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Sample records for anti-treponema pallidum antibodies

  1. Evaluation of the HISCL Anti-Treponema pallidum Assay as a Screening Test for Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    An, Jingna; Chen, Qixia; Liu, Qianqian; Rao, Chenli; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    The resurgence of syphilis in recent years has become a serious threat to public health worldwide, and the serological detection of specific antibodies against Treponema pallidum remains the most reliable method for laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. This study examined the performance of the recently launched HISCL anti-Treponema pallidum (anti-TP) assay as a screening test for syphilis in a high-volume laboratory. The HISCL anti-TP assay was tested in 300 preselected syphilis-positive samples, 704 fresh syphilis-negative samples, 48 preselected potentially interfering samples, and 30 “borderline” samples and was compared head to head with the commercially available Lumipulse G TP-N. In this study, the HISCL anti-TP assay was in perfect agreement with the applied testing algorithms with an overall agreement of 100%, comparable to that of Lumipulse G TP-N (99.63%). The sensitivity and specificity of the HISCL anti-TP assay were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 98.42% to 100%) and 100% (95% CI, 99.37% to 100%), respectively. Considering the excellent ease of use and automation, high throughput, and its favorable sensitivity and specificity, the HISCL anti-TP assay may represent a new choice for syphilis screening in high-volume laboratories. PMID:25972403

  2. Evaluation of the HISCL Anti-Treponema pallidum Assay as a Screening Test for Syphilis.

    PubMed

    An, Jingna; Chen, Qixia; Liu, Qianqian; Rao, Chenli; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Tingting; Tao, Chuanmin; Wang, Lanlan

    2015-07-01

    The resurgence of syphilis in recent years has become a serious threat to public health worldwide, and the serological detection of specific antibodies against Treponema pallidum remains the most reliable method for laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. This study examined the performance of the recently launched HISCL anti-Treponema pallidum (anti-TP) assay as a screening test for syphilis in a high-volume laboratory. The HISCL anti-TP assay was tested in 300 preselected syphilis-positive samples, 704 fresh syphilis-negative samples, 48 preselected potentially interfering samples, and 30 "borderline" samples and was compared head to head with the commercially available Lumipulse G TP-N. In this study, the HISCL anti-TP assay was in perfect agreement with the applied testing algorithms with an overall agreement of 100%, comparable to that of Lumipulse G TP-N (99.63%). The sensitivity and specificity of the HISCL anti-TP assay were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 98.42% to 100%) and 100% (95% CI, 99.37% to 100%), respectively. Considering the excellent ease of use and automation, high throughput, and its favorable sensitivity and specificity, the HISCL anti-TP assay may represent a new choice for syphilis screening in high-volume laboratories. PMID:25972403

  3. Antibody responses elicited against the Treponema pallidum repeat proteins differ during infection with different isolates of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Leader, Brandon T; Hevner, Karin; Molini, Barbara J; Barrett, Lynn K; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Lukehart, Sheila A

    2003-10-01

    Variation in the expression of the different Tpr proteins in the syphilis spirochete, Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, may have important implications in its ability to evade host immune detection and cause persistent infection. In the present study we examined the pattern of antibody responsiveness to different Tpr members during infection with three isolates of T. pallidum. There was variability in the specificities and temporal patterns of reactivity of the antibodies elicited against the individual Tpr proteins, suggesting that isolates may express different repertoires of Tpr proteins during infection. PMID:14500529

  4. Validation of serological tests for the detection of antibodies against Treponema pallidum in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Sascha; Dahlmann, Franziska; Batamuzi, Emmanuel K; Frischmann, Sieghard; Liu, Hsi

    2015-03-01

    There is evidence to suggest that the yaws bacterium (Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue) may exist in non-human primate populations residing in regions where yaws is endemic in humans. Especially in light of the fact that the World Health Organizaiton (WHO) recently launched its second yaws eradication campaign, there is a considerable need for reliable tools to identify treponemal infection in our closest relatives, African monkeys and great apes. It was hypothesized that commercially available serological tests detect simian anti-T. pallidum antibody in serum samples of baboons, with comparable sensitivity and specificity to their results on human sera. Test performances of five different treponemal tests (TTs) and two non-treponemal tests (NTTs) were evaluated using serum samples of 57 naturally T. pallidum-infected olive baboons (Papio anubis) from Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. The T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA) was used as a gold standard for comparison. In addition, the overall infection status of the animals was used to further validate test performances. For most accurate results, only samples that originated from baboons of known infection status, as verified in a previous study by clinical inspection, PCR and immunohistochemistry, were included. All tests, TTs and NTTs, used in this study were able to reliably detect antibodies against T. pallidum in serum samples of infected baboons. The sensitivity of TTs ranged from 97.7-100%, while specificity was between 88.0-100.0%. The two NTTs detected anti-lipoidal antibodies in serum samples of infected baboons with a sensitivity of 83.3% whereas specificity was 100%. For screening purposes, the TT Espline TP provided the highest sensitivity and specificity and at the same time provided the most suitable format for use in the field. The enzyme immune assay Mastblot TP (IgG), however, could be considered as a confirmatory test. PMID:25803295

  5. Validation of Serological Tests for the Detection of Antibodies Against Treponema pallidum in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Sascha; Dahlmann, Franziska; Batamuzi, Emmanuel K.; Frischmann, Sieghard; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence to suggest that the yaws bacterium (Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue) may exist in non-human primate populations residing in regions where yaws is endemic in humans. Especially in light of the fact that the World Health Organizaiton (WHO) recently launched its second yaws eradication campaign, there is a considerable need for reliable tools to identify treponemal infection in our closest relatives, African monkeys and great apes. It was hypothesized that commercially available serological tests detect simian anti-T. pallidum antibody in serum samples of baboons, with comparable sensitivity and specificity to their results on human sera. Test performances of five different treponemal tests (TTs) and two non-treponemal tests (NTTs) were evaluated using serum samples of 57 naturally T. pallidum-infected olive baboons (Papio anubis) from Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. The T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA) was used as a gold standard for comparison. In addition, the overall infection status of the animals was used to further validate test performances. For most accurate results, only samples that originated from baboons of known infection status, as verified in a previous study by clinical inspection, PCR and immunohistochemistry, were included. All tests, TTs and NTTs, used in this study were able to reliably detect antibodies against T. pallidum in serum samples of infected baboons. The sensitivity of TTs ranged from 97.7-100%, while specificity was between 88.0-100.0%. The two NTTs detected anti-lipoidal antibodies in serum samples of infected baboons with a sensitivity of 83.3% whereas specificity was 100%. For screening purposes, the TT Espline TP provided the highest sensitivity and specificity and at the same time provided the most suitable format for use in the field. The enzyme immune assay Mastblot TP (IgG), however, could be considered as a confirmatory test. PMID:25803295

  6. Four-step enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Treponema pallidum antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Farshy, C E; Hunter, E F; Helsel, L O; Larsen, S A

    1985-01-01

    Further studies of a four-step enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay procedure to detect Treponema pallidum antibody are described. High-titered antibody, produced in rabbits by intravenous injection of T. pallidum, was used to coat polyvinyl chloride microtiter plates. To these plates a known concentration of T. pallidum was added, followed in successive steps by serial dilutions of human sera and appropriately diluted peroxidase-labeled anti-human immunoglobulin G antibody. O-Phenylenediamine was the substrate. A total of 340 sera were obtained from the DeKalb County Sexually Transmitted Diseases Clinic, Atlanta, Ga., and examined within 3 days of receipt. Ninety-six percent test agreement between the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption-double staining test was obtained. A total of 372 additional sera stored at -20 degrees C were examined. The overall sensitivity of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with sera from patients with various stages of syphilis was 96%. With sera from uninfected individuals, the specificity of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was 95%. No antigen instability was noted with the two antigen preparations used during this evaluation. PMID:3884654

  7. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio)

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Sascha; Barnett, Ulrike; Maciej, Peter; Klapproth, Matthias; Ndao, Ibrahima; Frischmann, Sieghard; Fischer, Julia; Zinner, Dietmar; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum), yaws (ssp. pertenue), and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum) in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio) at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90%) baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560) versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7). Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication campaign with its goal to eradicate yaws by 2020. PMID:26588087

  8. Treponema pallidum major sheath protein homologue Tpr K is a target of opsonic antibody and the protective immune response.

    PubMed

    Centurion-Lara, A; Castro, C; Barrett, L; Cameron, C; Mostowfi, M; Van Voorhis, W C; Lukehart, S A

    1999-02-15

    We have identified a family of genes that code for targets for opsonic antibody and protective immunity in T. pallidum subspecies pallidum using two different approaches, subtraction hybridization and differential immunologic screening of a T. pallidum genomic library. Both approaches led to the identification of a polymorphic multicopy gene family with predicted amino acid homology to the major sheath protein of Treponema denticola. One of the members of this gene family, tpr K, codes for a protein that is predicted to have a cleavable signal peptide and be located in the outer membrane of the bacterium. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of T. pallidum reveals that Tpr K is preferentially transcribed in the Nichols strain of T. pallidum. Antibodies directed to purified recombinant variable domain of Tpr K can opsonize T. pallidum, Nichols strain, for phagocytosis, supporting the hypothesis that this portion of the protein is exposed at the surface of the treponeme. Immunization of rabbits with the purified recombinant variable domain of Tpr K provides significant protection against infection with the Nichols strain of T. pallidum. This gene family is hypothesized to be central to pathogenesis and immunity during syphilis infection. PMID:9989979

  9. Treponema-specific and antilipoidal 19S(IgM) antibodies in penicillin-treated and untreated rabbits after infection with Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, F; Oelerich, S

    1981-01-01

    The titres of treponema-specific and antilipoidal 19S(IgG) antibodies were determined in rabbits infected intratesticularly with Treponema pallidum. One group of rabbits was treated with penicillin the other served as control. Using different serological tests it was shown that 19S(IgM) antibodies were still detectable eight months after infection at about the same titres in both groups. In contrast, 19S(IgM) antibody titres in patients with syphilis became undetectable within three to six months after penicillin treatment. It is suggested therefore that the rabbit is not a reliable model for studying the effect of penicillin in human T pallidum infections. PMID:7008895

  10. A monoclonal antibody that conveys in vitro killing and partial protection in experimental syphilis binds a phosphorylcholine surface epitope of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Blanco, David R; Champion, Cheryl I; Dooley, Alek; Cox, David L; Whitelegge, Julian P; Faull, Kym; Lovett, Michael A

    2005-05-01

    Immunization with purified Treponema pallidum outer membrane vesicles (OMV) has previously resulted in high-titer complement-dependent serum bactericidal activity. In this study, OMV immunization resulted in the isolation of a monoclonal antibody, M131, with complement-dependent killing activity. Passive immunization of rabbits with M131 administered intravenously conferred significant immunity demonstrated by the failure of syphilitic lesions to appear at 29% of intradermal challenge sites (7/24) and a mean delay of approximately 8 days to lesion appearance at the remaining sites (17/24). M131 not only bound to OMV and to the surfaces of intact motile T. pallidum cells but also bound to organisms whose outer membranes were removed, indicating both surface and subsurface locations for the killing target. This target was determined to be a T. pallidum lipid. Lipid extracted from T. pallidum and made into liposomes bound M131. Reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography separation and fraction collection mass spectrometry (LC-MS+) of T. pallidum lipid showed that the target of M131 was phosphorylcholine. M131 binding required both liposome formation and a critical concentration of phospholipid containing phosphorylcholine, suggesting that the epitope has both a conformational and a compositional requirement. M131 did not react with red blood cells, which have phosphorylcholine-containing lipids in their exterior membrane leaflets, or with Venereal Disease Research Laboratory antigen that also contains phosphorylcholine, further indicating the specificity of M131. This is the first physical demonstration of an antigen on the T. pallidum surface and indication that such a surface antigen can be a target of immunity. PMID:15845516

  11. Protection against syphilis correlates with specificity of antibodies to the variable regions of Treponema pallidum repeat protein K.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Cecilia A; Lukehart, Sheila A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2003-10-01

    Syphilis has been recognized as a disease since the late 1400s, yet there is no practical vaccine available. One impediment to the development of a vaccine is the lack of understanding of multiple reinfections in humans despite the development of robust immune responses during the first episode. It has been shown that the Treponema pallidum repeat protein K (TprK) differs in seven discrete variable (V) regions in isolates and that the antibody response during infection is directed to these V regions. Immunization with TprK confers significant protection against infection with the homologous strain. We hypothesize that the antigenic diversity of TprK is involved in immune evasion, which contributes to the lack of heterologous protection. Here, using the rabbit model, we show a correlation between limited heterologous protection and tprK diversity in the challenge inoculum. We demonstrate that antibody responses to the V regions of one TprK molecule show limited cross-reactivity with heterologous TprK V regions. PMID:14500480

  12. The TprK protein of Treponema pallidum is periplasmic and is not a target of opsonic antibody or protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Hazlett, K R; Sellati, T J; Nguyen, T T; Cox, D L; Clawson, M L; Caimano, M J; Radolf, J D

    2001-05-01

    The finding that Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete, contains 12 orthologs of the Treponema denticola outer membrane major sheath protein has engendered speculation that members of this T. pallidum repeat (Tpr) family may be similarly surface exposed. In this regard, the TprK protein was reported to be a target of opsonic antibody and protective immunity and subject to immunologically driven sequence variation. Despite these findings, results from our previous analyses of treponemal outer membranes in concert with computer-based predictions for TprK prompted us to examine the cellular location of this protein. TprK-alkaline phosphatase fusions expressed in Escherichia coli demonstrate that TprK contains a signal peptide. However, opsonophagocytosis assays failed to indicate surface exposure of TprK. Moreover, results from three independent methodologies, i.e., (a) indirect immunofluorescence analysis of agarose-encapsulated organisms, (b) proteinase K treatment of intact spirochetes, and (c) Triton X-114 phase partitioning of T. pallidum conclusively demonstrated that native TprK is entirely periplasmic. Consistent with this location, immunization with the recombinant protein failed to induce either protective immunity or select for TprK variants in the rabbit model of experimental syphilis. These findings challenge the notion that TprK will be a component of an efficacious syphilis vaccine. PMID:11342586

  13. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...treponemal sources and that are used in the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test (FTA-ABS), the Treponema pallidum ...T.P.I.), and other treponemal tests used to identify antibodies to Treponema pallidum directly from infecting...

  14. Genome scale identification of Treponema pallidum antigens.

    PubMed

    McKevitt, Matthew; Brinkman, Mary Beth; McLoughlin, Melanie; Perez, Carla; Howell, Jerrilyn K; Weinstock, George M; Norris, Steven J; Palzkill, Timothy

    2005-07-01

    Antibody responses for 882 of the 1,039 proteins in the proteome of Treponema pallidum were examined. Sera collected from infected rabbits were used to systematically identify 106 antigenic proteins, including 22 previously identified antigens and 84 novel antigens. Additionally, sera collected from rabbits throughout the course of infection demonstrated a progression in the breadth and intensity of humoral immunoreactivity against a representative panel of T. pallidum antigens. PMID:15972547

  15. Development of a novel protein biochip enabling validation of immunological assays and detection of serum IgG and IgM antibodies against Treponema pallidum pathogens in the patients with syphilis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Na-Li; Ye, Lei; Schneider, Marion E; Du, Yi-Xin; Xu, Yuan-Hong; Fan, Li-Bin; Du, Wei-Dong

    2016-01-15

    In this study, we developed a novel protein biochip methodology that was characterized by dithiobis (succinimidyl undecanoate) (DSU) and specialized for detection of serum IgG and IgM antibodies against Treponema pallidum pathogens in the patients with syphilis, respectively. The biochips were validated by a dimension of atomic force microscope (AFM). The visualized detection limit of IgG antibody on the biochip was 0.39?g/ml. Finally, 286 serum samples from the patients with syphilis were simultaneously tested on the rTpN15-17-47 coated biochips. The results were evaluated in comparison with the assays of T. pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) and the toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST). The result demonstrated that the relative positive rate in the 286 patients by biochip was 99.0%, similar to that by TPPA (97.9%, P>0.05) and higher than that by TRUST, (76.2%, P<0.01). The detection specificities were 100% for the biochip and the TPPA and 97.0% for the TRUST. Thus, the protein biochip would provide a useful platform not only for enabling concurrent detection of the infectious antibodies directed against T. pallidum on a larger scale, but also for monitoring therapy modality of the disease. PMID:26364122

  16. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...compared) which are derived from treponemal sources and that are used in the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test (FTA-ABS), the Treponema pallidum immobilization test (T.P.I.), and other treponemal tests used to identify antibodies...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...compared) which are derived from treponemal sources and that are used in the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test (FTA-ABS), the Treponema pallidum immobilization test (T.P.I.), and other treponemal tests used to identify antibodies...

  18. Subfamily I Treponema pallidum repeat protein family: sequence variation and immunity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Eileen S; Molini, Barbara J; Barrett, Lynn K; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Lukehart, Sheila A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2004-07-01

    A 12-membered Treponema pallidum repeat (Tpr) protein family has been identified in T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis. The subfamily I Tpr proteins (C, D, F, and I) possess conserved sequence at the N- and C-termini and central regions that differentiate the members. These proteins may be important in the immune response during syphilis infection and in protective immunity. Strong antibody responses have been observed toward some of the subfamily I Tpr proteins during infection with different syphilis isolates. Some sequence variation has also been identified in one subfamily I Tpr member, TprD, among T. pallidum subsp. pallidum isolates. In this study, we examined sequences in the remaining subfamily I Tpr proteins among strains. Both TprF and TprI were conserved among T. pallidum subsp. pallidum isolates. While some heterogeneity was identified in TprC. We further examined the immune response and protective capacity of TprF protein in this paper. We demonstrate that the N-terminal conserved region of the subfamily I Tpr proteins elicits strong antibody and T-cell responses during infection, and immunization with this region attenuates syphilitic lesion development upon infectious challenge. PMID:15207819

  19. Characterization and serologic analysis of the Treponema pallidum proteome.

    PubMed

    McGill, Melanie A; Edmondson, Diane G; Carroll, James A; Cook, Richard G; Orkiszewski, Ralph S; Norris, Steven J

    2010-06-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease characterized by widespread tissue dissemination and chronic infection. In this study, we analyzed the proteome of T. pallidum by the isoelectric focusing (IEF) and nonequilibrating pH gel electrophoresis (NEPHGE) forms of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DGE), coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis. We determined the identity of 148 T. pallidum protein spots, representing 88 T. pallidum polypeptides; 63 of these polypeptides had not been identified previously at the protein level. To examine which of these proteins are important in the antibody response to syphilis, we performed immunoblot analysis using infected rabbit sera or human sera from patients at different stages of syphilis infection. Twenty-nine previously described antigens (predominantly lipoproteins) were detected, as were a number of previously unidentified antigens. The reactivity patterns obtained with sera from infected rabbits and humans were similar; these patterns included a subset of antigens reactive with all serum samples tested, including CfpA, MglB-2, TmpA, TmpB, flagellins, and the 47-kDa, 17-kDa, and 15-kDa lipoproteins. A unique group of antigens specifically reactive with infected human serum was also identified and included the previously described antigen TpF1 and the hypothetical proteins TP0584, TP0608, and TP0965. This combined proteomic and serologic analysis further delineates the antigens potentially useful as vaccine candidates or diagnostic markers and may provide insight into the host-pathogen interactions that occur during T. pallidum infection. PMID:20385758

  20. Assessment of cell-surface exposure and vaccinogenic potentials of Treponema pallidum candidate outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Tomson, Farol L; Conley, Patrick G; Norgard, Michael V; Hagman, Kayla E

    2007-09-01

    Syphilis, a sexually transmitted infection caused by the spirochetal bacterium Treponema pallidum, remains a global public health problem. T. pallidum is believed to be an extracellular pathogen and, as such, the identification of T. pallidum outer membrane proteins that could serve as targets for opsonic or bactericidal antibodies has remained a high research priority for vaccine development. However, the identification of T. pallidum outer membrane proteins has remained highly elusive. Recent studies and bioinformatics have implicated four treponemal proteins as potential outer membrane proteins (TP0155, TP0326, TP0483 and TP0956). Indirect immunofluorescence assays performed on treponemes encapsulated within agarose gel microdroplets failed to provide evidence that any of these four molecules were surface-exposed in T. pallidum. Second, recombinant fusion proteins corresponding to all four candidate outer membrane proteins were used separately, or in combination, to vaccinate New Zealand White rabbits. Despite achieving high titers (>1:50,000) of serum antibodies, none of the rabbits displayed chancre immunity after intradermal challenge with viable T. pallidum. PMID:17890130

  1. Activation and proteolytic activity of the Treponema pallidum metalloprotease, pallilysin.

    PubMed

    Houston, Simon; Hof, Rebecca; Honeyman, Lisa; Hassler, Julia; Cameron, Caroline E

    2012-01-01

    Treponema pallidum is a highly invasive pathogen that undergoes rapid dissemination to establish widespread infection. Previous investigations identified the T. pallidum adhesin, pallilysin, as an HEXXH-containing metalloprotease that undergoes autocatalytic cleavage and degrades laminin and fibrinogen. In the current study we characterized pallilysin's active site, activation requirements, cellular location, and fibrin clot degradation capacity through both in vitro assays and heterologous treponemal expression and degradation studies. Site-directed mutagenesis showed the pallilysin HEXXH motif comprises at least part of the active site, as introduction of three independent mutations (AEXXH [Hą??A], HAXXH [Eą??A], and HEXXA [H˛?˛A]) abolished pallilysin-mediated fibrinogenolysis but did not adversely affect host component binding. Attainment of full pallilysin proteolytic activity was dependent upon autocatalytic cleavage of an N-terminal pro-domain, a process which could not occur in the HEXXH mutants. Pallilysin was shown to possess a thrombin cleavage site within its N-terminal pro-domain, and in vitro studies confirmed cleavage of pallilysin with thrombin generates a truncated pallilysin fragment that has enhanced proteolytic activity, suggesting pallilysin can also exploit the host coagulation process to facilitate protease activation. Opsonophagocytosis assays performed with viable T. pallidum demonstrated pallilysin is a target of opsonic antibodies, consistent with a host component-interacting, surface-exposed cellular location. Wild-type pallilysin, but not the HEXXA mutant, degraded fibrin clots, and similarly heterologous expression of pallilysin in the non-invasive spirochete Treponema phagedenis facilitated fibrin clot degradation. Collectively these results identify pallilysin as a surface-exposed metalloprotease within T. pallidum that possesses an HEXXH active site motif and requires autocatalytic or host-mediated cleavage of a pro-domain to attain full host component-directed proteolytic activity. Furthermore, our finding that expression of pallilysin confers upon T. phagedenis the capacity to degrade fibrin clots suggests this capability may contribute to the dissemination potential of T. pallidum. PMID:22910436

  2. Footprint of positive selection in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum genome sequences suggests adaptive microevolution of the syphilis pathogen.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Jeffrey, Brendan M; Le, Hoavan T; Molini, Barbara J; Lukehart, Sheila A; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Rockey, Daniel D

    2012-01-01

    In the rabbit model of syphilis, infection phenotypes associated with the Nichols and Chicago strains of Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum), though similar, are not identical. Between these strains, significant differences are found in expression of, and antibody responses to some candidate virulence factors, suggesting the existence of functional genetic differences between isolates. The Chicago strain genome was therefore sequenced and compared to the Nichols genome, available since 1998. Initial comparative analysis suggested the presence of 44 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 103 small (?3 nucleotides) indels, and 1 large (1204 bp) insertion in the Chicago genome with respect to the Nichols genome. To confirm the above findings, Sanger sequencing was performed on most loci carrying differences using DNA from Chicago and the Nichols strain used in the original T. pallidum genome project. A majority of the previously identified differences were found to be due to errors in the published Nichols genome, while the accuracy of the Chicago genome was confirmed. However, 20 SNPs were confirmed between the two genomes, and 16 (80.0%) were found in coding regions, with all being of non-synonymous nature, strongly indicating action of positive selection. Sequencing of 16 genomic loci harboring SNPs in 12 additional T. pallidum strains, (SS14, Bal 3, Bal 7, Bal 9, Sea 81-3, Sea 81-8, Sea 86-1, Sea 87-1, Mexico A, UW231B, UW236B, and UW249C), was used to identify "Chicago-" or "Nichols -specific" differences. All but one of the 16 SNPs were "Nichols-specific", with Chicago having identical sequences at these positions to almost all of the additional strains examined. These mutations could reflect differential adaptation of the Nichols strain to the rabbit host or pathoadaptive mutations acquired during human infection. Our findings indicate that SNPs among T. pallidum strains emerge under positive selection and, therefore, are likely to be functional in nature. PMID:22720110

  3. Polypeptides of Treponema pallidum: progress toward understanding their structural, functional, and immunologic roles. Treponema Pallidum Polypeptide Research Group.

    PubMed Central

    Norris, S J

    1993-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the spirochete that causes syphilis, is unusual in a number of respects, including its small genome size, inability to grow under standard in vitro culture conditions, microaerophilism, apparent paucity of outer membrane proteins, structurally complex periplasmic flagella, and ability to evade the host immune responses and cause disease over a period of years to decades. Many of these attributes are related ultimately to its protein content. Our knowledge of the activities, structure, and immunogenicity of its proteins has been expanded by the application of recombinant DNA, hybridoma, and structural fractionation techniques. The purpose of this monograph is to summarize and correlate this new information by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, monoclonal antibody reactivity, sequence data, and other properties as the bases of polypeptide identification. The protein profiles of the T. pallidum subspecies causing syphilis, yaws, and endemic syphilis are virtually indistinguishable but differ considerably from those of other treponemal species. Among the most abundant polypeptides are a group of lipoproteins of unknown function that appear to be important in the immune response during syphilitic infection. The periplasmic flagella of T. pallidum and other spirochetes are unique with regard to their protein content and ultrastructure, as well as their periplasmic location. They are composed of three core proteins (homologous to the other members of the eubacterial flagellin family) and a single, unrelated sheath protein; the functional significance of this arrangement is not understood at present. Although the bacterium contains the chaperonins GroEL and DnaK, these proteins are not under the control of the heat shock regulon as they are in most organisms. Studies of the immunogenicity of T. pallidum proteins indicate that many may be useful for immunodiagnosis and immunoprotection. Future goals in T. pallidum polypeptide research include continued elucidation of their structural locations and functional activities, identification and characterization of the low-abundance outer membrane proteins, further study of the immunoprotective and immunodiagnostic potential of T. pallidum proteins, and clarification of the roles of treponemal proteins in pathogenesis. Images PMID:8246847

  4. Systematic cloning of Treponema pallidum open reading frames for protein expression and antigen discovery.

    PubMed

    McKevitt, Matthew; Patel, Krupa; Smajs, David; Marsh, Michael; McLoughlin, Melanie; Norris, Steven J; Weinstock, George M; Palzkill, Timothy

    2003-07-01

    A topoisomerase-based method was used to clone PCR products encoding 991 of the 1041 open reading frames identified in the genome sequence of the bacterium that causes syphilis, Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. Cloning the open reading frames into the univector plasmid system permitted the rapid conversion of the original clone set to other functional vectors containing a variety of promoters or tag sequences. A computational prediction of signal sequences identified 248 T. pallidum proteins that are potentially secreted from the cell. These clones were systematically converted into vectors designed to express the encoded proteins as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins. To test the potential of the clone set for novel antigen discovery, 85 of these fusion proteins were expressed from Escherichia coli, partially purified, and tested for antigenicity by using sera from rabbits infected with T. pallidum. Twelve of the 85 proteins bound significant levels of antibody. Of these 12 proteins, seven had previously been identified as T. pallidum antigens, and the remaining five represent novel antigens. These results demonstrate the potential of the T. pallidum clone set for antigen discovery and, more generally, for advancing the biology of this enigmatic spirochete. PMID:12805273

  5. Identification of a Treponema pallidum laminin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Caroline E

    2003-05-01

    Host extracellular matrix (ECM) components represent ideal microbial adhesion targets that many pathogens use for colonization of tissues and initiation of infection. This study investigated the interaction of the spirochete Treponema pallidum with the ECM component laminin. To identify candidate laminin-binding adhesins, the T. pallidum genome was analyzed to predict open reading frames that encode putative outer membrane proteins, as these proteins interact directly with host ECM components. Subsequent recombinant expression of these proteins and analysis of their laminin-binding potential identified one protein, Tp0751, that demonstrated specific attachment to laminin. Tp0751 attached to laminin in a dose-dependent, saturable manner but did not attach to the ECM component collagen type I or IV or to the negative control proteins fetuin or bovine serum albumin. Sodium metaperiodate treatment of laminin reduced the Tp0751-laminin interaction in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that oligosaccharides play a role in this interaction. In addition, Tp0751-specific antibodies were detected in serum samples collected from both experimental and natural syphilis infections, indicating that Tp0751 is expressed in vivo during the course of infection. Collectively, these experiments identified Tp0751 as a laminin-binding protein that is expressed during infection and may be involved in attachment of T. pallidum to host tissues. PMID:12704124

  6. Isolation and laboratory maintenance of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Lukehart, Sheila A; Marra, Christina M

    2007-11-01

    The spirochetal bacteria that cause syphilis, yaws, and bejel cannot be cultivated in vitro. This unit describes methods for the isolation of subspecies of Treponema pallidum and other pathogenic treponemes from clinical specimens, the propagation of these isolates in rabbits, isolation of clonal populations of T. pallidum, and techniques for maintenance of frozen stocks of these treponemes. PMID:18770607

  7. Antibody

    MedlinePLUS

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  8. Molecular differentiation of Treponema pallidum subspecies.

    PubMed

    Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Molini, Barbara J; Godornes, Charmie; Sun, Eileen; Hevner, Karin; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Lukehart, Sheila A

    2006-09-01

    Treponema pallidum includes three subspecies of antigenically highly related treponemes. These organisms cause clinically distinct diseases and cannot be distinguished by any existing test. In this report, genetic signatures are identified in two tpr genes which, in combination with the previously published signature in the 5' flanking region of the tpp15 gene, can differentiate the T. pallidum subspecies, as well as a simian treponeme. PMID:16954278

  9. Identification of Functional Candidates amongst Hypothetical Proteins of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Ahmad Abu Turab; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md. Imtaiyaz

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis is a globally occurring venereal disease, and its infection is propagated through sexual contact. The causative agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum, a Gram-negative sphirochaete, is an obligate human parasite. Genome of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum SS14 strain (RefSeq NC_010741.1) encodes 1,027 proteins, of which 444 proteins are known as hypothetical proteins (HPs), i.e., proteins of unknown functions. Here, we performed functional annotation of HPs of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum using various database, domain architecture predictors, protein function annotators and clustering tools. We have analyzed the sequences of 444 HPs of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum and subsequently predicted the function of 207 HPs with a high level of confidence. However, functions of 237 HPs are predicted with less accuracy. We found various enzymes, transporters, binding proteins in the annotated group of HPs that may be possible molecular targets, facilitating for the survival of pathogen. Our comprehensive analysis helps to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis to provide many novel potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:25894582

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of the Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum Sea81-4 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Iverson-Cabral, Stefanie L.; King, Jordon C. K.; Molini, Barbara J.; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Using the rabbit model of syphilis, the Sea81-4 strain of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum has been found to be more likely than other strains to invade the central nervous system (CNS). To identify possible explanations for this important phenotype at the genomic level, we sequenced the Sea81-4 strain genome. PMID:24744342

  11. A novel Treponema pallidum antigen, TP0136, is an outer membrane protein that binds human fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Mary Beth; McGill, Melanie A; Pettersson, Jonas; Rogers, Arthur; Matejková, Petra; Smajs, David; Weinstock, George M; Norris, Steven J; Palzkill, Timothy

    2008-05-01

    The antigenicity, structural location, and function of the predicted lipoprotein TP0136 of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum were investigated based on previous screening studies indicating that anti-TP0136 antibodies are present in the sera of syphilis patients and experimentally infected rabbits. Recombinant TP0136 (rTP0136) protein was purified and shown to be strongly antigenic during human and experimental rabbit infection. The TP0136 protein was exposed on the surface of the bacterial outer membrane and bound to the host extracellular matrix glycoproteins fibronectin and laminin. In addition, the TP0136 open reading frame was shown to be highly polymorphic among T. pallidum subspecies and strains at the nucleotide and amino acid levels. Finally, the ability of rTP0136 protein to act as a protective antigen to subsequent challenge with infectious T. pallidum in the rabbit model of infection was assessed. Immunization with rTP0136 delayed ulceration but did not prevent infection or the formation of lesions. These results demonstrate that TP0136 is expressed on the outer membrane of the treponeme during infection and may be involved in attachment to host extracellular matrix components. PMID:18332212

  12. Isolation of a Treponema pallidum gene encoding immunodominant outer envelope protein P6, which reacts with sera from patients at different stages of syphilis

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    A phage directing the synthesis of an abundant 45-kD Treponema pallidum surface protein was isolated from an EMBL-4 bacteriophage lambda library of T. pallidum DNA. The recombinant phage was identified using an mAb that was directed toward an immunodominant, outer envelope T. pallidum protein designated P6. The recombinant P6 protein possessed the same mol mass as the native treponemal antigen detected from total T. pallidum protein preparations, confirming the cloning of the structural gene for this molecule. Furthermore, E. coli was transformed by a 4.5-kb Eco RI lambda insert fragment subcloned into the plasmid vector pUC19. These transformed cells expressed and translocated the 45- kD protein to their outer membranes. Finally, all sera from patients with different stages of syphilis (primary, secondary, and latent) contained antibody reactive to this protein. PMID:3531382

  13. Genome differences between Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum strain Nichols and T. paraluiscuniculi strain Cuniculi A.

    PubMed

    Strouhal, Michal; Smajs, David; Matejková, Petra; Sodergren, Erica; Amin, Anita G; Howell, Jerrilyn K; Norris, Steven J; Weinstock, George M

    2007-12-01

    The genome of Treponema paraluiscuniculi strain Cuniculi A was compared to the genome of the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum strain Nichols using DNA microarray hybridization, whole-genome fingerprinting, and DNA sequencing. A DNA microarray of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum Nichols containing all 1,039 predicted open reading frame PCR products was used to identify deletions and major sequence changes in the Cuniculi A genome. Using these approaches, deletions, insertions, and prominent sequence changes were found in 38 gene homologs and six intergenic regions of the Cuniculi A genome when it was compared to the genome of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum Nichols. Most of the observed differences were localized in tpr loci and the vicinity of these loci. In addition, 14 other genes were found to contain frameshift mutations resulting in major changes in protein sequences. Analysis of restriction target sites representing 0.34% of the total genome length and DNA sequencing of three PCR products (0.46% of the total genome length) amplified from Cuniculi A chromosomal regions and comparison to the Nichols genome revealed a sequence similarity of 98.6 to 99.3%. These results are consistent with a close genetic relationship among the T. pallidum strains and subspecies and a strong, but relatively divergent connection between the human and rabbit pathogens. PMID:17893135

  14. Gene conversion: a mechanism for generation of heterogeneity in the tprK gene of Treponema pallidum during infection.

    PubMed

    Centurion-Lara, Arturo; LaFond, Rebecca E; Hevner, Karin; Godornes, Charmie; Molini, Barbara J; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Lukehart, Sheila A

    2004-06-01

    The tprK gene sequence of Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum (T. pallidum) is heterogeneous within and among isolates. Heterogeneity in the tprK open reading frame is localized in seven discrete variable (V) regions, and variability results from apparent base changes, insertions or deletions. The TprK V regions are the focus of anti-TprK antibodies arising during infection. To test our hypothesis that V region sequences change during infection and passage, we developed a clonal isolate from the Chicago strain of T. pallidum and confirmed V region diversification during passage of this isolate. We describe the sequence anatomy of the seven V regions of tprK and the identification of putative donor sites for new V region sequences, and we propose a model for generation of new V regions by segmental gene conversion. These findings suggest that antigenic variation of TprK occurs in T. pallidum and may be important in immune evasion and persistence. PMID:15186410

  15. Sequence conservation of glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase among Treponema pallidum strains.

    PubMed

    Cameron, C E; Castro, C; Lukehart, S A; Van Voorhis, W C

    1999-06-01

    Previous investigations have demonstrated that immunization with Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase significantly protects rabbits from subsequent treponeme challenge. In this report, we show that the glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase amino acid sequence is conserved among 12 strains from a total of five pathogenic treponemes. The invariant nature of this immunoprotective antigen makes it an attractive candidate for inclusion in a universal subunit vaccine against T. pallidum infection. In addition, these studies show a silent nucleotide substitution at position 579 of the gpd open reading frame which is consistently observed in the non-T. pallidum subsp. pallidum strains. This sequence alteration introduces a PleI restriction site in the nonsyphilis strains and thus allows genetic differentiation from T. pallidum subsp. pallidum strains. PMID:10338539

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Treponema pallidum, the

    E-print Network

    Salzberg, Steven

    Complete Genome Sequence of Treponema pallidum, the Syphilis Spirochete Claire M. Fraser,* Steven J and substantiates the considerable di- versity observed among pathogenic spirochetes. Venereal syphilis was first century with the age of exploration. Syphilis was ubiquitous by the 19th century and has been called

  17. Surface immunolabeling and consensus computational framework to identify candidate rare outer membrane proteins of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Cox, David L; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star; Desrosiers, Daniel C; Salazar, Juan C; Caimano, Melissa J; Radolf, Justin D

    2010-12-01

    Treponema pallidum reacts poorly with the antibodies present in rabbit and human syphilitic sera, a property attributed to the paucity of proteins in its outer membrane. To better understand the basis for the syphilis spirochete's "stealth pathogenicity," we used a dual-label, 3-step amplified assay in which treponemes encapsulated in gel microdroplets were probed with syphilitic sera in parallel with anti-FlaA antibodies. A small (approximately 5 to 10%) but reproducible fraction of intact treponemes bound IgG and/or IgM antibodies. Three lines of evidence supported the notion that the surface antigens were likely ?-barrel-forming outer membrane proteins (OMPs): (i) surface labeling with anti-lipoidal (VDRL) antibodies was not observed, (ii) immunoblot analysis confirmed prior results showing that T. pallidum glycolipids are not immunoreactive, and (iii) labeling of intact organisms was not appreciably affected by proteinase K (PK) treatment. With this method, we also demonstrate that TprK (TP0897), an extensively studied candidate OMP, and TP0136, a lipoprotein recently reported to be surface exposed, are both periplasmic. Consistent with the immunolabeling studies, TprK was also found to lack amphiphilicity, a characteristic property of ?-barrel-forming proteins. Using a consensus computational framework that combined subcellular localization and ?-barrel structural prediction tools, we generated ranked groups of candidate rare OMPs, the predicted T. pallidum outer membrane proteome (OMPeome), which we postulate includes the surface-exposed molecules detected by our enhanced gel microdroplet assay. In addition to underscoring the syphilis spirochete's remarkably poor surface antigenicity, our findings help to explain the complex and shifting balance between pathogen and host defenses that characterizes syphilitic infection. PMID:20876295

  18. Opsonic potential, protective capacity, and sequence conservation of the Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum Tp92.

    PubMed

    Cameron, C E; Lukehart, S A; Castro, C; Molini, B; Godornes, C; Van Voorhis, W C

    2000-04-01

    By means of a differential screening technique, a 92-kDa antigen, designated Tp92, was identified from Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum. This protein is similar in sequence to the protective surface antigens D15 from Haemophilus influenzae and Oma87 from Pasteurella multocida. Amino acid sequence analyses revealed a cleavable N-terminal signal sequence and predicted the outer membrane location for Tp92. In support of this, antiserum raised against recombinant Tp92 promotes opsonization and phagocytosis of T. pallidum by rabbit macrophages, and anti-Tp92 reactivity is absent from washed treponemal preparations presumed to be lacking outer membranes. The Tp92 amino acid sequence is 95.5%-100% conserved among 11 strains representing 4 pathogenic treponemes, and immunization with recombinant Tp92 partially protected rabbits from subsequent T. pallidum challenge. These results demonstrate that Tp92 is an invariant, immunoprotective antigen that may be present on the surface of T. pallidum and may represent a potential vaccine candidate for syphilis. PMID:10762571

  19. TP0326, a Treponema pallidum ?-barrel assembly machinery A (BamA) orthologue and rare outer membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Desrosiers, Daniel C; Anand, Arvind; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star M; LeDoyt, Morgan; Cummings, Michael A D; Eshghi, Azad; Cameron, Caroline E; Cruz, Adriana R; Salazar, Juan C; Caimano, Melissa J; Radolf, Justin D

    2011-06-01

    Definitive identification of Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has long eluded researchers. TP0326, the sole protein in T. pallidum with sequence homology to a Gram-negative OMP, belongs to the BamA family of proteins essential for OM biogenesis. Structural modelling predicted that five polypeptide transport-associated (POTRA) domains comprise the N-terminus of TP0326, while the C-terminus forms an 18-stranded amphipathic ?-barrel. Circular dichroism, heat modifiability by SDS-PAGE, Triton X-114 phase partitioning and liposome incorporation supported these topological predictions and confirmed that the ?-barrel is responsible for the native protein's amphiphilicity. Expression analyses revealed that native TP0326 is expressed at low abundance, while a protease-surface accessibility assay confirmed surface exposure. Size-exclusion chromatography and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a modular Bam complex in T. pallidum larger than that of Escherichia coli. Non-orthologous ancillary factors and self-association of TP0326 via its ?-barrel may both contribute to the Bam complex. T. pallidum-infected rabbits mount a vigorous antibody response to both POTRA and ?-barrel portions of TP0326, whereas humans with secondary syphilis respond predominantly to POTRA. The syphilis spirochaete appears to have devised a stratagem for harnessing the Bam pathway while satisfying its need to limit surface antigenicity. PMID:21488980

  20. Reactivity of lymphocytes from patients with syphilis towards T. pallidum antigen in the leucocyte migration and lymphocyte transformation tests.

    PubMed Central

    From, E; Thestrup-Pedersen, K; Thulin, H

    1976-01-01

    The reactivity of lymphocytes to Treponema pallidum antigen was studied before and after treatment in nine patients with early syphilis using a leucocyte migration test and a lymphocyte transformation test. Lymphocyte reactivity was also investigated in six patients treated for syphilis within the last 4 years, and in five untreated patients with a positive result to the T. pallidum immobilization test, but negative results to other serum tests for syphilis antibodies and without any known exposure to risk of infection by syphilis. Ten seronegative patients with different dermatological disorders served as a control group. A significant increase in lymphocyte reactivity to T. pallidum antigen was recorded in both tests in vitro after treatment. There was no difference in lymphocyte reactivity to T. pallidum antigen between the other patients studied and the control group. In early syphilis the spontaneous migration was found to be inhibited before treatment. Tuberculin skin tests were also performed and found to be suppressed in patients with primary and secondary syphilis. No difference in phytohaemagglutinin response was found between any of the groups. Plasma from patients with primary and secondary syphilis was found to change the in vitro reactivity of normal lymphocytes when stimulated with different mitogens. PMID:786437

  1. Antigenic variation of TprK V regions abrogates specific antibody binding in syphilis.

    PubMed

    LaFond, Rebecca E; Molini, Barbara J; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Lukehart, Sheila A

    2006-11-01

    The tprK gene in the syphilis spirochete, Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, undergoes antigenic variation in seven variable (V) regions. tprK is highly variable within T. pallidum strains, and a method has been developed to derive clones of T. pallidum that express a single, unique tprK sequence. Rabbits were infected with three different T. pallidum clones or the parent strain from which the clones were derived, and their sera were examined by immunoassay for antibody reactivity against synthetic peptides representing the TprK V regions from each clone. The parent strain expresses many different V region sequences, and infection with this strain induced antibody responses against a wide variety of V regions. In rabbits infected with the Chicago C clone, antibodies developed against all of the V regions except V1, while antibodies developed against only V5, V6, and V7 in Chicago A-infected rabbits. During Chicago B infection, antibodies developed against all of the V regions except V1 and V3. Antibodies were highly specific for the V regions of the infecting clone, and cross-reactivity was rare. The demonstration that the V regions elicit a variant-specific antibody response supports the hypothesis that TprK variants may help organisms to avoid the developing immune response in infected individuals, contributing to the ability of T. pallidum to establish chronic infection. PMID:16923793

  2. A Homology Model Reveals Novel Structural Features and an Immunodominant Surface Loop/Opsonic Target in the Treponema pallidum BamA Ortholog TP_0326

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Amit; Anand, Arvind; Hawley, Kelly L.; LeDoyt, Morgan; La Vake, Carson J.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Cruz, Adriana R.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently demonstrated that TP_0326 is a bona fide rare outer membrane protein (OMP) in Treponema pallidum and that it possesses characteristic BamA bipartite topology. Herein, we used immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) to show that only the ?-barrel domain of TP_0326 contains surface-exposed epitopes in intact T. pallidum. Using the solved structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae BamA, we generated a homology model of full-length TP_0326. Although the model predicts a typical BamA fold, the ?-barrel harbors features not described in other BamAs. Structural modeling predicted that a dome comprised of three large extracellular loops, loop 4 (L4), L6, and L7, covers the barrel's extracellular opening. L4, the dome's major surface-accessible loop, contains mainly charged residues, while L7 is largely neutral and contains a polyserine tract in a two-tiered conformation. L6 projects into the ?-barrel but lacks the VRGF/Y motif that anchors L6 within other BamAs. IFA and opsonophagocytosis assay revealed that L4 is surface exposed and an opsonic target. Consistent with B cell epitope predictions, immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed that L4 is an immunodominant loop in T. pallidum-infected rabbits and humans with secondary syphilis. Antibody capture experiments using Escherichia coli expressing OM-localized TP_0326 as a T. pallidum surrogate further established the surface accessibility of L4. Lastly, we found that a naturally occurring substitution (Leu593 ? Gln593) in the L4 sequences of T. pallidum strains affects antibody binding in sera from syphilitic patients. Ours is the first study to employ a “structure-to-pathogenesis” approach to map the surface topology of a T. pallidum OMP within the context of syphilitic infection. IMPORTANCE Previously, we reported that TP_0326 is a bona fide rare outer membrane protein (OMP) in Treponema pallidum and that it possesses the bipartite topology characteristic of a BamA ortholog. Using a homology model as a guide, we found that TP_0326 displays unique features which presumably relate to its function(s) in the biogenesis of T. pallidum's unorthodox OM. The model also enabled us to identify an immunodominant epitope in a large extracellular loop that is both an opsonic target and subject to immune pressure in a human population. Ours is the first study to follow a structure-to-pathogenesis approach to map the surface topology of a T. pallidum rare OMP within the context of syphilitic infection. PMID:25825429

  3. Similarity between the 38-kilodalton lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum and the glucose/galactose-binding (MglB) protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, P S; Akins, D R; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1994-01-01

    The recent discovery that abundant and immunogenic lipoproteins constitute the integral membrane proteins of Treponema pallidum has prompted efforts to investigate their importance in the physiology and ultrastructure of the organism and in immune responses during infection. Earlier studies identified a 38-kDa lipoprotein of T. pallidum believed to be specific to the pathogen. In the present study, monoclonal antibodies generated against the 38-kDa lipoprotein of T. pallidum reacted with cognate 37-kDa molecules in the nonpathogens Treponema phagedenis, Treponema denticola, and Treponema refringens. Cloning and expression of the 38-kDa-lipoprotein gene of T. pallidum in Escherichia coli revealed that the recombinant product displayed a slightly larger (39-kDa) apparent molecular mass but remained reactive with anti-38-kDa-protein monoclonal antibodies. The recombinant product was processed and acylated in E. coli. DNA and amino acid sequence analyses indicated an open reading frame encoding 403 amino acids, with the first 25 amino acids corresponding to a leader peptide terminated by a signal peptidase II processing site of Val-Val-Gly-Cys. The predicted mature protein is 378 amino acids in length with a deduced molecular weight of 40,422 (excluding acylation). Southern blotting failed to demonstrate in nonpathogenic treponemes genomic sequences homologous with the 38-kDa-lipoprotein gene of T. pallidum. Computer analysis revealed that the 38-kDa lipoprotein of T. pallidum had 34.2% identity and 58.9% similarity with the glucose/galactose-binding protein (MglB) of E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Furthermore, of the 19 amino acids of MglB involved in carbohydrate binding, the 38-kDa lipoprotein had identity with 11. These studies have allowed the first putative functional assignment (carbohydrate binding) to a T. pallidum integral membrane protein. Recognition of this potential physiological role for the 38-kDa lipoprotein underscores the possibility that the membrane biology of T. pallidum may more closely resemble that of gram-positive organisms, which also utilize lipoproteins as anchored transporters, than that of gram-negative bacteria to which T. pallidum often is analogized. Images PMID:8132345

  4. BAC library of T. pallidum DNA in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Smajs, David; McKevitt, Matthew; Wang, Ling; Howell, Jerrilyn K; Norris, Steven J; Palzkill, Timothy; Weinstock, George M

    2002-03-01

    Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum (Nichols) chromosomal DNA was used to construct a large insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library in Escherichia coli DH10B using the pBeloBAC11 cloning vector; 678 individual insert termini of 339 BAC clones (13.9 x coverage) were sequenced and the cloned chromosomal region in each clone was determined by comparison to the genomic sequence. A single 15.6-kb region of the T. pallidum chromosome was missing in the BAC library, between bp 248727 and 264323. In addition to the 12 open reading frames (ORFs) coded by this region, one additional ORF (TP0596) was not cloned as an intact gene. Altogether, 13 predicted T. pallidum ORFs (1.25% of the total) were incomplete or missing in the library. Three of 338 clones mapped by restriction enzyme digestion had detectable deletions and one clone had a detectable insertion within the insert. Of mapped clones, 19 were selected to represent the minimal set of E. coli BAC clones covering 1026 of the total 1040 (98.7%) predicted T. pallidum ORFs. Using this minimal set of clones, at least 12 T. pallidum proteins were shown to react with pooled sera from rabbits immunized with T. pallidum, indicating that at least some T. pallidum genes are transcribed and expressed in E. coli. PMID:11875041

  5. BAC Library of T. pallidum DNA in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Šmajs, David; McKevitt, Matthew; Wang, Ling; Howell, Jerrilyn K.; Norris, Steven J.; Palzkill, Timothy; Weinstock, George M.

    2002-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum (Nichols) chromosomal DNA was used to construct a large insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library in Escherichia coli DH10B using the pBeloBAC11 cloning vector; 678 individual insert termini of 339 BAC clones (13.9 x coverage) were sequenced and the cloned chromosomal region in each clone was determined by comparison to the genomic sequence. A single 15.6-kb region of the T. pallidum chromosome was missing in the BAC library, between bp 248727 and 264323. In addition to the 12 open reading frames (ORFs) coded by this region, one additional ORF (TP0596) was not cloned as an intact gene. Altogether, 13 predicted T. pallidum ORFs (1.25% of the total) were incomplete or missing in the library. Three of 338 clones mapped by restriction enzyme digestion had detectable deletions and one clone had a detectable insertion within the insert. Of mapped clones, 19 were selected to represent the minimal set of E. coli BAC clones covering 1026 of the total 1040 (98.7%) predicted T. pallidum ORFs. Using this minimal set of clones, at least 12 T. pallidum proteins were shown to react with pooled sera from rabbits immunized with T. pallidum, indicating that at least some T. pallidum genes are transcribed and expressed in E. coli. PMID:11875041

  6. Treponema pallidum Invades Intercellular Junctions of Endothelial Cell Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. Denee; Navab, Mahamad; Haake, David A.; Fogelman, Alan M.; Miller, James N.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1988-05-01

    The pathogenesis of syphilis reflects invasive properties of Treponema pallidum, but the actual mode of tissue invasion is unknown. We have found two in vitro parallels of treponemal invasiveness. We tested whether motile T. pallidum could invade host cells by determining the fate of radiolabeled motile organisms added to a HeLa cell monolayer; 26% of treponemes associated with the monolayer in a trypsin-resistant niche, presumably between the monolayer and the surface to which it adhered, but did not attain intracellularity. Attachment of T. pallidum to cultured human and rabbit aortic and human umbilical vein endothelial cells was 2-fold greater than to HeLa cells. We added T. pallidum to aortic endothelial cells grown on membrane filters under conditions in which tight intercellular junctions had formed. T. pallidum was able to pass through the endothelial cell monolayers without altering tight junctions, as measured by electrical resistance. In contrast, heat-killed T. pallidum and the nonpathogen Treponema phagedenis biotype Reiter failed to penetrate the monolayer. Transmission electron micrographs of sections of the monolayer showed T. pallidum in intercellular junctions. Our in vitro observations suggest that these highly motile spirochetes may leave the circulation by invading the junctions between endothelial cells.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Treponema pallidum strain DAL-1.

    PubMed

    Zobaníková, Marie; Mikolka, Pavol; Cejková, Darina; Pospíšilová, Petra; Chen, Lei; Strouhal, Michal; Qin, Xiang; Weinstock, George M; Smajs, David

    2012-10-10

    Treponema pallidum strain DAL-1 is a human uncultivable pathogen causing the sexually transmitted disease syphilis. Strain DAL-1 was isolated from the amniotic fluid of a pregnant woman in the secondary stage of syphilis. Here we describe the 1,139,971 bp long genome of T. pallidum strain DAL-1 which was sequenced using two independent sequencing methods (454 pyrosequencing and Illumina). In rabbits, strain DAL-1 replicated better than the T. pallidum strain Nichols. The comparison of the complete DAL-1 genome sequence with the Nichols sequence revealed a list of genetic differences that are potentially responsible for the increased rabbit virulence of the DAL-1 strain. PMID:23449808

  8. Dendritic cells phagocytose and are activated by Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Bouis, D A; Popova, T G; Takashima, A; Norgard, M V

    2001-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune processes play a prominent role in the clinical manifestations of syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease of humans caused by spirochetal bacterium Treponema pallidum. The immune cell type that initiates the early immune response to T. pallidum thus far has not been identified. However, dendritic cells (DCs) are the first immune-competent cells to encounter antigens within skin or mucous membranes, the principal sites of early syphilitic infection. In the present study, immature DC line XS52, derived from murine skin, was utilized to examine T. pallidum-DC interactions and subsequent DC activation (maturation). Electron microscopy revealed that T. pallidum was engulfed by DCs via both coiling and conventional phagocytosis and was delivered to membrane-bound vacuoles. The XS52 DC line expressed surface CD14 and mRNA for Toll-like receptors 2 and 4, molecules comprising important signaling components for immune cell activation by bacterial modulins. Both T. pallidum and a synthetic lipopeptide (corresponding to the 47-kDa major membrane lipoprotein) activated the XS52 DC line, as indicated by the secretion of interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-1beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-6 and elevated surface expression of CD54. The combined data support the contention that DCs stimulated by T. pallidum and/or its proinflammatory membrane lipoproteins are involved in driving the cellular immune processes that typify syphilis. PMID:11119545

  9. Cellular Metabolic Network Analysis: Discovering Important Reactions in Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueying; Zhao, Min; Qu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    T. pallidum, the syphilis-causing pathogen, performs very differently in metabolism compared with other bacterial pathogens. The desire for safe and effective vaccine of syphilis requests identification of important steps in T. pallidum's metabolism. Here, we apply Flux Balance Analysis to represent the reactions quantitatively. Thus, it is possible to cluster all reactions in T. pallidum. By calculating minimal cut sets and analyzing topological structure for the metabolic network of T. pallidum, critical reactions are identified. As a comparison, we also apply the analytical approaches to the metabolic network of H. pylori to find coregulated drug targets and unique drug targets for different microorganisms. Based on the clustering results, all reactions are further classified into various roles. Therefore, the general picture of their metabolic network is obtained and two types of reactions, both of which are involved in nucleic acid metabolism, are found to be essential for T. pallidum. It is also discovered that both hubs of reactions and the isolated reactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolisms play important roles in T. pallidum. These reactions could be potential drug targets for treating syphilis. PMID:26495292

  10. Topography and chemoarchitecture of the striatum and pallidum in a monotreme, the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Ashwell, K W S

    2008-09-01

    The topography and chemoarchitecture of the striatum and pallidum in a monotreme, the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) have been studied using Nissl staining in conjunction with myelin staining, enzyme reactivity to acetylcholinesterase and NADPH diaphorase, and immunoreactivity to parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, tyrosine hydroxylase, neuropeptide Y, and neurofilament protein (SMI-32 antibody). All those components of the striatum and pallidum found in eutherian mammals could also be identified in the echidna's brain, with broad chemoarchitectural similarities to those regions in eutherian brains also apparent. There was a clear chemoarchitectural gradient visible with parvalbumin immunoreactivity of neurons and fibers, suggesting a subdivision of the echidna caudatoputamen into weakly reactive rostrodorsomedial and strongly reactive caudoventrolateral components. This may, in turn, relate to subdivision into associative versus sensorimotor CPu and reflect homology to the caudate and putamen of primates. Moreover, the chemoarchitecture of the echidna striatum suggested the presence of striosome-matrix architecture. The morphology of identified neuronal groups (i.e., parvalbumin, calbindin, and neuropeptide Y immunoreactive) in the echidna striatum and pallidum showed many similarities to those seen in eutherians, although the pattern of distribution of calbindin immunoreactive neurons was more uniform in the caudatoputamen of the echidna than in therians. These observations indicate that the same broad features of striatal and pallidal organization apply across all mammals and suggest that these common features may have arisen before the divergence of the monotreme and therian lineages. PMID:18821282

  11. The tprK gene is heterogeneous among Treponema pallidum strains and has multiple alleles.

    PubMed

    Centurion-Lara, A; Godornes, C; Castro, C; Van Voorhis, W C; Lukehart, S A

    2000-02-01

    We have previously shown that the TprK antigen of T. pallidum, Nichols strain, is predominantly expressed in treponemes obtained 10 days after infection and that the hydrophilic domain of TprK is a target of opsonic antibodies and confers significant protection against homologous challenge. The T. pallidum genome sequence reported the presence of a single copy of the tprK gene in the Nichols strain. In the present study we demonstrate size heterogeneity in the central portions of the TprK hydrophilic domains of 14 treponemal isolates. Sequence analysis of the central domains and the complete open reading frames (ORFs) of the tprK genes confirms this heterogeneity. Further, multiple tprK sequences were found in the Nichols-defined tprK locus in three isolates (Sea 81-4, Bal 7, and Bal 73-1). In contrast, only a single tprK sequence could be identified in this locus in the Nichols strain. Alignment of the DNA and deduced amino acid sequences of the whole tprK ORFs shows the presence of seven discrete variable domains flanked by highly conserved regions. We hypothesize that these heterogeneous regions may be involved in antigenic heterogeneity and, in particular, evasion of the immune response. The presence of different tprK alleles in the tprK locus strongly suggests the existence of genetically different subpopulations within treponemal isolates. PMID:10639452

  12. Transcriptome of Treponema pallidum: Gene Expression Profile during Experimental Rabbit Infection†

    PubMed Central

    Šmajs, David; McKevitt, Matthew; Howell, Jerrilyn K.; Norris, Steven J.; Cai, Wei-Wen; Palzkill, Timothy; Weinstock, George M.

    2005-01-01

    RNA transcript levels in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols) isolated from experimentally infected rabbits were determined by the use of DNA microarray technology. This characterization of the T. pallidum transcriptome during experimental infection provides further insight into the importance of gene expression levels for the survival and pathogenesis of this bacterium. PMID:15716460

  13. Transcriptome of Treponema pallidum: gene expression profile during experimental rabbit infection.

    PubMed

    Smajs, David; McKevitt, Matthew; Howell, Jerrilyn K; Norris, Steven J; Cai, Wei-Wen; Palzkill, Timothy; Weinstock, George M

    2005-03-01

    RNA transcript levels in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols) isolated from experimentally infected rabbits were determined by the use of DNA microarray technology. This characterization of the T. pallidum transcriptome during experimental infection provides further insight into the importance of gene expression levels for the survival and pathogenesis of this bacterium. PMID:15716460

  14. Correlation of immunity in experimental syphilis with serum-mediated aggregation of Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Lewinski, M A; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A; Blanco, D R

    1999-07-01

    We have previously shown by freeze-fracture electron microscopy that serum from infection-immune syphilitic rabbits aggregates the low-density membrane-spanning Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane proteins (TROMPs). The purpose of this study was to determine if a relationship could be demonstrated between acquired immunity in experimental rabbit syphilis, serum complement-dependent treponemicidal antibody, and antibody directed against TROMPs as measured by the aggregation of TROMP particles. Three groups of T. pallidum-infected rabbits were treated curatively with penicillin at 9 days, 30 days, and 6 months postinfection to generate various degrees of immunity to challenge reinfection. Sera from rabbits completely susceptible to localized and disseminated reinfection possessed a low titer of treponemicidal antibody (/=50% of a treponemal suspension) and showed a correspondingly low level of TROMP aggregation (16.5% of the total number of outer membrane particles counted) similar to normal serum controls (13. 4%); the number of particles within these aggregates never exceeded three. Sera from partially immune rabbits, which were susceptible to local reinfection but had no evidence of dissemination, showed an increase in the titer of treponemicidal antibody (1:16) compared to the completely susceptible group (antibody. Finally, sera from rabbits completely immune to both local and disseminated reinfection possessed both high titers of treponemicidal antibody (1:128) and significant aggregation of TROMP (88.6%); approximately 50% of these aggregates contained four to six particles. The results indicate that complete immunity in experimental rabbit syphilis correlates with antibody that kills T. pallidum and aggregates TROMPs, suggesting that TROMPs are molecules which contribute to the development of acquired immunity. PMID:10377149

  15. Susceptibility of Treponema pallidum to host-derived antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Cox, David L; Sun, Yongcheng; Liu, Hsi; Lehrer, Robert I; Shafer, William M

    2003-11-01

    LL-37 displays potent broad-spectrum activity against a number of pathogenic bacteria and is the only cathelicidin thus far identified in humans. In this study, we examined the capacity of human LL-37 and the similar CAP-18-derived peptide from rabbits to exert antimicrobial activity against the causative agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum. We found that both peptides, as well as a truncated version of human LL-37 that contains its bactericidal domain, could exert rapid, but salt-sensitive antimicrobial activity against T. pallidum. Infectivity of T. pallidum in a rabbit model could effectively be blocked with the synthetic truncated LL-37-derived peptide WS22-N-amide. PMID:15019205

  16. Molecular detection of T. pallidum by PCR in seronegative cases.

    PubMed

    Talha, Elyas; Juhász, Emese; Kanizsai, Szilvia; Nagy, K

    2009-06-01

    For the molecular detection of Treponema pallidum authors introduced and used a nested PCR amplifying a conservative portion of the gene coding for the Tp 47 kDa membrane protein. PCR verified the presence of T. pallidum specific DNA in 5.7 per cent of syphilis seronegative 105 MSM belonging to HIV risk group. Treponema DNA was also detected in HIV infected, syphilis seronegative cases. Specificity of the method was demonstrated in rabbit inoculation test and also in clinically positive syphilis cases. PMID:19621769

  17. Genetic diversity in Treponema pallidum: implications for pathogenesis, evolution and molecular diagnostics of syphilis and yaws.

    PubMed

    Smajs, David; Norris, Steven J; Weinstock, George M

    2012-03-01

    Pathogenic uncultivable treponemes, similar to syphilis-causing Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, include T. pallidum ssp. pertenue, T. pallidum ssp. endemicum and Treponema carateum, which cause yaws, bejel and pinta, respectively. Genetic analyses of these pathogens revealed striking similarity among these bacteria and also a high degree of similarity to the rabbit pathogen, Treponema paraluiscuniculi, a treponeme not infectious to humans. Genome comparisons between pallidum and non-pallidum treponemes revealed genes with potential involvement in human infectivity, whereas comparisons between pallidum and pertenue treponemes identified genes possibly involved in the high invasivity of syphilis treponemes. Genetic variability within syphilis strains is considered as the basis of syphilis molecular epidemiology with potential to detect more virulent strains, whereas genetic variability within a single strain is related to its ability to elude the immune system of the host. Genome analyses also shed light on treponemal evolution and on chromosomal targets for molecular diagnostics of treponemal infections. PMID:22198325

  18. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for the identification of Treponema pallidum in tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Petrich, Annett; Rojas, Pablo; Schulze, Julia; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Giacani, Lorenzo; Schneider, Thomas; Hertel, Moritz; Kikhney, Judith; Moter, Annette

    2015-10-01

    Syphilis is often called the great imitator because of its frequent atypical clinical manifestations that make the disease difficult to recognize. Because Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the infectious agent of syphilis, is yet uncultivated in vitro, diagnosis is usually made using serology; however, in cases where serology is inconclusive or in patients with immunosuppression where these tests may be difficult to interpret, the availability of a molecular tool for direct diagnosis may be of pivotal importance. Here we present a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay that simultaneously identifies and analyzes spatial distribution of T. pallidum in histological tissue sections. For this assay the species-specific FISH probe TPALL targeting the 16S rRNA of T. pallidum was designed in silico and evaluated using T. pallidum infected rabbit testicular tissue and a panel of non-syphilis spirochetes as positive and negative controls, respectively, before application to samples from four syphilis-patients. In a HIV positive patient, FISH showed the presence of T. pallidum in inguinal lymph node tissue. In a patient not suspected to suffer from syphilis but underwent surgery for phimosis, numerous T. pallidum cells were found in preputial tissue. In two cases with oral involvement, FISH was able to differentiate T. pallidum from oral treponemes and showed infection of the oral mucosa and tonsils, respectively. The TPALL FISH probe is now readily available for in situ identification of T. pallidum in selected clinical samples as well as T. pallidum research applications and animal models. PMID:26365167

  19. Assessment of the immune responses to Treponema pallidum Gpd DNA vaccine adjuvanted with IL-2 and chitosan nanoparticles before and after Treponema pallidum challenge in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feijun; Zhang, Xiaohong; Liu, Shuangquan; Zeng, Tiebing; Yu, Jian; Gu, Weiming; Zhang, Yuejun; Chen, Xi; Wu, Yimou

    2013-02-01

    Syphilis is a multistage, sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochete, Treponema pallidum (Tp). A significantly high incidence of syphilis has been reported in several countries, including China, and there is an urgent need for the development of efficacious vaccines against syphilis. DNA vaccines are a major breakthrough in the field of vaccination with several advantages over traditional vaccines. Animal model studies of Tp DNA vaccines have not been reported elsewhere but our previous reports describe the development of a single-gene Tp DNA vaccine and preclinical immunization study. In this study, chitosan (CS) nanoparticles were used as a vector and an interleukin-2 expression plasmid (pIL-2) as an adjuvant to enhance a TpGpd DNA vaccine candidate (pTpGpd) in a rabbit Tp skin challenge model. At week 8 after the first immunization, three rabbits from each group were used to determine cytokine measurements and spleen lymphocyte proliferation assay. pTpGpd in combination with pIL-2 wrapped with CS led to the greatest enhancement of anti-TpGpd antibodies and T-cell proliferation. During infection, levels of anti-TpGpd antibodies and T-cell proliferation were measured. Both the serum special IgG and IL-2, interferon-? were significantly increased by the co-injection of the IL-2 plasmid compared with the injection of TpGpd DNA alone (P<0.05). Furthermore, IL-2 plasmid coinjection efficiently enhanced the antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation response. Additionally, the ratios of positive skin lesions and ulcer lesions in groups immunized with pTpGpd were significantly lower than those of the pIL-2, CS or pIL-2 mixed with CS control groups (P<0.001). CS vectored and pIL-2 adjuvanted pTpGpd immunized animals exhibited the lowest rates of positive skin tests (8.33%) and ulcer lesions (4.17%) and the fastest recovery (42 d). These experiments indicate that co-injection of a pIL-2 plasmid with pTpGpd DNA vaccine wrapped with CS can significantly strengthen the long-term stability of immune response during infection, efficiently improve the protective effect against T. pallidum spirochetes infection and attenuate syphilitic lesion development. PMID:23334700

  20. Use of the skin protection assay in experimental syphilis to assess protective immunity against a specific Treponema pallidum surface epitope.

    PubMed

    Blanco, David R; Champion, Cheryl I; Lovett, Michael A

    2005-08-01

    We have recently shown that a monoclonal antibody, designated M131, that binds a surface phosphorylcholine epitope on Treponema pallidum possesses complement-dependent killing activity and confers partial protection in rabbits following passive immunization (Blanco et al., 2005, Infect. Immun. 73:3083-3095). In this study, the protective potential of M131 was further tested using the rabbit skin protection assay of Titus and Weiser. Both M131 and infection-derived immune rabbit serum resulted in significant lesion delays corresponding to at least a 90% reduction of the treponemal challenge inoculum. The skin protection assay provides a way to assess the protective potential of specific immunogens while using far less antibody than in passive immunization protocols. PMID:16000244

  1. TprK sequence diversity accumulates during infection of rabbits with Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum Nichols strain.

    PubMed

    LaFond, Rebecca E; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Godornes, Charmie; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Lukehart, Sheila A

    2006-03-01

    The tprK gene in Treponema pallidum undergoes antigenic variation. In all T. pallidum isolates examined to date, except the Nichols type strain, heterogeneous tprK sequences have been identified. This heterogeneity is localized to seven variable (V) regions, and tprK sequence diversity accumulates with serial passage in naďve rabbits. The T. pallidum Nichols genome described a single tprK sequence, and after decades of independent passage, only minor tprK sequence diversity is seen among the Nichols strains from different laboratories. We hypothesized that T. pallidum Nichols is capable of only limited tprK diversification. To address this hypothesis, we passaged the T. pallidum Nichols strain in naďve rabbits at the peak of infection (rapid passage) or after the adaptive immune response had cleared most organisms in vivo (slow passage). After 22 rapid passages (9- to 10-day intervals), no tprK V region sequence changes were observed. In contrast, after two slow passages (30- to 35-day intervals), three V regions had sequences that were completely different from that of the original inoculum. New sequences were observed in all seven V regions by the fifth slow passage. In contrast to the rapid-passaged Nichols strain, rapid-passaged Chicago C, a clonal strain isolated from the highly diverse parent Chicago strain, developed significant tprK diversification. These findings suggest that tprK variation can occur, but at a lower rate, in Nichols and that immune pressure may be required for accumulation of bacteria with diverse tprK sequences. Adaptation to growth in rabbits may explain the limited repertoire of V region sequences seen in the Nichols strain. PMID:16495565

  2. T-Cell responses to Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum antigens during the course of experimental syphilis infection.

    PubMed

    Arroll, T W; Centurion-Lara, A; Lukehart, S A; Van Voorhis, W C

    1999-09-01

    In this study we describe the development of the T-cell response to a panel of Treponema pallidum antigens over the course of syphilis infection in the rabbit and determine whether these antigens induce the expression of Th1 cytokines. It was determined that the membrane proteins TpN17 and TpN47, as well as the endoflagellar sheath protein TpN37, induce strong proliferation responses through most of syphilis infection; Tromp1 induced only weak proliferative responses. An unexpected drop in proliferative response to these antigens at day 90 of infection, followed by a dramatic increase in response at day 180, suggests that there may be a secondary dissemination of T. pallidum which induces a recall response. Crude epitope mapping of TpN17 and TpN37 showed that multiple epitopes may be present on both antigens, which is likely a contributing factor in the immunodominance of these antigens. The T-cell response to the TpN37 molecule shows acquisition of newly recognized epitopes during the course of infection. Sonicated T. pallidum was found to induce the expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon and not IL-10 mRNA, showing that the general T-cell response to T. pallidum antigens in syphilis infection is biased towards the Th1 phenotype. Of the antigens tested, TpN37 appears to contribute the most to the Th1 cytokine response and therefore may play a key role in the clearance of T. pallidum from lesions. PMID:10456928

  3. [Projections of the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area and amygdala to the pallidum in dog brain].

    PubMed

    Gorbachevskaia, A I

    1999-01-01

    Using the method based on HRP retrograde axonal transport organization of projections of substantia nigra, tegmental ventral field and amygdala on pallidum was studied. Neuronal fibres from all dopaminergic portions of substantia nigra and tegmental ventral field were found to project on both structures of dog dorsal pallidum (globus pallidus and entopeduncular nucleus). Ventral pallidum receives projectional axons only from neurons of basal nucleus of amygdala and tegmental ventral field. PMID:10561844

  4. Molecular subtyping of Treponema pallidum in Paris, France.

    PubMed

    Grange, Philippe Alain; Allix-Beguec, Caroline; Chanal, Johan; Benhaddou, Nadjet; Gerhardt, Philippe; Morini, Jean-Pierre; Deleuze, Jean; Lassau, François; Janier, Michel; Dupin, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    Two major Treponema pallidum subtypes, 14 d/g and 14 d/f, were identified in a population of 119 patients with syphilis in Paris, France, characterized by a high proportion of men who have sex with men. A new subtype named 11 q/j was characterized, and a reinfection case was determined in 1 patient having consecuitve syphilis infection at 19-month interval. PMID:23859911

  5. The host-interacting proteins Tp0750 and Pallilysin; conservation among treponemes and restriction of proteolytic capacity to Treponema pallidum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spirochete Treponema pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a chronic, sexually transmitted bacterial infection characterized by multiple symptomatic and asymptomatic stages. Treponema pallidum is significantly more invasive than other treponemal species, being able to cross both the blood...

  6. The ventral pallidum and orbitofrontal cortex support food pleasantness inferences

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, W. Kyle; Rapuano, Kristina M.; Ingeholm, John E.; Avery, Jason; Kallman, Seth; Hall, Kevin D.; Martin, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Food advertisements often promote choices that are driven by inferences about the hedonic pleasures of eating a particular food. Given the individual and public health consequences of obesity, it is critical to address unanswered questions about the specific neural systems underlying these hedonic inferences. For example, although regions such as the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) are frequently observed to respond more to pleasant food images than less hedonically pleasing stimuli, one important hedonic brain region in particular has largely remained conspicuously absent among human studies of hedonic response to food images. Based on rodent research demonstrating that activity in the ventral pallidum underlies the hedonic pleasures experienced upon eating food rewards, one might expect that activity in this important ‘hedonic hotspot’ might also track inferred food pleasantness. To date, however, no human studies have assessed this question. We thus asked human subjects to undergo fMRI and make item-by-item ratings of how pleasant it would be to eat particular visually perceived foods. Activity in the ventral pallidum was strongly modulated with pleasantness inferences. Additionally, activity within a region of the orbitofrontal cortex that tracks the pleasantness of tastes was also modulated with inferred pleasantness. Importantly, the reliability of these findings is demonstrated by their replication when we repeated the experiment at a new site with new subjects. These two experiments demonstrate that the ventral pallidum, in addition to the OFC, plays a central role in the moment-to-moment hedonic inferences that influence food-related decision-making. PMID:23397317

  7. Expression in Escherichia coli of the 37-kilodalton endoflagellar sheath protein of Treponema pallidum by use of the polymerase chain reaction and a T7 expression system.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, R D; Radolf, J D

    1990-01-01

    We previously reported the complete primary structure of the 37-kilodalton endoflagellar sheath protein (FlaA) of Treponema pallidum. However, we were unable to determine the nucleotide sequence of flaA upstream of amino acid 10. The desired nucleotide sequence was obtained by use of a strategy based upon the polymerase chain reaction and was found to contain a consensus Escherichia coli promoter, a ribosomal binding site, and a 20-amino-acid signal peptide. Expression of FlaA in E. coli was achieved by cloning polymerase chain reaction-derived constructs lacking the native T. pallidum promoter into a temperature-inducible T7 expression system. Pulse-chase and ethanol inhibition analyses of protein processing in E. coli cells and minicells, respectively, indicated that processing of the FlaA precursor was incomplete. Native and recombinant FlaA were identical as assessed by antibody reactivity and sodium dodecyl sulfate- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic mobilities. Soluble FlaA was not detected in either the cytoplasmic or the periplasmic fractions of E. coli transformants. Fractionation of E. coli cell envelopes unexpectedly revealed that FlaA precursor and FlaA were associated with both the cytoplasmic and outer membranes. This is the first report of expression in E. coli of a T. pallidum protein which could not be cloned or expressed with its native promoter. Our data also indicate that information obtained in E. coli regarding the subcellular location of cloned treponemal proteins must be cautiously extrapolated to T. pallidum. Images PMID:2194955

  8. Immunological evaluation and cellular location analysis of the TprI antigen of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Sambri, Vittorio; Marangoni, Antonella; Cavrini, Francesca; Storni, Elisa; Donati, Manuela; Corona, Silvia; Lanzarini, Paolo; Cevenini, Roberto

    2005-06-01

    The TprI antigen of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum is a putative virulence factor predicted to be located in the outer membrane of the syphilis spirochete. In this study, we analyzed the immune response against TprI and its subunits in sera collected both from rabbits experimentally infected with the Nichols strain and from patients with syphilis, showing a different pattern of reactivity toward the antigen in these two groups of samples. The protective ability of recombinant TprI and its hypothetical outer membrane location were also investigated. Although no rabbit was protected after challenge, immunoelectron microscopy results, to be further investigated, were compatible with the outer membrane location of the antigen. PMID:15908421

  9. TprC/D (Tp0117/131), a trimeric, pore-forming rare outer membrane protein of Treponema pallidum, has a bipartite domain structure.

    PubMed

    Anand, Arvind; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star; Caimano, Melissa J; Karanian, Carson; LeDoyt, Morgan; Cruz, Adriana R; Salazar, Juan C; Radolf, Justin D

    2012-05-01

    Identification of Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has been a longstanding objective of syphilis researchers. We recently developed a consensus computational framework that employs a battery of cellular localization and topological prediction tools to generate ranked clusters of candidate rare OMPs (D. L. Cox et al., Infect. Immun. 78:5178-5194, 2010). TP0117/TP0131 (TprC/D), a member of the T. pallidum repeat (Tpr) family, was a highly ranked candidate. Circular dichroism, heat modifiability by SDS-PAGE, Triton X-114 phase partitioning, and liposome incorporation confirmed that full-length, recombinant TprC (TprC(Fl)) forms a ?-barrel capable of integrating into lipid bilayers. Moreover, TprC(Fl) increased efflux of terbium-dipicolinic acid complex from large unilamellar vesicles and migrated as a trimer by blue-native PAGE. We found that in T. pallidum, TprC is heat modifiable, trimeric, expressed in low abundance, and, based on proteinase K accessibility and opsonophagocytosis assays, surface exposed. From these collective data, we conclude that TprC is a bona fide rare OMP as well as a functional ortholog of Escherichia coli OmpF. We also discovered that TprC has a bipartite architecture consisting of a soluble N-terminal portion (TprC(N)), presumably periplasmic and bound directly or indirectly to peptidoglycan, and a C-terminal ?-barrel (TprC(C)). Syphilitic rabbits generate antibodies exclusively against TprC(C), while secondary syphilis patients fail to mount a detectable antibody response against either domain. The syphilis spirochete appears to have resolved a fundamental dilemma arising from its extracellular lifestyle, namely, how to enhance OM permeability without increasing its vulnerability to the antibody-mediated defenses of its natural human host. PMID:22389487

  10. Sequence diversity of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum tprK in human syphilis lesions and rabbit-propagated isolates.

    PubMed

    LaFond, Rebecca E; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Godornes, Charmie; Rompalo, Anne M; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Lukehart, Sheila A

    2003-11-01

    The tprK gene of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the causative agent of venereal syphilis, belongs to a 12-member gene family and encodes a protein with a predicted cleavable signal sequence and predicted transmembrane domains. Except for the Nichols type strain, all rabbit-propagated isolates of T. pallidum examined thus far are comprised of mixed populations of organisms with heterogeneous tprK sequences. We show that tprK sequences in treponemes obtained directly from syphilis patients are also heterogeneous. Clustering analysis demonstrates that primary chancre tprK sequences are more likely to cluster within a sample than among samples and that tighter clustering is seen within chancre samples than within rabbit-propagated isolates. Closer analysis of tprK sequences from a rabbit-propagated isolate reveals that individual variable regions have different levels of diversity, suggesting that variable regions may have different intrinsic rates of sequence change or may be under different levels of selection. Most variable regions show increased sequence diversity upon passage. We speculate that the diversification of tprK during infection allows organisms to evade the host immune response, contributing to reinfection and persistent infection. PMID:14563860

  11. [Cloning and expression of outer membrane protein gene Gpd from Treponema pallidum and preliminary studies on its immunogenicity in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei-jun; Wu, Yi-mou; Zhang, Xiao-hong; Liu, Shuang-quan; Yu, Min-jun

    2005-10-01

    To construct the recombinant plasmid of Eukaryotic expression containing Gpd gene from Treponema Pallidum and study its immunogenicity in New Zealand White rabbits. Gpd gene was amplified from the genomic DNA of T. pallidum and cloned into appropriate site of pcDNA3. 1 ( + ) vector. After verified that the Gpd antigen gene could be expressed in HeLa cells by Western blot and immunocytochemistry, recombinant plasmids pcDNA3.1 ( + )-Gpd, control plasmid pcDNA3. 1 ( + ) or PBS buffer were administered in three groups of New Zeal and White rabbits. Booster immunizations were employed at 2-week interval for three times. ELISA was used for the quantitative detection of the specific antibody in the sera of rabbits. The proliferation response of spleen cells was detected by MTT assay. The results of the Western blot and immunocytochemistry showed that Gpd gene constructed in pcDNA3.1 ( + ) vector could express a fusion protein with a calculated molecular mass of 41kD in HeLa cells and react with positive blood serum from syphilis patients. The significant specific antibody IgG titers were observed and the highest titer was 1:1024 in rabbits after three times with pcDNA3.1 ( + )-Gpd. The proliferation response of spleen cells were significantly higher than that of rabbits injected with pcDNA3.1 ( + ) (p < 0.05). All above results establish a solid basis for future studying the biological activities of Gpd and benefit the development of the Syphilis DNA vaccine. PMID:16342773

  12. Evaluation of a PCR Test for Detection of Treponema pallidum in Swabs and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Grange, P. A.; Gressier, L.; Dion, P. L.; Farhi, D.; Benhaddou, N.; Gerhardt, P.; Morini, J. P.; Deleuze, J.; Pantoja, C.; Bianchi, A.; Lassau, F.; Avril, M. F.; Janier, M.

    2012-01-01

    Syphilis diagnosis is based on clinical observation, serological analysis, and dark-field microscopy (DFM) detection of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the etiological agent of syphilis, in skin ulcers. We performed a nested PCR (nPCR) assay specifically amplifying the tpp47 gene of T. pallidum from swab and blood specimens. We studied a cohort of 294 patients with suspected syphilis and 35 healthy volunteers. Eighty-seven of the 294 patients had primary syphilis, 103 had secondary syphilis, 40 had latent syphilis, and 64 were found not to have syphilis. The T. pallidum nPCR results for swab specimens were highly concordant with syphilis diagnosis, with a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 95%. Reasonable agreement was observed between the results obtained with the nPCR and DFM methods (kappa = 0.53). No agreement was found between the nPCR detection of T. pallidum in blood and the diagnosis of syphilis, with sensitivities of 29, 18, 14.7, and 24% and specificities of 96, 92, 93, and 97% for peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC), plasma, serum, and whole-blood fractions, respectively. HIV status did not affect the frequency of T. pallidum detection in any of the specimens tested. Swab specimens from mucosal or skin lesions seemed to be more useful than blood for the efficient detection of the T. pallidum genome and, thus, for the diagnosis of syphilis. PMID:22219306

  13. Molecular characterization and analysis of a gene encoding the acidic repeat protein (Arp) of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsi; Rodes, Berta; George, Robert; Steiner, Bret

    2007-06-01

    The acidic repeat protein (arp) genes from three subspecies of the treponeme Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, Nichols strain; T. pallidum subsp. pertenue, CDC-1 and CDC-2 strains; and T. pallidum subsp. endemicum, Bosnia A strain) were cloned and sequenced. The predicted protein sequence contained a high percentage of glutamic acid, hence the name acidic repeat protein, or Arp. The protein had a potential membrane-spanning domain and a signal peptidase I site. The gene from the Nichols strain of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum contained a set of 14 nearly identical repeats of a 60 bp sequence, which occupied approximately 51 % of the length of the gene. Analyses of arp from laboratory strains showed that the 5' and 3' ends of the genes were conserved, but there was considerable heterogeneity in the number of repeats of this 60 bp sequence. Based on amino acid variations, the 14 sequence repeats could be classified into three types, which were named type I, type II and type III repeats. The type II repeat was the most common in the strains examined. The arp gene of the Nichols strain was subsequently cloned into the expression vector pBAD/TOPO ThioFusion. The expressed protein was detected in a Western blot assay using rabbit immune sera produced against T. pallidum, or synthetic peptides derived from the repeat sequences. Using an ELISA, rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test-positive sera reacted with synthetic peptides derived from the repeat region but not with peptides derived from N and C termini of the Arp protein. These results show that the Arp protein is immunogenic and could prove to be a useful target for serological diagnosis of T. pallidum infection. PMID:17510254

  14. [Direct detection of Treponema pallidum in diagnosis of syphilis].

    PubMed

    Woznicová, V; Heroldová, M

    2004-08-01

    Available methods for direct diagnosis of syphilis are summarized with emphasis being on those promising for routine use. Direct detection of the causative agent T. pallidum is limited since the agent is not able to synthesize enzyme cofactors, fatty acids and nucleotides de novo, is completely dependent on its host and thus culture on synthetic media is not feasible. Direct diagnosis of syphilis is based on rabbit infectivity testing (RIT), dark field or fluorescent microscopy and recently also on molecular biological methods used with increasing frequency in routine practice. Suitability and usability of different methods for direct detection of T. pallidum at different stages of syphilis are explained. Except for molecular biological methods, most of detection techniques can only be used at the primary and secondary stages or in early congenital syphilis. Major PCR methods for diagnosis of syphilis are presented. Not all of them are suitable for use in routine practice owing to differences in their sensitivity and design. The polA PCR method appears to be the most promising in this regard. PMID:15524270

  15. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3830 Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. (a)...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3820 Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. (a)...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3820 Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. (a)...

  18. Molecular cloning and DNA sequence analysis of the 37-kilodalton endoflagellar sheath protein gene of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, R D; Hanke, J H; Guzman-Verduzco, L M; Newport, G; Agabian, N; Norgard, M V; Lukehart, S A; Radolf, J D

    1989-01-01

    We have used a combination of nucleotide and N-terminal-amino-acid-sequence analyses to determine the primary structure of the 37-kilodalton (kDa) endoflagellar outer layer, or sheath, protein. Initially, a lambda gt11 clone (designated lambda A34) expressing a portion of the 37-kDa protein was selected from a Treponema pallidum genomic library with a murine monoclonal antibody (H9-2) directed against an epitope of the 37-kDa protein. The insert from lambda A34 provided a probe with which a chimeric plasmid (pR14) encoding all but the nine N-terminal amino acids of the entire protein was selected from a T. pallidum(pBR322) genomic library. The nine N-terminal amino acids determined by amino acid sequencing were combined with the DNA sequence encoded by pR14 to determine the primary structure of the entire 37-kDa protein; the combined sequence made up a polypeptide with a calculated molecular mass of 36,948 Da. Approximately one-third of the deduced sequence was confirmed by N-terminal amino acid analysis of tryptic peptides from the purified 37-kDa protein. Repeated attempts to clone upstream portions of the gene (flaA) by using a variety of strategies were unsuccessful, suggesting that unregulated expression of the intact sheath protein or of its most amino-terminal portions is toxic in Escherichia coli. These studies should provide the basis for further molecular investigations of the endoflagellar apparatus and of treponemal motility. Images PMID:2680972

  19. Thyroid Antibodies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Thyroid Antibodies Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Thyroid Autoantibodies; Antithyroid Antibodies; Antimicrosomal Antibody; Thyroid Microsomal Antibody; Thyroid Peroxidase Antibody; ...

  20. Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum TP0136 Protein Is Heterogeneous among Isolates and Binds Cellular and Plasma Fibronectin via its NH2-Terminal End

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Wujian; Molini, Barbara J.; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Giacani, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Adherence-mediated colonization plays an important role in pathogenesis of microbial infections, particularly those caused by extracellular pathogens responsible for systemic diseases, such as Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (T. pallidum), the agent of syphilis. Among T. pallidum adhesins, TP0136 is known to bind fibronectin (Fn), an important constituent of the host extracellular matrix. To deepen our understanding of the TP0136-Fn interaction dynamics, we used two naturally-occurring sequence variants of the TP0136 protein to investigate which region of the protein is responsible for Fn binding, and whether TP0136 would adhere to human cellular Fn in addition to plasma Fn and super Fn as previously reported. Fn binding assays were performed with recombinant proteins representing the two full-length TP0136 variants and their discrete regions. As a complementary approach, we tested inhibition of T. pallidum binding to Fn by recombinant full-length TP0136 proteins and fragments, as well as by anti-TP0136 immune sera. Our results show that TP0136 adheres more efficiently to cellular Fn than to plasma Fn, that the TP0136 NH2-terminal conserved region of the protein is primarily responsible for binding to plasma Fn but that binding sites for cellular Fn are also present in the protein’s central and COOH-terminal regions. Additionally, message quantification studies show that tp0136 is highly transcribed during experimental infection, and that its message level increases in parallel to the host immune pressure on the pathogen, which suggests a possible role for this protein in T. pallidum persistence. In a time where syphilis incidence is high, our data will help in the quest to identify suitable targets for development of a much needed vaccine against this important disease. PMID:25793702

  1. Immunization with the N-terminal portion of Treponema pallidum repeat protein K attenuates syphilitic lesion development in the rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Cecilia A; Lukehart, Sheila A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2002-12-01

    When used as an immunogen, Treponema pallidum repeat protein K (TprK) has been shown to attenuate syphilitic lesions upon homologous intradermal challenge in the rabbit model. To further explore this protein as a potential vaccine component, we sought to identify the immunogenic regions of TprK. The abilities of three recombinant peptides encompassing TprK to elicit T- and B-cell responses and to protect against challenge were examined. All three fragments elicited proliferative responses from splenocytes taken from infected rabbits. However, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays indicated that only fragments 1 and 3 were consistently recognized by antisera from infected rabbits. Each fragment was also used to immunize rabbits that were subsequently challenged intradermally with infectious T. pallidum. All lesions on unimmunized control rabbits ulcerated and contained treponemes, while the lesions on rabbits immunized with fragment 1 were the least likely to have detectable treponemes (25%) and the least likely to ulcerate (37.5%). The lesions on rabbits immunized with fragment 3 showed intermediate results, and rabbits immunized with fragment 2 were the most likely of all those on immunized rabbits to have detectable treponemes (91.7%) and to ulcerate (66.7%). These results demonstrate that epitopes in fragment 1 are recognized by T cells and antibodies during infection and that immunization with this portion of TprK most effectively attenuates syphilitic lesion development. PMID:12438357

  2. MyD88 Deficiency Markedly Worsens Tissue Inflammation and Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with Treponema pallidum, the Agent of Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Adam C.; Dunne, Dana W.; Zeiss, Caroline J.; Bockenstedt, Linda K.; Radolf, Justin D.; Salazar, Juan C.; Fikrig, Erol

    2013-01-01

    Research on syphilis, a sexually transmitted infection caused by the non-cultivatable spirochete Treponema pallidum, has been hampered by the lack of an inbred animal model. We hypothesized that Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent responses are essential for clearance of T. pallidum and, consequently, compared infection in wild-type (WT) mice and animals lacking MyD88, the adaptor molecule required for signaling by most TLRs. MyD88-deficient mice had significantly higher pathogen burdens and more extensive inflammation than control animals. Whereas tissue infiltrates in WT mice consisted of mixed mononuclear and plasma cells, infiltrates in MyD88-deficient animals were predominantly neutrophilic. Although both WT and MyD88-deficient mice produced antibodies that promoted uptake of treponemes by WT macrophages, MyD88-deficient macrophages were deficient in opsonophagocytosis of treponemes. Our results demonstrate that TLR-mediated responses are major contributors to the resistance of mice to syphilitic disease and that MyD88 signaling and FcR-mediated opsonophagocytosis are linked to the macrophage-mediated clearance of treponemes. PMID:23940747

  3. Identification of the Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum TP0092 (RpoE) regulon and its implications for pathogen persistence in the host and syphilis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Denisenko, Oleg; Tompa, Martin; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2013-02-01

    Bacteria often respond to harmful environmental stimuli with the induction of extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma (?) factors that in turn direct RNA polymerase to transcribe specific groups of response genes (or regulons) to minimize cellular damage and favor adaptation to the changed extracellular milieu. In Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the agent of syphilis, the TP0092 gene is predicted to code for the pathogen's only annotated ECF ? factor, homologous to RpoE, known in Escherichia coli to control a key transduction pathway for maintenance of envelope homeostasis in response to external stress and cell growth. Here we have shown that TP0092 is highly transcribed during experimental syphilis. Furthermore, TP0092 transcription levels significantly increase as infection progresses toward immune clearance of the pathogen, suggesting a role for TP0092 in helping T. pallidum respond to harmful stimuli in the host environment. To investigate this hypothesis, we determined the TP0092 regulon at two different time points during infection using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing. A total of 22 chromosomal regions, all containing putative TP0092-binding sites and corresponding to as many T. pallidum genes, were identified. Noteworthy among them are the genes encoding desulfoferrodoxin and thioredoxin, involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Because T. pallidum does not possess other enzymes for ROS detoxification, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, or glutathione peroxidase, our results suggest that the TP0092 regulon is important in protecting the syphilis spirochete from damage caused by ROS produced at the site of infection during the inflammatory response. PMID:23243302

  4. Membrane topology and cellular location of the Treponema pallidum glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase (GlpQ) ortholog.

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, D V; Sellati, T J; Cox, D L; Shevchenko, O V; Robinson, E J; Radolf, J D

    1999-05-01

    Recent reports that isolated Treponema pallidum outer membranes contain an ortholog for glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase (GlpQ) (D. V. Shevchenko, D. R. Akins, E. J. Robinson, M. Li, O. V. Shevchenko, and J. D. Radolf, Infect. Immun. 65:4179-4189, 1997) and that this protein is a potential opsonic target for T. pallidum (C. E. Stebeck, J. M. Shaffer, T. W. Arroll, S. A. Lukehart, and W. C. Van Voorhis, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 154:303-310, 1997) prompted a more detailed investigation of its physicochemical properties and cellular location. [14C]palmitate radiolabeling studies of a GlpQ-alkaline phosphatase fusion expressed in Escherichia coli confirmed the prediction from DNA sequencing that the protein is lipid modified. Studies using Triton X-114 phase partitioning revealed that the protein's amphiphilicity is due to lipid modification and that a substantial portion of the polypeptide is associated with the T. pallidum peptidoglycan sacculus. Three different approaches, i.e., (i) proteinase K treatment of intact treponemes, (ii) indirect immunofluorescence analysis of treponemes encapsulated in agarose beads, and (iii) opsonophagocytosis of treponemes incubated with antiserum against recombinant GlpQ by rabbit peritoneal macrophages, confirmed that GlpQ is entirely subsurface in T. pallidum. Moreover, rabbits hyperimmunized with GlpQ were not protected against intradermal challenge with virulent treponemes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed that the recombinant form of the polypeptide lacked discernible evidence of denaturation. Finally, GlpQ was not radiolabeled when T. pallidum outer membranes were incubated with 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)-diazarene, a photoactivatable, lipophilic probe which promiscuously labels both proteins and lipids within phospholipid bilayers. Taken as a whole, these studies indicate that the T. pallidum GlpQ ortholog is a periplasmic protein associated predominantly with the spirochete's peptidoglycan-cytoplasmic membrane complex. PMID:10225883

  5. Protective efficacy of a Treponema pallidum Gpd DNA vaccine vectored by chitosan nanoparticles and fused with interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feijun; Wang, Shiping; Zhang, Xiaohong; Gu, Weiming; Yu, Jian; Liu, Shuangquan; Zeng, Tiebing; Zhang, Yuejun; Wu, Yimou

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, immunomodulatory responses of a DNA vaccine constructed by fusing Treponema pallidum (Tp) glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase (Gpd) to interleukin-2 (IL-2) and using chitosan (CS) nanoparticles as vectors were investigated. New Zealand white rabbits were immunized by intramuscular inoculation of control DNAs, Tp Gpd DNA vaccine, or Gpd-IL-2 fusion DNA vaccine, which were vectored by CS nanoparticles. Levels of the anti-Gpd antibodies and levels of IL-2 and interferon-? in rabbits were increased upon inoculation of Gpd-IL-2 fusion DNA vaccine, when compared with the inoculation with Gpd DNA vaccine, with CS vectoring increasing the effects. The Gpd-IL-2 fusion DNA vaccine efficiently enhanced the antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferative response. When the rabbits were challenged intradermally with 10(5) Tp (Nichols) spirochetes, the Gpd-IL-2 fusion DNA vaccine conferred better protection than the Gpd DNA vaccine (P < 0.05), as characterized by lower detectable amounts of dark field positive lesions (17.5%), lower ulcerative lesion scores (15%), and faster recovery. Individuals treated with the Tp Gpd-IL-2 fusion DNA vaccine vectored by CS nanoparticles had the lowest amounts of dark field positive lesions (10%) and ulcerations (5%) observed and the fastest recovery (42 days). These results indicate that the Gpd-IL-2 fusion DNA vaccine vectored by CS nanoparticles can efficiently induce Th1-dominant immune responses, improve protective efficacy against Tp spirochete infection, and effectively attenuate development of syphilitic lesions. PMID:22260167

  6. Anxiolytic effect of neurotensin microinjection into the ventral pallidum.

    PubMed

    Ollmann, Tamás; Péczely, László; László, Kristóf; Kovács, Anita; Gálosi, Rita; Kertes, Erika; Kállai, Veronika; Zagorácz, Olga; Karádi, Zoltán; Lénárd, László

    2015-11-01

    Neurotensin (NT) acts as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in the central nervous system. NT is involved in reward and memory processes, drug addiction and also in the regulation of anxiety. The ventral pallidum (VP) receives neurotensinergic innervation from the ventral striatopallidal pathway originating from the nucleus accumbens. Positive reinforcing effects of NT in the VP had been shown recently, however the possible effects of NT on anxiety have not been examined yet. In our present experiments, the effects of NT on anxiety were investigated in the VP. In male Wistar rats bilateral microinjections of 100 ng or 250 ng NT were delivered in the volume of 0.4 ?l into the VP, and elevated plus maze (EPM) test was performed. In another groups of animals, 35 ng NT-receptor 1 (NTR1) antagonist SR 48,692 was applied by itself, or microinjected 15 min before 100 ng NT treatment. Open field test (OPF) was also conducted. The 100 ng dose of NT had anxiolytic effect, but the 250 ng NT did not influence anxiety. The antagonist pretreatment inhibited the effect of NT, while the antagonist itself had no effect. In the OPF test there was no difference among the groups. Our present results show that microinjection of NT into the VP induces anxiolytic effect, which is specific to the NTR1 receptors because it can be eliminated by a specific NTR1 antagonist. It is also substantiated that neither the NT, nor the NTR1 antagonist in the VP influences locomotor activity. PMID:26296669

  7. Neurochemical modulation of ingestive behavior in the ventral pallidum.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Tsuyoshi; Imaoka, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2006-03-01

    The nucleus accumbens and its related circuitry have been shown to play an important role in promoting the intake of hedonically desirable food. A previous report has demonstrated that the blockade of GABAA receptors in the ventral pallidum (VP), a target of GABAergic projection from the nucleus accumbens, greatly increases food, but not water, intake in satiated rats [Stratford et al. (1999)Brain Research, 825, 199-203]. The present study examined which neurotransmission in the VP is specifically involved in the intake of normally preferred taste stimuli. Microinjections of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline selectively increased the intake of saccharin solution but not that of water and quinine solution in water-deprived rats. In contrast, the facilitation of GABAA receptors by microinjections of muscimol in the VP generally suppressed the intake of saccharin, water and quinine. The same injections induced strong aversive taste reactivity responses to oral stimulation with not only quinine but also water and saccharin. The local administration of D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Glyol5-enkephalin, a selective micro-opioid receptor agonist, into the VP had time-dependent effects, decreasing saccharine intake early and increasing intake late. Microinjections of SCH-23390, a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, in the VP suppressed the intake of saccharin but not water or quinine. Microinjections of sulpiride, the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, the AMPA/kainate glutamate receptor antagonist, had no effect on fluid intake. These results reveal that GABA, opioid and D1 receptors in the VP are involved in the consumption of hedonically positive taste stimuli. PMID:16553623

  8. Susceptibility of Treponema pallidum to the toxic products of oxygen reduction and the non-treponemal nature of its catalase.

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, B; Wong, G H; Graves, S

    1984-01-01

    We examined the sensitivity of Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) to toxic products of oxygen reduction. T pallidum was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide at concentrations similar to those to which obligate anaerobes are sensitive. Accelerated death of T pallidum occurred at hydrogen peroxide concentrations below 50 mumol/l. Agents protective against hydrogen peroxide and the hydroxyl free radical (catalase, peroxidase, and mannitol) significantly enhanced treponemal survival in vitro under all three conditions of aerobiosis tested--that is, air, 3% oxygen, and 3% oxygen in conjunction with a reduced medium. Superoxide dismutase (which provides protection against superoxide radicals) did not enhance treponemal survival in normal media. When superoxide radicals were generated in the medium by means of a xanthine and xanthine oxidase system, however, the enzyme did protect T pallidum. A possible toxic involvement of singlet oxygen was also indicated by enhanced treponemal survival in air in the presence of histidine. Extracts of T pallidum from infected rabbit testes showed catalase activity which, on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had the same relative mobility as purified rabbit catalase. The treponemal catalase activity was neutralised by anti rabbit catalase antiserum (raised in guinea pigs). This confirmed that the catalase was of rabbit origin and not an endogenous enzyme of T pallidum. We discuss the relation of these results to the obligate parasitism of T pallidum. Images PMID:6421449

  9. CpG adjuvant enhances the mucosal immunogenicity and efficacy of a Treponema pallidum DNA vaccine in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Feijun; Liu, Shuangquan; Zhang, Xiaohong; Yu, Jian; Zeng, Tiebing; Gu, Weiming; Cao, Xunyu; Chen, Xi; Wu, Yimou

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The protective response against Treponema pallidum (Tp) infection of a DNA vaccine enhanced by an adjuvant CpG ODN was investigated. Results: The mucosal adjuvant CpG ODN enhanced the production of higher levels of anti-TpGpd antibodies induced by pcD/Gpd-IL-2 in rabbits. It also resulted in higher levels of secretion of IL-2 and IFN-?, and facilitated T cell proliferation and differentiation (p < 0.05). No significant difference about testing index above-mentioned was found in the intranasal immunization group of pcD/Gpd-IL-2 vaccine adjuvanted by CpG ODN when compared with the immunization by pcD/Gpd-IL-2 vaccine intramuscular injection alone (p > 0.05). Furthermore, CpG ODN stimulated the production of mucosa-specific anti-sIgA antibodies and resulted in the lowest Tp-positive rate (6.7%) for Tp-infection of skin lesions and the lowest rates (8.3%) of ulceration lesions, thus achieving better protective effects. Methods: New Zealand rabbits were immunized with the eukaryotic vector encoding recombinant pcD/Gpd-IL-2 using intramuscular multi-injection or together with mucosal enhancement via a nasal route. The effect of the mucosal adjuvant CpG ODN was examined. Conclusions:The CpG ODN adjuvant significantly enhances the humoral and cellular immune effects of the immunization by pcD/Gpd-IL-2 with mucosal enhancement via nasal route. It also stimulates strong mucosal immune effects, thus initiating more efficient immune-protective effects. PMID:23563515

  10. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  20. Evaluation of the Recombinant Protein TpF1 of Treponema pallidum for Serodiagnosis of Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chuanhao; Zhao, Feijun; Xiao, Jinhong; Zeng, Tiebing; Yu, Jian; Ma, Xiaohua; Wu, Haiying

    2013-01-01

    Syphilis is a chronic infection caused by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, and diagnosis with sensitive and specific methods is a challenging process that is important for its prevention and treatment. In the present study, we established a recombinant protein TpF1-based indirect immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a Western blot assay for human and rabbit sera. The 20-kDa recombinant protein TpF1 was detected by Western blotting performed with sera from rabbits immunized with recombinant TpF1 and infected with the T. pallidum Nichols strain and T. pallidum clinical isolates but was not detected by Western blotting with sera from uninfected rabbits. The sensitivity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from individuals with primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis (n = 82). The specificity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from uninfected controls (n = 30) and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections, including Lyme disease (n = 30) and leptospirosis (n = 5). The sensitivities of TpF1-based ELISAs were 93.3%, 100%, 100%, and 100% for primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis, respectively, and the specificities were all 100% for sera from uninfected controls and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections. In Western blot assays, the sensitivities and specificities of TpF1 for human sera were all 100%. The reactivities of TpF1 with syphilitic sera were proportional to the titers of the T. pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) assay. These data indicate that the recombinant protein TpF1 is a highly immunogenic protein in human and rabbit infections and a promising marker for the screening of syphilis. PMID:23945159

  1. Evaluation of the recombinant protein TpF1 of Treponema pallidum for serodiagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chuanhao; Zhao, Feijun; Xiao, Jinhong; Zeng, Tiebing; Yu, Jian; Ma, Xiaohua; Wu, Haiying; Wu, Yimou

    2013-10-01

    Syphilis is a chronic infection caused by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, and diagnosis with sensitive and specific methods is a challenging process that is important for its prevention and treatment. In the present study, we established a recombinant protein TpF1-based indirect immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a Western blot assay for human and rabbit sera. The 20-kDa recombinant protein TpF1 was detected by Western blotting performed with sera from rabbits immunized with recombinant TpF1 and infected with the T. pallidum Nichols strain and T. pallidum clinical isolates but was not detected by Western blotting with sera from uninfected rabbits. The sensitivity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from individuals with primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis (n = 82). The specificity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from uninfected controls (n = 30) and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections, including Lyme disease (n = 30) and leptospirosis (n = 5). The sensitivities of TpF1-based ELISAs were 93.3%, 100%, 100%, and 100% for primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis, respectively, and the specificities were all 100% for sera from uninfected controls and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections. In Western blot assays, the sensitivities and specificities of TpF1 for human sera were all 100%. The reactivities of TpF1 with syphilitic sera were proportional to the titers of the T. pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) assay. These data indicate that the recombinant protein TpF1 is a highly immunogenic protein in human and rabbit infections and a promising marker for the screening of syphilis. PMID:23945159

  2. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePLUS

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked to an increased risk ...

  3. Cryo-electron tomography elucidates the molecular architecture of Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete.

    PubMed

    Izard, Jacques; Renken, Christian; Hsieh, Chyong-Ere; Desrosiers, Daniel C; Dunham-Ems, Star; La Vake, Carson; Gebhardt, Linda L; Limberger, Ronald J; Cox, David L; Marko, Michael; Radolf, Justin D

    2009-12-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) was used to examine the native cellular organization of Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete. T. pallidum cells appeared to form flat waves, did not contain an outer coat and, except for bulges over the basal bodies and widening in the vicinity of flagellar filaments, displayed a uniform periplasmic space. Although the outer membrane (OM) generally was smooth in contour, OM extrusions and blebs frequently were observed, highlighting the structure's fluidity and lack of attachment to underlying periplasmic constituents. Cytoplasmic filaments converged from their attachment points opposite the basal bodies to form arrays that ran roughly parallel to the flagellar filaments along the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane (CM). Motile treponemes stably attached to rabbit epithelial cells predominantly via their tips. CET revealed that T. pallidum cell ends have a complex morphology and assume at least four distinct morphotypes. Images of dividing treponemes and organisms shedding cell envelope-derived blebs provided evidence for the spirochete's complex membrane biology. In the regions without flagellar filaments, peptidoglycan (PG) was visualized as a thin layer that divided the periplasmic space into zones of higher and lower electron densities adjacent to the CM and OM, respectively. Flagellar filaments were observed overlying the PG layer, while image modeling placed the PG-basal body contact site in the vicinity of the stator-P-collar junction. Bioinformatics and homology modeling indicated that the MotB proteins of T. pallidum, Treponema denticola, and Borrelia burgdorferi have membrane topologies and PG binding sites highly similar to those of their well-characterized Escherichia coli and Helicobacter pylori orthologs. Collectively, our results help to clarify fundamental differences in cell envelope ultrastructure between spirochetes and gram-negative bacteria. They also confirm that PG stabilizes the flagellar motor and enable us to propose that in most spirochetes motility results from rotation of the flagellar filaments against the PG. PMID:19820083

  4. Selective response of lymphocytes from Treponema pallidum-infected rabbits to mitogens and Treponema reiteri.

    PubMed Central

    Pavia, C S; Baseman, J B; Folds, J D

    1977-01-01

    The in vitro response of peripheral blood lymphocytes from rabbit infected with Treponema pallidum was examined using various mitogens and avirulent Treponema reiteri. For the first 4 weeks after treponemal infection, the response of lymphocytes from syphilitic rabbits to phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen was markedly reduced in comparison to uninfected controls. Lymphocytes from both groups of rabbits responded normally to class-specific immunoglobulin anti-sera (anti-immunoglobulin M and anti-immunoglobulin G) and T. reiteri. PMID:300359

  5. Dermal inflammation elicited by synthetic analogs of Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi lipoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Norgard, M V; Riley, B S; Richardson, J A; Radolf, J D

    1995-01-01

    The membrane lipoproteins of Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi have potent immunostimulatory properties in vitro, implicating them as major inflammatory mediators in syphilis and Lyme disease. Recently, we reported that synthetic lipohexapeptide analogs (lipopeptides) of the lipoproteins could be used as surrogates for native spirochetal lipoproteins in immune cell activation studies in vitro. The present study was designed to evaluate the inflammatory properties of the lipopeptides in vivo and to correlate the cellular responses to these synthetic analogs with the histopathology of syphilis and Lyme disease. Lipopeptides corresponding to the 47-kDa major membrane lipoprotein of T. pallidum and the outer surface protein A of B. burgdorferi injected intradermally induced dose-dependent dermal inflammation in mice; the initial predominantly neutrophilic (mice) or heterophilic (rabbits) cellular infiltrates were followed by infiltrates consisting predominantly of mononuclear cells. The intradermal response of rabbits to the 47-kDa lipopeptide was strikingly similar to that observed for animals infected intradermally with T. pallidum. In all cases, lipopolysaccharide was substantially more potent as an inflammatory mediator than the spirochetal lipopeptides. In contrast to the lipopeptides, nonacylated hexapeptides elicited minimal or no dermal lesions in mice or rabbits, underscoring the importance of acyl modification to the inflammatory properties of the lipopeptides. This study provides the first in vivo evidence that the spirochetal lipoproteins/lipopeptides contribute to the immunopathogenesis of syphilis and Lyme disease. PMID:7890417

  6. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  7. Identification and characterization of the Treponema pallidum tpn50 gene, an ompA homolog.

    PubMed Central

    Hardham, J M; Stamm, L V

    1994-01-01

    Treponema pallidum is a pathogenic spirochete that has no known genetic exchange mechanisms. In order to identify treponemal genes encoding surface and secreted proteins, we carried out TnphoA mutagenesis of a T. pallidum genomic DNA library in Escherichia coli. Several of the resulting clones expressed enzymatically active T. pallidum-alkaline phosphatase fusion proteins. The DNA sequence of the 5' portion of a number of the treponemal genes was obtained and analyzed. A recombinant clone harboring plasmid p4A2 that encoded a treponemal protein with an approximate molecular mass of 50,000 Da was identified. Plasmid p4A2 contained an open reading frame of 1,251 nucleotides that resulted in a predicted protein of 417 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 47,582 Da. We have named this gene tpn50 in accordance with the current nomenclature for T. pallidum genes. A 1.9-kb HincII-ClaI fragment from p4A2 that contained the tpn50 gene was subcloned to produce p4A2HC2. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence of TpN50 with protein sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information data base indicated statistically significant homology to the Pseudomonas sp. OprF, E. coli OmpA, Bordetella avium OmpA, Neisseria meningitidis RmpM, Neisseria gonorrhoeae PIII, Haemophilus influenzae P6, E. coli PAL, and Legionella pneumophila PAL proteins. These proteins are all members of a family of outer membrane proteins that are present in gram-negative bacteria. The tpn50 gene complemented E. coli ompA mutations on the basis of two separate criteria. First, morphometry and electron microscopy data showed that E. coli C386 (ompA lpp) cells harboring plasmid vector pEBH21 were rounded while cells of the same strain harboring p4A2HC2 (TpN50+), pWW2200 (OprF+), or pRD87 (OmpA+) were rod shaped. Second, E. coli BRE51 (MC4100 delta sulA-ompA) cells harboring pEBH21 grew poorly at 42 degrees C in minimal medium, while the growth of BRE51 cells harboring p4A2HC2 was similar to that of the parental MC4100 cells. These results demonstrate that the TpN50 protein is functionally equivalent to the E. coli OmpA protein. If TpN50 functions in a similar fashion in T. pallidum, then it may be localized to the treponemal outer membrane. Images PMID:8112835

  8. Antibody validation

    PubMed Central

    Bordeaux, Jennifer; Welsh, Allison W.; Agarwal, Seema; Killiam, Elizabeth; Baquero, Maria T.; Hanna, Jason A.; Anagnostou, Valsamo K.; Rimm, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are among the most frequently used tools in basic science research and in clinical assays, but there are no universally accepted guidelines or standardized methods for determining the validity of these reagents. Furthermore, for commercially available antibodies, it is clear that what is on the label does not necessarily correspond to what is in the tube. To validate an antibody, it must be shown to be specific, selective, and reproducible in the context for which it is to be used. In this review, we highlight the common pitfalls when working with antibodies, common practices for validating antibodies, and levels of commercial antibody validation for seven vendors. Finally, we share our algorithm for antibody validation for immunohistochemistry and quantitative immunofluorescence. PMID:20359301

  9. Macrolide treatment failure in a case of secondary syphilis: a novel A2059G mutation in the 23S rRNA gene of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Matejková, Petra; Flasarová, Magdalena; Zákoucká, Hana; Borek, Milan; Kremenová, Sona; Arenberger, Petr; Woznicová, Vladana; Weinstock, George M; Smajs, David

    2009-06-01

    We report an occurrence of treatment failure after oral spiramycin therapy in a man with secondary syphilis and a reported penicillin and tetracycline allergy. Molecular detection revealed treponemal DNA in the blood of the patient and sequencing of the 23S rDNA identified an A to G transition at the gene position corresponding to position 2059 in the Escherichia coli 23S rRNA gene. The occurrence of this novel 23S rDNA mutation was examined among 7 rabbit-propagated syphilitic strains of Treponema pallidum and among 22 syphilis patient isolates from the Czech Republic. The prevalence of A2058G and A2059G mutations among clinical specimens was 18.2 and 18.2 %, respectively. PMID:19429763

  10. Resequencing of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum Strains Nichols and SS14: Correction of Sequencing Errors Resulted in Increased Separation of Syphilis Treponeme Subclusters

    PubMed Central

    Strouhal, Michal; ?ejková, Darina; Zobaníková, Marie; Mikalová, Lenka; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M.; Šmajs, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum (TPA), the causative agent of syphilis, is a highly clonal bacterium showing minimal genetic variability in the genome sequence of individual strains. Nevertheless, genetically characterized syphilis strains can be clearly divided into two groups, Nichols-like strains and SS14-like strains. TPA Nichols and SS14 strains were completely sequenced in 1998 and 2008, respectively. Since publication of their complete genome sequences, a number of sequencing errors in each genome have been reported. Therefore, we have resequenced TPA Nichols and SS14 strains using next-generation sequencing techniques. Methodology/Principal Findings The genomes of TPA strains Nichols and SS14 were resequenced using the 454 and Illumina sequencing methods that have a combined average coverage higher than 90x. In the TPA strain Nichols genome, 134 errors were identified (25 substitutions and 109 indels), and 102 of them affected protein sequences. In the TPA SS14 genome, a total of 191 errors were identified (85 substitutions and 106 indels) and 136 of them affected protein sequences. A set of new intrastrain heterogenic regions in the TPA SS14 genome were identified including the tprD gene, where both tprD and tprD2 alleles were found. The resequenced genomes of both TPA Nichols and SS14 strains clustered more closely with related strains (i.e. strains belonging to same syphilis treponeme subcluster). At the same time, groups of Nichols-like and SS14-like strains were found to be more distantly related. Conclusion/Significance We identified errors in 11.5% of all annotated genes and, after correction, we found a significant impact on the predicted proteomes of both Nichols and SS14 strains. Corrections of these errors resulted in protein elongations, truncations, fusions and indels in more than 11% of all annotated proteins. Moreover, it became more evident that syphilis is caused by treponemes belonging to two separate genetic subclusters. PMID:24058545

  11. Evidence that TP_0144 of Treponema pallidum Is a Thiamine-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Jiang; Tu, Youbin; Wang, Song-Mei; Wang, Xuan-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), the biologically active form of thiamine (also known as vitamin B1), is an essential cofactor for several important enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, and therefore, it is required for all living organisms. We recently found that a thiamine-binding protein (TDE_0143) is essential for the survival of Treponema denticola, an important bacterial pathogen that is associated with human periodontitis. In this report, we provide experimental evidence showing that TP_0144, a homolog of TDE_0143 from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum, is a thiamine-binding protein that has biochemical features and functions that are similar to those of TDE_0143. First, structural modeling analysis reveal that both TDE_0143 and TP_0144 contain a conserved TPP-binding site and share similar structures to the thiamine-binding protein of Escherichia coli. Second, biochemical analysis shows that these two proteins bind to TPP with similar dissociation constant (Kd) values (TDE_0143, Kd of 36.50 nM; TP_0144, Kd of 32.62 nM). Finally, heterologous expression of TP_0144 in a ?TDE_0143 strain, a previously constructed TDE_0143 mutant of T. denticola, fully restores its growth and TPP uptake when exogenous thiamine is limited. Collectively, these results indicate that TP_0144 is a thiamine-binding protein that is indispensable for T. pallidum to acquire exogenous thiamine, a key nutrient for bacterial survival. In addition, the studies shown in this report further underscore the feasibility of using T. denticola as a platform to study the biology and pathogenicity of T. pallidum and probably other uncultivable treponemal species as well. PMID:25605310

  12. [Biological activity of lipids and photosynthetic pigments of Sargassum pallidum C. Agardh].

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, N I; Martyias, E A; Logvinov, S V; Busarova, N G

    2014-01-01

    The biological activity of lipids and photosynthetic pigments of the kelp Sargassum pallidum (Turner) C. Agardh has been studied. Free fatty acids and their esters demonstrated considerable antimicrobial activity against bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus[ital] and Escherichia coli), yeast-like fungi (Candida albicans), and opportunistic pathogenic (Aspergilius niger) and phytopathogenic (Fusarium oxysporum, and Septoria glycines) fungi. Glyceroglycolipids and neutral lipids demonstrated moderate activity. Fucoxanthin and chlorophylls weakly suppressed the growth of microorganisms. None of the studied substances demonstrated activity against Ehrlich's carcinoma. It was shown that the season of weed harvesting affected both antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of different lipids due to changes in their fatty acid composition. PMID:25272757

  13. A synthetic lymph node containing inactivated Treponema pallidum cells elicits strong, antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Lola V; Drapp, Rebecca L

    2014-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the use of a synthetic lymph node (SLN) for delivery of Treponema pallidum (Tp) antigens. Immune responses of C57BL/6 mice were analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after SLN implantation. Group 1 mice received SLN with no antigen; Group 2, SLN with formalin-inactivated Tp (f-Tp); and Group 3, SLN with f-Tp plus a CpG oligodeoxynucleotide. When tested by ELISA, sera from Group 2 and Group 3 mice showed stronger IgG antibody reactivity than sera from Group 1 mice to sonicates of f-Tp or untreated Tp, but not to sonicate of normal rabbit testicular extract at all times. The IgG1 level was higher than IgG2c level for Group 2 mice at all times and for Group 3 mice at 4 and 8 weeks. IgG1 and IgG2c levels were nearly equivalent for Group 3 mice at 12 weeks. Immunoblotting showed that IgG from Group 2 and Group 3 mice recognized several Tp proteins at all times. Supernatants of splenocytes from Group 2 and Group 3 mice contained significantly more IFN? than those from Group 1 mice after stimulation with f-Tp at all times. A significant level of IL-4 was not detected in any supernatants. These data show that strong humoral and cellular immune responses to Tp can be elicited via a SLN. PMID:24106125

  14. Structural, bioinformatic, and in vivo analyses of two Treponema pallidum lipoproteins reveal a unique TRAP transporter

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Goldberg, Martin; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, is predicted to encode one tripartite ATP- independent periplasmic transporter (TRAP-T). TRAP-Ts typically employ a periplasmic substrate-binding protein (SBP) to deliver the cognate ligand to the transmembrane symporter. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes encoding the putative TRAP-T components from T. pallidum, tp0957 (the SBP) and tp0958 (the symporter) are in an operon with an uncharacterized third gene, tp0956. We determined the crystal structure of recombinant Tp0956; the protein is trimeric and perforated by a pore. Part of Tp0956 forms an assembly similar to those of “tetratricopeptide repeat” (TPR) motifs. The crystal structure of recombinant Tp0957 was also determined; like the SBPs of other TRAP-Ts, there are two lobes separated by a cleft. In these other SBPs, the cleft binds a negatively charged ligand. However, the cleft of Tp0957 has a strikingly hydrophobic chemical composition, indicating that its ligand may be substantially different and likely hydrophobic. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the recombinant versions of Tp0956 and Tp0957 established that these proteins associate avidly. This unprecedented interaction was confirmed for the native molecules using in vivo cross-linking experiments. Finally, bioinformatic analyses suggested that this transporter exemplifies a new subfamily of TPR-protein associated TRAP transporters (TPATs) that require the action of a TPR-containing accessory protein for the periplasmic transport of a potentially hydrophobic ligand(s). PMID:22306465

  15. Structural, Bioinformatic, and In Vivo Analyses of Two Treponema pallidum Lipoproteins Reveal a Unique TRAP Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Goldberg, Martin; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-05-25

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, is predicted to encode one tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter (TRAP-T). TRAP-Ts typically employ a periplasmic substrate-binding protein (SBP) to deliver the cognate ligand to the transmembrane symporter. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes encoding the putative TRAP-T components from T. pallidum, tp0957 (the SBP), and tp0958 (the symporter), are in an operon with an uncharacterized third gene, tp0956. We determined the crystal structure of recombinant Tp0956; the protein is trimeric and perforated by a pore. Part of Tp0956 forms an assembly similar to those of 'tetratricopeptide repeat' (TPR) motifs. The crystal structure of recombinant Tp0957 was also determined; like the SBPs of other TRAP-Ts, there are two lobes separated by a cleft. In these other SBPs, the cleft binds a negatively charged ligand. However, the cleft of Tp0957 has a strikingly hydrophobic chemical composition, indicating that its ligand may be substantially different and likely hydrophobic. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the recombinant versions of Tp0956 and Tp0957 established that these proteins associate avidly. This unprecedented interaction was confirmed for the native molecules using in vivo cross-linking experiments. Finally, bioinformatic analyses suggested that this transporter exemplifies a new subfamily of TPATs (TPR-protein-associated TRAP-Ts) that require the action of a TPR-containing accessory protein for the periplasmic transport of a potentially hydrophobic ligand(s).

  16. Comparison of the locomotor activating effects of bicuculline infusions into the preoptic area and ventral pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Zahm, Daniel S.; Schwartz, Zachary M.; Lavezzi, Heather N.; Yetnikoff, Leora; Parsley, Kenneth P.

    2013-01-01

    Ambulatory locomotion in the rodent is robustly activated by unilateral infusions into the basal forebrain of type A gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor antagonists, such as bicuculline and picrotoxin. The present study was carried out to better localize the neuroanatomical substrate(s) underlying this effect. To accomplish this, differences in total locomotion accumulated during a 20 minute test period following bicuculline versus saline infusions in male Sprague-Dawley rats were calculated, rank ordered and mapped on a diagram of basal forebrain transposed from immunoprocessed sections. The most robust locomotor activation was elicited by bicuculline infusions clustered in rostral parts of the preoptic area. Unilateral infusions of bicuculline into the ventral pallidum produced an unanticipatedly diminutive activation of locomotion, which led us to evaluate bilateral ventral pallidal infusions, and these also produced only a small activation of locomotion, and, interestingly, a non-significant trend toward suppression of rearing. Subjects with bicuculline infused bilaterally into the ventral pallidum also exhibited persistent bouts of abnormal movements. Bicuculline infused unilaterally into other forebrain structures, including the bed nucleus of stria terminalis, caudate-putamen, globus pallidus, sublenticular extended amygdala and sublenticular substantia innominata, did not produce significant locomotor activation. Our data identify the rostral preoptic area as the main substrate for the locomotor activating effects of basal forebrain bicuculline infusions. In contrast, slight activation of locomotion and no effect on rearing accompanied unilateral and bilateral ventral pallidal infusions. Implications of these findings for forebrain processing of reward are discussed. PMID:23423460

  17. Designer Receptors Show Role for Ventral Pallidum Input to Ventral Tegmental Area in Cocaine Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Stephen V.; Vazey, Elena M.; Beckley, Jacob T; Keistler, Colby R.; McGlinchey, Ellen M.; Kaufling, Jennifer; Wilson, Steven P.; Deisseroth, Karl; Woodward, John J.; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Ventral pallidum (VP) is centrally positioned within mesocorticolimbic reward circuits, and its dense projection to ventral tegmental area (VTA) regulates neuronal activity there. However, VP is a heterogeneous structure, and how this complexity affects its role within wider reward circuits is unclear. Here we demonstrate that projections to VTA from rostral (RVP), but not caudal VP (CVP) are robustly Fos-activated during cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking—a rat model of relapse in addiction. Moreover, designer receptor-mediated transient inactivation of RVP neurons, their terminals in VTA, or functional connectivity between RVP and VTA dopamine neurons blocks the ability of drug-associated cues (but not a cocaine prime) to reinstate cocaine seeking. In contrast, CVP neuronal inhibition instead blocked cocaine-primed, but not cue-induced reinstatement. This novel double dissociation in VP sub-regional roles in drug seeking is likely important for understanding mesocorticolimbic circuits underlying reward seeking and addiction. PMID:24584054

  18. Role of D1 dopamine receptors of the ventral pallidum in inhibitory avoidance learning.

    PubMed

    Péczely, László; Ollmann, Tamás; László, Kristóf; Kovács, Anita; Gálosi, Rita; Szabó, Ádám; Karádi, Zoltán; Lénárd, László

    2014-08-15

    The mesolimbic dopaminergic system (MLDS) originating from the ventral tegmental area has important role in the regulation of motivation, learning and memory. The ventral pallidum (VP), innervated by the MLDS, is involved in the regulation of adaptive behavior, but its exact role is not known in inhibitory avoidance learning. The VP contains both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors, but the density of the former subtype is more excessive. Therefore, in our present experiments, the role of D1 dopamine receptors of the VP in one trial step-through inhibitory avoidance paradigm was investigated. In the conditioning trial, animals were shocked 3 times with 0.5 mA current for 1s, and subsequently were microinjected bilaterally with D1 dopamine receptor agonist SKF38393 into the VP in three doses (0.1 ?g, 1.0 ?g or 5.0 ?g in 0.4 ?l saline). To clarify whether the agonist effect was specific, we also applied the D1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390 (5.0 ?g in 0.4 ?l saline) 15 min prior the agonist treatment. The D1 dopamine receptor agonist, in a dose-dependent manner, significantly increased the step-through latency during the test trials: retention was significant relative to the controls even after 2 weeks of conditioning. The D1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390 pretreatment eliminated SKF38393 effects in the ventral pallidum. Our results show that D1 dopamine receptor mediated mechanisms in the VP facilitate learning and memory in inhibitory avoidance paradigm and this facilitation is specific because it can be eliminated by D1 dopamine receptor antagonist. PMID:24815313

  19. Recently Added Antibodies

    Cancer.gov

    Reagents Data Portal AntibodiesNCI announces the release of monoclonal antipeptide antibodies from rabbit for distribution on the antibody portal. There are 60 recently added monoclonal antibodies, with 56 generated from mouse and 4 generated from rabbit. Print

  20. Organization of the efferent projections of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus of the midbrain of the dog pallidum.

    PubMed

    Gorbachevskaya, A I; Chivileva, O G

    2006-05-01

    Studies of the pedunculopontinopallidal projections of the dog brain based on the retrograde axonal transport of horseradish peroxidase demonstrated that the compact zone (PPNc) and the lateral area of the diffuse zone (PPNd) of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPN) of the midbrain project to the globus pallidus, entopeduncular nucleus, and ventral pallidum. The medial area of the PPNd, adjacent to the chiasm of the upper cerebellar peduncles and seen in other animals as the mesencephalic extrapyramidal area (MEA), projects only to the globus pallidus. In dogs, this area of the tegmentum is not a major source of projections to the striopallidum, such that it is inappropriate to regard it as a separate structure, comment being restricted to the topical organization of PPNd projections to the pallidum. Projection fibers to pallidal structures arise from both cholinergic and non-cholinergic PPN neurons. PMID:16583172

  1. Immunization with Treponema pallidum outer membrane vesicles induces high-titer complement-dependent treponemicidal activity and aggregation of T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins (TROMPs).

    PubMed

    Blanco, D R; Champion, C I; Lewinski, M A; Shang, E S; Simkins, S G; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether immunization with purified outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from Treponema pallidum (T.p. ) could elicit Abs capable of killing this organism. It is well established that the immunization of rabbits or mice with killed T.p. or with recombinant T.p. Ags has failed to generate serum killing activity comparable with that of infection-derived immunity. Because of the small amount of T.p. OMV obtainable, a single mouse was immunized with purified OMV. The mouse anti-OMV serum and infection-derived immune rabbit serum (IRS) were compared by reactivities on two-dimensional T.p. immunoblots and by the T.p. immobilization test, a complement-dependent killing assay. Whereas IRS detected >40 Ags, the anti-OMV serum identified only 6 Ags corresponding to proteins identified previously in the outer membrane. T.p. immobilization testing showed that IRS had a 100% killing titer of 1:44 and a 50% killing titer of 1:662. By comparison, the mouse anti-OMV serum had a significantly greater 100% killing titer of 1:1,408 and a 50% killing titer of 1:16,896. Absorption of the anti-OMV serum to remove Ab against outer membrane-associated lipoproteins did not change the 100% killing titer. Freeze-fracture analysis of T.p. incubated in IRS or anti-OMV serum showed that T.p. rare membrane-spanning outer membrane proteins were aggregated. This is the first demonstration of high-titer killing Abs resulting from immunization with defined T.p. molecules; our study indicates that the targets for these Abs are T. p. rare outer membrane proteins. PMID:10453016

  2. The general transition metal (Tro) and Zn2+ (Znu) transporters in Treponema pallidum: analysis of metal specificities and expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Desrosiers, Daniel C; Sun, Yong Cheng; Zaidi, Akbar A; Eggers, Christian H; Cox, David L; Radolf, Justin D

    2007-07-01

    Acquisition of transition metals is central to the struggle between a bacterial pathogen and its mammalian host. Previous studies demonstrated that Treponema pallidum encodes a cluster-9 (C9) ABC transporter (troABCD) whose solute-binding protein component (TroA) ligands Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) with essentially equal affinities. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that T. pallidum encodes an additional C9 transporter (tp0034-36) orthologous to Zn(2+)-uptake (Znu) systems in other bacteria; the binding protein component, ZnuA, contains a His-rich tract characteristic of C9 Zn(2+)-binding proteins. Metal analysis and metal-reconstitution studies demonstrated that ZnuA is a Zn(2+)-binding protein; parallel studies confirmed that TroA binds Zn(2+), Mn(2+) and Fe. Circular dichroism showed that ZnuA, but not TroA, undergoes conformational changes in the presence of Zn(2+). Using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we demonstrated that TroA binds Zn(2+) and Mn(2+) with affinities approximately 100-fold greater than those previously reported. ITC analysis revealed that ZnuA contains multiple Zn(2+)-binding sites, two of which are high-affinity and presumed to be located within the binding pocket and His-rich loop. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of tro and znu transcripts combined with immunoblot analysis of TroA and ZnuA confirmed that both transporters are simultaneously expressed in T. pallidum and that TroA is expressed at much greater levels than ZnuA. Collectively, our findings indicate that T. pallidum procures transition metals via the concerted utilization of its general metal (Tro) and Zn(2+) (Znu) transporters. Sequestration of periplasmic Zn(2+) by ZnuA may free up TroA binding capacity for the importation of Fe and Mn(2+). PMID:17581125

  3. Development of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for the Detection of Treponema pallidum, HCV, HIV-1, and HBV.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Gong, Rui; Lu, Xuan; Zhang, Yi; Tang, Jingfeng

    2015-11-20

    Treponema pallidum, hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, and hepatitis B virus (HBV) are major causes of sexually transmitted diseases passed through blood contact. The development of a sensitive and efficient method for detection is critical for early diagnosis and for large-scale screening of blood specimens in China. This study aims to establish an assay to detect these pathogens in clinical serum specimens. We established a TaqMan-locked nucleic acid (LNA) real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for rapid, sensitive, specific, quantitative, and simultaneous detection and identification. The copy numbers of standards of these 4 pathogens were quantified. Standard curves were generated by determining the mean cycle threshold values versus 10-fold serial dilutions of standards over a range of 10(6) to 10(1) copies/?L, with the lowest detection limit of the assay being 10(1) copies/?L. The assay was applied to 328 clinical specimens and compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and commercial nucleic acid testing (NAT) methods. The assay identified 39 T. pallidum-, 96 HCV-, 13 HIV-1-, 123 HBV-, 5 HBV/HCV-, 1 T. pallidum/HBV-, 1 HIV-1/HCV-, and 1 HIV-1/T. pallidum-positive specimens. The high sensitivity of the assay confers strong potential for its use as a highly reliable, cost-effective, and useful molecular diagnostic tool for large-scale screening of clinical specimens. This assay will assist in the study of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of sexually transmitted blood diseases. PMID:25866106

  4. Excessive disgust caused by brain lesions or temporary inactivations: Mapping hotspots of nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chao-Yi; Berridge, Kent C.

    2014-01-01

    Disgust is a prototypical type of negative affect. In animal models of excessive disgust, only a few brain sites are known in which localized dysfunction (lesions or neural inactivations) can induce intense ‘disgust reactions’ (e.g., gapes) to a normally pleasant sensation such as sweetness. Here we aimed to map forebrain candidates more precisely to identify where either local neuronal damage (excitotoxin lesions) or local pharmacological inactivation (muscimol-baclofen microinjections) caused rats to emit excessive sensory disgust reactions to sucrose. Our study compared subregions of nucleus accumbens shell, ventral pallidum, lateral hypothalamus and adjacent extended amygdala. Results indicated the posterior half of ventral pallidum to be the only forebrain site where intense sensory disgust gapes to sucrose were induced by both lesions and temporary inactivations (this site was previously identified as a hedonic hotspot for enhancements of sweetness ‘liking’). By comparison, for the nucleus accumbens, temporary GABA inactivations in the caudal half of the medial shell also generated sensory disgust but lesions never did at any site. Further, even inactivations failed to induce disgust in the rostral half of accumbens shell (which also contains a hedonic hotspot). In other structures, neither lesions nor inactivations induced disgust as long as the posterior ventral pallidum remained spared. We conclude that the posterior ventral pallidum is an especially crucial hotspot for producing excessive sensory disgust by local pharmacological/lesion dysfunction. By comparison, the nucleus accumbens appears to segregate sites for pharmacological disgust induction and hedonic enhancement into separate posterior versus rostral halves of medial shell. PMID:25229197

  5. Antigenic variation in Treponema pallidum: TprK sequence diversity accumulates in response to immune pressure during experimental syphilis.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Molini, Barbara J; Kim, Eric Y; Godornes, B Charmie; Leader, B Troy; Tantalo, Lauren C; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Lukehart, Sheila A

    2010-04-01

    Pathogens that cause chronic infections often employ antigenic variation to evade the immune response and persist in the host. In Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum), the causative agent of syphilis, the TprK Ag undergoes variation of seven V regions (V1-V7) by nonreciprocal recombination of silent donor cassettes with the tprK expression site. These V regions are the targets of the host humoral immune response during experimental infection. The present study addresses the causal role of the acquired immune response in the selection of TprK variants in two ways: 1) by investigating TprK variants arising in immunocompetent versus immunosuppressed hosts; and 2) by investigating the effect of prior specific immunization on selection of TprK variants during infection. V region diversity, particularly in V6, accumulates more rapidly in immunocompetent rabbits than in pharmacologically immunosuppressed rabbits (treated with weekly injections of methylprednisolone acetate). In a complementary experiment, rabbits preimmunized with V6 region synthetic peptides had more rapid accumulation of V6 variant treponemes than control rabbits. These studies demonstrate that the host immune response selects against specific TprK epitopes expressed on T. pallidum, resulting in immune selection of new TprK variants during infection, confirming a role for antigenic variation in syphilis. PMID:20190145

  6. Recombinant Treponema pallidum Protein Tp0965 Activates Endothelial Cells and Increases the Permeability of Endothelial Cell Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui-Li; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Wang, Qian-Qiu

    2014-01-01

    The recombinant Treponema pallidum protein Tp0965 (rTp0965), one of the many proteins derived from the genome of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, shows strong immunogenicity and immunoreactivity. In this study, we investigated the effects of rTp0965 on the endothelial barrier. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with rTp0965 resulted in increased levels of ICAM-1, E-selectin, and MCP-1 mRNA and protein expression. These increases contributed to the adhesion and chemataxis of monocytes (THP-1 cells) to HUVECs preincubated with rTp0965. In addition, rTp0965 induced reorganization of F-actin and decreased expression of claudin-1 in HUVECs. Interestingly, inhibition of the RhoA/ROCK signal pathway protected against rTp0965-induced higher endothelial permeability as well as transendothelial migration of monocytes. These data indicate that Tp0965 protein may play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of syphilis. PMID:25514584

  7. The time-dependent clearance of virulent Treponema pallidum in susceptible and resistant strains of guinea pigs is significantly different.

    PubMed

    Wicher, V; Wicher, K; Abbruscato, F; Auger, I; Rudofsky, U

    1999-04-01

    The kinetics of clearance of Treponema pallidum spp. pallidum Nichols from skin and testes of susceptible C4-deficient (C4D) and -resistant Albany (Alb) strains of guinea pigs (gps) was evaluated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the rabbit infectivity test (RIT). For each strain there were two groups of animals, one infected with virulent T. pallidum (TP) and one control injected with heat-killed treponemes (HKTP). The kinetic studies and their statistical analysis showed that in the C4D strain the microbial clearance in both tissues was significantly slower (p < 0.005) and still incomplete at 3 months after infection. In the Alb strain the clearance was faster and apparently completed within a month. A greater permissiveness in bacterial growth in C4D compared to Alb appears to be one critical factor determining the different rate of local elimination after primary infection. In both strains there was some correlation between the severity and duration of cutaneous lesions and the local persistence of viable organisms. This correlation was not observed in testes. These studies suggest a genetic basis for the strain-specific susceptibility and resistance phenotypes in the pathogenesis of syphilis. PMID:10219257

  8. Treponema pallidum (syphilis) antigen TpF1 induces angiogenesis through the activation of the IL-8 pathway.

    PubMed

    Pozzobon, Tommaso; Facchinello, Nicola; Bossi, Fleur; Capitani, Nagaja; Benagiano, Marisa; Di Benedetto, Giulietta; Zennaro, Cristina; West, Nicole; Codolo, Gaia; Bernardini, Marialina; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Pellegrini, Luca; Argenton, Francesco; de Bernard, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Over 10 million people every year become infected by Treponema pallidum and develop syphilis, a disease with broad symptomatology that, due to the difficulty to eradicate the pathogen from the highly vascularized secondary sites of infection, is still treated with injections of penicillin. Unlike most other bacterial pathogens, T. pallidum infection produces indeed a strong angiogenic response whose mechanism of activation, however, remains unknown. Here, we report that one of the major antigen of T. pallidum, the TpF1 protein, has growth factor-like activity on primary cultures of human endothelial cells and activates specific T cells able to promote tissue factor production. The growth factor-like activity is mediated by the secretion of IL-8 but not of VEGF, two known angiogenic factors. The pathogen's factor signals IL-8 secretion through the activation of the CREB/NF-?B signalling pathway. These findings are recapitulated in an animal model, zebrafish, where we observed that TpF1 injection stimulates angiogenesis and IL-8, but not VEGF, secretion. This study suggests that the angiogenic response observed during secondary syphilis is triggered by TpF1 and that pharmacological therapies directed to inhibit IL-8 response in patients should be explored to treat this disease. PMID:26728351

  9. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  10. Positive reinforcing effect of neurotensin microinjection into the ventral pallidum in conditioned place preference test.

    PubMed

    Ollmann, Tamás; Péczely, László; László, Kristóf; Kovács, Anita; Gálosi, Rita; Berente, Eszter; Karádi, Zoltán; Lénárd, László

    2015-02-01

    The ventral pallidum (VP) is innervated by the mesolimbic dopaminergic system and it has a key role in motivation, reward, and memory processes. Neurotensin (NT) is an important neuromodulator which has been shown to modulate reinforcement in the ventral tegmental area, in the ventral mesencephalic region and in the central nucleus of amygdala. Neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR1) has already been detected in the VP in abundance, but its role in rewarding and reinforcing processes is not fully understood yet. In our present experiments, the effects of NT on positive reinforcement were investigated in the VP. In conditioned place preference (CPP) test, male Wistar rats were microinjected bilaterally with 100 ng or 250 ng NT in the volume of 0.4 ?l. In other groups of animals, 35 ng NTR1 antagonist SR 48692 was applied by itself, or microinjected 15 min before 100 ng NT treatment. One hundred ng dose of NT induced CPP, whereas animals injected with 250 ng NT did not exhibit significant differences from the vehicle group. Antagonist pretreatment inhibited the effect of NT, while the antagonist applied by itself had no effect. Our results show that NT injected into the VP is involved in positive reinforcement. This effect is specific to NTR1 receptors because the development of CPP can be prevented by specific antagonist. PMID:25447302

  11. A role for the ventral pallidum in context-induced and primed reinstatement of alcohol seeking.

    PubMed

    Perry, Christina J; McNally, Gavan P

    2013-09-01

    The ventral pallidum (VP) is a major target of projections from the nucleus accumbens, and has been implicated in the reinstatement of psychostimulant seeking as part of a cortical-striatal-pallidal 'final common pathway' for relapse. Here, we studied the role of the VP in context-induced and primed reinstatement of alcoholic beer seeking, using a combination of microinjections and tract tracing studies. In experiment 1, rats were trained to respond to alcoholic beer in one context (A), and then extinguished in a second context (B), prior to testing for reinstatement (ABA renewal) and extinction (ABB). VP microinjection of the ?-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist CTAP prevented reinstatement. In experiment 2, VP microinjection of CTAP also prevented the primed reinstatement of alcoholic beer seeking after rats were trained, extinguished, and tested in the same context. In experiment 3, we employed retrograde neural tract tracing together with c-Fos immunohistochemistry to identify the VP afferents recruited during context-induced reinstatement of alcoholic beer seeking. There was evidence for the recruitment of accumbens core?VP, basolateral amygdala?VP and paraventricular thalamus?VP pathways during context-induced reinstatement. These results indicate that the VP MORs are critical for context-induced reinstatement, and that the VP receives inputs from a number of regions known to be important in reinstatement of drug seeking. PMID:23773238

  12. Morphological alterations in the caudate, putamen, pallidum, and thalamus in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Amanmeet; Appel-Cresswell, Silke; Popuri, Karteek; McKeown, Martin J.; Beg, Mirza Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Like many neurodegenerative diseases, the clinical symptoms of Parkinsons disease (PD) do not manifest until significant progression of the disease has already taken place, motivating the need for sensitive biomarkers of the disease. While structural imaging is a potentially attractive method due to its widespread availability and non-invasive nature, global morphometric measures (e.g., volume) have proven insensitive to subtle disease change. Here we use individual surface displacements from deformations of an average surface model to capture disease related changes in shape of the subcortical structures in PD. Data were obtained from both the University of British Columbia (UBC) [n = 54 healthy controls (HC) and n = 55 Parkinsons disease (PD) patients] and the publicly available Parkinsons Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) [n = 137 (HC) and n = 189 (PD)] database. A high dimensional non-rigid registration algorithm was used to register target segmentation labels (caudate, putamen, pallidum, and thalamus) to a set of segmentation labels defined on the average-template. The vertex-wise surface displacements were significantly different between PD and HC in thalamic and caudate structures. However, overall displacements did not correlate with disease severity, as assessed by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). The results from this study suggest disease-relevant shape abnormalities can be robustly detected in subcortical structures in PD. Future studies will be required to determine if shape changes in subcortical structures are seen in the prodromal phases of the disease. PMID:25873854

  13. The sequence of the acidic repeat protein (arp) gene differentiates venereal from nonvenereal Treponema pallidum subspecies, and the gene has evolved under strong positive selection in the subspecies that causes syphilis.

    PubMed

    Harper, Kristin N; Liu, Hsi; Ocampo, Paolo S; Steiner, Bret M; Martin, Amy; Levert, Keith; Wang, Dongxia; Sutton, Madeline; Armelagos, George J

    2008-08-01

    Despite the completion of the Treponema pallidum genome project, only minor genetic differences have been found between the subspecies that cause venereal syphilis (ssp. pallidum) and the nonvenereal diseases yaws (ssp. pertenue) and bejel (ssp. endemicum). In this paper, we describe sequence variation in the arp gene which allows straightforward differentiation of ssp. pallidum from the nonvenereal subspecies. We also present evidence that this region is subject to positive selection in ssp. pallidum, consistent with pressure from the immune system. Finally, the presence of multiple, but distinct, repeat motifs in both ssp. pallidum and Treponema paraluiscuniculi (the pathogen responsible for rabbit syphilis) suggests that a diverse repertoire of repeat motifs is associated with sexual transmission. This study suggests that variations in the number and sequence of repeat motifs in the arp gene have clinical, epidemiological, and evolutionary significance. PMID:18554302

  14. Quantitative analysis of tpr gene expression in Treponema pallidum isolates: Differences among isolates and correlation with T-cell responsiveness in experimental syphilis.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Molini, Barbara; Godornes, Charmie; Barrett, Lynn; Van Voorhis, Wesley; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Lukehart, Sheila A

    2007-01-01

    Transcriptional analysis of the tpr genes in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (referred to here as simply T. pallidum) has been limited to date, and yet the expression of members of this gene family is likely relevant to the pathogenesis of syphilis. Recently, immunological studies and semiquantitative mRNA analysis led to the hypothesis of the modulation of tpr gene transcription during infection and suggested that various strains of T. pallidum might differentially express these genes. In this study we developed a real-time amplification assay to quantify the tpr mRNAs with respect to the 47-kDa lipoprotein message and to compare transcript levels among four different strains of T. pallidum. In addition, we analyzed the lymphocyte responsiveness pattern toward the Tpr antigens in late experimental syphilis to identify tpr genes that had been expressed during the course of infection. The T-cell response has been implicated in clearance of treponemes from early lesions, and some of the Tprs were identified as strong targets of the cellular immune response. We show that message for many of the tpr genes can be detected in treponemes harvested at the peak of early infection. Interestingly, tprK seems to be preferentially expressed in almost every strain, and it is uniformly the target of the strongest cellular immune response. These studies demonstrate the differential expression of certain tpr genes among strains of T. pallidum, and further studies are needed to explore the relationship between tpr gene expression and the clinical course of syphilis in infected individuals. PMID:17030565

  15. Transcription of TP0126, Treponema pallidum Putative OmpW Homolog, Is Regulated by the Length of a Homopolymeric Guanosine Repeat

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Stephanie L.; Ke, Wujian; Reid, Tara B.; Molini, Barbara J.; Iverson-Cabral, Stefanie; Ciccarese, Giulia; Drago, Francesco; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    An effective mechanism for introduction of phenotypic diversity within a bacterial population exploits changes in the length of repetitive DNA elements located within gene promoters. This phenomenon, known as phase variation, causes rapid activation or silencing of gene expression and fosters bacterial adaptation to new or changing environments. Phase variation often occurs in surface-exposed proteins, and in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the syphilis agent, it was reported to affect transcription of three putative outer membrane protein (OMP)-encoding genes. When the T. pallidum subsp. pallidum Nichols strain genome was initially annotated, the TP0126 open reading frame was predicted to include a poly(G) tract and did not appear to have a predicted signal sequence that might suggest the possibility of its being an OMP. Here we show that the initial annotation was incorrect, that this poly(G) is instead located within the TP0126 promoter, and that it varies in length in vivo during experimental syphilis. Additionally, we show that TP0126 transcription is affected by changes in the poly(G) length consistent with regulation by phase variation. In silico analysis of the TP0126 open reading frame based on the experimentally identified transcriptional start site shortens this hypothetical protein by 69 amino acids, reveals a predicted cleavable signal peptide, and suggests structural homology with the OmpW family of porins. Circular dichroism of recombinant TP0126 supports structural homology to OmpW. Together with the evidence that TP0126 is fully conserved among T. pallidum subspecies and strains, these data suggest an important role for TP0126 in T. pallidum biology and syphilis pathogenesis. PMID:25802057

  16. Transcription of TP0126, Treponema pallidum putative OmpW homolog, is regulated by the length of a homopolymeric guanosine repeat.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Brandt, Stephanie L; Ke, Wujian; Reid, Tara B; Molini, Barbara J; Iverson-Cabral, Stefanie; Ciccarese, Giulia; Drago, Francesco; Lukehart, Sheila A; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2015-06-01

    An effective mechanism for introduction of phenotypic diversity within a bacterial population exploits changes in the length of repetitive DNA elements located within gene promoters. This phenomenon, known as phase variation, causes rapid activation or silencing of gene expression and fosters bacterial adaptation to new or changing environments. Phase variation often occurs in surface-exposed proteins, and in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the syphilis agent, it was reported to affect transcription of three putative outer membrane protein (OMP)-encoding genes. When the T. pallidum subsp. pallidum Nichols strain genome was initially annotated, the TP0126 open reading frame was predicted to include a poly(G) tract and did not appear to have a predicted signal sequence that might suggest the possibility of its being an OMP. Here we show that the initial annotation was incorrect, that this poly(G) is instead located within the TP0126 promoter, and that it varies in length in vivo during experimental syphilis. Additionally, we show that TP0126 transcription is affected by changes in the poly(G) length consistent with regulation by phase variation. In silico analysis of the TP0126 open reading frame based on the experimentally identified transcriptional start site shortens this hypothetical protein by 69 amino acids, reveals a predicted cleavable signal peptide, and suggests structural homology with the OmpW family of porins. Circular dichroism of recombinant TP0126 supports structural homology to OmpW. Together with the evidence that TP0126 is fully conserved among T. pallidum subspecies and strains, these data suggest an important role for TP0126 in T. pallidum biology and syphilis pathogenesis. PMID:25802057

  17. Seroprevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and Treponema pallidum Infections among Blood Donors on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang-Tao; Eyi, Urbano Monsuy; Matesa, Rocio Apicante; Obono, Maximo Miko Ondo; Ehapo, Carlos Sala; Yang, Li-Ye; Yang, Hui; Yang, Hui-Tian; Lin, Min

    2015-01-01

    Background Regular screening of transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs), such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus (HBV and HCV, respectively), and Treponema pallidum, in blood donors is essential to guaranteeing clinical transfusion safety. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of four TTIs among blood donors on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea (EG). Methods A retrospective survey of blood donors from January 2011 to April 2013 was conducted to assess the presence of HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum. The medical records were analyzed to verify the seroprevalence of these TTIs among blood donations stratified by gender, age and geographical region. Results Of the total 2937 consecutive blood donors, 1098 (37.39%) had a minimum of one TTI and 185 (6.29%) harbored co-infections. The general seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum were 7.83%, 10.01%, 3.71% and 21.51%, respectively. The most frequent TTI co-infections were HBV-T. pallidum 60 (2.04%) and HIV-T. pallidum 46 (1.57%). The seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum were highest among blood donors 38 to 47 years, 18 to 27 years and ? 48 years age, respectively (P<0.05). The seroprevalence of TTIs varied according to the population from which the blood was collected on Bioko Island. Conclusions Our results firstly provide a comprehensive overview of TTIs among blood donors on Bioko Island. Strict screening of blood donors and improved hematological examinations using standard operating procedures are recommended. PMID:26448460

  18. HIV Antibody Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? HIV Antibody Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Screen; HIV Serology Formal name: Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody Test Related tests: p24 Antigen ; HIV Antigen/Antibody ...

  19. Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA) Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA) Fast Facts Autoimmune diseases can be treated. ... juvenile arthritis . How do you test for antinuclear antibodies? There are several methods used to test for ...

  20. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePLUS

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Screen Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Indirect Coombs Test; Indirect Anti-human Globulin Test; Antibody Screen Formal name: Red Blood Cell Antibody Screen ...

  1. Mitochondrial tRNA 5?-Editing in Dictyostelium discoideum and Polysphondylium pallidum*

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Maria G.; Long, Yicheng; Kinchen, R. Dimitri; Schindel, Elinor T.; Gray, Michael W.; Jackman, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) 5?-editing was first described more than 20 years ago; however, the first candidates for 5?-editing enzymes were only recently identified in a eukaryotic microbe (protist), the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. In this organism, eight of 18 mt-tRNAs are predicted to be edited based on the presence of genomically encoded mismatched nucleotides in their aminoacyl-acceptor stem sequences. Here, we demonstrate that mt-tRNA 5?-editing occurs at all predicted sites in D. discoideum as evidenced by changes in the sequences of isolated mt-tRNAs compared with the expected sequences encoded by the mitochondrial genome. We also identify two previously unpredicted editing events in which G-U base pairs are edited in the absence of any other genomically encoded mismatches. A comparison of 5?-editing in D. discoideum with 5?-editing in another slime mold, Polysphondylium pallidum, suggests organism-specific idiosyncrasies in the treatment of U-G/G-U pairs. In vitro activities of putative D. discoideum editing enzymes are consistent with the observed editing reactions and suggest an overall lack of tRNA substrate specificity exhibited by the repair component of the editing enzyme. Although the presence of terminal mismatches in mt-tRNA sequences is highly predictive of the occurrence of mt-tRNA 5?-editing, the variability in treatment of U-G/G-U base pairs observed here indicates that direct experimental evidence of 5?-editing must be obtained to understand the complete spectrum of mt-tRNA editing events in any species. PMID:24737330

  2. Differential roles of ventral pallidum subregions during cocaine self-administration behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Root, David H.; Ma, Sisi; Barker, David J.; Megehee, Laura; Striano, Brendan M.; Ralston, Carla M.; Fabbricatore, Anthony T.; West, Mark O.

    2012-01-01

    The ventral pallidum (VP) is necessary for drug-seeking behavior. VP contains ventromedial (VPvm) and dorsolateral (VPdl) subregions which receive projections from the nucleus accumbens shell and core, respectively. To date, no study has investigated the behavioral functions of the VPdl and VPvm subregions. To address this issue, we investigated whether changes in firing rate (FR) differed between VP subregions during four events: approaching toward, responding on, or retreating away from a cocaine-reinforced operandum, and a cocaine-associated cue. Baseline FR and waveform characteristics did not differ between subregions. VPdl neurons exhibited a greater change in FR compared to VPvm neurons during approaches toward, as well as responses on, the cocaine-reinforced operandum. VPdl neurons were more likely to exhibit a similar change in FR (direction and magnitude) during approach and response than VPvm neurons. In contrast, VPvm firing patterns were heterogeneous, changing FRs during approach or response alone, or both. VP neurons did not discriminate cued behaviors from uncued behaviors. No differences were found between subregions during the retreat and no VP neurons exhibited patterned changes in FR in response to the cocaine-associated cue. The stronger, sustained FR changes of VPdl neurons during approach and response may implicate VPdl in the processing of drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior via projections to subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata. In contrast, heterogeneous firing patterns of VPvm neurons may implicate VPvm in facilitating mesocortical structures with information related to the sequence of behaviors predicting cocaine self-infusions via projections to mediodorsal thalamus and ventral tegmental area. PMID:22806483

  3. Characterization of lymphocyte responsiveness in early experimental syphilis. II. Nature of cellular infiltration and Treponema pallidum distribution in testicular lesions.

    PubMed

    Lukehart, S A; Baker-Zander, S A; Lloyd, R M; Sell, S

    1980-01-01

    The nature of the cellular infiltration and the distribution of Treponema pallidum during rabbit testicular infection were examined by immunofluorescence and light microscopy. Low numbers of treponemes are demonstrable in the perivascular regions on day 3 post-infection. On days 6, 10, and 13, large numbers of organisms are found in the interstitial spaces. The treponemes do not appear to invade the walls or lumina of the seminiferous tubules, although tubular atrophy is obvious. On days 17, 24 and 31, treponemes are no longer identifiable by immunofluorescence in infected testicles. The cellular infiltration, which is apparent on day 6, reaches its peak on day 13, corresponding to the amount of swelling observed grossly. The infiltrate is primarily lymphocytic, but macrophages are also observed during the peak cellular response. These cells are located, as are the treponemes, in the interstitial spaces. The lymphocytes are demonstrated by specific immunofluorescence to be predominantly T cells. The peak T cell infiltration in the infected testicle is followed rapidly by the disappearance of the organisms from that organ. Thus, it is postulated that infiltration by specifically sensitized T cells results in the clearance of large numbers of T. pallidum from infected tissues. PMID:6153103

  4. Estimation of the genome sizes of the chigger mites Leptotrombidium pallidum and Leptotrombidium scutellare based on quantitative PCR and k-mer analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Leptotrombidium pallidum and Leptotrombidium scutellare are the major vector mites for Orientia tsutsugamushi, the causative agent of scrub typhus. Before these organisms can be subjected to whole-genome sequencing, it is necessary to estimate their genome sizes to obtain basic information for establishing the strategies that should be used for genome sequencing and assembly. Method The genome sizes of L. pallidum and L. scutellare were estimated by a method based on quantitative real-time PCR. In addition, a k-mer analysis of the whole-genome sequences obtained through Illumina sequencing was conducted to verify the mutual compatibility and reliability of the results. Results The genome sizes estimated using qPCR were 191?±?7 Mb for L. pallidum and 262?±?13 Mb for L. scutellare. The k-mer analysis-based genome lengths were estimated to be 175 Mb for L. pallidum and 286 Mb for L. scutellare. The estimates from these two independent methods were mutually complementary and within a similar range to those of other Acariform mites. Conclusions The estimation method based on qPCR appears to be a useful alternative when the standard methods, such as flow cytometry, are impractical. The relatively small estimated genome sizes should facilitate whole-genome analysis, which could contribute to our understanding of Arachnida genome evolution and provide key information for scrub typhus prevention and mite vector competence. PMID:24947244

  5. Treponema pallidum 3-phosphoglycerate mutase is a heat-labile enzyme that may limit the maximum growth temperature for the spirochete.

    PubMed

    Benoit, S; Posey, J E; Chenoweth, M R; Gherardini, F C

    2001-08-01

    In the causative agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum, the gene encoding 3-phosphoglycerate mutase, gpm, is part of a six-gene operon (tro operon) that is regulated by the Mn-dependent repressor TroR. Since substrate-level phosphorylation via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway is the principal way to generate ATP in T. pallidum and Gpm is a key enzyme in this pathway, Mn could exert a regulatory effect on central metabolism in this bacterium. To study this, T. pallidum gpm was cloned, Gpm was purified from Escherichia coli, and antiserum against the recombinant protein was raised. Immunoblots indicated that Gpm was expressed in freshly extracted infective T. pallidum. Enzyme assays indicated that Gpm did not require Mn(2+) while 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) was required for maximum activity. Consistent with these observations, Mn did not copurify with Gpm. The purified Gpm was stable for more than 4 h at 25 degrees C, retained only 50% activity after incubation for 20 min at 34 degrees C or 10 min at 37 degrees C, and was completely inactive after 10 min at 42 degrees C. The temperature effect was attenuated when 1 mM DPG was added to the assay mixture. The recombinant Gpm from pSLB2 complemented E. coli strain PL225 (gpm) and restored growth on minimal glucose medium in a temperature-dependent manner. Increasing the temperature of cultures of E. coli PL225 harboring pSLB2 from 34 to 42 degrees C resulted in a 7- to 11-h period in which no growth occurred (compared to wild-type E. coli). These data suggest that biochemical properties of Gpm could be one contributing factor to the heat sensitivity of T. pallidum. PMID:11466272

  6. Assessment of the kinetics of Treponema pallidum dissemination into blood and tissues in experimental syphilis by real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Juan C; Rathi, Asha; Michael, Nelson L; Radolf, Justin D; Jagodzinski, Linda L

    2007-06-01

    Little is known about the size and kinetics of treponemal burdens in blood and tissues during acquired or experimental syphilitic infection. We used real-time quantitative PCR to measure Treponema pallidum DNA levels in rabbits infected intratesticularly with the prototype Nichols strain. At the outset, we performed a series of in vitro blood spiking experiments to determine the effect of blood processing procedures on the distribution of treponemes in various blood components. T. pallidum DNA levels in plasma and whole blood were approximately 10-fold higher than those in serum and more than 200-fold greater than those in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Ten rabbits were inoculated intratesticularly with doses of treponemes ranging from 4 x 10(7) to 2 x 10(8) organisms. In five rabbits, T. pallidum DNA levels were measured sequentially in serum, plasma, whole blood, and PBMCs until sacrifice at peak orchitis, at which time brain, kidney, liver, spleen, and testicles were harvested; blood and organs were also harvested at orchitis from the other five rabbits. T. pallidum DNA was detected in plasma within 24 h postinfection. Treponeme levels in whole blood and blood components increased significantly with the development of peak orchitis. Overall, levels in serum and PBMCs were lower than those in plasma and whole blood; this disparity was particularly marked at early time points. Significantly greater numbers of spirochetes were found in the spleen than in liver, kidney, or brain tissue at the time of sacrifice. Our findings highlight the remarkable capacity of T. pallidum to disseminate from the site of infection to blood and tissues, and they identify the spleen as a prime target for treponemal invasion. PMID:17438037

  7. Conservation of the Host-Interacting Proteins Tp0750 and Pallilysin among Treponemes and Restriction of Proteolytic Capacity to Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Houston, Simon; Taylor, John S; Denchev, Yavor; Hof, Rebecca; Zuerner, Richard L; Cameron, Caroline E

    2015-11-01

    The spirochete Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a chronic, sexually transmitted infection characterized by multiple symptomatic and asymptomatic stages. Although several other species in the genus are able to cause or contribute to disease, T. pallidum differs in that it is able to rapidly disseminate via the bloodstream to tissue sites distant from the site of initial infection. It is also the only Treponema species able to cross both the blood-brain and placental barriers. Previously, the T. pallidum proteins, Tp0750 and Tp0751 (also called pallilysin), were shown to degrade host proteins central to blood coagulation and basement membrane integrity, suggesting a role for these proteins in T. pallidum dissemination and tissue invasion. In the present study, we characterized Tp0750 and Tp0751 sequence variation in a diversity of pathogenic and nonpathogenic treponemes. We also determined the proteolytic potential of the orthologs from the less invasive species Treponema denticola and Treponema phagedenis. These analyses showed high levels of sequence similarity among Tp0750 orthologs from pathogenic species. For pallilysin, lower levels of sequence conservation were observed between this protein and orthologs from other treponemes, except for the ortholog from the highly invasive rabbit venereal syphilis-causing Treponema paraluiscuniculi. In vitro host component binding and degradation assays demonstrated that pallilysin and Tp0750 orthologs from the less invasive treponemes tested were not capable of binding or degrading host proteins. The results show that pallilysin and Tp0750 host protein binding and degradative capability is positively correlated with treponemal invasiveness. PMID:26283341

  8. GE Healthcare Antibody Purification

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    GE Healthcare Antibody Purification Handbook GE Healthcare imagination at work agination at work from GE Healthcare #12;Antibody Purification Handbook #12; Handbook 18-1037-46 AD Contents Introduction

  9. Antibody Blood Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Tests People with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of certain antibodies ... rye and barley that are generically known as “gluten.” Antibody Testing: Only A First Step To help ...

  10. Effects of fibroblast transplantation into the internal pallidum on levodopa-induced dyskinesias in parkinsonian non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arun; Gutekunst, Claire A; Uthayathas, Subramaniam; Finberg, John P M; Mewes, Klaus; Gross, Robert E; Papa, Stella M; Feld, Yair

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that fibroblast transplantation can modify the activity of basal ganglia networks in models of Parkinson's disease. To determine its effects on parkinsonian motor symptoms, we performed autologous dermal fibroblast transplantation into the internal pallidum (GPi) in two parkinsonian rhesus monkeys with stable levodopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs). Levodopa responses were assessed every week after transplantation for three months. A reduction of between 58% and 64% in total LIDs on the contralateral side was observed in both animals. No clear LID changes were observed on the ipsilateral side. These effects lasted the entire 3-month period in one monkey, but declined after 6-8 weeks in the other. The antiparkinsonian effects of levodopa did not diminish. The results of this pilot study indicate that fibroblast transplantation into the GPi may have beneficial effects on LIDs and warrant further investigation for potential therapeutic use. PMID:26373985

  11. Monoclonal AntibodiesMonoclonal Antibodies Raymond LiuRaymond Liu

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    Monoclonal AntibodiesMonoclonal Antibodies Raymond LiuRaymond Liu Biochemistry 118QBiochemistry 118Q Spring 2004Spring 2004 #12;OverviewOverview Monoclonal AntibodiesMonoclonal Antibodies SpecificitySpecificity TargetingTargeting VarietyVariety #12;Antibodies and the Immune SystemAntibodies

  12. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  13. Broad specificity AhpC-like peroxiredoxin and its thioredoxin reductant in the sparse antioxidant defense system of Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Parsonage, Derek; Desrosiers, Daniel C; Hazlett, Karsten R O; Sun, Yongcheng; Nelson, Kimberly J; Cox, David L; Radolf, Justin D; Poole, Leslie B

    2010-04-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms by which Treponema pallidum (Tp), the causative agent of syphilis, copes with oxidative stress as it establishes persistent infection within its obligate human host. The Tp genomic sequence indicates that the bacterium's antioxidant defenses do not include glutathione and are limited to just a few proteins, with only one, TP0509, offering direct defense against peroxides. Although this Tp peroxiredoxin (Prx) closely resembles AhpC-like Prxs, Tp lacks AhpF, the typical reductant for such enzymes. Functionally, TpAhpC resembles largely eukaryotic, nonAhpC typical 2-Cys Prx proteins in using thioredoxin (Trx, TP0919) as an efficient electron donor and exhibiting broad specificity toward hydroperoxide substrates. Unlike many of the eukaryotic Prxs, however, TpAhpC is relatively resistant to inactivation during turnover with hydroperoxide substrates. As is often observed in typical 2-Cys Prxs, TpAhpC undergoes redox-sensitive oligomer formation. Quantitative immunoblotting revealed that TpTrx and TpAhpC are present at very high levels (over 100 and 300 microM, respectively) in treponemes infecting rabbit testes; their redox potentials, at -242 +/- 1 and -192 +/- 2 mV, respectively, are consistent with the role of TpTrx as the cellular reductant of TpAhpC. Transcriptional analysis of select antioxidant genes confirmed the presence of high mRNA levels for ahpC and trx which diminish greatly when spirochetes replicate under in vitro growth conditions. Thus, T. pallidum has evolved an extraordinarily robust, broad-spectrum AhpC as its sole mechanism for peroxide defense to combat this significant threat to treponemal growth and survival during infection. PMID:20304799

  14. Advances in Antibody Design.

    PubMed

    Tiller, Kathryn E; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics requires optimizing several of their key attributes. These include binding affinity and specificity, folding stability, solubility, pharmacokinetics, effector functions, and compatibility with the attachment of additional antibody domains (bispecific antibodies) and cytotoxic drugs (antibody-drug conjugates). Addressing these and other challenges requires the use of systematic design methods that complement powerful immunization and in vitro screening methods. We review advances in designing the binding loops, scaffolds, domain interfaces, constant regions, post-translational and chemical modifications, and bispecific architectures of antibodies and fragments thereof to improve their bioactivity. We also highlight unmet challenges in antibody design that must be overcome to generate potent antibody therapeutics. PMID:26274600

  15. Serum antibodies to whole-cell and recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi in cottontail rabbits.

    PubMed

    Magnarelli, Louis A; Norris, Steven J; Fikrig, Erol

    2012-01-01

    Archived serum samples, from 95 eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) captured in New York, New York, USA and Millbrook, New York, USA, during 1985-86, were analyzed in solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for total and class-specific immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibodies to whole-cell or recombinant antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. Using a polyvalent conjugate, rabbit sera contained antibodies to whole-cell and recombinant antigens (protein [p]35, p37, or VlsE) during different seasons, but there was no reactivity to outer surface protein (Osp)A or OspB. Seventy-six of the 102 sera (75%) analyzed were reactive with one or more of the antigens; 61 of the positive samples (80%) reacted to whole-cell antigens, followed by results for the p35 (58%, 44/76), VlsE (43%, 33/76), and p37 (29%, 22/ 76) antigens. Fifty-eight sera (76%) contained antibodies to the VlsE or p35 antigens with or without reactivity to whole-cell antigens. High antibody titers (?1:2,560) recorded for 52 sera indicate robust antibody production. In analyses for IgM antibodies in an ELISA containing whole-cell antigens, there were 30 positive sera; titers ranged from 1:160 to 1:640. There was minimal cross-reactivity when rabbit antisera to Treponema pallidum or four serovars of Leptospira interrogans were screened against B. burgdorferi antigens. Based on more-specific results, VlsE and p35 antigens appear to be useful markers for detecting possible B. burgdorferi infections. PMID:22247369

  16. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I: OUTER MEMBRANE INSERTION, TRIMERIZATION, AND PORIN FUNCTION REQUIRE A C-TERMINAL ?-BARREL DOMAIN.

    PubMed

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-05-01

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprC(N) and TprC(C)) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)) of Treponema denticola and that TprC(C) is solely responsible for ?-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSP(C)-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSP(N)-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSP(C)-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSP(N)-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the ?-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP. PMID:25805501

  17. Recombinant Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane protein 1 (Tromp1) expressed in Escherichia coli has porin activity and surface antigenic exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, D R; Champion, C I; Exner, M M; Shang, E S; Skare, J T; Hancock, R E; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1996-01-01

    We recently reported the cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding a 31-kDa Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum rare outer membrane porin protein, designated Tromp1 (D. R. Blanco, C. I. Champion, M. M. Exner, H. Erdjument-Bromage, R. E. W. Hancock, P. Tempst, J. N. Miller, and M. A. Lovett, J. Bacteriol. 177:3556-3562, 1995). Here, we report the stable expression of recombinant Tromp1 (rTromp1) in Escherichia coli. rTromp1 expressed without its signal peptide and containing a 22-residue N-terminal fusion resulted in high-level accumulation of a nonexported soluble protein that was purified to homogeneity by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). Specific antiserum generated to the FPLC-purified rTromp1 fusion identified on immunoblots of T. pallidum the native 31-kDa Tromp1 protein and two higher-molecular-mass oligomeric forms of Tromp1 at 55 and 80 kDa. rTromp1 was also expressed with its native signal peptide by using an inducible T7 promoter. Under these conditions, rTromp1 fractionated predominantly with the E. coli soluble and outer membrane fractions, but not with the inner membrane fraction. rTromp1 isolated from the E. coli outer membrane and reconstituted into planar lipid bilayers showed porin activity based on average single-channel conductances of 0.4 and 0.8 nS in 1 M KCl. Whole-mount immunoelectron microscopy using infection-derived immune serum against T. pallidum indicated that rTromp1 was surface exposed when expressed in E. coli. These findings demonstrate that rTromp1 can be targeted to the E. coli outer membrane, where it has both porin activity and surface antigenic exposure. PMID:8955283

  18. Whole Genome Sequence of the Treponema pallidum subsp. endemicum Strain Bosnia A: The Genome Is Related to Yaws Treponemes but Contains Few Loci Similar to Syphilis Treponemes

    PubMed Central

    Zobaníková, Marie; ?ejková, Darina; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Chen, Lei; Giacani, Lorenzo; Centurion-Lara, Arturo; Bruisten, Sylvia M.; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M.; Šmajs, David

    2014-01-01

    Background T. pallidum subsp. endemicum (TEN) is the causative agent of bejel (also known as endemic syphilis). Clinical symptoms of syphilis and bejel are overlapping and the epidemiological context is important for correct diagnosis of both diseases. In contrast to syphilis, caused by T. pallidum subsp. pallidum (TPA), TEN infections are usually spread by direct contact or contaminated utensils rather than by sexual contact. Bejel is most often seen in western Africa and in the Middle East. The strain Bosnia A was isolated in 1950 in Bosnia, southern Europe. Methodology/Principal Findings The complete genome of the Bosnia A strain was amplified and sequenced using the pooled segment genome sequencing (PSGS) method and a combination of three next-generation sequencing techniques (SOLiD, Roche 454, and Illumina). Using this approach, a total combined average genome coverage of 513× was achieved. The size of the Bosnia A genome was found to be 1,137,653 bp, i.e. 1.6–2.8 kbp shorter than any previously published genomes of uncultivable pathogenic treponemes. Conserved gene synteny was found in the Bosnia A genome compared to other sequenced syphilis and yaws treponemes. The TEN Bosnia A genome was distinct but very similar to the genome of yaws-causing T. pallidum subsp. pertenue (TPE) strains. Interestingly, the TEN Bosnia A genome was found to contain several sequences, which so far, have been uniquely identified only in syphilis treponemes. Conclusions/Significance The genome of TEN Bosnia A contains several sequences thought to be unique to TPA strains; these sequences very likely represent remnants of recombination events during the evolution of TEN treponemes. This finding emphasizes a possible role of repeated horizontal gene transfer between treponemal subspecies in shaping the Bosnia A genome. PMID:25375929

  19. Performance of the 47-Kilodalton Membrane Protein versus DNA Polymerase I Genes for Detection of Treponema pallidum by PCR in Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Frédéric; Schrenzel, Jacques; Charton, Béatrice; Jimenez-Getaz, Gisela; Tangomo, Manuela; Ferry, Tristan; Sednaoui, Patrice; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Toutous-Trellu, Laurence; Martinez de Tejada, Begońa; Cavassini, Matthias; Emonet, Stéphane; Perneger, Thomas; Salord, Hélčne

    2014-01-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) is a direct diagnostic method for primary and secondary syphilis, but there is no recommendation regarding the best choice of target gene. In this study, we sequentially tested 272 specimens from patients with sexually transmitted ulcers using Tp-PCR targeting the tpp47 and then polA genes. The two methods showed similar accuracies and an almost-perfect agreement. PMID:25520453

  20. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redoxmore »system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg˛?-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg˛?-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg˛? in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.« less

  1. Evidence for Posttranslational Protein Flavinylation in the Syphilis Spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and Biochemical Insights from the Catalytic Core of a Periplasmic Flavin-Trafficking Protein

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg2+-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg2+-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg2+ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm. PMID:25944861

  2. Presence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato antibodies in the serum of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Hinterseher, I; Gäbel, G; Corvinus, F; Lück, C; Saeger, H D; Bergert, H; Tromp, G; Kuivaniemi, H

    2012-05-01

    Infectious agents are likely to play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases, including abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). The goal of this study was to determine if Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (sl), a microorganism responsible for Lyme disease, is involved in the etiology of AAAs. The presence of serum antibodies against B. burgdorferi sl was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by Western blotting in 96 AAA and 108 peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for the detection of Borrelia-specific DNA in the aneurysm wall. Among AAA patients 34% and among PAD patients 16% were seropositive for B. burgdorferi sl antibodies (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.003; odds ratio [OR] 2.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-5.85). In the German general population, 3-17% are seropositive for Borrelia antibodies. No Borrelia DNA was detected in the aneurysm wall. Our findings suggest a relationship between AAAs and B. burgdorferi sl. We hypothesize that the underlying mechanism for B. burgdorferi sl in AAA formation is similar to that by the spirochete Treponema pallidum; alternatively, AAAs could develop due to induced autoimmunity via molecular mimicry due to similarities between some of the B. burgdorferi sl proteins and aortic proteins. PMID:21842293

  3. Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay seroreactivity among healthy Indian donors and its association with other transfusion transmitted diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pahuja, Sangeeta; Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Pujani, Mukta; Jain, Manjula

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of syphilis infection by Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay (TPHA) among blood donors in Delhi and to study their correlation with other markers of transfusion transmitted infections such as hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) so as to establish the utility of TPHA over and above venereal diseases research laboratory test (VDRL), not only as a marker for testing T. pallidum infection, but also as a marker of high risk behavior. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was carried out in the Regional Blood Transfusion Centre, Lady Hardinge Medical College and associated Sucheta Kriplani Hospital, New Delhi for a period of 2 years. Donated blood was screened for TPHA seroreactivity along with screening for anti HIV I and II, anti-HCV, HBsAg by third generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. A total of 8082 serum samples of blood donors were collected from healthy blood donors in our blood bank. They were classified into two groups- test group and control group based on TPHA positivity. The co-occurrence of HBsAg, HIV and HCV infection were determined in TPHA positive blood donors (test group) in comparison with TPHA negative blood donors (control group). Results: We found the TPHA seroreactivity to be 4.4% in Delhi's blood donors. Nearly 8.2% (663/8082) of the donated blood had serological evidence of infection by at least one pathogen (syphilis/HIV/hepatitis B virus/HCV) and 6.63% (44/663) donors with positive serology had multiple infections (two or more). Quadruple infection was seen in one donor, triple infection was seen in three donors and double infection was seen in 40 donors. Prevalence of HIV seroreactivity was found to be statistically significant and HCV seroreactivity statistically insignificant in TPHA positive group in comparison to TPHA negative group. Discussion: In our study, the TPHA seropositivity correlated with higher HIV and HCV seropositivity and the same correlation has been observed by several other studies also. In view of these observations, we propose that testing for syphilis by more sensitive and specific treponemal markers like TPHA rather than VDRL, rapid plasma reagin tests; as TPHA also has the added advantage of picking up all the high risk donors, whereas, VDRL picks up only currently infected donors. Moreover, TPHA should be continued as a marker of high risk behavior especially in high prevalence areas like India where we don’t have universal access to markers like nucleic acid amplification technique. PMID:25161350

  4. Natural Antibodies Against Sialoglycans.

    PubMed

    Shilova, Nadezhda; Huflejt, Margaret E; Vuskovic, Marko; Obukhova, Polina; Navakouski, Maksim; Khasbiullina, Nailya; Pazynina, Galina; Galanina, Oxana; Bazhenov, Alexey; Bovin, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    Natural antibodies, part of the innate immunity system, are produced at strictly regulated levels in normal sera without immunization and thus are part of the innate immune system. The best studied natural antibodies are those directed against blood group antigens A and B and xeno-antigens including glycolylneuraminic acid containing Hanganutziu-Deicher (HD) glycolipid. Abnormal levels of anti-glycan antibodies were found in a number of pathologies. In many cases pathological antibodies are known to bind gangliosides. The genesis of anti-glycan antibodies in healthy humans and the reasons for their changes in pathologies are poorly understood. With a growing interest in their diagnostic applications, it is important to determine the carbohydrate structures that are recognized by antibodies present in the circulation of healthy individuals. We tested a large number of healthy donors using a printed glycan array (PGA) in a microchip format. The PGA contained ~300 glycans, representing mostly normal mammalian structures of glycoproteins and glycolipids, and many of the structures presented are biologically relevant sialylated motifs. As revealed by PGA, the sera interacted with at least 70 normal human glycans. With only few exceptions, antibodies recognizing sialosides have not been identified. Moderate levels of antibodies and moderate variability were observed in the case of SiaT n and its glycolyl variant. Unexpectedly, we found minimal antibody titer directed against Neu5Gc? and the trisaccharide Neu5Gc?2-6Gal?1-4GlcNAc, although this form of neuraminic acid does not occur naturally in humans. Antibodies recognizing sialosides in unnatural ?-configuration have been detected and confirmed Springer's paradigm that circulating antibodies represent a reaction against bacteria. Gram-negative bacteria contain LPS with ?KDN and/or ?KDO which are very close analogs of Neu5Ac that are found in ?-connected form. Antibodies against the biantennary N-glycan chain, (Neu5Ac?2-6Gal?1-4GlcNAc?1-2Man?)2-3,6-Man?1-4GlcNAc?1-4GlcNAc were never observed and similarly we never saw antibodies directed against the SiaLe(a)/SiaLe (x) motifs. Anti-sialoglycan antibodies can be masked with gangliosides: for example, we observe about a five times higher level of anti-GD3 in purified total IgG compared to the same concentration of total Ig in the composition of native serum. For several antibodies we observed anomalous binding in diluted sera, namely, the signals towards sialylated glycans were increased in the PGA if diluted sera were used. PMID:24037491

  5. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  6. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  7. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  8. Antibody engineering for cancer therapy

    E-print Network

    Yeung, Yik Andy

    2005-01-01

    Antibodies targeting various tumor-associated antigens have been developed successfully to treat cancer. In this Thesis, novel antibodies and antibody-conjugate against two tumor antigens, AF-20 antigen and human aspartyl ...

  9. The Social Amoeba Polysphondylium pallidum Loses Encystation and Sporulation, but Can Still Erect Fruiting Bodies in the Absence of Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Du, Qingyou; Schaap, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    Amoebas and other freely moving protists differentiate into walled cysts when exposed to stress. As cysts, amoeba pathogens are resistant to biocides, preventing treatment and eradication. Lack of gene modification procedures has left the mechanisms of encystation largely unexplored. Genetically tractable Dictyostelium discoideum amoebas require cellulose synthase for formation of multicellular fructifications with cellulose-rich stalk and spore cells. Amoebas of its distant relative Polysphondylium pallidum (Ppal), can additionally encyst individually in response to stress. Ppal has two cellulose synthase genes, DcsA and DcsB, which we deleted individually and in combination. Dcsa- mutants formed fruiting bodies with normal stalks, but their spore and cyst walls lacked cellulose, which obliterated stress-resistance of spores and rendered cysts entirely non-viable. A dcsa-/dcsb- mutant made no walled spores, stalk cells or cysts, although simple fruiting structures were formed with a droplet of amoeboid cells resting on an sheathed column of decaying cells. DcsB is expressed in prestalk and stalk cells, while DcsA is additionally expressed in spores and cysts. We conclude that cellulose is essential for encystation and that cellulose synthase may be a suitable target for drugs to prevent encystation and render amoeba pathogens susceptible to conventional antibiotics. PMID:25113829

  10. Lateral hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, and ventral pallidum roles in eating and hunger: interactions between homeostatic and reward circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Daniel C.; Cole, Shannon L.; Berridge, Kent C.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the neural bases of eating behavior, hunger, and reward has consistently implicated the lateral hypothalamus (LH) and its interactions with mesocorticolimbic circuitry, such as mesolimbic dopamine projections to nucleus accumbens (NAc) and ventral pallidum (VP), in controlling motivation to eat. The NAc and VP play special roles in mediating the hedonic impact (“liking”) and motivational incentive salience (“wanting”) of food rewards, and their interactions with LH help permit regulatory hunger/satiety modulation of food motivation and reward. Here, we review some progress that has been made regarding this circuitry and its functions: the identification of localized anatomical hedonic hotspots within NAc and VP for enhancing hedonic impact; interactions of NAc/VP hedonic hotspots with specific LH signals such as orexin; an anterior-posterior gradient of sites in NAc shell for producing intense appetitive eating vs. intense fearful reactions; and anatomically distributed appetitive functions of dopamine and mu opioid signals in NAc shell and related structures. Such findings help improve our understanding of NAc, VP, and LH interactions in mediating affective and motivation functions, including “liking” and “wanting” for food rewards. PMID:26124708

  11. Vitros 5600 Syphilis TPA assay: evaluation of an automated chemiluminescence assay for detection of Treponema pallidum antibodies in a high prevalence setting.

    PubMed

    Van den Bossche, Dorien; Florence, Eric; Kenyon, Christopher; Van Esbroeck, Marjan

    2014-11-01

    The performance of the Syphilis TPA assay (Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics) on Vitros 5600 Integrated System was evaluated and demonstrated excellent results. Our data support the use of this assay for test confirmation in the traditional algorithm and for screening for syphilis in a routine automated laboratory setting when using the reverse algorithm. PMID:25299416

  12. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  13. EQUINE ANTIHAPTEN ANTIBODY

    PubMed Central

    Rockey, John H.

    1967-01-01

    Eight antigenically unique immunoglobulins have been identified in purified equine anti-p-azophenyl-?-lactoside (Lac) antibody isolated from a single horse. The Fc fragments of the ?Ga-, ?Gb-, ?Gc-, and -?A-globulins have been shown to possess unique antigenic determinants. Common ?G- and ?A-Fc fragment antigenic determinants, which were absent from the 10S?1- and ?M-globulins, have also been observed. All antibody populations share two antigenically distinct light (B, L) chain variants. The association of anti-Lac antibody with the hapten p-(p-dimethylamino-benzeneazo)-phenyl-?-lactoside has been measured by equilibrium dialysis and by fluorescence quenching. A variation in the affinity of anti-Lac antibody for hapten has been observed. The affinity of antibody was unaltered by enzymatic removal of the Fc fragments by peptic digestion or dissociation of the two combining sites on the papain 3.5S Fab fragments, indicating that the observed heterogeneity of affinities was not a direct function of the heterogeneity in structure of the Fc fragments. Isolated heavy (A, H) chains of ?A-anti-Lac antibody have been shown to have retamed affinity for Lac dye by equilibrium dialysis and by analytical ultracentrifugation, employing a combination of schlieren and absorption optics. The heavy (A, H) chains from two physically separable, antigenically distinct antibody populations, isolated from the same animal and having affinity for the same haptenic determinant, have been found to differ in their amino acid composition. Anti-Lac antibody light (B, L) chains have also been shown to be chemically heterogeneous, and contained populations of polypeptide chains possessing, and populations lacking methionine. The relevance of the observed structural heterogeneity of equine anti-Lac antibody to the problem of defining the mechanism of acquisition of immunological specificity is briefly discussed. PMID:4959973

  14. Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Visit Global Sites Search Help? Heparin-induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Heparin-PF4 Antibody; HIT Antibody; HIT PF4 Antibody; Heparin Induced Antibody; ...

  15. Activation of human monocytic cells by Borrelia burgdorferi and Treponema pallidum is facilitated by CD14 and correlates with surface exposure of spirochetal lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Sellati, T J; Bouis, D A; Caimano, M J; Feulner, J A; Ayers, C; Lien, E; Radolf, J D

    1999-08-15

    Here we examined the involvement of CD14 in monocyte activation by motile Borrelia burgdorferi and Treponema pallidum. B. burgdorferi induced secretion of IL-8 by vitamin D3-matured THP-1 cells, which was inhibited by a CD14-specific mAb known to block cellular activation by LPS and the prototypic spirochetal lipoprotein, outer surface protein A. Enhanced responsiveness to B. burgdorferi also was observed when THP-1 cells were transfected with CD14. Because borreliae within the mammalian host and in vitro-cultivated organisms express different lipoproteins, experiments also were performed with "host-adapted" spirochetes grown within dialysis membrane chambers implanted into the peritoneal cavities of rabbits. Stimulation of THP-1 cells by host-adapted organisms was CD14 dependent and, interestingly, was actually greater than that observed with in vitro-cultivated organisms grown at either 34 degrees C or following temperature shift from 23 degrees C to 37 degrees C. Consistent with previous findings that transfection of Chinese hamster ovary cells with CD14 confers responsiveness to LPS but not to outer surface protein A, B. burgdorferi failed to stimulate CD14-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. T. pallidum also activated THP-1 cells in a CD14-dependent manner, although its stimulatory capacity was markedly less than that of B. burgdorferi. Moreover, cell activation by motile T. pallidum was considerably less than that induced by treponemal sonicates. Taken together, these findings support the notion that lipoproteins are the principle component of intact spirochetes responsible for monocyte activation, and they indicate that surface exposure of lipoproteins is an important determinant of a spirochetal pathogen's proinflammatory capacity. PMID:10438943

  16. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  17. Seroprevalence of the Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and Human Immunodeficiency Viruses and Treponema pallidum at the Beijing General Hospital from 2010 to 2014: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shaoxia; Wang, Qiaofeng; Zhang, Weihong; Qiu, Zhifeng; Cui, Jingtao; Yan, Wenjuan; Ni, Anping

    2015-01-01

    Background The hepatitis B, hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency viruses and Treponema pallidum are important causes of infectious diseases concern to public health. Methods Between 2010 and 2014, we used an automated chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay to detect the hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and human immunodeficiency viruses as well as Treponema pallidum (the rapid plasma regain test was used in 2010–2011). Positive human immunodeficiency virus tests were confirmed via western blotting. Results Among 416,130 subjects, the seroprevalences for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and Treponema pallidum were 5.72%, 1.23%, 0.196%, and 0.76%, respectively. Among 671 patients with positive human immunodeficiency virus results, 392 cases were confirmed via western blotting. Hepatitis B and human immunodeficiency virus infections were more frequent in men (7.78% and 0.26%, respectively) than in women (4.45% and 0.021%, respectively). The hepatitis B and C virus seroprevalences decreased from 6.21% and 1.58%, respectively, in 2010, to 5.37% and 0.988%, respectively, in 2014. The human immunodeficiency virus seroprevalence increased from 0.04% in 2010 to 0.17% in 2014, and was elevated in the Infectious Disease (2.65%), Emergency (1.71%), and Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (1.12%) departments. The specificity of the human immunodeficiency virus screening was 71.4%. The false positive rates for the Treponema pallidum screening tests increased in patients who were 60–70 years old. The co-infection rates for the hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency viruses were 0.47% in hepatitis C virus-positive patients and 7.33% in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients. Conclusions During 2010–2014, hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus infections were more frequent among men at our institution. Although the seroprevalences of hepatitis B and C viruses decreased, the seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus infection increased (with higher seroprevalences in high-risk departments). Older patients were more likely to exhibit false positive findings for syphilis. PMID:26502175

  18. Intracellular antibody immunity.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, Ruth E; McEwan, William A; James, Leo C

    2014-07-01

    Antibodies allow the immune system to target pathogens despite their tremendous diversity and rapid evolution. Once bound to a pathogen, antibodies induce a broad range of effector mechanisms, including phagocytosis and complement. However, these mechanisms are all initiated in the extracellular space, meaning that pathogens like viruses evade them upon infection of their target cells. Recently, it has been shown that, in addition to mediating extracellular immune responses, antibodies also activate immunity inside infected cells. Antibodies that are bound to the surface of non-enveloped viruses or bacteria are carried into the cell during pathogen entry. Once inside the cell, these pathogen-attached antibodies are recognised by a highly conserved, high affinity cytosolic antibody receptor called TRIM21. TRIM21 initiates both sensor and effector responses that reduce viral replication and induce an antiviral state. These responses are an important part of antiviral immunity and the removal of TRIM21 results in uncontrolled viraemia and death in a mouse model of infection. PMID:24722852

  19. Delta-opioid receptor blockade in the ventral pallidum increases perceived palatability and consumption of saccharin solution in rats.

    PubMed

    Inui, Tadashi; Shimura, Tsuyoshi

    2014-08-01

    The ventral pallidum (VP) is involved in ingestive behaviour. It receives dense GABAergic projections from the nucleus accumbens. GABAergic terminals in the VP co-express enkephalin, an endogenous ligand of delta-opioid receptors. The role of the delta-opioid receptors in the VP in the context of ingestive behaviour remains unclear, in contrast to the well-understood involvement of the mu-opioid receptors. We used the single-bottle test to examine the effects of VP microinjections of the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole on consumption of a saccharin solution. Naltrindole injections significantly increased the intake of saccharin, but not water, during a 2-h test session. We also investigated perceived palatability of saccharin using a taste reactivity test. The drug treatments increased ingestive responses to intraorally infused saccharin. Further experimentation explored the role of VP delta-opioid receptors in behavioural responses to saccharin that were previously paired with malaise upon the retrieval of conditioned taste aversion (CTA). Naltrindole-injected rats exhibited longer latency for the first occurrence of aversive responses than vehicle-injected control rats. However, there was no between-group difference in total aversive responses. These results suggest that naltrindole injections into the VP induce an enhancement of perceived palatability of a normally preferred saccharin solution, and thereby facilitate consumption of the solution. On the other hand, delayed aversive responses to the conditioned aversive saccharin suggest that the delta-opioid receptors in the VP mediate the initiation of aversive taste reactivity responses to the conditioned stimulus upon CTA retrieval. PMID:24739358

  20. The Multifunctional Role of the Pallilysin-Associated Treponema pallidum Protein, Tp0750, in Promoting Fibrinolysis and Extracellular Matrix Component Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Simon; Russell, Shannon; Hof, Rebecca; Roberts, Alanna K.; Cullen, Paul; Irvine, Kyle; Smith, Derek S.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Tonkin, Michelle L.; Boulanger, Martin J.; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms that facilitate dissemination of the highly invasive spirochete, Treponema pallidum, are incompletely understood. Previous studies showed the treponemal metalloprotease pallilysin (Tp0751) possesses fibrin clot degradation capability, suggesting a role in treponemal dissemination. In the current study we report characterization of the functionally-linked protein Tp0750. Structural modelling predicts Tp0750 contains a von Willebrand factor type A (vWFA) domain, a protein-protein interaction domain commonly observed in extracellular matrix (ECM)-binding proteins. We report Tp0750 is a serine protease that degrades the major clot components fibrinogen and fibronectin. We also demonstrate Tp0750 cleaves a matrix metalloprotease (MMP) peptide substrate that is targeted by several MMPs, enzymes central to ECM remodelling. Through proteomic analyses we show Tp0750 binds the endothelial fibrinolytic receptor, annexin A2, in a specific and dose-dependent manner. These results suggest Tp0750 constitutes a multifunctional protein that is able to (1) degrade infection-limiting clots by both inhibiting clot formation through degradation of host coagulation cascade proteins and promoting clot dissolution by complexing with host proteins involved in the fibrinolytic cascade and (2) facilitate ECM degradation via MMP-like proteolysis of host components. We propose that through these activities Tp0750 functions in concert with pallilysin to enable T. pallidum dissemination. PMID:24303899

  1. The sequence-variable, single-copy tprK gene of Treponema pallidum Nichols strain UNC and Street strain 14 encodes heterogeneous TprK proteins.

    PubMed

    Stamm, L V; Bergen, H L

    2000-11-01

    Syphilis is a chronic infection with early relapses that are hypothesized to result from the emergence of phenotypic variants of Treponema pallidum. Recent studies demonstrated that TprK, a target of protective immunity, is heterogeneous in several T. pallidum strains, but not in Nichols strain Seattle (A. Centurion-Lara, C. Godornes, C. Castro, W. C. Van Voorhis, and S. A. Lukehart, Infect. Immun. 68:824-831, 2000). Analysis of PCR-amplified tprK from Nichols strain UNC and Street strain 14 treponemes showed that TprK has seven regions of intrastrain heterogeneity resulting from amino acid substitutions, insertions, and deletions. In contrast, analysis of PCR-amplified tprJ showed little intrastrain or interstrain heterogeneity. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis demonstrated that mRNA transcripts representing unique polymorphic TprK proteins are present during syphilitic infection. Southern hybridization confirmed that Nichols strain UNC and Street strain 14 each contain a single copy of tprK, indicating that intrastrain heterogeneity is due to the presence of multiple treponemal subpopulations which contain a variant form of tprK. PMID:11035764

  2. The Treponema pallidum tro operon encodes a multiple metal transporter, a zinc-dependent transcriptional repressor, and a semi-autonomously expressed phosphoglycerate mutase.

    PubMed

    Hazlett, Karsten R O; Rusnak, Frank; Kehres, David G; Bearden, Scott W; La Vake, Carson J; La Vake, Morgan E; Maguire, Michael E; Perry, Robert D; Radolf, Justin D

    2003-06-01

    The Treponema pallidum tro operon encodes an ABC transporter (TroABCD), a transcriptional repressor (TroR), and the essential glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase (Gpm). The apparently discordant observations that the solute binding protein (TroA) binds Zn2+, whereas DNA binding by TroR in vitro is Mn2+-dependent, have generated uncertainty regarding the identities of the ligand(s) and co-repressor(s) of the permease. Moreover, this operonic structure suggests that Gpm expression, and hence glycolysis, the sole source of ATP for the bacterium, would be suspended during TroR-mediated repression. To resolve these discrepancies, we devised an experimental strategy permitting a more direct assessment of Tro operon function and regulation. We report that (i) apo-TroA has identical affinities for Zn2+ and Mn2+; (ii) the Tro transporter expressed in Escherichia coli imports Zn2+, Mn2+, and possibly iron; (iii) TroR represses transporter expression in E. coli at significantly lower concentrations of Zn2+ than of Mn2+; and (iv) TroR-mediated repression causes a disproportionately greater down-regulation of the transporter genes than of gpm. The much higher concentrations of Zn2+ than of Mn2+ in human body fluids suggests that Zn2+ is both the primary substrate and co-repressor of the permease in vivo. Our data also indicate that Gpm expression and, therefore, glycolysis would not be abrogated when T. pallidum encounters high Zn2+ levels. PMID:12668673

  3. Re-188 labelled antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, B A; Lambert, C R; Marek, M J; Knapp, F F; Harvey, E B

    1996-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies can be directly labelled with 188Re using a simple one-step radiolabelling kit. Using B72.3 as a model antibody, the formulation was optimized and kits were made and tested and compared to data previously reported for the same antibody labelled with other radioisotopes. Labelling with Re-188 was carried out with the eluate of a W-188/Re-188 generator from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Fresh generator eluate was added to the pre-reduced lyophilized antibody and the mixture allowed to incubate overnight at room temperature. The radiochemical purity, immunoreactive fraction, and biodistribution in normal and LS174T tumor bearing nude mice was determined. The radiochemical purity was 88 +/- 7%, the immunoreactive fraction was 68.46 +/- 3.8%. The immunoreactive fraction was higher than any previously reported for this antibody when labelled with other radioisotopes. At 48 h, 7.9 +/- 2.4% of the injected dose per gram was found in the tumor. The biodistribution and tumor uptake of Re-188 labelled B72.3 was similar to that previously reported for Re-186 and In-111 labelled B72.3. PMID:8589673

  4. Assessments of antibody biodistribution.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Patrick M; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Balthasar, Joseph P

    2015-03-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics are in use for several disease conditions, and have generally shown excellent clinical benefit, in large part due to their high specificity and affinity for target proteins. As this therapeutic class continues to grow in size, improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling mAb biodistribution and protein binding may be expected to allow better prediction of safety and efficacy. Due to the large size and polarity of antibodies, rates of mAb distribution and elimination are typically much slower than those reported for small molecule drugs. Additionally, high affinity interaction with target proteins will often influence mAb pharmacokinetics, leading to complex, nonlinear tissue distribution and elimination. In this report, we summarize key determinants of mAb disposition, methods for assessing antibody exposure and protein binding, and model-based approaches that may be utilized to predict mAb pharmacokinetics. PMID:25707961

  5. [Evaluation of the Fundamental Performance of 4 Latex Agglutination Reagents to Measure Anti-TP Antibody Concentration and Detailed Investigation of Decision-Mismatched Samples].

    PubMed

    Ito, Atsushi; Niizeki, Noriyasu; Kurose, Hitomi; Yonezawa, Takatoshi; Sasaki, Rie; Tachibana, Mineji; Tomoda, Yutaka; Kino, Shuichi; Fujii, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Serological diagnosis of syphilis can be made by using the serological test for syphilis (STS) method for detecting a lipid antibody and Treponema pallidum (TP) method for detecting the anti-TP-specific antibody. In STS and TP methods, the basis using latex agglutination reaction has been used in many facilities. However, in latex agglutination, false-positive results due to non-specific reaction have sometimes been obtained in reactions of a routine laboratory test reagent detecting the anti-TP antibody used in our medical laboratory. We evaluated the fundamental performance of 4 reagents to measure anti-TP antibody concentration using latex agglutination: Reagents A, B, C and D produced by SEKISUI MEDICAL, FUJI REBIO, DENKA SEIKEN and SHINO TEST, respectively. We examined the correlations between Reagent A (routine laboratory test reagent) and Reagents B, C, and D in sera from 68 patients, and we performed additional investigation by using a neutralization test, immunochromatography, Western blotting, FTA-ABS (IgG), and STS method by an automatic analyzer for 13 decision-mismatched samples. The fundamental performance of each reagent was as good as that previously reported. Eight of the 13 decision-mismatched samples were false positives due to non-specific reaction of Reagent A. In latex agglutination non-specific reaction is inevitable. However, this study strongly suggests that using a neutralization test and immunochromatography that can be performed quickly is sufficient to verify whether positive reactions are true or false. PMID:26524876

  6. Human Germline Antibody Gene Segments Encode Polyspecific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Jordan R.; Briney, Bryan S.; DeLuca, Samuel L.; Crowe, James E.; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding. PMID:23637590

  7. Superoxide reductase from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: crystallization and structure determination using soft X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Silva, Teresa; Trincăo, José; Carvalho, Ana L.; Bonifácio, Cecília; Auchčre, Françoise; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J. G.; Romăo, Maria J.

    2005-11-01

    Superoxide reductase is a non-haem iron-containing protein involved in resistance to oxidative stress. The oxidized form of the protein has been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure solved. A highly redundant X-ray diffraction data set was collected on a rotating-anode generator using Cu K? X-ray radiation. Four Fe atoms were located in the asymmetric unit corresponding to four protein molecules arranged as a dimer of homodimers. Superoxide reductase is a 14 kDa metalloprotein containing a catalytic non-haem iron centre [Fe(His){sub 4}Cys]. It is involved in defence mechanisms against oxygen toxicity, scavenging superoxide radicals from the cell. The oxidized form of Treponema pallidum superoxide reductase was crystallized in the presence of polyethylene glycol and magnesium chloride. Two crystal forms were obtained depending on the oxidizing agents used after purification: crystals grown in the presence of K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} belonged to space group P2{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 60.3, b = 59.9, c = 64.8 Ĺ, ? = 106.9°) and diffracted beyond 1.60 Ĺ resolution, while crystals grown in the presence of Na{sub 2}IrCl{sub 6} belonged to space group C2 (a = 119.4, b = 60.1, c = 65.6 Ĺ, ? = 104.9°) and diffracted beyond 1.55 Ĺ. A highly redundant X-ray diffraction data set from the C2 crystal form collected on a copper rotating-anode generator (? = 1.542 Ĺ) clearly defined the positions of the four Fe atoms present in the asymmetric unit by SAD methods. A MAD experiment at the iron absorption edge confirmed the positions of the previously determined iron sites and provided better phases for model building and refinement. Molecular replacement using the P2{sub 1} data set was successful using a preliminary trace as a search model. A similar arrangement of the four protein molecules could be observed.

  8. The Art of Making Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headon, Denis R.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the nature and production of antibodies. Points out that the production of monoclonal antibodies blends the malignant with the beneficial to create a medical tool of exciting potential. (JN)

  9. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePLUS

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  10. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePLUS

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Identification Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alloantibody Identification; Antibody ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red ...

  11. Molecular versatility of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Henry

    2002-07-01

    As immunology developed into a discrete discipline, the principal experimental efforts were directed towards uncovering the molecular basis of the specificity exhibited by antibodies and the mechanism by which antigens induced their production. Less attention was given to how antibodies carry out some of their effector functions, although this subject presents an interesting protein-chemical and evolutionary problem; that is, how does a family of proteins that can bind a virtually infinite variety of ligands, many of which the species producing that protein has never encountered, reproducibly initiate an appropriate response? The experimental data persuasively suggested that aggregation of the antibody was a necessary and likely sufficient initiating event, but this only begged the question: how does aggregation induce a response? I used the IgE:mast cell system as a paradigm to investigate this subject. Data from our own group and from many others led to a molecular model that appears to explain how a cell 'senses' that antigen has reacted with the IgE. The model is directly applicable to one of the fundamental questions cited above, i.e. the mechanism by which antigens induce the production of antibodies. Although the model is conceptually simple, incorporating the actual molecular events into a quantitatively accurate scheme represents an enormous challenge. PMID:12190931

  12. Natural antibodies to glycans.

    PubMed

    Bovin, N V

    2013-07-01

    A wide variety of so-called natural antibodies (nAbs), i.e. immunoglobulins generated by B-1 cells, are directed to glycans. nAbs to glycans can be divided in three groups: 1) conservative nAbs, i.e. practically the same in all healthy donors with respect to their epitope specificity and level in blood; 2) allo-antibodies to blood group antigens; 3) plastic antibodies related to the first or the second group but discussed separately because their level changes considerably during diseases and some temporary conditions, in particular inflammation and pregnancy. Antibodies from the third group proved to be prospective markers of a number of diseases, whereas their unusual level (below or above the norm) is not necessarily the consequence of disease/state. Modern microarrays allowed the determination of the human repertoire, which proved to be unexpectedly broad. It was observed that the content of some nAbs reaches about 0.1% of total immunoglobulins. Immunoglobulins of M class dominate for most nAbs, constituting up to 80-90%. Their affinity (to a monovalent glycan, in KD terms) were found to be within the range 10(-4)-10(-6) M. Antibodies to Gal?1-3GlcNAc (Le(C)), 4-HSO3Gal?1-4GalNAc (4'-O-SuLN), Fuc?1-3GlcNAc, Fuc?1-4GlcNAc, GalNAc?1-3Gal (Adi), Gal?1-4Gal?1-4Glc (P(k)), Gal?1-4Gal?1-4GlcNAc (P1), GlcNAc?-terminated glycans, and hyaluronic acid should be noted among the nAbs revealed and studied during the last decade. At the same time, a kind of "taboo" is observed for a number of glycans: antibodies to Le(X) and Le(Y), and almost all gangliosides have not been observed in healthy persons. Many of the revealed nAbs were directed to constrained inner (core) part of glycan, directly adjoined to lipid of cell membrane or protein. The biological function of these nAbs remains unclear; for anti-core antibodies, a role of surveillance on appearance of aberrant, especially cancer, antigens is supposed. The first data related to oncodiagnostics based on quantitation of anti-glycan nAbs are reported. PMID:24010841

  13. Antibody modeling assessment.

    PubMed

    Almagro, Juan C; Beavers, Mary Pat; Hernandez-Guzman, Francisco; Maier, Johannes; Shaulsky, Jodi; Butenhof, Kenneth; Labute, Paul; Thorsteinson, Nels; Kelly, Kenneth; Teplyakov, Alexey; Luo, Jinquan; Sweet, Raymond; Gilliland, Gary L

    2011-11-01

    A blinded study to assess the state of the art in three-dimensional structure modeling of the variable region (Fv) of antibodies was conducted. Nine unpublished high-resolution x-ray Fab crystal structures covering a wide range of antigen-binding site conformations were used as benchmark to compare Fv models generated by four structure prediction methodologies. The methodologies included two homology modeling strategies independently developed by CCG (Chemical Computer Group) and Accerlys Inc, and two fully automated antibody modeling servers: PIGS (Prediction of ImmunoGlobulin Structure), based on the canonical structure model, and Rosetta Antibody Modeling, based on homology modeling and Rosetta structure prediction methodology. The benchmark structure sequences were submitted to Accelrys and CCG and a set of models for each of the nine antibody structures were generated. PIGS and Rosetta models were obtained using the default parameters of the servers. In most cases, we found good agreement between the models and x-ray structures. The average rmsd (root mean square deviation) values calculated over the backbone atoms between the models and structures were fairly consistent, around 1.2 Ĺ. Average rmsd values of the framework and hypervariable loops with canonical structures (L1, L2, L3, H1, and H2) were close to 1.0 Ĺ. H3 prediction yielded rmsd values around 3.0 Ĺ for most of the models. Quality assessment of the models and the relative strengths and weaknesses of the methods are discussed. We hope this initiative will serve as a model of scientific partnership and look forward to future antibody modeling assessments. PMID:21935986

  14. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  15. Her2 Monoclonal Antibodies, Antibody Drug Conjugates, and Site Specific Antibody Conjugate Methods

    Cancer.gov

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADC) can demonstrate high efficacy as cancer therapeutics, however, much more can be done to improve their efficacy and safety profile. Site-specific antibody drug conjugation is a promising way to do this.

  16. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-04-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed. PMID:25264572

  17. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Scott, Jamie; Larrick, James W; Plückthun, Andreas; Veldman, Trudi; Adams, Gregory P; Parren, Paul WHI; Chester, Kerry A; Bradbury, Andrew; Reichert, Janice M; Huston, James S

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Biology), who will discuss a systems approach for studying disease that is enabled by emerging technology; Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), who will discuss systems analysis of cell communication network dynamics for therapeutic biologics design; David Baker (University of Washington), who will describe computer-based design of smart protein therapeutics; and William Schief (The Scripps Research Institute), who will discuss epitope-focused immunogen design.   In this preview of the conference, the workshop and session chairs share their thoughts on what conference participants may learn in sessions on: (1) three-dimensional structure antibody modeling; (2) identifying clonal lineages from next-generation data sets of expressed VH gene sequences; (3) antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; (4) the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on the antibody response; (5) directed evolution; (6) antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; (7) use of knowledge-based design to guide development of complementarity-determining regions and epitopes to engineer or elicit the desired antibody; (8) optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; (9) antibodies in a complex environment; (10) polyclonal, oligoclonal and bispecific antibodies; (11) antibodies to watch in 2014; and (12) polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to gonadotropin subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, P.H.; Moyle, W.R.; Canfield, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies to peptide hormones, with their unifocal binding sites, can provide tools for understanding hormone structure and function. The paper focuses on techniques that are important for the study of monoclonal antibodies to chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), including hybridoma production, methods of screening for desired clones, properties of the monoclonal antibodies, effect of antibodies on hormone-receptor interaction, inhibition of binding of radiolabeled hCG, inhibition of hCG induced steroidogenesis, determination of relative orientation of epitopes, and synergistic actions of monoclonal antibodies to hCG.

  19. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially. PMID:22277519

  20. Commercial antibodies and their validation

    PubMed Central

    Voskuil, JLA

    2014-01-01

    Despite an impressive growth in the business of research antibodies a general lack of trust in commercial antibodies remains in place. A variety of issues, each one potentially causing an antibody to fail, underpin the frustrations that scientists endure. Lots of money goes to waste in buying and trying one failing antibody after the other without realizing all the pitfalls that come with the product: Antibodies can get inactivated, both the biological material and the assay itself can potentially be flawed, a single antibody featuring in many different catalogues can be deemed as a set of different products, and a bad choice of antibody type, wrong dilutions, and lack of proper validation can all jeopardize the intended experiments. Antibodies endorsed by scientific research papers do not always meet the scientist’s requirements either due to flawed specifications, or due to batch-to-batch variations. Antibodies can be found with Quality Control data obtained from previous batches that no longer represent the batch on sale. In addition, one cannot assume that every antibody is fit for every application. The best chance of success is to try an antibody that already was confirmed to perform correctly in the required platform. PMID:25324967

  1. Therapeutic antibodies against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Mark J.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics against cancer are highly successful in clinic and currently enjoy unprecedented recognition of their potential; 13 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for clinical use in the European Union and in the United States (one, mylotarg, was withdrawn from market in 2010). Three of the mAbs (bevacizumab, rituximab, trastuzumab) are in the top six selling protein therapeutics with sales in 2010 of more than $5 bln each. Hundreds of mAbs including bispecific mAbs and multispecific fusion proteins, mAbs conjugated with small molecule drugs and mAbs with optimized pharmacokinetics are in clinical trials. However, challenges remain and it appears that deeper understanding of mechanisms is needed to overcome major problems including resistance to therapy, access to targets, complexity of biological systems and individual variations. PMID:22520975

  2. Antibody-mediated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, W.D.; Lipsztein, R.; Dalton, J.F.

    1985-05-01

    Antibodies that react with antigens on the surface of tumor cells but not normal cells have great potential for cancer detection and therapy. If radiolabeled without loss of immunologic specificity, such antibodies may be able to deliver cytoxic amounts of radiation. Target- cell specificity and a high extraction coefficient are necessary with any radionuclide in order to minimize normal tissue irradiation. Tumor- cell-retention time and the rate of catabolized radionuclide will also influence ultimate applicability. Among the unanswered questions for choosing a radionuclide is the choice of particle emitter. Although classic beta emitters have been used in a number of clinical situations, they have not had a major impact on disease outcome except in diseases of the thyroid. Unfortunately, Auger emitters such as iodine 125 are cytotoxic only when localized within close proximity to the genome. On the other hand, alpha emitters such as astatine 211 eliminate the need for subcellular sequestration but not cell-specific localization. 34 references.

  3. Aberrant secondary antibody responses to sheep erythrocytes in rabbits with experimental syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Baughn, R E; Musher, D M

    1979-01-01

    Rabbits infected with Treponema pallidum have strikingly depressed in vivo immunoglobulin G responses to sheep erythrocytes. To gain further insight into the nature of this suppression, the immune responses of splenic and peripheral blood lymphocytes from infected rabbits to sheep erythrocytes were studied in vitro. Spleen cells from rabbits that had been sensitized with sheep erythrocytes during active syphilis had greatly decreased immunoglobulin M and G responses after in vitro incubation with sheep erythrocytes, when compared to the results obtained with cells from sensitized uninfected animals. Suppressor cells could be demonstrated in peripheral blood lymphocytes of control rabbits 6 months after sensitization with sheep erythrocytes; these cells could be removed by nylon wool filtration. When primary sensitization with sheep erythrocytes was carried out during active syphilis, these suppressor cells were not detectable in peripheral blood lymphocytes 6 to 9 months later. These findings provide further evidence that induction of immune responses may be abnormal early in treponemal infection and may help to explain the failure of the host to produce antibodies which eradicate the organism during the first 2 to 3 months of infection. PMID:157977

  4. The future of monoclonal antibody technology

    PubMed Central

    Zider, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid growth of monoclonal antibody-based products, new technologies have emerged for creating modified forms of antibodies, including fragments, conjugates and multi-specific antibodies. We created a database of 450 therapeutic antibodies in development to determine which technologies and indications will constitute the “next generation” of antibody products. We conclude that the antibodies of the future will closely resemble the antibodies that have already been approved for commercial sale. PMID:20676053

  5. Guinea-pig reaginic antibody

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R. A.; Hajos, Silvia E.

    1973-01-01

    The physicochemical and biological properties of purified guinea-pig reaginic antibody were studied. It is a labile protein different to ?1. Its antibody activity is completely destroyed by heating at 56° for 6 hours and by treatment with mercaptoethanol. The capacity to give PCA is decreased by repeated freezing and thawing. It is a bivalent antibody, haemagglutinating, does not fix complement and is capable of sensitizing guinea-pig skin for PCA reaction after a latent period of a week but not after 3 hours. Reaginic antibody appears on day 7–8 after the first inoculation and the higher levels (PCA reaction) are obtained at the eleventh to thirteenth days. After the fifteenth to seventeenth days the PCA is negative. The reaginic antibody does not pass the placenta. Higher levels of reaginic antibody were obtained when the guinea-pigs were inoculated with the antigen in saline with simultaneous inoculation, intraperitoneally, of killed Bordetella pertussis, phase I. PMID:4354828

  6. Glycosylation of recombinant antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Jefferis, Royston

    2005-01-01

    The adaptive immune system has the capacity to produce antibodies with a virtually infinite repertoire of specificities. Recombinant antibodies specific for human targets are established in the clinic as therapeutics and represent a major new class of drug. Therapeutic efficacy depends on the formation of complexes with target molecules and subsequent activation of downstream biologic effector mechanisms that result in elimination of the target. The activation of effector mechanisms is dependent on structural characteristics of the antibody molecule that result from posttranslational modifications, in particular, glycosylation. The production of therapeutic antibody with a consistent human glycoform profile has been and remains a considerable challenge to the biopharmaceutical industry. Recent research has shown that individual glycoforms of antibody may provide optimal efficacy for selected outcomes. Thus a further challenge will be the production of a second generation of antibody therapeutics customized for their clinical indication. PMID:15903235

  7. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is defined by the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with recurrent venous or arterial thromboembolism or pregnancy morbidity. Anti-thrombotic therapy is the mainstay of treatment given the high risk of recurrent thromboembolism that characterizes this condition. Despite the prothrombotic nature of APS, thrombocytopenia is present in a proportion of patients. which can complicate management and limit the use of antithrombotic therapy. The mechanism of APS-associated thrombocytopenia is multifactorial and its relation to thrombotic risk poorly characterized. However, the presence of thrombocytopenia does not appear to reduce thrombotic risk in patients with APS, who can develop thromboembolic complications necessitating antithrombotic treatment. In these cases, treatment of the thrombocytopenia may be necessary to facilitate administration of antithrombotic agents. Clinical trials have demonstrated that patients with antiphospholipid antibodies and venous thromboembolism should be treated with vitamin K antagonists (warfarin); that ischemic stroke may be treated with aspirin or warfarin; and that women with recurrent pregnancy loss should receive prophylactic-dose heparin and aspirin. However, application of these trial results to patients with APS-associated thrombocytopenia can be challenging since there are limited data on the optimal use of antithrombotic agents in this setting. Issues such as determining the platelet threshold at which antithrombotic agents can be safely used and managing patients with both bleeding and thromboembolic complications remain unresolved. Ultimately the risks and benefits of antithrombotic therapy, balanced against the severity of the thrombocytopenia and its potential bleeding risks, need to be assessed using an individualized patient approach. PMID:20008203

  8. The PnrA (Tp0319; TmpC) lipoprotein represents a new family of bacterial purine nucleoside receptor encoded within an ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-like operon in Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Deka, Ranjit K; Brautigam, Chad A; Yang, Xiaofeng F; Blevins, Jon S; Machius, Mischa; Tomchick, Diana R; Norgard, Michael V

    2006-03-24

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, cannot be cultivated in vitro. This constraint has severely impeded the study of the membrane biology of this complex human pathogen. A structure-to-function approach thus was adopted as a means of discerning the likely function of Tp0319, a 35-kDa cytoplasmic membrane-associated lipoprotein of T. pallidum formerly designated as TmpC. A 1.7-A crystal structure showed that recombinant Tp0319 (rTp0319) consists of two alpha/beta domains, linked by three crossovers, with a deep cleft between them akin to ATP-binding cassette (ABC) receptors. In the cleft, a molecule of inosine was bound. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that rTp0319 specifically binds purine nucleosides (dissociation constant (Kd) approximately 10(-7) M). This predilection for purine nucleosides by rTp0319 is consistent with its likely role as a receptor component of a cytoplasmic membrane-associated transporter system. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis of RNA isolated from rabbit tissue-extracted T. pallidum additionally showed that tp0319 is transcriptionally linked to four other downstream open reading frames, thereby supporting the existence of an ABC-like operon (tp0319-0323). We herein thus re-name tp0319 as purine nucleoside receptor A (pnrA), with its operonic partners tp0320-0323 designated as pnrB-E, respectively. Our study not only infers that PnrA transports purine nucleosides essential for the survival of T. pallidum within its obligate human host, but to our knowledge, this is the first description of an ABC-type nucleoside transport system in any bacterium. PnrA has been grouped with a functionally uncharacterized protein family (HBG016869), thereby implying that other members of the family may have similar nucleoside-binding function(s). PMID:16418175

  9. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg˛?-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg˛?-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg˛? in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.

  10. Antibodies: Protective, destructive and regulatory role

    SciTech Connect

    Milgrom, F.; Abeyounis, C.J.; Albini, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers under 10 subject headings. The headings are: Production and Function of Antibodies, Protective Role of Antibodies, Antibodies to Foreign and Neoplastic Cells, Autoantibodies, Regulatory Mechanisms, Allergy, Immune Complexes, Antibodies in Pregnancy and Aging, Administration of Antibodies for Prevention and Therapy, and Abstracts of Poster Presentations.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miraldi, F. )

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.48 references.

  12. Radiolabeled antibodies in cancer. Oncology Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories through the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiolabeled antibodies--labeling and imaging techniques; Radiolabeled antibodies--carcinoembryonic antigen; Radiolabeled antibodies--alpha-fetoprotein; Radiolabeled antibodies--human chorionic gonadotropin; Radiolabeled antibodies--ferritin; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of colorectal tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of malignant melanoma; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of urogenital tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of thyroid tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--other clinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--selected preclinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--reviews.

  13. Platelet-associated antibodies blood test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be a harmful substance. In the case of platelet antibodies, your body created antibodies to attack platelets. As ... This means that you do not have anti-platelet antibodies in your blood. Normal value ranges may vary ...

  14. Antibodies - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    NCI announces the release of monoclonal antipeptide antibodies from rabbit for distribution on the antibody portal. There are 60 recently added monoclonal antibodies, with 56 generated from mouse and 4 generated from rabbit.

  15. Micromechanical antibody sensor

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Jacobson, K. Bruce (Oak Ridge, TN); Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Knoxville, TN); Kennel, Stephen J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Warmack, Robert J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A sensor apparatus is provided using a microcantilevered spring element having a coating of a detector molecule such as an antibody or antigen. A sample containing a target molecule or substrate is provided to the coating. The spring element bends in response to the stress induced by the binding which occurs between the detector and target molecules. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers.

  16. Antimyenteric neuronal antibodies in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Howe, S; Eaker, E Y; Sallustio, J E; Peebles, C; Tan, E M; Williams, R C

    1994-08-01

    The pathogenesis of gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility in scleroderma is incompletely understood, although previous studies have proposed a neuropathic mechanism. We studied patients with scleroderma as compared with other connective tissue disease patients and normal controls for the presence of circulating antibodies to myenteric neurons. Serial dilutions of sera were overlaid on rat intestine, double-labeled with antineurofilament antibody as a myenteric plexus marker, and imaged using indirect immunofluorescence techniques. High titer sera (> or = 1:50) from 19 out of 41 scleroderma patients stained myenteric neurons, whereas none of 22 normals or 5 patients with idiopathic GI dysmotility were positive. Although 6 out of 20 SLE and 6 out of 10 mixed connective tissue disease patients' sera stained myenteric plexus neurons, when positive sera were absorbed with calf thymus extract to remove antinuclear antibody, 15 scleroderma sera, 0 SLE, and 2 mixed connective tissue disease patients retained positive staining of myenteric neurons. Western blotting using actin and neuronal intermediate filament preparations failed to show immunoreactivity with scleroderma sera containing antimyenteric neuronal antibodies. Paraneoplastic sera associated with GI dysmotility stained myenteric neurons in a different pattern than seen with scleroderma sera. A positive correlation between the presence of Raynaud's phenomenon and antimyenteric neuronal antibodies was observed in scleroderma patients. Our results indicate that IgG antibodies reacting with myenteric neurons are present in many patients with scleroderma. Although the neuronal antigen has not yet been identified, the presence of myenteric neuronal antibodies in patients with GI dysmotility and scleroderma suggests a neuropathic process. PMID:8040331

  17. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ? four new products per year, ? 70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion. PMID:25529996

  18. Reducing heterophilic antibody interference in immunoassays using single chain antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Tan, Ruimin; Fischer, Christopher J.; Victry, Kristin D.; Zangar, Richard C.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2011-12-15

    Sandwich ELISA microarrays have the potential to simultaneously quantify the levels of multiple diagnostic targets in a biological sample. However, as seen with traditional ELISA diagnostics, heterophilic antibodies (HA) in patient sera have the potential to cause interference in these assays. We demonstrate here that reducing the diagnostic capture antibody to its minimal functional unit, the variable heavy and light domains artificially connected with a short polypeptide linker (scFv), is an effective strategy for reducing the HA assay interference.

  19. Segregation of B and T cell epitopes of Treponema pallidum repeat protein K to variable and conserved regions during experimental syphilis infection.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Cecilia A; Molini, Barbara J; Lukehart, Sheila A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2002-07-15

    Robust immune responses clear millions of treponemes to resolve lesions of primary and secondary syphilis, but cannot clear the treponemes that lead to debilitating and sometimes fatal tertiary syphilis. It is also known that the rabbit model and humans can be reinfected with heterologous isolates. How some treponemes are able to escape the immune system is unknown. In our laboratories rabbits immunized with the Seattle Nichols strain Treponema pallidum repeat protein K (TprK) were previously shown to have attenuated lesion development following challenge. In other isolates, TprK was shown to have seven discrete variable regions, with sequence variation among and within isolates. Using overlapping synthetic 20-aa peptides, we demonstrate that during experimental infection with the Nichols strain, the T cell responses are directed to conserved regions, while the Ab responses are directed primarily to variable regions. Abs from rabbits immunized with recombinant TprK recognized conserved and variable regions, suggesting that the conserved regions are inherently as immunogenic as the variable regions. TprK variability may allow some treponemes to escape recognition from Abs. The variable region heterogeneity may help explain the lack of protection against heterologous isolates. PMID:12097401

  20. Chryseobacterium ureilyticum sp. nov., Chryseobacterium gambrini sp. nov., Chryseobacterium pallidum sp. nov. and Chryseobacterium molle sp. nov., isolated from beer-bottling plants.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Peter; Winkler, Ilka; Wolking, Dorothee; Kämpfer, Peter; Lipski, André

    2008-01-01

    Four Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming and non-motile bacterial strains were isolated from surfaces and biofilms associated with beer-bottling plants. Based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences these isolates were allocated to the genus Chryseobacterium. The sequence similarities of the isolates to the next most closely related type strains of this genus ranged from 96.4 to 98.3%. The presence of menaquinone MK-6 and predominant fatty acids 15:0 iso, 17:1 iso cis9, 15:0 iso 2-OH and 17:0 iso 3-OH supported the affiliation of these strains to the genus. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization, biochemical tests and chemotaxonomic properties allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of the strains from the next most closely related Chryseobacterium species with validly published names. Therefore, the isolates represent four novel species for which the names Chryseobacterium ureilyticum (type strain F-Fue-04IIIaaaa(T)=DSM 18017(T)=CCUG 52546(T)), Chryseobacterium gambrini (type strain 5-1St1a(T)=DSM 18014(T)=CCUG 52549(T)), Chryseobacterium pallidum (type strain 26-3St2b(T)=DSM 18015(T)=CCUG 52548(T)) and Chryseobacterium molle (type strain DW3(T)=DSM 18016(T)=CCUG 52547(T)) are proposed. PMID:18175677

  1. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of the interaction between two periplasmic Treponema pallidum lipoproteins that are components of a TPR-protein-associated TRAP transporter (TPAT)

    PubMed Central

    Brautigam, Chad A.; Deka, Ranjit K.; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporters (TRAP-Ts) are bacterial transport systems that have been implicated in the import of small molecules into the cytoplasm. A newly discovered subfamily of TRAP-Ts (TPATs) has four components. Three are common to both TRAP-Ts and TPATs: the P component, a ligand-binding protein, and a transmembrane symporter apparatus comprising the M and Q components (M and Q are sometimes fused to form a single polypeptide). TPATs are distinguished from TRAP-Ts by the presence of a unique protein called the “T component”. In Treponema pallidum, this protein (TatT) is a water-soluble trimer whose protomers are each perforated by a pore. Its respective P component (TatPT) interacts with the TatT in vitro and in vivo. In this work, we further characterized this interaction. Co-crystal structures of two complexes between the two proteins confirm that up to three monomers of TatPT can bind to the TatT trimer. A putative ligand-binding cleft of TatPT aligns with the pore of TatT, strongly suggesting ligand transfer between T and PT. We used a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and analytical ultracentrifugation to derive thermodynamic parameters for the interactions. These observations confirm that the observed crystallographic interface is recapitulated in solution. These results prompt a hypothesis of the molecular mechanism(s) of hydrophobic ligand transport by the TPATs. PMID:22504226

  2. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    MedlinePLUS

    Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining of cells. These substances prevent blood clotting in ... Most often lupus anticoagulants and aPL are found in people with ... as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Lupus anticoagulants and ...

  3. Heterophile antibodies in human transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, F. T.; Kano, K.; Milgrom, F.

    1968-01-01

    Sensitization of human recipients with transplantation antigens (leucocytes, skin, or kidney allografts) has resulted in the appearance of serum hemagglutinins directed against sheep, guinea pig, and rat erythrocytes. Such hemagglutinins have been identified as IgG and IgM antibodies. Their appearance was not related to AB0 erythrocyte group incompatibility between donors and recipients, and the antibodies were not of the Forssman or Paul-Bunnel type. The antibody responses appeared to be primarily directed against antigen(s) present on rat erythrocytes, but shared to varying extents by other species. The peak antibody titers occurred in association with allograft rejection. In this regard, they may be of interest as a possible early warning system for the diagnosis and prompt management of rejection crises in clinical organ transplantation. Images PMID:4866325

  4. Surface chemistries for antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays promise to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The original technology for printing ELISA microarray chips and capturing antibodies on slides was derived from the DNA microarray field. However, due to the need to maintain antibody structure and function when immobilized, surface chemistries used for DNA microarrays are not always appropriate for ELISA microarrays. In order to identify better surface chemistries for antibody capture, a number of commercial companies and academic research groups have developed new slide types that could improve antibody function in microarray applications. In this review we compare and contrast the commercially available slide chemistries, as well as highlight some promising recent advances in the field.

  5. Radioimmunoguided surgery using monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, E.W. Jr.; Mojzisik, C.M.; Hinkle, G.H. Jr.; Sampsel, J.; Siddiqi, M.A.; Tuttle, S.E.; Sickle-Santanello, B.; Colcher, D.; Thurston, M.O.; Bell, J.G.

    1988-11-01

    The potential proficiency of radioimmunoguided surgery in the intraoperative detection of tumors was assessed using labeled monoclonal antibody B72.3 in 66 patients with tissue-proved tumor. Monoclonal antibody B72.3 was injected 5 to 42 days preoperatively, and the hand-held gamma-detecting probe was used intraoperatively to detect the presence of tumor. Intraoperative probe counts of less than 20 every 2 seconds, or tumor-to-adjacent normal tissue ratios less than 2:1 were considered negative (system failure). Positive probe counts were detected in 5 of 6 patients with primary colon cancer (83 percent), in 31 of 39 patients with recurrent colon cancer (79 percent), in 4 of 5 patients with gastric cancer (80 percent), in 3 of 8 patients with breast cancer (37.5 percent), and in 4 of 8 patients with ovarian cancer (50 percent) undergoing second-look procedures. Additional patients in each group were scored as borderline positive. Overall, radioimmunoguided surgery using B72.3 identified tumors in 47 patients (71.2 percent), bordered on positive in 6 patients (9.1 percent), and failed to identify tumor in 13 patients (19.7 percent). Improved selection of patients for antigen-positive tumors, the use of higher affinity second-generation antibodies, alternate routes of antibody administration, alternate radionuclides, and more sophisticatedly bioengineered antibodies and antibody combinations should all lead to improvements in radioimmunoguided surgery.

  6. Novel antibodies as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zafir-Lavie, I; Michaeli, Y; Reiter, Y

    2007-05-28

    In recent years antibodies, whether generated by traditional hybridoma technology or by recombinant DNA strategies, have evolved from Paul Ehrlich's 'magic bullets' to a modern age 'guided missile'. In the recent years of immunologic research, we are witnessing development in the fields of antigen screening and protein engineering in order to create specific anticancer remedies. The developments in the field of recombinant DNA, protein engineering and cancer biology have let us gain insight into many cancer-related mechanisms. Moreover, novel techniques have facilitated tools allowing unique distinction between malignantly transformed cells, and regular ones. This understanding has paved the way for the rational design of a new age of pharmaceuticals: monoclonal antibodies and their fragments. Antibodies can select antigens on both a specific and a high-affinity account, and further implementation of these qualities is used to target cancer cells by specifically identifying exogenous antigens of cancer cell populations. The structure of the antibody provides plasticity resonating from its functional sites. This review will screen some of the many novel antibodies and antibody-based approaches that are being currently developed for clinical applications as the new generation of anticancer agents. PMID:17530025

  7. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, David Sherman

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  8. Antibodies to watch in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    The commercial pipeline of recombinant antibody therapeutics is robust and dynamic. As of early December 2014, a total of 6 such products (vedolizumab, siltuximab, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, blinatumomab) were granted first marketing approvals in 2014. As discussed in this perspective on antibodies in late-stage development, the outlook for additional approvals, potentially still in 2014 and certainly in 2015, is excellent as marketing applications for 6 antibody therapeutics (secukinumab, evolocumab, mepolizumab, dinutuximab, nivolumab, necitumumab) are undergoing a first regulatory review in the EU or US. Of the 39 novel mAbs currently in Phase 3 studies, a marketing application for one (alirocumab) may be submitted in late 2014, and marketing application submissions for at least 4 (reslizumab, ixekizumab, ocrelizumab, obiltoxaximab) are expected in 2015. Other ‘antibodies to watch’ are those in Phase 3 studies with estimated primary completion dates in late 2014 or 2015, which includes 13 for non-cancer indications (brodalumab, bimagrumab, bococizumab, MABp1, gevokizumab, dupilumab, sirukumab, sarilumab, tildrakizumab, guselkumab, epratuzumab, combination of actoxumab + bezlotoxumab, romosozumab) and 2 (racotumomab and clivatuzumab tetraxetan) undergoing evaluation as treatments for cancer. In addition to the novel antibody therapeutics mentioned, biosimilar infliximab and biosimilar trastuzumab are ‘antibodies to watch’ in 2015 because of their potential for entry into the US market and regulatory review, respectively. PMID:25484055

  9. SPECIFICITY OF ANTIBODIES: UNEXPECTED CROSS-REACTIVITY OF ANTIBODIES DIRECTED AGAINST THE EXCITATORY AMINO ACID

    E-print Network

    Bergles, Dwight

    SPECIFICITY OF ANTIBODIES: UNEXPECTED CROSS-REACTIVITY OF ANTIBODIES DIRECTED AGAINST--Specific antibodies are essential tools for identify- ing individual proteins in biological samples. While genera- tion of antibodies is often straightforward, determination of the antibody specificity is not. Here we

  10. Fluorophore Conjugation of Antibodies Here Alexa conjugation of IgG antibodies

    E-print Network

    Lamond, Angus I.

    Fluorophore Conjugation of Antibodies Here Alexa conjugation of IgG antibodies Reagents conjugating an antibody to Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 546, a range of Alexa dye to antibody concentrations mg antibody. Compare each conjugate by cell staining. Select conjugate with the brightest `positive

  11. Rab antibody characterization: comparison of Rab14 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Andrew J; McCaffrey, Mary W

    2015-01-01

    Rab14 functions in the endocytic recycling pathway, having been implicated in the trafficking of the ADAM10 protease, GLUT4, and components of cell-cell junctions to the plasma membrane. It localizes predominantly to endocytic membranes with a pool also found on trans-Golgi network (TGN) membranes, and is most closely related to the Rab11 subfamily of GTPases. Certain intracellular bacteria such as Legionella pneumophila, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Salmonella enterica utilize Rab14 to promote their maturation and replication. Furthermore, the HIV envelope glycoprotein complex subverts the function of Rab14, and its effector the Rab Coupling Protein (RCP), in order to direct its transport to the plasma membrane. Since the use of antibodies is critical for the functional characterization of cellular proteins and their specificity and sensitivity is crucial in drawing reliable conclusions, it is important to rigorously characterize antibodies prior to their use in cell biology or biochemistry experiments. This is all the more critical in the case of antibodies raised to a protein which belongs to a protein family. In this chapter, we present our evaluation of the specificity and sensitivity of a number of commercially available Rab14 antibodies. We hope that this analysis provides guidance for researchers for antibody characterization prior to its use in cellular biology or biochemistry. PMID:25800840

  12. Autologous antibodies that bind neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujing; Sholler, Giselle S; Shukla, Girja S; Pero, Stephanie C; Carman, Chelsea L; Zhao, Ping; Krag, David N

    2015-11-01

    Antibody therapy of neuroblastoma is promising and our goal is to derive antibodies from patients with neuroblastoma for developing new therapeutic antibodies. The feasibility of using residual bone marrow obtained for clinical indications as a source of tumor cells and a source of antibodies was assessed. From marrow samples, neuroblastoma cells were recovered, grown in cell culture and also implanted into mice to create xenografts. Mononuclear cells from the marrow were used as a source to generate phage display antibody libraries and also hybridomas. Growth of neuroblastoma patient cells was possible both in vitro and as xenografts. Antibodies from the phage libraries and from the monoclonal hybridomas bound autologous neuroblastoma cells with some selectivity. It appears feasible to recover neuroblastoma cells from residual marrow specimens and to generate human antibodies that bind autologous neuroblastoma cells. Expansion of this approach is underway to collect more specimens, optimize methods to generate antibodies, and to evaluate the bioactivity of neuroblastoma-binding antibodies. PMID:26210205

  13. Communication: Antibody stability and behavior on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Derek B.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2015-08-01

    Antibody microarrays have the potential to revolutionize molecular detection in scientific, medical, and other biosensor applications, but their current use is limited because of poor reliability. It is hypothesized that one reason for their poor performance results from strong antibody-surface interactions that destabilize the antibody structure and create steric interference for antigen recognition. Using a recently developed coarse-grain protein-surface model that has been parameterized against experimental data, antibody-surface interactions for two antibody orientations on two types of surfaces have been investigated. The results show that regardless of attachment geometry, antibodies tend to collapse onto hydrophobic surfaces and exhibit lower overall stability compared to antibodies on hydrophilic surfaces or in bulk solution. The results provide an unprecedented view into the dynamics of antibodies on surfaces and offer new insights into the poor performance exhibited by current antibody microarrays.

  14. Production of recombinant antibodies using bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Shukra, A. M.; Sridevi, N. V.; Dev Chandran

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant antibody fragments such as Fab, scFv, diabodies, triabodies, single domain antibodies and minibodies have recently emerged as potential alternatives to monoclonal antibodies, which can be engineered using phage display technology. These antibodies match the strengths of conventionally produced monoclonal antibodies and offer advantages for the development of immunodiagnostic kits and assays. These fragments not only retain the specificity of the whole monoclonal antibodies but also easy to express and produce in prokaryotic expression system. Further, these antibody fragments are genetically stable, less expensive, easy to modify in response to viral mutations and safer than monoclonal antibodies for use in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This review describes the potential of antibody fragments generated using phage display and their use as diagnostic reagents. PMID:24883194

  15. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-22

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  16. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  17. Communication: Antibody stability and behavior on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bush, Derek B; Knotts, Thomas A

    2015-08-14

    Antibody microarrays have the potential to revolutionize molecular detection in scientific, medical, and other biosensor applications, but their current use is limited because of poor reliability. It is hypothesized that one reason for their poor performance results from strong antibody-surface interactions that destabilize the antibody structure and create steric interference for antigen recognition. Using a recently developed coarse-grain protein-surface model that has been parameterized against experimental data, antibody-surface interactions for two antibody orientations on two types of surfaces have been investigated. The results show that regardless of attachment geometry, antibodies tend to collapse onto hydrophobic surfaces and exhibit lower overall stability compared to antibodies on hydrophilic surfaces or in bulk solution. The results provide an unprecedented view into the dynamics of antibodies on surfaces and offer new insights into the poor performance exhibited by current antibody microarrays. PMID:26277119

  18. The transition from closed to open conformation of Treponema pallidum outer membrane-associated lipoprotein TP0453 involves membrane sensing and integration by two amphipathic helices.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Amit; Zhu, Guangyu; Desrosiers, Daniel C; Eggers, Christian H; Mulay, Vishwaroop; Anand, Arvind; McArthur, Fiona A; Romano, Fabian B; Caimano, Melissa J; Heuck, Alejandro P; Malkowski, Michael G; Radolf, Justin D

    2011-12-01

    The molecular architecture and composition of the outer membrane (OM) of Treponema pallidum (Tp), the noncultivable agent of venereal syphilis, differ considerably from those of typical Gram-negative bacteria. Several years ago we described TP0453, the only lipoprotein associated with the inner leaflet of the Tp OM. Whereas polypeptides of other treponemal lipoproteins are hydrophilic, non-lipidated TP0453 can integrate into membranes, a property attributed to its multiple amphipathic helices (AHs). Furthermore, membrane integration of the TP0453 polypeptide was found to increase membrane permeability, suggesting the molecule functions in a porin-like manner. To better understand the mechanism of membrane integration of TP0453 and its physiological role in Tp OM biogenesis, we solved its crystal structure and used mutagenesis to identify membrane insertion elements. The crystal structure of TP0453 consists of an ?/?/?-fold and includes five stably folded AHs. In high concentrations of detergent, TP0453 transitions from a closed to open conformation by lateral movement of two groups of AHs, exposing a large hydrophobic cavity. Triton X-114 phase partitioning, liposome floatation assay, and bis-1-anilino-8-naphthalenesulfonate binding revealed that two adjacent AHs are critical for membrane sensing/integration. Using terbium-dipicolinic acid complex-loaded large unilamellar vesicles, we found that TP0453 increased efflux of fluorophore only at acidic pH. Gel filtration and cross-linking experiments demonstrated that one AH critical for membrane sensing/insertion also forms a dimeric interface. Based on structural dynamics and comparison with Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoproteins LprG and LppX, we propose that TP0453 functions as a carrier of lipids, glycolipids, and/or derivatives during OM biogenesis. PMID:21965687

  19. Antibody recognition of carbohydrate epitopes†.

    PubMed

    Haji-Ghassemi, Omid; Blackler, Ryan J; Martin Young, N; Evans, Stephen V

    2015-09-01

    Carbohydrate antigens are valuable as components of vaccines for bacterial infectious agents and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and for generating immunotherapeutics against cancer. The crystal structures of anti-carbohydrate antibodies in complex with antigen reveal the key features of antigen recognition and provide information that can guide the design of vaccines, particularly synthetic ones. This review summarizes structural features of anti-carbohydrate antibodies to over 20 antigens, based on six categories of glyco-antigen: (i) the glycan shield of HIV glycoproteins; (ii) tumor epitopes; (iii) glycolipids and blood group A antigen; (iv) internal epitopes of bacterial lipopolysaccharides; (v) terminal epitopes on polysaccharides and oligosaccharides, including a group of antibodies to Kdo-containing Chlamydia epitopes; and (vi) linear homopolysaccharides. PMID:26033938

  20. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shuptrine, Casey; Surana, Rishi; Weiner, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, the clinical utility of monoclonal antibodies has been realized and antibodies are now a mainstay for the treatment of cancer. Antibodies have the unique capacity to target and kill tumor cells while simultaneously activating immune effectors to kill tumor cells through the complement cascade or antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). This multifaceted mechanism of action combined with target specificity underlies the capacity of antibodies to elicit anti-tumor responses while minimizing the frequency and magnitude of adverse events. This review will focus on mechanisms of action, clinical applications and putative mechanisms of resistance to monoclonal antibody therapy in the context of cancer. PMID:22245472

  2. Novel Antibody Vectors for Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Olafsen, Tove; Wu, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    Non-invasive molecular imaging approaches include nuclear, optical, MRI, CT, ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging, which require accumulation of a signal delivered by a probe at the target site. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are high affinity molecules that can be used for specific, high signal delivery to cell surface molecules. However, their long circulation time in blood makes them unsuitable as imaging probes. Efforts to improve antibodies pharmacokinetics without compromising affinity and specificity have been made through protein engineering. Antibody variants that differ in antigen binding sites and size have been generated and evaluated as imaging probes to target tissues of interest. Fast clearing fragments such as single-chain Fv (scFv; 25 kDa) with one antigen binding site (monovalent) demonstrated low accumulation in tumors due the low exposure time to the target. Using scFv as building block to produce larger, bivalent fragments such as scFv dimers (diabodies, 50 kDa) and scFv-fusion proteins (80 kDa minibodies and 105 kDa scFv-Fc) resulted in higher tumor accumulation due to their longer residence time in blood. Imaging studies with these fragments following radiolabeling have demonstrated excellent, high contrast images in gamma cameras and PET scanners. Several studies have also investigated antibody fragments conjugated to fluorescence (near infrared dyes), bioluminescence (luciferases) and quantum dots for optical imaging and iron oxides nanoparticles for MRI. However, these studies indicate that there are several factors that influence successful targeting and imaging. These include stability of the antibody fragment, the labeling chemistry (direct or indirect), whether critical residues are modified, the number of antigen expressed on the cell, and whether the target has a rapid recycling rate or internalizes upon binding. The preclinical data presented are compelling and it is evident that antibody-based molecular imaging tracers will play an important future role in the diagnosis and management of cancer and other diseases. PMID:20350626

  3. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  4. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    DOEpatents

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  5. The European antibody network's practical guide to finding and validating suitable antibodies for research.

    PubMed

    Roncador, Giovanna; Engel, Pablo; Maestre, Lorena; Anderson, Amanda P; Cordell, Jacqueline L; Cragg, Mark S; Šerbec, Vladka ?; Jones, Margaret; Lisnic, Vanda J; Kremer, Leonor; Li, Demin; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Pascual, Núria; Rodríguez-Barbosa, Jose-Ignacio; Torensma, Ruurd; Turley, Helen; Pulford, Karen; Banham, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are widely exploited as research/diagnostic tools and therapeutics. Despite providing exciting research opportunities, the multitude of available antibodies also offers a bewildering array of choice. Importantly, not all companies comply with the highest standards, and thus many reagents fail basic validation tests. The responsibility for antibodies being fit for purpose rests, surprisingly, with their user. This paper condenses the extensive experience of the European Monoclonal Antibody Network to help researchers identify antibodies specific for their target antigen. A stepwise strategy is provided for prioritising antibodies and making informed decisions regarding further essential validation requirements. Web-based antibody validation guides provide practical approaches for testing antibody activity and specificity. We aim to enable researchers with little or no prior experience of antibody characterization to understand how to determine the suitability of their antibody for its intended purpose, enabling both time and cost effective generation of high quality antibody-based data fit for publication. PMID:26418356

  6. Chemical engineering of cell penetrating antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Lou, D; Burkett, J; Kohler, H

    2001-08-01

    Antibodies, being exquisitely specific tools in biology, are routinely used to detect and identify intra-cellular structures. However, current intra-cellular application of antibodies requires that the membrane be rendered leaky, resulting in the death of cells. Here, we present a novel method to allow antibodies to penetrate the cellular membrane of living cells without affecting cell viability. A peptide (MTS, membrane transport sequence) that facilitates transport across membranes has been site-specifically attached to antibodies. MTS-antibodies enter the living cells in culture and can be detected by immunofluorescence and ELISA after extraction. Cellular structures are visualized in living cells using a specific MTS-antibody. Antibodies with membrane penetrating properties can become an important tool for the study of intra-cellular processes in living cells. Furthermore, such membrane penetrating antibodies can be used to selectively stimulate or suppress functions of the cellular machinery. PMID:11406159

  7. Towards a carbon nanotube antibody sensor

    E-print Network

    Bojö, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This work investigated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/polymer-protein A complexes for optically reporting antibody concentration via a change in near infrared fluorescent emission after antibody binding. SWNT have ...

  8. Antarctic seals carry antibodies against seal herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Stenvers, O; Plötz, J; Ludwig, H

    1992-01-01

    Weddell seals in the Antarctica had high neutralizing antibody titres to seal- and feline herpesvirus and none against phocine distemper virus. Crab-eater seals were free of antibodies. This suggests an evolutionary wide spread of seal herpesvirus. PMID:1562238

  9. Abnormal Glycoprotein Antibodies Possible Detection Biomarkers

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have found that cancer patients produce antibodies that target abnormal glycoproteins (proteins with sugar molecules attached) made by their tumors. The result of this work suggests that antitumor antibodies in the blood may provide a fruitful

  10. Mechanisms of Allergen-Antibody Interaction of Cockroach Allergen Bla g 2 with Monoclonal Antibodies

    E-print Network

    Mechanisms of Allergen-Antibody Interaction of Cockroach Allergen Bla g 2 with Monoclonal Antibodies That Inhibit IgE Antibody Binding Jill Glesner1 , Sabina Wu¨ nschmann1 , Mi Li2,3 , Alla Gustchina is strongly associated with asthma, and involves the production of IgE antibodies against inhaled allergens

  11. Temperature-Triggered Purification of Antibodies

    E-print Network

    Chen, Wilfred

    Temperature-Triggered Purification of Antibodies Jae-Young Kim,1,2 Ashok Mulchandani,1 Wilfred Chen) to reversibly precipitate was combined with the high affinity and specificity of antibody-binding do- mains such as Protein G, Protein L, or Protein LG as a general method for antibody purification that combines

  12. Effects of medium concentration on antibody production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J.

    1984-01-01

    Antibody production by two different cell lines was measured as the media were supplemented with varied amounts of glucose and fetal bovine serum. Both cell lines elaborated antidinitrophenyl hapten antibodies. Two basic media were used: RPMI 1640 and Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. The production of antibodies was followed from 0 to 180 h and was assayed by radioimmunoassay.

  13. Structure and specificity of lamprey monoclonal antibodies

    E-print Network

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Structure and specificity of lamprey monoclonal antibodies Brantley R. Herrin*§ , Matthew N. Alder with particulate antigens induces VLR-B-bearing lymphocytes to secrete antigen-specific VLR-B antibodies. Here, we describe the production of recombinant VLR-B antibodies specific for BclA, a major coat protein of Bacillus

  14. Anti-DNA antibodies in SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 8 chapters. Some of the titles are: Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE: Historical Perspective; Specificity of Anti-DNA Antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Monoclonial Autoimmune Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Structure--Function Analyses of Anti-DNA Autoantibodies.

  15. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic...

  16. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic...

  17. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic...

  18. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic...

  19. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic...

  20. Fos expression following activation of the ventral pallidum in normal rats and in a model of Parkinson's Disease: implications for limbic system and basal ganglia interactions.

    PubMed

    Turner, Michael S; Gray, Thackery S; Mickiewicz, Amanda L; Napier, T Celeste

    2008-09-01

    The circuit-related consequences of activating the ventral pallidum (VP) are not well known, and lacking in particular is how these effects are altered in various neuropathological states. To help to address these paucities, this study investigated the brain regions affected by VP activation by quantifying neurons that stain for Fos-like immunoreactivity (ir). Fos-ir was assessed after intra-pallidal injections of the excitatory amino acid agonist, NMDA, or the GABA(A) antagonist, bicuculline in normal rats and in those rendered Parkinsonian-like by lesioning dopaminergic neurons with the neurotoxin, 6-OHDA. We hypothesized that activation of the VP will alter the activity state of brain regions associated with both the basal ganglia and limbic system, and that this influence would be modified in the Parkinsonian state. Blocking tonically activated GABA(A) receptors with bicuculline (50 ng/0.5 microl) elevated Fos-ir in the VP to 423% above the contralateral, vehicle-injected side. Likewise, intra-VP NMDA (0.23 microg or 0.45 microg/0.5 microl), dose-dependently increased the number of pallidal neurons expressing Fos-ir by 224 and 526%, respectively. At higher NMDA doses, the density of Fos-ir neurons was not elevated above control levels. This inverted U-shaped profile was mirrored by a VP output structure, the medial subthalamic nucleus (mSTN). The mSTN showed a 289% increase in Fos-ir neurons with intra-VP injections of 0.45 microg NMDA, and this response was halved following intra-VP injections of 0.9 microg NMDA. Of the 12 other brain regions measured, three showed VP NMDA-induced enhancements in Fos-ir: the frontal cortex, entopeduncular nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata, all regions associated with the basal ganglia. In a second study, we evaluated the NMDA activation profile in a rat model of Parkinson's Disease (PD) which was created by a unilateral injection of 6-OHDA into the rostral substantia nigra pars compacta. Comparisons of responses to intra-VP NMDA between the hemispheres ipsilateral and contralateral to the lesion revealed that Fos-ir cells in the pedunculopontine nucleus was reduced by 62%, whereas Fos-ir for the basolateral amygdala and STN was reduced by 32 and 42%, respectively. These findings support the concept that the VP can influence both the basal ganglia and the limbic system, and that that the nature of this influence is modified in an animal model of PD. As the VP regulates motivation and cognition, adaptations in this system may contribute to the mood and mnemonic disorders that can accompany PD. PMID:18663473

  1. Antibody biosimilars: Fears or opportunities?

    PubMed Central

    Guillon-Munos, Audrey; Daguet, Arnaud; Watier, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    The annual “LabEx MAbImprove industrial workshops” are primarily intended to provide scientists involved in therapeutic antibodies, a comprehensive view about topics of interest for the pharmaceutical industry. They are organized by the “LabEx MAbImprove industrial committee”, for this first edition especially in partnership with ARITT, the regional agency for innovation and technology transfer which operates in the French Région Centre, the 1st French region for pharmaceutical production. The 2013 edition, held May 28 at the Vinci Center of Tours, was dedicated to antibody biosimilars. Depending on opinions, the impending expiry of antibody patents and the imminent marketing approval of competitors to blockbusters can be perceived as good or bad things. Fears or opportunities? Risks for patients? Breath of fresh air for the health systems? Opportunity for re-industrializing France? In this context, it is necessary for people to form a fair and informed opinion on the current landscape of antibody biosimilars. In particular, this is especially important for scientists from the academic world, from the industry or from the regulation agencies, for pharmacists, for pharmacovigilance specialists, for health authorities, and staff from health insurance and decision makers. The first session was devoted to market and regulatory issues, and included both an overview of the evolution of the patent landscape and a description of biosimilars regulation in the European Union (EU). This session was closed by a talk on manufacturing processes for biosimilars. In the next session, quality control attributes of biosimilars were discussed and compared with the consistent quality of biotechnology products to raise the question: “How close is close enough?” In vitro assays for evaluating the Fc function of therapeutic antibodies were also discussed. The third session focused on development of biosimilars and primarily on the stepwise process for introducing an antibody biosimilar on the EU market, and included a presentation of the ongoing clinical evaluation of an infliximab biosimilar. The session concluded with a rich debate on the indication extrapolation of a biosimilar compared to the originator. The last session was dedicated to societal issues and focused on two aspects: (1) the need of biosimilars for EU health economy; and (2) last but not least, the ethical issues about clinical evaluation of biosimilars. All speakers and attendees enjoyed this very stimulating and rewarding meeting, which gathered many people with divergent scientific backgrounds from the academic or industrial world. PMID:24714167

  2. Therapeutic antibodies: Discovery, design and deployment.

    PubMed

    Ramsland, Paul A; Hutchinson, Andrew T; Carter, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have come of age with major progress being made in cancer, autoimmunity and chronic inflammation, as well as a wide range of other human diseases. Antibody engineering is further driving development of novel antibody formats and genetically modified cell-based therapies that harness the power of the immune system to progress cures in otherwise intractable human diseases. Nevertheless, there are still significant challenges ahead for basic and applied research relating to therapeutic antibodies. This special issue of the journal provides reviews and opinions that relate to the discovery, design and deployment of antibodies as therapeutics. PMID:25990602

  3. Production of therapeutic antibodies with controlled fucosylation

    PubMed Central

    Yamane-Ohnuki, Naoko

    2009-01-01

    The clinical success of therapeutic antibodies is demonstrated by the number of antibody therapeutics that have been brought to market and the increasing number of therapeutic antibodies in development. Recombinant antibodies are molecular-targeted therapeutic agents and represent a major new class of drugs. However, it is still very important to optimize and maximize the clinical efficacy of therapeutic antibodies, in part to help lower the cost of therapeutic antibodies by potentially reducing the dose or the duration of treatment. Clinical trials using therapeutic antibodies fully lacking core fucose residue in the Fc oligosaccharides are currently underway, and their remarkable physiological activities in humans in vivo have attracted attention as next-generation therapeutic antibody approaches with improved efficacy. Thus, an industrially applicable antibody production process that provides consistent yields of fully non-fucosylated antibody therapeutics with fixed quality has become a key goal in the successful development of next-generation therapeutic agents. In this article, we review the current technologies for production of therapeutic antibodies with control of fucosylation of the Fc N-glycans. PMID:20065644

  4. Immunologic and pharmacologic concepts of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zuckier, L S; Rodriguez, L D; Scharff, M D

    1989-07-01

    While monoclonal antibodies have solved many of the difficulties of using immunologic reagents for radioimmunodiagnosis and therapy, in the 13 years since their introduction a number of persistent problems remain, most notably a low yield of antibody-producing cells from the fusion process, difficulty in obtaining high-affinity antibodies, and the potential immunogenicity of murine immunoglobulins (Igs). Several solutions are under development, including fusion techniques that enrich for cells producing desired antibodies, production of human-mouse chimeric antibodies by recombinant DNA technology, and the generation of human monoclonal antibodies by promising new approaches. Until these upcoming methodologies are established, and to better direct their development and application, a sound understanding of the pharmacology of presently available native and modified monoclonal antibodies is crucial. Although much has been already determined in this area, a great deal of further clarification remains necessary. PMID:2669128

  5. Antibodies directed against receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    FAUVEL, Bénédicte; Yasri, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30 therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have already been approved for cancers and inflammatory diseases, and monoclonal antibodies continue to be one of the fastest growing classes of therapeutic molecules. Because aberrant signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is a commonly observed factor in cancer, most of the subclasses of RTKs are being extensively studied as potential targets for treating malignancies. The first two RTKs that have been targeted by antibody therapy, with five currently marketed antibodies, are the growth factor receptors EGFR and HER2. However, due to systemic side effects, refractory patients and the development of drug resistance, these treatments are being challenged by emerging therapeutics. This review examines current monoclonal antibody therapies against RTKs. After an analysis of agents that have already been approved, we present an analysis of antibodies in clinical development that target RTKs. Finally, we highlight promising RTKs that are emerging as new oncological targets for antibody-based therapy. PMID:24859229

  6. Antibody engineering and therapeutics conference

    PubMed Central

    Larrick, James W; Parren, Paul WHI; Huston, James S; Plückthun, Andreas; Bradbury, Andrew; Tomlinson, Ian M; Chester, Kerry A; Burton, Dennis R; Adams, Gregory P; Weiner, Louis M; Scott, Jamie K; Alfenito, Mark R; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    The 25th anniversary of the Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics Conference, the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA, December 7–11, 2014. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the event will celebrate past successes, educate participants on current activities and offer a vision of future progress in the field. Keynote addresses will be given by academic and industry experts Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Ira Pastan (National Cancer Institute), James Wells (University of California, San Francisco), Ian Tomlinson (GlaxoSmithKline) and Anthony Rees (Rees Consulting AB and Emeritus Professor, University of Bath). These speakers will provide updates of their work, placed in the context of the substantial growth of the industry over the past 25 years. PMID:25517297

  7. Antinuclear antibodies in rosacea patients

    PubMed Central

    Salamon, Ma?gorzata; McCauliffe, Daniel; Sysa-J?drzejowska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Rosacea is a common inflammatory disorder, characterized by a spectrum of facial manifestations. The clinical similarity to other dermatoses, like lupus erythematosus, might lead to misdiagnosis, particularly in patients with elevated antinuclear antibody titers. Aim To assess the frequency, titer and specificity of antinuclear antibodies in rosacea patients and correlate these findings with clinical features. Material and methods The study included 101 rosacea patients and 26 sex- and age-matched controls. Immunofluorescence antinuclear antibody testing was performed on HEp-2 substrates. Patients’ sera with ANA titers of 1 : 160 or higher were evaluated by Euroline analysis. Results Over a half (53.5%) of rosacea patients had an ANA titer greater than or equal to 1 : 160. Within this group 13.86% had a titer of 1 : 320, 8.91% had a titer of 1 : 640, and 6.93% had a titer of 1 : 1,280 or higher. The specificity of these antibodies could not be identified. Elevated ANA titers were present more often in women (55.8%) than in men (44.15%). Only two of 26 healthy volunteers had elevated ANA titers. One had a titer of 1 : 160 and the other of 1 : 320. During a two-year observation period, after the initial ANA testing, none of the patients with ANA titers above 1 : 640 developed an apparent autoimmune disorder. Conclusions Elevated ANA titers are commonly found in rosacea patients, what with simultaneously existing facial erythema and photosensitivity might lead to misdiagnosis of lupus erythematosus. Clinicians should beware of these findings to avoid misdiagnosing lupus erythematosus in rosacea patients with elevated ANA titers. PMID:24278039

  8. STUDIES ON FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY STAINING

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Gerald; Slizys, Irene S.; Chase, Merrill W.

    1961-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the non-specific fluorescent staining of splenic imprints treated with fluorescent sheep antibody globulins. 2. In tissue imprints made with the spleens of antigen-stimulated animals, no morphological distinction was evident between areas showing non-specific fluorescence and specific fluorescence. 3. Elimination of non-specific fluorescence was not achieved by any one, or any combination of the following: (a) conjugating only gamma globulins with fluorescein isothiocyanate; (b) removal of dialyzable fluorescent products on sephadex, followed by concentration through the use of pressure dialysis; (c) use of crystalline preparations of fluorescein isothiocyanate. 4. Individual preparations of fluorescent antibodies were separated by gradient elution chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) cellulose into fractions possessing different numbers of fluorescein radicals per molecule of globulin. 5. The coupling ratio of 50 mg fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) per gm of protein, as commonly advocated, can not be recommended for the precise localization of antibody globulin in tissues owing to the capacity of the coupled products to give non-specific fluorescent staining. When crystalline preparations of FITC are used instead of the amorphous product at 50 mg/gm protein, far too high non-specific fluorescence results. 6. A fraction with bright specific fluorescence and no or negligible nonspecific fluorescence was obtained from each fluorescent antibody that was prepared by using 6 to 8 mg of crystalline fluorescein isothiocyanate per gm of globulin and was then subjected to DEAE-cellulose chromatography and gradient elution to eliminate the most highly coupled molecules. PMID:13706641

  9. PHYLOGENETIC ORIGINS OF ANTIBODY STRUCTURE

    PubMed Central

    Marchalonis, J.; Edelman, G. M.

    1965-01-01

    The elasmobranch Mustelus canis has been shown to produce antibodies to Limulus hemocyanin. The serum of both normal and immunized M. canis contains immunoglobulins having sedimentation coefficients of approximately 7S and 17S. Antibody activity was found in the 17S immunoglobulin which may be dissociated to 7S components with concomitant loss of activity. Both 17S and 7S serum, immunoglobulins were antigenically identical. They consisted of light and heavy chains present in amounts comparable to those of higher vertebrates. Peptide maps indicated that the light chains had an entirely different primary structure than the heavy chains, but that the corresponding chains of 7S and 17S dogfish serum immunoglobulins were similar in primary structure. The heavy chains appeared to resemble the n chains of immunoglobulins of higher vertebrates in their starch gel electrophoretic behavior. It is suggested that the elasmobranch M. canis may have only one major class of immunoglobulins resembling that of macroglobulins (?M-immunoglobulins) seen in higher vertebrates. The results indicate that the multichain structure of antibodies is an ancient evolutionary development. PMID:4158437

  10. Single-Chain Antibody Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Baird, Cheryl

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have constructed a nonimmune library consisting of 109 human antibody scFv fragments, which have been cloned and expressed on the surface of yeast. Nanomolar-affinity scFvs are routinely obtained by magnetic bead screening and flow cytometric sorting. The yeast library can be amplified 1010 fold without measurable loss of clonal diversity. This allows for indefinite expansion of the library. All scFv clones can be assessed directly on the yeast cell surface by immunofluorescent labeling and flow cytometry, obviating separate subcloning, expression, and purification steps. The ability to use multiplex library screening demonstrates the utility of this approach for high-throughput antibody isolation for proteomic applications. The yeast library may be used for research projects or teaching performed for U.S. Government purposes only. If you would like to request an aliquot of the single-chain antibody library for your research, please print and fill out the Materials Transfer Agreement (MTA) [PDF, 20K]. The website provides the contact information for mailing the MTA. [copied from http://www.sysbio.org/dataresources/singlechain.stm

  11. Improved monoclonal antibodies to halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, M.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.; Thomas, C.B.

    1983-10-18

    The development, method of production, characterization and methods of use of two hybridomas, CIdU-1 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8321) and CIdU-2 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8320), are described. These secrete IgG/sub 1/(K) immunoglobulins that react with halodeoxyuridine (HdU or halodU) such as bromo, chloro, fluoro and iodo deoxyuridine (BrdU, CldU, FdU and IdU), whether these are free in solution or incorporated into single stranded DNA in whole cells. The antibodies do not react with naturally occurring free nucleic acids or with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymers. These antibodies are suitable for use in enzyme immunoassays for free CldU, FdU, IdU and BrdU and for detecting cells with these nucleotides incorporated into them. The monoclonal antibodies are useful in the detection of the sensitivity of tumor cells to specific chemotherapeutic agents, in the measurement of the rate of cellular DNA synthesis, in the measurement of the rate of proliferation of normal and malignant cells and in the detection of HPRT deficiency in cells. 1 tab.

  12. Measurement of antibody avidity for hepatitis C virus distinguishes primary antibody responses from passively acquired antibody.

    PubMed

    Ward, K N; Dhaliwal, W; Ashworth, K L; Clutterbuck, E J; Teo, C G

    1994-08-01

    A new IgG antibody avidity test for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been developed and was validated using sera from 12 renal dialysis patients infected with HCV. In primary HCV infection low avidity antibody (mean avidity index 24%) was detected within 50 days of seroconversion whereas in long-term infection (at least 300 days after seroconversion), the mean avidity index was high (88%); in five patients, the avidity index was shown to increase rapidly as time elapsed after primary infection, whereas immunosuppressive therapy was found to delay maturation of the immune response in two further patients. The assay was then employed to confirm that a spurious outbreak of primary HCV infection in eight bone marrow transplant patients was explicable by passive acquisition of high avidity anti-HCV after intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. It is concluded that this avidity test will have an important role in the investigation of HCV infection in patients. PMID:7525865

  13. [Improved IgG Antibody Diagnostics of Feather Duvet Lung by an Antibody Screening Test].

    PubMed

    Sennekamp, J; Lehmann, E

    2015-11-01

    The underdiagnosed feather duvet lung, an extrinsic allergic alveolitis (hypersensitivity pneumonitis) caused by duck and goose feathers, can be more frequently diagnosed, if duck and goose feather antibodies are included in the panel of the routinely applied IgG antibody screening test. This does not necessarily require extending the screening test to include duck and goose feather antigens. By analysing 100 sera with duck and goose antibodies we found that the commonly used pigeon and budgerigar antibodies can also screen for feather duvet antibodies. All examined sera lacking pigeon and budgerigar antibodies also lacked clear-cut duck and goose feather antibodies. The examined sera with strong pigeon or budgerigar antibodies always also contained feather duvet antibodies. However, sera with medium or low concentrated pigeon or budgerigar antibodies are not always associated with feather duvet antibodies. In the light of these observations, we find that 71?% of the duck and goose antibody analyses would be dispensable without essential loss of quality, if the results of screening for pigeon and budgerigar antibodies were incorporated into the procedure of a step-by- step diagnostics. PMID:26458127

  14. Nanoliposome-mediated targeting of antibodies to tumors: IVIG antibodies as a model.

    PubMed

    Nikpoor, Amin Reza; Tavakkol-Afshari, Jalil; Gholizadeh, Zahra; Sadri, Kayvan; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Chamani, Jamshidkhan; Badiee, Ali; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-11-10

    Monoclonal antibodies are routinely used as tools in immunotherapies against solid tumors. However, administration of monoclonal antibodies may cause undesired side effects due to their accumulation in non-targeted organs. Nanoliposomes of less than 200nm can target antibodies to tumors by enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) mechanisms. To direct monoclonal antibodies to tumors, nanoliposomes encapsulating intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) as a model antibody were prepared. The liposomes had average diameters of 100nm and encapsulation efficiencies of 31 to 46%. They showed less than 10% release in plasma at 37°C up to seven days. The secondary and tertiary structures of liposome-encapsulated antibodies were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The near and far-UV spectra analyses revealed no obvious conformational changes in the structures of the encapsulated antibodies. The biodistribution of free and liposome-encapsulated iodinated antibodies was investigated in mice bearing C-26 colon carcinoma tumors. The accumulation of liposome-encapsulated antibodies in tumors was significantly greater than that of free antibodies due to the EPR effect. The PEGylated liposomes were more efficient in the delivery of antibodies to the tumor site than non-PEGylated liposomes. We conclude that administration of monoclonal antibodies in PEGylated liposomes is more efficient than administration of non-encapsulated monoclonal antibodies for solid tumor immunotherapy. PMID:26302860

  15. Antibody engineering and therapeutics, The Annual Meeting of the Antibody Society: December 8-12, 2013, Huntington Beach, CA.

    PubMed

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul W H I; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  16. Controlled delivery of antibodies from injectable hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Nathan A; Babcock, Lyndsey R; Murray, Ellen A; Krebs, Melissa D

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are currently used for the treatment of various diseases, but large doses delivered systemically are typically required. Localized controlled delivery techniques would afford major benefits such as decreasing side effects and required doses. Injectable biopolymer systems are an attractive solution due to their minimally invasive potential for controlled release in a localized area. Here, alginate-chitosan hydrogels are demonstrated to provide controlled delivery of IgG model antibodies and also of Fab antibody fragments. Also, an alternate delivery system comprised of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loaded with antibodies and encapsulated in alginate was shown to successfully provide another level of control over release. These biopolymer systems that offer controlled delivery for antibodies and antibody fragments will be promising for many applications in drug delivery and regenerative medicine. PMID:26652435

  17. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of PCR Targeting the 47-Kilodalton Protein Membrane Gene of Treponema pallidum and PCR Targeting the DNA Polymerase I Gene: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gayet-Ageron, Angčle; Combescure, Christophe; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ninet, Béatrice; Perneger, Thomas V

    2015-11-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) testing now is recommended as a valid tool for the diagnosis of primary or secondary syphilis. The objectives were to systematically review and determine the optimal specific target gene to be used for Tp-PCR. Comparisons of the performance of the two main targets are tpp47 and polA genes were done using meta-analysis. Three electronic bibliographic databases, representing abstract books from five conferences specialized in infectious diseases from January 1990 to March 2015, were searched. Search keywords included ("syphilis" OR "Treponema pallidum" OR "neurosyphilis") AND ("PCR" OR "PCR" OR "molecular amplification"). We included diagnostic studies assessing the performance of Tp-PCR targeting tpp47 (tpp47-Tp-PCR) or the polA gene (polA-Tp-PCR) in ulcers from early syphilis. All studies were assessed against quality criteria using the QUADAS-2 tool. Of 37 studies identified, 62.2% were judged at low risk of bias or applicability. Most used the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) case definitions for primary or secondary (early) syphilis (89.2%; n = 33); 15 (40.5%) used darkfield microscopy (DFM). We did not find differences in sensitivity and specificity between the two Tp-PCR methods in the subgroup of studies using adequate reference tests. Among studies using DFM as the reference test, sensitivities were 79.8% (95% confidence intervals [CI], 72.7 to 85.4%) and 71.4% (46.0 to 88.0%) for tpp47-Tp-PCR and polA-Tp-PCR (P = 0.217), respectively; respective specificities were 95.3% (93.5 to 96.6%) and 93.7% (91.8 to 95.2%) (P = 0.304). Our findings suggest that the two Tp-PCR methods have similar accuracy and could be used interchangeably. PMID:26311859

  18. Gluten antibodies in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, A L; Rees, B W; Jones, L T

    1984-04-01

    The level of gluten antibodies has been determined in plasma samples from 36 patients with MS using a haemagglutination technique. Only one of the 36 patients studied showed any evidence of gluten antibodies and the level of antibodies in this patient did not justify putting the patient on a gluten-free diet. This study has provided no evidence to support the use of a gluten-free diet as part of the management of MS. PMID:6746319

  19. A positive antibody screen--an encounter with the Augustine antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Burnette, Robert E.; Couter, Kyle

    2002-01-01

    An antibody screen is performed on the blood of patients who may require blood transfusion. If an antibody is detected, it must be identified to avoid transfusing the patient with blood that contains the corresponding antigen. Antibody screens are also performed as part of a prenatal profile to detect antibodies that may cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. In this article we report the detection of a unique antibody to an antigen of high incidence, the anti-Augustine antibody. We describe problems that may occur when this antibody is encountered, including its identification and obtaining suitable transfusion products for the patient. A brief historical review of the clinical significance of this antibody is included in the article. PMID:11918386

  20. Monoclonal antibodies with group specificity toward sulfonamides: Selection of hapten and antibody selectivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although many antibodies to sulfonamides have been generated, immunoassays based on the current available antibodies for large multi-sulfonamide screening programs have properties dependent on the immunizing hapten structure and have always suffered from high selectivity for individual sulfonamides....

  1. Cancer therapy with bispecific antibodies: Clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Archana; Lum, Lawrence G

    2013-01-01

    The binding of at least two molecular targets simultaneously with a single bispecific antibody is an attractive concept. The use of bispecific antibodies as possible therapeutic agents for cancer treatment was proposed in the mid-1980s. The design and production of bispecific antibodies using antibody- and/or receptor-based platform technology has improved significantly with advances in the knowledge of molecular manipulations, protein engineering techniques, and the expression of antigens and receptors on healthy and malignant cells. The common strategy for making bispecific antibodies involves combining the variable domains of the desired mAbs into a single bispecific structure. Many different formats of bispecific antibodies have been generated within the research field of bispecific immunotherapeutics, including the chemical heteroconjugation of two complete molecules or fragments of mAbs, quadromas, F(ab’)2, diabodies, tandem diabodies and single-chain antibodies. This review describes key modifications in the development of bispecific antibodies that can improve their efficacy and stability, and provides a clinical perspective on the application of bispecific antibodies for the treatment of solid and liquid tumors, including the promises and research limitations of this approach. PMID:20521223

  2. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations

    PubMed Central

    Gearhart, Patricia J.; Castiblanco, Diana P.; Russell Knode, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations. PMID:26641938

  3. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  4. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-15

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  5. Preparation of astatine-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Milesz, S.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Szucs, Z. |

    1995-07-01

    In the cationic state astatine forms a stable complex with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Thanks to this complex, astatine can be bound to monoclonal antibodies of the RYa{sub 1} type. The most favorable conditions for preparing astatine-labeled antibodies are established. The chromatographic analysis and electromigration experiments showed that astatine is firmly linked to a biomolecule in vitro and it did not escape from labeled monoclonal antibodies even under treatment with such highly effective astatine-complexing agent as thiourea. The immune activity of astatine-labeled antibodies did not change even after 20 h.

  6. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations.

    PubMed

    Gearhart, Patricia J; Castiblanco, Diana P; Russell Knode, Lisa M

    2015-12-01

    Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations. PMID:26641938

  7. Monoclonal Antibody That Defines Human Myoepithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dairkee, Shahnaz Hashmi; Blayney, Carlene; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1985-11-01

    We have isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody that, upon immunohistochemical localization in frozen sections, displays specificity for human myoepithelial cells in the resting mammary gland, sweat glands, and salivary glands. Furthermore, this antibody was strongly and homogeneously reactive with frozen sections of 3 of 60 breast carcinoma specimens. Using immunolocalization techniques in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have determined that the reactivity of this monoclonal antibody is directed toward a 51,000-dalton keratin polypeptide. The potential uses of this antibody in the prognosis of human mammary carcinoma and in understanding the role of the myoepithelium in development and differentiation are discussed.

  8. Monoclonal Antibodies as Diagnostics; an Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, M. Z.

    2010-01-01

    Ever since the development of Hybridoma Technology in 1975 by Kohler and Milstein, our vision for antibodies as tools for research for prevention, detection and treatment of diseases, vaccine production, antigenic characterization of pathogens and in the study of genetic regulation of immune responses and disease susceptibility has been revolutionized. The monoclonal antibodies being directed against single epitopes are homogeneous, highly specific and can be produced in unlimited quantities. In animal disease diagnosis, they are very useful for identification and antigenic characterization of pathogens. Monoclonal antibodies have tremendous applications in the field of diagnostics, therapeutics and targeted drug delivery systems, not only for infectious diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and protozoa but also for cancer, metabolic and hormonal disorders. They are also used in the diagnosis of lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, tissue typing, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, radio immunoassay, serotyping of microorganisms, immunological intervention with passive antibody, antiidiotype inhibition, or magic bullet therapy with cytotoxic agents coupled with anti mouse specific antibody. Recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology through genetic engineering has successfully led to the possibility of reconstruction of monoclonal antibodies viz. chimeric antibodies, humanized antibodies and complementarily determining region grafted antibodies and their enormous therapeutic use. PMID:20582184

  9. Reconciling the Structural Attributes of Avian Antibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, Paul J.; Law, Ruby H. P.; Gilgunn, Sarah; Hearty, Stephen; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Lloyd, Gordon; O'Kennedy, Richard J.; Whisstock, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are high value therapeutic, diagnostic, biotechnological, and research tools. Combinatorial approaches to antibody discovery have facilitated access to unique antibodies by surpassing the diversity limitations of the natural repertoire, exploitation of immune repertoires from multiple species, and tailoring selections to isolate antibodies with desirable biophysical attributes. The V-gene repertoire of the chicken does not utilize highly diverse sequence and structures, which is in stark contrast to the mechanism employed by humans, mice, and primates. Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has generated high quality, high affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic, diagnostic and biotechnological applications. Furthermore, extensive examination of the amino acid characteristics of the chicken repertoire has provided significant insight into mechanisms employed by the avian immune system. A paucity of avian antibody crystal structures has limited our understanding of the structural consequences of these uniquely chicken features. This paper presents the crystal structure of two chicken single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies generated from large libraries by phage display against important human antigen targets, which capture two unique CDRL1 canonical classes in the presence and absence of a non-canonical disulfide constrained CDRH3. These structures cast light on the unique structural features of chicken antibodies and contribute further to our collective understanding of the unique mechanisms of diversity and biochemical attributes that render the chicken repertoire of particular value for antibody generation. PMID:24737329

  10. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gonococcal antibody test (GAT). 866.3290 Section... antibody test (GAT). (a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that..., indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera...

  11. Wholemount immunostaining with Alkaline Phosphatase Antibodies Hiroki Kuroda

    E-print Network

    De Robertis, Eddy M.

    Wholemount immunostaining with Alkaline Phosphatase Antibodies Hiroki Kuroda Kuroda et al. Genes Dev. 19, 1022-1027 (2005) Immunostaining is done using anti-dpERK mouse antibody (1:10,000) for the first antibody and anti-mouse IgG-AP conjugated antibody (1:1,000) for the second antibody. Conditions

  12. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gonococcal antibody test (GAT). 866.3290 Section... antibody test (GAT). (a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that..., indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gonococcal antibody test (GAT). 866.3290 Section... antibody test (GAT). (a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that..., indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gonococcal antibody test (GAT). 866.3290 Section... antibody test (GAT). (a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that..., indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gonococcal antibody test (GAT). 866.3290 Section... antibody test (GAT). (a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that..., indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera...

  16. Mathematical and Experimental Analyses of Antibody Transport in Hollow-Fiber-Based Specific Antibody Filters

    E-print Network

    Federspiel, William J.

    Mathematical and Experimental Analyses of Antibody Transport in Hollow-Fiber-Based Specific mathematical model of SAF-based antibody removal and performed in vitro antibody removal experiments to test to facilitate ABO blood group-incompatible kidney transplants (1) and heart (2) and kidney (3) xenotransplants

  17. Passive antibody transfer in chickens to model maternal antibody after avian influenza vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Birds transfer maternal antibodies (MAb) to their offspring through the egg yolk where the antibody is absorbed and enters the circulatory system. Maternal antibodies provide early protection from disease, but may interfere with the vaccination efficacy in the chick. MAb are thought to interfere wit...

  18. ANTIBODY TITRATION PROTOCOL NOTE: When titrating an antibody for use in flow cytometry, you should

    E-print Network

    ANTIBODY TITRATION PROTOCOL NOTE: When titrating an antibody for use in flow cytometry, you should attempt to titrate it under the same conditions in which it will be used during your experimental cell're titrating. You should titrate each new vial of antibody you receive in your lab, even if you've used

  19. Treponema pallidum - The Great Imitator.

    PubMed

    Militz, Helga; Hungerer, Christine

    2015-11-19

    A 50-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital with swelling of the left lateral malleolus after an ankle sprain and rupture of the Achilles tendon. Examination was notable for ulcerated lesions with sanguineous secretions on the left breast, back, and left shoulder. PMID:26580999

  20. PHYLOGENETIC ORIGINS OF ANTIBODY STRUCTURE

    PubMed Central

    Marchalonis, J.; Edelman, G. M.

    1966-01-01

    The anuran amphibian, Rana catesbiana, has been found to possess at least two kinds of immunoglobulins corresponding to ?G- and ?M-classes. These classes have the same chain structures as those of their counterparts in higher animal species. Light chains of both immunoglobulins had molecular weights of 20,000. Heavy chains of the ?M-class had molecular weights of 72,100; those of the ?G-class had molecular weights of 53,600. The carbohydrate content of the ?G-immunoglobulin was 2.1%, and that of the ?M-protein was 10.8%. The amino acid compositions of the immunoglobulins were generally similar to those of mammalian immunoglobulins. After a single injection of phage antigen (f2), the order of appearance of phage-neutralizing activity in the frog immunoglobulin classes was (a) ?M-antibodies, and (b) ?G-antibodies. The results of this and previous studies suggest that the ?G-immunoglobulins emerged at some point in evolution between the elasmobranchs and the anuran amphibians. PMID:4162734

  1. IBC’s 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society

    PubMed Central

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H.J.; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3–6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3–5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4–5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society’s special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5–6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy. PMID:23575266

  2. Mechanisms of Neonatal Mucosal Antibody Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following an abrupt transition at birth from the sterile uterus to an environment with abundant commensal and pathogenic microbes, neonatal mammals are protected by maternal antibodies at mucosal surfaces. We show in mice that different antibody isotypes work in distinct ways to protect the neonatal...

  3. Structural Biology of Moonlighting --Lessons from Antibodies

    E-print Network

    Martin, Andrew C.R.

    this detailed definition, antibodies as a family are consummate moon- lighters. However, individual antibodies chal- lenged in a number of ways. First, the importance of RNA as a functional molecule rather than, and performs RNA splicing. More importantly, many ncRNAs are involved in the regulation of many thousands

  4. Fc-Small Molecule Antibody Mimetics.

    PubMed

    Wold, Erik D; Axup, Jun Y; Felding, Brunhilde H; Smider, Vaughn V

    2015-12-16

    Antibody therapeutics are a promising drug class due to their high specificity and favorable pharmacokinetics. While there are many methods for the development of antibodies specific to disease associated antigens, selecting antibodies against functional epitopes with high specificity and affinity can be difficult for certain epitopes. We describe a generalizable method for synthesizing antibody mimetics by site specifically conjugating small molecules (with high affinity and specificity to disease associated antigens) to an Fc fragment to develop drugs with the benefits of an antibody. As a proof of concept, an E269pAcPhe Fc antibody Fc fragment was produced and subsequently site-specifically labeled with a linker-modified folic acid compound to generate an Fc-folic acid antibody-mimetic. This was chosen as the model system because the high-affinity folate receptor FR-? is highly expressed in a number of cancer types including breast and ovarian cancer. The specificity of the Fc-folic acid conjugate was assessed via flowcytometry with the folate-receptor positive breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 by measuring Fc-folic acid binding in both the absence and presence of an excess of folic acid. Fc-small molecule conjugates could be developed into a unique class of antibody-like therapeutics. PMID:26536496

  5. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  6. Antibody-drug conjugates: Intellectual property considerations.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2015-11-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates are highly complex entities that combine an antibody, a linker and a toxin. This complexity makes them demanding both technically and from a regulatory point of view, and difficult to deal with in their patent aspects. This article discusses different issues of patent protection and freedom to operate with regard to this promising new class of drugs. PMID:26292154

  7. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  8. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  9. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross—linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  10. How to successfully patent therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lahrtz, Fritz

    2015-04-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have become an established class of drugs for the treatment of a variety of diseases, especially cancer and autoimmune/inflammatory disorders, and a sufficient patent protection is a prerequisite for their successful commercialization. As monoclonal antibodies and their therapeutic potential have been well known for decades, the mere production of yet another therapeutic antibody is in many jurisdictions not considered a patentable invention. In contrast, antibodies with novel structural features and/or improved properties may be patentable. When drafting the claims, care should be taken to obtain a broad patent scope that protects both the antibody of interest and related antibodies having the same functional features, thereby preventing competitors from marketing a functionally equivalent antibody. Furthermore, the application should contain experimental evidence showing the improved properties of the claimed antibody. After the filing of a priority patent application, patent protection should be initiated at least in countries that are of particular commercial importance. Subsequent inventions relating to novel uses, formulations, dosage regimens, and combinations with other treatment modalities should be protected by further patent applications to extend patent term. PMID:25614506

  11. 8th Annual European Antibody Congress 2012

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Alain; Carter, Paul J.; Gerber, Hans-Peter; Lugovskoy, Alexey A.; Wurch, Thierry; Junutula, Jagath R.; Kontermann, Roland E; Mabry, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The 8th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapin Ltd., was again held in Geneva, Switzerland, following on the tradition established with the 4th EAC. The new agenda format for 2012 included three parallel tracks on: (1) naked antibodies; (2) antibody drug conjugates (ADCs); and (3) bispecific antibodies and alternative scaffolds. The meeting started and closed with three plenary lectures to give common background and to share the final panel discussion and conclusions. The two day event included case studies and networking for nearly 250 delegates who learned of the latest advances and trends in the global development of antibody-based therapeutics. The monoclonal antibody track was focused on understanding the structure-function relationships, optimization of antibody design and developability, and processes that allow better therapeutic candidates to move through the clinic. Discussions on novel target identification and validation were also included. The ADC track was dedicated to evaluation of the ongoing success of the established ADC formats alongside the rise of the next generation drug-conjugates. The bispecific and alternative scaffold track was focused on taking stock of the multitude of bispecific formats being investigated and gaining insight into recent innovations and advancements. Mechanistic understanding, progression into the clinic and the exploration of multispecifics, redirected T cell killing and alternative scaffolds were extensively discussed. In total, nearly 50 speakers provided updates of programs related to antibody research and development on-going in the academic, government and commercial sectors. PMID:23493119

  12. Monoclonal antibodies specific for mercuric ions.

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, D E; Lu, D; Carlson, L D; Carlson, R; Babacan, K F; Schuster, S M; Wagner, F W

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that react with soluble mercuric ions have been produced by injection of BALB/c mice with a hapten-carrier complex designed to maximize exposure of the metal to the immune system. Three hybridomas producing antibodies that reacted with bovine serum albumin (BSA)-glutathione-HgCl, but not with BSA-glutathione, were isolated from the spleen of a mouse given multiple injections with glutathione-HgCl conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Stable subclones were established from two of these antibodies, designated mAb 4A10 and mAb 1F10. The binding of both antibodies to immobilized BSA-glutathione-HgCl was inhibited by soluble HgCl2, and dissociation constants for mercuric chloride binding were 2.3 and 3.7 nM for mAbs 4A10 and 1F10, respectively. Both antibodies bound mercuric acetate with similar affinities, demonstrating that the antibodies were capable of binding to mercuric ions in the presence of a different counterion than the one used in the immunogen. Reactions were not observed with other metal cations by either antibody. These data demonstrate the successful induction of antibodies that react very specifically with mercuric ions in solution regardless of the presence of a carrier. PMID:1570337

  13. The therapeutic antibodies market to 2008.

    PubMed

    Pavlou, Alex K; Belsey, Mark J

    2005-04-01

    The therapeutic biologics market is currently dominated by recombinant protein products. However, many of these products are mature, and growth of the biologics market will increasingly rely on the expansion of the therapeutic monoclonal antibody sector. Successive technology waves have driven the growth of the monoclonal antibody sector, which is currently dominated by chimeric antibodies. Chimeric products, led by Remicade and Rituxan, will continue to drive market share through to 2008. However, over the forecast period, humanized and fully human monoclonal antibodies, together with technologies such as Fabs and conjugated antibodies, will play an increasingly important role, driving monoclonal antibody market growth at a forecast compound annual growth rate of 20.9%, to reach $16.7 billion by 2008. In terms of therapeutic focus, the monoclonal antibody market is heavily focused on oncology and arthritis, immune and inflammatory disorders, and products within these therapeutic areas are set to continue to be the key growth drivers over the forecast period. Underlying the growth of the market is the evolution of the monoclonal antibody company business model, set to transition towards the highly successful innovator model. PMID:15760719

  14. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section...These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to... (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  15. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section...These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to... (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  16. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section...These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to... (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  17. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section...These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to... (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  18. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section...These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to... (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE Detection of pancreatic cancer using antibody

    E-print Network

    Peterson, Carsten

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Detection of pancreatic cancer using antibody microarray-based serum proteinFv antibody microarray in an attempt to classify sera derived from pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients versus profiling proteome analysis / Oncopro- teomics / Pancreatic cancer / Recombinant antibody microarray

  20. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    DOEpatents

    Kassis, Amin I. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Khawli, Leslie A. (Newton Centre, MA)

    1991-01-01

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabelled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody.

  1. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Antibody Scientific Committee

    Cancer.gov

    The Antibody Scientific Committee provides scientific insight and guidance to the National Cancer Institute's Antibody Characterization Program. Specifically the members of this committee evaluate request from the external scientific community for development and characterization of antibodies by the program.

  2. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    DOEpatents

    Kassis, A.I.; Khawli, L.A.

    1991-02-19

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabeled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody. No Drawings

  3. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...antibody immunological test system. 866.5100 Section...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5100 Antinuclear...antibody immunological test system is a device that consists...antibodies in serum, other body fluids,...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5090 Antimitochondrial...antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification...antibody immunological test system is a device that consists...antimitochondrial antibodies in human serum. The measurements...produced against the body's own...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5090 Antimitochondrial...antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification...antibody immunological test system is a device that consists...antimitochondrial antibodies in human serum. The measurements...produced against the body's own...

  6. Synthetic Antibodies for Reversible Cell Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing Zhou

    2011-12-01

    Antibody-mediated cell recognition plays a critical role in various biological and biomedical applications. However, strong antibody-cell interactions can lead to the difficulty of separating antibodies from the bound cells in a simple and non-destructive manner, which is often necessary to numerous applications such as cell sorting or separation. Thus, this thesis research is aimed to create an antibody-like nanomaterial with the function of reversible cell recognition It was hypothesized that nucleic acid aptamer and dendrimer could be used as fundamental structural components to develop an antibody-like nanomaterial. The aptamer functions as the binding site of an antibody; the dendrimer is used as a robust, defined nano-scaffold to support the aptamer and to carry small molecules (e.g., fluorophores). To test this hypothesis, a novel method was first developed to discover the essential nucleotides of full-length aptamers to mimic the binding sites of antibodies. The essential nucleotides were further conjugated with a dendrimer to synthesize a monovalent aptamer-dendrimer nanomaterial. The results clearly showed that the essential nucleotides could maintain high affinity and specificity after tethered on dendrimer surface. To further test the hypothesis that antibody-like nanomaterials can be rationally designed to acquire the capability of reversible cell recognition, an aptamer that was selected at 0 °C was used as a model to synthesize a "Y-shaped" nanomaterial by conjugating two aptamers to the same dendrimer. The results showed that the nanomaterial-cell interaction could be affected by the distance between two binding aptamers. In addition, the "Y-shaped" antibody-like nanomaterial could bind target cells more strongly than its monovalent control. Importantly, the strong cell-nanomaterial interaction could be rapidly reversed when the temperature was shifted from 0 °C to 37 °C. In summary, we developed a synthetic antibody that can not only mimic the functional structure and cell recognition capability of antibodies, but also possess specific features that natural antibodies do not possess. This study has opened a new avenue for developing synthetic antibodies and has also advanced the understanding of the functionality of multivalent nanomaterials. This novel synthetic antibody holds great potential for various biological and biomedical applications such as cell separation.

  7. Dual targeting strategies with bispecific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are widely used for the treatment of cancer, inflammatory and infectious diseases and other disorders. Most of the marketed antibodies are monospecific and therefore capable of interacting and interfering with a single target. However, complex diseases are often multifactorial in nature, and involve redundant or synergistic action of disease mediators or upregulation of different receptors, including crosstalk between their signaling networks. Consequently, blockade of multiple, different pathological factors and pathways may result in improved therapeutic efficacy. This result can be achieved by combining different drugs, or use of the dual targeting strategies applying bispecific antibodies that have emerged as an alternative to combination therapy. This review discusses the various dual targeting strategies for which bispecific antibodies have been developed and provides an overview of the established bispecific antibody formats. PMID:22453100

  8. ENHANCEMENT OF ANTIBODY SYNTHESIS BY 6-MERCAPTOPURINE

    PubMed Central

    Chanmougan, Devendrathan; Schwartz, Robert S.

    1966-01-01

    The administration of 6-MP to rabbits led to either suppression or enhancement of antibody production, depending on when the drug was given in relation to the antigenic challenge. Maximum enhancement of antibody synthesis was found when a small dose of BGG was administered 5 days after the last dose of a 1 wk course of 6-MP. There were no indications that the macrophage system or immunological memory was affected in animals with augmented antibody synthesis. It was proposed that enhancement of antibody production by 6-MP was due to nucleic acids released from cells killed or injured by the drug. It was suggested that lymphocytes incorporating these nucleic acids were transformed into specialized cells capable of direct and immediate stimulation by antigen and lacking immunological memory (hemocytoblasts). A relatively small dose of antigen was apparently capable of stimulating all the hemocytoblasts representing a given clone) with the result that large amounts of antibody rapidly appeared in the serum. PMID:4162484

  9. Genetically engineered antibody molecules and their application.

    PubMed

    Morrison, S L; Wims, L; Wallick, S; Tan, L; Oi, V T

    1987-01-01

    Immunoglobulin genes can be efficiently expressed following transfection into myeloma cells. Using protoplast fusion, transfection frequencies greater than 10(-3) can be achieved. Compatible plasmids containing two different selectible markers are used to simultaneously deliver heavy and light chain genes to the same cell. To produce molecules with differing specificities the rearranged and expressed variable regions can be cloned from the appropriate hybridoma. In some cases, variable regions from cDNAs can be inserted into the expression vectors. It is possible to manipulate the immunoglobulin genes and produce novel antibody molecules. Antibodies have been produced in which the variable regions from mouse antibodies have been joined to human constant regions. In addition, antibodies with altered constant regions have been produced. These genetically engineered antibodies provide a unique set of reagents to study structure-function relationships within the molecule. They also can potentially be used in the diagnosis and therapy of human disease. PMID:3327412

  10. Affinity of FVIII-specific antibodies reveals major differences between neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies in humans.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Christoph J; Whelan, Shawn F J; Hirschler, Maria; Allacher, Peter; Horling, Frank M; Lawo, John-Philip; Oldenburg, Johannes; Tiede, Andreas; Male, Christoph; Windyga, Jerzy; Greinacher, Andreas; Knöbl, Paul N; Schrenk, Gerald; Koehn, Jadranka; Scheiflinger, Friedrich; Reipert, Birgit M

    2015-02-12

    Recently, we reported that distinct immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes and IgG subclasses of factor VIII (FVIII)-specific antibodies are found in different cohorts of patients with hemophilia A and in healthy individuals. Prompted by these findings, we further investigated the distinguishing properties among the different populations of FVIII-specific antibodies. We hypothesized that the affinity of antibodies would discriminate between the neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies found in different study cohorts. To test this idea, we established a competition-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technology to assess the apparent affinities for each isotype and IgG subclass of FVIII-specific antibodies without the need for antibody purification. We present a unique data set of apparent affinities of FVIII-specific antibodies found in healthy individuals, patients with congenital hemophilia A with and without FVIII inhibitors, and patients with acquired hemophilia A. Our data indicate that FVIII-specific antibodies found in patients with FVIII inhibitors have an up to 100-fold higher apparent affinity than that of antibodies found in patients without inhibitors and in healthy individuals. High-affinity FVIII-specific antibodies could be retrospectively detected in longitudinal samples of an individual patient with FVIII inhibitors 543 days before the first positive Bethesda assay. This finding suggests that these antibodies might serve as potential biomarkers for evolving FVIII inhibitor responses. PMID:25515962

  11. Immobilization of antibodies and enzyme-labeled antibodies by radiation polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.; Suzuki, M.; Adachi, S.

    1983-04-01

    Immobilization of antibodies and enzyme-labeled antibodies by radiation polymerization at low temperatures was studied. The antibody activity of antibody was not affected by irradiation at an irradiation dose of below 8 MR and low temperatures. Immobilization of peroxidase-labeled anti-rabbit IgG goat IgG, anti-peroxidase, peroxidase, and anti-alpha-fetoprotein was carried out with hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers. The activity of the immobilized enzyme-labeled antibody membranes varied with the thickness of the membranes and increased with decreasing membrane thickness. The activity of the immobilized antibody particles was varied by particle size. Immobilized anti-alpha-fetoprotein particles and membranes can be used for the assay of alpha-fetoprotein by the antigen-antibody reaction, such as a solid-phase sandwich method with high sensitivity.

  12. Recombinant human polyclonal antibodies: A new class of therapeutic antibodies against viral infections.

    PubMed

    Bregenholt, Sřren; Jensen, Allan; Lantto, Johan; Hyldig, Sara; Haurum, John S

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian immune system eliminates pathogens by generating a specific antibody response. Polyclonality is a key feature of this immune response: the immune system produces antibodies which bind to different structures on a given pathogen thereby increasing the likelihood of its elimination. The vast majority of current recombinant antibody drugs rely on monospecific monoclonal antibodies. Inherently, such antibodies do not represent the benefits of polyclonality utilized by a natural immune system and this has impeded the identification of efficacious antibody drugs against infectious agents, including viruses. The development of novel technologies has allowed the identification and manufacturing of antigen-specific recombinant polyclonal human antibodies, so-called symphobodies. This review describes the rationale for designing drugs based on symphobodies against pathogenic viruses, including HIV, vaccinia and smallpox virus, and respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:16787244

  13. Not all antibodies are equal

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been validated as a therapeutic target in several human tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC).1,2 Occupancy of the EGFR with ligand can activate the RAS/RAF/MAPK, STAT, and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These pathways modulate cellular proliferation, adhesion, angiogenesis, migration, and survival.3 Anti-EGFR targeted antibodies, such as cetuximab and panitumumab, have shown response and disease stabilization rates of approximately 10% and 30%, respectively, when administered as monotherapy in CRC.1,4 EGFR expression is used for patient selection for these studies. However, clinical results have suggested that the level of EGFR expression as measured by immunohistochemistry may not predict clinical benefit.4,5 PMID:24317328

  14. B Cells, Antibodies, and More.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G; Chalasani, Geetha

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell-targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell-targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  15. Clinical considerations for biosimilar antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mellstedt, Hĺkan

    2013-01-01

    Biosimilar agents are approximate copies of branded biologic therapies. Since the first biosimilar was authorized in the European Union in 2006, fifteen additional agents have been approved by the European Medicines Agency, including two biosimilar monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Biosimilar mAbs represent a distinct class given their large molecular size, complex protein structure, and post-translational modifications. While guidelines have been established for the development, approval, and use of biosimilars, further scrutiny and discussion is necessary to fully understand their potential impact on clinical outcomes. This review takes a critical look at the structural complexity of biosimilar mABs, the feasibility of indication extrapolation, the impact of product variability on immunogenicity, the importance of comprehensive pharmacovigilance, and the potential for ongoing pharmacoeconomic impact. PMID:26217160

  16. Antibodies in the Pathogenesis of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Christopher T.; Lieu, Maggie; Toh, Ban-Hock; Kyaw, Tin S.; Bobik, Alexander; Sobey, Christopher G.; Drummond, Grant R.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that circulating levels of IgG and IgM antibodies are elevated in patients with essential and pregnancy-related hypertension. Recent studies indicate these antibodies target, and in many cases activate, G-protein coupled receptors and ion channels. Prominent among these protein targets are AT1 receptors, ?1-adrenoceptors, ?1-adrenoceptors, and L-type voltage operated Ca2+ channels, all of which are known to play key roles in the regulation of blood pressure through modulation of vascular tone, cardiac output, and/or Na+/water reabsorption in the kidneys. This suggests that elevated antibody production may be a causal mechanism in at least some cases of hypertension. In this brief review, we will further describe the protein targets of the antibodies that are elevated in individuals with essential and pregnancy-related hypertension and the likely pathophysiological consequences of antibody binding to these targets. We will speculate on the potential mechanisms that underlie elevated antibody levels in hypertensive individuals and, finally, we will outline the therapeutic opportunities that could arise with a better understanding of how and why antibodies are produced in hypertension. PMID:25050352

  17. Immunoperoxidase inhibition assay for rabies antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Batista, H B C R; Lima, F E S; Maletich, D; Silva, A C R; Vicentini, F K; Roehe, L R; Spilki, F R; Franco, A C; Roehe, P M

    2011-06-01

    An immunoperoxidase inhibition assay (IIA) for detection of rabies antibodies in human sera is described. Diluted test sera are added to microplates with paraformaldehyde-fixed, CER cells infected with rabies virus. Antibodies in test sera compete with a rabies polyclonal rabbit antiserum which was added subsequently. Next, an anti-rabbit IgG-peroxidase conjugate is added and the reaction developed by the addition of the substrate 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC). The performance of the assay was compared to that of the "simplified fluorescence inhibition microtest" (SFIMT), an established virus neutralization assay, by testing 422 human sera. The IIA displayed 97.6% sensitivity, 98% specificity and 97.6% accuracy (Kappa correlation coefficient=0.9). The IIA results can be read by standard light microscopy, where the clearly identifiable specific staining is visible in antibody-negative sera, in contrast to the absence of staining in antibody-positive samples. The assay does not require monoclonal antibodies or production of large amounts of virus; furthermore, protein purification steps or specialized equipment are not necessary for its performance. The IIA was shown to be suitable for detection of rabies antibodies in human sera, with sensitivity, specificity and accuracy comparable to that of a neutralization-based assay. This assay may be advantageous over other similar methods designed to detect rabies-specific binding antibodies, in that it can be easily introduced into laboratories, provided basic cell culture facilities are available. PMID:21458492

  18. Secretory IgA antibodies from plants.

    PubMed

    Wycoff, K L

    2005-01-01

    Secretory IgA (SIgA) is the antibody type produced in both mammals and birds that protects the body from infection at mucosal surfaces. While monoclonal IgG antibodies, particularly those against tumor antigens, have received a great deal of attention, both scientific and commercial, as immunotherapeutic agents, the potential of SIgA antibodies has only recently begun to be exploited. Part of the reason for this is that SIgA production in vivo normally requires the cooperation of two different cell types, and single animal cell systems for monoclonal SIgA production are inefficient. Transgenic plants are currently the most productive and economical system for making SIgA. The only monoclonal SIgA to be tested therapeutically in a human clinical trial is a product called CaroRx, made in transgenic tobacco, which is designed to block adherence to teeth of the bacteria that causes cavities. This antibody accumulates to high levels in the leaves of tobacco, where it is located primarily in the endoplasmic reticulum. The antibody can be efficiently purified using the affinity reagent protein G. Topical oral treatment in human subjects was safe and effective. Characterization of the expression, secretion, purification and therapeutic use of this antibody serves as a model for additional plant-made therapeutic SIgA antibodies under development. PMID:16026297

  19. X antigen/antibody markers in hepadnavirus infections. Antibodies to the X gene product(s).

    PubMed

    Feitelson, M A; Clayton, M M

    1990-08-01

    Antibodies to the X antigen of hepatitis B virus and woodchuck hepatitis virus were assayed in serial sera from infected individuals and compared with other markers of infection. Antibody to the X antigen was found in 11 of 17 (65%) patients and 17 of 40 (42%) woodchucks that were surface-antigen positive. In comparison, this antibody was found in 5 of 14 (36%) patients and in none of 4 woodchucks that were surface-antigen negative. In 5 of 6 patients showing seroconversion from hepatitis B e antigen to antibody, antibody to X appeared at or near the time of seroconversion. In patients persistently positive for e antigen, X antibody often appeared when viral DNA became undetectable in the serum. In 14 of 17 (82%) woodchucks positive for antibody to X antigen, it also appeared near or after the time that viral DNA in serum disappeared. X antibodies were detected with great frequency only in populations with high frequencies of other hepatitis B virus markers. The results are consistent with the conclusion that antibody to X antigen is a marker of hepadnavirus infections that seems to be associated with a decrease in viral replication. Antibodies to the X antigen, then, may be a host response to the replication complex of the virus. PMID:2365196

  20. Antibodies Against Three Forms of Urokinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Atassi, M. Zouhair

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies that bind to preselected regions of the urokinase molecule have been developed. These antibodies can be used to measure small quantities of each of three molecular forms of urokinase that could be contained in microsamples or conditioned media harvested from cultures of mammalian cells. Previously available antibodies and assay techniques do not yield both clear distinctions among, and measurements of, all three forms. Urokinase is a zymogen that is synthesized in a single-chain form, called ScuPA, which is composed of 411 amino acid residues (see figure). ScuPA has very little enzyme activity, but it can be activated in two ways: (1) by cleavage of the peptide bond lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the loss of lysine 158 to obtain the high molecular-weight (HMW) form of the enzyme or (2) by cleavage of the bond lysine 135/lysine 136 to obtain the low-molecular-weight (LMW) form of the enzyme. The antibodies in question were produced in mice and rabbits by use of peptides as immunogens. The peptides were selected to obtain antibodies that bind to regions of ScuPA that include the lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the lysine 135/lysine 136 bonds. The antibodies include monoclonal and polyclonal ones that yield indications as to whether either of these bonds is intact. The polyclonal antibodies include ones that preferentially bind to the HMW or LMW forms of the urokinase molecule. The monoclonal antibodies include ones that discriminate between the ScuPA and the HMW form. A combination of these molecular-specific antibodies will enable simultaneous assays of the ScuPA, HMW, and LMW forms in the same specimen of culture medium.

  1. [Hepatitis C antibodies in health personnel].

    PubMed

    Pazdiora, P; Topolcan, O; Herynková, R

    1994-03-01

    Using the second generation test, the authors examined 320 health professionals of the Faculty Hospital in Plzen and dialyzation centres in Karlovy Vary and Sokolov for the presence of antibodies against the hepatitis C virus. Antibodies were detected in 7 of them (2.2%). Serum positivity was confirmed only in paramedical workers, the highest herd immunity was recorded in workers in the dialyzation centre in Plzen. The authors evaluate the prevalence of antibodies in relation to age and period of practice in the health services. PMID:7513266

  2. HIT-antibodies promote their own antigen.

    PubMed

    Greinacher, Andreas; Krauel, Krystin; Jensch, Inga

    2012-08-01

    Antiplatelet factor 4 (PF4) antibodies have an important role in the most frequent drug-induced immune disorder, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). In this issue of Blood, Sachais and coworkers propose a new feature that may explain why only some anti-PF4 antibodies are pathogenic.(1) In addition to epitope specificity-determining affinity and a high titer, the ability of antibodies to promote formation of their own target antigens seems to be a key factor for pathogenicity. PMID:22859710

  3. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  4. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  5. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  6. Uses of monoclonial antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-06-23

    This invention provides an antibody that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the heavy chain CDR (Complementary Determining Region)1 comprises NYDIN, heavy chain CDR2 comprises WIFPGDGSTQY, heavy chain CDR3 comprises QTTATWFAY, and the light chain CDR1 comprises RASQSISDYLH, light chain CDR2 comprises YASQSIS, and light chain CDR3 comprises QNGHSFPLT. In another embodiment, there is provided a polypeptide that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the polypeptide comprises NYDIN, WIFPGDGSTQY, QTTATWFAY, RASQSISDYLH, YASQSIS, and QNGHSFPLT.

  7. Antibody Drug Conjugates for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Polakis, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) constitute a family of cancer therapeutics designed to preferentially direct a cytotoxic drug to cells expressing a cell-surface antigen recognized by an antibody. The antibody and drug are linked through chemistries that enable release of the cytotoxic drug or drug adduct upon internalization and digestion of the ADC by the cell. Over 40 distinct ADCs, targeting an array of antigens and utilizing a variety of drugs and linkers, are undergoing clinical evaluation. This review primarily covers ADCs that have advanced to clinical investigation with a particular emphasis on how the individual targets, linker chemistries, and appended drugs influence their behavior. PMID:26589413

  8. METHODS AND APPLICATIONS Eliminating antibody polyreactivity

    E-print Network

    . Standard tests such as antibody binding to cardiolipin, HEp-2 cells, or nuclear antigens provide measures-cardiolipin ELISA, (ii) Luminex AtheNA Multi-Lyte ANA binding, and (iii) HEp-2 cell staining. The reduced

  9. Cost modeling for monoclonal antibody manufacturing

    E-print Network

    Simpson, Christina M. (Christina Margaret)

    2011-01-01

    The Novartis BioPharmOps division is responsible for manufacturing large molecule products, including monoclonal antibodies, for late stage clinical trials and commercial sales. The BioPharmOps site in Huningue, France is ...

  10. Polynucleotides encoding anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2011-01-11

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  11. Detection of rabies antibodies in dog sera.

    PubMed

    Ondrejková, A; Süli, J; Ondrejka, R; Slepecká, E; Prokeš, M; ?echvala, P; Supuka, P

    2015-01-01

    In the presented work, we compared the results of determination of rabies antibodies using three in vitro methods: rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT), fluorescent antibody virus neutralisation test (FAVNT) and the immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA). 196 dog sera samples were examined with FAVNT, RFFIT methods and the ELISA test. Sera with low and sufficiently high titre of antibodies had a similar result in determining by all methods. A critical level of rabies antibodies close to the required protection level (0.5 IU/cm3) was seen in sera of 18 dogs (9.18%); these were the sera obtained after primary vaccination of dogs. At this level, even small differences can cause a change in the assessment of the patient's serum seronegativity or seropositivity. Therefore, it is important to choose the appropriate method that has sufficiently strict criteria while having a good reproducibility. PMID:25928909

  12. ANCA / MPO / PR3 Antibodies Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... other autoimmune disorders , such as systemic lupus erythematosus , rheumatoid arthritis , and Sjögren syndrome . The following table shows results that may be seen in some vasculitis conditions. Condition % of patients with cANCA pattern (PR3 antibodies) % of patients with ...

  13. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology.

    PubMed

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2015-11-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease. PMID:26494046

  14. Brain-Reactive Antibodies and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, B.; Honig, G.; Mader, S.; Brimberg, L.; Volpe, B.T.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases currently affect 5–7% of the world's population; in most diseases there are circulating autoantibodies. Brain-reactive antibodies are present in approximately 2–3% of the general population but do not usually contribute to brain pathology. These antibodies penetrate brain tissue only early in development or under pathologic conditions. This restriction on their pathogenicity and the lack of correlation between serum titers and brain pathology have, no doubt, contributed to a delayed appreciation of the contribution of autoantibodies in diseases of the central nervous system. Nonetheless, it is increasingly clear that antibodies can cause damage in the brain and likely initiate or aggravate multiple neurologic conditions; brain-reactive antibodies contribute to symptomatology in autoimmune disease, infectious disease, and malignancy. PMID:23516983

  15. Chemical biology: How to minimalize antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    The success of antibodies as pharmaceuticals has triggered interest in crafting much smaller mimics. A crucial step forward has been taken with the chemical synthesis of small molecules that recruit immune cells to attack cancer cells.

  16. Myopathy with anti-HMGCR antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Ali; Choksi, Rati; Bucelli, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze clinical features and myopathology changes in muscle fibers, connective tissue, and vessels in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) antibody–associated myopathies. Methods: Retrospective review of records and myopathologic features of 49 consecutive patients with myopathies and serum HMGCR antibodies. Results: Clinical features included onset age from 12 to 83 years, female predominance (67%), proximal, symmetric weakness (84%), muscle discomfort (78%), dysphagia (35%), systemic features, including skin rash and interstitial lung disease (37%), statin use (38%), and a high serum creatine kinase (83%). Myopathology included muscle fiber necrosis or regeneration (66%), myonuclear pathology (43%), perimysial connective tissue damage (61%), and lymphocytic foci (27%). Conclusions: Patients with HMGCR antibody–associated myopathies present with weakness and muscle discomfort and often have damage to both perimysial connective tissue and muscle fibers, with necrosis and myonuclear pathology. Only a minority of patients with HMGCR antibody–associated myopathies have a history of statin exposure. PMID:26090508

  17. Antibody production in human malaria as determined by the fluorescent antibody technique.

    PubMed

    KUVIN, S F; TOBIE, J E; EVANS, C B; COATNEY, G R; CONTACOS, P G

    1962-03-30

    No reliable serological test has been available in the past to follow the course of antibody production in malarial infections. The indirect method of immunofluorescence was utilized in this investigation to study antibody response to sporozoite-induced Plasmodium vivax infections in two human volunteers. Malarial antibody was demonstrated approximately 3 weeks after infection, and has persisted thus far for 121 days. These preliminary results suggest that this method of serological testing is specific and provides a sensitive means of titrating antibody produced in malarial infections. PMID:14460984

  18. A novel strategy for generating monoclonal antibodies from single, isolated lymphocytes producing antibodies of defined specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Babcook, J S; Leslie, K B; Olsen, O A; Salmon, R A; Schrader, J W

    1996-01-01

    We report a novel approach to the generation of monoclonal antibodies based on the molecular cloning and expression of immunoglobulin variable region cDNAs generated from single rabbit or murine lymphocytes that were selected for the production of specific antibodies. Single cells secreting antibodies for a specific peptide either from gp116 of the human cytomegalovirus or from gp120 of HIV-1 or for sheep red blood cells were selected using antigen-specific hemolytic plaque assays. Sheep red blood cells were coated with specific peptides in a procedure applicable to any antigen that can be biotinylated. Heavy- and light-chain variable region cDNAs were rescued from single cells by reverse transcription-PCR and expressed in the context of human immunoglobulin constant regions. These chimeric murine and rabbit monoclonal antibodies replicated the target specificities of the original antibody-forming cells. The selected lymphocyte antibody method exploits the in vivo mechanisms that generate high-affinity antibodies. This method can use lymphocytes from peripheral blood, can exploit a variety of procedures that identify individual lymphocytes producing a particular antibody, and is applicable to the generation of monoclonal antibodies from many species, including humans. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8755564

  19. Competitive exclusion by autologous antibodies can prevent broad HIV-1 antibodies from arising

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-08-31

    The past decade has seen the discovery of numerous broad and potent monoclonal antibodies against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Eliciting these antibodies via vaccination appears to be remarkably difficult, not least because they arise late in infection and are highly mutated relative to germline antibody sequences. Here, using a computational model, we show that broad antibodies could in fact emerge earlier and be less mutated, but that they may be prevented from doing so as a result of competitive exclusion by the autologous antibody response. We further find that this competitive exclusion is weaker in infections founded by multiple distinct strains, with broadly neutralizing antibodies emerging earlier than in infections founded by a single strain. Our computational model simulates coevolving multitype virus and antibody populations. Broadly neutralizing antibodies may therefore be easier for the adaptive immune system to generate than previously thought. As a result, if less mutated broad antibodies exist, it may be possible to elicit them with a vaccine containing a mixture of diverse virus strains.

  20. Competitive exclusion by autologous antibodies can prevent broad HIV-1 antibodies from arising

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-08-31

    The past decade has seen the discovery of numerous broad and potent monoclonal antibodies against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Eliciting these antibodies via vaccination appears to be remarkably difficult, not least because they arise late in infection and are highly mutated relative to germline antibody sequences. Here, using a computational model, we show that broad antibodies could in fact emerge earlier and be less mutated, but that they may be prevented from doing so as a result of competitive exclusion by the autologous antibody response. We further find that this competitive exclusion is weaker in infections founded by multiple distinctmore »strains, with broadly neutralizing antibodies emerging earlier than in infections founded by a single strain. Our computational model simulates coevolving multitype virus and antibody populations. Broadly neutralizing antibodies may therefore be easier for the adaptive immune system to generate than previously thought. As a result, if less mutated broad antibodies exist, it may be possible to elicit them with a vaccine containing a mixture of diverse virus strains.« less

  1. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5110 - Antiparietal antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antiparietal antibody immunological test system....5110 Antiparietal antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antiparietal antibody... the specific antibody for gastric parietal cells in serum and other body fluids. Gastric...

  5. 9 CFR 113.450 - General requirements for antibody products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General requirements for antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.450 General requirements for antibody products. Unless otherwise prescribed in a Standard Requirement or in a filed Outline of Production, all antibody products shall...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5110 - Antiparietal antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antiparietal antibody immunological test system....5110 Antiparietal antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antiparietal antibody... the specific antibody for gastric parietal cells in serum and other body fluids. Gastric...

  8. 9 CFR 113.450 - General requirements for antibody products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General requirements for antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.450 General requirements for antibody products. Unless otherwise prescribed in a Standard Requirement or in a filed Outline of Production, all antibody products shall...

  9. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    David Bradley

    2011-03-31

    During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

  10. 21 CFR 866.5110 - Antiparietal antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antiparietal antibody immunological test system....5110 Antiparietal antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antiparietal antibody... the specific antibody for gastric parietal cells in serum and other body fluids. Gastric...

  11. 9 CFR 113.450 - General requirements for antibody products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General requirements for antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.450 General requirements for antibody products. Unless otherwise prescribed in a Standard Requirement or in a filed Outline of Production, all antibody products shall...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5110 - Antiparietal antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antiparietal antibody immunological test system....5110 Antiparietal antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antiparietal antibody... the specific antibody for gastric parietal cells in serum and other body fluids. Gastric...

  13. 9 CFR 113.450 - General requirements for antibody products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General requirements for antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.450 General requirements for antibody products. Unless otherwise prescribed in a Standard Requirement or in a filed Outline of Production, all antibody products shall...

  14. 21 CFR 866.5110 - Antiparietal antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antiparietal antibody immunological test system....5110 Antiparietal antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antiparietal antibody... the specific antibody for gastric parietal cells in serum and other body fluids. Gastric...

  15. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular...

  16. 9 CFR 113.450 - General requirements for antibody products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General requirements for antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.450 General requirements for antibody products. Unless otherwise prescribed in a Standard Requirement or in a filed Outline of Production, all antibody products shall...

  17. Autoimmune encephalitis: Clinical diagnosis versus antibody confirmation

    PubMed Central

    Cyril, Asha Caroline; Nair, Sruthi S.; Mathai, Annamma; Kannoth, Sudheeran; Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Autoimmune encephalitis is a heterogeneous disorder which is being diagnosed with increasing frequency. The diagnosis of these disorders is based on the detection of autoantibodies and characteristic clinical profiles. Aims: We aimed to study the antibody profile in encephalitis patients with suspected autoimmune etiology presenting to a tertiary care center. Settings and Design: The subjects were selected by screening all patients with clinical profile suggesting autoimmune encephalitis admitted in the neuromedical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care center in South India. Materials and Methods: Patients who fulfilled modified Zuliani et al.'s, criteria for autoimmune encephalitis were identified during the period December 2009–June 2013. Blood samples from these subjects were screened for six neuronal antibodies. Statistical analysis used: Chi-square test was applied to compare the antibody positive and negative patients. Results: Out of 1,227 patients screened, 39 subjects (14 males: 25 females) were identified with a mean age of 15.95 years and 19 cases were assessed in the acute and 20 in the convalescent phase of the illness. Seizure (87.8 %) was the most common presenting symptom; status epilepticus occurred in 23 (60.5%) patients during the course of the illness. Fourteen (35.9%) patients were N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibody-positive and all were negative for the other antibodies tested. Conclusions: One-third of patients presenting with acute noninfective encephalitis would be positive for NMDAR antibodies with the remaining two-thirds with clinically suspected autoimmune encephalitis being antibody-negative. There are few markers in the clinical and investigative profiles to distinguish antibody-positive and -negative patients. PMID:26713011

  18. Autoimmune hepatitis with anti centromere antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lodh, Moushumi; Pradhan, Debkant; Parida, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    We present the case report of a 49-year-old type 2 diabetes mellitus patient presenting with abdominal pain and black stool for 15 days. A proper workup of laboratory investigations helped us diagnose autoimmune hepatitis with anticentromere antibodies. The authors would like to highlight that screening AIH patients for anticentromere antibody is not mandatory but can be considered, especially in the presence of disease-related symptomatology for quicker, more accurate diagnosis and optimum management. PMID:25379307

  19. Working towards a consensus for antibody validation

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Peter D.; Min, Danxi; Leung, Mei Y.

    2014-01-01

    Commercial research antibodies are the most commonly used product in the life science tools market, and their applications represent a significant investment of time and resources for researchers. Frequently however, the quality of antibodies does not meet the expectations of consumers, causing loss of valuable time and money. This can delay research efforts and scientific discovery, or even lead to false, irreproducible results to be published in the scientific literature. This raises the question of whether there should be universal standards for validating antibodies.   During the 1 st International Antibody Validation Forum, hosted by St John’s Laboratory Ltd on October 15 th 2014 at Queen Mary University of London, scientists from academia and industry presented data highlighting quality issues arising from lack of antibody validation. While the forum identified significant current problems in the antibody market, it also discussed future opportunities for improved quality and transparency by encouraging data disclosure and data sharing. This article highlights the key issues and conclusions reached at the forum. PMID:25580232

  20. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research. PMID:26482034

  1. Delivery of antibodies to the cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Andrea LJ; Zhang, Congcong; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Perez, Franck; Dübel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibodies to target their antigens in living cells is a powerful analytical tool for cell biology research. Not only can molecules be localized and visualized in living cells, but interference with cellular processes by antibodies may allow functional analysis down to the level of individual post-translational modifications and splice variants, which is not possible with genetic or RNA-based methods. To utilize the vast resource of available antibodies, an efficient system to deliver them into the cytosol from the outside is needed. Numerous strategies have been proposed, but the most robust and widely applicable procedure still remains to be identified, since a quantitative ranking of the efficiencies has not yet been done. To achieve this, we developed a novel efficiency evaluation method for antibody delivery based on a fusion protein consisting of a human IgG1 Fc and the recombination enzyme Cre (Fc-Cre). Applied to suitable GFP reporter cells, it allows the important distinction between proteins trapped in endosomes and those delivered to the cytosol. Further, it ensures viability of positive cells and is unsusceptible to fixation artifacts and misinterpretation of cellular localization in microscopy and flow cytometry. Very low cytoplasmic delivery efficiencies were found for various profection reagents and membrane penetrating peptides, leaving electroporation as the only practically useful delivery method for antibodies. This was further verified by the successful application of this method to bind antibodies to cytosolic components in living cells. PMID:24848507

  2. Antinuclear antibodies in patients on anticonvulsant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Segovia, D.; Fishbein, Eugenia; Reyes, P. A.; Díes, H.; Shwadsky, S.

    1972-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies to calf thymus nuclei, NP, DNA, sDNA, sNP and Sm antigen were investigated in sera from 170 patients on various programmes of prolonged anticonvulsant treatment. Findings were compared to those on 214 tuberculous patients on isoniazid, 109 SLE patients and 66 healthy subjects. Patients on anticonvulsants had a significantly higher incidence of ANA to DNA, sDNA, sNP and Sm antigen than the controls but had a lower incidence of ANA to all antigens, except sNP, than the SLE patients. Patients on isoniazid did not have DNA antibodies, but had antibodies to whole nuclei and to NP which were practically absent in the anticonvulsant group. Of all patients on anticonvulsants only those receiving hydantoins had ANA to Sm antigen, while those receiving only primidone had antibodies to sNP but no antibodies to DNA. Alteration of sNP with isoniazid did not result in an increased incidence of ANA in the anticonvulsant group as it does in isoniazid treated subjects. It is concluded that the SLE-activating properties of diverse anticonvulsants probably resides in their potential to induce ANA. Although all anticonvulsants elicit ANA directed primarily to sNP, each may do so by different mechanisms or by altering different sites in the sNP molecule. The mechanisms by which anticonvulsant and isoniazid intake results in ANA probably differ. Presence of DNA antibodies in some patients on anticonvulsants may indicate that their convulsions were due to SLE. PMID:4117275

  3. Monoclonal antibody to chicken oviduct progesterone receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Radanyi, C; Joab, I; Renoir, J M; Richard-Foy, H; Baulieu, E E

    1983-01-01

    Antibodies to molybdate-stabilized chicken oviduct progesterone receptor were raised in a Wistar rat and detected by interaction with homogeneous radioiodinated progesterone receptor. Spleen cells of this rat were then fused with mouse Sp2/0-Ag14 myeloma cells and the antibodies produced by the hybrid cells were detected by double immunoprecipitation using the 125I-labeled receptor. Cells of one of the positive cultures were then cloned by limiting dilution and one hybridoma cell line was studied. The monoclonal antibody produced was an IgG2b, and it reacted with the molybdate-stabilized "8-9S" form of the chicken oviduct progesterone receptor, labeled with either [3H]progesterone or [3H]ORG 2058 (a high-affinity synthetic progestin). Kd for the 8-9S progesterone receptor was approximately equal to 1 nM. Progesterone receptor-monoclonal antibody complexes were labeled with radioactive progesterone, suggesting that antibody does not prevent hormone binding. By using a [35S]methionine-labeled antibody, we were able to detect the progesterone receptor independently of its characteristic function of binding radioactive hormone. No crossreaction with human progesterone receptor was detected. PMID:6574454

  4. E-clonal antibodies: selection of full-length IgG antibodies using bacterial periplasmic display

    E-print Network

    Georgiou, George

    E-clonal antibodies: selection of full-length IgG antibodies using bacterial periplasmic display a protocol for the selection of full-length IgG antibodies from repertoires displayed on Escherichia coli within 3­4 weeks, a timescale that is comparable with most prevalent antibody display technologies

  5. Antibodies and cancer therapy: versatile platforms for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Surana, Rishi; Wang, Shangzi

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies have emerged as important therapeutics for cancer. Recently, it has become clear that antibodies possess multiple clinically relevant mechanisms of action. Many clinically useful antibodies can manipulate tumour-related signalling. In addition, antibodies exhibit various immunomodulatory properties and, by directly activating or inhibiting molecules of the immune system, antibodies can promote the induction of anti-tumour immune responses. These immunomodulatory properties can form the basis for new cancer treatment strategies. PMID:20414205

  6. Taxonomic study of the genera Halogeometricum and Halosarcina: transfer of Halosarcina limi and Halosarcina pallida to the genus Halogeometricum as Halogeometricum limi comb. nov. and Halogeometricum pallidum comb. nov., respectively

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xing-Xing; Zhao, Mei-Lin; Han, Dong; Zhang, Wen-Jiao; Dyall-Smith, Mike L.

    2013-01-01

    Members of the haloarchaeal genera Halosarcina and Halogeometricum (family Halobacteriaceae) are closely related to each other and show 96.6–98?% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. This is higher than the accepted threshold value (95?%) to separate two genera, and a taxonomic study using a polyphasic approach of all four members of the two genera was conducted to clarify their relationships. Polar lipid profiles indicated that Halogeometricum rufum RO1-4T, Halosarcina pallida BZ256T and Halosarcina limi RO1-6T are related more to each other than to Halogeometricum borinquense CGMCC 1.6168T. Phylogenetic analyses using the sequences of three different genes (16S rRNA gene, rpoB? and EF-2) strongly supported the monophyly of these four species, showing that they formed a distinct clade, separate from the related genera Halopelagius, Halobellus, Haloquadratum, Haloferax and Halogranum. The results indicate that the four species should be assigned to the same genus, and it is proposed that Halosarcina pallida and Halosarcina limi be transferred to the genus Halogeometricum as Halogeometricum pallidum comb. nov. (type strain, BZ256T?=?KCTC 4017T?=?JCM 14848T) and Halogeometricum limi comb. nov. (type strain, RO1-6T?=?CGMCC 1.8711T?=?JCM 16054T). PMID:24097833

  7. Antibodies to Trichomonas vaginalis surface glycolipid

    PubMed Central

    Bastida-Corcuera, F D; Singh, B N; Gray, G C; Stamper, P D; Davuluri, M; Schlangen, K; Corbeil, R R; Corbeil, L B

    2015-01-01

    Background Human trichomoniasis is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease, yet immune responses are not well studied. Methods Since the Trichomonas vaginalis lipophosphoglycan (TvLPG) is an important virulence factor, a bank of eight monoclonal antibodies was generated to define the antigen in clinical isolates. The TvLPG-specific antibody response of women who were culture positive (n=33) or negative (n=33) for T vaginalis infection was determined by isotype-specific ELISA. Results The bank of monoclonal antibodies reacted with conserved surface TvLPG epitopes in 27 isolates from pregnant women at their first prenatal visit. Conserved TvLPG epitopes were shown to be surface exposed by immunofluorescence. Sera collected from the same patients at the same time were assayed for specific antibodies. Serum and vaginal secretions from 33 T vaginalis-positive women had statistically higher IgG anti-TvLPG levels than age-matched and race-matched negative controls in the same clinical study (p<0.01). Vaginal IgA anti-TvLPG levels of the women with trichomoniasis were almost significantly higher than controls (p=0.055). Infected women with normal pregnancies had significantly higher vaginal IgG anti-TvLPG values than infected women with adverse outcomes of pregnancy. Conclusions These antibody responses show that infected women can respond to the conserved TvLPG antigen. Since antibodies to trichomonad surface LPG protect in a bovine model of trichomoniasis, the role of these antibodies in the human disease should be investigated. PMID:23785040

  8. Higher cytotoxicity of divalent antibody-toxins than monovalent antibody-toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Won, JaeSeon; Nam, PilWon; Lee, YongChan; Choe, MuHyeon

    2009-04-24

    Recombinant antibody-toxins are constructed via the fusion of a 'carcinoma-specific' antibody fragment to a toxin. Due to the high affinity and high selectivity of the antibody fragments, antibody-toxins can bind to surface antigens on cancer cells and kill them without harming normal cells [L.H. Pai, J.K. Batra, D.J. FitzGerald, M.C. Willingham, I. Pastan, Anti-tumor activities of immunotoxins made of monoclonal antibody B3 and various forms of Pseudomonas exotoxin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88 (1991) 3358-3362]. In this study, we constructed the antibody-toxin, Fab-SWn-PE38, with SWn (n = 3, 6, 9) sequences containing n-time repeated (G{sub 4}S) between the Fab fragment and PE38 (38 kDa truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A). The SWn sequence also harbored one cysteine residue that could form a disulfide bridge between two Fab-SWn-PE38 monomers. We assessed the cytotoxicity of the monovalent (Fab-SWn-PE38), and divalent ([Fab-SWn-PE38]{sub 2}) antibody-toxins. The cytotoxicity of the dimer against the CRL1739 cell line was approximately 18.8-fold higher than that of the monomer on the ng/ml scale, which was approximately 37.6-fold higher on the pM scale. These results strongly indicate that divalency provides higher cytotoxicity for an antibody-toxin.

  9. 179Antibody Fc 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.2014 Antibody Glycosylation

    E-print Network

    Rs or comple- ment components to clear pathogens and trigger both innate and adaptive immune responses and adaptive immunity by binding to Fc receptors (FcRs) as well as components of the complement system on the immune function of antibodies and discuss the implica- tions for monoclonal antibody and intravenous

  10. High level transient production of recombinant antibodies and antibody fusion proteins in HEK293 cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand of monospecific high affinity binding reagents, particularly monoclonal antibodies, has been steadily increasing over the last years. Enhanced throughput of antibody generation has been addressed by optimizing in vitro selection using phage display which moved the major bottleneck to the production and purification of recombinant antibodies in an end-user friendly format. Single chain (sc)Fv antibody fragments require additional tags for detection and are not as suitable as immunoglobulins (Ig)G in many immunoassays. In contrast, the bivalent scFv-Fc antibody format shares many properties with IgG and has a very high application compatibility. Results In this study transient expression of scFv-Fc antibodies in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells was optimized. Production levels of 10-20 mg/L scFv-Fc antibody were achieved in adherent HEK293T cells. Employment of HEK293-6E suspension cells expressing a truncated variant of the Epstein Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen (EBNA) 1 in combination with production under serum free conditions increased the volumetric yield up to 10-fold to more than 140 mg/L scFv-Fc antibody. After vector optimization and process optimization the yield of an scFv-Fc antibody and a cytotoxic antibody-RNase fusion protein further increased 3-4-fold to more than 450 mg/L. Finally, an entirely new mammalian expression vector was constructed for single step in frame cloning of scFv genes from antibody phage display libraries. Transient expression of more than 20 different scFv-Fc antibodies resulted in volumetric yields of up to 600 mg/L and 400 mg/L in average. Conclusion Transient production of recombinant scFv-Fc antibodies in HEK293-6E in combination with optimized vectors and fed batch shake flasks cultivation is efficient and robust, and integrates well into a high-throughput recombinant antibody generation pipeline. PMID:23802841

  11. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Eduardo B; Farah, Michel E; Maia, Maurício; Penha, Fernando M; Regatieri, Caio; Melo, Gustavo B; Pinheiro, Marcelo M; Zanetti, Carlos R

    2009-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be used therapeutically by binding to molecular targets with high specificity. Therefore, they have excellent therapeutic applications in ophthalmology. This manuscript presents four aspects of the therapeutic use of mAbs in ophthalmology: the scientific rationale, the unique characteristics of selected mAbs, the current state-of-the-art application, and relevant therapeutic mAbs for future applications in ophthalmology. We identified in the literature various single-agent therapies that inhibit the following targets: tumor necrosis factor (TNF), epithelial growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor, basic fibroblast growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor, and cluster of differentiation antigens. The roles of all biochemical targets in ocular diseases were evaluated. Current and future mAbs against various cytokines were assessed for the treatment of ocular diseases. The medical literature showed the clinical benefits of mAbs for treating angiogenic and inflammatory ocular diseases. Two anti-VEGF mAbs, bevacizumab and ranibizumab, and three anti-TNF agents, infliximab, etanercept, and adalimumab, control ocular neovascularization and intraocular inflammation. Other mAbs such as rituximab, daclizumab, efalizumab, and alemtuzumab showed positive results in animal and early clinical studies and may represent useful adjuvant therapies for ocular lymphoma or ocular inflammation. Ranibizumab is the only FDA-approved therapy; for other mAbs the so-called off-label application remains the standard. Intravenous administration of mAbs has demonstrated acceptable toxicity profiles, while intraocular injection may decrease the chances of systemic complications and increase the amount of drug available to the retina and choroid. In conclusion, effective clinical use of mAbs in ophthalmology is more commonly seen in the field of angiogenic vitreoretinal and autoimmune inflammatory diseases. The challenge for the future is combining biologic therapies to improve the quality and duration of responses while diminishing side effects. The role of mAbs within ophthalmic treatments will be defined according to future clinical experience and the results of randomized clinical trials. PMID:19114125

  12. Antibodies to selected minor target antigens in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA).

    PubMed

    Talor, M V; Stone, J H; Stebbing, J; Barin, J; Rose, N R; Burek, C L

    2007-10-01

    In patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, indirect immunofluorescence (IF) distinguishes between cytoplasmic (C-ANCA) and perinuclear (P-ANCA) neutrophil staining patterns. In patients with primary systemic vasculitis such as Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis and Churg-Strauss syndrome, these IF staining patterns correspond broadly with antibodies to the two major antigens: the C-ANCA pattern is associated generally with antibodies to serine protease 3 (PR3) and the P-ANCA pattern with antibodies to myeloperoxidase (MPO). However, some sera positive for ANCA by IF are negative for anti-PR3 and anti-MPO antibodies, suggesting the presence of antibodies to minor antigens of PMN granules. We tested sera from a previously well-defined clinical cohort of patients for antibodies to four possible minor antigens: bactericidal permeability increasing protein, elastase, cathepsin G and lactoferrin. IF-positive (+) sera had significantly higher antibody frequencies to the minor antigens than did the IF-negative (-) sera (P < 0.01). Patients with IF(+) PR3(-)MPO(-) sera showed the most varied reactivity to the minor antigens. Among the IF(+) groups, the IF(+) PR3(+)/MPO(-) sera showed the lowest reactivity to the minor antigens. Patients with well-defined ANCA specificities, e.g. the PR3-ANCA response associated with Wegener's granulomatosis, are less likely than are other patient subsets to have antibodies to minor antigen targets. Autoantibodies to these minor antigens contribute to the overall pattern of ANCA identified by IF and help to explain why the correlation between IF and enzyme immunoassays show discrepancies. While the pathophysiological significance of antibodies to minor target antigens needs further evaluation, they may be markers of inflammation associated with disease processes. PMID:17614969

  13. Antibody phage display technology and its applications.

    PubMed

    Hoogenboom, H R; de Bruďne, A P; Hufton, S E; Hoet, R M; Arends, J W; Roovers, R C

    1998-06-01

    In recent years, the use of display vectors and in vitro selection technologies has transformed the way in which we generate ligands, such as antibodies and peptides, for a given target. Using this technology, we are now able to design repertoires of ligands from scratch and use the power of phage selection to select those ligands having the desired (biological) properties. With phage display, tailor-made antibodies may be synthesized and selected to acquire the desired affinity of binding and specificity for in vitro and in vivo diagnosis, or for immunotherapy of human disease. This review addresses recent progress in the construction of, and selection from phage antibody libraries, together with novel approaches for screening phage antibodies. As the quality of large naďve and synthetic antibody repertoires improves and libraries becomes more generally available, new and exciting applications are pioneered such as the identification of novel antigens using differential selection and the generation of receptor a(nta)gonists. A combination of the design and generation of millions to billions of different ligands, together with phage display for the isolation of binding ligands and with functional assays for identifying (and possibly selecting) bio-active ligands, will open even more challenging applications of this inspiring technology, and provide a powerful tool for drug and target discovery well into the next decade. PMID:9661810

  14. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-zhe; Coljee, Vincent W.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  15. [Big data: the progress and applications of antibody repertoire sequencing].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zai-Bao; Guan, Qian; Zhang, Zhen-Hai

    2015-04-01

    Antibody, the major effector in adaptive immunity, plays key roles in protective and pathogenic immune responses. Integrative analyses of antibody development, differentiation, and maturation promote the research in immune mechanism, vaccine design, and therapies for autoimmune disorders. The development of next generation sequencing technologies has enabled large-scale characterization of functional antibody repertoires. With the advantages of next generation sequencing, antibody and antibody repertoire analysis have been successfully used in identification of HIV-1-broadly neutralizing antibodies, design of rationale structure-based vaccine, and development of immunology. With increasing sequence length and precision, improvement of experimental protocols and bioinformatics analyses, and development of single cell sequencing technology, antibody repertoire sequencing will expedite the research in antibody-related immune response, and thus facilitates vaccine design for infectious diseases, clinical diagnosis and interference of autoimmune diseases. This review introduces the technologies, progresses, applications, and caveats of antibody repertoire sequencing. PMID:25907926

  16. Antibody-Specific Model of Amino Acid Substitution for Immunological Inferences from Alignments of Antibody Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mirsky, Alexander; Kazandjian, Linda; Anisimova, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins produced by the immune system as a dynamically adaptive line of defense against invading pathogens. Very elegant and specific mutational mechanisms allow B lymphocytes to produce a large and diversified repertoire of antibodies, which is modified and enhanced throughout all adulthood. One of these mechanisms is somatic hypermutation, which stochastically mutates nucleotides in the antibody genes, forming new sequences with different properties and, eventually, higher affinity and selectivity to the pathogenic target. As somatic hypermutation involves fast mutation of antibody sequences, this process can be described using a Markov substitution model of molecular evolution. Here, using large sets of antibody sequences from mice and humans, we infer an empirical amino acid substitution model AB, which is specific to antibody sequences. Compared with existing general amino acid models, we show that the AB model provides significantly better description for the somatic evolution of mice and human antibody sequences, as demonstrated on large next generation sequencing (NGS) antibody data. General amino acid models are reflective of conservation at the protein level due to functional constraints, with most frequent amino acids exchanges taking place between residues with the same or similar physicochemical properties. In contrast, within the variable part of antibody sequences we observed an elevated frequency of exchanges between amino acids with distinct physicochemical properties. This is indicative of a sui generis mutational mechanism, specific to antibody somatic hypermutation. We illustrate this property of antibody sequences by a comparative analysis of the network modularity implied by the AB model and general amino acid substitution models. We recommend using the new model for computational studies of antibody sequence maturation, including inference of alignments and phylogenetic trees describing antibody somatic hypermutation in large NGS data sets. The AB model is implemented in the open-source software CodonPhyML (http://sourceforge.net/projects/codonphyml) and can be downloaded and supplied by the user to ProGraphMSA (http://sourceforge.net/projects/prographmsa) or other alignment and phylogeny reconstruction programs that allow for user-defined substitution models. PMID:25534034

  17. Antibody-specific model of amino acid substitution for immunological inferences from alignments of antibody sequences.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Alexander; Kazandjian, Linda; Anisimova, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins produced by the immune system as a dynamically adaptive line of defense against invading pathogens. Very elegant and specific mutational mechanisms allow B lymphocytes to produce a large and diversified repertoire of antibodies, which is modified and enhanced throughout all adulthood. One of these mechanisms is somatic hypermutation, which stochastically mutates nucleotides in the antibody genes, forming new sequences with different properties and, eventually, higher affinity and selectivity to the pathogenic target. As somatic hypermutation involves fast mutation of antibody sequences, this process can be described using a Markov substitution model of molecular evolution. Here, using large sets of antibody sequences from mice and humans, we infer an empirical amino acid substitution model AB, which is specific to antibody sequences. Compared with existing general amino acid models, we show that the AB model provides significantly better description for the somatic evolution of mice and human antibody sequences, as demonstrated on large next generation sequencing (NGS) antibody data. General amino acid models are reflective of conservation at the protein level due to functional constraints, with most frequent amino acids exchanges taking place between residues with the same or similar physicochemical properties. In contrast, within the variable part of antibody sequences we observed an elevated frequency of exchanges between amino acids with distinct physicochemical properties. This is indicative of a sui generis mutational mechanism, specific to antibody somatic hypermutation. We illustrate this property of antibody sequences by a comparative analysis of the network modularity implied by the AB model and general amino acid substitution models. We recommend using the new model for computational studies of antibody sequence maturation, including inference of alignments and phylogenetic trees describing antibody somatic hypermutation in large NGS data sets. The AB model is implemented in the open-source software CodonPhyML (http://sourceforge.net/projects/codonphyml) and can be downloaded and supplied by the user to ProGraphMSA (http://sourceforge.net/projects/prographmsa) or other alignment and phylogeny reconstruction programs that allow for user-defined substitution models. PMID:25534034

  18. Antidrug Antibodies: B Cell Immunity Against Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fogdell-Hahn, A

    2015-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are now treated with a range of different biopharmaceuticals, often requiring lifelong parenteral administrations. This exposure to drugs is unnatural and can trigger the immune system and result in the formation of antidrug antibodies. Drug-specific antibodies will, if of sufficiently high titre and affinity, block the intended effect of the drug, increase its clearance and make continued treatment worthless. We expect the immune system to react towards therapies against which tolerance has never been established, which is the case for factor VIII treatment in patients with haemophilia A. However, even biopharmaceutical molecules that we should be tolerant against can elicit antidrug antibodies, for instance in treatment of multiple sclerosis patients with recombinant human interferon-beta. Possible immunological mechanisms behind the breaking of tolerance against drugs, the impact this has on continuous treatment success, clinical practice and drug development, will be discussed in this review. PMID:26098690

  19. Photopatterned antibodies for selective cell attachment.

    PubMed

    Custódio, C A; San Miguel-Arranz, V; Gropeanu, R A; Gropeanu, M; Wirkner, M; Reis, R L; Mano, J F; del Campo, A

    2014-08-26

    We present a phototriggerable system that allows for the spatiotemporal controlled attachment of selected cell types to a biomaterial using immobilized antibodies that specifically target individual cell phenotypes. o-Nitrobenzyl caged biotin was used to functionalize chitosan membranes and mediate site-specific coupling of streptavidin and biotinylated antibodies after light activation. The ability of this system to capture and immobilize specific cells on a surface was tested using endothelial-specific biotinylated antibodies and nonspecific ones as controls. Homogeneous patterned monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were obtained on CD31-functionalized surfaces. This is a simple and generic approach that is applicable to other ligands, materials, and cell types and shows the flexibility of caged ligands to trigger and control the interaction between cells and biomaterials. PMID:25076392

  20. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1991-05-01

    The accurate determination of the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) is important for calculation of dosimetry and evaluation of pharmacokinetic variables such as antibody dose and route of administration. A major long-term objective of this proposal is to determine the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for quantifying the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies labeled with the clinically relevant radionuclide iodine-123 (I-123). The pharmacokinetics of I-123 labeled MoAbs will be determined by the SPECT in non-human primates. The errors associated with the SPECT measurements will be assessed with Monte Carlo simulations and by scanning phantoms containing I-123 activity in regions of uniform and nonuniform attenuation. The ability of SPECT to quantify I-123 distributions will be assessed, and new acquisition geometries and reconstruction algorithms for improved quantification will be evaluated. 33 refs.

  1. Removal of Species Constraints in Antibody Detection ?

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Alison Jane; Biggerstaff, Brad J.; Kosoy, Olga L.; Junna, Shilpa R.; Panella, Nicholas A.; Powers, Ann M.; Stark, Lillian M.; Nemeth, Nicole M.

    2010-01-01

    Serum antibodies from myriad species, particularly birds, can provide key information regarding the transmission and the expansion of the territory of emerging pathogens. Expedient antibody analysis is constrained by a lack of species-specific reagents, a deficiency potentially highlighted by the recent swine-origin influenza A virus (H1N1) outbreak. Available methodologies present difficulties that discourage thorough serologic monitoring of potential disease vectors or hosts. Rapid high-throughput procedures that combined serum amine labeling via biotinylation, contaminant removal, and microsphere-based immunoassays for antibodies to three arboviruses were developed. Agent-specific adaptations of this simple format should facilitate expanded surveillance and diagnostic capabilities regarding pathogens of human and veterinary importance. PMID:19923570

  2. Antibody-based biological toxin detection

    SciTech Connect

    Menking, D.E.; Goode, M.T.

    1995-12-01

    Fiber optic evanescent fluorosensors are under investigation in our laboratory for the study of drug-receptor interactions for detection of threat agents and antibody-antigen interactions for detection of biological toxins. In a direct competition assay, antibodies against Cholera toxin, Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B or ricin were noncovalently immobilized on quartz fibers and probed with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) - labeled toxins. In the indirect competition assay, Cholera toxin or Botulinum toxoid A was immobilized onto the fiber, followed by incubation in an antiserum or partially purified anti-toxin IgG. These were then probed with FITC-anti-IgG antibodies. Unlabeled toxins competed with labeled toxins or anti-toxin IgG in a dose dependent manner and the detection of the toxins was in the nanomolar range.

  3. Method for preparation of single chain antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V. (New York, NY); Guo, Hong-fen (New York, NY)

    2012-04-03

    This invention provides a method for identifying cells expressing a target single chain antibody (scFv) directed against a target antigen from a collection of cells that includes cells that do not express the target scFv, comprising the step of combining the collection of cells with an anti-idiotype directed to an antibody specific for the target antigen and detecting interaction, if any, of the anti-idiotype with the cells, wherein the occurrence of an interaction identifies the cell as one which expresses the target scFv. This invention also provides a method for making a single chain antibody (scFv) directed against an antigen, wherein the selection of clones is made based upon interaction of those clones with an appropriate anti-idiotype, and heretofore inaccessible scFv so made. This invention provides the above methods or any combination thereof. Finally, this invention provides various uses of these methods.

  4. Antibody-Mediated Pathogen Resistance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Peschen, Dieter; Schillberg, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The methods described in this chapter were developed in order to produce transgenic plants expressing pathogen-specific single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies fused to antifungal peptides (AFPs), conferring resistance against fungal pathogens. We describe the selection from a phage display library of avian scFv antibodies that recognize cell surface proteins on fungi from the genus Fusarium, and the construction of scFv-AFP fusion protein constructs followed by their transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana spp.) plants and stable expression in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Using these techniques, the antibody fusion with the most promising in vitro activity can be used to generate transgenic plants that are resistant to pathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. matthiolae. PMID:26614296

  5. Method for altering antibody light chain interactions

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J. (Naperville, IL); Stevens, Priscilla Wilkins (Evanston, IL); Raffen, Rosemarie (Elmhurst, IL); Schiffer, Marianne (Downers Grove, IL)

    2002-01-01

    A method for recombinant antibody subunit dimerization including modifying at least one codon of a nucleic acid sequence to replace an amino acid occurring naturally in the antibody with a charged amino acid at a position in the interface segment of the light polypeptide variable region, the charged amino acid having a first polarity; and modifying at least one codon of the nucleic acid sequence to replace an amino acid occurring naturally in the antibody with a charged amino acid at a position in an interface segment of the heavy polypeptide variable region corresponding to a position in the light polypeptide variable region, the charged amino acid having a second polarity opposite the first polarity. Nucleic acid sequences which code for novel light chain proteins, the latter of which are used in conjunction with the inventive method, are also provided.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  7. Paraneoplastic syndrome-associated neuronal antibodies in adult ADHD.

    PubMed

    Haukanes, Bjřrn Ivar; Hegvik, Tor-Arne; Eichler, Tilo; Haavik, Jan; Vedeler, Christian

    2015-11-15

    A high seroprevalence of Yo antibodies targeting cerebellar Purkinje cells was recently reported in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We investigated the presence of 8 paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS)-associated antibodies including anti-Yo in 169 adult ADHD patients. No associations between ADHD and serum Yo antibodies or other antibodies associated with PNS were found. However, 10 out of 48 ADHD patient sera analyzed by immunofluorescence presented antibodies targeting cerebellar Purkinje cells. This reactivity probably represents the presence of low levels of antibodies against multiple cellular hitherto unknown antigens with little to no clinical significance. PMID:26531699

  8. Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network laboratory guidelines for the use of direct tests to detect syphilis in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Raymond SW; Morshed, Muhammad; Chernesky, Max A; Jayaraman, Gayatri C; Kadkhoda, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and/or its nucleic acid can be detected by various methods such as microscopy, rabbit infectivity test or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. The rabbit infectivity test for T. pallidum, although very sensitive, has been discontinued from most laboratories due to ethical issues related to the need for animal inoculation with live T. pallidum, the technically demanding procedure and long turnaround time for results, thus making it impractical for routine diagnostic use. Dark-field and phase-contrast microscopy are still useful at clinic- or hospital-based laboratories for near-bedside detection of T. pallidum in genital, skin or mucous lesions although their availability is decreasing. The lack of reliable and specific anti-T. pallidum antibodies and its inferior sensitivity to PCR may explain why the direct fluorescent antibody test for T. pallidum is not widely available for clinical use. Immunohistochemical staining for T. pallidum also depends on the availability of specific antibodies, and the method is only applicable for histopathological examination of biopsy and autopsy specimens necessitating an invasive specimen collection approach. With recent advances in molecular diagnostics, PCR is considered to be the most reliable, versatile and practical for laboratories to implement. In addition to being an objective and sensitive test for direct detection of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum DNA in skin and mucous membrane lesions, the resulting PCR amplicons from selected gene targets can be further characterized for antimicrobial (macrolide) susceptibility testing, strain typing and identification of T. pallidum subspecies. PMID:25798160

  9. Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network laboratory guidelines for the use of direct tests to detect syphilis in Canada.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Raymond Sw; Morshed, Muhammad; Chernesky, Max A; Jayaraman, Gayatri C; Kadkhoda, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and/or its nucleic acid can be detected by various methods such as microscopy, rabbit infectivity test or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. The rabbit infectivity test for T. pallidum, although very sensitive, has been discontinued from most laboratories due to ethical issues related to the need for animal inoculation with live T. pallidum, the technically demanding procedure and long turnaround time for results, thus making it impractical for routine diagnostic use. Dark-field and phase-contrast microscopy are still useful at clinic- or hospital-based laboratories for near-bedside detection of T. pallidum in genital, skin or mucous lesions although their availability is decreasing. The lack of reliable and specific anti-T. pallidum antibodies and its inferior sensitivity to PCR may explain why the direct fluorescent antibody test for T. pallidum is not widely available for clinical use. Immunohistochemical staining for T. pallidum also depends on the availability of specific antibodies, and the method is only applicable for histopathological examination of biopsy and autopsy specimens necessitating an invasive specimen collection approach. With recent advances in molecular diagnostics, PCR is considered to be the most reliable, versatile and practical for laboratories to implement. In addition to being an objective and sensitive test for direct detection of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum DNA in skin and mucous membrane lesions, the resulting PCR amplicons from selected gene targets can be further characterized for antimicrobial (macrolide) susceptibility testing, strain typing and identification of T. pallidum subspecies. PMID:25798160

  10. Human antibody production in transgenic animals.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Marianne; Osborn, Michael J; Ma, Biao; Hayre, Jasvinder; Avis, Suzanne; Lundstrom, Brian; Buelow, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Fully human antibodies from transgenic animals account for an increasing number of new therapeutics. After immunization, diverse human monoclonal antibodies of high affinity can be obtained from transgenic rodents, while large animals, such as transchromosomic cattle, have produced respectable amounts of specific human immunoglobulin (Ig) in serum. Several strategies to derive animals expressing human antibody repertoires have been successful. In rodents, gene loci on bacterial artificial chromosomes or yeast artificial chromosomes were integrated by oocyte microinjection or transfection of embryonic stem (ES) cells, while ruminants were derived from manipulated fibroblasts with integrated human chromosome fragments or human artificial chromosomes. In all strains, the endogenous Ig loci have been silenced by gene targeting, either in ES or fibroblast cells, or by zinc finger technology via DNA microinjection; this was essential for optimal production. However, comparisons showed that fully human antibodies were not as efficiently produced as wild-type Ig. This suboptimal performance, with respect to immune response and antibody yield, was attributed to imperfect interaction of the human constant region with endogenous signaling components such as the Ig?/? in mouse, rat or cattle. Significant improvements were obtained when the human V-region genes were linked to the endogenous CH-region, either on large constructs or, separately, by site-specific integration, which could also silence the endogenous Ig locus by gene replacement or inversion. In animals with knocked-out endogenous Ig loci and integrated large IgH loci, containing many human Vs, all D and all J segments linked to endogenous C genes, highly diverse human antibody production similar to normal animals was obtained. PMID:25467949

  11. Molecular Imaging of Pancreatic Cancer with Antibodies.

    PubMed

    England, Christopher G; Hernandez, Reinier; Eddine, Savo Bou Zein; Cai, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Development of novel imaging probes for cancer diagnostics remains critical for early detection of disease, yet most imaging agents are hindered by suboptimal tumor accumulation. To overcome these limitations, researchers have adapted antibodies for imaging purposes. As cancerous malignancies express atypical patterns of cell surface proteins in comparison to noncancerous tissues, novel antibody-based imaging agents can be constructed to target individual cancer cells or surrounding vasculature. Using molecular imaging techniques, these agents may be utilized for detection of malignancies and monitoring of therapeutic response. Currently, there are several imaging modalities commonly employed for molecular imaging. These imaging modalities include positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (fluorescence and bioluminescence), and photoacoustic (PA) imaging. While antibody-based imaging agents may be employed for a broad range of diseases, this review focuses on the molecular imaging of pancreatic cancer, as there are limited resources for imaging and treatment of pancreatic malignancies. Additionally, pancreatic cancer remains the most lethal cancer with an overall 5-year survival rate of approximately 7%, despite significant advances in the imaging and treatment of many other cancers. In this review, we discuss recent advances in molecular imaging of pancreatic cancer using antibody-based imaging agents. This task is accomplished by summarizing the current progress in each type of molecular imaging modality described above. Also, several considerations for designing and synthesizing novel antibody-based imaging agents are discussed. Lastly, the future directions of antibody-based imaging agents are discussed, emphasizing the potential applications for personalized medicine. PMID:26620581

  12. Analysis of acetylcholine receptor phosphorylation sites using antibodies to synthetic peptides and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Safran, A; Neumann, D; Fuchs, S

    1986-01-01

    Three peptides corresponding to residues 354-367, 364-374, 373-387 of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) delta subunit were synthesized. These peptides represent the proposed phosphorylation sites of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, the tyrosine-specific protein kinase and the calcium/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase respectively. Using these peptides as substrates for phosphorylation by the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase it was shown that only peptides 354-367 was phosphorylated whereas the other two were not. These results verify the location of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site within the AChR delta subunit. Antibodies elicited against these peptides reacted with the delta subunit. The antipeptide antibodies and two monoclonal antibodies (7F2, 5.46) specific for the delta subunit were tested for their binding to non-phosphorylated receptor and to receptor phosphorylated by the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Antibodies to peptide 354-367 were found to react preferentially with non-phosphorylated receptor whereas the two other anti-peptide antibodies bound equally to phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated receptors. Monoclonal antibody 7F2 reacted preferentially with the phosphorylated form of the receptor whereas monoclonal antibody 5.46 did not distinguish between the two forms. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3816758

  13. Anti-transferrin receptor antibody and antibody-drug conjugates cross the blood-brain barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Friden, P.M.; Walus, L.R.; Musso, G.F.; Taylor, M.A.; Malfroy, B.; Starzyk, R.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Delivery of nonlipophilic drugs to the brain is hindered by the tightly apposed capillary endothelial cells that make up the blood-brain barrier. The authors have examined the ability of a monoclonal antibody (OX-26), which recognizes the rat transferrin receptor, to function as a carrier for the delivery of drugs across the blood-brain barrier. This antibody, which was previously shown to bind preferentially to capillary endothelial cells in the brain after intravenous administration, labels the entire cerebrovascular bed in a dose-dependent manner. The initially uniform labeling of brain capillaries becomes extremely punctate {approximately} 4 hr after injection, suggesting a time-dependent sequestering of the antibody. Capillary-depletion experiments, in which the brain is separated into capillary and parenchymal fractions, show a time-dependent migration of radiolabeled antibody from the capillaries into the brain parenchyma, which is consistent with the transcytosis of compounds across the blood-brain barrier. Antibody-methotrexate conjugates were tested in vivo to assess the carrier ability of this antibody. Immunohistochemical staining for either component of an OX-26-methotrexate conjugate revealed patterns of cerebrovascular labeling identical to those observed with the unaltered antibody. Accumulation of radiolabeled methotrexate in the brain parenchyma is greatly enhanced when the drug is conjugated to OX-26.

  14. Nephropathia epidemica in Norway: antigen and antibodies in rodent reservoirs and antibodies in selected human populations.

    PubMed Central

    Traavik, T.; Sommer, A. I.; Mehl, R.; Berdal, B. P.; Stavem, K.; Hunderi, O. H.; Dalrymple, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Nephropathia epidemica (NE) antigen was detected by IFAT (indirect fluorescent antibody technique) in the lungs of 14 of 97 bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) collected in three endemic areas. The distribution of antigen positive voles within an endemic location was scattered. Antibodies to Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) virus antigens were detected by IFAT in 12 of 14 NE antigen positive bank voles and in 15 of 83 that were antigen negative. NE antigen positive voles exhibited higher antibody titres. Antibodies to KHF were demonstrated in sera from C. rutilus and C. rufocanus collected more than 200 km north of the distribution area for C. glareolus. It appears likely that these vole species can serve as virus vectors for NE cases occurring north of the bank vole area. NE antibodies cross-reacting with KHF virus seem to diminish with time after infection in some NE patients, while for others such cross-reacting antibodies were detected up to 12 years after the disease. Antibodies to KHF were detected in eight of 106 healthy forestry workers with no clinical history of NE. No serological cross-reactions were detected between NE/KHF antigens and representative Bunyaviridae present in Norway. NE/KHF-like viruses appear widespread in Norway, both within and outside of the distribution area of the bank vole. PMID:6146649

  15. PRIMARY ANTIBODY RESPONSE IN ORGAN CULTURES

    PubMed Central

    Globerson, Amiela; Auerbach, Robert

    1966-01-01

    Specific antibody formation has been elicited in vitro following antigenic stimulation by either sheep (in a total of 472 of 875 cultures) or chick erythrocytes (in 65 of 135 cultures tested). The response was manifested by mouse spleen and lymph node explants whereas thymus cultures were inactive. The reaction has been characterized as a primary immune response in view of its kinetics as compared to defined primary and secondary responses, the effect of 2-mercaptoethanol on the antibodies formed, its subject to puromycin inhibition and its sensitivity to X-irradiation. Histological studies revealed preservation of the lymphoid cell populations throughout the entire experimental period. PMID:5926296

  16. Insulin receptor antibodies and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Magsino, C H; Spencer, J

    1999-07-01

    The presence of insulin receptor antibodies is a rare cause of insulin resistance. Patients usually have a combination of hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, and autoimmune features. We report a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and severe insulin resistance due to insulin receptor antibodies. The most striking aspect of the clinical presentation is the resistance to insulin therapy, with our patient unresponsive to doses of up to 154,075 units in a day. While on a low-dose glucocorticoid therapy, the patient had clinical improvement, and glucose levels subsequently became normal even without insulin and glucocorticoid. PMID:10414483

  17. Circulating antigen-antibody complexes in onchocerciasis.

    PubMed Central

    Steward, M W; Sisley, B; Mackenzie, C D; El Sheikh, H

    1982-01-01

    The presence of circulating antigen-antibody complexes in the sera of patients with onchocerciasis was investigated using the Clq and conglutinin solid-phase binding assays. Only 50% of patients' sera had demonstrable complexes, levels of complexes were unrelated to microfilarial load and specific anti-onchocercal antibody titres and results with the two tests for complexes were not correlated. Both IgM- and IgG-containing complexes were commonly involved but there was no correlation between the levels of complexes containing these isotypes. Evidence for the presence of IgE in complexes of sera from a minority of individuals was also obtained. PMID:6979445

  18. Process analytics for purification of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Flatman, Stephen; Alam, Imtiaz; Gerard, Jeffery; Mussa, Nesredin

    2007-03-15

    The application of appropriate analytical methods is an essential requirement for the purification of therapeutic antibodies. A range of analytical methods need to be employed to effectively determine the purity, identity, integrity and activity of these important class of pharmaceuticals. These include notably electrophoresis, high performance liquid chromatography and immunoassays. Regulatory and industry demands in recent years have brought the need for improvements and many have been successfully implemented. This article reviews the current analytical methods applied to support the purification of monoclonal antibodies. PMID:17161664

  19. Effects of interferon on antibody formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of the effects of interferon on primary and secondary antibody responses and of the relationship of interferon to other cytokines, or cell products, are presented. Dosage- and timing-dependent immunoenhancing and immunosuppressive activities of interferon are documented for mouse spleen cell cultures and for mice infected with murine hepatitis virus (MHV-3). A possibility that altered interferon production might lead to immunopathological disorders, such as lupus erythematosus, AIDS, arthritis, etc., is discussed. Latest technological developments are presented that indicate that interferon does apparently play a major role in the regulation of antibody responses.

  20. Phase Transitions in Antibody Solutions: from Pharmaceuticals to Human Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Benedek, George; Dana Farber Cancer Institute Collaboration; Amgen Inc. Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Antibodies are very important proteins. Natural antibodies play essential role in the immune system of human body. Pharmaceutical antibodies are used as drugs. Antibodies are also indispensable tools in biomedical research and diagnostics. Recently, a number of observations of phase transitions of pharmaceutical antibodies have been reported. These phase transitions are undesirable from the perspective of colloid stability of drug solutions in processing and storage, but can be used for protein purification, X-ray crystallography, and improving pharmokinetics of drugs. Phase transitions of antibodies can also take place in human body, particularly in multiple myeloma patients who overproduce monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies, in some cases, crystallize at body temperature and cause severe complications called cryoglobulinemia. I will present the results of our current studies on phase transitions of both pharmaceutical antibodies and cryoglobulinemia-associated antibodies. These studies have shown that different antibodies have different propensity to undergo phase transitions, but their phase behavior has universal features which are remarkably different from those of spherical proteins. I will discuss how studies of phase behavior can be useful in assessing colloid stability of pharmaceutical antibodies and in early diagnostics of cryoglobulinemia, as well as general implications of the fact that some antibodies can precipitate at physiological conditions.

  1. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that consists of the...asymptomatic females at low risk of infection. Identification of antibodies...device may indicate past or present infection of the patient with Neisseria...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that consists of the...asymptomatic females at low risk of infection. Identification of antibodies...device may indicate past or present infection of the patient with Neisseria...

  3. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  4. NCI Requests Cancer Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  5. Antibody-Based Strategies to Prevent and Treat Influenza

    E-print Network

    Shriver, Zachary

    Passive immunization using antibodies is a promising alternative to other antiviral treatment options. The potential for seasonal protection arising from a single injection of antibodies is appealing and has been pursued ...

  6. Engineering aglycosylated antibody variants with immune effector functions

    E-print Network

    Sazinsky, Stephen L. (Stephen Lael)

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have emerged as a promising class of therapeutics for the treatment of human disease, and in particular human cancer. While multiple mechanisms contribute to antibody efficacy, the engagement and ...

  7. Screening individual hybridomas by microengraving to discover monoclonal antibodies

    E-print Network

    Ogunniyi, Adebola Oluwakayode

    The demand for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in biomedical research is significant, but the current methodologies used to discover them are both lengthy and costly. Consequently, the diversity of antibodies available for ...

  8. PLCG2-associatiated antibody deficiency immune dysregulation (PLAID)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area PLCG2-associated Antibody Deficiency and Immune Dysregulation (PLAID) PLAID and PLAID- ... tend to have high levels of anti-nuclear antibodies, which react against their own cells and tissues ...

  9. Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2000 1999 Spotlight on Research 2014 September 2014 Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis Two types of antibody molecules act in concert to stimulate inflammation in ...

  10. Antibody Request - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  11. Quantitative analysis of perivascular antibody distribution in solid tumors

    E-print Network

    Rhoden, John J. (John Joseph)

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies and proteins derived from them are an emerging class of anticancer therapeutics that have shown efficacy in a range of blood and solid tumors. Antibodies targeting solid tumors face considerable ...

  12. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics 2015: The Antibody Society's annual meeting December 7-10, 2015, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Parren, Paul W H I; Burton, Dennis R; Bradbury, Andrew; Huston, James S; Carter, Paul J; Veldman, Trudi; Chester, Kerry A; Larrick, James W; Alfenito, Mark R; Scott, Jamie K; Weiner, Louis M; Adams, Gregory P; Reichert, Janice M

    2015-11-01

    Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in San Diego, CA in early December 2015. In this meeting preview, the chairs provide their thoughts on the importance of their session topics, which include antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy, and building comprehensive IGVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IGVH genes. The Antibody Society's special session will focus on "Antibodies to watch" in 2016, which are a subset of the nearly 50 antibodies currently in Phase 3 clinical studies. Featuring over 100 speakers in total, the meeting will commence with keynote presentations by Erica Ollmann Saphire (The Scripps Research Institute), Wayne A. Marasco (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School), Joe W. Gray (Oregon Health & Science University), and Anna M. Wu (University of California Los Angeles), and it will conclude with workshops on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries and on computational antibody design. PMID:26421752

  13. GAMMA GLOBULIN AND ANTIBODY FORMATION IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Stecher, Vera J.; Thorbecke, G. Jeanette

    1967-01-01

    The present studies have shown that the influence of X-irradiation on the secondary antibody response in vitro is remarkably similar to its effect on the primary response in vivo. When sensitized tissue was first irradiated and then reexposed to antigen, the duration of the interval between irradiation and antigen addition determined the degree of inhibition of the secondary response obtained. A delay of 12 hr resulted in stronger inhibition than a delay of 6 hr, and an interval of 24 hr before reexposure to antigen caused complete suppression of antibody production to diphtheria toxoid and almost complete suppression when sheep RBC were used as the antigen. Induction of the secondary response in rabbit lymph node tissue in vitro followed by exposure to X-irradiation, revealed that immediate exposure to irradiation after antigen produced stronger inhibition of the subsequent response than irradiation on days 2–3. Irradiation on day 6 had no detectable effect. The effectiveness of the early radiation is probably due to prevention of the proliferation of the antibody-forming cells. BUDR was found to be effective at similar time periods as X-irradiation, whereas colchicine could still stop antibody formation when added late during the secondary response in vitro. It was noted that lymph nodes from some BSA-sensitized rabbits as late as 18 months after sensitization gave a response indistinguishable from a typical secondary response, even when not reexposed to antigen. PMID:4163360

  14. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with chicken interleukin-17

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In our previous study chicken interleukin -17 (chIL-17) gene was cloned from the expressed sequence tag (EST) cDNA library and initially analyzed. To further investigate biological properties of chicken IL-17, six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against bacterially expressed protein were produced and c...

  15. Antibodies to actin in autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), autoreactive antibodies directed against red blood cells are up-regulated, leading to erythrocyte death. Mycoplasma suis infections in pigs induce AIHA of both the warm and cold types. The aim of this study was to identify the target autoantigens of warm autoreactive IgG antibodies. Sera from experimentally M. suis-infected pigs were screened for autoreactivity. Results Actin-reactive antibodies were found in the sera of 95% of all animals tested. The reactivity was species-specific, i.e. reactivity with porcine actin was significantly higher than with rabbit actin. Sera of animals previously immunised with the M. suis adhesion protein MSG1 showed reactivity with actin prior to infection with M. suis indicating that molecular mimicry is involved in the specific autoreactive mechanism. A potentially cross-reactive epitope was detected. Conclusions This is the first report of autoreactive anti-actin antibodies involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. PMID:20353574

  16. Dengue Antibody Prevalence in German Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Lauschke, Annekathrin; Frank, Christina; Shu, Pei-Yun; Niedrig, Matthias; Huang, Jyh-Hsiung; Stark, Klaus; Jelinek, Tomas

    2005-01-01

    We studied 2,259 German citizens after they returned from dengue-endemic countries from 1996 to 2004. Serotype-specific dengue antibodies indicated acute infections in 51 (4.7%) travelers with recent fever and 13 (1.1%) travelers with no recent fever, depending largely on destination and epidemic activity in the countries visited. PMID:15890135

  17. Antibody-catalyzed anaerobic destruction of methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Hixon, Mark S.; Yamamoto, Noboru; McAllister, Laura A.; Wentworth, Anita D.; Wentworth, Paul; Janda, Kim D.

    2007-01-01

    Methamphetamine [(+)-2] abuse has emerged as a fast-rising global epidemic, with immunopharmacotherapeutic approaches being sought for its treatment. Herein, we report the generation and characterization of a monoclonal antibody, YX1-40H10, that catalyzes the photooxidation of (+)-2 into the nonpsychoactive compound benzaldehyde (14) under anaerobic conditions in the presence of riboflavin (6). Studies have revealed that the antibody facilitates the conversion of (+)-2 into 14 by binding the triplet photoexcited state of 6 in proximity to (+)-2. The antibody binds riboflavin (Kd = 180 ?M), although this was not programmed into hapten design, and the YX1-40H10-catalyzed reaction is inhibited by molecular oxygen via the presumed quenching of the photoexcited triplet state of 6. Given that this reaction is another highlight in the processing of reactive intermediates by antibodies, we speculate that this process may have future significance in vivo with programmed immunoglobulins that use flavins as cofactors to destroy selectable molecular targets under hypoxic or even anoxic conditions. PMID:17360412

  18. JDIP Genomics, Antibodies, and Proteomics Core Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The JDIP Genomics, Proteomics, and Antibodies Core has developed several resources that are available for use by JDIP researchers. Five tasks have been completed or are in progress: Task 1 – Transposon mutants: Nearly 24,000 gene disruption M. paratuberculosis mutants are now available for JDIP re...

  19. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The accurate determination of the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) is important for calculation of dosimetry and evaluation of pharmacokinetic variables such as antibody dose and route of administration. The hypothesis of this application is that the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) can be quantitatively determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The major thrusts during the third year include the continued development and evaluation of improved 3D SPECT acquisition and reconstruction approaches to improve quantitative imaging of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), and the implementation and evaluation of algorithms to register serial SPECT image data sets, or to register 3D SPECT images with 3D image data sets acquired from positron emission tomography (PEI) and magnetic resonance images (MRI). The research has involved the investigation of statistical models and iterative reconstruction algorithms that accurately account for the physical characteristics of the SPECT acquisition system. It is our belief that SPECT quantification can be improved by accurately modeling the physical processes such as attenuation, scatter, geometric collimator response, and other factors that affect the measured projection data.

  20. Platelet antibody: review of detection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, K.A.

    1988-10-01

    The driving force behind development of in vitro methods for platelet antibodies is identification of plasma factors causing platelet destruction. Early methods relied on measurement of platelet activation. Current methods are more specific and use a purified antibody against immunoglobulin or complement, which is usually labeled with /sup 125/I or tagged with an enzyme or fluorescein. Comparisons of quantitation of platelet-associated IgG show wide variability between different methods. The disparate results can be related both to differences in binding of secondary antibodies to immunoglobulin in solution compared to immunoglobulins attached to platelets and to the improper assumption that the binding ratio between the secondary detecting and primary antiplatelet antibody is one. Most assays can 1) identify neonatal isoimmune thrombocytopenia and posttransfusion purpura, 2) help to differentiate between immune and nonimmune thrombocytopenias, 3) help to sort out the offending drug when drug-induced thrombocytopenia is suspected, and 4) identify platelet alloantibodies and potential platelet donors via a cross match assay for refractory patients. However, the advantages of quantitative assays over qualitative methods with respect to predictions of patients clinical course and response to different treatments remain to be investigated. 61 references.

  1. Developing recombinant antibodies for biomarker detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Miller, Keith D.; Kagen, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.

    2010-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have an essential role in biomarker validation and diagnostic assays. A barrier to pursuing these applications is the reliance on immunization and hybridomas to produce mAbs, which is time-consuming and may not yield the desired mAb. We recommend a process flow for affinity reagent production that utilizes combinatorial protein display systems (eg, yeast surface display or phage display) rather than hybridomas. These systems link a selectable phenotype-binding conferred by an antibody fragment-with a means for recovering the encoding gene. Recombinant libraries obtained from immunizations can produce high-affinity antibodies (<10 nM) more quickly than other methods. Non-immune libraries provide an alternate route when immunizations are not possible, or when suitable mAbs are not recovered from an immune library. Directed molecular evolution (DME) is an integral part of optimizing mAbs obtained from combinatorial protein display, but can also be used on hybridoma-derived mAbs. Variants can easily be obtained and screened to increase the affinity of the parent mAb (affinity maturation). We discuss examples where DME has been used to tailor affinity reagents to specific applications. Combinatorial protein display also provides an accessible method for identifying antibody pairs, which are necessary for sandwich-type diagnostic assays.

  2. IgA Antibodies in Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, K. L.; Skjeldal, O.

    2006-01-01

    The level of IgA antibodies to gluten and gliadin proteins found in grains and to casein found in milk, as well as the level of IgG to gluten and gliadin, have been examined in 23 girls with Rett syndrome and 53 controls. Highly statistically significant increases were found for the Rett population compared to the controls. The reason for this…

  3. Radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies for radiotherapy

    E-print Network

    Sangsuriyan, J; Iamsam-Ang, W; Ngamprayad, T; Picha, P; Wardwilai, C

    1998-01-01

    Preparation of beta emitting radioisotope and development of labelling techniques with antibodies, peptides and their conjugates was investigated. Samarium-153 was labelled to DTPA - antibody conjugate giving low yields due to instability of labelled products and low specific activity of sup 1 sup 5 sup 3 Sm produced. Rhenium-188 was labelled to antibodies and lanreotide peptides by direct method and indirect method via MAG sub 3 -conjugate giving maximum yields of 86.1% and 79.5% labelling for sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Re-labelled antibody and 99.3% and 85.0% labelling for sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Re-labelled lanreotide, respectively. Synthesis of DOTA and DOTA-lanreotide was performed and the products were characterized by instrumental analysis and compared with standard sample. Yttrium-90 was produced by sup 9 sup 0 Sr/ sup 9 sup 0 Y generator system and was labelled to DOTA-lanreotide with more than 97% labelling yields. All radiolabelled products were determined for radiochemical purity by ITLC and HPLC, in vitro and s...

  4. Structure-specific antibodies using epitope scaffolds

    E-print Network

    El-Naggar, Moh

    for optimal structural stability and epitope exposure. The epitope is recognized by the HIV-1 neutralizingStructure-specific antibodies using epitope scaffolds Epitopes, or the antigenic portions technique to graft an epitope of the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 onto protein scaffolds engineered

  5. Viral antibody dynamics in a chiropteran host

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kate S; Suu-Ire, Richard; Barr, Jennifer; Hayman, David T S; Broder, Christopher C; Horton, Daniel L; Durrant, Christopher; Murcia, Pablo R; Cunningham, Andrew A; Wood, James L N

    2014-01-01

    Bats host many viruses that are significant for human and domestic animal health, but the dynamics of these infections in their natural reservoir hosts remain poorly elucidated. In these, and other, systems, there is evidence that seasonal life-cycle events drive infection dynamics, directly impacting the risk of exposure to spillover hosts. Understanding these dynamics improves our ability to predict zoonotic spillover from the reservoir hosts. To this end, we followed henipavirus antibody levels of >100 individual E. helvum in a closed, captive, breeding population over a 30-month period, using a powerful novel antibody quantitation method. We demonstrate the presence of maternal antibodies in this system and accurately determine their longevity. We also present evidence of population-level persistence of viral infection and demonstrate periods of increased horizontal virus transmission associated with the pregnancy/lactation period. The novel findings of infection persistence and the effect of pregnancy on viral transmission, as well as an accurate quantitation of chiropteran maternal antiviral antibody half-life, provide fundamental baseline data for the continued study of viral infections in these important reservoir hosts. PMID:24111634

  6. Directing stem cell differentiation with antibodies

    E-print Network

    degenerative diseases. The medical exploita- tion of this phenomenon is carried out using stem cells derivedCOMMENTARY Directing stem cell differentiation with antibodies Martin Dalziel, Max Crispin OX1 3QU, United Kingdom Stem cells are highly specialized cells en- dowed with unlimited replicative

  7. Sperm auto - antibodies and anti-nuclear antigen antibodies in chronic dioxin - exposed veterans.

    PubMed

    Chinh, T T; Phi, P T; Thuy, N T

    1996-02-01

    The authors studied anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) in 25 chronic dioxin - exposed veterans by IIF technics with Hep-2 cell line and sperm autoantibodies by agglutination test of Franklin-Dukes. The site of antibody binding on spermatozoon is detected by IIF test. The control group for ANA detection is 63 healthy persons of the same age as that of dioxin - exposed veterans and the control group for sperm autoantibodies is 36 healthy males of 28-63 years old, having 1-2 children. Obtained results show that the rate of ANA positive in veterans group is normal, and sperm auto-antibodies is also at normal range. The site of antibody binding on spermatozoon is predominantly head - head, rarely head - neck or tail - tail. PMID:8907229

  8. Automated Aufbau of antibody structures from given sequences using Macromoltek's SmrtMolAntibody.

    PubMed

    Berrondo, Monica; Kaufmann, Susana; Berrondo, Manuel

    2014-08-01

    This study was a part of the second antibody modeling assessment. The assessment is a blind study of the performance of multiple software programs used for antibody homology modeling. In the study, research groups were given sequences for 11 antibodies and asked to predict their corresponding structures. The results were measured using root-mean-square deviation (rmsd) between the submitted models and X-ray crystal structures. In 10 of 11 cases, the results using SmrtMolAntibody show good agreement between the submitted models and X-ray crystal structures. In the first stage, the average rmsd was 1.4 Ĺ. Average rmsd values for the framework was 1.2 Ĺ and for the H3 loop was 3.0 Ĺ. In stage two, there was a slight improvement with an rmsd for the H3 loop of 2.9 Ĺ. PMID:24777752

  9. An Interactive Database for the Assessment of Histone Antibody Specificity.

    PubMed

    Rothbart, Scott B; Dickson, Bradley M; Raab, Jesse R; Grzybowski, Adrian T; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Guo, Angela H; Shanle, Erin K; Josefowicz, Steven Z; Fuchs, Stephen M; Allis, C David; Magnuson, Terry R; Ruthenburg, Alexander J; Strahl, Brian D

    2015-08-01

    Access to high-quality antibodies is a necessity for the study of histones and their posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Here we debut the Histone Antibody Specificity Database (http://www.histoneantibodies.com), an online and expanding resource cataloging the behavior of widely used, commercially available histone antibodies by peptide microarray. This interactive web portal provides a critical resource to the biological research community that routinely uses these antibodies as detection reagents for a wide range of applications. PMID:26212453

  10. A new tool for monoclonal antibody analysis

    PubMed Central

    An, Yan; Zhang, Ying; Mueller, Hans-Martin; Shameem, Mohammed; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) products are extraordinarily heterogeneous due to the presence of a variety of enzymatic and chemical modifications, such as deamidation, isomerization, oxidation, glycosylation, glycation, and terminal cyclization. The modifications in different domains of the antibody molecule can result in different biological consequences. Therefore, characterization and routine monitoring of domain-specific modifications are essential to ensure the quality of the therapeutic antibody products. For this purpose, a rapid and informative methodology was developed to examine the heterogeneity of individual domains in mAb products. A recently discovered endopeptidase, IdeS, cleaves heavy chains below the hinge region, producing F(ab')2 and Fc fragments. Following reduction of disulfide bonds, three antibody domains (LC, Fd, and Fc/2) can be released for further characterization. Subsequent analyses by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, capillary isoelectric focusing, and glycan mapping enable domain-specific profiling of oxidation, charge heterogeneity, and glycoform distribution. When coupled with reversed phase chromatography, the unique chromatographic profile of each molecule offers a simple strategy for an identity test, which is an important formal test for biopharmaceutical quality control purposes. This methodology is demonstrated for a number of IgGs of different subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG4), as well as an Fc fusion protein. The presented technique provides a convenient platform approach for scientific and formal therapeutic mAb product characterization. It can also be applied in regulated drug substance batch release and stability testing of antibody and Fc fusion protein products, in particular for identity and routine monitoring of domain-specific modifications. PMID:24927271

  11. A Rapid Procedure for Preparing Fluorescein-labeled Specific Antibodies from Whole Antiserum-

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Robert D.

    A Rapid Procedure for Preparing Fluorescein-labeled Specific Antibodies from Whole Antiserum- Its conjugation of affinity-purified antibodies with fluorescein (termed DCAPA) is described. This procedure involves the immobilization of antibodies as antigen- antibody complexes on nitrocellulose blots

  12. Expression and purification of recombinant antibody formats and antibody fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Siegemund, Martin; Richter, Fabian; Seifert, Oliver; Unverdorben, Felix; Kontermann, Roland E

    2014-01-01

    In the laboratory-scale production of antibody fragments or antibody fusion proteins, it is often difficult to keep track on the most suitable affinity tags for protein purification from either prokaryotic or eukaryotic host systems. Here, we describe how such recombinant proteins derived from Escherichia coli lysates as well as HEK293 cell culture supernatants are purified by IMAC and by different affinity chromatography methods based on fusions to FLAG-tag, Strep-tag, and Fc domains. PMID:24515473

  13. Specific antibody filter (SAF) binding capacity enhancement to remove anti-A antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Shalini; Korchagina, Elena Y; Bovin, Nicolai V; Federspiel, William J

    2010-11-01

    Removal of Anti-A/B antibodies prior to ABO-incompatible transplantation can prevent hyperacute organ rejection. We are developing a specific antibody filter (SAF) device to selectively remove ABO blood group antibodies from the whole blood by utilizing immunoaffinity adsorption. The device consists of ultrafiltration hollow fiber membranes with synthetic antigens specific to bind blood group antibodies immobilized on the inner lumenal walls of the fibers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of antigen molecular weight and surface activation process to increase the antibody binding capacity of the fiber membrane surface. A new higher molecular weight antigen Atri-pNSA-1000 compared with Atri-pNPA-30 (A-trisaccharide (Atri) conjugated to activated polymers of Mol. wt. 1000 kDa and 30 kDa, respectively) was employed to improve accessibility of the antigen to bind antibodies. Also, a cyanogen bromide (CNBr) based surface activation method mediated by TEA in neutral pH medium was used to enhance the number of active sites for antigen binding compared to a strong basic medium of NaOH. Using a CNBr/TEA activation method and by immobilizing Atri-pNSA-1000 antigen, an antibody binding capacity (?0.01 monoclonal anti-A IgM nmol/cm(2)) was achieved on the fiber surface. This binding capacity was sufficient to reduce monoclonal antibody titer from 1:128 to final titer below 1:4 with a surface area to volume ratio that is similar to commercial dialysis device (?1.1 m(2) surface area for an average body blood volume of 5 L). PMID:20878917

  14. Arabidopsis growth curves Antibody effect on fibrinogen to fibrin conversion

    E-print Network

    McCullagh, Peter

    UCseal Arabidopsis growth curves Antibody effect on fibrinogen to fibrin conversion Gaussian Arabidopsis growth curves Antibody effect on fibrinogen to fibrin conversion Gaussian processes Outline 1 Arabidopsis growth curves 2 Antibody effect on fibrinogen to fibrin conversion 3 Gaussian processes Peter Mc

  15. Aged venous thrombi: radioimmunoimaging with fibrin-specific monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Rosebrough, S.F.; Grossman, Z.D.; McAfee, J.G.; Kudryk, B.J.; Subramanian, G.; Ritter-Hrncirik, C.A.; Witanowski, L.S.; Tillapaugh-Fay, G.; Urrutia, E.

    1987-02-01

    Radioimmunoimaging of fresh canine venous thrombi with a murine monoclonal antibody specific for human and dog fibrin has been reported. Successful imaging of canine deep venous thrombi 1, 3, and 5 days old at the time of antibody injection is reported. Images were positive in all dogs, and the uptake of fibrin-specific antibody was equivalent to that of fresh thrombi.

  16. Synthetic approach to the generation of antibody diversity

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hyunbo

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro antibody discovery technologies revolutionized the generation of target-specific antibodies that traditionally relied on the humoral response of immunized animals. An antibody library, a large collection of diverse, pre-constructed antibodies, can be rapidly screened using in vitro display technologies such as phage display. One of the keys to successful in vitro antibody discovery is the quality of the library diversity. Antibody diversity can be obtained either from natural B-cell sources or by the synthetic methods that combinatorially generate random nucleotide sequences. While the functionality of a natural antibody library depends largely upon the library size, various other factors can affect the quality of a synthetic antibody library, making the design and construction of synthetic antibody libraries complicated and challenging. In this review, we present various library designs and diversification methods for synthetic antibody library. From simple degenerate oligonucleotide synthesis to trinucleotide synthesis to physicochemically optimized library design, the synthetic approach is evolving beyond the simple emulation of natural antibodies, into a highly sophisticated method that is capable of producing high quality antibodies suitable for therapeutic, diagnostic, and other demanding applications. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 489-494] PMID:26129672

  17. Prevalence of antibody to the Norwalk virus in various countries.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, H B; Valdesuso, J; Kapikian, A Z; Chanock, R M; Wyatt, R G; Szmuness, W; Larrick, J; Kaplan, J; Gilman, R H; Sack, D A

    1979-10-01

    Serum samples from children and adults from several countries were tested by radioimmunoassay for antibody to the Norwalk virus. Antibody was commonly found in adults from all the countries tested. Antibody appears to be acquired more rapidly in children from underdeveloped countries than in children from the United States. PMID:227798

  18. Prevalence of antibody to the Norwalk virus in various countries.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, H B; Valdesuso, J; Kapikian, A Z; Chanock, R M; Wyatt, R G; Szmuness, W; Larrick, J; Kaplan, J; Gilman, R H; Sack, D A

    1979-01-01

    Serum samples from children and adults from several countries were tested by radioimmunoassay for antibody to the Norwalk virus. Antibody was commonly found in adults from all the countries tested. Antibody appears to be acquired more rapidly in children from underdeveloped countries than in children from the United States. PMID:227798

  19. Potent Antibody Protection against an Emerging Alphavirus Threat.

    PubMed

    Kielian, Margaret; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2015-11-19

    Chikungunya virus recently caused large outbreaks world-wide. In this issue of Cell, Fox et al. describe several potently neutralizing antibodies against multiple alphaviruses. The structure of the virus in complex with one of the antibodies reveals the antibody-induced rearrangement and crosslinking of the viral surface proteins that result in neutralization. PMID:26590413

  20. Antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor in myasthenic dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Garlepp, M; Farrow, B; Kay, P; Dawkins, R L

    1979-01-01

    Antibodies to the AChR and anti-striational antibodies have been detected in dogs suffering from myasthenia gravis. The detection of these antibodies adds to the known similarities between the human and canine disease. This animal model will facilitate investigation of agents involved in the induction of spontaneous myasthenia gravis. PMID:500127

  1. Development of Enantioselective Polyclonal Antibodies to Detect Styrene Oxide Protein

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Development of Enantioselective Polyclonal Antibodies to Detect Styrene Oxide Protein Adducts)-enantiomer was more toxic than the (S)-enantiomer. The purpose of this study was to develop polyclonal antibodies enantiomers. Polyclonal antibodies were raised by immunization of rabbits with the chiral immunogens

  2. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to attain... proficiency testing event. (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test... Systems § 866.5090 Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure...

  4. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to attain... proficiency testing event. (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  5. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to attain... proficiency testing event. (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  6. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to attain... proficiency testing event. (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test... Systems § 866.5090 Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure...

  8. A Simple Model System to Demonstrate Antibody Structure and Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Kennedy, Richard

    1991-01-01

    A model that can be used to show the arrangement of light and heavy chains, disulfide linkages, domains, and subclass variations in antibodies is given. It can be constructed and modified to illustrate Fab, F(ab')2, and Fc fragments, single domain and bifunctional antibodies, and labeling of antibodies. (Author)

  9. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test... Systems § 866.5090 Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure...

  10. Research paper Measuring affinity constants of 1450 monoclonal antibodies to

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    Research paper Measuring affinity constants of 1450 monoclonal antibodies to peptide targets antibodies (mAbs) are major reagents for research and clinical diagnosis. For their inherently high classes of new drugs. Yet binding properties of most monoclonal antibodies are not well characterized

  11. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test... Systems § 866.5090 Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure...

  12. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to attain... proficiency testing event. (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  13. Monoclonal antibodies and method for detecting dioxins and dibenzofurans

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, Martin (San Ramon, CA); Stanker, Larry H. (Livermore, CA); Watkins, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Bailey, Nina R. (Berkley, CA)

    1989-01-01

    Compositions of matter are described which include five monoclonal antibodies that react with dioxins and dibenzofurans, and the five hybridomas that produce these monoclonal antibodies. In addition, a method for the use of these antibodies in a sensitive immunoassay for dioxins and dibenzofurans is given, which permits detection of these pollutants in samples at concentrations in the range of a few parts per billion.

  14. Adlershofer Kolloquium Microarray technologies with antibodies, oligonucleotides, and nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    Röder, Beate

    with antibodies, oligonucleotides, and nanoparticles Prof. Dr. Reinhard Nießner Institute of Hydrochemistry molecules (e.g., antibiotics, drugs of abuse, small molecule toxins), proteins (e.g., antibodies or protein. This lecture will deal with developments based on antibodies, oligonucleotides and nanoparticles. As readout

  15. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test... Systems § 866.5090 Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system is a device that consists of the reagents used to measure...

  16. Behavioral and Psychological Responses to HIV Antibody Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Paul B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Considers effects of informing individuals of their antibody status as determined by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody testing. Reviews research examining changes in psychological distress and in behaviors associated with HIV infections among individuals who have undergone antibody testing. Identifies methodological issues in studying…

  17. Isolation of engineered, full-length antibodies from libraries

    E-print Network

    Georgiou, George

    Isolation of engineered, full- length antibodies from libraries expressed in Escherichia coli Yariv facile isolation of full-length IgG antibodies from combinatorial libraries expressed in E. coli. Full membrane, spheroplast clones expressing so-called E-clonal antibodies, which specifically recognize

  18. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...antibody immunological test system. 866.5100 Section...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5100 Antinuclear...antibody immunological test system is a device that consists...antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and...

  19. FINAL REPORT. ENGINEERED ANTIBODIES FOR MONITORING OF POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project was conducted to remove the major barrier to the timely development and use of more versatile antibody-based detection and sample cleanup methods. The main objective was to adapt combinatorial antibody library and antibody engineering methods for preparing a panel of...

  20. Monoclonal antibody specific for a pigmentation associated antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, T.M.; Mattes, M.J.; Old, L.J.; Lloyd, K.O

    1989-01-17

    Monoclonal antibody TA99, which specifically binds to a pigmentation associated antigen present on melanoma cells is described. Additionally, the hybridoma cell line deposited with the ATCC under Accession Number HB 8704 from which the antibody is derived, as well as methods for using the antibody are described.

  1. Envelope Deglycosylation Enhances Antigenicity of HIV-1 gp41 Epitopes for Both Broad Neutralizing Antibodies and Their Unmutated Ancestor Antibodies

    E-print Network

    Ma, Ben-Jiang; Alam, M. S.; Go, Eden P.; Lu, Xiaozhi; Desaire, Heather; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Bowman, Cindy; Sutherland, Laura L.; Scearce, Richard M.; Santra, Sampa; Letivn, Norman L.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2011-09-01

    The HIV-1 gp41 envelope (Env) membrane proximal external region (MPER) is an important vaccine target that in rare subjects can elicit neutralizing antibodies. One mechanism proposed for rarity of MPER neutralizing antibody generation is lack...

  2. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in antimyelin antibody-induced oligodendrocyte damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Griot-Wenk, M; Griot, C; Pfister, H; Vandevelde, M

    1991-08-01

    Treatment of dissociated murine brain cell cultures with an antibody recognizing galactocerebroside (GalC) led to degeneration of oligodendrocytes with loss of their cell processes. F(ab')2 fragments prepared from this antibody showed no effect. The anti-GalC antibody--but not its F(ab')2 fragments b2 was able to stimulate macrophages in these cultures as seen in a chemiluminescence assay. Therefore, antibodies bound to oligodendrocytes stimulated nearby macrophages by interacting with their Fc receptors. The oligodendroglial damage coincided with the release of toxic compounds by the stimulated macrophages, since treatment of the cultures with the anti-GalC antibody and a variety of other macrophage stimulating agents led to secretion of reactive oxygen species and--in some experiments--tumor necrosis factor, both known to be toxic for oligodendrocytes. These in vitro experiments show evidence that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity may be an important mechanism of tissue destruction in inflammatory demyelinating diseases. PMID:2066397

  3. Late antibody-mediated rejection by de novo donor HLA-DP-specific antibody after renal transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cippŕ, Pietro E; Gaspert, Ariana; Etter, Christoph; Guenduez, Zehra; Ferrari-Lacraz, Sylvie; Rüsi, Barbara; Fehr, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The role of donor HLA-DP-specific antibodies after renal transplantation is controversial, and only preformed HLA-DP-specific antibodies have been shown to mediate rejection. Here we present a case of late humoral rejection mediated by de novo donor HLA-DP-specific antibodies in a non-sensitized recipient. This unique case demonstrates the pathogenic role of de novo anti-DP antibodies and suggests that HLA-DP matching might be relevant for renal transplantation. PMID:24530822

  4. Paradoxical suppression of poly-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies in the presence of strain-specific neutralizing antibodies following

    E-print Network

    De Leenheer, Patrick

    Paradoxical suppression of poly-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies in the presence of strain-specific neutralizing antibodies following HIV infection Stanca M. Ciupe a,Ă, Patrick De Leenheer b , Thomas B. Kepler c Accepted 31 January 2011 Available online 16 February 2011 Keywords: HIV infection Viral dynamics Antibody

  5. Immunologically driven chemical engineering of antibodies for catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Dias, Sonia; Jovic, Florence; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Taran, Fréderic; Créminon, Christophe; Mioskowski, Charles; Grassi, Jacques

    2002-11-01

    We describe a new strategy for the preparation of catalytic antibodies based on a two-step procedure. Firstly, monoclonal antibodies are selected only if displaying the following binding features: binding both the substrate and a reactive group in such a way that the two groups are in a reactive position towards each other. Secondly, the selected monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are chemically engineered by covalently binding the reactive group into the binding pocket of the antibody. Using previously isolated monoclonal antibodies, we have focused our studies on the control of this second step. PMID:12379354

  6. Production of antibodies which recognize opiate receptors on murine leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.J.J.; Bost, K.L.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    An antibody has been developed which recognizes opiate receptors on cells of the immune system. This antibody blocks specific binding of the radiolabeled opiate receptor ligand, /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine, to receptors on murine splenocytes. Additionally, the anti-receptor antibody competes with ..beta..-endorphin, meta-enkephalin, and naloxone for the same binding site on the leukocytes. Moreover, the anti-receptor antibody possesses agonist activity similar to ..beta..-endorphin in suppressing cAMP production by lymphocytes. These results suggest the development of an antibody which recognizes classical opiate receptors on cells of the immune system.

  7. Structural and genetic diversity in antibody repertoires from diverse species.

    PubMed

    de Los Rios, Miguel; Criscitiello, Michael F; Smider, Vaughn V

    2015-08-01

    The antibody repertoire is the fundamental unit that enables development of antigen specific adaptive immune responses against pathogens. Different species have developed diverse genetic and structural strategies to create their respective antibody repertoires. Here we review the shark, chicken, camel, and cow repertoires as unique examples of structural and genetic diversity. Given the enormous importance of antibodies in medicine and biological research, the novel properties of these antibody repertoires may enable discovery or engineering of antibodies from these non-human species against difficult or important epitopes. PMID:26188469

  8. Cloning, bacterial expression and crystallization of Fv antibody fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E´, Jean-Luc; Boulot, Ginette; Chitarra, V´ronique; Riottot, Marie-Madeleine; Souchon, H´le`ne; Houdusse, Anne; Bentley, Graham A.; Narayana Bhat, T.; Spinelli, Silvia; Poljak, Roberto J.

    1992-08-01

    The variable Fv fragments of antibodies, cloned in recombinant plasmids, can be expressed in bacteria as functional proteins having immunochemical properties which are very similar or identical with those of the corresponding parts of the parent eukaryotic antibodies. They offer new possibilities for the study of antibody-antigen interactions since the crystals of Fv fragments and of their complexes with antigen reported here diffract X-rays to a higher resolution that those obtained with the cognate Fab fragments. The Fv approach should facilitate the structural study of the combining site of antibodies and the further characterization of antigen-antibody interactions by site-directed mutagenesis experiments.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies against rabbit mammary prolactin receptors. Specific antibodies to the hormone binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, M.; Djiane, J.; Kelly, P.A.

    1985-09-25

    Three monoclonal antibodies (M110, A82, and A917) were obtained by fusing myeloma cells and spleen cells from mice immunized with partially purified rabbit mammary gland prolactin (PRL) receptors. All 3 antibodies were capable of complete inhibition of SVI-ovine prolactin (oPRL) binding to rabbit mammary PRL receptors in either particulate or soluble form. M110 showed slightly greater potency than oPRL in competing for SVI-oPRL binding. These antibodies also inhibited PRL binding to microsomal fractions from rabbit liver, kidney, adrenal, ovary, and pig mammary gland, although A82 showed poor inhibition in pig mammary gland. There was no cross-reaction of any of the 3 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the other species tested: human (T-47D breast cancer cells) and rat (liver, ovary). In order to confirm that these antibodies are specific to the binding domain, antibodies were purified, iodinated, and binding characteristics were investigated. SVI-M110 and SVI-A82 binding was completely inhibited by lactogenic hormones, whereas nonlactogenic hormones did not cross-react. Competition of 125I-M110 by oPRL was comparable to that of SVI-oPRL by unlabeled oPRL, while SVI-A917 binding was only partially competed (30-60%) by lactogenic hormones. Tissue and species specificity of labeled antibody binding paralleled results of binding inhibition experiments using 125I-oPRL. In addition, A82 and A917 completely inhibited 125I-M110 binding. In contrast, 125I-A82 binding was stimulated by A917 and 125I-A917 binding was stimulated by A82.

  10. Purification and properties of non-precipitating rabbit antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R.; Binaghi, R.

    1972-01-01

    Precipitating and non-precipitating anti-egg albumin and anti-dinitrophenyl rabbit antibodies were specifically purified from hyperimmunized sera. Both populations of antibody were similar with regard to electrophoretic mobility and molecular size. Non-precipitating antibodies brought about passive haemagglutination and PCA, although with less efficiency than precipitating antibodies. On the other hand, only precipitating antibodies fixed complement and produced a reverse Arthus reaction. The F(ab?)2 fragment obtained from non-precipitating antibody did not precipitate with antigen. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that non-precipitability is due to a particular configuration of the molecule that makes it impossible for one molecule of antibody to combine with two different molecules of antigen simultaneously. PMID:4259530

  11. Mechanism of human antibody-mediated neutralization of Marburg virus.

    PubMed

    Flyak, Andrew I; Ilinykh, Philipp A; Murin, Charles D; Garron, Tania; Shen, Xiaoli; Fusco, Marnie L; Hashiguchi, Takao; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Slaughter, James C; Sapparapu, Gopal; Klages, Curtis; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Ward, Andrew B; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Bukreyev, Alexander; Crowe, James E

    2015-02-26

    The mechanisms by which neutralizing antibodies inhibit Marburg virus (MARV) are not known. We isolated a panel of neutralizing antibodies from a human MARV survivor that bind to MARV glycoprotein (GP) and compete for binding to a single major antigenic site. Remarkably, several of the antibodies also bind to Ebola virus (EBOV) GP. Single-particle EM structures of antibody-GP complexes reveal that all of the neutralizing antibodies bind to MARV GP at or near the predicted region of the receptor-binding site. The presence of the glycan cap or mucin-like domain blocks binding of neutralizing antibodies to EBOV GP, but not to MARV GP. The data suggest that MARV-neutralizing antibodies inhibit virus by binding to infectious virions at the exposed MARV receptor-binding site, revealing a mechanism of filovirus inhibition. PMID:25723164

  12. Monoclonal antibody to growth hormone receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.S.A.; Friesen, H.G.

    1985-01-01

    Using hybridoma technology, monoclonal antibodies to growth hormone receptors can be prepared in large quantities with only a few micrograms of purified antigen by in vitro immunization or by immunization of larger quantities of less pure material. The discussion centers on areas most pertinent to receptors such as receptor preparation, immunization procedure, fusion method, screening assay, and identification of the immunoglobulin class. The specificity of the antibody for growth hormone receptor was examined by testing the ability of the ascitic fluid to inhibit binding of (/sup 125/I) growth hormone to the prolactin receptors on rabbit mammary gland membranes and the inhibition of /sup 125/I-labelled rat growth hormone binding to rabbit liver membrane.

  13. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  14. Vaccination Strategies to Promote Mucosal Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kang; Cerutti, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    There are great interest and demand for the development of vaccines to prevent and treat diverse microbial infections. Mucosal vaccines elicit immune protection by stimulating the production of antibodies at mucosal surfaces and systemic districts. Being positioned in close proximity to a large community of commensal microbes, the mucosal immune system deploys a heterogeneous population of cells and a complex regulatory network to maintain the balance between surveillance and tolerance. A successful mucosal vaccine relies on leveraging the functions of these immune cells and regulatory components. This article reviews the important cellular interactions and molecular pathways underlying the induction and regulation of mucosal antibody responses and discusses their implications on mucosal vaccination. PMID:21029959

  15. Next generation and biosimilar monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Next Generation and Biosimilar Monoclonal Antibodies: Essential Considerations Towards Regulatory Acceptance in Europe workshop, organized by the European Centre of Regulatory Affairs Freiburg (EUCRAF), was held February 3–4, 2011 in Freiburg, Germany. The workshop attracted over 100 attendees from 15 countries, including regulators from 11 agencies, who interacted over the course of two days. The speakers presented their authoritative views on monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) as attractive targets for development, the experience to date with the regulatory process for biosimilar medicinal products, the European Medicines Agency draft guideline on biosimilar mAbs, as well as key elements in the development of mAbs. Participants engaged in many lively discussions, and much speculation on the nature of the quality, non-clinical and clinical requirements for authorization of biosimilar mAbs. PMID:21487235

  16. Antibody enhancement of free-flow electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohly, H. H. P.; Morrison, Dennis R.; Atassi, M. Zouhair

    1988-01-01

    Specific T cell clones and antibodies (ABs) were developed to study the efficiency of purifying closely associated T cells using Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System. Enhanced separation is accomplished by tagging cells first with ABs directed against the antigenic determinants on the cell surface and then with ABs against the Fc portion of the first AB. This second AB protrudes sufficiently beyond the cell membrane and glycocalyx to become the major overall cell surface potential determinant and thus causes a reduction of electrophoretic mobility. This project was divided into three phases. Phase one included development of specific T cell clones and separation of these specific clones. Phase two extends these principles to the separation of T cells from spleen cells and immunized lymph node cells. Phase three applies this double antibody technique to the separation of T cytotoxic cells from bone marrow.

  17. Antibody-mediated cofactor-driven reactions

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA)

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reactions capable of being rate-enhanced by auxiliary species which interact with the reactants but do not become chemically bound to them in the formation of the final product are performed in the presence of antibodies which promote the reactions. The antibodies contain regions within their antigen binding sites which recognize the auxiliary species in a conformation which promotes the reaction. The antigen binding site frequently recognizes a particular transition state complex or other high energy complex along the reaction coordinate, thereby promoting the progress of the reaction along the desired route as opposed to other less favorable routes. Various classes of reaction together with appropriate antigen binding site specificities tailored for each are disclosed.

  18. Immunopharmacology: utilizing antibodies as ion channel modulators.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Mark L; Deuchars, Susan A; Deuchars, Jim

    2010-05-01

    Development of the patch clamp technique by the Nobel Prize winners Bert Sakmann and Erwin Neher led to huge advances in ion channel research. Their work laid the foundations and revolutionized electrophysiological studies of cells and ion channels. These ion channels underlie many basic cellular physiological processes and, therefore, are key therapeutic targets for pharmaceutical companies. However, current pharmacological strategies are hampered by the lack of specific ion channel blockers. Intense research and development programs are now actively employing antibodies to target ion channels in various formats. This review discusses the use of ion channel antibodies and their associated small molecules as pharmacological tools, termed immunopharmacology. In addition, we will review some recent studies looking into clinical applications of immunopharmacology and intrabodies. PMID:22111610

  19. The INNs and outs of antibody nonproprietary names.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tim D; Carter, Paul J; Plückthun, Andreas; Vásquez, Max; Holgate, Robert G E; Hötzel, Isidro; Popplewell, Andrew G; Parren, Paul W H I; Enzelberger, Markus; Rademaker, Hendrik J; Clark, Michael R; Lowe, David C; Dahiyat, Bassil I; Smith, Victoria; Lambert, John M; Wu, Herren; Reilly, Mary; Haurum, John S; Dübel, Stefan; Huston, James S; Schirrmann, Thomas; Janssen, Richard A J; Steegmaier, Martin; Gross, Jane A; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Burton, Dennis R; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Chester, Kerry A; Glennie, Martin J; Davies, Julian; Walker, Adam; Martin, Steve; McCafferty, John; Baker, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    An important step in drug development is the assignment of an International Nonproprietary Name (INN) by the World Health Organization (WHO) that provides healthcare professionals with a unique and universally available designated name to identify each pharmaceutical substance. Monoclonal antibody INNs comprise a -mab suffix preceded by a substem indicating the antibody type, e.g., chimeric (-xi-), humanized (-zu-), or human (-u-). The WHO publishes INN definitions that specify how new monoclonal antibody therapeutics are categorized and adapts the definitions to new technologies. However, rapid progress in antibody technologies has blurred the boundaries between existing antibody categories and created a burgeoning array of new antibody formats. Thus, revising the INN system for antibodies is akin to aiming for a rapidly moving target. The WHO recently revised INN definitions for antibodies now to be based on amino acid sequence identity. These new definitions, however, are critically flawed as they are ambiguous and go against decades of scientific literature. A key concern is the imposition of an arbitrary threshold for identity against human germline antibody variable region sequences. This leads to inconsistent classification of somatically mutated human antibodies, humanized antibodies as well as antibodies derived from semi-synthetic/synthetic libraries and transgenic animals. Such sequence-based classification implies clear functional distinction between categories (e.g., immunogenicity). However, there is no scientific evidence to support this. Dialog between the WHO INN Expert Group and key stakeholders is needed to develop a new INN system for antibodies and to avoid confusion and miscommunication between researchers and clinicians prescribing antibodies. PMID:26716992

  20. Improved Antibodies Against ERBB4/HER4

    Cancer.gov

    The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Section on Molecular Neurobiology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further evaluate or commercialize specific rabbit monoclonal antibodies generated against the ErbB4 receptor (also known as HER4) that have been validated for specificity using tissue sections and extracts from ErbB4 knockout mice.