotherapies and lead to individualized MS therapy in the future. Limitations are given for primary progressive MS due to the lack of suitable tissue specimens and experimental models. Neuroprotective treatment strategies aiming at the protection of glial and neuronal cells are still in early stages of development. PMID:17668159

  7. Food allergen immunotherapy: Current status and prospects for the future.

    PubMed

    Wood, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Food allergy is a common condition for which the only currently approved treatments are avoidance of the allergenic food and administration of emergency medications on accidental exposure. Over the past 10 years, significant advances have been made in the field of food immunotherapy, including oral immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy, and, more recently, epicutaneous immunotherapy. Each of these approaches are intended to induce some level of desensitization with chronic or repeated exposure to the allergenic food protein, although the risks and potential benefits of each treatment differ significantly. Although new data are emerging at a rapid pace and progress has been substantial, a number of important issues need to be addressed before introduction of these therapies into clinical practice. Furthermore, it is entirely possible that advances in this field will render these current approaches obsolete over the next 20 to 30 years as new and better therapies are developed. PMID:27059725

  8. Immunotherapy: Critical Appraisal, Effectiveness and Cost/Benefit Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Amant, Serge

    1986-01-01

    A critical appraisal of the literature shows that allergy skin testing is safe, economical and useful when correlated by a meticulous medical history and physical examination. Immunotherapy is beneficial in appropriately selected patients, if properly performed using licensed and preferably standardized allergenic extracts. This article reviews the labelling and standardization of those extracts, the guidelines in determining their degree of effectiveness, their current status and their different nature through inhalation, contact, injection or ingestion. It emphasizes the basic steps in dealing with potential allergic complaints, enumerating the specific indications for immunotherapy, in which conditions it gives results and the extent of these results. The cost/benefit ratio of immunotherapy and the future prospects for allergy skin testing and immunotherapy are discussed. PMID:21274249

  9. Oral lyophilisate and food immunotherapy: from research to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Tabar, A I

    2008-01-01

    Thanks to its excellent safety profile, sublingual immunotherapy has served as a basis for launching two important lines of research in current allergology: sublingual immunotherapy with pharmaceutical registry (oral lyophilizates or tablets), and sublingual immunotherapy with food. At present, clinical trials are being conducted which use rapid dissolution oral lyophilizates. The results of the clinical trials carried out in large patient groups and based on a double-blind methodological design have allowed pharmaceutical registry of this form of treatment, with the therapeutic indications of rhinitis and allergy to grasses. Phleum lyophilizate indicated for the treatment of rhinoconjunctivitis will be marketed in Spain in the coming months. In parallel to development of the sublingual route, advances in our knowledge of pollen allergy and its relationship to plant food allergies have facilitated the conducting of studies involving sublingual immunotherapy for allergy to kiwifruit, hazelnut and peach - thus giving rise to promising future perspectives for affected patients. PMID:19080800

  10. Challenges in Immunotherapy Presented by the Glioblastoma Multiforme Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Christopher; Ruzevick, Jacob; Phallen, Jillian; Belcaid, Zineb; Lim, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. Despite intensive treatment, the prognosis for patients with GBM remains grim with a median survival of only 14.6 months. Immunotherapy has emerged as a promising approach for treating many cancers and affords the advantages of cellular-level specificity and the potential to generate durable immune surveillance. The complexity of the tumor microenvironment poses a significant challenge to the development of immunotherapy for GBM, as multiple signaling pathways, cytokines, and cell types are intricately coordinated to generate an immunosuppressive milieu. The development of new immunotherapy approaches frequently uncovers new mechanisms of tumor-mediated immunosuppression. In this review, we discuss many of the current approaches to immunotherapy and focus on the challenges presented by the tumor microenvironment. PMID:22190972

  11. Brain Tumor Immunotherapy: What have We Learned so Far?

    PubMed Central

    Van Gool, Stefaan Willy

    2015-01-01

    High grade glioma is a rare brain cancer, incurable in spite of modern neurosurgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Novel approaches are in research, and immunotherapy emerges as a promising strategy. Clinical experiences with active specific immunotherapy demonstrate feasibility, safety and most importantly, but incompletely understood, prolonged long-term survival in a fraction of the patients. In relapsed patients, we developed an immunotherapy schedule and we categorized patients into clinically defined risk profiles. We learned how to combine immunotherapy with standard multimodal treatment strategies for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme patients. The developmental program allows further improvements related to newest scientific insights. Finally, we developed a mode of care within academic centers to organize cell-based therapies for experimental clinical trials in a large number of patients. PMID:26137448

  12. Immunotherapy for small-cell lung cancer: emerging evidence.

    PubMed

    Reck, Martin; Heigener, David; Reinmuth, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Treatment for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) has changed little over the past few decades; available therapies have failed to extend survival in advanced disease. In recent years, immunotherapy with treatments such as interferons, TNFs, vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has advanced and shown promise in the treatment of several tumor types. Immune checkpoint inhibitors such as ipilimumab, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, durvalumab, tremelimumab and ulocuplumab are at the forefront of immunotherapy and have achieved approvals for certain cancer types, including melanoma (ipilimumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab), non-SCLC (nivolumab and pembrolizumab) and renal cell carcinoma (nivolumab). Clinical trials are investigating different immunotherapies in patients with other solid and hematologic malignancies, including SCLC. We review emerging evidence supporting the use of immunotherapy in SCLC patients. PMID:26882955

  13. Optimizing Dendritic Cell-Based Approaches for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Jashodeep; Terhune, Julia H.; Lowenfeld, Lea; Cintolo, Jessica A.; Xu, Shuwen; Roses, Robert E.; Czerniecki, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells uniquely suited for cancer immunotherapy. They induce primary immune responses, potentiate the effector functions of previously primed T-lymphocytes, and orchestrate communication between innate and adaptive immunity. The remarkable diversity of cytokine activation regimens, DC maturation states, and antigen-loading strategies employed in current DC-based vaccine design reflect an evolving, but incomplete, understanding of optimal DC immunobiology. In the clinical realm, existing DC-based cancer immunotherapy efforts have yielded encouraging but inconsistent results. Despite recent U.S. Federal and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of DC-based sipuleucel-T for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, clinically effective DC immunotherapy as monotherapy for a majority of tumors remains a distant goal. Recent work has identified strategies that may allow for more potent “next-generation” DC vaccines. Additionally, multimodality approaches incorporating DC-based immunotherapy may improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25506283

  14. Future directions in bladder cancer immunotherapy: towards adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sean G; Zaharoff, David A

    2016-03-01

    The clinical management of bladder cancer has not changed significantly in several decades. In particular, intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy has been a mainstay for high-risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer since the late 1970s/early 1980s. This is despite the fact that bladder cancer has the highest recurrence rates of any cancer and BCG immunotherapy has not been shown to induce a tumor-specific immune response. We and others have hypothesized that immunotherapies capable of inducing tumor-specific adaptive immunity are needed to impact bladder cancer morbidity and mortality. This article summarizes the preclinical and clinical development of bladder cancer immunotherapies with an emphasis on the last 5 years. Expected progress in the near future is also discussed. PMID:26860539

  15. [Immunotherapy of malignant diseases--developments and prospects].

    PubMed

    Paukovits, Patricia; Himmler, Gottfried; Loibner, Hans

    2004-05-01

    Conventional strategies in cancer management, such as surgery, chemotherapy or radiation therapy are effective treatments for most tumors, but often fail in achieving complete remission. The reason for this failure is, that single tumor cells have already spread to various organs by the time the tumor is diagnosed and lead, often years later, to the development of metastases. Therefore it is insufficient to treat the tumor solely at its point of origin; tumor dissemination should be prevented too. Tumor immunotherapy is one of the treatment options that target tumor propagation. In cancer immunotherapy, the immune system of the patient is influenced such, that the tumor is recognized and attacked by the body's defences. Since these therapies specifically aim at tumor cells, they cause fewer adverse events and improve the quality of life of patients. This review outlines previous developments in cancer immunotherapies with a focus on active immunotherapies and vaccination strategies. PMID:15244049

  16. Developing dendritic cell polynucleotide vaccination for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Berlyn, K A; Ponniah, S; Stass, S A; Malone, J G; Hamlin-Green, G; Lim, J K; Cottler-Fox, M; Tricot, G; Alexander, R B; Mann, D L; Malone, R W

    1999-08-20

    Immunotherapy has been successfully used to treat some human malignancies, principally melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. Genetic-based cancer immunotherapies were proposed which prime T lymphocyte recognition of unique neo-antigens arising from specific mutations. Genetic immunization (polynucleotide vaccination, DNA vaccines) is a process whereby gene therapy methods are used to create vaccines and immunotherapies. Recent findings indicate that genetic immunization works indirectly via a bone marrow derived cell, probably a type of dendritic antigen presenting cell (APC). Direct targeting of genetic vaccines to these cells may provide an efficient method for stimulating cellular and humoral immune responses to infectious agents and tumor antigens. Initial studies have provided monocytic-derived dendritic cell (DC) isolation and culture techniques, simple methods for delivering genes into these cells, and have also uncovered potential obstacles to effective cancer immunotherapy which may restrict the utility of this paradigm to a subset of patients. PMID:10486925

  17. Toxoplasmic encephalitis during mycophenolate mofetil immunotherapy of neuromuscular disease

    PubMed Central

    Chahin, Nizar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To show that immunotherapy with medications such mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) can cause serious complications in patients with neuromuscular disorders. Methods: Two patients with neuromuscular disorders on immunotherapy with long-term MMF who developed toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) were included in this case series. Results: One patient with myasthenia gravis and one patient with inflammatory myopathy on immunotherapy with long-term MMF developed severe TE. Diagnosis was based on clinical presentation, MRI brain imaging characteristics, and CSF PCR positivity for Toxoplasma gondii. Both patients were treated with pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, and leucovorin for 2 months without clinical improvement, and both died. Conclusions: Immunotherapy with medications such as MMF can cause devastating TE in non-HIV patients with neuromuscular disorders. Early consideration and recognition of this complication is important to possibly prevent unfavorable outcomes. The utility of screening and prophylaxis against toxoplasmosis in individuals with neuroimmunologic disorders and other autoimmune disorders who receive immunosuppressive therapy requires future study. PMID:25635260

  18. Cancer immunotherapy: harnessing the immune system to battle cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiping

    2015-09-01

    The recent clinical successes of immune checkpoint blockade and chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapies represent a turning point in cancer immunotherapy. These successes also underscore the importance of understanding basic tumor immunology for successful clinical translation in treating patients with cancer. The Reviews in this Review Series focus on current developments in cancer immunotherapy, highlight recent advances in our understanding of basic aspects of tumor immunology, and suggest how these insights can lead to the development of new immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26325031

  19. Immunotherapy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: an overview of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Alessandro; Merkow, Justin; Edil, Barish H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and current therapeutic strategies are often unsatisfactory. Identification and development of more efficacious therapies is urgently needed. Immunotherapy offered encouraging results in preclinical models during the last decades, and several clinical trials have explored its therapeutic application in PDAC. The aim of this review is to summarize the results of clinical trials conducted to evaluate the future perspective of immunotherapy in the treatment of PDAC. PMID:26361407

  20. Recent advances in the field of anti-cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Henrique; Kwok, Hang Fai

    2015-01-01

    Background The main goal of anti-cancer therapy is to specifically inhibit the malignant activity of cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. As such, for every proposed therapy, it is important to keep in mind the therapeutic index — the ratio of the toxic dose over the therapeutic dose. The use of immunotherapy has allowed a means to both specifically block protein–protein interaction and deliver cytotoxic events to a tumor-specific antigen. Review scope It is the objective of this review to give an overview on current immunotherapy treatment for cancers using monoclonal antibodies. We demonstrate three exciting targets for immunotherapy, TNF-α Converting Enzyme (TACE), Cathepsin S and Urokinase Plasmogen Activator and go over the advances made with one of the most used monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy, Rituximab; as well as Herceptin, which is used for breast cancer therapy. Furthermore, we touch on other venues of immunotherapy, such as adaptive cell transfer, the use of nucleic acids and the use of dendritic cells. Finally, we summarize some ongoing studies that spell tentative advancements for anti-cancer immunotherapy. General significance Immunotherapy is at the forefront of anti-cancer therapies, allying both a high degree of specificity to general high effectiveness and fewer side-effects. PMID:26673349

  1. Allergen hybrids – next generation vaccines for Fagales pollen immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, U; Hauser, M; Hofer, H; Himly, M; Hoflehner, E; Steiner, M; Mutschlechner, S; Hufnagl, K; Ebner, C; Mari, A; Briza, P; Bohle, B; Wiedermann, U; Ferreira, F; Wallner, M

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Trees belonging to the order of Fagales show a distinct geographical distribution. While alder and birch are endemic in the temperate zones of the Northern Hemisphere, hazel, hornbeam and oak prefer a warmer climate. However, specific immunotherapy of Fagales pollen-allergic patients is mainly performed using birch pollen extracts, thus limiting the success of this intervention in birch-free areas. Objectives T cells are considered key players in the modification of an allergic immune response during specific immunotherapy (SIT), therefore we thought to combine linear T cell epitope-containing stretches of the five most important Fagales allergens from birch, hazel, alder, oak and hornbeam resulting in a Fagales pollen hybrid (FPH) molecule applicable for SIT. Methods A Fagales pollen hybrid was generated by PCR-based recombination of low IgE-binding allergen epitopes. Moreover, a structural-variant FPH4 was calculated by in silico mutagenesis, rendering the protein unable to adopt the Bet v 1-like fold. Both molecules were produced in Escherichia coli, characterized physico-chemically as well as immunologically, and tested in mouse models of allergic sensitization as well as allergy prophylaxis. Results Using spectroscopic analyses, both proteins were monomeric, and the secondary structure elements of FPH resemble the ones typical for Bet v 1-like proteins, whereas FPH4 showed increased amounts of unordered structure. Both molecules displayed reduced binding capacities of Bet v 1-specific IgE antibodies. However, in a mouse model, the proteins were able to induce high IgG titres cross-reactive with all parental allergens. Moreover, prophylactic treatment with the hybrid proteins prevented pollen extract-induced allergic lung inflammation in vivo. Conclusion The hybrid molecules showed a more efficient uptake and processing by dendritic cells resulting in a modified T cell response. The proteins had a lower IgE-binding capacity compared with the parental allergens, thus the high safety profile and increased efficacy emphasize clinical application for the treatment of Fagales multi-sensitization. PMID:24330218

  2. Combination of Active Specific Immunotherapy or Adoptive Antibody or Lymphocyte Immunotherapy with Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianqian; Herlyn, Dorothee

    2009-01-01

    Successful treatment of cancer patients with a combination of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and chemotherapeutic drugs has spawned various other forms of additional combination therapies, including vaccines or adoptive lymphocyte transfer combined with chemotherapeutics. These therapies were effective against established tumors in animal models and showed promising results in initial clinical trials in cancer patients, awaiting testing in larger randomized controlled studies. Although combination between immunotherapy and chemotherapy has long been viewed as incompatible as chemotherapy, especially in high doses meant to increase anti-tumor efficacy, has induced immunosuppression, various mechanisms may explain the reported synergistic effects of the two types of therapies. Thus direct effects of chemotherapy on tumor or host environment, such as induction of tumor cell death, elimination of regulatory T cells, and/or enhancement of tumor cell sensitivity to lysis by CTL may account for enhancement of immunotherapy by chemotherapy. Furthermore, induction of lymphopenia by chemotherapy has increased the efficacy of adoptive lymphocyte transfer in cancer patients. On the other hand, immunotherapy may directly modulate the tumor's sensitivity to chemotherapy. Thus, anti-tumor mAb can increase the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and patients treated first with immunotherapy followed by chemotherapy showed higher clinical response rates than patients that had received chemotherapy alone. In conclusion, combination of active specific immunotherapy or adoptive mAb or lymphocyte immunotherapy with chemotherapy has great potential for the treatment of cancer patients which needs to be confirmed in larger controlled and randomized Phase III trials. PMID:18925393

  3. Perspectives in vaccine adjuvants for allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Filì, Lucia; Cardilicchia, Elisa; Maggi, Enrico; Parronchi, Paola

    2014-10-01

    The design of more powerful adjuvants is a tool of crucial interest to ameliorate vaccination strategies to reduce injections and/or dose of antigen, induce local immunity and obtain better protection. Effective anti-infectious vaccines should elicit protective TH1 responses, cytotoxic CD8+ cells and antibody-forming cells. However, cytokine microenvironment is a key point also in targeted therapeutic vaccinations, such as allergen-specific immunotherapy, where the interference with an already-existing but inappropriate immunity is required. In this case, safe, appropriately conditioning and potentially orally available adjuvants together with delivery to appropriate subsets of dendritic cells would be highly appreciated to properly boost innate immune cells. In fact, aluminium hydroxide, although safe, has been classically associated with the induction of a TH2 response to co-formulated antigens. Thus, detoxified lipopolysaccaride (MPL-A), CpG oligonucleotides, imidazoquinolines and adenine derivatives acting via innate sensors may represent improvements in therapeutic vaccinations for allergy as able to interfere with pathogenic TH2 cells with eventual induction of TH1 differentiation. PMID:24361819

  4. Why has active immunotherapy not worked in lung cancer?

    PubMed

    Thomas, A; Giaccone, G

    2015-11-01

    Vaccines that rely on active specific stimulation of the host immune system have the potential to trigger durable antitumor responses with minimal toxicity. However, in nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), several large phase III trials of vaccines reported within the last year have yielded disappointing results. Compared with placebo, belagenpumatucel-L (an allogenic tumor cell vaccine), tecemotide (a peptide vaccine targeting MUC-1) and melanoma-associated antigen-A3 (a protein-based vaccine) did not improve outcomes in NSCLC. The lack of clinically significant outcomes, despite their ability to prime and expand tumor antigen-specific T cells could at least partly be attributed to the inability of vaccine-induced T-cell responses to overcome the tumoral mechanisms of immune escape which limit the clonal expansion of T cells following vaccination. A number of such mechanisms have been recognized including reduced antigen presentation, antigenic loss, cytokines, immunosuppressive cells and immune checkpoints. Strategies aimed at modulating the immune checkpoints have shown promise and are on the verge of revolutionizing the therapeutic landscape of metastatic NSCLC. Overcoming immune tolerance and improving the activation of antitumor T cells via combinatorial approaches may represent a new and more promising therapeutic application for active immunotherapies in NSCLC. PMID:26232492

  5. Statins are Associated with Reduced Use of Steroids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: a Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Crockett, Seth D.; Hansen, Richard A.; Stürmer, Til; Schectman, Robin; Darter, Jane; Sandler, Robert S.; Kappelman, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Statin medications have anti-inflammatory effects. We sought to determine whether statin use in persons with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was associated with reduced rates of steroid use or other markers of disease activity. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study using administrative data. Statin users with IBD were compared to statin-unexposed IBD subjects. The primary outcome was an oral steroid prescription; secondary outcomes included anti-TNF initiation, hospitalization, or abdominal surgery. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) adjusted for potential confounders. Results The study cohort included 1,986 statin-exposed and 9,871 unexposed subjects. Statin use was associated with an 18% reduction in the rate of steroid initiation [HR 0.82 (95% CI 0.71, 0.94)]. A statistically significant result was seen with atorvastatin only [HR 0.76 (95% CI 0.60, 0.96)]. Statins were associated with a reduced rate of steroids in ulcerative colitis [HRs 0.75 (95% CI 0.62, 0.91)], but not in Crohn’s disease [HR 0.91 (95% CI 0.74, 1.12)]. Statin use was associated with reduced hazard of anti-TNF use [HR 0.72 (95% CI 0.46, 1.11)], abdominal surgery [HR 0.80 (95% CI 0.63, 1.02)], and hospitalization [HR 0.88 (95% CI 0.74, 1.05)], but these results did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion In this large retrospective cohort study, statin use amongst persons with IBD was associated with reduced use of oral steroids, particularly for UC. Prospective clinical trials are needed to confirm whether adjuvant treatment of IBD with statin drugs may spare immunosuppressant therapy or ameliorate flares. PMID:21826766

  6. Clinical and histopathological evaluation of the effect of addition of immunotherapy with Mw vaccine to standard chemotherapy in borderline leprosy.

    PubMed

    Kamal, R; Natrajan, M; Katoch, K; Arora, M

    2012-01-01

    This study reports detailed analysis of clinical parameters and clearance of granuloma in borderline leprosy patients treated with immunotherapy and chemotherapy. It aims to assess the additive effect of immunotherapy (Mwvaccine) with standard MDT on clinical status of untreated borderline leprosy cases and on granuloma fraction of untreated borderline leprosy cases. Patients attending the OPD were serially recruited in two groups. A total of 150 cases in one treatment (trial) group (Mw vaccine plus MDT) and 120 cases in another treatment (control) group (MDT only) of border line leprosy have been included. After the formal written consent, detailed clinical examination, charting, smear examination of all untreated borderline patients of both groups was done, biopsies were taken from the active lesions of all patients of both groups at start of therapy and every six month thereafter till the completion of therapy. The same procedure was repeated every six months during the follow-up period. Standard MDT was given to all the patients of both groups according to type of disease. Mw vaccine 0.1 ml (0.5 x 10(9) bacilli) was injected intra-dermally at the start of therapy and every six months in addition to chemotherapy to the treatment group. The BT cases were followed up after 6 doses of MDT and 2 doses of Mw vaccine, and, the BB, BL cases were followed up after 24 doses of MDT plus 5 doses of Mw vaccine. Clinically, greater and faster improvement was observed in all the clinical parameters, faster attainment of smear negativity and two episodes of lepra reaction occurred in cases treated with combined chemotherapy and immunotherapy, as compared to controls (chemotherapy alone) wherein clinical improvement was slower in all parameters, slower attainment of smear negativity in bacillary index and seven showed the occurrence of reactions, histipathologically in addition to more rapid clearance of granuloma in immunotherapy treated group, a significant finding was an increase in the epithelioid cells population in this group. This suggests a possible immunoactivation of the macrophages especially in BB/BL immunotherapy group. Overall comparison of regression induced by chemotherapy alone with that induced by combined chemotherapy and immunotherapy shows a greater reduction in clinical parameters as well as granuloma fraction in BT cases as well as in BB/BL cases. This trial shows the potential usefulness of this approach of addition of immunotherapy to standard chemotherapy in borderline leprosy cases which leads to in faster recovery from disease reduced chances of reactions and faster granuloma clearance. Such information is expected to be useful in improving the immunotherapeutic approaches for treatinggranulomatous conditions in general and in leprosy in particular. PMID:23720894

  7. Sublingual immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization position paper 2013 update

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have prepared this document, “Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2013 Update”, according to the evidence-based criteria, revising and updating chapters of the originally published paper, “Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2009”, available at http://www.waojournal.org. Namely, these comprise: “Mechanisms of sublingual immunotherapy;” “Clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy” – reporting all the data of all controlled trials published after 2009; “Safety of sublingual immunotherapy” – with the recently published Grading System for adverse reactions; “Impact of sublingual immunotherapy on the natural history of respiratory allergy” – with the relevant evidences published since 2009; “Efficacy of SLIT in children” – with detailed analysis of all the studies; “Definition of SLIT patient selection” – reporting the criteria for eligibility to sublingual immunotherapy; “The future of immunotherapy in the community care setting”; “Methodology of clinical trials according to the current scientific and regulatory standards”; and “Guideline development: from evidence-based medicine to patients' views” – including the evolution of the methods to make clinical recommendations. Additionally, we have added new chapters to cover a few emerging crucial topics: “Practical aspects of schedules and dosages and counseling for adherence” – which is crucial in clinical practice for all treatments; “Perspectives and new approaches” – including recombinant allergens, adjuvants, modified allergens, and the concept of validity of the single products. Furthermore, “Raising public awareness about sublingual immunotherapy”, as a need for our patients, and strategies to increase awareness of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) among patients, the medical community, all healthcare stakeholders, and public opinion, are also reported in detail. PMID:24679069

  8. Immunotherapy for advanced melanoma: fulfilling the promise.

    PubMed

    Gogas, Helen; Polyzos, Aristidis; Kirkwood, John

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide and despite early detection and intervention, the number of patients dying from metastatic disease continues to rise. The prognosis of advanced melanoma remains poor, with median survival between 6 and 9 months. Over the past thirty years and despite extensive clinical research, the treatment options for metastatic disease were limited and melanoma is still considered as one of the most therapy-resistant malignancies. Single-agent and combination chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biochemotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted agent therapy and combination regimes failed to show significant improvement in overall survival. Recent advances and in-depth understanding of the biology of melanoma, have contributed in the development of new agents. Based on the molecular and immunological background of the disease, the new drugs have shown benefit in overall and progression free survival. As the picture of the disease begins to change, oncologists need to alter their approach to melanoma treatment and consider disease biology together with targeted individualized treatment. In this review the authors attempt to offer an insight in present and past melanoma treatment options, with a focus on the recently approved immunotherapeutic agents and the clinical perspectives of these new weapons against metastatic melanoma. PMID:23725878

  9. Advances in cancer immunology and cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Voena, Claudia; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    After decades of setbacks, cancer immunology is living its Golden Age. Recent advances in cancer immunology have provided new therapeutic approaches to treat cancer. The objective clinical response observed in patients treated with antibodies that block the immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1)/programmed cell-death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathways, has led to their FDA approval for the treatment of melanoma in 2011 and in 2014, respectively. The anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab has received the FDA-approval in March 2015 for squamous lung cancer treatment. In addition, antibodies targeting PD-1 or PD-L1 have demonstrated their efficacy and safety in additional tumors, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer, and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Almost at the same time, the field of adoptive cell transfer has exploded. The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T technology has provided strong evidence of efficacy in the treatment of B cell malignancies, and different T cell based treatments are currently under investigation for different types of tumors. In this review we will discuss the latest advances in cancer immunology and immunotherapy as well as new treatments now under development in the clinic and potential strategies that have shown promising results in preclinical models. PMID:27011048

  10. Recent developments on immunotherapy for brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, Derek; Nigam, Pragati; Thaci, Bart; Dey, Mahua

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Brain tumors are a unique class of cancers since they are anatomically shielded from normal immunosurveillance by the blood brain barrier, lack a normal lymphatic drainage system and reside in a potently immunosuppressive environment. Of the primary brain cancers, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive in adults. Although treatment options include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, the average lifespan of GBM patients remains at only 14.6 months post-diagnosis. Areas covered A review of key cellular and molecular immune system mediators in the context of brain tumors including TGF-β, cytotoxic T cells, Tregs, CTLA-4, PD-1, and IDO, is discussed. In addition, prognostic factors, currently utilized immunotherapeutic strategies, on-going clinical trials, and a discussion of new or potential immunotherapies for brain tumor patients are considered. Expert opinion Current drugs that improve the quality of life and overall survival in patients with brain tumors, especially for GBM, are poorly effective. This disease requires a re-analysis of currently accepted treatment strategies, as well as newly designed approaches. Here, we review the fundamental aspects of immunosuppression in brain tumors, new and promising immunotherapeutic drugs, as well as combinatorial strategies that focus on the simultaneous inhibition of immunosuppressive hubs, both in immune- and brain tumor-cells, which is critical to consider for achieving future success for the treatment of this devastating disease. PMID:22533851

  11. Immunotherapy targeting colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Iovino, Flora; Meraviglia, Serena; Spina, Marisa; Orlando, Valentina; Saladino, Vitanna; Dieli, Francesco; Stassi, Giorgio; Todaro, Matilde

    2011-01-01

    In the last 10 years, cancer stem cells have interested the scientific community because this small tumorigenic population is also associated with tumor progression in human patients and specific targeting of cancer stem cells could be a strategy to eradicate cancers currently resistant to conventional therapy. Clinical studies have recently demonstrated that adding immune therapy to chemotherapy has survival benefits in comparison with chemotherapy alone that can sensitize tumors to immune cell-mediated killing (e.g., increasing sensitivity of tumor cells to subsequent cytotoxicity by T cells via upregulation of death receptors DR5 and Fas). However, loss of MHC molecules is often observed in cancer cells, rendering tumor cells resistant to CD8 T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. For this reason, we review the role of other T-cell subsets, such as γδ T and NK cells that are able to efficiently recognize and kill tumor cells and that could be used in passive or active immunotherapy in cancer stem cell eradication. PMID:21174560

  12. Optimal vaccine scheduling in cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccoli, B.; Castiglione, F.

    2006-10-01

    Cancer immunotherapy aims at stimulating the immune system to react against cancer stealth capabilities. It consists of repeatedly injecting small doses of a tumor-associated molecule one wants the immune system to recognize, until a consistent immune response directed against the tumor cells is observed. We have applied the theory of optimal control to the problem of finding the optimal schedule of injections of an immunotherapeutic agent against cancer. The method employed works for a general ODE system and can be applied to find the optimal protocol in a variety of clinical problems where the kinetics of the drug or treatment and its influence on the normal physiologic functions have been described by a mathematical model. We show that the choice of the cost function has dramatic effects on the kind of solution the optimization algorithm is able to find. This provides evidence that a careful ODE model and optimization schema must be designed by mathematicians and clinicians using their proper different perspectives.

  13. Effects of laser immunotherapy on tumor microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Wood, Ethan W.; Hasanjee, Aamr; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2014-02-01

    The microenvironments of tumors are involved in a complex and reciprocal dialog with surrounding cancer cells. Any novel treatment must consider the impact of the therapy on the microenvironment. Recently, clinical trials with laser immunotherapy (LIT) have proven to effectively treat patients with late-stage, metastatic breast cancer and melanoma. LIT is the synergistic combination of phototherapy (laser irradiation) and immunological stimulation. One prominent cell type found in the tumor stroma is the fibroblast. Fibroblast cells can secrete different growth factors and extracellular matrix modifying molecules. Furthermore, fibroblast cells found in the tumor stroma often express alpha smooth muscle actin. These particular fibroblasts are coined cancer-associated fibroblast cells (CAFs). CAFs are known to facilitate the malignant progression of tumors. A collagen lattice assay with human fibroblast cells is used to elucidate the effects LIT has on the microenvironment of tumors. Changes in the contraction of the lattice, the differentiation of the fibroblast cells, as well as the proliferation of the fibroblast cells will be determined.

  14. Combining radiotherapy and immunotherapy: A revived partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Demaria, Sandra; Bhardwaj, Nina; McBride, William H.; Formenti, Silvia C. . E-mail: silvia.formenti@med.nyu.edu

    2005-11-01

    Ionizing radiation therapy (RT) is an important local modality for the treatment of cancer. The current rationale for its use is based largely on the ability of RT to kill the cancer cells by a direct cytotoxic effect. Nevertheless, considerable evidence indicates that RT effects extend beyond the mere elimination of the more radiosensitive fraction of cancer cells present within a tumor at the time of radiation exposure. For instance, a large body of evidence is accumulating on the ability of RT to modify the tumor microenvironment and generate inflammation. This might have far-reaching consequences regarding the response of a patient to treatment, especially if radiation-induced tumor cell kill were to translate into the generation of effective antitumor immunity. Although much remains to be learned about how radiation can impact tumor immunogenicity, data from preclinical studies provide the proof of principle that different immunotherapeutic strategies can be combined with RT to enhance antitumor effects. Conversely, RT could be a useful tool to combine with immunotherapy. This article will briefly summarize what is known about the impact of RT on tumor immunity, including tumor-associated antigens, antigen-presenting cells, and effector mechanisms. In addition, the experimental evidence supporting the contention that RT can be used as a tool to induce antitumor immunity is discussed, and a new approach to radioimmunotherapy of cancer is proposed.

  15. Biomarkers for immunotherapy in genitourinary malignancies.

    PubMed

    Slovin, Susan F

    2016-04-01

    Immunotherapy for genitourinary malignancies such as prostate, renal, and bladder cancers has experienced a resurgence since the development of 3 novel strategies: the autologous cellular product therapy, Sipuleucel-T for prostate cancer, the checkpoint inhibitors, anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (anti-CTLA-4), anti-programmed cell death ligand 1 (anti-PD1), and anti-programmed cell death ligand 1), respectively. These agents have led to strikingly durable responses in several of these solid tumors, but their efficacy has been inconsistent. Why all solid tumors are not equal in their response to these therapies is unclear. More importantly, changes in humoral or cellular responses which may reflect changes in a tumor's biology have been limited due to differences in immune monitoring and lack of consistency in established reliable immunologic endpoints. How to design immunologic end points that reflect a meaningful effect on the cancer remains a challenge for clinical trial development. The issues faced by clinical investigators and the current state of immune monitoring are discussed. PMID:25791754

  16. Adoptive immunotherapy with activated peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Horvath, J; Sinkovics, J G

    1994-04-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy is used to treat malignant tumors resistant to conventional therapeutic modalities. Patients with metastatic melanoma, renal cell carcinoma or mesothelioma are most likely to benefit from this treatment. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) contain tumor specific killer cells and are found to be the most effective. When TIL is not available or until it can be produced in sufficient amount, autologous activated lymphocytes (AAL) are an alternative. AAL are leukapheresed lymphocytes, activated by conditioned medium from OKT3 stimulated autologous lymphocytes. Subcutaneous IL-2 and oral cimetidine are also administered to support the reinfused AAL and to inhibit activation of CD8+ suppressor cells, respectively. To improve the yield and activation of reinfused lymphocytes, addition of IL-2 to the culture medium was tested in different time intervals after the onset of the culture. Interleukin-2 added in the first or second day i) improved the yield of activated lymphocytes; ii) increased the expression of activation markers CD25 (IL-2 receptor) and HLA-DR and iii) augmented killing of tumor cells. Later addition of IL-2 had no or negative effects. In vitro priming of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with autologous or allogeneic but histologically identical tumors was used to increase tumor-specificity of AAL. Autologous serum, containing antibodies specific to tumor cells, facilitated antigen presentation and yielded cytotoxic lymphocytes capable of efficiently killing tumor cells. PMID:8152278

  17. Oral immunotherapy and tolerance induction in childhood.

    PubMed

    Tang, M L K; Martino, D J

    2013-09-01

    Prevalence rates of food allergy have increased rapidly in recent decades. Of concern, rates of increase are greatest among children under 5 yrs of age and for those food allergies that persist into adulthood such as peanut or tree nut allergy and shellfish allergy. Given these trends, the overall prevalence of food allergy will compound over time as the number of children affected by food allergy soars and a greater proportion of food-allergic children are left with persistent disease into adulthood. It is therefore vital to identify novel curative treatment approaches for food allergy. Acquisition of oral tolerance to the diverse array of ingested food antigens and intestinal microbiota is an active immunologic process that is successfully established in the majority of individuals. In subjects who develop food allergy, there is a failure or loss of oral tolerance acquisition to a limited number of food allergens. Oral immunotherapy (OIT) offers a promising approach to induce specific oral tolerance to selected food allergens and represents a potential strategy for long-term curative treatment of food allergy. This review will summarize the current understanding of oral tolerance and clinical trials of OIT for the treatment of food allergy. PMID:23905867

  18. Cellular immunotherapy for pediatric solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    HEGDE, MEENAKSHI; MOLL, ALEXANDER; BYRD, TIARA T.; LOUIS, CHRYSTAL U.; AHMED, NABIL

    2015-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the treatment of pediatric solid tumors over the past 4 decades. However, children with metastatic and or recurrent disease continue to do poorly despite the aggressive multi-modality conventional therapies. The increasing understanding of the tumor biology and the interaction between the tumor and the immune system over the recent years have led to the development of novel immune-based therapies as alternative options for some of these high-risk malignancies. The safety and anti-tumor efficacy of various tumor vaccines and tumor-antigen specific immune cells are currently being investigated for various solid tumors. In early clinical trials, most of these cellular therapies have been well tolerated and have shown promising clinical responses. Although substantial work is being done in this field, the available knowledge for pediatric tumors remains limited. We review the contemporary early phase cell-based immunotherapy efforts for pediatric solid tumors and discuss the rationale and the challenges thereof. PMID:25082406

  19. [Immunotherapies for multiple sclerosis : review and update].

    PubMed

    Havla, J; Kümpfel, T; Hohlfeld, R

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, presumably autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system. Early stages of the disease are characterized by conspicuous inflammation of the white and grey matter. During later stages, presumably secondary neurodegeneration leads to physical disability progression. Over the last decade increasingly effective therapeutic options have been approved. Currently 11 immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive therapies targeting relapse rate, disease progression and paraclinical disease activity are available, mostly for relapsing forms of MS. However, the ideal of "precision medicine" is still in the distant future since biomarkers for individualized treatment are lacking. For implementation of risk-management plans to minimize the risk of severe side effects, interdisciplinary collaboration between neurologists and internists is essential. In this review article we summarize practical aspects of the implemented risk-management plans, and discuss possible side effects and special caveats of the three new immunotherapies teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, and alemtuzumab. This article is based on, among others, the recently updated guidelines of the German Society of Neurology. Particular attention is given to the risks of new therapies, monitoring, and on special aspects needing attention when changing treatments. Teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, and alemtuzumab expand treatment options for relapsing-remitting MS. Treatment selection should take into consideration the safety profile of the substance, previous and concomitant diseases, and other individual factors. This requires in-depth consultation and individual assessment of current disease activity, the potential efficacy of the therapy, and the possible risks and side effects. PMID:25720530

  20. Humoral-targeted immunotherapies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lulu, Sabeen; Waubant, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    The continuous improvements of our understanding of the pathophysiological changes that occur in multiple sclerosis (MS) have translated into many novel therapeutic agents at different stages of development. These agents target more specifically the innate or the adaptive immune response. We will review agents available or under development that target the humoral pathways of the adaptive immune response. As such, humoral targeted immunotherapies that are being developed for MS are discussed herein: rituximab, ocrelizumab, and ofatumumab show promise as B-cell depleting agents. Other agents, such as atacicept were suspended during development in MS due to increased inflammatory activity versus the placebo. Although most agents were tested in relapsing-remitting forms of MS, rituximab and ocrelizumab have both been studied in progressive MS, whereas ocrelizumab only is currently moving forward in primary progressive MS trials. We provide an overview of agents available and under development that target the humoral response and include their mechanisms of action, safety profiles, and results of clinical trials. PMID:23208729

  1. Allergen Immunotherapy: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Marek; Kosowska, Anna; Smolinska, Sylwia

    2016-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT), although in clinical use for more than a century, is still the only causal treatment of allergic diseases. The safety and efficacy of AIT has been demonstrated in a large number of clinical trials. In addition to allergy symptom reduction AIT plays an essential role in preventing new allergies and asthma and shows long-term effects after discontinuation of treatment. Ideally, it is capable of curing allergy. However, AIT is not effective in all allergic individuals and is not equally effective in the treatment of various hypersensitivities to different allergens. For many years, the route of administration and the vaccine compositions have been evolving. Still there is a strong need for research in the field of new AIT modalities to increase its effectiveness and safety. Growing evidence on immunological effects of AIT, especially new T cell subsets involved in antigen/allergen tolerance, provides novel concepts for safer and more effective vaccination. Pharmacoeconomic studies have demonstrated a clear advantage of AIT over pharmacologic therapies. PMID:26922928

  2. Antibody-based immunotherapy of cryptosporidiosis.

    PubMed

    Crabb, J H

    1998-01-01

    Passive antibody immunotherapy (PAI) for cryptosporidiosis is a treatment strategy that has been actively pursued in laboratory studies and early-stage clinical studies for the last decade. Several experimental approaches have been initiated, including use of bovine colostrum and colostral antibodies (hyperimmune and natural), monoclonal antibodies, chicken egg yolk antibodies, and even orally administered human plasma antibodies. Most studies have employed oral administration to treat or prevent this intestinal infection. The interest in this treatment strategy has been sparked by the lack of an effective or approved therapy, increased awareness of the widespread nature of this parasite, epidemiological evidence that humoral immunity plays an important role in host resistance, and several early case reports of antibody therapy in which remarkable resolution of the disease was observed. Most studies using a variety of preparations of antibodies administered to animals and humans have shown some degree of efficacy, though the responses have been, for the most part, partial rather than complete resolution of the disease. This chapter examines critically the scientific rationale and the evidence for PAI for cryptosporidiosis, including practical considerations and future approaches. PMID:9554072

  3. Effect of laser immunotherapy and surgery on the treatment of mouse mammary tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Vivian A.; Le, Henry; Li, Xiaosong; Wolf, Roman F.; Ferguson, Halie; Sarkar, Akhee; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-02-01

    Laser immunotherapy using laser photothermal therapy and immunological stimulation could achieve tumor-specific immune responses, as indicated by our previous pre-clinical and preliminary clinical studies. To further study the effect of laser immunotherapy, we conducted an investigation combining laser immunotherapy and surgery. After laser immunotherapy, treated tumors were surgically removed at different time points. The survival rates of treated mice were compared among different groups. Furthermore, the cured mice were rechallenged to test the immunity induced by laser immunotherapy. Our results showed that the mice treated with surgical removal one week after laser immunotherapy had the highest survival rate (77%). When the tumors were removed immediately after laser immunotherapy treatment, the survival rate was 57%. Most cured mice withstood tumor rechallenges, indicating an induction of tumor immunity by laser immunotherapy. The differentiations between different surgery groups indicate that the treated tumors have contributed to the immunological responses of the hosts.

  4. Opposing effects of immunotherapy in melanoma using multisubtype interferon-alpha – can tumor immune escape after immunotherapy accelerate disease progression?

    PubMed Central

    Strannegård, Örjan; Thorén, Fredrik B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT With checkpoint inhibitors, patients with advanced melanoma display durable responses suggesting cure of disease. However, the immune system has dual roles in cancer; while the immune system may eradicate a tumor, a subtotal elimination may selectively destroy immunogenic cells driving the proliferation of non-immunogenic tumors. Here, we performed a retrospective analysis of results obtained in a controlled trial of patients with melanoma treated with adjuvant, multisubtype interferon-α. The survival curves displayed a late divergence for treated patients and controls resulting in substantially higher estimates of overall (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) rates among treated patients after 9 y of follow up. Interestingly, succumbing patients in the treatment group displayed reduced time between relapse and death, suggesting therapy-induced acceleration of disease progression. These findings suggest that effective immunotherapy that induces durable, curative responses in some patients, may potentially accelerate disease progression in others, highlighting the importance of developing advanced strategies to identify patients who are likely to benefit from immunotherapy. PMID:27141351

  5. CSPG4 As a Target of Antibody-Based Immunotherapy For Malignant Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Zeyana; Ferrone, Soldano; Wang, Xinhui; Jube, Sandro; Yang, Haining; Pass, Harvey; Kanodia, Shreya; Gaudino, Giovanni; Carbone, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive cancer, resistant to current therapies. Membrane Chondroitin Sulphate Proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4), which has been successfully targeted in melanoma and breast cancer, was found highly expressed in MM, but not in normal mesothelium. Therefore, we explored CSPG4 as a suitable target for monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based immunotherapy of MM. Experimental Design We assayed adhesion, motility, invasiveness, wound-healing, apoptosis and anchorage-independent growth of MM cells on cell cultures. CSPG4 expression and signaling was studied by immunoblotting. The growth of MM SCID mice xenografts induced by PPM-Mill cells, engineered to express the luciferase reporter gene, was monitored by imaging, upon treatment with CSPG4 mAb TP41.2. Animal toxicity and survival were assayed in both tumor inhibition and therapeutic experiments. Results CSPG4 was expressed on 6 out of 8 MM cell lines and in 25 out of 41 MM biopsies, with minimal expression in surrounding healthy cells. MM cell adhesion was mediated by CSPG4-dependent engagement of extracellular matrix components (ECM). Cell adhesion was inhibited by mAb TP41.2 resulting in decreased phosphorylation of FAK and AKT, reduced expression of cyclin D1 and apoptosis. Moreover, TP41.2 significantly reduced MM cell motility, migration and invasiveness, and inhibited MM growth in soft agar. In vivo, treatment with mAb TP41.2 prevented or inhibited the growth of MM xenografts in SCID mice, with a significant increase in animal survival. Conclusion These results establish the safety of CSPG4 mAb-based immunotherapy and suggest that CSPG4 mAb-based immunotherapy may represent a novel approach for the treatment of MM. PMID:22893632

  6. Allergenic Characterization of New Mutant Forms of Pru p 3 as New Immunotherapy Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Casado, C.; Garrido-Arandia, M.; Gamboa, P.; Blanca-López, N.; Canto, G.; Varela, J.; Cuesta-Herranz, J.; Pacios, L. F.; Díaz-Perales, A.; Tordesillas, L.

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, treatment of food allergy only considered the avoidance of the specific food. However, the possibility of cross-reactivity makes this practice not very effective. Immunotherapy may exhibit as a good alternative to food allergy treatment. The use of hypoallergenic molecules with reduced IgE binding capacity but with ability to stimulate the immune system is a promising tool which could be developed for immunotherapy. In this study, three mutants of Pru p 3, the principal allergen of peach, were produced based on the described mimotope and T cell epitopes, by changing the specific residues to alanine, named as Pru p 3.01, Pru p 3.02, and Pru p 3.03. Pru p 3.01 showed very similar allergenic activity as the wild type by in vitro assays. However, Pru p 3.02 and Pru p 3.03 presented reduced IgE binding with respect to the native form, by in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo assays. In addition, Pru p 3.03 had affected the IgG4 binding capacity and presented a random circular dichroism, which was reflected in the nonrecognition by specific antibodies anti-Pru p 3. Nevertheless, both Pru p 3.02 and Pru p 3.03 maintained the binding to IgG1 and their ability to activate T lymphocytes. Thus, Pru p 3.02 and Pru p 3.03 could be good candidates for potential immunotherapy in peach-allergic patients. PMID:24324505

  7. A modified ultrarush insect venom immunotherapy protocol for children.

    PubMed

    Steiss, Jens-Oliver; Jödicke, Birgit; Lindemann, Hermann

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of insect venom allergy in the European population is approximately 5%. Hymenoptera venom allergy is an important epidemiological problem. Ten to 40 deaths are reported annually in Germany. In contrast to conventional dose increase schedules lasting a minimum of 5 days, shorter protocols reduce the patient's stay in the hospital and provide an earlier protection toward stings. Clinical studies on ultrarush protocols have been published for adult patients, but very little data are currently available for children. Therefore, we investigated the safety and tolerability of a shortened insect venom immunotherapy (VIT) in children and adolescents. Forty-three children and adolescents (aged 4-18 years) with insect venom allergy were treated in this study. Five children were hyposensitized according to the ultrarush protocol with nine injections (as suggested by Brehler et al. (Safety of a two-day ultrarush insect VIT protocol in comparison with protocols of longer duration and involving a larger number of injections. J Allergy Clin Immunol 105:1231-1235,2000); 38 children received the modified ultrarush schedules with only eight subcutaneous injections. With both protocols the maintenance dose (100 microg) was achieved in 24 hours. Twenty-five patients (58.1%) showed no reaction after the injections. In 11 patients (25.6%), extensive erythema (>5 cm, maximum of 20 cm) was found at the injection site. Erythema and edema (>5 cm, maximum of 15 cm) were observed in seven patients (16.2%). The maintenance dose was well tolerated, with no systemic reaction in any patient. The modified ultrarush protocol for insect VIT used in this study showed very good tolerability and safety in children and adolescents. This dose regimen can increase compliance by shortening inpatient stay and reduces hospital costs. PMID:16724635

  8. Development of antibody fragments for immunotherapy of prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Campana, Vincenza; Zentilin, Lorena; Mirabile, Ilaria; Kranjc, Agata; Casanova, Philippe; Giacca, Mauro; Prusiner, Stanley B; Legname, Giuseppe; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2009-03-15

    Prions are infectious proteins responsible for a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases called TSEs (transmissible spongiform encephalopathies) or prion diseases. In mammals, prions reproduce themselves by recruiting the normal cellular protein PrP(C) and inducing its conversion into the disease-causing isoform denominated PrP(Sc). Recently, anti-prion antibodies have been shown to permanently cure prion-infected cells. However, the inability of full-length antibodies and proteins to cross the BBB (blood-brain barrier) hampers their use in the therapy of TSEs in vivo. Alternatively, brain delivery of prion-specific scFv (single-chain variable fragment) by AAV (adeno-associated virus) transfer delays the onset of the disease in infected mice, although protection is not complete. We investigated the anti-prion effects of a recombinant anti-PrP (D18) scFv by direct addition to scrapie-infected cell cultures or by infection with both lentivirus and AAV-transducing vectors. We show that recombinant anti-PrP scFv is able to reduce proteinase K-resistant PrP content in infected cells. In addition, we demonstrate that lentiviruses are more efficient than AAV in gene transfer of the anti-PrP scFv gene and in reducing PrP(Sc) content in infected neuronal cell lines. Finally, we have used a bioinformatic approach to construct a structural model of the D18scFv-PrP(C) complex. Interestingly, according to the docking results, Arg(PrP)(151) (Arg(151) from prion protein) is the key residue for the interactions with D18scFv, anchoring the PrP(C) to the cavity of the antibody. Taken together, these results indicate that combined passive and active immunotherapy targeting PrP might be promising strategies for therapeutic intervention in prion diseases. PMID:19000036

  9. Peptide-based immunotherapy for multiple myeloma: current approaches.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fu-Ling; Meng, Shan; Zhang, Wang-Gang; Wei, Yong-Chang; Cao, Xing-Mei; Bai, Gai-Gai; Wang, Bai-Yan

    2010-08-23

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal B-cell malignancy with many fatal clinical sequelae. Despite extensive therapeutic approaches, cures remain rare exceptions. A recent promising area of investigation is the development of immunotherapeutic approaches that target and eliminate myeloma cells more selectively. Because of its potential to promote the destruction of cancerous cells via cytotoxic T-cell responses, peptide-based immunotherapy is one of these strategies to have attracted considerable attention. Furthermore, many studies were carried out to identify the best epitope peptides, the optimal vaccine formulation and schedule, and the preferable clinical situation for vaccination. Based on these results, various epitope peptides have been identified that may be selectively targeted by host immunity, and various approaches have been used to enhance the immune responses of peptides. This chapter focuses on reviewing previous immunotherapy trials, describing the current strategies for peptide-based immunotherapy, and discussing the achievable prospects in MM. PMID:20619381

  10. Past, present and future targets for immunotherapy in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Carlton L; English, Diana P; Roque, Dana M; Pasternak, Monica; Santin, Alessandro D

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the US. Treatments have improved with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy and advanced surgical techniques but disease recurrence is common and fatal in nearly all cases. Current evidence suggests that the immune system and its ability to recognize and eliminate microscopic disease is paramount in preventing recurrence. Ovarian cancer immunotherapy is targeting tumors through active, passive and adoptive approaches. The goal of immunotherapy is to balance the activation of the immune system against cancer while preventing the potential for tremendous toxicity elicited by immune modulation. In this paper we will review the different immunotherapies available for ovarian cancer as well as current ongoing studies and potential future directions. PMID:25524384

  11. The Role of Surgical Pathology in Guiding Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lovitch, Scott B; Rodig, Scott J

    2016-05-23

    The recognition that the immune system can identify and destroy tumor cells has driven a paradigm shift in our understanding of human cancer. Therapies designed to enhance this capacity, including cancer vaccines and coinhibitory receptor blockade, have demonstrated clinical efficacy in treating tumors refractory to conventional therapy. In this review, we discuss how the analysis of the immune microenvironment in primary tissue biopsy samples can be used to stratify patients according to clinical outcome, identify patients likely to benefit from specific immunotherapies, and tailor combination immunotherapy to individual patients and tumor types. As immunotherapy gains in complexity and is used in combination with agents that target oncogenic, intracellular signaling pathways, diagnostic pathologists will play an increasingly important part in identifying and quantifying cellular and molecular biomarkers in tissue samples that reflect the nature and magnitude of the antitumor immune response. PMID:27193453

  12. Strategies to genetically engineer T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Spear, Timothy T; Nagato, Kaoru; Nishimura, Michael I

    2016-06-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most promising and innovative approaches to treat cancer, viral infections, and other immune-modulated diseases. Adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified T cells is an exciting and rapidly evolving field. Exploiting knowledge of basic T cell biology and immune cell receptor function has fostered innovative approaches to modify immune cell function. Highly translatable clinical technologies have been developed to redirect T cell specificity by introducing designed receptors. The ability to engineer T cells to manifest desired phenotypes and functions is now a thrilling reality. In this review, we focus on outlining different varieties of genetically engineered T cells, their respective advantages and disadvantages as tools for immunotherapy, and their promise and drawbacks in the clinic. PMID:27138532

  13. Cancer Immunotherapy: Selected Targets and Small-Molecule Modulators.

    PubMed

    Weinmann, Hilmar

    2016-03-01

    There is a significant amount of excitement in the scientific community around cancer immunotherapy, as this approach has renewed hope for many cancer patients owing to some recent successes in the clinic. Currently available immuno-oncology therapeutics under clinical development and on the market are mostly biologics (antibodies, proteins, engineered cells, and oncolytic viruses). However, modulation of the immune system with small molecules offers several advantages that may be complementary and potentially synergistic to the use of large biologicals. Therefore, the discovery and development of novel small-molecule modulators is a rapidly growing research area for medicinal chemists working in cancer immunotherapy. This review provides a brief introduction into recent trends related to selected targets and pathways for cancer immunotherapy and their small-molecule pharmacological modulators. PMID:26836578

  14. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases. PMID:26264195

  15. Cellular and Antibody Based Approaches for Pediatric Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Michael A.; Krishnadas, Deepa K.; Lucas, Kenneth G.

    2015-01-01

    Progress in the use of traditional chemotherapy and radiation-based strategies for the treatment of pediatric malignancies has plateaued in the past decade, particularly for patients with relapsing or therapy refractory disease. As a result, cellular and humoral immunotherapy approaches have been investigated for several childhood cancers. Several monoclonal antibodies are now FDA approved and commercially available, some of which are currently considered standard of practice. There are also several new cellular immunotherapy approaches under investigation, including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells, cancer vaccines and adjuvants, and natural killer (NK) cell therapies. In this review, we will discuss previous studies on pediatric cancer immunotherapy and new approaches that are currently being investigated in clinical trials. PMID:26587548

  16. Limbic encephalitis following immunotherapy against metastatic malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Salam, Sharfaraz; Lavin, Timothy; Turan, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    Novel immunotherapies are increasingly being used to treat malignant melanoma. The use of such agents has been associated with triggering autoimmunity. However, there has been a paucity in reports of limbic encephalitis associated with these immunotherapies. Pembrolizumab, a monoclonal antibody against programmed cell death antigen (PD-1), is currently being trialled in the UK to treat malignant melanoma. We report a unique case of antibody-negative limbic encephalitis presenting 1 year after starting pembrolizumab, in the context of malignant melanoma. The patient presented with progressive cognitive decline. MRI of the brain revealed signal change within the limbic structures. Cerebrospinal fluid studies confirmed evidence of inflammation with raised white cell count and protein. We were able to prevent further progression of symptoms by stopping pembrolizumab and treating the patient instead with steroids. We advocate considering autoimmune neuroinflammation as a differential for neurological disorders presenting in patients receiving PD-1 antagonist treatment and immunotherapy in general. PMID:27009198

  17. Immunotherapy following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: potential for synergistic effects

    PubMed Central

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Redelman, Doug; Murphy, William J

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a particularly important treatment for hematologic malignancies. Unfortunately, following allogeneic HSCT, graft-versus-host disease, immunosuppression and susceptibility to opportunistic infections remain among the most substantial problems restricting the efficacy and use of this procedure, particularly for cancer. Adoptive immunotherapy and/or manipulation of the graft offer ways to attack residual cancer as well as other transplant-related complications. Recent exciting discoveries have demonstrated that HSCT could be expanded to solid tissue cancers with profound effects on the effectiveness of adoptive immunotherapy. This review will provide a background regarding HSCT, discuss the complications that make it such a complex treatment procedure following up with current immunotherapeutic strategies and discuss emerging approaches in applying immunotherapy in HSCT for cancer. PMID:20635904

  18. Immunotherapy updates in pancreatic cancer: are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    Gunturu, Krishna Soujanya; Rossi, Gabriela R.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease and remains one of the most resistant cancers to traditional therapies. Historically, chemotherapy or radiotherapy did not provide meaningful survival benefit in advanced pancreatic cancer. Gemcitabine and recently FOLFIRINOX (5-flourouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin and irinotecan) have provided some limited survival advantage in advanced pancreatic cancer. Targeted agents in combination with gemcitabine had not shown significant improvement in the survival. Current therapies for pancreatic cancer have their limitations; thus, we are in dire need of newer treatment options. Immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer works by recruiting and activating T cells that recognize tumor-specific antigens which is a different mechanism compared with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Preclinical models have shown that immunotherapy and targeted therapies like vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor inhibitors work synergistically. Hence, new immunotherapy and targeted therapies represent a viable option for pancreatic cancer. In this article, we review the vaccine therapy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:23323149

  19. [Current research advance on cellular immunotherapy for leukemia-review].

    PubMed

    Tian, Hong; Chen, Guang-Hua; Xu, Yang; Qiao, Man; Liu, Hui-Wen; Wu, De-Pei

    2013-10-01

    Despite the chemotherapy is successful in inducing remission of hematologic malignancy, this disease also has a high probability of relapse; besides, the toxicity of chemotherapy for these patients can not be avoided. Researchers have been attempting to eliminate tumor cells by immunotherapy. Recently, various leukemia-associated antigens (LAA) that are recognized by cytotoxic T cell (CTL) in the context of HLA class I molecules have been identified. These LAA include WT1, PR-3, RHAMM, BCR-ABL and Aur-A. On the basis of these findings, various clinical trials of immunotherapy for hematologic malignancy including tumor peptide vaccination, adoptive T cell therapy, NK cell therapy and dendritic cells-cytokine induced killer (DC-CIK) cell therapy are on going. In this review, the current status and future feasibility of cellular immunotherapy for leukemia are discussed. PMID:24156459

  20. Rush sublingual immunotherapy in Parietaria allergic patients.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, F P; Ricciardi, L; Isola, S; Savi, E; Parmiani, S; Puccinelli, P; Musarra, A

    1996-01-01

    Forty patients, monosensitized to Parietaria judaica with a clinical history of at least two years of rhinoconjunctivitis with or without asthma, were selected and randomly allocated in two groups. According to an open controlled experimental plan, twenty patients were submitted to sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with a solution of purified and biologically standardized extract of Parietaria judaica, following a preseasonal rush schedule. All patients, twenty belonging to the SLIT group and twenty belonging to the control group, were allowed to take authorized rescue drugs at need. At the end of the Parietaria pollen season. 15 patients for each group resulted to have complied with the criteria of the study. SLIT tolerance turned out to be excellent as no side effects were noticed in the group under treatment. No change could be detected in specific IgE and IgG4 in either group. According to the daily symptom and drug scores registered by each patient in a diary card, the SLIT group showed a statistically significant lower symptom score (p = 0.032) and lower drug plus symptom score (p = 0.037) during the peak pollen period (May-June 1994) in comparison to the group treated only with symptomatic drugs. Moreover, 13 out of 15 patients submitted to SLIT expressed a very favourable subjective opinion about the therapy and asked to continue the same treatment the following season. According to our results, the rush SLIT schedule, followed by maintenance during the pollen season, is simple, safe and effective for Parietaria pollen allergy and showed an excellent compliance. PMID:8939269

  1. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  2. Prolonged overall survival in gastric cancer patients after adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-Qing; Zhao, Hong; Wu, Jian-Yu; Li, Jin-Yu; Yan, Xiang; Wang, Gang; Wu, Liang-Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Gang; Shao, Yi; Wang, Yu; Jiao, Shun-Chang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy of immunotherapy with expanded activated autologous lymphocytes (EAALs) in gastric cancer. METHODS: An observational study was designed to retrospectively analyze the clinical data of 84 gastric cancer patients, of whom 42 were treated by EAAL immunotherapy plus conventional treatment and another 42 only received conventional treatment (control group). EAALs were obtained by proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients followed by phenotype determination. Clinical data including age, gender, clinical stage, chemotherapeutic regimens, hospitalization, surgical, radiotherapy, and survival data were collected along with EAAL therapy details and side effects. Patients were followed and the relationship between treatment and overall survival (OS) data obtained for the immunotherapy and control groups were compared retrospectively. The safety of EAAL immunotherapy was also evaluated. RESULTS: After in vitro culture and proliferation, the percentages of CD3+, CD3+CD8+, CD8+CD27+, CD8+CD28+, and CD3+CD16+/CD56+ cells increased remarkably (P < 0.05), while the percentages of CD3+CD4+, CD4+CD25+, and CD3-CD16+/CD56+ (natural killer cells) were overtly decreased (P < 0.05); no significant change was observed in CD4+CD25+CD127- cells (P = 0.448). Interestingly, OS in the immunotherapy group was significantly higher than that in the control group, with 27.0 and 13.9 mo obtained for the two groups, respectively (P = 0.028, HR = 0.573, 95%CI: 0.347-0.945). These findings indicated a 42.7% decrease in the risk of death. In addition, we found that clinical stage and application of EAAL immunotherapy were independent prognostic factors for gastric cancer patients. Indeed, the OS in stage IIIc and IV patients that had received surgery was prolonged after EAAL immunotherapy (P < 0.05). Importantly, in vitro induction and proliferation of EAAL were easy and biologically safe. CONCLUSION: Overall, EAAL adoptive immunotherapy might prolong the OS in gastric cancer patients. PMID:25759549

  3. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients. PMID:27158196

  4. Universes Collide: Combining Immunotherapy with Targeted Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wargo, Jennifer A.; Cooper, Zachary A.; Flaherty, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    There have been significant advances in the past several years with regard to targeted therapy and immunotherapy for cancer. This is highlighted in melanoma, where treatment with targeted therapy (against the BRAF oncogene) results in responses in the majority of patients, though duration of response is limited. In contrast, treatment with immunotherapy results in a lower response rate, but ones that tend to be more durable. Insights regarding mechanisms of response and potential synergy between these treatment strategies for melanoma are a focus of this review, with opportunities to extend these insights to the treatment of other cancers. PMID:25395294

  5. The oncolytic peptide LTX-315 overcomes resistance of cancers to immunotherapy with CTLA4 checkpoint blockade.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, T; Pitt, J M; Vétizou, M; Marabelle, A; Flores, C; Rekdal, Ø; Kroemer, G; Zitvogel, L

    2016-06-01

    Intratumoral immunotherapies aim at reducing local immunosuppression, as well as reinstating and enhancing systemic anticancer T-cell functions, without inducing side effects. LTX-315 is a first-in-class oncolytic peptide-based local immunotherapy that meets these criteria by inducing a type of malignant cell death that elicits anticancer immune responses. Here, we show that LTX-315 rapidly reprograms the tumor microenvironment by decreasing the local abundance of immunosuppressive Tregs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells and by increasing the frequency of polyfunctional T helper type 1/type 1 cytotoxic T cells with a concomitant increase in cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4) and drop in PD-1 expression levels. Logically, in tumors that were resistant to intratumoral or systemic CTLA4 blockade, subsequent local inoculation of LTX-315 cured the animals or caused tumor regressions with abscopal effects. This synergistic interaction between CTLA4 blockade and LTX-315 was reduced upon blockade of the β-chain of the interleukin-2 receptor (CD122). This preclinical study provides a strong rationale for administering the oncolytic peptide LTX-315 to patients who are receiving treatment with the CTLA4 blocking antibody ipilimumab. PMID:27082453

  6. Effectiveness evaluation of dendritic cell immunotherapy for osteosarcoma on survival rate and in vitro immune response.

    PubMed

    Fang, X; Jiang, C; Xia, Q

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dendritic cell (DC) therapy in osteosarcoma. Bone marrow DCs from Wistar (allograft group) and Sprague Dawley (SD) (homograft group) rats were electrically fused with the SD-derived osteosarcoma cell line UMR106 to generate a DC-osteosarcoma fusion (DOF) tumor vaccine, which was co-incubated with SD T lymphocytes to stimulate T cell proliferation. CD8+ and CD4+ cell percentages were measured by flow cytometry; tumor-cytotoxic effects of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were measured by the MTT assay. Active immunotherapy was applied to SD osteosarcoma model rats via subcutaneous injection of the tumor vaccine. Significant potentiation of T lymphocyte proliferation was observed in both groups. In the homograft group, the CD8+/CD4+ ratio was elevated to 78.2 from 55.1% after stimulation (P < 0.05) whereas the CD4+ cell percentage was reduced from 61.3 to 21.2% (P < 0.05). Similarly, in the allograft group the CD8+ and CD4+ cell percentages significantly increased (33.8 to 69.6%) or decreased (61.3 to 28.1%) after stimulation, respectively (P < 0.05). The preferential homograft group response was not significant (P > 0.05). Induced UMR106- specific CTLs showed a significantly higher tumor-cytotoxic effect after stimulation (P < 0.05). After DOF active immunotherapy, tumor bodies displayed atrophy or disappearance, leading to higher survival times and rates (60 and 70% in the allograft and homograft groups) (P < 0.05). This study demonstrated that osteosarcoma immunotherapy using a DC-fused tumor vaccine can effectively stimulate T lymphocyte proliferation and induce the tumor-cytotoxic activity of CTLs. PMID:26436501

  7. Immune consequences of tyrosine kinase inhibitors that synergize with cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kwilas, Anna R.; Donahue, Renee N.; Tsang, Kwong Y.; Hodge, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Combination therapy for the treatment of cancer is becoming increasingly essential as we gain improved understanding of the complexity of cancer progression and the mechanisms by which cancer cells become resistant to single-agent therapy. Recent studies, both clinical and preclinical, have suggested that immunotherapy is a promising approach to the treatment of cancer; however, strategies to improve its clinical efficacy are still needed. A number of recent studies have indicated that antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) target multiple components of the tumor microenvironment and are an ideal class of agents for synergizing with cancer immunotherapy. TKIs are well known to modulate tumor endothelial cells, leading to vascular normalization; however, these agents have also been recently shown to decrease tumor compactness and tight junctions, thereby reducing solid tumor pressure and allowing for improved perfusion of collapsed vessels and increased tumor oxygenation. In addition, some TKIs are capable of inducing immunogenic modulation, whereby tumor cells are sensitized to killing by T lymphocytes. Moreover, a number of TKIs have been shown to be involved in immune subset conditioning, increasing the frequency and function of effector immune elements, while decreasing the number and function of immune suppressor cells. The alteration of the immune landscape, direct modification of tumor cells, and improved vascular perfusion leads to improved antitumor efficacy when antiangiogenic TKIs are combined with immunotherapy. Collectively, the data presented in this review support the clinical combination of multi-targeted antiangiogenic TKIs, including but not limited to cabozantinib, sunitinib, and sorafenib, as well as to other antiangiogenic therapies, such as the anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab, with cancer vaccines for improved treatment of solid tumors. PMID:26005708

  8. Microneedle delivery of autoantigen for immunotherapy in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Birchall, James C; Coulman, Sion A; Tatovic, Danijela; Singh, Ravinder K; Wen, Li; Susan Wong, F; Dayan, Colin M; Hanna, Stephanie J

    2016-02-10

    Antigen specific immunotherapy mediated via the sustained generation of regulatory T cells arguably represents the ideal therapeutic approach to preventing beta cell destruction in type 1 diabetes. However, there is a need to enhance the efficacy of this approach to achieve disease modification in man. Previous studies suggest that prolonged expression of self-antigen in skin in a non-inflammatory context is beneficial for tolerance induction. We therefore sought to develop a dry-coated microneedle (MN) delivery system and combine it with topical steroid to minimise local inflammation and promote prolonged antigen presentation in the skin. Here we show that a combination of surface-modified MNs coated with appropriate solvent systems can deliver therapeutically relevant quantities of peptide to mouse and human skin even with hydrophobic peptides. Compared to conventional "wet" intradermal (ID) administration, "dry" peptide delivered via MNs was retained for longer in the skin and whilst topical hydration of the skin with vehicle or steroid accelerated loss of ID-delivered peptide from the skin, MN delivery of peptide was unaffected. Furthermore, MN delivery resulted in enhanced presentation of antigen to T cells in skin draining lymph nodes (LNs) both 3 and 10days after administration. Repeated administration of islet antigen peptide via MN was effective at reducing antigen-specific T cell proliferation in the pancreatic LN, although topical steroid therapy did not enhance this. Taken together, these data show auto-antigenic peptide delivery into skin using coated MNs results in prolonged retention and enhanced antigen presentation compared to conventional ID delivery and this approach may have potential in individuals identified as being at a high risk of developing type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:26739548

  9. Advances in the Treatment of Food Allergy: Sublingual and Epicutaneous Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sindher, Sayantani; Fleischer, David M; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2016-02-01

    Food allergies continue to increase in prevalence. Standard care is a strict elimination diet, but life-threatening reactions still occur. Allergen immunotherapy has the most potential in treating food allergy. Subcutaneous immunotherapy has not been adopted into food allergy therapy. Oral immunotherapy has a high rate of adverse reactions. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) uses the tolerogenic environment of the oral mucosa and epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT) uses the immune cells of the epidermis to transport antigens to afferent lymph nodes to activate immune responses. SLIT and EPIT can successfully desensitize patients. More research is needed to define optimal doses and administration protocols. PMID:26617226

  10. Early gene expression changes with rush immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To examine whether whole genome expression profiling could reveal changes in mRNA expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from allergic patients undergoing rush immunotherapy (RIT) that might be manifest within the first few months of treatment. Methods For this study, PBMC from three allergic patients undergoing RIT were assessed at four timepoints: prior to RIT, at 1 week and 7 week post-RIT, during build-up and at 4 months, after establishment of a maintenance dose. PBMC mRNA gene expression changes over time were determined by oligonucleotide microarrays using the Illumina Human-6 BeadChip Platform, which simultaneously interrogates expression profiles of > 47,000 transcripts. Differentially expressed genes were identified using well-established statistical analysis for microarrays. In addition, we analyzed peripheral blood basophil high-affinity IgE receptor (Fc epsilon RI) expression and T-regulatory cell frequency as detected by expression of CD3+CD4+CD25bright cells at each timepoint using flow cytometry. Results In comparing the initial 2 timepoints with the final 2 timepoints and analyzing for genes with ?1.5-fold expression change (p less than or equal to 0.05, BH-FDR), we identified 507 transcripts. At a 2-fold change (p less than or equal to 0.05, BH-FDR), we found 44 transcripts. Of these, 28 were up-regulated and 16 were down-regulated genes. From these datasets, we have identified changes in immunologically relevant genes from both the innate and adaptive response with upregulation of expressed genes for molecules including IL-1?, IL-8, CD40L, BTK and BCL6. At the 4 month timepoint, we noted a downward trend in Fc epsilon RI expression in each of the three patients and increased allergen-specific IgG4 levels. No change was seen in the frequency of peripheral T-regulatory cells expressed over the four timepoints. Conclusions We observed significant changes in gene expression early in peripheral blood samples from allergic patients undergoing RIT. Moreover, serum levels for allergen specific IgG4 also increased over the course of treatment. These studies suggest that RIT induces rapid and dynamic alterations in both innate and adaptive immunity which can be observed in the periphery of allergic patients. These alterations could be directly related to the therapeutic shift in the allergen-specific class of immunoglobulin. PMID:21961521

  11. Novel technologies and emerging biomarkers for personalized cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jianda; Hegde, Priti S; Clynes, Raphael; Foukas, Periklis G; Harari, Alexandre; Kleen, Thomas O; Kvistborg, Pia; Maccalli, Cristina; Maecker, Holden T; Page, David B; Robins, Harlan; Song, Wenru; Stack, Edward C; Wang, Ena; Whiteside, Theresa L; Zhao, Yingdong; Zwierzina, Heinz; Butterfield, Lisa H; Fox, Bernard A

    2016-01-01

    The culmination of over a century's work to understand the role of the immune system in tumor control has led to the recent advances in cancer immunotherapies that have resulted in durable clinical responses in patients with a variety of malignancies. Cancer immunotherapies are rapidly changing traditional treatment paradigms and expanding the therapeutic landscape for cancer patients. However, despite the current success of these therapies, not all patients respond to immunotherapy and even those that do often experience toxicities. Thus, there is a growing need to identify predictive and prognostic biomarkers that enhance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the complex interactions between the immune system and cancer. Therefore, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) reconvened an Immune Biomarkers Task Force to review state of the art technologies, identify current hurdlers, and make recommendations for the field. As a product of this task force, Working Group 2 (WG2), consisting of international experts from academia and industry, assembled to identify and discuss promising technologies for biomarker discovery and validation. Thus, this WG2 consensus paper will focus on the current status of emerging biomarkers for immune checkpoint blockade therapy and discuss novel technologies as well as high dimensional data analysis platforms that will be pivotal for future biomarker research. In addition, this paper will include a brief overview of the current challenges with recommendations for future biomarker discovery. PMID:26788324

  12. Towards Curative Cancer Immunotherapy: Overcoming Posttherapy Tumor Escape

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gang; Levitsky, Hyam

    2012-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed the evolvement of cancer immunotherapy as an increasingly effective therapeutic modality, evidenced by the approval of two immune-based products by the FDA, that is, the cancer vaccine Provenge (sipuleucel-T) for prostate cancer and the antagonist antibody against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) ipilimumab for advanced melanoma. In addition, the clinical evaluations of a variety of promising immunotherapy drugs are well under way. Benefiting from more efficacious immunotherapeutic agents and treatment strategies, a number of recent clinical studies have achieved unprecedented therapeutic outcomes in some patients with certain types of cancers. Despite these advances, however, the efficacy of most cancer immunotherapies currently under clinical development has been modest. A recurring scenario is that therapeutic maneuvers initially led to measurable antitumor immune responses in cancer patients but ultimately failed to improve patient outcomes. It is increasingly recognized that tumor cells can antagonize therapy-induced immune attacks through a variety of counterregulation mechanisms, which represent a fundamental barrier to the success of cancer immunotherapy. Herein we summarize the findings from some recent preclinical and clinical studies, focusing on how tumor cells advance their survival and expansion by hijacking therapy-induced immune effector mechanisms that would otherwise mediate their destruction. PMID:22778760

  13. Toward effective immunotherapy for the treatment of malignant brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Duane A.; Sampson, John H.

    2009-01-01

    The immunologic treatment of cancer has long been heralded as a targeted molecular therapeutic with the promise of eradicating tumor cells with minimal damage to surrounding normal tissues. However, a demonstrative example of the efficacy of immunotherapy in modulating cancer progression is still lacking for most human cancers. Recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the mechanisms leading to full T-cell activation, and recognition of the importance of overcoming tumor-induced immunosuppressive mechanisms, have shed new light on how to generate effective anti-tumor immune responses in humans, and sparked a renewed and enthusiastic effort to realize the full potential of cancer immunotherapy. The immunologic treatment of invasive malignant brain tumors has not escaped this reinvigorated endeavor, and promising therapies are currently under active investigation in dozens of clinical trials at several institutions worldwide. This review will focus on some of the most important breakthroughs in our understanding of how to generate potent anti-tumor immune responses, and some of the clear challenges that lie ahead in achieving effective immunotherapy for the majority of patients with malignant brain tumors. A review of immunotherapeutic strategies currently under clinical evaluation, as well as an outline of promising novel approaches on the horizon, is included in order to provide perspective on the active and stalwart progress toward effective immunotherapy for the treatment of malignant brain tumors. PMID:19560742

  14. Immunotherapy of melanoma: efficacy and mode of action.

    PubMed

    Wieder, Thomas; Brenner, Ellen; Braumüller, Heidi; Röcken, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Forty years of research have brought about the development of antibodies that induce effective antitumor immune responses through sustained activation of the immune system. These "immune checkpoint inhibitors" are directed against immune inhibitory molecules, such as cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4), programmed death 1 (PD-1) or programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Disruption of the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction improves the intermediate-term prognosis even in patients with advanced stage IV melanoma. One and a halfyears after treatment initiation, 30-60 % of these patients are still alive. While cancer immunotherapies usually do not eradicate metastases completely, they do cause a regression by 20-80 %. It is well established that the immune system is able to kill tumor cells, and this has also been demonstrated for immunotherapies. Preclinical data, however, has shown that anti-cancer immunity is not limited to killing cancer cells. Thus, through interferon gamma and tumor necrosis factor, the immune system is able to induce stable tumor growth arrest, referred to as senescence. Ensuring patient survival by long-term stabilization of metastatic growth will therefore become a central goal of antitumor immunotherapies. This therapeutic approach is effective in melanoma and non-small-cell lung cancer. Once immunotherapies also have an indication for common cancer types, drug prices will have to drop considerably in order to be able to keep them available to those dependent on such therapies. PMID:26713633

  15. Dendritic cell based personalized immunotherapy based on cancer antigen research.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yutaka; Fujita, Tomonobu; Kudo, Chie; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Udagawa, Masaru; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Hasegawa, Go; Hayashi, Emiko; Ueda, Yoko; Iwata, Tomoko; Wang, Qinfu; Okada, Starlyn; Tsukamoto, Nobuo; Matsuzaki, Yuriko; Sumimoto, Hidetoshi

    2008-01-01

    Human tumor antigens were identified using various immunological and genetic methods, and immune responses to the identified antigens were evaluated in cancer patients. Autologous tumor specific unique antigens derived from genetic alterations in cancer cells were isolated from patients with favorable prognosis after immunotherapy, indicating that they are attractive targets for immunotherapy. Immunogenicity of shared antigens was found to differ among patients due to antigen expression in cancer cells and patients' immunoreactivity. These observations suggest that personalization may be applied for cancer immunotherapy. We therefore developed intratumoral DC administration protocols that are able to induce immune responses to both unique and shared tumor antigens expressed in each individual cancer. By combining cryoablative tumor pretreatment and TLR stimulated DC, the anti-tumor effect of the intratumoral DC administration was significantly augmented in a murine tumor model. This improved protocol enhanced systemic induction of anti-tumor CD8+ CTL, and was able to regress relatively large remote untreated tumors. In clinical trials, systemic immune induction was observed by intratumoral DC administration following cryoablative tumor treatment, although anti-tumor effects are relatively weak, indicating that additional interventions are required for more effective immunotherapy. PMID:17981682

  16. From Bench to Bedside: Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Brian Wan-Chi; Jovanovic, Lidija; Nelson, Colleen Coyne; de Souza, Paul; Power, Carl Andrew; Russell, Pamela Joan

    2014-01-01

    The mainstay therapeutic strategy for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) continues to be androgen deprivation therapy usually in combination with chemotherapy or androgen receptor targeting therapy in either sequence, or recently approved novel agents such as Radium 223. However, immunotherapy has also emerged as an option for the treatment of this disease following the approval of sipuleucel-T by the FDA in 2010. Immunotherapy is a rational approach for prostate cancer based on a body of evidence suggesting these cancers are inherently immunogenic and, most importantly, that immunological interventions can induce protective antitumour responses. Various forms of immunotherapy are currently being explored clinically, with the most common being cancer vaccines (dendritic-cell, viral, and whole tumour cell-based) and immune checkpoint inhibition. This review will discuss recent clinical developments of immune-based therapies for prostate cancer that have reached the phase III clinical trial stage. A perspective of how immunotherapy could be best employed within current treatment regimes to achieve most clinical benefits is also provided. PMID:25276838

  17. Big Data Offers Novel Insights for Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Stephanie L.; Stojdl, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale assays, such as microarrays, next-generation sequencing and various “omics” technologies, have explored multiple aspects of the immune response following virus infection, often from a public health perspective. Yet a lack of similar data exists for monitoring immune engagement during oncolytic virus immunotherapy (OVIT) in the cancer setting. Tracking immune signatures at the tumour site can create a snapshot or longitudinally analyse immune cell activation, infiltration and functionality within global populations or individual cells. Mapping immune changes over the course of oncolytic biotherapy—from initial infection to tumour stabilisation/regression through to long-term cure or escape/relapse—has the potential to generate important therapeutic insights around virus-host interactions. Further, correlating such immune signatures with specific tumour outcomes has significant value for guiding the development of novel oncolytic virus immunotherapy strategies. Here, we provide insights for OVIT from large-scale analyses of immune populations in the infection, vaccination and immunotherapy setting. We analyse several approaches to manipulating immune engagement during OVIT. We further explore immunocentric changes in the tumour tissue following immunotherapy, and compile several immune signatures of therapeutic success. Ultimately, we highlight clinically relevant large-scale approaches with the potential to strengthen future oncolytic strategies to optimally engage the immune system. PMID:26861383

  18. Big Data Offers Novel Insights for Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Swift, Stephanie L; Stojdl, David F

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale assays, such as microarrays, next-generation sequencing and various "omics" technologies, have explored multiple aspects of the immune response following virus infection, often from a public health perspective. Yet a lack of similar data exists for monitoring immune engagement during oncolytic virus immunotherapy (OVIT) in the cancer setting. Tracking immune signatures at the tumour site can create a snapshot or longitudinally analyse immune cell activation, infiltration and functionality within global populations or individual cells. Mapping immune changes over the course of oncolytic biotherapy-from initial infection to tumour stabilisation/regression through to long-term cure or escape/relapse-has the potential to generate important therapeutic insights around virus-host interactions. Further, correlating such immune signatures with specific tumour outcomes has significant value for guiding the development of novel oncolytic virus immunotherapy strategies. Here, we provide insights for OVIT from large-scale analyses of immune populations in the infection, vaccination and immunotherapy setting. We analyse several approaches to manipulating immune engagement during OVIT. We further explore immunocentric changes in the tumour tissue following immunotherapy, and compile several immune signatures of therapeutic success. Ultimately, we highlight clinically relevant large-scale approaches with the potential to strengthen future oncolytic strategies to optimally engage the immune system. PMID:26861383

  19. Cancer immunotherapy: the beginning of the end of cancer?

    PubMed

    Farkona, Sofia; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Blasutig, Ivan M

    2016-01-01

    These are exciting times for cancer immunotherapy. After many years of disappointing results, the tide has finally changed and immunotherapy has become a clinically validated treatment for many cancers. Immunotherapeutic strategies include cancer vaccines, oncolytic viruses, adoptive transfer of ex vivo activated T and natural killer cells, and administration of antibodies or recombinant proteins that either costimulate cells or block the so-called immune checkpoint pathways. The recent success of several immunotherapeutic regimes, such as monoclonal antibody blocking of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1), has boosted the development of this treatment modality, with the consequence that new therapeutic targets and schemes which combine various immunological agents are now being described at a breathtaking pace. In this review, we outline some of the main strategies in cancer immunotherapy (cancer vaccines, adoptive cellular immunotherapy, immune checkpoint blockade, and oncolytic viruses) and discuss the progress in the synergistic design of immune-targeting combination therapies. PMID:27151159

  20. One-Shot Immunomodulatory Nanodiamond Agents for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Cui, Zhifen; Kong, Huating; Xia, Kai; Pan, Liang; Li, Jiang; Sun, Yanhong; Shi, Jiye; Wang, Lihua; Zhu, Ying; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-04-01

    The use of functional nanodiamonds (fNDs) to deliver CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs) for sustained immunostimulation is reported. It is demonstrated that monotherapy using this immunostimulatory agent significantly suppresses the tumor growth in two murine tumor models. This fND-based nanoagent opens new opportunities for immunotherapy, as well as clinical applications of various types of therapeutic nucleic acids. PMID:26833992

  1. NK Cell-based Immunotherapies in Pediatric Oncology

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Kimberly A.; Hank, Jacquelyn A.; DeSantes, Kenneth B.; Capitini, Christian M.; Otto, Mario; Sondel, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen several anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies transition from “promising preclinical models” to treatments with proven clinical activity or benefit. In 2013, the journal Science selected the field of Cancer Immunotherapy as the overall number-1 breakthrough for the year in all of scientific research. In the setting of cancer immunotherapy for adult malignancies, many of these immunotherapy strategies have relied on the cancer patient’s endogenous anti-tumor T cell response. While much promising research in pediatric oncology is similarly focused on T cell reactivity, several pediatric malignancies themselves, or the chemo-radiotherapy used to achieve initial responses, can be associated with profound immune suppression, particularly of the T cell system. A separate component of the immune system, also able to mediate anti-tumor effects and less suppressed by conventional cancer treatment, is the NK cell system. In recent years, several distinct immunotherapeutic approaches that rely on the activity of NK cells have moved from preclinical development into clinical testing, and some have shown clear antitumor benefit. This review provides an overview of NK cell-based immunotherapy efforts that are directed towards childhood malignancies, with an emphasis on protocols that are already in clinical testing. PMID:25590232

  2. Dual B Cell Immunotherapy Is Superior to Individual Anti-CD20 Depletion or BAFF Blockade in Murine Models of Spontaneous or Accelerated Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, WeiYu; Seshasayee, Dhaya; Lee, Wyne P; Caplazi, Patrick; McVay, Sami; Suto, Eric; Nguyen, Allen; Lin, Zhonghua; Sun, Yonglian; DeForge, Laura; Balazs, Mercedesz; Martin, Flavius; Zarrin, Ali A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether a combination of B cell depletion and BAFF blockade is more effective than monotherapy in treating models of spontaneous or accelerated systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in (NZB × NZW)F1 mice. Methods Clinical parameters such as disease progression–free survival, proteinuria, and renal injury were assessed in models of spontaneous, interferon-α (IFNα)–accelerated, or pristane-accelerated lupus in (NZB × NZW)F1 mice. Treatment arms included anti-CD20 (B cell depletion), B lymphocyte stimulator receptor 3 fusion protein (BR-3-Fc) (BAFF blockade), the combination of anti-CD20 and BR-3-Fc, isotype control, or cyclophosphamide. In models of spontaneous, IFNα-accelerated, or pristane-accelerated lupus, mice were treated for 24 weeks, 8 weeks, or 12 weeks, respectively. Peripheral and resident B cell subsets and various autoantibodies were examined. Results Compared to B cell depletion or BAFF blockade alone, combined therapy significantly improved disease manifestations in all 3 lupus models. In addition, marginal zone B cells, plasmablasts, and circulating and tissue plasma cells were decreased more effectively. Dual B cell immunotherapy also reduced multiple classes of pathogenic autoantibodies, consistent with its observed effectiveness in reducing immune complex–mediated renal injury. Conclusion Dual immunotherapy via B cell depletion and BAFF blockade is more efficacious than single agent immunotherapy in murine SLE models, and this combination treatment is predicted to be an effective strategy for immunotherapy in human SLE. PMID:25303150

  3. Active Idiotypic Vaccination Versus Control Immunotherapy for Follicular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Ronald; Ganjoo, Kristen N.; Leonard, John P.; Vose, Julie M.; Flinn, Ian W.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Connors, Joseph M.; Berinstein, Neil L.; Belch, Andrew R.; Bartlett, Nancy L.; Nichols, Craig; Emmanouilides, Christos E.; Timmerman, John M.; Gregory, Stephanie A.; Link, Brian K.; Inwards, David J.; Freedman, Arnold S.; Matous, Jeffrey V.; Robertson, Michael J.; Kunkel, Lori A.; Ingolia, Diane E.; Gentles, Andrew J.; Liu, Chih Long; Tibshirani, Robert; Alizadeh, Ash A.; Denney, Dan W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Idiotypes (Ids), the unique portions of tumor immunoglobulins, can serve as targets for passive and active immunotherapies for lymphoma. We performed a multicenter, randomized trial comparing a specific vaccine (MyVax), comprising Id chemically coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) plus granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to a control immunotherapy with KLH plus GM-CSF. Patients and Methods Patients with previously untreated advanced-stage follicular lymphoma (FL) received eight cycles of chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone. Those achieving sustained partial or complete remission (n = 287 [44%]) were randomly assigned at a ratio of 2:1 to receive one injection per month for 7 months of MyVax or control immunotherapy. Anti-Id antibody responses (humoral immune responses [IRs]) were measured before each immunization. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included IR and time to subsequent antilymphoma therapy. Results At a median follow-up of 58 months, no significant difference was observed in either PFS or time to next therapy between the two arms. In the MyVax group (n = 195), anti-Id IRs were observed in 41% of patients, with a median PFS of 40 months, significantly exceeding the median PFS observed in patients without such Id-induced IRs and in those receiving control immunotherapy. Conclusion This trial failed to demonstrate clinical benefit of specific immunotherapy. The subset of vaccinated patients mounting specific anti-Id responses had superior outcomes. Whether this reflects a therapeutic benefit or is a marker for more favorable underlying prognosis requires further study. PMID:24799467

  4. Cytotoxic immunotherapy strategies for cancer: mechanisms and clinical development.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Laura K; Guzik, Brian W; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo

    2011-08-01

    Traditional therapies for cancer include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Chemotherapy has widespread systemic cytotoxic effects against tumor cells but also affects normal cells. Radiation has more targeted local cytotoxicity but is limited to killing cells in the radiation field. Immunotherapy has the potential for systemic, specific killing of tumor cells. However, if the immune response is specific to a single antigen, tumor evasion can occur by down-regulation of that antigen. An immunotherapy approach that induces polyvalent immunity to autologous tumor antigens can provide a personalized vaccine with less potential for immunologic escape. A cytotoxic immunotherapy strategy creates such a tumor vaccine in situ. Immunogenic tumor cell death provides tumor antigen targets for the adaptive immune response and stimulates innate immunity. Attraction and activation of antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells is important to process and present tumor antigens to T cells. These include cytotoxic T cells that kill tumor cells and T cells which positively and negatively regulate immunity. Tipping the balance in favor of anti-tumor immunity is an important aspect of an effective strategy. Clinically, immunotherapies may be most effective when combined with standard therapies in a complimentary way. An example is gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy (GMCI) which uses an adenoviral vector, AdV-tk, to deliver a cytotoxic and immunostimulatory gene to tumor cells in vivo in combination with standard therapies creating an immunostimulatory milieu. This approach, studied extensively in animal models and early stage clinical trials, is now entering a definitive Phase 3 trial for prostate cancer. PMID:21465529

  5. Passive Immunotherapy Protects against Enteric Invasion and Lethal Sepsis in a Murine Model of Gastrointestinal Anthrax.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bruce; Xie, Tao; Rotstein, David; Fang, Hui; Frucht, David M

    2015-10-01

    The principal portal for anthrax infection in natural animal outbreaks is the digestive tract. Enteric exposure to anthrax, which is difficult to detect or prevent in a timely manner, could be exploited as an act of terror through contamination of human or animal food. Our group has developed a novel animal model of gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax for evaluation of disease pathogenesis and experimental therapeutics, utilizing vegetative Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain) administered to A/J mice (a complement-deficient strain) by oral gavage. We hypothesized that a humanized recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) * that neutralizes the protective antigen (PA) component of B. anthracis lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin (ET) could be an effective treatment. Although the efficacy of this anti-anthrax PA mAb has been shown in animal models of inhalational anthrax, its activity in GI infection had not yet been ascertained. We hereby demonstrate that passive immunotherapy with anti-anthrax PA mAb, administered at the same time as gastrointestinal exposure to B. anthracis, prevents lethal sepsis in nearly all cases (>90%), while a delay of up to forty-eight hours in treatment still greatly reduces mortality following exposure (65%). Moreover, passive immunotherapy protects against enteric invasion, associated mucosal injury and subsequent dissemination by gastrointestinal B. anthracis, indicating that it acts to prevent the initial stages of infection. * Expired raxibacumab being cycled off the Strategic National Stockpile; biological activity confirmed by in vitro assay. PMID:26426050

  6. Generation of hypoallergenic neoglycoconjugates for dendritic cell targeted vaccination: A novel tool for specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Esther E.; Himly, Martin; Myschik, Julia; Hauser, Michael; Altmann, Friedrich; Isakovic, Almedina; Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of allergic disorders and asthma continuously increased over the past decades, consuming a considerable proportion of the health care budget. Allergen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy represents the only intervention treating the underlying causes of type I allergies, but still suffers from unwanted side effects and low compliance. There is an urgent need for novel approaches improving safety and efficacy of this therapy. In the present study we investigated carbohydrate-mediated targeting of allergens to dermal antigen-presenting cells and its influence on immunogenicity and allergenicity. Mannan, high (40kDa) and low (6kDa) molecular weight dextran, and maltodextrin were covalently attached to ovalbumin and papain via mild carbohydrate oxidation resulting in neoglycocomplexes of various sizes. In particular, mannan-conjugates were efficiently taken up by dendritic cells in vivo leading to elevated humoral immune responses against the protein moiety and a shift from IgE to IgG. Beyond providing an adjuvant effect, papain glycocomplexes also proved to mask B-cell epitopes, thus rendering the allergen derivative hypoallergenic. The present data demonstrate that carbohydrate-modified allergens combine targeting of antigen presenting cells with hypoallergenicity, offering the potential for low dose allergen-specific immunotherapy while concomitantly reducing the risk of side effects. PMID:23147517

  7. Efficacy of Sublingual Immunotherapy with Dermatophagoides Pteronyssinus: A Real-life Study.

    PubMed

    Vesna, Tomic-Spiric; Denisa, Dizdarevic; Slavenka, Jankovic; Lidija, Burazer; Aleksandra, Barac; Jasna, Bolpacic; Vojislav, Djuric; Aleksandra, Peric-Popadic; Aleksandra, Aleksic; Mirjana, Bogic

    2016-04-01

    Sublingual allergen immunotherapy (SLIT) is considered to be safer and more convenient than subcutaneus immunotherapy. SLIT trials with house dust mites involving patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and asthma reported discordant results. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of SLIT with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (D.pt) extract produced in Serbia and patient's satisfaction through open-label trial. Adult patients with allergic rhinitis were randomized into two groups: one received drugs and SLIT, while other received only drugs. Symptom score (SS), medication score (MS) and cumulative score (CS), skin prick tests (SPT) and serum level of D. pt specific IgE were assessed. One year after, the patients were re-evaluated. In total, 61 patients were enrolled in the study, but 52 of them were analyzed at the end of the year. CS (29.3%, p<0.001) and MS (54.3%, p<0.05) reduced significantly in the SLIT group. There was a significant improvement of MS and CS in the SLIT compared to control group (p<0.001 and p<0.05 respectively). There was no significant improvement of SS as well as specific slgE. Patients in the SLIT group were more satisfied with treatment (p<0.001). The incidence of mild adverse reaction was 38.4%. Specific lgG was not done. One year SLIT with D.pt extract was clinically efficient treatment in AR patients. PMID:27090364

  8. Passive Immunotherapy Protects against Enteric Invasion and Lethal Sepsis in a Murine Model of Gastrointestinal Anthrax

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bruce; Xie, Tao; Rotstein, David; Fang, Hui; Frucht, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The principal portal for anthrax infection in natural animal outbreaks is the digestive tract. Enteric exposure to anthrax, which is difficult to detect or prevent in a timely manner, could be exploited as an act of terror through contamination of human or animal food. Our group has developed a novel animal model of gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax for evaluation of disease pathogenesis and experimental therapeutics, utilizing vegetative Bacillus anthracis (Sterne strain) administered to A/J mice (a complement-deficient strain) by oral gavage. We hypothesized that a humanized recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) * that neutralizes the protective antigen (PA) component of B. anthracis lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin (ET) could be an effective treatment. Although the efficacy of this anti-anthrax PA mAb has been shown in animal models of inhalational anthrax, its activity in GI infection had not yet been ascertained. We hereby demonstrate that passive immunotherapy with anti-anthrax PA mAb, administered at the same time as gastrointestinal exposure to B. anthracis, prevents lethal sepsis in nearly all cases (>90%), while a delay of up to forty-eight hours in treatment still greatly reduces mortality following exposure (65%). Moreover, passive immunotherapy protects against enteric invasion, associated mucosal injury and subsequent dissemination by gastrointestinal B. anthracis, indicating that it acts to prevent the initial stages of infection. * Expired raxibacumab being cycled off the Strategic National Stockpile; biological activity confirmed by in vitro assay. PMID:26426050

  9. CD8+ T-cell Immune Evasion Enables Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pourchet, Aldo; Fuhrmann, Steven R.; Pilones, Karsten A.; Demaria, Sandra; Frey, Alan B.; Mulvey, Matthew; Mohr, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Although counteracting innate defenses allows oncolytic viruses (OVs) to better replicate and spread within tumors, CD8+ T-cells restrict their capacity to trigger systemic anti-tumor immune responses. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) evades CD8+ T-cells by producing ICP47, which limits immune recognition of infected cells by inhibiting the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). Surprisingly, removing ICP47 was assumed to benefit OV immuno-therapy, but the impact of inhibiting TAP remains unknown because human HSV-1 ICP47 is not effective in rodents. Here, we engineer an HSV-1 OV to produce bovine herpesvirus UL49.5, which unlike ICP47, antagonizes rodent and human TAP. Significantly, UL49.5-expressing OVs showed superior efficacy treating bladder and breast cancer in murine models that was dependent upon CD8+ T-cells. Besides injected subcutaneous tumors, UL49.5-OV reduced untreated, contralateral tumor size and metastases. These findings establish TAP inhibitor-armed OVs that evade CD8+ T-cells as an immunotherapy strategy to elicit potent local and systemic anti-tumor responses. PMID:27077112

  10. CD8(+) T-cell Immune Evasion Enables Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pourchet, Aldo; Fuhrmann, Steven R; Pilones, Karsten A; Demaria, Sandra; Frey, Alan B; Mulvey, Matthew; Mohr, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Although counteracting innate defenses allows oncolytic viruses (OVs) to better replicate and spread within tumors, CD8(+) T-cells restrict their capacity to trigger systemic anti-tumor immune responses. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) evades CD8(+) T-cells by producing ICP47, which limits immune recognition of infected cells by inhibiting the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). Surprisingly, removing ICP47 was assumed to benefit OV immuno-therapy, but the impact of inhibiting TAP remains unknown because human HSV-1 ICP47 is not effective in rodents. Here, we engineer an HSV-1 OV to produce bovine herpesvirus UL49.5, which unlike ICP47, antagonizes rodent and human TAP. Significantly, UL49.5-expressing OVs showed superior efficacy treating bladder and breast cancer in murine models that was dependent upon CD8(+) T-cells. Besides injected subcutaneous tumors, UL49.5-OV reduced untreated, contralateral tumor size and metastases. These findings establish TAP inhibitor-armed OVs that evade CD8(+) T-cells as an immunotherapy strategy to elicit potent local and systemic anti-tumor responses. PMID:27077112

  11. Can we reduce the dosage of biologics in spondyloarthritis?

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Ignazio; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Padula, Angela; Leccese, Pietro; Nigro, Angelo; Palazzi, Carlo

    2013-05-01

    TNF blockers have revolutionized the management of spondyloarthritis (SpA). To date, four anti-TNFα agents (etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab) have been approved for the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The first objective in the management of AS and PsA with TNF inhibitors is to reduce disease activity to clinical remission or low disease activity. After remission has been achieved, this state should be maintained as long as possible. However, the financial burden associated with the cost of anti-TNF agents as well as concerns about their long-term safety suggest reducing the dosage of the drug or discontinuing the therapy in the hopes of drug-free remission. The aim of this review is to examine what has, till now, been published on this topic in axial SpA, which includes AS and non-radiographic axial SpA (nr-axSpA), peripheral SpA and PsA. Discontinuation of therapy in axial SpA is not possible in the majority of patients, while on the contrary, reducing the dosage often is. In some patients with peripheral SpA and PsA it is also possible to discontinue therapy and to achieve drug-free remission. PMID:22940233

  12. Immunotherapy of acute radiation syndromes with antiradiation gamma G globulin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav; Casey, Rachael; Jones, Jeffrey; Kedar, Prasad

    Introduction: If an immunotherapy treatment approach to treatment of acute radiation syndromes (ARS) were to be developed; consideration could be given to neutralization of radiation toxins (Specific Radiation Determinants- SRD) by specific antiradiation antibodies. To accomplish this objective, irradiated animals were injected with a preparation of antiradiation immunoglobulin G (IgG) obtained from hyperimmune donors. Radiation-indeced toxins that we call Specific Radiation Determinants (SRD) possess toxic (neurotoxic, haemotoxic and enterotoxic) characteristics as well as specific antigenic properties that combined with the direct physiochemical direct radiation damage, induce the development of many of the pathological processes associated with ARS. We tested several specific hyperimmune IgG preparations against these radiation toxins and observed that their toxic properties were neutralized by specific antiradiation IgGs. Material and Methods: Rabbits were inoculated with SRD radiation toxins to induce hyperimmune serum. The hyperimmune serum was pooled from several animals, purified, and concentrated. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays of the hyperimmune serum revealed high titers of IgG with specific binding to radiation toxins. The antiradiation IgG preparation was injected into laboratory animals one hour before and three hours after irradiation, and was evaluated for its ability to protect inoculated animals against the development of acute radiation syndromes. Results: Animals that were inoculated with specific antiradiation antibodies before receiving lethal irradiation at LD 100/30 exhibited 60-75% survival rate at 30 days, whereas all control animals expired by 30 days following exposure. These inoculated animals also exhibited markedly reduced clinical symptoms of ARS, even those that did not survive irradiation. Discussion: The results of our experiments demonstrate that rabbit hyperimmune serum directed against SRD toxins afford significant, albeit incomplete, protection against high doses of radiation. In comparison, the mortality rate of irradiated control animals was 100% in the same time period. The mortality rates of hyperimmune serum-treated animals varied in different groups of animals and different forms of ARS; however, significant radioprotection was observed in each group treated with IgGs activated against specific radiation toxins.

  13. Immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma with small double-stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide with limited therapeutic options. Since HCC has been shown to be immunogenic, immunotherapy is considered a promising therapeutic approach. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), depending on their structure and sequence, can trigger the innate immune system, which can potentially enhance the adaptive anticancer immune response in the tumor-bearing subjects. Immunostimulatory properties of nucleic acids can be applied to develop adjuvants for HCC treatment. Methods The transplantable HCC G-29 tumor in male CBA/LacSto (CBA) mice was used to study the effects of immunostimulatory RNA on tumor growth. Tumor size, metastases area in different organs of mice and mouse survival rate were analyzed. Furthermore the mouse serum IFN-α levels were measured using ELISA. Results In the present study, we found that a 19-bp RNA duplex (ImmunoStimulattory RNA or isRNA) with 3-nt overhangs at the 3′-ends of specific sequence displays immunostimulatory, antitumor, and antimetastatic activities in mice bearing HCC G-29. Our results demonstrate that isRNA strongly increases the level of interferon-α (IFN-α) by up to 25-fold relative to the level in mice injected with Lipofectamine alone (Mock), and to a lesser extent increases the level of proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) (by up to 5.5-fold relative to the Mock level), in mice blood serum. We showed that isRNA reliably (P < 0.05) inhibits primary tumor growth in mice compared to the mock group. Furthermore, injections of isRNA significantly enhanced necrotic processes in the center of the primary tumor, and decreased by twofold the width of the undifferentiated peripheral zone and the number of mitotic cells in this zone. The results showed that isRNA efficiently reduces the area of metastases in the liver, kidneys, and heart of CBA/LacSto mice with HCC. Conclusions The obtained results clearly demonstrate immunostimulatory and antimetastatic properties of the isRNAs in mice with HCC. Consequently, this short double-stranded RNA can be considered as a potential adjuvant for the therapy of HCC. PMID:24886485

  14. Current role of immunotherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Porfyris, O; Kalomoiris, P

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the conventional treatment for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) which provides only modest benefits. In the last few years, immunotherapy has emerged as an exciting therapeutic modality for advanced prostate cancer. Several characteristics of prostate cancer make it an ideal target for immunotherapy, and FDA approved recently sipuleucel-T based on improvement in overall survival (OS) in patients with CRPC. Current trials investigate the role of various immunological approaches in the treatment of prostate cancer, as far as the clinical benefit they provide is concerned and also deal with the issue of the measurability of this benefit. Future studies will focus on the combination of immunotherapeutic agents with conventional treatments in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. PMID:24344002

  15. Cytomegalovirus-targeted immunotherapy and glioblastoma: hype or hope?

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Sherise D; Srinivasan, Visish M; Ghali, Michael Gz; Heimberger, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    Malignant gliomas, including glioblastoma (GBM), are the most common primary brain tumors. Despite extensive research only modest gains have been made in long-term survival. Standard of care involves maximizing safe surgical resection followed by concurrent chemoradiation with temozolomide. Immunotherapy for GBM is an area of intense research in recent years. New immunotherapies, although promising, have not been integrated into standard practice. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a DNA virus of the family Herpesviridae. Human seroprevalence is approximately 80%, and in most cases, is associated with asymptomatic infection. HCMV may be an important agent in the initiation, promotion and/or progression of tumorigenesis. Regardless of a possible etiologic role in GBM, interest has centered on exploiting this association for development of immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:26973123

  16. Cancer-associated fibroblasts as targets for immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kakarla, Sunitha; Song, Xiao-Tong; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy for solid tumors has shown promise in preclinical as well as early clinical studies. However, its efficacy remains limited. The hindrance to achieving objective, long-lasting therapeutic responses in solid tumors is, in part, mediated by the dynamic nature of the tumor and its complex microenvironment. Tumor-directed therapies fail to eliminate components of the microenvironment, which can reinstate a tumorigenic milieu and contribute to recurrence. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) form the most preponderant cell type in the solid tumor microenvironment. Given their pervasive role in facilitating tumor growth and metastatic dissemination, CAFs have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets in the tumor microenvironment. In this article, we highlight the cross-talk between CAFs and cancer cells, and discuss how targeting CAFs has the potential to improve current immunotherapy approaches for cancer. PMID:23194363

  17. Targeting CD8+ T-cell tolerance for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Stephanie R; Yuan, Jinyun; Teague, Ryan M

    2014-01-01

    In the final issue of Science in 2013, the American Association of Science recognized progress in the field of cancer immunotherapy as the ‘Breakthrough of the Year.’ The achievements were actually twofold, owing to the early success of genetically engineered chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) and to the mounting clinical triumphs achieved with checkpoint blockade antibodies. While fundamentally very different, the common thread of these independent strategies is the ability to prevent or overcome mechanisms of CD8+ T-cell tolerance for improved tumor immunity. Here we discuss how circumventing T-cell tolerance has provided experimental insights that have guided the field of clinical cancer immunotherapy to a place where real breakthroughs can finally be claimed. PMID:25290416

  18. Vascular normalization as an emerging strategy to enhance cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuhui; Goel, Shom; Duda, Dan G.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    The recent approval of Provenge has brought new hope for anti-cancer vaccine therapies. However, the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment seems to impair the efficacy of vaccine therapies. The abnormal tumor vasculature creates a hypoxic microenvironment that polarizes inflammatory cells toward immune suppression. Moreover, tumors systemically alter immune cells’ proliferation, differentiation and function via secretion of growth factors and cytokines. For example, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a major pro-angiogenic cytokine induced by hypoxia, plays a critical role in immunosuppression via these mechanisms. Hence, anti-angiogenic treatment may be an effective modality to potentiate immunotherapy. Here we discuss the local and systemic effects of VEGF on tumor immunity, and propose a potentially translatable strategy to re-engineer the tumor immune microenvironment and improve cancer immunotherapy by using lower “vascular normalizing” doses of anti-angiogenic agents. PMID:23440426

  19. Combinations of Immunotherapy and Radiation in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vatner, Ralph E.; Cooper, Benjamin T.; Vanpouille-Box, Claire; Demaria, Sandra; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2014-01-01

    The immune system has the ability to recognize and specifically reject tumors, and tumors only become clinically apparent once they have evaded immune destruction by creating an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Radiotherapy (RT) can cause immunogenic tumor cell death resulting in cross-priming of tumor-specific T-cells, acting as an in situ tumor vaccine; however, RT alone rarely induces effective anti-tumor immunity resulting in systemic tumor rejection. Immunotherapy can complement RT to help overcome tumor-induced immune suppression, as demonstrated in pre-clinical tumor models. Here, we provide the rationale for combinations of different immunotherapies and RT, and review the pre-clinical and emerging clinical evidence for these combinations in the treatment of cancer. PMID:25506582

  20. Mutanome Engineered RNA Immunotherapy: Towards Patient-Centered Tumor Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Vormehr, Mathias; Schrörs, Barbara; Boegel, Sebastian; Löwer, Martin; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2015-01-01

    Advances in nucleic acid sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, allowing the efficient targeting of mutated neoantigens for personalized cancer vaccination. Due to their absence during negative selection of T cells and their lack of expression in healthy tissue, tumor mutations are considered as optimal targets for cancer immunotherapy. Preclinical and early clinical data suggest that synthetic mRNA can serve as potent drug format allowing the cost efficient production of highly efficient vaccines in a timely manner. In this review, we describe a process, which integrates next generation sequencing based cancer mutanome mapping, in silico target selection and prioritization approaches, and mRNA vaccine manufacturing and delivery into a process we refer to as MERIT (mutanome engineered RNA immunotherapy). PMID:26844233

  1. Cellular-Based Immunotherapies for Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xun; Stockhammer, Florian; Schmitt, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains to be a challenge with a median survival of 14.6?months following diagnosis. Standard treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy, and systemic chemotherapy with temozolomide. Despite the fact that the brain constitutes an immunoprivileged site, recent observations after immunotherapies with lysate from autologous tumor cells pulsed on dendritic cells (DCs), peptides, protein, messenger RNA, and cytokines suggest an immunological and even clinical response from immunotherapies. Given this plethora of immunomodulatory therapies, this paper gives a structure overview of the state-of-the art in the field. Particular emphasis was also put on immunogenic antigens as potential targets for a more specific stimulation of the immune system against GBM. PMID:22474481

  2. Bacterial vectors for active immunotherapy reach clinical and industrial stages

    PubMed Central

    Le Gouëllec, Audrey; Chauchet, Xavier; Polack, Benoit; Buffat, Laurent; Toussaint, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Active immunotherapy based on live attenuated bacterial vectors has matured in terms of industrial development and develops through a combination of three phenomena. First, active immunotherapy that stimulates an antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell immune response has become a reality after several years of work. Second, there is still a need to identify vectors that can deliver antigens to the cytosol of antigen-presenting cells in vivo. Third, the recent progress in the understanding of bacterial lifestyle and in developing genetic engineering tools has enabled the design of bioengineered bugs that are capable of delivering antigens. Here, we review the mechanisms by which clinical bacterial vectors deliver antigens into the cytosol of antigen-presenting cells and summarize the development strategy of the three identified firms in this field. PMID:22894945

  3. Immunotherapy and targeted therapy for cervical cancer: an update.

    PubMed

    Menderes, Gulden; Black, Jonathan; Schwab, Carlton L; Santin, Alessandro D

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor with a median survival of 8-13 months. Despite the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, this treatment is rarely curative and should be considered palliative only. In the last few years, a better understanding of Human papillomavirus tumor-host immune system interactions and the development of new therapeutics targeting immune check points have renewed interest in the use of immunotherapy in cervical cancer patients. Moreover, next generation sequencing has emerged as an attractive option for the identification of actionable driver mutations and other markers. In this review, we provide background information on the molecular biology of cervical cancer and summarize immunotherapy studies, targeted therapies, including those with angiogenesis inhibitors and tyrosine kinase inhibitors recently completed or currently on-going in cervical cancer patients. PMID:26568261

  4. Molecular imaging of cell-based cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Swierczewska, Magdalena; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based cancer immunotherapy represents a new and powerful weapon in the arsenal of anticancer treatments. Non-invasive monitoring of the disposition, migration and destination of therapeutic cells will facilitate the development of cell based therapy. The therapeutic cells can be modified intrinsically by a reporter gene or labeled extrinsically by introducing imaging probes into the cells or on the cell surface before transplant. Various advanced non-invasive molecular imaging techniques are playing important roles in optimizing cellular therapy by tracking cells and monitoring the therapeutic effects of transplanted cells in vivo. This review will summarize the application of multiple molecular imaging modalities in cell-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:21308113

  5. FcγR requirements leading to successful immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Lekh N; Roghanian, Ali; Beers, Stephen A; Cragg, Mark S

    2015-11-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) immunotherapy is currently experiencing an unprecedented amount of success, delivering blockbuster sales for the pharmaceutical industry. Having experienced several false dawns and overcoming technical issues which limited progress, we are now entering a golden period where mAbs are becoming a mainstay of treatment regimes for diseases ranging from cancer to autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss how these mAbs are most likely working and focus in particular on the key receptors that they interact with to precipitate their therapeutic effects. Although their targets may vary, their engagement with Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) on numerous immune effector cells is almost universal, and here we review their roles in delivering successful immunotherapy. PMID:26497516

  6. Current advances in T-cell-based cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingjun; Yin, Bingnan; Wang, Helen Y; Wang, Rong-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide; due to the lack of ideal cancer biomarkers for early detection or diagnosis, most patients present with late-stage disease at the time of diagnosis, thus limiting the potential for successful treatment. Traditional cancer treatments, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, have demonstrated very limited efficacy for patients with late-stage disease. Therefore, innovative and effective cancer treatments are urgently needed for cancer patients with late-stage and refractory disease. Cancer immunotherapy, particularly adoptive cell transfer, has shown great promise in the treatment of patients with late-stage disease, including those who are refractory to standard therapies. In this review, we will highlight recent advances and discuss future directions in adoptive cell transfer based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25524383

  7. [Self defense instead of offense - Immunotherapy in lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Moldvay, Judit; Ostoros, Gyula

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and also in Hungary, therefore new therapeutic strategies are of great importance. Among immunotherapeutic approaches immune checkpoint inhibition appears to be the most promising. Recent studies have shown efficacy of immunotherapy, especially in squamous cell lung cancer, which is a big step forward in the treatment of this histological subtype. Unlike in the molecularly targeted therapies, the patient selection method has not yet been developed, although some studies indicate the predictive value of tumor cell PD-L1 immunopositivity, especially in lung adenocarcinoma. Introduction of immunotherapy carries challenge for clinicians regarding the radiological assessment of therapeutic efficiency as well as the management of side effects of new profile. The favorable results of recent studies, however, provide hope in this malignancy still presenting a major therapeutic challenge. PMID:26934348

  8. Overview of Cellular Immunotherapy for Patients with Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Vauleon, Elodie; Avril, Tony; Collet, Brigitte; Mosser, Jean; Quillien, Véronique

    2010-01-01

    High grade gliomas (HGG) including glioblastomas (GBM) are the most common and devastating primary brain tumours. Despite important progresses in GBM treatment that currently includes surgery combined to radio- and chemotherapy, GBM patients' prognosis remains very poor. Immunotherapy is one of the new promising therapeutic approaches that can specifically target tumour cells. Such an approach could also maintain long term antitumour responses without inducing neurologic defects. Since the past 25 years, adoptive and active immunotherapies using lymphokine-activated killer cells, cytotoxic T cells, tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes, autologous tumour cells, and dendritic cells have been tested in phase I/II clinical trials with HGG patients. This paper inventories these cellular immunotherapeutic strategies and discusses their efficacy, limits, and future perspectives for optimizing the treatment to achieve clinical benefits for GBM patients. PMID:20953324

  9. New Strategies in Bladder Cancer: A Second Coming for Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ghasemzadeh, Ali; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Hahn, Noah M; Drake, Charles G

    2016-02-15

    Urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) remains one of the most common and deadly cancers worldwide, and platinum-based chemotherapy, which has been the standard-of-care in metastatic bladder cancer, has had limited success in improving outcomes for patients. The recent development and translation of therapeutic strategies aimed at harnessing the immune system have led to durable and prolonged survival for patients with several different cancers, including UBC. In this review, we discuss new findings in bladder cancer immunotherapy, including recent successes with immune checkpoint blockade. We also discuss therapeutic cancer vaccines and highlight several additional immunotherapy modalities in early stages of development. Clin Cancer Res; 22(4); 793-801. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26683632

  10. Novel Anti-Melanoma Immunotherapies: Disarming Tumor Escape Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sapoznik, Sivan; Hammer, Ohad; Ortenberg, Rona; Besser, Michal J.; Ben-Moshe, Tehila; Schachter, Jacob; Markel, Gal

    2012-01-01

    The immune system fights cancer and sometimes temporarily eliminates it or reaches an equilibrium stage of tumor growth. However, continuous immunological pressure also selects poorly immunogenic tumor variants that eventually escape the immune control system. Here, we focus on metastatic melanoma, a highly immunogenic tumor, and on anti-melanoma immunotherapies, which recently, especially following the FDA approval of Ipilimumab, gained interest from drug development companies. We describe new immunomodulatory approaches currently in the development pipeline, focus on the novel CEACAM1 immune checkpoint, and compare its potential to the extensively described targets, CTLA4 and PD1. This paper combines multi-disciplinary approaches and describes anti-melanoma immunotherapies from molecular, medical, and business angles. PMID:22778766

  11. Genetic modification of natural killer cells for adoptive cellular immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pegram, Hollie J; Kershaw, Michael H; Darcy, Phillip K

    2009-07-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer is a rapidly developing field; one such development is the manipulation and use of natural killer (NK) cells. These cells with 'killer instincts' are an attractive cell to utilize, as they are directly reactive toward tumor and could potentially activate the endogenous adaptive immune system. Their employment in adoptive cell transfer treatments has yielded important results and discoveries, although effective antitumor responses are limited. To address these limitations, NK cells are the target of a new generation of immunotherapy involving gene transfer. The gene modification of immune cells is a relatively recent technique and some groups have targeted NK cells for gene modification to improve their antitumor efficacy. This review will investigate studies describing the gene modification of NK cells and their encouraging antitumor effects. PMID:20635990

  12. Epigenetic modifiers in immunotherapy: a focus on checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Terranova-Barberio, Manuela; Thomas, Scott; Munster, Pamela N

    2016-06-01

    Immune surveillance should be directed to suppress tumor development and progression, involving a balance of coinhibitory and costimulatory signals that amplify immune response without overwhelming the host. Immunotherapy confers durable clinical benefit in 'immunogenic tumors', whereas in other tumors the responses are modest. Thus, immune checkpoint inhibitors may need to be combined with strategies to boost immune response or increase the tumor immune profile. Epigenetic aberrations contribute significantly to carcinogenesis. Recent findings suggest that epigenetic drugs prime the immune response by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens and immune-related genes, as well as modulating chemokines and cytokines involved in immune system activation. This review describes our current understanding regarding epigenetic and immunotherapy combination, focusing on immune response priming to checkpoint blockade. PMID:27197539

  13. Management of polysensitized patient: from molecular diagnostics to biomolecular immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ciprandi, Giorgio; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Frati, Franco

    2015-01-01

    A panel of Italian allergists gathered to discuss the issue concerning the management of polysensitized patients. The main conclusions were as follows: polysensitization is a relevant clinical characteristic as it affects about 70-80% of the global allergic population; the diagnostic pathway needs the use of an adequate and thorough methodology, based on the demonstration of consistency between history and documented sensitization; polysensitization and polyallergy are not synonymous: true allergy should always be demonstrated; polysensitization does not constitute a limitation to allergen immunotherapy prescription, as 1-2 allergen extracts could be effective in polysensitized patients; the allergen immunotherapy product characteristics should include the following: high efficacy and optimal safety profile, standardized production, and documented presence and titration of the major allergen. PMID:26144241

  14. Sublingual immunotherapy: from safety to mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, F; Sensi, L; Allocca, G; Chiarello, F; Palleri, P; Ugolini, E; Di Rienzo, A; Castellani, S; Incorvaia, C; Di Cara, G; Puccinelli, P; Frati, F

    2007-03-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy is an important option for the treatment of respiratory allergy and its clinical efficacy has been clearly demonstrated by several studies. However, the injective route of administration and the possibility of severe side effects has limited its use in children and led to the introduction of new forms of administration. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has proven to be an effective and safe treatment for respiratory allergy. However, its mechanism of action is still debated. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that, differently from nasal mucosa, allergen extracts administered by SLIT are not immediately adsorbed but are long retained before being drained to local lymph nodes. This difference may be responsible of the absence of severe side effects and instead of short-lasting local symptoms. Studies by biopsies of the oral mucosa should greatly help in defining the presence and the role of cells involved in the mechanisms of oral tolerance. PMID:17465282

  15. Is immunotherapy an opportunity for effective treatment of drug addiction?

    PubMed

    Zalewska-Kaszubska, Jadwiga

    2015-11-27

    Immunotherapy has a great potential of becoming a new therapeutic strategy in the treatment of addiction to psychoactive drugs. It may be used to treat addiction but also to prevent neurotoxic complications of drug overdose. In preclinical studies two immunological methods have been tested; active immunization, which relies on the administration of vaccines and passive immunization, which relies on the administration of monoclonal antibodies. Until now researchers have succeeded in developing vaccines and/or antibodies against addiction to heroin, cocaine, methamphetamine, nicotine and phencyclidine. Their effectiveness has been confirmed in preclinical studies. At present, clinical studies are being conducted for vaccines against nicotine and cocaine and also anti-methamphetamine monoclonal antibody. These preclinical and clinical studies suggest that immunotherapy may be useful in the treatment of addiction and drug overdose. However, there are a few problems to be solved. One of them is controlling the level of antibodies due to variability between subjects. But even obtaining a suitable antibody titer does not guarantee the effectiveness of the vaccine. Additionally, there is a risk of intentional or unintentional overdose. As vaccines prevent passing of drugs through the blood/brain barrier and thereby prevent their positive reinforcement, some addicted patients may erroneously seek higher doses of psychoactive substances to get "high". Consequently, vaccination should be targeted at persons who have a strong motivation to free themselves from drug dependency. It seems that immunotherapy may be an opportunity for effective treatment of drug addiction if directed to adequate candidates for treatment. For other addicts, immunotherapy may be a very important element supporting psycho- and pharmacotherapy. PMID:26432911

  16. Preliminary Evaluation of a Bunyavirus Vector for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oreshkova, N; Spel, L; Vloet, R P M; Wichgers Schreur, P J; Moormann, R J M; Boes, M; Kortekaas, J

    2015-09-01

    Replicon particles of Rift Valley fever virus, referred to as nonspreading Rift Valley fever virus (NSR), are intrinsically safe and highly immunogenic. Here, we demonstrate that NSR-infected human dendritic cells can activate CD8(+) T cells in vitro and that prophylactic and therapeutic vaccinations of mice with NSR encoding a tumor-associated CD8 peptide can control the outgrowth of lymphoma cells in vivo. These results suggest that the NSR system holds promise for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26085169

  17. Assessing T-cell responses in anticancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Escors, David; Liechtenstein, Therese; Perez-Janices, Noemi; Schwarze, Julia; Dufait, Ines; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Lanna, Alessio; Arce, Frederick; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Kochan, Grazyna; Guerrero-Setas, David; Breckpot, Karine

    2013-01-01

    Since dendritic cells operate as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and hence are capable of jumpstarting the immune system, they have been exploited to develop a variety of immunotherapeutic regimens against cancer. In the few past years, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been shown to mediate robust immunosuppressive functions, thereby inhibiting tumor-targeting immune responses. Thus, we propose that the immunomodulatory activity of MDSCs should be carefully considered for the development of efficient anticancer immunotherapies. PMID:24244902

  18. Promising systemic immunotherapies in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gildener-Leapman, Neil; Ferris, Robert L.; Bauman, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) demonstrate poor survival and significant treatment morbidity with standard therapy. The immune profile in HNSCC, whether caused by carcinogen exposure or human papillomavirus (HPV), is notably immunosuppressive. Early clinical trials of immunotherapy in HNSCC were troubled by systemic toxicity or difficulties in local administration. Now, interest in immunotherapy has been revitalized by mechanistic insights into immune evasion by HNSCC, coupled to ongoing development of novel immunotherapies. This review will summarize immune escape mechanisms in HNSCC, namely downregulation of tumor antigen (TA) presentation, aberrant regulation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family, the immunosuppressive cytokine milieu, and dysregulation of immune effector cells. Therapeutic strategies hypothesized to specifically counter HNSCC immunosuppression will then be discussed. We will survey TA-targeted monoclonal antibodies (mAb), including the prototype cetuximab, as well as adjunctive strategies to enhance antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. We will review immunomodulation to restore STAT1/STAT3 activation balance. Examples of mAb therapy to block immunosuppressive cytokines, such as interleukin-6 or VEGF, will be provided. mAbs which release co-inhibitory T cell receptors such as CTLA-4 and PD-1, overexpressed in HNSCC, also hold therapeutic promise. Finally, we will describe principles for therapeutic vaccination in HPV-associated HNSCC, where non-host TAs such as viral oncoproteins represent ideal targets, and HPV-negative HNSCC, where p53 is a promising target. Insights into immunosuppression in HNSCC have elucidated mechanistic targets for immunotherapy. Rational clinical investigation may lead to effective stand alone or combinatorial treatment approaches. PMID:24126223

  19. Advances in Chimeric Antigen Receptor Immunotherapy for Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Heczey, Andras; Louis, Chrystal U.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NBL) is the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor and has heterogeneous biology and behavior. Patients with high-risk disease have poor prognosis despite complex multimodal therapy; therefore, novel curative approaches are needed. Immunotherapy is a novel therapeutic approach that harnesses the inherent activity of the immune system to control and eliminate malignant cells. One form of immunotherapy uses chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) to target tumor-associated antigens. CARs are derived from the antigen-binding domain of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) coupled with the intracellular signaling portion of the T cell receptor. CARs can combine the specificity and effectiveness of MAbs with the active bio-distribution, direct cytotoxicity, and long-term persistence of T cells. NBL provides an attractive target for CAR immunotherapy as many of its tumor-associated antigens are not expressed at significant levels on normal tissues, thus decreasing potential treatment related toxicity. Two previous clinical trials utilizing L1-cell adhesion molecule (L1-CAM) and disialoganglioside (GD2) specific CARs (GD2-CAR) have demonstrated safety and anti-tumor efficacy in heavily pretreated relapsed/refractory neuroblastoma patients. Based on these promising results and on improved techniques that can further potentiate CAR therapies, two clinical trials are currently investigating the use of GD2-CARs in children with NBL. Several approaches may further enhance anti-tumor activity and persistence of CAR modified cells, and if these can be safely translated into the clinic, CAR-based immunotherapy could become a viable adjunct or potential alternative to conventional treatment options for patients with NBL. PMID:24333408

  20. Mechanistic basis of immunotherapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenhao; Xie, Aini; Chan, Lawrence

    2013-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease for which there is no cure. The pancreatic beta cells are the source of insulin that keeps blood glucose normal. When susceptible individuals develop T1D, their beta cells are destroyed by autoimmune T lymphocytes and no longer produce insulin. T1D patients therefore depend on daily insulin injections for survival. Gene therapy in T1D aims at the induction of new islets to replace those that have been destroyed by autoimmunity. A major goal of T1D research is to restore functional beta cell mass while eliminating diabetogenic T cells in the hope of achieving insulin independence. Multiple therapeutic strategies for the generation of new beta cells have been under intense investigations. However, newly formed beta cells would be immediately destroyed by diabetogenic T cells. Therefore, successful islet induction therapy must be supported by potent immunotherapy that will protect the newly formed beta cells. Herein, we will summarize the current information on immunotherapies that aim at modifying T cell response to beta cells. We will first outline the immune mechanisms that underlie T1D development and progression and review the scientific background and rationale for specific modes of immunotherapy. Numerous clinical trials using antigen-specific strategies and immune-modifying drugs have been published, though most have proved too toxic or have failed to provide long-term beta cell protection. To develop an effective immunotherapy, there must be a continued effort on defining the molecular basis that underlies T cell response to pancreatic islet antigens in T1D. PMID:23348026

  1. Current status of immunotherapy in B cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kofler, D M; Mayr, C; Wendtner, C-M

    2006-10-01

    Conventional treatment of hematologic malignancies mainly consists of chemotherapeutic agents or a combination of both, chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Despite recent advances, chemotherapeutic treatments often remain unsatisfying due to severe side effects and incomplete long-term remission. Therefore the evaluation of novel therapeutic options is of great interest. B cell malignancies, in particularly follicular lymphomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and multiple myeloma, represent the most immune-responsive types of all human cancer. Several immunotherapeutic strategies are presently employed to combat these B-cell malignancies. Active immunotherapies include vaccination strategies with dendritic cells (DCs) and genetically-modified tumor cell preparations as well as DNA and protein vaccination. Most of these vaccines target the tumor-specific immunoglobulin idiotype and have already demonstrated some anti-lymphoma activity in early phase clinical trials while their definitive impact is evaluated in ongoing phase III randomized trials. In contrast to these active immunizations, T cells transduced with chimeric antigen receptors and donor leukocyte infusions (DLI) represent adoptive (passive) immunotherapies. Recent advances of gene transduction technologies enabled improvement of immunotherapeutic strategies based on genetic modification of malignant cells or adoptive T cells. Current early phase clinical trials are investigating the potential of these innovative approaches. At the moment it remains unclear if the novel immunotherapeutic strategies will be able to play a similar role in the treatment of B cell malignancies than the already established antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:17073599

  2. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer – Recent Developments and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Michael T.; Drake, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    Since the approval of sipuleucel-T for men with metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer in 2010, great strides in the development of anti-cancer immunotherapies have been made. Current drug development in this area has focused primarily on antigen specific [i.e. cancer vaccines and antibody based therapies)] or checkpoint inhibitor therapies, with the checkpoint inhibitors perhaps gaining the most attention as of late. Indeed, drugs blocking the inhibitory signal generated by the engagement of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) found on T-cells has emerged as potent means to combat the immunosuppressive milieu. The anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibody ipilimumab has already been approved in advanced melanoma and two phase III trials evaluating ipilimumab in men with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer are underway. A phase III trial evaluating ProstVac-VF, a poxvirus-based therapeutic prostate cancer vaccine, is also underway. While there has been reason for encouragement over the past few years, many questions regarding the use of immunotherapies remain. Namely it is unclear what stage of disease is most likely to benefit from these approaches, how best to incorporate said treatments with each other and into our current treatment regimens and which therapy is most appropriate for which disease. Herein we review some of the recent advances in immunotherapy as related to the treatment of prostate cancer and outline some of the challenges that lie ahead. PMID:24477411

  3. Recent advances in immunotherapy and vaccine development for peanut allergy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Peanut allergy is a common problem and can be the cause of severe, life-threatening allergic reactions. It rarely resolves, with the majority of patients carrying the disease onto adulthood. Peanut allergy poses a significant burden on the quality of life of sufferers and their families, which results mainly from the fear of accidental peanut ingestion, but is also due to dietary and social restrictions. Current standard management involves avoidance, patient education and provision of emergency medication, for use in allergic reactions, when they occur. Efforts have been made to develop a vaccine for peanut allergy. Recent developments have also highlighted the use of immunotherapy, which has shown promise as an active form of treatment and may present a disease-modifying therapy for peanut allergy. So far, results, especially from oral immunotherapy studies, have shown good efficacy in achieving desensitization to peanut with a good safety profile. However, the capacity to induce long-term tolerance has not been demonstrated conclusively yet and larger, phase III studies are required to further investigate safety and efficacy of this intervention. Peanut immunotherapy is not currently recommended for routine clinical use or outside specialist allergy units. PMID:26288733

  4. Targeting NK Cells for Anticancer Immunotherapy: Clinical and Preclinical Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Carotta, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. Although the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer (NK) cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells, as they kill target cells in an antigen-independent manner. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the active role of NK cells in cancer immune surveillance, only few clinically approved therapies currently exist that harness their potential. Our increased understanding of NK cell biology over the past few years has renewed the interest in NK cell-based anticancer therapies, which has lead to a steady increase of NK cell-based clinical and preclinical trials. Here, the role of NK cells in cancer immune surveillance is summarized, and several novel approaches to enhance NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer are discussed. PMID:27148271

  5. Immunotherapy for Brain Cancer: Recent Progress and Future Promise

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Christopher M.; Lim, Michael; Drake, Charles G.

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is emerging as the newest pillar of cancer treatment, with the potential to assume a place alongside surgical debulking, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Early experiences with antitumor vaccines demonstrated the feasibility and potential efficacy of this approach, and newer agents, such as immune checkpoint blocking antibodies and modern vaccine platforms, have ushered in a new era. These efforts are headlined by work in melanoma, prostate cancer, and renal cell carcinoma; however, substantial progress has been achieved in a variety of other cancers, including high-grade gliomas. A recurrent theme of this work is that immunotherapy is not a one-size-fits-all solution. Rather, dynamic, tumor-specific interactions within the tumor microenvironment continually shape the immunologic balance between tumor elimination and escape. High-grade gliomas are a particularly fascinating example. These aggressive, universally fatal tumors are highly resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy and inevitably recur after surgical resection. Located in the immune-privileged central nervous system, high-grade gliomas also use an array of defenses that serve as direct impediments to immune attack. Despite these challenges, vaccines have shown activity against high-grade gliomas, and anecdotal, preclinical, and early clinical data bolster the notion that durable remission is possible with immunotherapy. Realizing this potential, however, will require an approach tailored to the unique aspects of glioma biology. PMID:24771646

  6. Immunomonitoring in glioma immunotherapy: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lamano, Jonathan B.; Ampie, Leonel; Choy, Winward; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; DiDomenico, Joseph David; Oyon, Daniel E.; Parsa, Andrew T.; Bloch, Orin

    2016-01-01

    Given the continued poor clinical outcomes and refractory nature of glioblastoma multiforme to traditional interventions, immunotherapy is gaining traction due to its potential for specific tumor-targeting and long-term antitumor protective surveillance. Currently, development of glioma immunotherapy relies on overall survival as an endpoint in clinical trials. However, the identification of surrogate immunologic biomarkers can accelerate the development of successful immunotherapeutic strategies. Immunomonitoring techniques possess the potential to elucidate immunological mechanisms of antitumor responses, monitor disease progression, evaluate therapeutic effect, identify candidates for immunotherapy, and serve as prognostic markers of clinical outcome. Current immunomonitoring assays assess delayed-type hypersensitivity, T-cell proliferation, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte function, cytokine secretion profiles, antibody titers, and lymphocyte phenotypes. Yet, no single immunomonitoring technique can reliably predict outcomes, relegating immunological markers to exploratory endpoints. In response, the most recent immunomonitoring assays are incorporating emerging technologies and novel analysis techniques to approach the goal of identifying a competent immunological biomarker which predicts therapy responsiveness and clinical outcome. This review addresses the current status of immunomonitoring in glioma vaccine clinical trials with emphasis on correlations with clinical response. PMID:26638171

  7. Possible role of laser phototherapy in laser immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hode, Tomas; Hode, Lars

    2009-02-01

    Laser immunotherapy is a promising cancer treatment method that induces antitumor immunity and appears to be effective both locally and systemically. In this context, an important factor is the overall state of the immune system, both locally and systemically. The success of any immunotherapy treatment depends on the balance between the local immunosuppressive forces induced by the tumor and the immune response of the host organism. Factors that influence this balance include heat-shock proteins (for example HSP70), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukins, and more. Laser phototherapy, which is based on non-thermal photobiological processes, has been shown to modulate the body's own immune response, both locally and systemically, with a strong influence on for example cytokine production and heat-shock protein synthesis. Laser phototherapy may therefore be an important component in the overall efficacy of laser immunotherapy, and may tip the balance between the immunosuppressive and immunostimulatory forces in favor of immunostimulation.

  8. IgE-based immunotherapy of cancer: challenges and chances

    PubMed Central

    Singer, J; Jensen-Jarolim, E

    2014-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies is an indispensable cornerstone of clinical oncology. Notably, all FDA-approved antibodies comprise the IgG class, although numerous research articles proposed monoclonal antibodies of the IgM, IgG, IgA and IgE classes directed specifically against tumor-associated antigens. In particular, for the IgE isotype class, several recent studies could demonstrate high tumoricidic efficacy. Therefore, this review specifically highlights the latest developments toward IgE-based immunotherapy of cancer. Possible mechanisms and safety aspects of IgE-mediated tumor cell death are discussed with special focus on the attracted immune cells. An outlook is given on how especially comparative oncology could contribute to further developments. Humans and dogs have a highly comparable IgE biology, suggesting that translational AllergoOncology studies in patients with canine cancer could have predictive value for the potential of IgE-based anticancer immunotherapy in human clinical oncology. PMID:24117861

  9. Immunotherapy in Multiple Myeloma Using Cancer-Testis Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Seifi-Alan, Mahnaz; Shamsi, Roshanak; Esfandiary, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Context: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B-cell malignancy characterized by monoclonal expansion of abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow. It accounts for 10% of hematological malignancies. Although patients respond to a wide range of anticancer modalities, relapse occurs in a significant number of the cases. Immunotherapeutic approaches have been evolved to tackle this problem. Cancer-testis antigens CTAs as a group of tumor-associated antigens are appropriate targets for cancer immunotherapy as they have restricted expression pattern in normal tissues except for testis which is an immune-privileged site. Expression of these antigens has been assessed in different malignancies including MM. Evidence Acquisition: We performed a computerized search of the MEDLINE/PubMed databases with key words: multiple myeloma, cancer-testis antigen, and cancer stem cell and immunotherapy. Results: Several CTAs including NY-ESO-1, MAGE and GAGE family have been shown to be expressed in MM patients. Cellular and humoral immune responses against these antigens have been detected in MM patients. Conclusions: The frequent and high expression level of CTAs in MM patients shows that these antigens can be applied as cancer biomarkers as well as targets for immunotherapy in these patients. PMID:26634107

  10. Tumour immunogenicity, antigen presentation and immunological barriers in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Escors, David

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, scientists have tried to stimulate the anti-tumour activities of the immune system to fight against cancer. However, the scientific effort devoted on the development of cancer immunotherapy has not been translated into the expected clinical success. On the contrary, classical anti-neoplastic treatments such as surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are the first line of treatment. Nevertheless, there is compelling evidence on the immunogenicity of cancer cells, and the capacity of the immune system to expand cancer-specific effector cytotoxic T cells. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses strongly depends on efficient tumour antigen presentation from professional antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Several strategies have been used to boost DC antigen presenting functions, but at the end cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as would be expected according to preclinical models. In this review we comment on these discrepancies, focusing our attention on the contribution of regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells to the lack of therapeutic success of DC-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24634791

  11. Immunotherapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Rachna; Vaena, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is often curable by surgery alone. However, metastatic RCC is generally incurable. In the 1990s, immunotherapy in the form of cytokines was the mainstay of treatment for metastatic RCC. However, responses were seen in only a minority of highly selected patients with substantial treatment-related toxicities. The advent of targeted agents such as vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase inhibitors VEGF-TKIs and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors led to a change in this paradigm due to improved response rates and progression-free survival, a better safety profile, and the convenience of oral administration. However, most patients ultimately progress with about 12% being alive at 5 years. In contrast, durable responses lasting 10 years or more are noted in a minority of those treated with cytokines. More recently, an improved overall survival with newer forms of immunotherapy in other malignancies (such as melanoma and prostate cancer) has led to a resurgence of interest in immune therapies in metastatic RCC. In this review we discuss the rationale for immunotherapy and recent developments in immunotherapeutic strategies for treating metastatic RCC. PMID:26161397

  12. Sublingual immunotherapy for aeroallergens: status in the United States.

    PubMed

    Cox, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has been used in the treatment of allergic disease for nearly 30 years and is prescribed at least as frequently as subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). Several large U.S. clinical trials using single allergen tablets (grass and ragweed) or extract solution (ragweed) have met their primary clinical efficacy outcome. In December, 2013 the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) Allergenic Products Advisory Committee favorably reviewed two grass tablet product formulations; the FDA usually follows the recommendations of their advisory committees. Industry-sponsored and investigator-initiated aeroallergen SLIT clinical trials conducted in the United States are the focus of this article. To provide a basis for evaluation of this treatment, SLIT mechanisms, pharmacokinetics, efficacy as reported in systematic reviews, and safety are also discussed. Practical considerations of SLIT in the clinical setting are reviewed. These include patient instructions and adherence, which appear to be as poor as SCIT. Estimated treatment costs based on U.S.-licensed allergen extract manufacturers' list prices and doses reported to be effective in studies using U.S.-licensed allergen extracts or the allergen immunotherapy practice parameters are presented. Unmet needs, which include unknown effective dose for many allergen extracts, optimal schedule (daily versus other) and timing of treatment initiation (perennial versus precoseasonal, ≥8 weeks before or just at the start of season), and whether epinephrine autoinjectors should be routinely prescribed for SLIT patients are discussed. PMID:24433595

  13. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens: prime candidates for immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gjerstorff, Morten F.; Andersen, Mads H.; Ditzel, Henrik J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments have set the stage for immunotherapy as a supplement to conventional cancer treatment. Consequently, a significant effort is required to further improve efficacy and specificity, particularly the identification of optimal therapeutic targets for clinical testing. Cancer/testis antigens are immunogenic, highly cancer-specific, and frequently expressed in various types of cancer, which make them promising candidate targets for cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer with chimeric T-cell receptors. Our current understanding of tumor immunology and immune escape suggests that targeting oncogenic antigens may be beneficial, meaning that identification of cancer/testis antigens with oncogenic properties is of high priority. Recent work from our lab and others provide evidence that many cancer/testis antigens, in fact, have oncogenic functions, including support of growth, survival and metastasis. This novel insight into the function of cancer/testis antigens has the potential to deliver more effective cancer vaccines. Moreover, immune targeting of oncogenic cancer/testis antigens in combination with conventional cytotoxic therapies or novel immunotherapies such as checkpoint blockade or adoptive transfer, represents a highly synergistic approach with the potential to improve patient survival. PMID:26158218

  14. Cancer immunotherapy in veterinary medicine: Current options and new developments.

    PubMed

    Regan, Daniel; Guth, Amanda; Coy, Jonathan; Dow, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Excitement in the field of tumor immunotherapy is being driven by several remarkable breakthroughs in recent years. This review will cover recent advances in cancer immunotherapy, including the use of T cell checkpoint inhibitors, engineered T cells, cancer vaccines, and anti-B cell and T cell antibodies. Inhibition of T cell checkpoint molecules such as PD-1 and CTLA-4 using monoclonal antibodies has achieved notable success against advanced tumors in humans, including melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and non-small cell lung cancer. Therapy with engineered T cells has also demonstrated remarkable tumor control and regression in human trials. Autologous cancer vaccines have recently demonstrated impressive prolongation of disease-free intervals and survival times in dogs with lymphoma. In addition, caninized monoclonal antibodies targeting CD20 and CD52 just recently received either full (CD20) or conditional (CD52) licensing by the United States Department of Agriculture for clinical use in the treatment of canine B-cell and T-cell lymphomas, respectively. Thus, immunotherapy for cancer is rapidly moving to the forefront of cancer treatment options in veterinary medicine as well as human medicine. PMID:26545847

  15. Can Alzheimer disease be prevented by amyloid-beta immunotherapy?

    PubMed

    Lemere, Cynthia A; Masliah, Eliezer

    2010-02-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide has become a major therapeutic target in AD on the basis of pathological, biochemical and genetic evidence that supports a role for this molecule in the disease process. Active and passive Abeta immunotherapies have been shown to lower cerebral Abeta levels and improve cognition in animal models of AD. In humans, dosing in the phase II clinical trial of the AN1792 Abeta vaccine was stopped when approximately 6% of the immunized patients developed meningoencephalitis. However, some plaque clearance and modest clinical improvements were observed in patients following immunization. As a result of this study, at least seven passive Abeta immunotherapies are now in clinical trials in patients with mild to moderate AD. Several second-generation active Abeta vaccines are also in early clinical trials. On the basis of preclinical studies and the limited data from clinical trials, Abeta immunotherapy might be most effective in preventing or slowing the progression of AD when patients are immunized before or in the very earliest stages of disease onset. Biomarkers for AD and imaging technology have improved greatly over the past 10 years and, in the future, might be used to identify presymptomatic, at-risk individuals who might benefit from Abeta immunization. PMID:20140000

  16. Neutralization of Tumor Acidity Improves Antitumor Responses to Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pilon-Thomas, Shari; Kodumudi, Krithika N; El-Kenawi, Asmaa E; Russell, Shonagh; Weber, Amy M; Luddy, Kimberly; Damaghi, Mehdi; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Mulé, James J; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Gillies, Robert J

    2016-03-15

    Cancer immunotherapies, such as immune checkpoint blockade or adoptive T-cell transfer, can lead to durable responses in the clinic, but response rates remain low due to undefined suppression mechanisms. Solid tumors are characterized by a highly acidic microenvironment that might blunt the effectiveness of antitumor immunity. In this study, we directly investigated the effects of tumor acidity on the efficacy of immunotherapy. An acidic pH environment blocked T-cell activation and limited glycolysis in vitro. IFNγ release blocked by acidic pH did not occur at the level of steady-state mRNA, implying that the effect of acidity was posttranslational. Acidification did not affect cytoplasmic pH, suggesting that signals transduced by external acidity were likely mediated by specific acid-sensing receptors, four of which are expressed by T cells. Notably, neutralizing tumor acidity with bicarbonate monotherapy impaired the growth of some cancer types in mice where it was associated with increased T-cell infiltration. Furthermore, combining bicarbonate therapy with anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD1, or adoptive T-cell transfer improved antitumor responses in multiple models, including cures in some subjects. Overall, our findings show how raising intratumoral pH through oral buffers therapy can improve responses to immunotherapy, with the potential for immediate clinical translation. Cancer Res; 76(6); 1381-90. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26719539

  17. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Iemoli, E; Borgonovo, L; Fusi, A; Magni, C; Ricci, E D; Rizzardini, G; Piconi, S

    2016-03-01

    HIV infection is a relative contraindication for allergic immunotherapy (AIT). In the last decade, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has improved the immune function and life expectancy in HIV-infected patients whose respiratory allergic incidence is similar to the general population. We evaluated the safety and clinical effectiveness of sublingual immunotherapy in a group of grass pollen-allergic HAART-treated HIV-positive patients. Thirteen patients received sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablet (Oralair, Stallergenes©) and symptomatic therapy and were compared with nine patients receiving symptomatic therapy alone. Clinical benefits were evaluated by the analysis of total combined score (TCS), sum of symptom-medication score, and a quality of life (QoL) questionnaire. HIV viral load and peripheral TCD4 lymphocytes were analyzed at the beginning and at the end of the study. Clinical efficacy data showed a significant improvement in SLIT-treated patients compared to controls (TCS: P = 0.0001; QoL: P = 0.03). We did not observe any significant alteration of TCD4 cell counts and viral load (VL) in both groups. Our preliminary data showed that SLIT therapy in viro-immunological controlled HAART treated HIV positive patients was efficacious, safe and well tolerated. PMID:26228482

  18. The Immune Response to Tumors as a Tool toward Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pandolfi, F.; Cianci, R.; Pagliari, D.; Casciano, F.; Bagalà, C.; Astone, A.; Landolfi, R.; Barone, C.

    2011-01-01

    Until recently cancer medical therapy was limited to chemotherapy that could not differentiate cancer cells from normal cells. More recently with the remarkable mushroom of immunology, newer tools became available, resulting in the novel possibility to attack cancer with the specificity of the immune system. Herein we will review some of the recent achievement of immunotherapy in such aggressive cancers as melanoma, prostatic cancer, colorectal carcinoma, and hematologic malignancies. Immunotherapy of tumors has developed several techniques: immune cell transfer, vaccines, immunobiological molecules such as monoclonal antibodies that improve the immune responses to tumors. This can be achieved by blocking pathways limiting the immune response, such as CTLA-4 or Tregs. Immunotherapy may also use cytokines especially proinflammatory cytokines to enhance the activity of cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) derived from tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). The role of newly discovered cytokines remains to be investigated. Alternatively, an other mechanism consists in enhancing the expression of TAAs on tumor cells. Finally, monoclonal antibodies may be used to target oncogenes. PMID:22190975

  19. Laser immunotherapy: a novel approach for metastatic tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Korbelik, Mladen; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2004-08-01

    The ideal treatment modality for tumors, particularly for those that metastasize to multiple remote sites, should eradicate the primary tumor and elicit a systemic, tumor-specific response leading to elimination of metastases and to long-term tumor immunity. Using the selective photothermal interaction as a precursor, laser immunotherapy was developed by introducing a novel immunoadjuvant administered in conjunction with the laser-absorbing dye. Specifically, an 805-nm laser and indocyanine green (ICG) was used for the selective photothermal interaction, and a novel immunoadjuvant, glycated chitosan (GC), was used as the immunological stimulant. The laser-ICG-GC combinations has been resulted in the following results in animal studies. (1) Selective destruction of deep target tumor target has been achieved; (2) Eradication of treated primary tumors and regression and disappearance of untreated distant metastases have been observed; (3) Long-term survival of tumor-bearing rats have been resulted; (4) Long-term immunity for resistance to repeated, dose-escalated subsequent tumor challenges has been induced; (5) Tumor-specific immunological responses, after laser immunotherapy treatment, have been detected at cellular and molecular levels. The procedure of laser immunotherapy and major results in animal studies will be summarized and some new results using the immunological enhancement for photodynamic therapy treatment will be presented.

  20. Bubble-Assisted Ultrasound: Application in Immunotherapy and Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Deckers, Roel; Bos, Clemens; Moonen, Chrit

    2016-01-01

    Bubble-assisted ultrasound is a versatile technology with great potential in immunotherapy and vaccination. This technology involves the exposure of immune cells (i.e., dendritic cells, lymphocytes) in-vitro or diseased tissues (i.e., brain, tumor) in-vivo to ultrasound treatment with gas bubbles. Bubble destruction leads to physical forces that induce the direct delivery of weakly permeant immuno-stimulatory molecules either into the cytoplasm of immune cells, or through the endothelial barrier of diseased tissues. Hence, therapeutic antibodies (i.e., antibody-based immunotherapy) and cytokine-encoding nucleic acids (i.e., cytokine gene therapy) can be successfully delivered into diseased tissues, thus improving immune responses. In addition, protein antigens, as well as antigen-encoding nucleic acids (pDNA, mRNA), can be delivered into dendritic cells (i.e., dendritic cell-based vaccines), thus leading to a long-lasting prophylactic or therapeutic immunization. This chapter focuses on the state-of-the-art of bubble-assisted ultrasound in the field of immunotherapy and vaccination. PMID:26486342

  1. Peptide immunotherapies in Type 1 diabetes: lessons from animal models.

    PubMed

    Fierabracci, A

    2011-01-01

    Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (Type 1 diabetes, T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by the destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells by proinflammatory autoreactive T cells. In the past, several therapeutic approaches have been exploited by immunologists aiming to regulate the autoimmune response; this can occur by deleting lymphocyte subsets and/or re-establishing immune tolerance via activation of regulatory T cells. The use of broad immunosuppressive drugs was the first approach to be explored. Subsequently, antibody-based immunotherapies failed to discriminate between autoreactive versus non-autoimmune effectors. Antigen-based immunotherapy is a third approach developed to manipulate beta cell autoimmunity. This approach allows the selective targeting of disease-relevant T cells, while leaving the remainder of the immune system intact. Animal models have been successfully employed to prevent or treat T1D by injection of either the self proteins or peptides derived from them. Peptide immunotherapies have been mainly experimented in the NOD mouse spontaneous model of disease. In this review we therefore report the main approaches that rely on the use of peptides obtained from relevant autoantigens such as glutamic acid decarboxylase, isoform 65 (GAD65), insulin, proinsulin and islet-specific glucose 6 phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP). Protective peptides have proven to be effective in treating or delaying the diabetic process. We also highlight the main difficulties encountered in extrapolating data to guide clinical translational investigations in humans. PMID:21143110

  2. Molecular Pathways: At the Crossroads of Cancer Epigenetics and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Maio, Michele; Covre, Alessia; Fratta, Elisabetta; Di Giacomo, Anna Maria; Taverna, Pietro; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Coral, Sandra; Sigalotti, Luca

    2015-09-15

    Epigenetic regulation allows heritably modulating gene expression profiles without modifying the primary sequence of gDNA. Under physiologic conditions, epigenetic patterns determine tissue-specific gene expression landscapes, gene imprinting, inactivation of chromosome X, and preservation of genomic stability. The most characterized mediators of epigenetic inheritance are gDNA methylation and histone posttranslational modifications that cooperate to alter chromatin state and genome transcription. According to these notions, it is not surprising that cancer cells invariantly deploy epigenetic alterations to achieve gene expression patterns required for neoplastic transformation and tumor progression. In this context, the recently uncovered use of epigenetic alterations by cancer cells to become stealth from the host's immune recognition has significant immunobiologic relevance in tumor progression, and it appears to have potential clinical usefulness. Indeed, immune evasion is among the major obstacles to further improve the efficacy of cancer immunotherapies and to increase long-lasting disease control. Luckily, different "epigenetic drugs" able to revert these "epimutations" are available, some of which have already been approved for clinical use. Here, we summarize the immunomodulatory activities of epigenetic drugs that lead to improved immune recognition of cancer cells and focus on the potential of this class of agents in improving the anticancer activity of novel immunotherapies through combinatorial epigenetic immunotherapy approaches. PMID:26374074

  3. Immunotherapy with B cell epitopes ameliorates inflammatory responses in Balb/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, P; Gaur, S N; Arora, N

    2015-01-01

    Osmotin, a protein from the pathogenesis-related family (PR-5), has been identified as an allergen based on in-silico and in-vitro studies. In the present study, three B cell epitopes of osmotin with single and double amino acid modifications were studied for immunotherapy in a murine model. The single-modification peptides (P-1-1, P-2-1 and P-3-1) and double-modification peptides (P-1-2, P-2-2 and P-3-2) showed significantly lower immunoglobulin (Ig)E binding with patients' sera compared to osmotin (P < 0·01). These peptides showed reduced IgE binding compared to the unmodified peptides (B cell epitopes) P-1, P-2 and P-3. Among the modified peptides, P-2-1, P-3-1, P-2-2 and P-3-2 showed significant reduction in IgE binding and were used for immunotherapy in mice. The sera of mice group treated with peptides showed a significant increase in IgG2a level and a significant decrease in IgE and IgG1 levels (P < 0·05). The mice that received peptide immunotherapy showed a shift from a T helper type 2 (Th2) to Th1 type where interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-10 levels were elevated, with a significant increase in groups treated with peptides P-3-1 and P-3-2 (P < 0·05). There was a reduction in the IL-4 and IL-5 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in the peptide-treated mice groups. Total cell count and eosinophil count in BALF of the peptide-treated groups was also reduced compared to the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated group. Lung histology showed a significant reduction in cellular infiltrate in mice treated with P-2-2 and P-3-2 compared to PBS. In conclusion, peptides P-2-2 and P-3-2 lowered inflammatory responses and induced a Th1 response in mice. PMID:25142552

  4. Oral and sublingual immunotherapy for food allergy: current progress and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Timothy P; Vickery, Brian P; Burks, A Wesley

    2014-01-01

    Food allergies are increasing in prevalence and present an emerging epidemic for westernized countries. Strict dietary avoidance is the only approved management for food allergy, but accidental exposures regularly occur, leading to significant patient anxiety and decreased quality of life. Over the past decade, oral and sublingual immunotherapies have emerged as potential treatments for food allergy. While several small clinical trials have demonstrated that immunotherapy can desensitize food-allergic individuals, strategies for further enhancing safety and definitively establishing long-term efficacy are needed. This review presents an overview of recent oral and sublingual immunotherapy trials, and provides a glimpse into what the next generation of food immunotherapy may entail. PMID:23972904

  5. Effect of Immunotherapy on Seizure Outcome in Patients with Autoimmune Encephalitis: A Prospective Observational Registry Study

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Keun-Hwa; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Moon, Jangsup; Lim, Jung-Ah; Lee, Doo Young; Shin, Yong-Won; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lee, Keon-Joo; Lee, Woo-Jin; Lee, Han-Sang; Jun, Jinsun; Kim, Dong-Yub; Kim, Man-Young; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Suh, Hong Il; Lee, Yoojin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Jin Ho; Choi, Woo Chan; Bae, Dae Woong; Shin, Jung-Won; Jeon, Daejong; Park, Kyung-Il; Jung, Ki-Young; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the seizure characteristics and outcome after immunotherapy in adult patients with autoimmune encephalitis (AE) and new-onset seizure. Methods Adult (age ≥18 years) patients with AE and new-onset seizure who underwent immunotherapy and were followed-up for at least 6 months were included. Seizure frequency was evaluated at 2–4 weeks and 6 months after the onset of the initial immunotherapy and was categorized as “seizure remission”, “> 50% seizure reduction”, or “no change” based on the degree of its decrease. Results Forty-one AE patients who presented with new-onset seizure were analysed. At 2–4 weeks after the initial immunotherapy, 51.2% of the patients were seizure free, and 24.4% had significant seizure reduction. At 6 months, seizure remission was observed in 73.2% of the patients, although four patients died during hospitalization. Rituximab was used as a second-line immunotherapy in 12 patients who continued to have seizures despite the initial immunotherapy, and additional seizure remission was achieved in 66.6% of them. In particular, those who exhibited partial response to the initial immunotherapy had a better seizure outcome after rituximab, with low adverse events. Conclusion AE frequently presented as seizure, but only 18.9% of the living patients suffered from seizure at 6 months after immunotherapy. Aggressive immunotherapy can improve seizure outcome in patients with AE. PMID:26771547

  6. Immunotherapy trial for horses in British Columbia with Culicoides (Diptera:Ceratopogonidae) hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, G S; Belton, P; Jahren, E; Lange, H; Kleider, N

    1996-05-01

    Immunotherapy was used to treat horses in British Columbia for Culicoides hypersensitivity. This is a severe, chronic, recurrent allergic disease of horses that results in severe irritation, large lesions, hair loss and secondary infection in the ventral midline, mane, and proximal region of the tail. A crude Culicoides extract was injected subcutaneously, in increasing doses, into 10 horses that were affected severely by the disease. Weekly doses reduced the clinical signs in 9 of the 10 horses in the 1st yr. Eight horses were treated with a maintenance dose during a 2nd yr. After the 2nd yr, 3 horses were completely free of clinical signs, 3 showed much less severe clinical signs than in untreated years, and 2 showed moderate reduction in clinical signs. Dosage, frequency of injections, and possible future applications of this technique are discussed. PMID:8667395

  7. Optimal control on bladder cancer growth model with BCG immunotherapy and chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewi, C.; Trisilowati

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, an optimal control model of the growth of bladder cancer with BCG (Basil Calmate Guerin) immunotherapy and chemotherapy is discussed. The purpose of this optimal control is to determine the number of BCG vaccine and drug should be given during treatment such that the growth of bladder cancer cells can be suppressed. Optimal control is obtained by applying Pontryagin principle. Furthermore, the optimal control problem is solved numerically using Forward-Backward Sweep method. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the vaccine and drug in controlling the growth of cancer cells. Hence, it can reduce the number of cancer cells that is not infected with BCG as well as minimize the cost of the treatment.

  8. Effect of passive immunotherapy against Clostridium difficile infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Diraviyam, Thirumalai; He, Jin-Xin; Chen, Chen; Zhao, Bin; Michael, Antonysamy; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-05-01

    This systematic review aimed to determine the effect of antibody therapy against Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) using meta-analysis. In total, 28 studies (animals - 12; human - 17) were identified from the database on the basis of inclusion criteria; then selected studies were systematically reviewed and statistically analyzed. In animal experiments, the pooled relative risk of eight potential studies suggested that the antibody treatment could reduce the risk of CDI. However, the methodological heterogeneity was moderately higher. In human subjects, the majority of reports demonstrated the beneficial effect of passive immunotherapy against CDI. However, this systematic review and meta-analysis recommends that more intensive controlled studies are indispensable for legitimate confirmation. PMID:27140414

  9. Targeting Multiple-Myeloma-Induced Immune Dysfunction to Improve Immunotherapy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rutella, Sergio; Locatelli, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy associated with high levels of monoclonal (M) protein in the blood and/or serum. MM can occur de novo or evolve from benign monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). Current translational research into MM focuses on the development of combination therapies directed against molecularly defined targets and that are aimed at achieving durable clinical responses. MM cells have a unique ability to evade immunosurveillance through several mechanisms including, among others, expansion of regulatory T cells (Treg), reduced T-cell cytotoxic activity and responsiveness to IL-2, defects in B-cell immunity, and induction of dendritic cell (DC) dysfunction. Immune defects could be a major cause of failure of the recent immunotherapy trials in MM. This article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular determinants of immune evasion in patients with MM and highlights how these pathways can be targeted to improve patients' clinical outcome. PMID:22567028

  10. Prevention and Immunotherapy of Secondary Murine Alveolar Echinococcosis Employing Recombinant EmP29 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Boubaker, Ghalia; Hemphill, Andrew; Huber, Cristina Olivia; Spiliotis, Markus; Babba, Hamouda; Gottstein, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is caused by infection with the larval stage of the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis. An increasing understanding of immunological events that account for the metacestode survival in human and murine AE infection prompted us to undertake explorative experiments tackling the potential of novel preventive and/or immunotherapeutic measures. In this study, the immunoprotective and immunotherapeutic ability of recombinant EmP29 antigen (rEmP29) was assessed in mice that were intraperitoneally infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes. For vaccination, three intraperitoneal injections with 20μg rEmP29 emulsified in saponin adjuvants were applied over 6 weeks. 2 weeks after the last boost, mice were infected, and at 90 days post-infection, rEmP29-vaccinated mice exhibited a median parasite weight that was reduced by 75% and 59% when compared to NaCl- or saponin–treated control mice, respectively. For immunotherapeutical application, the rEmP29 (20μg) vaccine was administered to experimentally infected mice, starting at 1 month post-infection, three times with 2 weeks intervals. Mice undergoing rEmP29 immunotherapy exhibited a median parasite load that was reduced by 53% and 49% when compared to NaCl- and saponin–treated control mice, respectively. Upon analysis of spleen cells, both, vaccination and treatment with rEmP29, resulted in low ratios of Th2/Th1 (IL-4/IFN-γ) cytokine mRNA and low levels of mRNA coding for IL-10 and IL-2. These results suggest that reduction of the immunosuppressive environment takes place in vaccinated as well as immunotreated mice, and a shift towards a Th1 type of immune response may be responsible for the observed increased restriction of parasite growth. The present study provides the first evidence that active immunotherapy may present a sustainable route for the control of AE. PMID:26053794

  11. New roles for Fc receptors in neurodegeneration-the impact on Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Fuller, James P; Stavenhagen, Jeffrey B; Teeling, Jessica L

    2014-01-01

    There are an estimated 18 million Alzheimer's disease (AD) sufferers worldwide and with no disease modifying treatment currently available, development of new therapies represents an enormous unmet clinical need. AD is characterized by episodic memory loss followed by severe cognitive decline and is associated with many neuropathological changes. AD is characterized by deposits of amyloid beta (Aβ), neurofibrillary tangles, and neuroinflammation. Active immunization or passive immunization against Aβ leads to the clearance of deposits in transgenic mice expressing human Aβ. This clearance is associated with reversal of associated cognitive deficits, but these results have not translated to humans, with both active and passive immunotherapy failing to improve memory loss. One explanation for these observations is that certain anti-Aβ antibodies mediate damage to the cerebral vasculature limiting the top dose and potentially reducing efficacy. Fc gamma receptors (FcγR) are a family of immunoglobulin-like receptors which bind to the Fc portion of IgG, and mediate the response of effector cells to immune complexes. Data from both mouse and human studies suggest that cross-linking FcγR by therapeutic antibodies and the subsequent pro-inflammatory response mediates the vascular side effects seen following immunotherapy. Increasing evidence is emerging that FcγR expression on CNS resident cells, including microglia and neurons, is increased during aging and functionally involved in the pathogenesis of age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, we propose that increased expression and ligation of FcγR in the CNS, either by endogenous IgG or therapeutic antibodies, has the potential to induce vascular damage and exacerbate neurodegeneration. To produce safe and effective immunotherapies for AD and other neurodegenerative diseases it will be vital to understand the role of FcγR in the healthy and diseased brain. Here we review the literature on FcγR expression, function and proposed roles in multiple age-related neurological diseases. Lessons can be learnt from therapeutic antibodies used for the treatment of cancer where antibodies have been engineered for optimal efficacy. PMID:25191216

  12. Exploiting the Immunomodulatory Properties of Chemotherapeutic Drugs to Improve the Success of Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kersten, Kelly; Salvagno, Camilla; de Visser, Karin E.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is gaining momentum in the clinic. The current challenge is to understand why a proportion of cancer patients do not respond to cancer immunotherapy, and how this can be translated into the rational design of combinatorial cancer immunotherapy strategies aimed at maximizing success of immunotherapy. Here, we discuss how tumors orchestrate an immunosuppressive microenvironment, which contributes to their escape from immune attack. Relieving the immunosuppressive networks in cancer patients is an attractive strategy to extend the clinical success of cancer immunotherapy. Since the clinical availability of drugs specifically targeting immunosuppressive cells or mediators is still limited, an alternative strategy is to use conventional chemotherapy drugs with immunomodulatory properties to improve cancer immunotherapy. We summarize the preclinical and clinical studies that illustrate how the anti-tumor T cell response can be enhanced by chemotherapy-induced relief of immunosuppressive networks. Treatment strategies aimed at combining chemotherapy-induced relief of immunosuppression and T cell-boosting checkpoint inhibitors provide an attractive and clinically feasible approach to overcome intrinsic and acquired resistance to cancer immunotherapy, and to extend the clinical success of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26500653

  13. Failure of anti tumor-derived endothelial cell immunotherapy depends on augmentation of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pezzolo, Annalisa; Marimpietri, Danilo; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Cocco, Claudia; Pistorio, Angela; Gambini, Claudio; Cilli, Michele; Horenstein, Alberto; Malavasi, Fabio; Pistoia, Vito

    2014-11-15

    We have previously demonstrated that Tenascin-C (TNC)(+) human neuroblastoma (NB) cells transdifferentiate into tumor-derived endothelial cells (TDEC), which have been detected both in primary tumors and in tumors formed by human NB cell lines in immunodeficient mice. TDEC are genetically unstable and may favor tumor progression, suggesting that their elimination could reduce tumor growth and dissemination. So far, TDEC have never been targeted by antibody-mediated immunotherapy in any of the tumor models investigated. To address this issue, immunodeficient mice carrying orthotopic NB formed by the HTLA-230 human cell line were treated with TDEC-targeting cytotoxic human (h)CD31, that spares host-derived endothelial cells, or isotype-matched mAbs. hCD31 mAb treatment did not affect survival of NB-bearing mice, but increased significantly hypoxia in tumor microenvironment, where apoptotic and proliferating TDEC coexisted, indicating the occurrence of vascular remodeling. Tumor cells from hCD31 mAb treated mice showed i) up-regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related and vascular mimicry (VM)-related gene expression, ii) expression of endothelial (i.e. CD31 and VE-cadherin) and EMT-associated (i.e. Twist-1, N-cadherin and TNC) immunophenotypic markers, and iii) up-regulation of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) expression. In vitro experiments with two NB cell lines showed that hypoxia was the common driver of all the above phenomena and that human recombinant HMGB-1 amplified EMT and TDEC trans-differentiation. In conclusion, TDEC targeting with hCD31 mAb increases tumor hypoxia, setting the stage for the occurrence of EMT and of new waves of TDEC trans-differentiation. These adaptive responses to the changes induced by immunotherapy in the tumor microenvironment allow tumor cells to escape from the effects of hCD31 mAb. PMID:25362644

  14. Tasquinimod modulates suppressive myeloid cells and enhances cancer immunotherapies in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li; Sundstedt, Anette; Ciesielski, Michael; Miles, Kiersten Marie; Celander, Mona; Adelaiye, Remi; Orillion, Ashley; Ciamporcero, Eric; Ramakrishnan, Swathi; Ellis, Leigh; Fenstermaker, Robert; Abrams, Scott I.; Eriksson, Helena; Leanderson, Tomas; Olsson, Anders; Pili, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    A major barrier for cancer immunotherapy is the presence of suppressive cell populations in cancer patients, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), which contribute to the immunosuppressive microenvironment that promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Tasquinimod is a novel antitumor agent that is currently at an advanced stage of clinical development for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. A target of tasquinimod is the inflammatory protein S100A9, which has been demonstrated to affect the accumulation and function of tumor-suppressive myeloid cells. Here, we report that tasquinimod provided a significant enhancement to the antitumor effects of two different immunotherapeutics in mouse models of cancer: a tumor vaccine (SurVaxM) for prostate cancer and a tumor-targeted superantigen (TTS) for melanoma. In the combination strategies, tasquinimod inhibited distinct MDSC populations and TAMs of the M2-polarized phenotype (CD206+). CD11b+ myeloid cells isolated from tumors of treated mice expressed lower levels of arginase-1 and higher levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and were less immunosuppressive ex vivo, which translated into a significantly reduced tumor-promoting capacity in vivo when these cells were co-injected with tumor cells. Tumor-specific CD8+ T cells were increased markedly in the circulation and in tumors. Furthermore, T-cell effector functions, including cell-mediated cytotoxicity and IFNγ production, were potentiated. Taken together, these data suggest that pharmacologic targeting of suppressive myeloid cells by tasquinimod induces therapeutic benefit and provide the rationale for clinical testing of tasquinimod in combination with cancer immunotherapies. PMID:25370534

  15. Anti-Aß immunotherapy in Alzheimer's disease; relevance of transgenic mouse studies to clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Wilcock, Donna M.; Colton, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic approaches to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease are focused primarily on the Aß peptide which aggregates to form amyloid deposits in the brain. The amyloid hypothesis states that amyloid is the precipitating factor that results in the other pathologies of Alzheimer's, namely neurofibrillary tangles and neurodegeneration, as well as the clinical dementia. One such therapy that has attracted significant attention is anti-Aß immunotherapy. First described in 1999, immunotherapy uses anti-Aß antibodies to lower brain amyloid levels. Active immunization, in which Aß is combined with an adjuvant to stimulate an immune response producing antibodies and passive immunization, in which antibodies are directly injected, were shown to lower brain amyloid levels and improve cognition in multiple transgenic mouse models. Mechanisms of action were studied in these mice and revealed a complex set of mechanisms that depended on the type of antibody used. When active immunization advanced to clinical trials a subset of patients developed meningoencephalitis; an event not predicted in mouse studies. However, it was suspected that a T-cell response due to the type of adjuvant used was the cause of the meningoencephalitis and studies in mice indicated alternative methods of vaccination. Passive immunization has also advanced to phase III clinical trials on the basis of successful transgenic mouse studies. Reports from the active immunization clinical trial indicated that, indeed, amyloid levels in brain were reduced. While APP transgenic mouse models are useful in studying amyloid pathology these mice do not generate significant tau pathology or neuron loss. Continued development of new mouse models that do generate all of these pathologies will be critical in more accurately testing therapeutics and predicting the clinical outcome of such therapeutics. PMID:19096156

  16. [Current status and prospects of immunotherapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Yatsuda, Junji; Eto, Masatoshi

    2014-12-01

    Surgery, radiation and chemotherapy are three major therapies for cancer. But now, hope is being gathered in immunotherapy as a treatment for fourth. Immunotherapy has been done than before, but they are non-specific immunotherapy. Those that have become hot topics are specific immunotherapies targeting certain molecules or antigens. In this chapter, current status and prospects of immunotherapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are described. As concrete examples, Sipuleucel-T(Provenge), GVAX, PROSTVAC-VF, Ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4 mAb), anti-PD-1 mAb and anti-PSMA mAb are cited. As a result, it is not obtained results which therapy also satisfactory at present. Because of its uncertainties we are in the developmental stages of this therapy and improved outcomes might be achievable. PMID:25518354

  17. Sublingual grass and ragweed immunotherapy: Clinical considerations-a PRACTALL consensus report.

    PubMed

    Li, James T; Bernstein, David I; Calderon, Moises A; Casale, Thomas B; Cox, Linda; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Pfaar, Oliver; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G

    2016-02-01

    Sublingual allergen immunotherapy provides a new option for patients with allergic rhinitis in the United States. The efficacy of these sublingual immunotherapy tablets in the treatment of allergic rhinitis has been firmly established in large multicenter clinical trials. In addition, the clinical benefits of sublingual immunotherapy might persist after treatment is discontinued. Local reactions, such as gastrointestinal or oropharyngeal symptoms, are common. However, severe anaphylaxis is rare, and therefore the immunotherapy tablets can be administered at home. Sublingual immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis has been used successfully for years in Europe, and these products might be appropriate for patients who do not do well with standard drug therapy or for those who prefer a disease-modifying approach. PMID:26371843

  18. Porcine sensitized lymph node cells (immunotherapy) and attenuated irradiation for infiltrative transitional cells carcinoma of bladder.

    PubMed

    Cockett, A T; de Sant'agnese, P A; Hamlin, D J; Keys, H M

    1982-06-01

    Thirty-four patients wih infiltrative bladder carcinoma, Stage B2C or higher were treated with immunotherapy and irradiation. Seventeen patients are alive, and 17 have succumbed to their disease. Eight patients underwent cystectomy after immunotherapy and irradiation; 6 of 8 are alive and well at the present time. The technique of immunotherapy is outlined. New methodology for sequential CT scans and scheduled bladder biopsies is mentioned. The 17 patients have survived twelve to sixty-nine months after immunotherapy and irradiation. Downstaging is demonstrated based on sequential CT scans of the bony pelvis and histologic biopsy. The biopsies reveal eosinophilia and multinucleated giant cells, a specific response to immunotherapy. A prospective randomized study will be initiated. PMID:7090105

  19. How can nanotechnology help membrane vesicle-based cancer immunotherapy development?

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xin; Zhu, Motao; Nie, Guangjun

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are nanosized vesicles originating from endosomal compartments and secreted by most living cells. In the past decade, exosomes have emerged as potent tools for cancer immunotherapy due to their important roles in modulation of immune responses, and promising results have been achieved in exosome-based immunotherapy. The recent rapid progress of nanotechnology, especially on tailored design of nanocarriers for drug delivery based on both passive and active targeting strategies, sheds light on re-engineering native membrane vesicles for enhanced immune regulation and therapy. Applications of nanotechnology toolkits might provide new opportunity not only for value-added therapeutic or diagnostic strategies based on exosomes in cancer immunotherapy, but also new insights for biogenesis and biological relevance of membrane vesicles. This commentary focuses on the recent development and limitations of using exosomes in cancer immunotherapy and our perspectives on how nanomaterials with potential immune regulatory effects could be introduced into exosome-based immunotherapy. PMID:23108359

  20. Venom immunotherapy in patients with mastocytosis and hymenoptera venom anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    González-de-Olano, David; Alvarez-Twose, Iván; Vega, Arantza; Orfao, Alberto; Escribano, Luis

    2011-05-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is typically suspected in patients with cutaneous mastocytosis (CM). In recent years, the presence of clonal mast cells (MCs) in a subset of patients with systemic symptoms associated with MC activation in the absence of CM has been reported and termed monoclonal MC activation syndromes or clonal systemic MC activation syndromes. In these cases, bone marrow (BM) MC numbers are usually lower than in SM with CM, there are no detectable BM MC aggregates, and serum baseline tryptase is often <20 µg/l; thus, diagnosis of SM in these patients should be based on careful evaluation of other minor WHO criteria for SM in reference centers, where highly sensitive techniques for immunophenotypic analysis and investigation of KIT mutations on fluorescence-activated cell sorter-purified BM MCs are routinely performed. The prevalence of hymenoptera venom anaphylaxis (HVA) among SM patients is higher than among the normal population and it has been reported to be approximately 5%. In SM patients with IgE-mediated HVA, venom immunotherapy is safe and effective and it should be prescribed lifelong. Severe adverse reactions to hymenoptera stings or venom immunotherapy have been associated with increased serum baseline tryptase; however, presence of clonal MC has not been ruled out in most reports and thus both SM and clonal MC activation syndrome might be underdiagnosed in such patients. In fact, clonal BM MC appears to be a relevant risk factor for both HVA and severe reactions to venom immunotherapy, while the increase in serum baseline tryptase by itself should be considered as a powerful surrogate marker for anaphylaxis. The Spanish Network on Mastocytosis has developed a scoring system based on patient gender, the clinical symptoms observed during anaphylaxis and serum baseline tryptase to predict for the presence of both MC clonality and SM among individuals who suffer from anaphylaxis. PMID:21554093

  1. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Myeloid Leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Schürch, Christian M.; Riether, Carsten; Ochsenbein, Adrian F.

    2013-01-01

    Acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (AML, CML) are hematologic malignancies arising from oncogene-transformed hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells known as leukemia stem cells (LSCs). LSCs are selectively resistant to various forms of therapy including irradiation or cytotoxic drugs. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has dramatically improved disease outcome in patients with CML. For AML, however, prognosis is still quite dismal. Standard treatments have been established more than 20 years ago with only limited advances ever since. Durable remission is achieved in less than 30% of patients. Minimal residual disease (MRD), reflected by the persistence of LSCs below the detection limit by conventional methods, causes a high rate of disease relapses. Therefore, the ultimate goal in the treatment of myeloid leukemia must be the eradication of LSCs. Active immunotherapy, aiming at the generation of leukemia-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), may represent a powerful approach to target LSCs in the MRD situation. To fully activate CTLs, leukemia antigens have to be successfully captured, processed, and presented by mature dendritic cells (DCs). Myeloid progenitors are a prominent source of DCs under homeostatic conditions, and it is now well established that LSCs and leukemic blasts can give rise to “malignant” DCs. These leukemia-derived DCs can express leukemia antigens and may either induce anti-leukemic T cell responses or favor tolerance to the leukemia, depending on co-stimulatory or -inhibitory molecules and cytokines. This review will concentrate on the role of DCs in myeloid leukemia immunotherapy with a special focus on their generation, application, and function and how they could be improved in order to generate highly effective and specific anti-leukemic CTL responses. In addition, we discuss how DC-based immunotherapy may be successfully integrated into current treatment strategies to promote remission and potentially cure myeloid leukemias. PMID:24427158

  2. Subcutaneous Immunotherapy Improves the Symptomatology of Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Edmir Américo; Caldeira, Eduardo José; Carvalho, César Alexandre Fabrega; Cunha, Marcelo Rodriques; Carvalho, Marcus Vinícius Henriques; Passos, Saulo Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The relevance of allergic rhinitis is unquestionable. This condition affects people's quality of life and its incidence has increased over the last years. Objective Thus, this study aims to analyze the effectiveness of subcutaneous injectable immunotherapy in cases of nasal itching, sneeze, rhinorrhea and nasal congestion in allergic rhinitis patients. Methods In the present study, the same researcher analyzed the records of 281 patients. Furthermore, the researchers identified allergens through puncture cutaneous tests using standardized extracts containing acari, fungi, pet hair, flower pollen, and feathers. Then, the patients underwent treatment with subcutaneous specific immunotherapy, using four vaccine vials for desensitization, associated with environmental hygiene. The authors analyzed conditions of nasal itching, sneeze, rhinorrhea, and nasal congestion throughout the treatment, and assigned them with a score ranging from zero (0), meaning absence of these symptoms to three (3), for severe cases. The symptoms were statistically compared in the beginning, during, and after treatment. Results In this study, authors analyzed the cases distribution according to age and the evolution of symptomatology according to the scores, comparing all phases of treatment. The average score for the entire population studied was 2.08 before treatment and 0.44 at the end. These results represent an overall improvement of ∼79% in symptomatology of allergic rhinitis in the studied population. Conclusion The subcutaneous immunotherapy as treatment of allergic rhinitis led to a reduction in all symptoms studied, improving the quality of life of patients, proving itself as an important therapeutic tool for these pathological conditions. PMID:26722338

  3. Subcutaneous Immunotherapy Improves the Symptomatology of Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Lourenço, Edmir Américo; Caldeira, Eduardo José; Carvalho, César Alexandre Fabrega; Cunha, Marcelo Rodriques; Carvalho, Marcus Vinícius Henriques; Passos, Saulo Duarte

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The relevance of allergic rhinitis is unquestionable. This condition affects people's quality of life and its incidence has increased over the last years. Objective Thus, this study aims to analyze the effectiveness of subcutaneous injectable immunotherapy in cases of nasal itching, sneeze, rhinorrhea and nasal congestion in allergic rhinitis patients. Methods In the present study, the same researcher analyzed the records of 281 patients. Furthermore, the researchers identified allergens through puncture cutaneous tests using standardized extracts containing acari, fungi, pet hair, flower pollen, and feathers. Then, the patients underwent treatment with subcutaneous specific immunotherapy, using four vaccine vials for desensitization, associated with environmental hygiene. The authors analyzed conditions of nasal itching, sneeze, rhinorrhea, and nasal congestion throughout the treatment, and assigned them with a score ranging from zero (0), meaning absence of these symptoms to three (3), for severe cases. The symptoms were statistically compared in the beginning, during, and after treatment. Results In this study, authors analyzed the cases distribution according to age and the evolution of symptomatology according to the scores, comparing all phases of treatment. The average score for the entire population studied was 2.08 before treatment and 0.44 at the end. These results represent an overall improvement of ∼79% in symptomatology of allergic rhinitis in the studied population. Conclusion The subcutaneous immunotherapy as treatment of allergic rhinitis led to a reduction in all symptoms studied, improving the quality of life of patients, proving itself as an important therapeutic tool for these pathological conditions. PMID:26722338

  4. Plasma Onco-Immunotherapy: Novel Approach to Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Presentation is reviewing the newest results obtained by researchers of A.J. Drexel Plasma Institute on direct application of non-thermal plasma for direct treatment of different types of cancer by means of specific stimulation of immune system in the frameworks of the so-called onco-immunotherapy. Especial attention is paid to analysis of depth of penetration of different plasma-medical effects, from ROS, RNS, and ions to special biological signaling and immune system related processes. General aspects of the plasma-stimulation of immune system are discussed, pointing out specific medical applications. Most of experiments have been carried out using nanosecond pulsed DBD at low power and relatively low level of treatment doses, guaranteeing non-damage no-toxicity treatment regime. The nanosecond pulsed DBD physics is discussed mostly regarding its space uniformity and control of plasma parameters relevant to plasma medical treatment, and especially relevant to depth of penetration of different plasma medical effects. Detailed mechanism of the plasma-induced onco-immunotherapy has been suggested based upon preliminary in-vitro experiments with DBD treatment of different cancer cells. Sub-elements of this mechanism related to activation of macrophages and dendritic cells, specific stressing of cancer cells and the immunogenic cell death (ICD) are to be discussed based on results of corresponding in-vitro experiments. In-vivo experiments focused on the plasma-induced onco-immunotherapy were carried out in collaboration with medical doctors from Jefferson University hospital of Philadelphia. Todays achievements and nearest future prospective of clinical test focused on plasma-controlled cancer treatment are discussed in conclusion.

  5. Cancer immunotherapy: nanodelivery approaches for immune cell targeting and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conniot, João; Silva, Joana; Fernandes, Joana; Silva, Liana; Gaspar, Rogério; Brocchini, Steve; Florindo, Helena; Barata, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Cancer is one of the most common diseases afflicting people globally. New therapeutic approaches are needed due to the complexity of cancer as a disease. Many current treatments are very toxic and have modest efficacy at best. Increased understanding of tumor biology and immunology has allowed the development of specific immunotherapies with minimal toxicity. It is important to highlight the performance of monoclonal antibodies, immune adjuvants, vaccines and cell-based treatments. Although these approaches have shown varying degrees of clinical efficacy, they illustrate the potential to develop new strategies. Targeted immunotherapy is being explored to overcome the heterogeneity of malignant cells and the immune suppression induced by both the tumor and its microenvironment. Nanodelivery strategies seek to minimize systemic exposure to target therapy to malignant tissue and cells. Intracellular penetration has been examined through the use of functionalized particulates. These nano-particulate associated medicines are being developed for use in imaging, diagnostics and cancer targeting. Although nano-particulates are inherently complex medicines, the ability to confer, at least in principle, different types of functionality allows for the plausible consideration these nanodelivery strategies can be exploited for use as combination medicines. The development of targeted nanodelivery systems in which therapeutic and imaging agents are merged into a single platform is an attractive strategy. Currently, several nanoplatform-based formulations, such as polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, liposomes and dendrimers are in preclinical and clinical stages of development. Herein, nanodelivery strategies presently investigated for cancer immunotherapy, cancer targeting mechanisms and nanocarrier functionalization methods will be described. We also intend to discuss the emerging nano-based approaches suitable to be used as imaging techniques and as cancer treatment options.

  6. Cancer immunotherapy: nanodelivery approaches for immune cell targeting and tracking

    PubMed Central

    Conniot, João; Silva, Joana M.; Fernandes, Joana G.; Silva, Liana C.; Gaspar, Rogério; Brocchini, Steve; Florindo, Helena F.; Barata, Teresa S.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most common diseases afflicting people globally. New therapeutic approaches are needed due to the complexity of cancer as a disease. Many current treatments are very toxic and have modest efficacy at best. Increased understanding of tumor biology and immunology has allowed the development of specific immunotherapies with minimal toxicity. It is important to highlight the performance of monoclonal antibodies, immune adjuvants, vaccines and cell-based treatments. Although these approaches have shown varying degrees of clinical efficacy, they illustrate the potential to develop new strategies. Targeted immunotherapy is being explored to overcome the heterogeneity of malignant cells and the immune suppression induced by both the tumor and its microenvironment. Nanodelivery strategies seek to minimize systemic exposure to target therapy to malignant tissue and cells. Intracellular penetration has been examined through the use of functionalized particulates. These nano-particulate associated medicines are being developed for use in imaging, diagnostics and cancer targeting. Although nano-particulates are inherently complex medicines, the ability to confer, at least in principle, different types of functionality allows for the plausible consideration these nanodelivery strategies can be exploited for use as combination medicines. The development of targeted nanodelivery systems in which therapeutic and imaging agents are merged into a single platform is an attractive strategy. Currently, several nanoplatform-based formulations, such as polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, liposomes and dendrimers are in preclinical and clinical stages of development. Herein, nanodelivery strategies presently investigated for cancer immunotherapy, cancer targeting mechanisms and nanocarrier functionalization methods will be described. We also intend to discuss the emerging nano-based approaches suitable to be used as imaging techniques and as cancer treatment options. PMID:25505783

  7. NK cell-based immunotherapy for malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Min; Chen, Yongyan; Xiao, Weihua; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in host immunity against cancer. In response, cancers develop mechanisms to escape NK cell attack or induce defective NK cells. Current NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy aims to overcome NK cell paralysis using several approaches. One approach uses expanded allogeneic NK cells, which are not inhibited by self histocompatibility antigens like autologous NK cells, for adoptive cellular immunotherapy. Another adoptive transfer approach uses stable allogeneic NK cell lines, which is more practical for quality control and large-scale production. A third approach is genetic modification of fresh NK cells or NK cell lines to highly express cytokines, Fc receptors and/or chimeric tumor-antigen receptors. Therapeutic NK cells can be derived from various sources, including peripheral or cord blood cells, stem cells or even induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and a variety of stimulators can be used for large-scale production in laboratories or good manufacturing practice (GMP) facilities, including soluble growth factors, immobilized molecules or antibodies, and other cellular activators. A list of NK cell therapies to treat several types of cancer in clinical trials is reviewed here. Several different approaches to NK-based immunotherapy, such as tissue-specific NK cells, killer receptor-oriented NK cells and chemically treated NK cells, are discussed. A few new techniques or strategies to monitor NK cell therapy by non-invasive imaging, predetermine the efficiency of NK cell therapy by in vivo experiments and evaluate NK cell therapy approaches in clinical trials are also introduced. PMID:23604045

  8. Targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G; Rosenblat, Todd L

    2014-01-01

    Because alpha-particles have a shorter range and a higher linear energy transfer (LET) compared with beta-particles, targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy offers the potential for more efficient tumor cell killing while sparing surrounding normal cells. To date, clinical studies of alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have focused on the myeloid cell surface antigen CD33 as a target using the humanized monoclonal antibody lintuzumab. An initial phase I study demonstrated the safety, feasibility, and antileukemic effects of bismuth-213 ((213)Bi)-labeled lintuzumab. In a subsequent study, (213)Bi-lintuzumab produced remissions in some patients with AML after partial cytoreduction with cytarabine, suggesting the utility of targeted alpha-particle therapy for small-volume disease. The widespread use of (213)Bi, however, is limited by its short half-life. Therefore, a second-generation construct containing actinium-225 ((225)Ac), a radiometal that generates four alpha-particle emissions, was developed. A phase I trial demonstrated that (225)Ac-lintuzumab is safe at doses of 3 μCi/kg or less and has antileukemic activity across all dose levels studied. Fractionated-dose (225)Ac-lintuzumab in combination with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) is now under investigation for the management of older patients with untreated AML in a multicenter trial. Preclinical studies using (213)Bi- and astatine-211 ((211)At)-labeled anti-CD45 antibodies have shown that alpha-particle immunotherapy may be useful as part conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation. The use of novel pretargeting strategies may further improve target-to-normal organ dose ratios. PMID:24857092

  9. Cancer immunotherapy: nanodelivery approaches for immune cell targeting and tracking.

    PubMed

    Conniot, João; Silva, Joana M; Fernandes, Joana G; Silva, Liana C; Gaspar, Rogério; Brocchini, Steve; Florindo, Helena F; Barata, Teresa S

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most common diseases afflicting people globally. New therapeutic approaches are needed due to the complexity of cancer as a disease. Many current treatments are very toxic and have modest efficacy at best. Increased understanding of tumor biology and immunology has allowed the development of specific immunotherapies with minimal toxicity. It is important to highlight the performance of monoclonal antibodies, immune adjuvants, vaccines and cell-based treatments. Although these approaches have shown varying degrees of clinical efficacy, they illustrate the potential to develop new strategies. Targeted immunotherapy is being explored to overcome the heterogeneity of malignant cells and the immune suppression induced by both the tumor and its microenvironment. Nanodelivery strategies seek to minimize systemic exposure to target therapy to malignant tissue and cells. Intracellular penetration has been examined through the use of functionalized particulates. These nano-particulate associated medicines are being developed for use in imaging, diagnostics and cancer targeting. Although nano-particulates are inherently complex medicines, the ability to confer, at least in principle, different types of functionality allows for the plausible consideration these nanodelivery strategies can be exploited for use as combination medicines. The development of targeted nanodelivery systems in which therapeutic and imaging agents are merged into a single platform is an attractive strategy. Currently, several nanoplatform-based formulations, such as polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, liposomes and dendrimers are in preclinical and clinical stages of development. Herein, nanodelivery strategies presently investigated for cancer immunotherapy, cancer targeting mechanisms and nanocarrier functionalization methods will be described. We also intend to discuss the emerging nano-based approaches suitable to be used as imaging techniques and as cancer treatment options. PMID:25505783

  10. NK cell-based immunotherapy for malignant diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Min; Chen, Yongyan; Xiao, Weihua; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in host immunity against cancer. In response, cancers develop mechanisms to escape NK cell attack or induce defective NK cells. Current NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy aims to overcome NK cell paralysis using several approaches. One approach uses expanded allogeneic NK cells, which are not inhibited by self histocompatibility antigens like autologous NK cells, for adoptive cellular immunotherapy. Another adoptive transfer approach uses stable allogeneic NK cell lines, which is more practical for quality control and large-scale production. A third approach is genetic modification of fresh NK cells or NK cell lines to highly express cytokines, Fc receptors and/or chimeric tumor-antigen receptors. Therapeutic NK cells can be derived from various sources, including peripheral or cord blood cells, stem cells or even induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and a variety of stimulators can be used for large-scale production in laboratories or good manufacturing practice (GMP) facilities, including soluble growth factors, immobilized molecules or antibodies, and other cellular activators. A list of NK cell therapies to treat several types of cancer in clinical trials is reviewed here. Several different approaches to NK-based immunotherapy, such as tissue-specific NK cells, killer receptor-oriented NK cells and chemically treated NK cells, are discussed. A few new techniques or strategies to monitor NK cell therapy by non-invasive imaging, predetermine the efficiency of NK cell therapy by in vivo experiments and evaluate NK cell therapy approaches in clinical trials are also introduced. PMID:23604045

  11. Cell-based Immunotherapy Against Gliomas: From Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Bovenberg, M Sarah S; Degeling, M Hannah; Tannous, Bakhos A

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) comprises 51% of all gliomas and is the most malignant form of brain tumors with a median survival of 1821 months. Standard-of-care treatment includes maximal surgical resection of the tumor mass in combination with radiation and chemotherapy. However, as the poor survival rate indicates, these treatments have not been effective in preventing disease progression. Cellular immunotherapy is currently being explored as therapeutic approach to treat malignant brain tumors. In this review, we discuss advances in active, passive, and vaccine-based immunotherapeutic strategies for gliomas both at the bench and in the clinic. PMID:23648695

  12. Production of Monoclonal Antibodies in Plants for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Moussavou, Ghislain; Ko, Kisung; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Choo, Young-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Plants are considered as an alternative platform for recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) production due to the improvement and diversification of transgenic techniques. The diversity of plant species offers a multitude of possibilities for the valorization of genetic resources. Moreover, plants can be propagated indefinitely, providing cheap biomass production on a large scale in controlled conditions. Thus, recent studies have shown the successful development of plant systems for the production of mAbs for cancer immunotherapy. However, their several limitations have to be resolved for efficient antibody production in plants. PMID:26550566

  13. Development of dendritic cell-based immunotherapy for autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Hilkens, Catharien M U; Isaacs, John D; Thomson, Angus W

    2010-04-01

    Dendritic cells are professional antigen-presenting cells that maintain immune tolerance to self-antigens by deleting or controlling the pathogenicity of auto-reactive T-cells. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapies show great promise for the restoration of tolerance in autoimmune disease. Dendritic cells can be modified ex vivo to induce stable tolerogenic function and be used as cellular 'vaccines' or they can be targeted in vivo with sophisticated antigen delivery systems. Tolerogenic dendritic cells induce antigen-specific T-cell tolerance in vivo and have therapeutic effects in animal models of autoimmunity. The current challenge is to bring tolerogenic dendritic cell therapy to the clinic. PMID:20199240

  14. Allergen Immunotherapy Outcomes and Unmet Needs: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Caimmi, Davide; Calderon, Moises A; Bousquet, Jean; Demoly, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been evaluated throughout several studies over the last years. A position paper from the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology highlighted the total combined symptoms score as the method to record the primary end point in AIT studies for allergic rhinitis, but this score still needs to be formally validated and more work done for other allergic diseases. These aspects still seem to be the main unmet need in the evaluation of AIT clinical outcomes in clinical trials. PMID:26617234

  15. Directing dendritic cell immunotherapy towards successful cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sabado, Rachel Lubong; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2010-01-01

    The use of dendritic cells (DCs) for tumor immunotherapy represents a powerful approach for harnessing the patient's own immune system to eliminate tumor cells. However, suboptimal conditions for generating potent immunostimulatory DCs, as well as the induction of tolerance and suppression mediated by the tumors and its microenvironment have contributed to limited success. Combining DC vaccines with new approaches that enhance immunogenicity and overcome the regulatory mechanisms underlying peripheral tolerance may be the key to achieving effective and durable anti-tumor immune responses that translate to better clinical outcomes. PMID:20473346

  16. Allergen-specific sublingual immunotherapy for respiratory allergy.

    PubMed

    Passalacqua, G; Canonica, G W

    2001-01-01

    Present knowledge regarding the clinical efficacy and safety of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for the treatment of respiratory allergy is reviewed. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is presently considered a 'biological response modifier' for the treatment of respiratory allergy, to be used in association with drug therapy and allergen avoidance. Its value in the treatment of these conditions has been established in position papers from the World Health Organization and the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology. Immunotherapy is usually administered subcutaneously (SCIT), and with this route several severe adverse events and fatalities have been described. Therefore, in the last 15 years, novel and safer routes of administration (local routes) have been developed. SLIT, in particular, has been investigated in 18 randomised controlled clinical trials. SLIT's clinical efficacy (improvement in symptoms and reduction in drug intake) in both asthma and rhinitis has been clearly assessed in 16 of these studies and for the most common allergens. SLIT's safety profile, derived from the clinical trials and from post-marketing surveillance studies, was shown to be satisfactory in both adults and children. The most frequently reported adverse events are gastrointestinal complaints, which can be avoided through appropriate dosage adjustment. For these reasons, SLIT has been accepted as a viable alternative to SCIT in recent position papers. The main advantages of SLIT are its safety (no severe systemic adverse event has ever been described) and good patient acceptance, especially in children; in addition, SLIT is a self-administered treatment that can be carried out at home by the patient. In contrast to injection immunotherapy, knowledge of the mechanisms of action of SLIT is still developing, albeit rapidly, although interesting data about its pharmacokinetics in humans are available. Data are also required concerning the possible preventive and long-lasting effects. SLIT is a viable alternative to SCIT, with the same rationale and indications. It is intended to be used in association with proper pharmacological treatment, at the earliest stages of the disease, for optimal management of respiratory allergy. PMID:11543692

  17. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant as a platform for tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Ephraim J; Whartenby, Katharine A

    2004-02-01

    Blood or marrow transplantation (BMT) has been utilized as a cancer therapy with varying levels of success. While it has been an important option for many hematological malignancies, it has met with less success in solid tumors. More recently, new combinations of therapies with BMT have been developed to enhance the efficacy of this therapy and to expand the number of target tumors. This review highlights current uses of BMT, rationales for experimental approaches using BMT alone or as a part of a combination therapy, and reviews some of the novel therapies that have been developed in tumor immunotherapy with BMT, in addition to the implications for translation. PMID:15011781

  18. Combination immunotherapy and photodynamic therapy for cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Castano, Ana P.; Mroz, Pawel

    2006-02-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death among modern people largely due to metastatic disease. The ideal cancer treatment should target both the primary tumor and the metastases with minimal toxicity towards normal tissue. This is best accomplished by priming the body's immune system to recognize the tumor antigens so that after the primary tumor is destroyed, distant metastases will also be eradicated. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the IV administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species leading to vascular shutdown and tumor cell death. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, generation of tumor-specific antigens, and induction of heat-shock proteins. Combination regimens using PDT and immunostimulating treatments are likely to even further enhance post-PDT immunity. These immunostimulants are likely to include products derived from pathogenic microorganisms that are effectively recognized by Toll-like receptors and lead to upregulation of transcription factors for cytokines and inflammatory mediators. The following cascade of events causes activation of macrophages, dendritic and natural killer cells. Exogenous cytokine administration can be another way to increase PDT-induced immunity as well as treatment with a low dose of cyclophosphamide that selectively reduces T-regulatory cells. Although so far these combination therapies have only been used in animal models, their use in clinical trials should receive careful consideration.

  19. The Pathophysiology of Thyroid Eye Disease (TED): Implications for Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shivani; Douglas, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of Review Thyroid eye disease (TED) is a poorly understood autoimmune manifestation most commonly associated with Graves’ disease. Current nonspecific treatment paradigms offer symptomatic improvement but fail to target the underlying pathogenic mechanisms and thus, do not significantly alter the long-term disease outcome. The purpose of this review is to provide an update of the current understanding of the immunopathogenesis of TED and explore these implications for targeted immunotherapy. Recent Findings Orbital fibroblasts are integral to the pathogenesis of TED and may modulate immune responses by production of cytokines and hyaluronan in response to activation of shared autoantigens including thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-R1). Fibrocytes share many of these phenotypic and functional features, suggesting a link between systemic and site-specific disease. Use of targeted immunotherapies in TED is limited, though data from the use Rituximab (RTX), a B cell depleting agent, are encouraging. Sustained clinical response has been seen with RTX in several reports, despite return of peripheral B cell levels to pretreatment levels. Additionally, this response appears to be independent to cytokine and antibody production, suggesting possible modulation of antigen presentation as a mechanism of its effect. Summary Progressive advances in the understanding of the immunopathogenesis of TED continue to spur clinical trials utilizing targeted immune therapies. Continued understanding of the molecular mechanisms of disease will expand potential treatments for TED patients and obviate the need for reconstructive surgical therapies. PMID:21730841

  20. Gastric cancer and the epoch of immunotherapy approaches

    PubMed Central

    Niccolai, Elena; Taddei, Antonio; Prisco, Domenico; Amedei, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of gastric cancer (GC) fell dramatically over the last 50 years, but according to IARC-Globocan 2008, it is the third most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths with a case fatality GC ratio higher than other common malignancies. Surgical resection is the primary curative treatment for GC though the overall 5-year survival rate remains poor (approximately 20%-25%). To improve the outcome of resectable gastric cancer, different treatment strategies have been evaluated such as adjuvant or perioperative chemotherapy. In resected gastric cancer, the addition of radiotherapy to chemotherapy does not appear to provide any additional benefit. Moreover, in metastatic patients, chemotherapy is the mainstay of palliative therapy with a median overall survival of 8-10 mo and objective response rates of merely 20%-40%. Therefore, the potential for making key beneficial progress is to investigate the GC molecular biology to realize innovative therapeutic strategies, such as specific immunotherapy. In this review, we provide a panoramic view of the different immune-based strategies used for gastric cancer treatment and the results obtained in the most significant clinical trials. In detail, firstly we describe the therapeutic approaches that utilize the monoclonal antibodies while in the second part we analyze the cell-based immunotherapies. PMID:26019442

  1. Potentiating Cancer Immunotherapy Using Papaya Mosaic Virus-Derived Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Marie-Ève; Chartrand, Karine; Tarrab, Esther; Savard, Pierre; Leclerc, Denis; Lamarre, Alain

    2016-03-01

    The recent development of novel immunotherapies is revolutionizing cancer treatment. These include, for example, immune checkpoint blockade, immunomodulation, or therapeutic vaccination. Although effective on their own, combining multiple approaches will most likely be required in order to achieve the maximal therapeutic benefit. In this regard, the papaya mosaic virus nanoparticle (PapMV) has shown tremendous potential as (i) an immunostimulatory molecule, (ii) an adjuvant, and (iii) a vaccine platform through its intrinsic capacity to activate the innate immune response in an IFN-α-dependent manner. Here, we demonstrate that intratumor administration of PapMV significantly slows down melanoma progression and prolongs survival. This correlates with enhanced chemokine and pro-inflammatory-cytokine production in the tumor and increased immune-cell infiltration. Proportions of total and tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells dramatically increase following PapMV treatment whereas those of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) concomitantly decrease. Moreover, systemic PapMV administration prevents metastatic tumor-implantation in the lungs. Importantly, PapMV also synergistically improves the therapeutic benefit of dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccination and PD-1 blockade by potentiating antitumor immune responses. This study illustrates the immunostimulatory potential of a plant virus-derived nanoparticle for cancer therapy either alone or in conjunction with other promising immunotherapies in clinical development. PMID:26891174

  2. Immunotherapy and complexity: overcoming barriers to control of advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Lage, Agustin

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in fundamental immunology are changing paradigms for management of advanced cancer, now acknowledged as a chronic disease whose prevalence will increase, and one whose complexity makes it difficult to control. Immunotherapy is emerging as an alternative, with new monoclonal antibodies, therapeutic vaccines and deeper understanding of fundamental phenomena in the interaction between tumor and immune system. These novel insights concern mechanisms of programmed contraction of the immune response, characterization of molecular and cellular markers of immunosenescence, the dual role of inflammation, characterization of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and cancer stem cells, and the phenomena of immunogenic apoptosis and oncogene addiction. Additionally, new data drive a deeper understanding of four barriers to overcome in control of advanced cancer: the complexity of biological systems, tumor heterogeneity, tumor mutation rates, and human genome-environment mismatch. The new landscape points to six main strategies: manage advanced cancer as a chronic disease, find relevant molecular markers for patient stratification, develop a rationale for therapeutic combinations, target regulatory control loops in the immune system, expand mathematical modeling capacity, and evaluate complex health intervention packages in real-world conditions. These transitions in cancer immunotherapy research are illustrated in this paper through description of ongoing projects at Cuba's Molecular Immunology Center. PMID:25208123

  3. Irradiation and immunotherapy: From concept to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Salama, April K S; Postow, Michael A; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, an increased understanding of T-cell-regulatory mechanisms has led to the development of a novel class of immune-checkpoint inhibitors that have robust clinical activity against a broad array of malignancies-even those that historically were not believed to be sensitive to immune therapy. With this, there has been renewed interest in the potential for synergy with more traditional forms of anticancer therapy like radiation therapy (RT). The role of RT in palliation or as definitive treatment for certain malignancies has been well established. Yet, in recent years, the concept has come to light that RT could be an attractive partner for use in combination with other immunotherapies. The effects of RT include not only control of an irradiated tumor but also multiple immunomodulatory effects on both the tumor and the microenvironment, priming tumors for an immune-mediated response. Herein, the authors summarize relevant preclinical data and rationale supporting the synergy of combined RT and immunotherapy and highlight recent clinical work on promising combination strategies. Cancer 2016;122:1659-71. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26914620

  4. New Approaches to Immunotherapy for HPV Associated Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Kassianos, Andrew; Frazer, Ian H; Mittal, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer of women worldwide and is the first cancer shown to be entirely induced by a virus, the human papillomavirus (HPV, major oncogenic genotypes HPV-16 and -18). Two recently developed prophylactic cervical cancer vaccines, using virus-like particles (VLP) technology, have the potential to prevent a large proportion of cervical cancer associated with HPV infection and to ensure long-term protection. However, prophylactic HPV vaccines do not have therapeutic effects against pre-existing HPV infections and do not prevent their progression to HPV-associated malignancy. In animal models, therapeutic vaccines for persisting HPV infection can eliminate transplantable tumors expressing HPV antigens, but are of limited efficacy in inducing rejection of skin grafts expressing the same antigens. In humans, clinical trials have reported successful immunotherapy of HPV lesions, providing hope and further interest. This review discusses possible new approaches to immunotherapy for HPV associated cancer, based on recent advances in our knowledge of the immunobiology of HPV infection, of epithelial immunology and of immunoregulation, with a brief overview on previous and current HPV vaccine clinical trials. PMID:24212964

  5. Clinical Development of Listeria monocytogenes–Based Immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Le, Dung T.; Dubensky, Thomas W.; Brockstedt, Dirk G.

    2013-01-01

    Active immunotherapy targeting dendritic cells (DCs) has shown great promise in preclinical models and in human clinical trials for the treatment of malignant disease. Sipuleucel-T (Provenge, Dendreon, Seattle, WA), which consists of antigen-loaded dendritic cells (DCs), recently became the first targeted therapeutic cancer vaccine to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, ex vivo therapies such as Provenge have practical limitations and elicit an immune response with limited scope. By contrast, live-attenuated Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) naturally targets DCs in vivo and stimulates both innate and adaptive cellular immunity. Lm-based vaccines engineered to express cancer antigens have demonstrated striking efficacy in several animal models and have resulted in encouraging anecdotal survival benefit in early human clinical trials. Two different Lm-based vaccine platforms have advanced into phase II clinical trials in cervical and pancreatic cancer. Future Lm-based clinical vaccine candidates are expected to feature polyvalent antigen expression and to be used in combination with other immunotherapies or conventional therapies such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy to augment efficacy. PMID:22595054

  6. HDAC inhibitors and immunotherapy; a double edged sword?

    PubMed Central

    Kroesen, Michiel; Armandari, Inna; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Adema, Gosse J.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications, like histone acetylation, are essential for regulating gene expression within cells. Cancer cells acquire pathological epigenetic modifications resulting in gene expression patterns that facilitate and sustain tumorigenesis. Epigenetic manipulation therefore is emerging as a novel targeted therapy for cancer. Histone Acetylases (HATs) and Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) regulate histone acetylation and hence gene expression. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are well known to affect cancer cell viability and biology and are already in use for the treatment of cancer patients. Immunotherapy can lead to clinical benefit in selected cancer patients, especially in patients with limited disease after tumor debulking. HDAC inhibitors can potentially synergize with immunotherapy by elimination of tumor cells. The direct effects of HDAC inhibitors on immune cell function, however, remain largely unexplored. Initial data have suggested HDAC inhibitors to be predominantly immunosuppressive, but more recent reports have challenged this view. In this review we will discuss the effects of HDAC inhibitors on tumor cells and different immune cell subsets, synergistic interactions and possible mechanisms. Finally, we will address future challenges and potential application of HDAC inhibitors in immunocombination therapy of cancer. PMID:25115382

  7. Langerhans cells as targets for immunotherapy against skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stoitzner, Patrizia; Sparber, Florian; Tripp, Christoph H

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is the second most common cause of death in the world. Treatment of cancer is very challenging and immunotherapy has been developed as a potential way to fight cancer. The main obstacle with immunotherapy is that cancer cells evolve from healthy body cells in response to an accumulation of genetic mutations. As a consequence, the immune system struggles to detect the abnormal cells as they are mainly recognized as self. This implies that equipping the immune system to eliminate cancer cells is tricky, yet represents a very efficient way to constrain the growth of tumors. We became interested in developing immunotherapeutical strategies against skin cancer in the context of our observations that Langerhans cells (LC) are very potent antigen presenting cells and are able to incorporate protein antigens and present them to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the skin-draining lymph nodes. As a consequence, we developed an immunization strategy through the skin, termed epicutaneous immunization. Protein antigen applied onto barrier-disrupted skin induces long-lasting cytotoxic T-cell responses, potent enough to control and inhibit tumor growth. In this review, we suggest that immunization strategies through the skin could be a promising new approach for the treatment of skin cancer. PMID:20351746

  8. Pilot Trial of FANG Immunotherapy in Ewing's Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghisoli, Maurizio; Barve, Minal; Schneider, Reva; Mennel, Robert; Lenarsky, Carl; Wallraven, Gladice; Pappen, Beena O; LaNoue, John; Kumar, Padmasini; Nemunaitis, Derek; Roth, Alyssa; Nemunaitis, James; Whiting, Sam; Senzer, Neil; Fletcher, Frederick A; Nemunaitis, John

    2015-01-01

    We report on 12 consecutive patients with advanced/metastatic Ewing's sarcoma who were treated as a separate cohort of a phase 1 trial of FANG autologous immunotherapy (1 × 106–2.5 × 107 cells/intradermal injection each month for minimum 4 months). Safety and clinical response were monitored. Patient immune response to unmodified autologous tumor cells was assessed by gamma interferon-enzyme-linked immunospot (γIFN-ELISPOT) assay using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from baseline (pretreatment) and multiple postvaccination time points. None of the 12 patients (47 vaccinations) developed grade 2/3/4 drug-related toxicity. Median product release granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor expression was 1,941 pg/106 cells, and TGFβ1and TGFβ2 knockdown were 99 and 100%, respectively. Eight patients were assessed for ELISPOT response to autologous tumor cells at baseline and all (100%) were negative. In contrast, follow-up ELISPOT response at month 1 or month 4 (one patient) after FANG was positive in all eight patients. One patient achieved a partial tumor response (38% tumor reduction, RECIST 1.1). The Kaplan–Meier estimated survival of these 12 patients at 1 year was 75%. In this phase 1 study in patients with Ewing's sarcoma, FANG immunotherapy was well tolerated, elicited a tumor-specific systemic immune response in all patients, and was associated with favorable 1-year survival. Further clinical testing is indicated. PMID:25917459

  9. Molecular Recognition of Gangliosides and Their Potential for Cancer Immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Krengel, Ute; Bousquet, Paula A.

    2014-01-01

    Gangliosides are sialic-acid-containing glycosphingolipids expressed on all vertebrate cells. They are primarily positioned in the plasma membrane with the ceramide part anchored in the membrane and the glycan part exposed on the surface of the cell. These lipids have highly diverse structures, not the least with respect to their carbohydrate chains, with N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NeuGc) being the two most common sialic-acid residues in mammalian cells. Generally, human healthy tissue is deficient in NeuGc, but this molecule is expressed in tumors and in human fetal tissues, and was hence classified as an onco-fetal antigen. Gangliosides perform important functions through carbohydrate-specific interactions with proteins, for example, as receptors in cell–cell recognition, which can be exploited by viruses and other pathogens, and also by regulating signaling proteins, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), through lateral interaction in the membrane. Through both mechanisms, tumor-associated gangliosides may affect malignant progression, which makes them attractive targets for cancer immunotherapies. In this review, we describe how proteins recognize gangliosides, focusing on the molecular recognition of gangliosides associated with cancer immunotherapy, and discuss the importance of these molecules in cancer research. PMID:25101077

  10. Immunotherapy of Ovarian Cancer: The Role of Checkpoint Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Francesca; Marchetti, Claudia; Palaia, Innocenza; Musio, Daniela; Muzii, Ludovico; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Panici, Pierluigi Benedetti

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most important cause of gynecological cancer-related mortality, with the majority of women presenting with advanced disease. Although surgery and chemotherapy can improve survival rates, it is necessary to integrate alternative strategies to improve the outcomes. Advances in understanding the role of immune system in the pathogenesis of cancer have led to the rapid evolvement of immunotherapy, which might establish a sustained immune system response against recurring cancer cells. Recently, it has emerged that powerful immunologic effector cells may be blocked by inhibitory regulatory pathways controlled by specific molecules often called immune checkpoints, which turn off the immune system. Similarly, cancer cells are able to use these checkpoints to avoid immune control and rejection. Inhibition of these inhibitory pathways represents a potent strategy in the fight against cancer and is currently under investigation with encouraging results in some cancers, such as melanoma. In ovarian cancer researches are still in an early phase, but with promising results. In this review we will explore the rationale of immunotherapy in ovarian cancer with a special focus on these emerging molecules. PMID:26236750

  11. Rationale for anti-CD137 cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Makkouk, Amani; Chester, Cariad; Kohrt, Holbrook E

    2016-02-01

    The consideration of the complex interplay between the tumour microenvironment (TME) and the immune response is the key for designing effective immunotherapies. Therapeutic strategies that harness co-stimulatory receptors have recently gained momentum in the clinic. One such strategy with promising clinical applications is the targeting of CD137, a member of the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily. Its expression on both innate and adaptive immune cells, coupled with its unique ability to potentiate antitumour responses through modulating the TME and to ameliorate autoimmune responses, has established it as an appealing target. In this review, we will discuss the various CD137-targeted immunotherapeutics that have reached clinical development, with a focus on recent advances and novel modalities such as CD137 chimeric antigen receptors and CD137 bispecific antibodies. We will also highlight the effect of CD137 targeting on the TME and discuss the importance of probing TME changes for predicting and testing the efficacy of CD137-mediated immunotherapy. PMID:26751393

  12. Current Clinical Trials Testing Combinations of Immunotherapy and Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, M.; Kohrt, H.; Levy, R.; Jones, J.; Camphausen, K.; Dicker, A.; Demaria, S.; Formenti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical evidence of successful combinations of ionizing radiation with immunotherapy has inspired testing the translation of these results to the clinic. Interestingly, the preclinical work has consistently predicted the responses encountered in clinical trials. The first example came from a proof-of-principle trial started in 2001 that tested the concept that growth factors acting on antigen-presenting cells improve presentation of tumor antigens released by radiation and induce an abscopal effect. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was administered during radiotherapy to a metastatic site in patients with metastatic solid tumors to translate evidence obtained in a murine model of syngeneic mammary carcinoma treated with cytokine FLT-3L and radiation. Subsequent clinical availability of vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has triggered a wave of enthusiasm for testing them in combination with radiotherapy. Examples of ongoing clinical trials are described in this report. Importantly, these trials include careful immune monitoring of the patients enrolled and will generate important data about the proimmunogenic effects of radiation in combination with a variety of immune modulators in different disease settings. Results of these studies are building a platform of evidence for radiotherapy as an adjuvant to immunotherapy and encourage the growth of this novel field of radiation oncology. PMID:25481267

  13. Sublingual immunotherapy for pediatric allergic rhinitis: The clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Poddighe, Dimitri; Licari, Amelia; Caimmi, Silvia; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is estimated to affect 10%-20% of pediatric population and it is caused by the IgE-sensitization to environmental allergens, most importantly grass pollens and house dust mites. Allergic rhinitis can influence patient’s daily activity severely and may precede the development of asthma, especially if it is not diagnosed and treated correctly. In addition to subcutaneous immunotherapy, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) represents the only treatment being potentially able to cure allergic respiratory diseases, by modulating the immune system activity. This review clearly summarizes and analyzes the available randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials, which aimed at evaluating the effectiveness and the safety of grass pollen and house dust mite SLIT for the specific treatment of pediatric allergic rhinitis. Our analysis demonstrates the good evidence supporting the efficacy of SLIT for allergic rhinitis to grass pollens in children, whereas trials regarding pediatric allergic rhinitis to house dust mites present lower quality, although several studies supported its usefulness. PMID:26862501

  14. Immunotherapy for neurodegenerative diseases: focus on α-synucleinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Elvira; Masliah, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy is currently being intensively explored as much-needed disease-modifying treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. While Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been the focus of numerous immunotherapeutic studies, less attention has been paid to Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. The reason for this difference is that the amyloid beta (Aβ) protein in AD is a secreted molecule that circulates in blood and is readably recognized by antibodies. In contrast, α-synuclein (α-syn), tau, huntingtin and other proteins involved in neurodegenerative diseases have been considered to be exclusively of intracellular nature. However, the recent discovery that toxic oligomeric versions of α-syn and tau accumulate in the membrane and can be excreted to the extracellular environment has provided a rationale for the development of immunotherapeutic approaches for PD, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia, and other neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the abnormal accumulation of these proteins. Active immunization, passive immunization, and T cell-mediated cellular immunotherapeutic approaches have been developed targeting Aβ, α-syn and tau. Most advanced studies, including results from phase III clinical trials for passive immunization in AD, have been recently reported. Results suggest that immunotherapy might be a promising therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases that progress with the accumulation and propagation of toxic protein aggregates. In this manuscript we provide an overview on immunotherapeutic advances for neurodegenerative disorders, with special emphasis on α-synucleinopathies. PMID:23384597

  15. Clinical contraindications to allergen immunotherapy: an EAACI position paper.

    PubMed

    Pitsios, C; Demoly, P; Bilò, M B; Gerth van Wijk, R; Pfaar, O; Sturm, G J; Rodriguez del Rio, P; Tsoumani, M; Gawlik, R; Paraskevopoulos, G; Ruëff, F; Valovirta, E; Papadopoulos, N G; Calderón, M A

    2015-08-01

    Clinical indications for allergen immunotherapy (AIT) in respiratory and Hymenoptera venom allergy are well established; however, clinical contraindications to AIT are not always well documented. There are some discrepancies when classifying clinical contraindications for different forms of AIT as 'absolute' or 'relative'. EAACI Task Force on 'Contraindications to AIT' was created to evaluate and review current literature on clinical contraindications, and to update recommendations for both sublingual and subcutaneous AIT for respiratory and venom immunotherapy. An extensive review of the literature was performed on the use of AIT in asthma, autoimmune disorders, malignant neoplasias, cardiovascular diseases, acquired immunodeficiencies and other chronic diseases (including mental disorders), in patients treated with β-blockers, ACE inhibitors or monoamine oxidase inhibitors, in children under 5 years of age, during pregnancy and in patients with poor compliance. Each topic was addressed by the following three questions: (1) Are there any negative effects of AIT on this concomitant condition/disease? (2) Are more frequent or more severe AIT-related side-effects expected? and (3) Is AIT expected to be less efficacious? The evidence, for the evaluation of these clinical conditions as contraindications, was limited, and most of the conclusions were based on case reports. Based on an extended literature research, recommendations for each medical condition assessed are provided. The final decision on the administration of AIT should be based on individual evaluation of any medical condition and a risk/benefit assessment for each patient. PMID:25913519

  16. Use of lectin-functionalized particles for oral immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Diesner, Susanne C; Wang, Xue-Yan; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Untersmayr, Eva; Gabor, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy, in recent times, has found its application in a variety of immunologically mediated diseases. Oral immunotherapy may not only increase patient compliance but may, in particular, also induce both systemic as well as mucosal immune responses, due to mucosal application of active agents. To improve the bioavailability and to trigger strong immunological responses, recent research projects focused on the encapsulation of drugs and antigens into polymer particles. These particles protect the loaded antigen from the harsh conditions in the GI tract. Furthermore, modification of the surface of particles by the use of lectins, such as Aleuria aurantia lectin, wheatgerm agglutinin or Ulex europaeus-I, enhances the binding to epithelial cells, in particular to membranous cells, of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Membranous cell-specific targeting leads to an improved transepithelial transport of the particle carriers. Thus, enhanced uptake and presentation of the encapsulated antigen by antigen-presenting cells favor strong systemic, but also local, mucosal immune responses. PMID:22834202

  17. Immunotherapy with mutated onchocystatin fails to enhance the efficacy of a sub-lethal oxytetracycline regimen against Onchocerca ochengi.

    PubMed

    Bah, Germanus S; Tanya, Vincent N; Makepeace, Benjamin L

    2015-08-15

    Human onchocerciasis (river blindness), caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus, has been successfully controlled by a single drug, ivermectin, for over 25 years. Ivermectin prevents the disease symptoms of severe itching and visual impairment by killing the microfilarial stage, but does not eliminate the adult parasites, necessitating repeated annual treatments. Mass drug administration with ivermectin does not always break transmission in forest zones and is contraindicated in individuals heavily co-infected with Loa loa, while reports of reduced drug efficacy in Ghana and Cameroon may signal the development of resistance. An alternative treatment for onchocerciasis involves targeting the essential Wolbachia symbiont with tetracycline or its derivatives, which are adulticidal. However, implementation of antibiotic therapy has not occurred on a wide scale due to the prolonged treatment regimen required (several weeks). In the bovine Onchocerca ochengi system, it has been shown previously that prolonged oxytetracycline therapy increases eosinophil counts in intradermal nodules, which kill the adult worms by degranulating on their surface. Here, in an "immunochemotherapeutic" approach, we sought to enhance the efficacy of a short, sub-lethal antibiotic regimen against O. ochengi by prior immunotherapy targeting onchocystatin, an immunomodulatory protein located in the adult female worm cuticle. A key asparagine residue in onchocystatin was mutated to ablate immunomodulatory activity, which has been demonstrated previously to markedly improve the protective efficacy of this vaccine candidate when used as an immunoprophylactic. The immunochemotherapeutic regimen was compared with sub-lethal oxytetracycline therapy alone; onchocystatin immunotherapy alone; a gold-standard prolonged, intermittent oxytetracycline regimen; and no treatment (negative control) in naturally infected Cameroonian cattle. Readouts were collected over one year and comprised adult worm viability, dermal microfilarial density, anti-onchocystatin IgG in sera, and eosinophil counts in nodules. Only the gold-standard antibiotic regimen achieved significant killing of adult worms, a profound reduction in microfilarial load, and a sustained increase in local tissue eosinophilia. A small but statistically significant elevation in anti-onchocystatin IgG was observed for several weeks after immunisation in the immunotherapy-only group, but the antibody response in the immunochemotherapy group was more variable. At 12 weeks post-treatment, only a transient and non-significant increase in eosinophil counts was apparent in the immunochemotherapy group. We conclude that the addition of onchocystatin immunotherapy to a sub-lethal antibiotic regimen is insufficient to induce adulticidal activity, although with booster immunisations or the targeting of additional filarial immunomodulatory proteins, the efficacy of this strategy could be strengthened. PMID:26100152

  18. Immunotherapy response assessment in neuro-oncology: a report of the RANO working group.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hideho; Weller, Michael; Huang, Raymond; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Gilbert, Mark R; Wick, Wolfgang; Ellingson, Benjamin M; Hashimoto, Naoya; Pollack, Ian F; Brandes, Alba A; Franceschi, Enrico; Herold-Mende, Christel; Nayak, Lakshmi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Pope, Whitney B; Prins, Robert; Sampson, John H; Wen, Patrick Y; Reardon, David A

    2015-11-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising area of therapy in patients with neuro-oncological malignancies. However, early-phase studies show unique challenges associated with the assessment of radiological changes in response to immunotherapy reflecting delayed responses or therapy-induced inflammation. Clinical benefit, including long-term survival and tumour regression, can still occur after initial disease progression or after the appearance of new lesions. Refinement of the response assessment criteria for patients with neuro-oncological malignancies undergoing immunotherapy is therefore warranted. Herein, a multinational and multidisciplinary panel of neuro-oncology immunotherapy experts describe immunotherapy Response Assessment for Neuro-Oncology (iRANO) criteria based on guidance for the determination of tumour progression outlined by the immune-related response criteria and the RANO working group. Among patients who demonstrate imaging findings meeting RANO criteria for progressive disease within 6 months of initiating immunotherapy, including the development of new lesions, confirmation of radiographic progression on follow-up imaging is recommended provided that the patient is not significantly worse clinically. The proposed criteria also include guidelines for the use of corticosteroids. We review the role of advanced imaging techniques and the role of measurement of clinical benefit endpoints including neurological and immunological functions. The iRANO guidelines put forth in this Review will evolve successively to improve their usefulness as further experience from immunotherapy trials in neuro-oncology accumulate. PMID:26545842

  19. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) - indications, mechanism, and efficacy Position paper prepared by the Section of Immunotherapy, Polish Society of Allergy.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Marek; Bartkowiak-Emeryk, Małgorzata; Bręborowicz, Anna; Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Emeryk, Andrzej; Gawlik, Radosław; Gonerko, Paweł; Rogala, Barbara; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna; Samoliński, Bolesław; Pta, And Other Members Of It Section

    2016-03-01

    SLIT (sublingual immunotherapy,) induces allergen-specific immune tolerance by sublingual administration of a gradually increasing dose of an allergen. The mechanism of SLIT is comparable to those during SCIT (subcutaneous immunotherapy), with the exception of local oral dendritic cells, pre-programmed to elicit tolerance. In the SLIT dose, to achieve the same efficacy as in SCIT, it should be 50-100 times higher with better safety profile. The highest quality evidence supporting the efficacy of SLIT lasting 1 - 3 years has been provided by the large scale double-blind, placebo-controlled (DBPC) trials for grass pollen extracts, both in children and adults with allergic rhinitis. Current indications for SLIT are allergic rhinitis (and conjunctivitis) in both children and adults sensitized to pollen allergens (trees, grass, Parietaria), house dust mites (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae), cat fur, as well as mild to moderate controlled atopic asthma in children sensitized to house dust mites. There are positive findings for both asthma and new sensitization prevention. Severe adverse events, including anaphylaxis, are very rare, and no fatalities have been reported. Local adverse reactions develop in up to 70 - 80% of patients. Risk factors for SLIT adverse events have not been clearly identified. Risk factors of non-adherence to treatment might be dependent on the patient, disease treatment, physician-patient relationship, and variables in the health care system organization. PMID:27012173

  20. Clinical significance of immunotherapy with combined three kinds of cells for operable colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Hai-Liang; Li, Li; Xia, Shao-You; Ning, Ning; Zou, Zhen-Yu; Teng, Da; Xiao, Chun-Hong; Li, Rong; Xu, Ying-Xin

    2015-07-01

    Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy have presented with the ability of killing tumor cells, as well as damaging the immune function, which can be corrected by the immunotherapy. The purpose of this perspective cohort study was to evaluate the efficacy of postoperative immunotherapies of tumor lysate-loaded dendritic cells (DC), in vitro DC-activated T (DC-AT), and activated T cells (ATC) combined with chemotherapy on the survival of patients with operable colorectal cancer. A total of 253 patients with primary colorectal cancer resection including 181 patients receiving postoperative simple chemotherapy (control group) and 72 patients receiving immunotherapies of DC, DC-AT, and ATC combined with chemotherapy during the corresponding period (immunotherapy group) were enrolled in this perspective cohort study. The survival of these patients was analyzed. The immunotherapy group presented a higher 5-year overall survival rate than the control group (75.63 vs 67.81 %, P = 0.035), as well as 3-year overall survival rate (87.07 vs 74.80 %, P = 0.045). For patients with advanced cancer (TNM stages III and IV), immunotherapy significantly promotes mean survival than control subjects (59.74 ± 3.21 vs 49.99 ± 2.54 years, P = 0.034). Patients who received more than three cycles of immunotherapies had a higher 5-year overall survival rate than those with less than three cycles (82.10 vs 69.90 %, P = 0.035). No serious adverse effect was observed in the immunotherapy group. Postoperative immunotherapies with DC, DC-AT, and ATC combination can promote the survival of patients with operable colorectal cancer (Clinical Trials, ChiCTR-OCH-12002610). PMID:25764087

  1. Leveraging immunotherapy for the treatment of gynecologic cancers in the era of precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Zamarin, Dmitriy; Jazaeri, Amir A

    2016-04-01

    During the past decade significant progress in the understanding of stimulatory and inhibitory signaling pathways in immune cells has reinvigorated the field of immuno-oncology. In this review we outline the current immunotherapy based approaches for the treatment of gynecological cancers, and focus on the emerging clinical data on immune checkpoint inhibitors, adoptive cell therapies, and vaccines. It is anticipated that in the coming years biomarker-guided clinical trials, will provide for a better understanding of the mechanisms of response and resistance to immunotherapy, and guide combination treatment strategies that will extend the benefit from immunotherapy to patients with gynecologic cancers. PMID:27016233

  2. Autologous cytokine-induced killer (CIK) immunotherapy in a case of disseminated tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ping, Xu; Junchi, Xu; Xinnian, Chen; Zhijian, Ye; Meiying, Wu

    2015-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman had dry cough, fever and chest tightness for 1 months. Through thoracic CT scan and serological examination, the patient was clinically diagnosed as disseminated tuberculosis. she was given anti-tuberculosis therapy combined with autologous cytokine-induced killer (CIK) immunotherapy. Through the close follow-ups we found that after immunotherapy Her condition would have a swift improvement and she do not appear liver damage after a large doses of antibiotic therapy. In conclusion, adjuvant autologous CIK immunotherapy is an effective approach for disseminated tuberculosis. PMID:26237360

  3. Endemic fungal infections in inflammatory bowel disease associated with anti-TNF antibody therapy.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Miguel E; Farraye, Francis A; Di Palma, Jack A

    2013-10-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are susceptible to complications from pharmacologic treatment of their disease. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors are being used increasingly in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and can be associated with adverse events, including common infections, and rarely the development of serious life-threatening opportunistic infections. TNF-α inhibitors have the ability to prevent an effective patient granulomatous response, and this may be associated with an increased risk of developing mycobacterial and certain fungal infections, including histoplasmosis, blastomycosis, and coccidioidomycosis, endemic in several parts of the United States. The concern for invasive fungal infection was realized during clinical trials and further demonstrated after the marketing of TNF-α inhibitors. Because of this awareness, the Food and Drug Administration developed an adverse event-reporting system to capture cases of infections associated with the use of TNF-α inhibitors. These opportunistic fungi have a great degree of regional variability, and it has been very difficult to quantify the incidence of infection in patients treated with TNF-α inhibitors. Currently, there are no formal guidelines regarding the use of TNF-α inhibitors and these fungal infections. Considering that gastroenterologists have embraced the use TNF-α inhibitors as a valuable armamentarium in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, they must be aware of therapy-related infectious complications, including appropriate diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive strategies. In this article, we explore the association of these fungal entities in relation to the TNF-α inhibitor therapy by considering information provided in the gastroenterology, infectious diseases, rheumatology, and transplant literature. Finally, we provide some recommendations on diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23694943

  4. Two cases of Takayasu's arteritis occurring under anti-TNF therapy.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Nicola; So, Alexander; Aubry-Rozier, Bérengère

    2013-03-01

    Takayasu's arteritis is a granulomatous, large vessel vasculitis that affects the aorta, its major branches and the pulmonary arteries. Compelling evidence exists to support the notion that Takayasu's arteritis is a T-cell mediated process and that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) is an important factor in the pathogenesis of this disease. Moreover, encouraging results from recent studies support the use of anti-TNFa therapy for relapsing or resistant cases of Takayasu's arteritis. Here, however, we describe the case of two patients: one with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis, the other with HLA-B27 negative spondylarthropathy, who developed Takayasu's arteritis during treatment with TNFa inhibitors (adalimumab and golimumab respectively). This is the first report of Takayasu's arteritis in rheumatic patients under TNFa blocking agents which suggests the presence of different pathogenetic mechanism in a subgroup of patients with Takayasu's arteritis, as well as a potential role of TNFa blockers as triggers of this disease in some cases. PMID:22999907

  5. Anti-TNF therapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Semeraro, Francesco; Arcidiacono, Barbara; Nascimbeni, Giuseppe; Angi, Martina; Parolini, Barbara; Costagliola, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is the most common type of uveitis in childhood and one of the main causes of visual impairment in children. The introduction of biological treatment has widened the range of therapeutic options for children with uveitis refractory to standard nonbiologic immunosuppressants. Data from clinical trials suggest that both adalimumab and infliximab have demonstrated effectiveness and safety in open-label studies, although no large, randomized, controlled trials have been reported so far. The role of etanercept in treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is not yet well defined. In our experience, anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy has been shown to be more effective than steroids and/or methotrexate in treating uveitis. Up to now, tumor necrosis factor blocking compounds have been reserved for the treatment of the most severe cases of refractory uveitis, and larger prospective clinical trials are required in order to better assess the safety of these new compounds. PMID:24711694

  6. Onset of lupus like syndrome in patients with spondyloarthritis treated with anti-TNF

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The anti-TNFα therapy has been since its approval by the FDA, along with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), one of the most important therapies for control of spondyloarthritis (SpA). The onset of Lupus Like Syndrome (LLS) has been described in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with anti-TNFα therapy but there is little literature on the occurrence of this entity in patients with SpA. Methods We studied 57 patients with SpA who received more than 1 year of anti-TNFα therapy (infliximab, adalimumab or etanercept). Patients were analyzed for the development of LLS, in addition to measuring ANA levels ≥ 1:160 and Anti-dsDNA (measured by IIF). Results In total, 7.01% of patients treated with anti-TNFα had titers of ANA ≥ 1:160, whereas 3.5% of patients had serum levels of dsDNA. However, only one patient (1.75%; n = 1) experienced clinical symptoms of LLS; this was a female patient with a history of psoriatic arthritis. Conclusions The presence of LLS secondary to anti-TNFα therapy in patients with SpA is observed less frequently compared with patients with RA. LLS was only detected in a patient with a history of psoriasis since youth, who developed psoriatic arthritis after 27 years of age and had received anti-TNFα therapy for > 2 years. This may be because LLS is an entity clearly associated with innate immunity, with little central role of B and T cells. PMID:22336076

  7. Ultrasound Detection of Salmonella Septic Arthritis in a Rheumatoid Arthritis Patient on Anti-TNF Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of Salmonella septic arthritis detected by ultrasound in a 40-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis while he was on anti–tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibody certolizumab. An aspirate of his left elbow joint showed Salmonella enteritidis infection that was sensitive to ceftraixone. This was preceded by a brief episode of loose stools following a visit to the Far East. He was treated with antibiotics and made a good recovery. There have only been a few case reports of Salmonella septic arthritis in a rheumatoid arthritis patient on anti–tumor necrosis factor treatment but none previously in association with certolizumab. PMID:26425605

  8. Anti-TNF Therapy in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Insights for the Clinician

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Laura C.; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Bennett, Alexander N.; Emery, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-blocking therapy has revolutionized the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) over the last decade. This review highlights the current evidence relating to the use of TNF-blocking therapy in AS. International guidelines for the use of TNF blockers in AS are summarized. An outline of the evidence for efficacy and safety of these drugs is included, highlighting recent data from registries and real-life observational studies. Such cohort data is also reviewed highlighting the evidence for ‘switching’ TNF blockers in AS in the case of non-response or adverse events. The potential new application of TNF blockers in preradiographic axial spondyloarthropathy (SpA) or ‘early AS’ is discussed with reviews of two recent studies in this area. Finally research into the possible additional impacts of TNF therapies is reviewed. The question of whether TNF blockers are truly disease modifying in AS remains unanswered with conflicting reports. The additional burden of AS in terms of cardiovascular disease is now becoming understood. Recent data from basic science studies highlights the potential impact of TNF blockers on this excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Future studies and registry data will be able to assess whether TNF blockers have an additional role in controlling systemic inflammation and its associated cardiovascular risk. PMID:22870436

  9. Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy Following Anti-TNF-α Therapy With Infliximab for Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Concepcion, Orestes; Schlachterman, Alexander; Glover, Sarah; Forsmark, Christopher Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a 29-year-old male with Crohn's disease who developed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) related to infliximab therapy. He developed lower extremity weakness and dysesthesia 3 weeks after a fourth infliximab dose. Laboratory examination revealed an elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein without pleocytosis. The patient initially responded to plasmapheresis therapy with marked symptomatic improvement, but relapsed and was refractory to subsequent treatments with plasmaphereisis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and glucocorticoids. While a causal relationship between infliximab and CIDP cannot be proven, clinicians should monitor Crohn's disease patients who are receiving TNF-α antagonists for neurologic symptoms suggestive of demyelinating disease. PMID:27144200

  10. Economic evaluation of anti-TNF agents for patients with rheumatoid arthritis in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Fragoulakis, Vasilis; Vitsou, Elli; Hernandez, Ana Cristina; Maniadakis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to estimate the total mean annual treatment cost of different therapy options for patients with moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Greece. Methods A cost-minimization approach was adopted. An economic model was developed to estimate the direct costs of the three widely used treatments within a 1-year time horizon, from a health care payer perspective, either for new or for existing patients. Data on resource use, dose escalation, and frequency of therapy were based on a nationwide field survey of rheumatologists. Other analyses were also undertaken based on evidence from the literature. Total cost comprised the cost of drugs, administration, and hospital day care visits. Unit cost data were obtained from the price bulletin and the government gazettes issued by the Ministry of Health. Due to the short time horizon of the study, the cost was not discounted. Results The mean annual total cost per new (or per existing) responder patient on etanercept was estimated at €9,845 (€9,840), and the total cost on etanercept/methotrexate (MTX) was estimated at €9,857 (€9,852). Therapy with etanercept had lower annual cost relative to adalimumab and infliximab. On an annual basis, it was estimated that the difference between etanercept monotherapy and adalimumab monotherapy was €544 (€1,323). Similarly, the difference between etanercept/MTX and infliximab/MTX was €1,871 (€1,490) and €543 (€1,323), respectively, relative to adalimumab/MTX. Results remained constant under other scenario analyses undertaken. Conclusion In the real-life practice setting in Greece, where dose intensity and frequency differences occur, etanercept alone or in combination with MTX, if prescribed as per label, represents the option with lower annual cost per patient when compared with adalimumab or infliximab in patients with RA. These results hold true as long as the assumptions and data used in the analysis remain stable and may alter if any of the underlying parameters, such as drug price, change. PMID:25653545

  11. Failure of anti-TNF therapy to reactivate previously septic prosthetic joints.

    PubMed

    Manolios, Nicholas; Burneikis, Anthony; Spencer, David; Howe, Graydon

    2013-01-01

    A patient with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis was admitted with Streptococcus pneumoniae septicaemia and bilateral septic knee joints. He was treated conservatively with intravenous antibiotics and arthroscopic washouts and discharged home on oral antibiotics. Six months posthospital discharge, following re-exacerbation of arthritis, an informed consent was given by the patient to continue antitumour necrosis factor therapy. After 5 years of observation, there has been no recurrence of sepsis and the rheumatoid arthritis remains in remission. PMID:23839609

  12. Production of human natural killer cells for adoptive immunotherapy using a computer-controlled stirred-tank bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Pierson, B A; Europa, A F; Hu, W S; Miller, J S

    1996-10-01

    Large-scale ex vivo expansion of human natural killer (NK) cells for adoptive immunotherapy requires assurance of good manufacturing practices. However, maximal expansion of NK is also desired to facilitate clinical trials with large numbers of IL-2-activated NK (ANK). A closed-system stirred-tank bioreactor is amenable to computer control of culture variables, thereby reducing the risk of contamination. We demonstrate that NK cultured in 250-ml spinner flasks expand 2.5-fold more than NK cultured in stationary tissue culture wells. We further show that during 33 days of culture, it is feasible to control the pH between 7.0 and 7.2 and the dissolved oxygen concentration at 40% of air saturation via direct on-line computer control in a 750-ml stirred-tank bioreactor. On-line measurement of optical density by a laser turbidity sensor, as a measure of cell concentration, correlated well with actual cell count data. NK expansion in the 750-ml bioreactor was 7-fold greater than in stationary tissue culture controls and 3-fold greater than in spinner flask controls. Consumption rates of glucose and oxygen and the production rate of lactate were measured and will be used to develop a nutrient feeding strategy to convert the batch reactor experiment into closed-system fed-batch or continuous flow modes. Computer-controlled stirred-tank bioreactors may facilitate clinical trials with high-purity ANK populations for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:8938519

  13. Low dose gemcitabine-loaded lipid nanocapsules target monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells and potentiate cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sasso, Maria Stella; Lollo, Giovanna; Pitorre, Marion; Solito, Samantha; Pinton, Laura; Valpione, Sara; Bastiat, Guillaume; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo; Marigo, Ilaria; Benoit, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Tumor-induced expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) is known to impair the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Among pharmacological approaches for MDSC modulation, chemotherapy with selected drugs has a considerable interest due to the possibility of a rapid translation to the clinic. However, such approach is poorly selective and may be associated with dose-dependent toxicities. In the present study, we showed that lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) loaded with a lauroyl-modified form of gemcitabine (GemC12) efficiently target the monocytic (M-) MDSC subset. Subcutaneous administration of GemC12-loaded LNCs reduced the percentage of spleen and tumor-infiltrating M-MDSCs in lymphoma and melanoma-bearing mice, with enhanced efficacy when compared to free gemcitabine. Consistently, fluorochrome-labeled LNCs were preferentially uptaken by monocytic cells rather than by other immune cells, in both tumor-bearing mice and human blood samples from healthy donors and melanoma patients. Very low dose administration of GemC12-loaded LNCs attenuated tumor-associated immunosuppression and increased the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. Overall, our results show that GemC12-LNCs have monocyte-targeting properties that can be useful for immunomodulatory purposes, and unveil new possibilities for the exploitation of nanoparticulate drug formulations in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27135716

  14. Macrophage-directed immunotherapy as adjuvant to photodynamic therapy of cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Korbelik, M.; Naraparaju, V. R.; Yamamoto, N.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of Photofrin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) and adjuvant treatment with serum vitamin D3-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (DBPMAF) was examined using a mouse SCCVII tumour model (squamous cell carcinoma). The results show that DBPMAF can markedly enhance the curative effect of PDT. The most effective DBPMAF therapy consisted of a combination of intraperitoneal and peritumoral injections (50 and 0.5 ng kg-1 respectively) administered on days 0, 4, 8 and 12 after PDT. Used with a PDT treatment curative to 25% of the treated tumours, this DBPMAF regimen boosted the cures to 100%. The DBPMAF therapy alone showed no notable effect on the growth of SCCVII tumour. The PDT-induced immunosuppression, assessed by the evaluation of delayed-type contact hypersensitivity response in treated mice, was greatly reduced with the combined DBPMAF treatment. These observations suggest that the activation of macrophages in PDT-treated mice by adjuvant immunotherapy has a synergistic effect on tumour cures. As PDT not only reduces tumour burden but also induces inflammation, it is proposed that recruitment of the activated macrophages to the inflamed tumour lesions is the major factor for the complete eradication of tumours. PMID:9010027

  15. Combined active and passive immunization enhances the efficacy of immunotherapy against nicotine in rats.

    PubMed

    Roiko, Samuel A; Harris, Andrew C; Keyler, Daniel E; Lesage, Mark G; Zhang, Yan; Pentel, Paul R

    2008-06-01

    Vaccination against nicotine reduces the behavioral effects of nicotine in rats, and it is under clinical evaluation as a treatment for tobacco addiction. Efficacy is limited by the need for high serum nicotine-specific antibody (NicAb) levels, and currently available nicotine vaccines do not uniformly generate the required NicAb levels. Passive immunization with a nicotine-specific monoclonal antibody (Nic311) has also shown efficacy in rats. The principal aim of this study was to determine whether the combined use of vaccination and passive immunization would produce greater effects than vaccination alone on nicotine pharmacokinetics and locomotor sensitization (LMS) to nicotine. Rats were treated with vaccination alone, Nic311 alone, both, or neither, and then they were administered 10 daily injections of 0.3 mg/kg nicotine s.c. Treatment with Nic311 or vaccination alone increased the binding of nicotine in serum, reduced the unbound serum nicotine concentration and nicotine distribution to brain, and attenuated the development of LMS. Combined use of vaccination and passive immunization produced higher total serum NicAb levels, greater changes in nicotine pharmacokinetics, and a greater attenuation of LMS than either treatment alone. The total serum NicAb concentration was significantly correlated with brain nicotine levels and locomotor activity. These data indicate that providing higher serum NicAb concentrations improves the efficacy of immunotherapy against nicotine and that supplementing vaccination with passive immunization is a potential strategy to accomplish this. PMID:18305013

  16. Strategies for combining immunotherapy with radiation for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Seyedin, Steven N; Schoenhals, Jonathan E; Lee, Dean A; Cortez, Maria A; Wang, Xiaohong; Niknam, Sharareh; Tang, Chad; Hong, David S; Naing, Aung; Sharma, Padmanee; Allison, James P; Chang, Joe Y; Gomez, Daniel R; Heymach, John V; Komaki, Ritsuko U; Cooper, Laurence J; Welsh, James W

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy controls local disease but also prompts the release of tumor-associated antigens and stress-related danger signals that primes T cells to promote tumor regression at unirradiated sites known as the abscopal effect. This may be enhanced by blocking inhibitory immune signals that modulate immune activity through a variety of mechanisms. Indeed, abscopal responses have occurred in patients with lung cancer or melanoma when given anti-CTLA4 antibody and radiation. Other approaches involve expanding and reinfusing T or NK cells or engineered T cells to express receptors that target specific tumor peptides. These approaches may be useful for immunocompromised patients receiving radiation. Preclinical and clinical studies are testing both immune checkpoint-based strategies and adoptive immunotherapies with radiation. PMID:26310908

  17. Allergen extracts for immunotherapy: to mix or not to mix?

    PubMed

    Nony, Emmanuel; Martelet, Armelle; Jain, Karine; Moingeon, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is established as a curative treatment for allergic rhinitis, asthma, as well as insect venom allergy. AIT is based on the administration of natural allergen extracts via the subcutaneous or sublingual routes to reorient the immune system towards tolerogenic mechanisms. In this regard, since many patients are poly-allergic, mixtures of allergen extracts are often used with a potential risk to cause allergen degradation, thereby affecting treatment efficacy. Herein, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of mixing homologous (i.e., related) or heterogeneous (i.e., unrelated) allergen extracts. We provide evidence for incompatibilities between mixes of grass pollen and house dust mite extracts containing bodies and feces, and summarize critical points to consider when mixing allergen extracts for AIT. PMID:26652799

  18. Nanoparticle Targeting of Neutrophils for Improved Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Dafeng; Zhao, Qi; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Faya; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhenjia

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy using tumor specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) presents a novel approach for cancer treatment. A monoclonal antibody TA99 specific for gp75 antigen of melanoma, initiates neutrophil recruitment in tumor responsible for cancer therapy. Here we report a strategy for hijacking neutrophils in vivo using nanoparticles (NPs) to deliver therapeutics into tumor. In a mouse model of melanoma, we showed that systemically delivered albumin NPs increased in tumor when TA99 antibody was injected; and the nanoparticle tumor accumulation was mediated by neutrophils. After the administration of pyropheophorbide-a (Ppa) loaded albumin NPs and TA99, photodynamic therapy significantly suppressed the tumor growth and increased mouse survival compared with treatment with the NPs or TA99. The study reveals a new avenue to treat cancer by nanoparticle hitchhiking of immune systems to enhance delivery of therapeutics into tumor sites. PMID:26989887

  19. Baked Egg and Milk Exposure as Immunotherapy in Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Stephanie A

    2016-04-01

    Baked milk and egg have the potential to act as a form of oral immunotherapy (OIT). Clinical studies have shown that a majority of milk- and egg-allergic children can tolerate these allergens modified in baked form, and immunologic changes reported in subjects ingesting baked milk and egg mirror those seen in food allergy OIT trials. In addition, several studies have indicated that resolution of milk and egg allergies occur sooner in populations regularly ingesting baked milk and egg. Oral food challenges remain the best method for determining tolerability of baked milk and egg since baseline characteristics and diagnostic testing have not been reliable predictors. In this review, we explore the tolerability of baked milk and egg and their potential as OIT treatment for milk and egg allergy. PMID:27002516

  20. A mathematical model of the dynamics of antitumor laser immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawkins, Bryan A.; Laverty, Sean M.

    2014-02-01

    We use a mathematical model to describe and predict the population dynamics of tumor cells, immune cells, and other immune components in a host undergoing laser immunotherapy treatment against metastatic cancer. We incorporate key elements of the treatment into the model: a function describing the laser-induced primary tumor cell death and parameters capturing the role and strength of the primary immunoadjuvant, glycated chitosan. We focus on identifying conditions that ensure a successful treatment. In particular, we study the patient response (i.e., anti-tumor immune dynamics and treatment outcome) in two different but related mathematical models as we vary quantitative features of the immune system (supply, proliferation, death, and interaction rates). We compare immune dynamics of a `baseline' immune model against an `augmented' model (with additional cell types and antibodies) and in both, we find that using strong immunoadjuvants, like glycated chitosan, that enhance dendritic cell activity yields more promising patient outcomes.