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Sample records for anti-treponema pallidum antibodies

  1. Evaluation of the HISCL Anti-Treponema pallidum Assay as a Screening Test for Syphilis.

    PubMed

    An, Jingna; Chen, Qixia; Liu, Qianqian; Rao, Chenli; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Tingting; Tao, Chuanmin; Wang, Lanlan

    2015-07-01

    The resurgence of syphilis in recent years has become a serious threat to public health worldwide, and the serological detection of specific antibodies against Treponema pallidum remains the most reliable method for laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. This study examined the performance of the recently launched HISCL anti-Treponema pallidum (anti-TP) assay as a screening test for syphilis in a high-volume laboratory. The HISCL anti-TP assay was tested in 300 preselected syphilis-positive samples, 704 fresh syphilis-negative samples, 48 preselected potentially interfering samples, and 30 "borderline" samples and was compared head to head with the commercially available Lumipulse G TP-N. In this study, the HISCL anti-TP assay was in perfect agreement with the applied testing algorithms with an overall agreement of 100%, comparable to that of Lumipulse G TP-N (99.63%). The sensitivity and specificity of the HISCL anti-TP assay were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 98.42% to 100%) and 100% (95% CI, 99.37% to 100%), respectively. Considering the excellent ease of use and automation, high throughput, and its favorable sensitivity and specificity, the HISCL anti-TP assay may represent a new choice for syphilis screening in high-volume laboratories. PMID:25972403

  2. Evaluation of the HISCL Anti-Treponema pallidum Assay as a Screening Test for Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    An, Jingna; Chen, Qixia; Liu, Qianqian; Rao, Chenli; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    The resurgence of syphilis in recent years has become a serious threat to public health worldwide, and the serological detection of specific antibodies against Treponema pallidum remains the most reliable method for laboratory diagnosis of syphilis. This study examined the performance of the recently launched HISCL anti-Treponema pallidum (anti-TP) assay as a screening test for syphilis in a high-volume laboratory. The HISCL anti-TP assay was tested in 300 preselected syphilis-positive samples, 704 fresh syphilis-negative samples, 48 preselected potentially interfering samples, and 30 “borderline” samples and was compared head to head with the commercially available Lumipulse G TP-N. In this study, the HISCL anti-TP assay was in perfect agreement with the applied testing algorithms with an overall agreement of 100%, comparable to that of Lumipulse G TP-N (99.63%). The sensitivity and specificity of the HISCL anti-TP assay were 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 98.42% to 100%) and 100% (95% CI, 99.37% to 100%), respectively. Considering the excellent ease of use and automation, high throughput, and its favorable sensitivity and specificity, the HISCL anti-TP assay may represent a new choice for syphilis screening in high-volume laboratories. PMID:25972403

  3. Treponema pallidum-immobilizing antibodies in guinea pig experimental syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Wicher, K; Miller, J N; Urquhart, A W; Wicher, V

    1989-01-01

    Treponema pallidum-immobilizing (TPI) antibodies were examined in intradermally infected inbred strain 13 and adoptively immune inbred strain 2 guinea pigs. Both strains of animals produced TPI antibodies at or after 90 days of infection. TPI antibodies were not associated with the protective mechanism(s) operative after challenge in adoptively immune animals. Images PMID:2668194

  4. Validation of Serological Tests for the Detection of Antibodies Against Treponema pallidum in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Sascha; Dahlmann, Franziska; Batamuzi, Emmanuel K.; Frischmann, Sieghard; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence to suggest that the yaws bacterium (Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue) may exist in non-human primate populations residing in regions where yaws is endemic in humans. Especially in light of the fact that the World Health Organizaiton (WHO) recently launched its second yaws eradication campaign, there is a considerable need for reliable tools to identify treponemal infection in our closest relatives, African monkeys and great apes. It was hypothesized that commercially available serological tests detect simian anti-T. pallidum antibody in serum samples of baboons, with comparable sensitivity and specificity to their results on human sera. Test performances of five different treponemal tests (TTs) and two non-treponemal tests (NTTs) were evaluated using serum samples of 57 naturally T. pallidum-infected olive baboons (Papio anubis) from Lake Manyara National Park in Tanzania. The T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TP-PA) was used as a gold standard for comparison. In addition, the overall infection status of the animals was used to further validate test performances. For most accurate results, only samples that originated from baboons of known infection status, as verified in a previous study by clinical inspection, PCR and immunohistochemistry, were included. All tests, TTs and NTTs, used in this study were able to reliably detect antibodies against T. pallidum in serum samples of infected baboons. The sensitivity of TTs ranged from 97.7-100%, while specificity was between 88.0-100.0%. The two NTTs detected anti-lipoidal antibodies in serum samples of infected baboons with a sensitivity of 83.3% whereas specificity was 100%. For screening purposes, the TT Espline TP provided the highest sensitivity and specificity and at the same time provided the most suitable format for use in the field. The enzyme immune assay Mastblot TP (IgG), however, could be considered as a confirmatory test. PMID:25803295

  5. Four-step enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Treponema pallidum antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Farshy, C E; Hunter, E F; Helsel, L O; Larsen, S A

    1985-01-01

    Further studies of a four-step enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay procedure to detect Treponema pallidum antibody are described. High-titered antibody, produced in rabbits by intravenous injection of T. pallidum, was used to coat polyvinyl chloride microtiter plates. To these plates a known concentration of T. pallidum was added, followed in successive steps by serial dilutions of human sera and appropriately diluted peroxidase-labeled anti-human immunoglobulin G antibody. O-Phenylenediamine was the substrate. A total of 340 sera were obtained from the DeKalb County Sexually Transmitted Diseases Clinic, Atlanta, Ga., and examined within 3 days of receipt. Ninety-six percent test agreement between the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption-double staining test was obtained. A total of 372 additional sera stored at -20 degrees C were examined. The overall sensitivity of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with sera from patients with various stages of syphilis was 96%. With sera from uninfected individuals, the specificity of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was 95%. No antigen instability was noted with the two antigen preparations used during this evaluation. PMID:3884654

  6. High Prevalence of Antibodies against the Bacterium Treponema pallidum in Senegalese Guinea Baboons (Papio papio)

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Sascha; Barnett, Ulrike; Maciej, Peter; Klapproth, Matthias; Ndao, Ibrahima; Frischmann, Sieghard; Fischer, Julia; Zinner, Dietmar; Liu, Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Treponema pallidum is known to cause syphilis (ssp. pallidum), yaws (ssp. pertenue), and endemic syphilis (ssp. endemicum) in humans. Nonhuman primates have also been reported to be infected with the bacterium with equally versatile clinical manifestations, from severe skin ulcerations to asymptomatic. At present all simian strains are closely related to human yaws-causing strains, an important consideration for yaws eradication. We tested clinically healthy Guinea baboons (Papio papio) at Parc National Niokolo Koba in south eastern Senegal for the presence of anti-T. pallidum antibodies. Since T. pallidum infection in this species was identified 50 years ago, and there has been no attempt to treat non-human primates for infection, it was hypothesized that a large number of West African baboons are still infected with simian strains of the yaws-bacterium. All animals were without clinical signs of treponematoses, but 18 of 20 (90%) baboons tested positive for antibodies against T. pallidum based on treponemal tests. Yet, Guinea baboons seem to develop no clinical symptoms, though it must be assumed that infection is chronic or comparable to the latent stage in human yaws infection. The non-active character is supported by the low anti-T. pallidum serum titers in Guinea baboons (median = 1:2,560) versus serum titers that are found in genital-ulcerated olive baboons with active infection in Tanzania (range of medians among the groups of initial, moderate, and severe infected animals = 1:15,360 to 1:2.097e+7). Our findings provide evidence for simian infection with T. pallidum in wild Senegalese baboons. Potentially, Guinea baboons in West Africa serve as a natural reservoir for human infection, as the West African simian strain has been shown to cause sustainable yaws infection when inoculated into humans. The present study pinpoints an area where further research is needed to support the currently on-going second WHO led yaws eradication campaign with its goal to eradicate yaws by 2020. PMID:26588087

  7. Evaluation of the Determine Syphilis TP assay for the detection of antibodies against Treponema pallidum for the serodiagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Y-H; Tian, Y; Chen, Y; Tang, J; Wang, J-Q; Li, P; Li, Q; Jiang, Y-Q

    2012-06-01

    Currently, infectious syphilis has been resurgent in China and has become a significant public health problem. The rapid expansion of syphilis screening programs is urgently required. In the present study, the performance of the Determine Syphilis TP assay (Determine TP assay) for the detection of antibodies against Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum) for syphilis serodiagnosis was evaluated. In total, 300 serum samples were tested for the presence of treponemal-specific antibodies using the Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) assay, the Determine TP assay, and the InTec immunochromatography assay (InTec assay). The Determine TP assay detected 99, 11, and 5 positive results, whereas the InTec assay detected 97, 3, and 3 positive samples from group I (100 TPPA-positive sera), group II (13 TPPA 1:80 +/- sera), and group III (187 TPPA-negative sera), respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and the rate concordant with TPPA for the Determine TP assay were 97.35, 98.91, and 97.33%, respectively. In comparison to the TPPA, the Determine TP assay is simple to perform and time-saving, making it a favorable alternative for the detection of T. pallidum-specific antibodies where other T. pallidum-specific confirmatory tests are not available. In addition, this rapid treponemal test promotes prompt treatment for syphilis by providing early laboratory diagnosis. PMID:21866323

  8. Clinical utility of a competitive ELISA to detect antibodies against Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, J; Vergara, M J; Soto, M J; Piédrola, G; Maroto, M d

    2000-01-01

    Screening for Treponema pallidum infection is carried out on a large human population. To reduce costs, fewer tests which still offer adequate sensitivity and specificity could be performed. We studied the reliability of a novel indirect ELISA method to test for this infection. Several panels of sera were used that corresponded to 40 primary infections (group 1), 13 recurrences (group 2), 348 latent infections (group 3), 5 samples with anticardiolipin antibodies (group 4), 15 samples from patients with Lyme borreliosis (group 5), and 400 samples from blood donors and healthy pregnant women (group 6). The ELISA showed a global sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 99.5%, respectively. Our evaluation shows that Enzygnost Syphilis is a sensitive, specific, and simple test to screen for this infection. PMID:10683619

  9. Mucopolysaccharidase of Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, T. J.; Johnson, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) exhibited mucopolysaccharidase activity. Acidic mucopolysaccharides were broken down more rapidly by viable treponemes than by heat-inactivated treponemes or membrane filtrates of treponemal suspensions. Ouchterlony immunodiffusion demonstrated the occurrence of antibodies to the hyaluronidase-like enzyme within syphilitic sera. After intratesticular inoculation of 2 107 to 6 107 treponemes, these anti-mucopolysaccharidase antibodies were detected between 9 and 35 days postinoculation. In addition, acidic mucopolysaccharides were present in the serum of infected animals 9 and 16 days postinoculation. Immune serum that contained antibodies to the mucopolysaccharidase restricted treponemal breakdown of acidic mucopolysaccharides. It has been previously demonstrated that immune rabbit serum contains a factor that blocks attachment of T. pallidum (Nichols strain) to cultured mammalian cells. This factor was effectively absorbed by prior incubation with bovine hyaluronidase. It is postulated that T. pallidum attaches to acidic mucopolysaccharides on the surface of cultured cells through the mucopolysaccharidase enzyme at the surface of the organisms. These findings are discussed in terms of the histopathogenesis of T. pallidum with applications to the healing immune response. PMID:156698

  10. Further evaluation of the characteristics of Treponema pallidum-specific IgM antibody in syphilis serofast reaction patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Rong; Zheng, Wei-Hong; Tong, Man-Li; Fu, Zuo-Gen; Liu, Gui-Li; Fu, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Dai-Wei; Yang, Tian-Ci; Liu, Li-Li

    2011-11-01

    Syphilis serofast reaction (SSR) is common in clinical work. From June 2005 to May 2009, 1208 syphilis patients were chosen for research by the Xiamen Center of Clinical Laboratory in China. Serologic tests were performed with toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST) and Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA). Then, T. pallidum-specific IgM antibody (TP-IgM) was detected with fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-Abs) and TPPA. In this study, patients were divided into the following experimental groups according to the results of TRUST and TPPA: (1) the SSR group consisted of 411 cases with (+) TRUST and (+) TPPA, and without clinical manifestations after 1 year of recommended syphilis treatment; (2) the serum cure group, which was further subdivided into group A consisting of 251cases with (-) TRUST and (+) TPPA; (3) group B consisting of 546 cases with (-) TRUST and (-) TPPA; and (4) the blood donor control group which consisted of 100 cases. We demonstrated that a total of 136 cases (33.09%) of 411 SSR patients were TP-IgM positive by TPPA, and this percentage was markedly higher than that in serum cure group A (9.16%). FTA-Abs analyses revealed similar results. All samples in serum cure group B and the control group were TP-IgM negative, which is identical to our previous report. The present study also indicated that the TP-IgM positive rate was not significantly different among patients with different ages, genders, and clinical phases after 1 year of recommended therapy. From the total of 1208 syphilis patients, 289 were randomly selected for TP-DNA detection by fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the positive rate of TP-DNA was 32.53%, which was slightly higher than that of FTA-Abs TP-IgM, and no statistically significant difference by chi-square tests, indicating the TP-DNA result is preferably consistent with FTA-Abs and supporting our deduction that TP-IgM could be used as a serologic marker for the relapse and infection of syphilis. PMID:21899981

  11. Development of a novel protein biochip enabling validation of immunological assays and detection of serum IgG and IgM antibodies against Treponema pallidum pathogens in the patients with syphilis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Na-Li; Ye, Lei; Schneider, Marion E; Du, Yi-Xin; Xu, Yuan-Hong; Fan, Li-Bin; Du, Wei-Dong

    2016-01-15

    In this study, we developed a novel protein biochip methodology that was characterized by dithiobis (succinimidyl undecanoate) (DSU) and specialized for detection of serum IgG and IgM antibodies against Treponema pallidum pathogens in the patients with syphilis, respectively. The biochips were validated by a dimension of atomic force microscope (AFM). The visualized detection limit of IgG antibody on the biochip was 0.39μg/ml. Finally, 286 serum samples from the patients with syphilis were simultaneously tested on the rTpN15-17-47 coated biochips. The results were evaluated in comparison with the assays of T. pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) and the toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST). The result demonstrated that the relative positive rate in the 286 patients by biochip was 99.0%, similar to that by TPPA (97.9%, P>0.05) and higher than that by TRUST, (76.2%, P<0.01). The detection specificities were 100% for the biochip and the TPPA and 97.0% for the TRUST. Thus, the protein biochip would provide a useful platform not only for enabling concurrent detection of the infectious antibodies directed against T. pallidum on a larger scale, but also for monitoring therapy modality of the disease. PMID:26364122

  12. Evaluation of a colloidal gold immunochromatography assay in the detection of Treponema pallidum specific IgM antibody in syphilis serofast reaction patients: a serologic marker for the relapse and infection of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Rong; Tong, Man-Li; Fu, Zuo-Gen; Dan, Bing; Zheng, Wei-Hong; Zhang, Chang-Gong; Yang, Tian-Ci; Zhang, Zhong-Ying

    2011-05-01

    Syphilis remains as a worldwide public health problem; hence, it is necessary to develop a new diagnostic approach that is easier and faster than conventional tests. A new testing method to detect Treponema pallidum IgM (TP-IgM), named colloidal gold immunochromatography assay (GICA), is presented in place of fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-Abs). TP-IgM was detected using GICA developed on syphilis-specific recombinant proteins TPN17 and TPN47. The FTA-Abs IgM test was set as the gold standard. A GICA TP-IgM test was performed to detect syphilis in 1208 patients who received recommended therapy for syphilis for more than 1 year at the Xiamen Center of Clinical Laboratory in China from June 2005 to May 2009. One hundred blood donors were set up as control. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio were 98.21%, 99.04%, 93.75%, 99.73%, 102.3, and 0.018, respectively. Detection on 500 interference specimens indicated that the biological false-positive rate of the GICA test was extremely low and was free from other biological and chemical factors. The patients were divided into the following experimental groups based on the results of toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST) and treponemal pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA): (1) the syphilis serofast reaction (SSR) group consisted of 411 cases with (+) TRUST and (+) TPPA, which exhibited no clinical manifestations of syphilis after 1 year of recommended syphilis treatment; (2) the serum cure group, which was further subdivided into group A, a group that consisted of 251 cases with (-) TRUST and (+) TPPA, and (3) group B, a group that consisted of 546 cases with (-) TRUST and (-) TPPA; and (4) the blood donor control group, which consisted of 100 healthy persons with (-) ELISA-TP and (-) TPPA. We used the FTA-Abs method and the GICA method to detect TP-IgM; the positive rate of TP-IgM in 411 SSR patients was 34.55% and 36.01%, respectively. However, in serum cure group A, the positive rate of TP-IgM was 10.36% and 11.16%, respectively. The χ(2) test revealed that there is a significant difference in the positive rate between these 2 groups (P < 0.01). The TP-IgM positive rate in the same group, as detected by the GICA method and the FTA-Abs method, had no significant difference in statistics. However, as detected by the GICA method and the FTA-Abs method, all the samples in serum cure group B and the control group were negative for TP-IgM. The TP-IgM-positive result demonstrated that active T. pallidum remained in the bodies of SSR patients. In summary, the characteristics of GICA TP-IgM correspond to that of FTA-Abs TP-IgM; this can be used as a serologic marker for the relapse and infection of syphilis in place of the conventional FTA-Abs IgM test. PMID:21388769

  13. Surface Mucopolysaccharides of Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, T. J.; Johnson, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    The viscous mucoid fluid that accumulates within syphilitic lesions may be due to breakdown of host tissue during infection, or may be synthesized by Treponema pallidum. Experiments were performed to investigate the acidic mucopolysaccharides that occur at the surface of T. pallidum (Nichols strain). These mucopolysaccharides were demonstrated by reaction with acidified bovine serum albumin and by agglutination with wheat germ agglutinin and soybean agglutinin. The polycations ruthenium red and toluidine blue influenced treponemal survival. Concentrations of both compounds at 200 ?g/ml inhibited survival, whereas concentrations at 0.1?g/ml enhanced survival. The mucopolysaccharide concentration within the mucoid fluid that accumulates during intratesticular infection was determined by reaction with acidified bovine serum albumin; it ranged from 10,000 ?g/ml to less than 8 ?g/ml. The addition of this mucoid fluid to treponemal suspensions resulted in differing effects on T. pallidum survival. Some preparations were inhibitory, and others were stimulatory. Commercial preparations of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate at 400, 200, 100, and 50 ?g/ml were detrimental to treponemal survival. The organisms exhibited pronounced clumping in the presence of the higher concentrations of hyaluronic acid. These clumps of treponemes were comprised of mucopolysaccharides as shown by acidified bovine serum albumin and toluidine blue reactions and by hyaluronidase degradation. Results are discussed in terms of the derivation and potential role of acidic mucopolysaccharides at the surface of T. pallidum. Images PMID:156696

  14. Activation and Proteolytic Activity of the Treponema pallidum Metalloprotease, Pallilysin

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Simon; Hof, Rebecca; Honeyman, Lisa; Hassler, Julia; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2012-01-01

    Treponema pallidum is a highly invasive pathogen that undergoes rapid dissemination to establish widespread infection. Previous investigations identified the T. pallidum adhesin, pallilysin, as an HEXXH-containing metalloprotease that undergoes autocatalytic cleavage and degrades laminin and fibrinogen. In the current study we characterized pallilysin's active site, activation requirements, cellular location, and fibrin clot degradation capacity through both in vitro assays and heterologous treponemal expression and degradation studies. Site-directed mutagenesis showed the pallilysin HEXXH motif comprises at least part of the active site, as introduction of three independent mutations (AEXXH [H198A], HAXXH [E199A], and HEXXA [H202A]) abolished pallilysin-mediated fibrinogenolysis but did not adversely affect host component binding. Attainment of full pallilysin proteolytic activity was dependent upon autocatalytic cleavage of an N-terminal pro-domain, a process which could not occur in the HEXXH mutants. Pallilysin was shown to possess a thrombin cleavage site within its N-terminal pro-domain, and in vitro studies confirmed cleavage of pallilysin with thrombin generates a truncated pallilysin fragment that has enhanced proteolytic activity, suggesting pallilysin can also exploit the host coagulation process to facilitate protease activation. Opsonophagocytosis assays performed with viable T. pallidum demonstrated pallilysin is a target of opsonic antibodies, consistent with a host component-interacting, surface-exposed cellular location. Wild-type pallilysin, but not the HEXXA mutant, degraded fibrin clots, and similarly heterologous expression of pallilysin in the non-invasive spirochete Treponema phagedenis facilitated fibrin clot degradation. Collectively these results identify pallilysin as a surface-exposed metalloprotease within T. pallidum that possesses an HEXXH active site motif and requires autocatalytic or host-mediated cleavage of a pro-domain to attain full host component-directed proteolytic activity. Furthermore, our finding that expression of pallilysin confers upon T. phagedenis the capacity to degrade fibrin clots suggests this capability may contribute to the dissemination potential of T. pallidum. PMID:22910436

  15. Polypeptides of Treponema pallidum: progress toward understanding their structural, functional, and immunologic roles. Treponema Pallidum Polypeptide Research Group.

    PubMed Central

    Norris, S J

    1993-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the spirochete that causes syphilis, is unusual in a number of respects, including its small genome size, inability to grow under standard in vitro culture conditions, microaerophilism, apparent paucity of outer membrane proteins, structurally complex periplasmic flagella, and ability to evade the host immune responses and cause disease over a period of years to decades. Many of these attributes are related ultimately to its protein content. Our knowledge of the activities, structure, and immunogenicity of its proteins has been expanded by the application of recombinant DNA, hybridoma, and structural fractionation techniques. The purpose of this monograph is to summarize and correlate this new information by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, monoclonal antibody reactivity, sequence data, and other properties as the bases of polypeptide identification. The protein profiles of the T. pallidum subspecies causing syphilis, yaws, and endemic syphilis are virtually indistinguishable but differ considerably from those of other treponemal species. Among the most abundant polypeptides are a group of lipoproteins of unknown function that appear to be important in the immune response during syphilitic infection. The periplasmic flagella of T. pallidum and other spirochetes are unique with regard to their protein content and ultrastructure, as well as their periplasmic location. They are composed of three core proteins (homologous to the other members of the eubacterial flagellin family) and a single, unrelated sheath protein; the functional significance of this arrangement is not understood at present. Although the bacterium contains the chaperonins GroEL and DnaK, these proteins are not under the control of the heat shock regulon as they are in most organisms. Studies of the immunogenicity of T. pallidum proteins indicate that many may be useful for immunodiagnosis and immunoprotection. Future goals in T. pallidum polypeptide research include continued elucidation of their structural locations and functional activities, identification and characterization of the low-abundance outer membrane proteins, further study of the immunoprotective and immunodiagnostic potential of T. pallidum proteins, and clarification of the roles of treponemal proteins in pathogenesis. Images PMID:8246847

  16. Studies on the action lysozyme in immune immobilization of Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain)

    PubMed Central

    Mller, F.; Feddersen, H.; Segerling, M.

    1973-01-01

    The action of antibodies and of the haemolytic complement system does not induce immune immobilization of Treponema pallidum, but only destroys superficial wall structures of these Gram-negative organisms. In sensitized and complement coated treponemes the immobilization is a result of the lysozyme interaction with the mucopeptide layer of the cell wall. In a lysozyme-free medium, immunologically damaged treponemes are able to repair the defects in the outer layers of their cell wall structures. Furthermore, it is shown that the long lag period in immune immobilization of T. pallidum can only partly be explained by the interaction of lysozyme with the treponemes. PMID:4706566

  17. Purification and characterization of a cloned protease-resistant Treponema pallidum-specific antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Fehniger, T E; Walfield, A M; Cunningham, T M; Radolf, J D; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1984-01-01

    A cloned Treponema pallidum antigen, designated 4D, was purified from Escherichia coli predominantly as a 190-kilodalton (kd) polypeptide, although higher oligomeric forms exist. Extensive proteolysis of 4D created a limit digestion product of 90 kd which retained antigenicity with sera from patients with primary, secondary, early latent, late latent, and tertiary syphilis. A molecule indistinguishable from 90-kd 4D in size, isoelectric point, and antigenicity was isolated from T. pallidum after proteolysis. The 190- and 90-kd forms of 4D were stable at 68 degrees C but converted to 19- and 14-kd species, respectively, after boiling in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The low-molecular-weight species did not react with syphilitic sera. Rabbits immunized with the purified 4D antigen developed antibodies which immobilized virulent T. pallidum in a complement-dependent assay system, suggesting that the antigen has a native surface location. Images PMID:6389353

  18. The Treponema pallidum immobilization test

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Hans Aage; Reyn, Alice

    1956-01-01

    The authors first discuss the principle of the Treponema pallidum immobilization (TPI) test, considered both as a qualitative and as a quantitative test, and then various specific aspects of passage of the Nichols strain of treponeme in rabbit testes. A number of important technical details and modifications in the test procedure are then reviewed, and the clinical value of the test is discussed. The sensitivity of the TPI test is considerably greater than that of the serological tests for syphilis more usually performed, and its specificity is also remarkably high. However, it is stressed that, at the present stage of development, the greatest value of the TPI test lies in its use as an excellent aid to diagnosis rather than as a test of cure. PMID:13329850

  19. Identification of Functional Candidates amongst Hypothetical Proteins of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Ahmad Abu Turab; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md. Imtaiyaz

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis is a globally occurring venereal disease, and its infection is propagated through sexual contact. The causative agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum, a Gram-negative sphirochaete, is an obligate human parasite. Genome of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum SS14 strain (RefSeq NC_010741.1) encodes 1,027 proteins, of which 444 proteins are known as hypothetical proteins (HPs), i.e., proteins of unknown functions. Here, we performed functional annotation of HPs of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum using various database, domain architecture predictors, protein function annotators and clustering tools. We have analyzed the sequences of 444 HPs of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum and subsequently predicted the function of 207 HPs with a high level of confidence. However, functions of 237 HPs are predicted with less accuracy. We found various enzymes, transporters, binding proteins in the annotated group of HPs that may be possible molecular targets, facilitating for the survival of pathogen. Our comprehensive analysis helps to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis to provide many novel potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:25894582

  20. Antimicrobial activity of rabbit leukocyte defensins against Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, L A; Selsted, M E; Lehrer, R I; Miller, J N

    1991-01-01

    Defensins, which are peptides with broad antimicrobial activity, are major constituents of rabbit neutrophils and certain macrophages. We tested six rabbit defensins, NP-1, NP-2, NP-3a, NP-3b, NP-4, and NP-5, for activity against Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum. Mixtures of T. pallidum and defensin in 10% normal rabbit serum (NRS) or heat-inactivated NRS (HI-NRS) were incubated anaerobically for various time periods ranging between 0 and 16 h and then examined by dark-field microscopy for treponemal motility or inoculated intradermally into rabbits to assess treponemal virulence. Immobilization of T. pallidum by NP-1 (400 micrograms/ml) occurred after 4 and 8 h of coincubation in mixtures containing NRS and HI-NRS, respectively. Similarly, neutralization of T. pallidum by NP-1 occurred more rapidly and was complete when incubations were performed in NRS as compared with that in HI-NRS. Endpoint titration confirmed the augmentation of NP-1 antitreponemal activity by heat-labile serum factors; NP-1 showed neutralizing activity at 4 micrograms/ml (about 1 microM) in NRS and at 40 micrograms/ml in HI-NRS. When NP-1 was tested in serum that was deficient in C6, the T. pallidum neutralizing activity of NP-1 was reduced to levels slightly greater than that observed in HI-NRS. NP-1 that had been reduced and alkylated was inactive against T. pallidum. When NP-2, NP-3a, NP-3b, NP-4, and NP-5 were tested at 400 micrograms/ml, all exerted potent treponemicidal activity, manifested by abrogation or delayed development of cutaneous lesions relative to that of controls. These data suggest that defensins may equip certain macrophages and neutrophils to participate in host defense against T. pallidum, that the direct activity of defensins against T. pallidum is enhanced by heat-labile serum factors (presumably complement), and that conformational factors influence the biological activity of the defensin molecule. Images PMID:2004816

  1. Factors affecting the multiplication and subculture of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum in a tissue culture system.

    PubMed

    Norris, S J; Edmondson, D G

    1986-09-01

    Limited multiplication of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols strain) can be obtained in the presence of Sf1Ep rabbit epithelial cell cultures, but continuous culture has not yet been achieved. In the system currently employed, growth is exponential for the first 10 to 15 days of culturing, after which multiplication and the percentage of motile organisms decrease. In an effort to identify culture conditions which may adversely affect treponemal viability and growth, eight culture parameters were monitored over a 12-day period of incubation. Several of these parameters, including pH, redox potential, dissolved oxygen concentration, and glucose levels were found to change dramatically during the course of incubation, indicating that they may be responsible for the cessation of treponemal multiplication. The feasibility of extending the period of growth by subculturing was also investigated. In preparation for planned serial subcultivation experiments, several subculture procedures were tested and found to be effective in allowing the transfer of T. pallidum from 3-day-old primary cultures to secondary cultures without loss of motility or growth potential. Increases of up to 55-fold were observed in secondary cultures, but increased growth due to subculturing was not a consistent finding. Use of subculture intervals of greater than or equal to 6 days resulted in a progressive decrease in treponemal multiplication in secondary cultures, although retention of motility was extended in the subcultures compared with motility in the primary cultures. These results indicate that the lack of continued multiplication of T. pallidum in subcultures is not due to damage to the treponemes during subculture. Prolonged multiplication of T. pallidum may be obtained through the stabilization of culture conditions by either performing subcultures at regular intervals or by medium replacement techniques. It was also found that primary T. pallidum cultures could be established by using as the inoculum treponemes that had been stored at -70 degrees C in a medium containing 15% glycerol. PMID:3091504

  2. Surface Immunolabeling and Consensus Computational Framework To Identify Candidate Rare Outer Membrane Proteins of Treponema pallidum?

    PubMed Central

    Cox, David L.; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star; Desrosiers, Daniel C.; Salazar, Juan C.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Radolf, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    Treponema pallidum reacts poorly with the antibodies present in rabbit and human syphilitic sera, a property attributed to the paucity of proteins in its outer membrane. To better understand the basis for the syphilis spirochete's stealth pathogenicity, we used a dual-label, 3-step amplified assay in which treponemes encapsulated in gel microdroplets were probed with syphilitic sera in parallel with anti-FlaA antibodies. A small (approximately 5 to 10%) but reproducible fraction of intact treponemes bound IgG and/or IgM antibodies. Three lines of evidence supported the notion that the surface antigens were likely ?-barrel-forming outer membrane proteins (OMPs): (i) surface labeling with anti-lipoidal (VDRL) antibodies was not observed, (ii) immunoblot analysis confirmed prior results showing that T. pallidum glycolipids are not immunoreactive, and (iii) labeling of intact organisms was not appreciably affected by proteinase K (PK) treatment. With this method, we also demonstrate that TprK (TP0897), an extensively studied candidate OMP, and TP0136, a lipoprotein recently reported to be surface exposed, are both periplasmic. Consistent with the immunolabeling studies, TprK was also found to lack amphiphilicity, a characteristic property of ?-barrel-forming proteins. Using a consensus computational framework that combined subcellular localization and ?-barrel structural prediction tools, we generated ranked groups of candidate rare OMPs, the predicted T. pallidum outer membrane proteome (OMPeome), which we postulate includes the surface-exposed molecules detected by our enhanced gel microdroplet assay. In addition to underscoring the syphilis spirochete's remarkably poor surface antigenicity, our findings help to explain the complex and shifting balance between pathogen and host defenses that characterizes syphilitic infection. PMID:20876295

  3. BAC Library of T. pallidum DNA in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    majs, David; McKevitt, Matthew; Wang, Ling; Howell, Jerrilyn K.; Norris, Steven J.; Palzkill, Timothy; Weinstock, George M.

    2002-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum (Nichols) chromosomal DNA was used to construct a large insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library in Escherichia coli DH10B using the pBeloBAC11 cloning vector; 678 individual insert termini of 339 BAC clones (13.9 x coverage) were sequenced and the cloned chromosomal region in each clone was determined by comparison to the genomic sequence. A single 15.6-kb region of the T. pallidum chromosome was missing in the BAC library, between bp 248727 and 264323. In addition to the 12 open reading frames (ORFs) coded by this region, one additional ORF (TP0596) was not cloned as an intact gene. Altogether, 13 predicted T. pallidum ORFs (1.25% of the total) were incomplete or missing in the library. Three of 338 clones mapped by restriction enzyme digestion had detectable deletions and one clone had a detectable insertion within the insert. Of mapped clones, 19 were selected to represent the minimal set of E. coli BAC clones covering 1026 of the total 1040 (98.7%) predicted T. pallidum ORFs. Using this minimal set of clones, at least 12 T. pallidum proteins were shown to react with pooled sera from rabbits immunized with T. pallidum, indicating that at least some T. pallidum genes are transcribed and expressed in E. coli. PMID:11875041

  4. Antibody

    MedlinePLUS

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  5. Comparative studies on the haemolytic and Treponema pallidum immobilizing complement activity in the serum of different species

    PubMed Central

    Mller, F.; Segerling, M.

    1970-01-01

    Complement activity in the serum of eight species has been studied in two ways: by immobilization of Treponema pallidum sensitized with human or rabbit antibody and by haemolysis of sheep red cells sensitized with rabbit antibody. Serum of the pig, monkey and man was actively haemolytic but contained a heatlabile factor that immobilized unsensitized T. pallidum in the presence of guinea-pig complement and precluded the detection of immune immobilizing activity. Sera of other species, although without action on unsensitized treponemes, even with added guinea-pig complement, differed in their relative haemolytic and immobilizing activities: that of the rabbit having a measurable haemolytic and no immobilizing activity, of the horse high immobilizing and low haemolytic activity and that of the goat, sheep, rat and cow neither. PMID:4983520

  6. Treponema pallidum Invades Intercellular Junctions of Endothelial Cell Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. Denee; Navab, Mahamad; Haake, David A.; Fogelman, Alan M.; Miller, James N.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1988-05-01

    The pathogenesis of syphilis reflects invasive properties of Treponema pallidum, but the actual mode of tissue invasion is unknown. We have found two in vitro parallels of treponemal invasiveness. We tested whether motile T. pallidum could invade host cells by determining the fate of radiolabeled motile organisms added to a HeLa cell monolayer; 26% of treponemes associated with the monolayer in a trypsin-resistant niche, presumably between the monolayer and the surface to which it adhered, but did not attain intracellularity. Attachment of T. pallidum to cultured human and rabbit aortic and human umbilical vein endothelial cells was 2-fold greater than to HeLa cells. We added T. pallidum to aortic endothelial cells grown on membrane filters under conditions in which tight intercellular junctions had formed. T. pallidum was able to pass through the endothelial cell monolayers without altering tight junctions, as measured by electrical resistance. In contrast, heat-killed T. pallidum and the nonpathogen Treponema phagedenis biotype Reiter failed to penetrate the monolayer. Transmission electron micrographs of sections of the monolayer showed T. pallidum in intercellular junctions. Our in vitro observations suggest that these highly motile spirochetes may leave the circulation by invading the junctions between endothelial cells.

  7. Similarity between the 38-kilodalton lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum and the glucose/galactose-binding (MglB) protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, P S; Akins, D R; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1994-01-01

    The recent discovery that abundant and immunogenic lipoproteins constitute the integral membrane proteins of Treponema pallidum has prompted efforts to investigate their importance in the physiology and ultrastructure of the organism and in immune responses during infection. Earlier studies identified a 38-kDa lipoprotein of T. pallidum believed to be specific to the pathogen. In the present study, monoclonal antibodies generated against the 38-kDa lipoprotein of T. pallidum reacted with cognate 37-kDa molecules in the nonpathogens Treponema phagedenis, Treponema denticola, and Treponema refringens. Cloning and expression of the 38-kDa-lipoprotein gene of T. pallidum in Escherichia coli revealed that the recombinant product displayed a slightly larger (39-kDa) apparent molecular mass but remained reactive with anti-38-kDa-protein monoclonal antibodies. The recombinant product was processed and acylated in E. coli. DNA and amino acid sequence analyses indicated an open reading frame encoding 403 amino acids, with the first 25 amino acids corresponding to a leader peptide terminated by a signal peptidase II processing site of Val-Val-Gly-Cys. The predicted mature protein is 378 amino acids in length with a deduced molecular weight of 40,422 (excluding acylation). Southern blotting failed to demonstrate in nonpathogenic treponemes genomic sequences homologous with the 38-kDa-lipoprotein gene of T. pallidum. Computer analysis revealed that the 38-kDa lipoprotein of T. pallidum had 34.2% identity and 58.9% similarity with the glucose/galactose-binding protein (MglB) of E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Furthermore, of the 19 amino acids of MglB involved in carbohydrate binding, the 38-kDa lipoprotein had identity with 11. These studies have allowed the first putative functional assignment (carbohydrate binding) to a T. pallidum integral membrane protein. Recognition of this potential physiological role for the 38-kDa lipoprotein underscores the possibility that the membrane biology of T. pallidum may more closely resemble that of gram-positive organisms, which also utilize lipoproteins as anchored transporters, than that of gram-negative bacteria to which T. pallidum often is analogized. Images PMID:8132345

  8. A Homology Model Reveals Novel Structural Features and an Immunodominant Surface Loop/Opsonic Target in the Treponema pallidum BamA Ortholog TP_0326

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Amit; Anand, Arvind; Hawley, Kelly L.; LeDoyt, Morgan; La Vake, Carson J.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Cruz, Adriana R.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently demonstrated that TP_0326 is a bona fide rare outer membrane protein (OMP) in Treponema pallidum and that it possesses characteristic BamA bipartite topology. Herein, we used immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) to show that only the β-barrel domain of TP_0326 contains surface-exposed epitopes in intact T. pallidum. Using the solved structure of Neisseria gonorrhoeae BamA, we generated a homology model of full-length TP_0326. Although the model predicts a typical BamA fold, the β-barrel harbors features not described in other BamAs. Structural modeling predicted that a dome comprised of three large extracellular loops, loop 4 (L4), L6, and L7, covers the barrel's extracellular opening. L4, the dome's major surface-accessible loop, contains mainly charged residues, while L7 is largely neutral and contains a polyserine tract in a two-tiered conformation. L6 projects into the β-barrel but lacks the VRGF/Y motif that anchors L6 within other BamAs. IFA and opsonophagocytosis assay revealed that L4 is surface exposed and an opsonic target. Consistent with B cell epitope predictions, immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed that L4 is an immunodominant loop in T. pallidum-infected rabbits and humans with secondary syphilis. Antibody capture experiments using Escherichia coli expressing OM-localized TP_0326 as a T. pallidum surrogate further established the surface accessibility of L4. Lastly, we found that a naturally occurring substitution (Leu593 → Gln593) in the L4 sequences of T. pallidum strains affects antibody binding in sera from syphilitic patients. Ours is the first study to employ a “structure-to-pathogenesis” approach to map the surface topology of a T. pallidum OMP within the context of syphilitic infection. IMPORTANCE Previously, we reported that TP_0326 is a bona fide rare outer membrane protein (OMP) in Treponema pallidum and that it possesses the bipartite topology characteristic of a BamA ortholog. Using a homology model as a guide, we found that TP_0326 displays unique features which presumably relate to its function(s) in the biogenesis of T. pallidum's unorthodox OM. The model also enabled us to identify an immunodominant epitope in a large extracellular loop that is both an opsonic target and subject to immune pressure in a human population. Ours is the first study to follow a structure-to-pathogenesis approach to map the surface topology of a T. pallidum rare OMP within the context of syphilitic infection. PMID:25825429

  9. Rapid Treponema pallidum Clearance from Blood and Ulcer Samples following Single Dose Benzathine Penicillin Treatment of Early Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Tipple, Craig; Jones, Rachael; McClure, Myra; Taylor, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the efficacy of syphilis treatment is measured with anti-lipid antibody tests. These can take months to indicate cure and, as a result, syphilis treatment trials require long periods of follow-up. The causative organism, Treponema pallidum (T. pallidum), is detectable in the infectious lesions of early syphilis using DNA amplification. Bacteraemia can likewise be identified, typically in more active disease. We hypothesise that bacterial clearance from blood and ulcers will predict early the standard serology-measured treatment response and have developed a qPCR assay that could monitor this clearance directly in patients with infectious syphilis. Patients with early syphilis were given an intramuscular dose of benzathine penicillin. To investigate the appropriate sampling timeframe samples of blood and ulcer exudate were collected intensively for T. pallidum DNA (tpp047 gene) and RNA (16S rRNA) quantification. Sampling ended when two consecutive PCRs were negative. Four males were recruited. The mean peak level of T. pallidum DNA was 1626 copies/ml whole blood and the mean clearance half-life was 5.7 hours (std. dev. 0.53). The mean peak of 16S rRNA was 8879 copies/ml whole blood with a clearance half-life of 3.9 hours (std. dev. 0.84). From an ulcer, pre-treatment, 67,400 T. pallidum DNA copies and 7.08x107 16S rRNA copies were detected per absorbance strip and the clearance half-lives were 3.2 and 4.1 hours, respectively. Overall, T. pallidum nucleic acids were not detected in any sample collected more than 56 hours (range 20–56) after treatment. All patients achieved serologic cure. In patients with active early syphilis, measuring T. pallidum levels in blood and ulcer exudate may be a useful measure of treatment success in therapeutic trials. These laboratory findings need confirmation on a larger scale and in patients receiving different therapies. PMID:25700164

  10. Cellular Metabolic Network Analysis: Discovering Important Reactions in Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueying; Zhao, Min; Qu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    T. pallidum, the syphilis-causing pathogen, performs very differently in metabolism compared with other bacterial pathogens. The desire for safe and effective vaccine of syphilis requests identification of important steps in T. pallidum's metabolism. Here, we apply Flux Balance Analysis to represent the reactions quantitatively. Thus, it is possible to cluster all reactions in T. pallidum. By calculating minimal cut sets and analyzing topological structure for the metabolic network of T. pallidum, critical reactions are identified. As a comparison, we also apply the analytical approaches to the metabolic network of H. pylori to find coregulated drug targets and unique drug targets for different microorganisms. Based on the clustering results, all reactions are further classified into various roles. Therefore, the general picture of their metabolic network is obtained and two types of reactions, both of which are involved in nucleic acid metabolism, are found to be essential for T. pallidum. It is also discovered that both hubs of reactions and the isolated reactions in purine and pyrimidine metabolisms play important roles in T. pallidum. These reactions could be potential drug targets for treating syphilis. PMID:26495292

  11. Topography and chemoarchitecture of the striatum and pallidum in a monotreme, the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Ashwell, K W S

    2008-09-01

    The topography and chemoarchitecture of the striatum and pallidum in a monotreme, the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) have been studied using Nissl staining in conjunction with myelin staining, enzyme reactivity to acetylcholinesterase and NADPH diaphorase, and immunoreactivity to parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, tyrosine hydroxylase, neuropeptide Y, and neurofilament protein (SMI-32 antibody). All those components of the striatum and pallidum found in eutherian mammals could also be identified in the echidna's brain, with broad chemoarchitectural similarities to those regions in eutherian brains also apparent. There was a clear chemoarchitectural gradient visible with parvalbumin immunoreactivity of neurons and fibers, suggesting a subdivision of the echidna caudatoputamen into weakly reactive rostrodorsomedial and strongly reactive caudoventrolateral components. This may, in turn, relate to subdivision into associative versus sensorimotor CPu and reflect homology to the caudate and putamen of primates. Moreover, the chemoarchitecture of the echidna striatum suggested the presence of striosome-matrix architecture. The morphology of identified neuronal groups (i.e., parvalbumin, calbindin, and neuropeptide Y immunoreactive) in the echidna striatum and pallidum showed many similarities to those seen in eutherians, although the pattern of distribution of calbindin immunoreactive neurons was more uniform in the caudatoputamen of the echidna than in therians. These observations indicate that the same broad features of striatal and pallidal organization apply across all mammals and suggest that these common features may have arisen before the divergence of the monotreme and therian lineages. PMID:18821282

  12. Transcriptome of Treponema pallidum: Gene Expression Profile during Experimental Rabbit Infection

    PubMed Central

    majs, David; McKevitt, Matthew; Howell, Jerrilyn K.; Norris, Steven J.; Cai, Wei-Wen; Palzkill, Timothy; Weinstock, George M.

    2005-01-01

    RNA transcript levels in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols) isolated from experimentally infected rabbits were determined by the use of DNA microarray technology. This characterization of the T. pallidum transcriptome during experimental infection provides further insight into the importance of gene expression levels for the survival and pathogenesis of this bacterium. PMID:15716460

  13. Virulent Treponema pallidum promotes adhesion of leukocytes to human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, B S; Oppenheimer-Marks, N; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1994-01-01

    Perivasculitis and endothelial cell abnormalities are characteristic histopathologic features of syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pallidum. To extend earlier studies demonstrating that T. pallidum activates endothelial cells, we now show that virulent T. pallidum, but not heat-killed T. pallidum or nonpathogenic Treponema phagedenis, promotes increased adherence of lymphocytes and monocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Lymphocytes and monocytes are the two cell types prominent in the histopathology of syphilis. Recognition that T. pallidum can stimulate endothelial cells to bind leukocytes provides important insights into the early mechanisms of syphilis immunopathogenesis. Images PMID:7927729

  14. In vitro cultivation of Treponema pallidum: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Thomas

    1981-01-01

    In vitro cultivation of Treponema pallidum would facilitate many different aspects of syphilis research. This review summarizes developments in this field that have been published since 1975. Findings are discussed in terms of treponemes and the oxygen question, treponemal metabolism involving proteins, nucleic acids, and fatty acids, and treponemal interaction with tissue culture cells. Suggested future approaches and potential problem areas pertinent to successful cultivation are discussed. PMID:6172213

  15. Molecular subtyping of Treponema pallidum in Paris, France.

    PubMed

    Grange, Philippe Alain; Allix-Beguec, Caroline; Chanal, Johan; Benhaddou, Nadjet; Gerhardt, Philippe; Morini, Jean-Pierre; Deleuze, Jean; Lassau, Franois; Janier, Michel; Dupin, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    Two major Treponema pallidum subtypes, 14 d/g and 14 d/f, were identified in a population of 119 patients with syphilis in Paris, France, characterized by a high proportion of men who have sex with men. A new subtype named 11 q/j was characterized, and a reinfection case was determined in 1 patient having consecuitve syphilis infection at 19-month interval. PMID:23859911

  16. The host-interacting proteins Tp0750 and Pallilysin; conservation among treponemes and restriction of proteolytic capacity to Treponema pallidum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spirochete Treponema pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a chronic, sexually transmitted bacterial infection characterized by multiple symptomatic and asymptomatic stages. Treponema pallidum is significantly more invasive than other treponemal species, being able to cross both the blood...

  17. A redescripton of Lyrosoma pallidum (Eschscholtz) and distributional range extension of Lyrosoma Mannerheim (Coleoptera, Agyrtidae)

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, In-Seong; Sikes, Derek; Ahn, Kee-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A redescription with illustrations of the species Lyrosoma pallidum and a key to the Korean species of the family Agyrtidae are provided. New distributional data, including a range extension, of the two Lyrosoma Mannerheim species are presented. Lyrosoma pallidum (Eschscholtz) is recorded for the first time in Korea. PMID:24146551

  18. Effect of spectinomycin on T. pallidum in incubating experimental syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Petzoldt, D

    1975-01-01

    Animal experiments were performed to determine if a single-dose treatment for acute gonorrhoea with 2 g. spectinomycin could cure a simultaneously acquired syphilis at a very early stage of incubation. 300 treponemes (Nichols stain T. pallidum) were inoculated intratesticularly and 3 days later spectinomycin was administered in a dose which produced spectinomycin serum levels similar to those in patients who had received a single oral dose of 2 g. This dosage of spectinomycin did not prevent the development of syphilitic orchitis or reactivity to the FTA-ABS test, but it prolonged the subclinical incubation period. PMID:127646

  19. TprC/D (Tp0117/131), a Trimeric, Pore-Forming Rare Outer Membrane Protein of Treponema pallidum, Has a Bipartite Domain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Arvind; Luthra, Amit; Dunham-Ems, Star; Caimano, Melissa J.; Karanian, Carson; LeDoyt, Morgan; Cruz, Adriana R.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) has been a longstanding objective of syphilis researchers. We recently developed a consensus computational framework that employs a battery of cellular localization and topological prediction tools to generate ranked clusters of candidate rare OMPs (D. L. Cox et al., Infect. Immun. 78:51785194, 2010). TP0117/TP0131 (TprC/D), a member of the T. pallidum repeat (Tpr) family, was a highly ranked candidate. Circular dichroism, heat modifiability by SDS-PAGE, Triton X-114 phase partitioning, and liposome incorporation confirmed that full-length, recombinant TprC (TprCFl) forms a ?-barrel capable of integrating into lipid bilayers. Moreover, TprCFl increased efflux of terbium-dipicolinic acid complex from large unilamellar vesicles and migrated as a trimer by blue-native PAGE. We found that in T. pallidum, TprC is heat modifiable, trimeric, expressed in low abundance, and, based on proteinase K accessibility and opsonophagocytosis assays, surface exposed. From these collective data, we conclude that TprC is a bona fide rare OMP as well as a functional ortholog of Escherichia coli OmpF. We also discovered that TprC has a bipartite architecture consisting of a soluble N-terminal portion (TprCN), presumably periplasmic and bound directly or indirectly to peptidoglycan, and a C-terminal ?-barrel (TprCC). Syphilitic rabbits generate antibodies exclusively against TprCC, while secondary syphilis patients fail to mount a detectable antibody response against either domain. The syphilis spirochete appears to have resolved a fundamental dilemma arising from its extracellular lifestyle, namely, how to enhance OM permeability without increasing its vulnerability to the antibody-mediated defenses of its natural human host. PMID:22389487

  20. Evaluation of a PCR Test for Detection of Treponema pallidum in Swabs and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Grange, P. A.; Gressier, L.; Dion, P. L.; Farhi, D.; Benhaddou, N.; Gerhardt, P.; Morini, J. P.; Deleuze, J.; Pantoja, C.; Bianchi, A.; Lassau, F.; Avril, M. F.; Janier, M.

    2012-01-01

    Syphilis diagnosis is based on clinical observation, serological analysis, and dark-field microscopy (DFM) detection of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the etiological agent of syphilis, in skin ulcers. We performed a nested PCR (nPCR) assay specifically amplifying the tpp47 gene of T. pallidum from swab and blood specimens. We studied a cohort of 294 patients with suspected syphilis and 35 healthy volunteers. Eighty-seven of the 294 patients had primary syphilis, 103 had secondary syphilis, 40 had latent syphilis, and 64 were found not to have syphilis. The T. pallidum nPCR results for swab specimens were highly concordant with syphilis diagnosis, with a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 95%. Reasonable agreement was observed between the results obtained with the nPCR and DFM methods (kappa = 0.53). No agreement was found between the nPCR detection of T. pallidum in blood and the diagnosis of syphilis, with sensitivities of 29, 18, 14.7, and 24% and specificities of 96, 92, 93, and 97% for peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC), plasma, serum, and whole-blood fractions, respectively. HIV status did not affect the frequency of T. pallidum detection in any of the specimens tested. Swab specimens from mucosal or skin lesions seemed to be more useful than blood for the efficient detection of the T. pallidum genome and, thus, for the diagnosis of syphilis. PMID:22219306

  1. Sensitive detection of Treponema pallidum by using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Burstain, J M; Grimprel, E; Lukehart, S A; Norgard, M V; Radolf, J D

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a sensitive assay for Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (T. pallidum), the agent of veneral syphilis, based upon the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A 658-bp portion of the gene encoding the 47-kDa membrane immunogen was amplified, and the PCR products were probed by DNA-DNA hybridization with a 496-bp fragment internal to the amplitifed DNA. The assay detected approximately 0.01 pg of purified T. pallidum DNA, and positive results were obtained routinely from suspensions of treponemes calculated to contain 10 or more organism and from some suspensions calculated to contain a single organism. Specific PCR products were obtained for the closely related agent of yaws, Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue, but not with human DNA or DNAs from other spirochetes (including Borrelia burgdoferi), skin microorganisms, sexually transmitted disease pathogens, and central nervous system pathogens. T. pallidum DNA was detected in serum, cerebrospinal fluids, and amniotic fluids from syphilis patients but not in in nonsyphilitic controls. T. pallidum DNA was also amplified from paraffin-embedded tissue. The diagnosis of syphillis by using PCR may become a significant addition to the diagnostic armamentarium and a valuable technique for the investigation of syphilis pathogenesis. Images PMID:1993770

  2. Molecular Typing of Treponema pallidum in South Africa: Cross-Sectional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, A.; Liu, H.; Ebrahim, S.; Chen, C. Y.; Lai, W.; Fehler, G.; Ballard, R. C.; Steiner, B.; Sturm, A. W.; Morse, S. A.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated a molecular subtyping system for Treponema pallidum for its ability to differentiate between strains obtained from male patients with primary syphilis in South Africa. Of 201 T. pallidum-positive specimens, 161 were typeable, revealing 35 subtypes. The unique subtypes identified in Durban, Cape Town, and Carletonville and the total number of subtypes suggested that the strain population was very diverse and varied geographically. PMID:11773125

  3. Molecular typing of Treponema pallidum in South Africa: cross-sectional studies.

    PubMed

    Pillay, A; Liu, H; Ebrahim, S; Chen, C Y; Lai, W; Fehler, G; Ballard, R C; Steiner, B; Sturm, A W; Morse, S A

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated a molecular subtyping system for Treponema pallidum for its ability to differentiate between strains obtained from male patients with primary syphilis in South Africa. Of 201 T. pallidum-positive specimens, 161 were typeable, revealing 35 subtypes. The unique subtypes identified in Durban, Cape Town, and Carletonville and the total number of subtypes suggested that the strain population was very diverse and varied geographically. PMID:11773125

  4. Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum TP0136 protein is heterogeneous among isolates and binds cellular and plasma fibronectin via its NH2-terminal end.

    PubMed

    Ke, Wujian; Molini, Barbara J; Lukehart, Sheila A; Giacani, Lorenzo

    2015-03-01

    Adherence-mediated colonization plays an important role in pathogenesis of microbial infections, particularly those caused by extracellular pathogens responsible for systemic diseases, such as Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (T. pallidum), the agent of syphilis. Among T. pallidum adhesins, TP0136 is known to bind fibronectin (Fn), an important constituent of the host extracellular matrix. To deepen our understanding of the TP0136-Fn interaction dynamics, we used two naturally-occurring sequence variants of the TP0136 protein to investigate which region of the protein is responsible for Fn binding, and whether TP0136 would adhere to human cellular Fn in addition to plasma Fn and super Fn as previously reported. Fn binding assays were performed with recombinant proteins representing the two full-length TP0136 variants and their discrete regions. As a complementary approach, we tested inhibition of T. pallidum binding to Fn by recombinant full-length TP0136 proteins and fragments, as well as by anti-TP0136 immune sera. Our results show that TP0136 adheres more efficiently to cellular Fn than to plasma Fn, that the TP0136 NH2-terminal conserved region of the protein is primarily responsible for binding to plasma Fn but that binding sites for cellular Fn are also present in the protein's central and COOH-terminal regions. Additionally, message quantification studies show that tp0136 is highly transcribed during experimental infection, and that its message level increases in parallel to the host immune pressure on the pathogen, which suggests a possible role for this protein in T. pallidum persistence. In a time where syphilis incidence is high, our data will help in the quest to identify suitable targets for development of a much needed vaccine against this important disease. PMID:25793702

  5. Fibronectin Binding to the Treponema pallidum Adhesin Protein Fragment rTp0483 on Functionalized Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Matthew T.; Abney, Morgan B.; Cameron, Caroline E.; Knecht, Marc; Bachas, Leonidas G.; Anderson, Kimberly W.

    2012-01-01

    Past work has shown that Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, binds host fibronectin (FN). FN and other host proteins are believed to bind to rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of T. pallidum, and it is postulated that this interaction may facilitate cell attachment and mask antigenic targets on the surface. This research seeks to prepare a surface capable of mimicking the FN binding ability of T. pallidum in order to investigate the impact of FN binding with adsorbed Tp0483 on the host response to the surface. By understanding this interaction it may be possible to develop more effective treatments for infection and possibly mimic the stealth properties of the bacteria. Functionalized self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on0 gold were used to investigate rTp0483 and FN adsorption. Using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) rTp0483 adsorption and subsequent FN adsorption onto rTp0483 was determined to be higher on negatively charged carboxylate-terminated self-assembled monolayers (?COO? SAMs) compared to the other surfaces analyzed. Kinetic analysis of rTp0483 adsorption using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) supported this finding. Kinetic analysis of FN adsorption using SPR revealed a multi-step event, where the concentration of immobilized rTp0483 plays a role in FN binding. An examination of relative QCM dissipation energy compared to the shift in frequency showed a correlation between the physical properties of adsorbed rTp0483 and SAM surface chemistry. In addition, AFM images of rTp0483 on selected SAMs illustrated a preference of rTp0483 to bind as aggregates. Adsorption on ?COO? SAMs was more uniform across the surface, which may help further explain why FN bound more strongly. rTp0483 antibody studies suggested the involvement of amino acids 274289 and 316333 in binding between rTp0483 to FN, while a peptide blocking study only showed inhibition of binding with amino acids 316333. Finally, surface adsorbed rTp0483 with FN bound significantly less anti-RGD and gelatin compared to FN adsorbed directly to ?COO? SAMs indicating that one or both binding regions may play a role in binding between rTp0483 and FN. PMID:22175441

  6. Failure of PCR to Detect Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue DNA in Blood in Latent Yaws.

    PubMed

    Marks, Michael; Katz, Samantha; Chi, Kai-Hua; Vahi, Ventis; Sun, Yongcheng; Mabey, David C; Solomon, Anthony W; Chen, Cheng Y; Pillay, Allan

    2015-06-01

    Yaws, caused by Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue, is a neglected tropical disease closely related to venereal syphilis and is targeted for eradication by 2020. Latent yaws represents a diagnostic challenge, and current tools cannot adequately distinguish between individuals with true latent infection and individuals who are serofast following successful treatment. PCR on blood has previously been shown to detect T. pallidum DNA in patients with syphilis, suggesting that this approach may be of value in yaws. We performed real-time PCR for Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue on blood samples from 140 children with positive T. pallidum Particle Agglutination (TPPA) and Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) tests and 7 controls (negative serology), all collected as part of a prospective study of yaws in the Solomon Islands. All samples were also tested by a nested PCR for T. pallidum. 12 patients had clinical evidence of active yaws whilst 128 were considered to have latent yaws. 43 children had high titre rapid plasma reagins (RPRs) of ≥1:32. PCR testing with both assays gave negative results in all cases. It is possible that the failure to detect T. pallidum ssp. pertenue in blood reflects lower loads of organism in latent yaws compared to those in latent infection with T. pallidum ssp. pertenue, and/or a lower propensity for haematogenous dissemination in yaws than in syphilis. As the goal of the yaws control programme is eradication, a tool that can differentiate true latent infection from individuals who are serofast would be of value; however, PCR of blood is not that tool. PMID:26125585

  7. Failure of PCR to Detect Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue DNA in Blood in Latent Yaws

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Kai-Hua; Vahi, Ventis; Sun, Yongcheng; Mabey, David C.; Solomon, Anthony W.; Chen, Cheng Y.; Pillay, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Yaws, caused by Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue, is a neglected tropical disease closely related to venereal syphilis and is targeted for eradication by 2020. Latent yaws represents a diagnostic challenge, and current tools cannot adequately distinguish between individuals with true latent infection and individuals who are serofast following successful treatment. PCR on blood has previously been shown to detect T. pallidum DNA in patients with syphilis, suggesting that this approach may be of value in yaws. We performed real-time PCR for Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue on blood samples from 140 children with positive T. pallidum Particle Agglutination (TPPA) and Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR) tests and 7 controls (negative serology), all collected as part of a prospective study of yaws in the Solomon Islands. All samples were also tested by a nested PCR for T. pallidum. 12 patients had clinical evidence of active yaws whilst 128 were considered to have latent yaws. 43 children had high titre rapid plasma reagins (RPRs) of ≥1:32. PCR testing with both assays gave negative results in all cases. It is possible that the failure to detect T. pallidum ssp. pertenue in blood reflects lower loads of organism in latent yaws compared to those in latent infection with T. pallidum ssp. pertenue, and/or a lower propensity for haematogenous dissemination in yaws than in syphilis. As the goal of the yaws control programme is eradication, a tool that can differentiate true latent infection from individuals who are serofast would be of value; however, PCR of blood is not that tool. PMID:26125585

  8. A one-day Treponema pallidum immobilization test*

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, M.

    1965-01-01

    The author has previously shown that the addition of egg-white lysozyme to the reaction mixture used in the Treponema pallidum immobilization test (TPI test) can reduce the time required for immobilization from 18 hours to as little as 6 hours. This opened up the possibility of developing a one-day TPI test and of further simplifying the procedure, as the conditions do not need to be so strictly controlled to ensure survival of the treponemes for the shorter time. In this paper it is shown that the standard procedure of incubation under an atmosphere of nitrogen and carbon dioxide can be replaced by incubation under a layer of liquid paraffin. The survival of treponemes is satisfactory under these conditions and the oil technique does not alter the sensitivity of the 6-hour test with added lysozyme. Comparative tests using the standard procedure, the lysozyme-gas technique and the lysozyme-oil technique showed that both modifications give the same degree of sensitivity and specificity after incubation for 6 hours as does the standard method. The feasibility of introducing these modifications into routine laboratory practice is discussed. PMID:14315709

  9. Identification of the Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum TP0092 (RpoE) regulon and its implications for pathogen persistence in the host and syphilis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Denisenko, Oleg; Tompa, Martin; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2013-02-01

    Bacteria often respond to harmful environmental stimuli with the induction of extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma (σ) factors that in turn direct RNA polymerase to transcribe specific groups of response genes (or regulons) to minimize cellular damage and favor adaptation to the changed extracellular milieu. In Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the agent of syphilis, the TP0092 gene is predicted to code for the pathogen's only annotated ECF σ factor, homologous to RpoE, known in Escherichia coli to control a key transduction pathway for maintenance of envelope homeostasis in response to external stress and cell growth. Here we have shown that TP0092 is highly transcribed during experimental syphilis. Furthermore, TP0092 transcription levels significantly increase as infection progresses toward immune clearance of the pathogen, suggesting a role for TP0092 in helping T. pallidum respond to harmful stimuli in the host environment. To investigate this hypothesis, we determined the TP0092 regulon at two different time points during infection using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing. A total of 22 chromosomal regions, all containing putative TP0092-binding sites and corresponding to as many T. pallidum genes, were identified. Noteworthy among them are the genes encoding desulfoferrodoxin and thioredoxin, involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Because T. pallidum does not possess other enzymes for ROS detoxification, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, or glutathione peroxidase, our results suggest that the TP0092 regulon is important in protecting the syphilis spirochete from damage caused by ROS produced at the site of infection during the inflammatory response. PMID:23243302

  10. Anxiolytic effect of neurotensin microinjection into the ventral pallidum.

    PubMed

    Ollmann, Tams; Pczely, Lszl; Lszl, Kristf; Kovcs, Anita; Glosi, Rita; Kertes, Erika; Kllai, Veronika; Zagorcz, Olga; Kardi, Zoltn; Lnrd, Lszl

    2015-11-01

    Neurotensin (NT) acts as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in the central nervous system. NT is involved in reward and memory processes, drug addiction and also in the regulation of anxiety. The ventral pallidum (VP) receives neurotensinergic innervation from the ventral striatopallidal pathway originating from the nucleus accumbens. Positive reinforcing effects of NT in the VP had been shown recently, however the possible effects of NT on anxiety have not been examined yet. In our present experiments, the effects of NT on anxiety were investigated in the VP. In male Wistar rats bilateral microinjections of 100 ng or 250 ng NT were delivered in the volume of 0.4 ?l into the VP, and elevated plus maze (EPM) test was performed. In another groups of animals, 35 ng NT-receptor 1 (NTR1) antagonist SR 48,692 was applied by itself, or microinjected 15 min before 100 ng NT treatment. Open field test (OPF) was also conducted. The 100 ng dose of NT had anxiolytic effect, but the 250 ng NT did not influence anxiety. The antagonist pretreatment inhibited the effect of NT, while the antagonist itself had no effect. In the OPF test there was no difference among the groups. Our present results show that microinjection of NT into the VP induces anxiolytic effect, which is specific to the NTR1 receptors because it can be eliminated by a specific NTR1 antagonist. It is also substantiated that neither the NT, nor the NTR1 antagonist in the VP influences locomotor activity. PMID:26296669

  11. Neurochemical modulation of ingestive behavior in the ventral pallidum.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Tsuyoshi; Imaoka, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2006-03-01

    The nucleus accumbens and its related circuitry have been shown to play an important role in promoting the intake of hedonically desirable food. A previous report has demonstrated that the blockade of GABAA receptors in the ventral pallidum (VP), a target of GABAergic projection from the nucleus accumbens, greatly increases food, but not water, intake in satiated rats [Stratford et al. (1999)Brain Research, 825, 199-203]. The present study examined which neurotransmission in the VP is specifically involved in the intake of normally preferred taste stimuli. Microinjections of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline selectively increased the intake of saccharin solution but not that of water and quinine solution in water-deprived rats. In contrast, the facilitation of GABAA receptors by microinjections of muscimol in the VP generally suppressed the intake of saccharin, water and quinine. The same injections induced strong aversive taste reactivity responses to oral stimulation with not only quinine but also water and saccharin. The local administration of D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Glyol5-enkephalin, a selective micro-opioid receptor agonist, into the VP had time-dependent effects, decreasing saccharine intake early and increasing intake late. Microinjections of SCH-23390, a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, in the VP suppressed the intake of saccharin but not water or quinine. Microinjections of sulpiride, the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, the AMPA/kainate glutamate receptor antagonist, had no effect on fluid intake. These results reveal that GABA, opioid and D1 receptors in the VP are involved in the consumption of hedonically positive taste stimuli. PMID:16553623

  12. [Generalized infantile neuroaxonal dystrophies with pigmentation and lipophanerosis of the pallidum in concordant twins (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Peiffer, J; Brunner, N; Landolt, R F; Mller, G; Schlote, W

    1976-08-01

    Monozygotic male twins died at the age of 6 1/2 and 7 1/2 years respectively after a progressive course of mental deterioration, hypotonia, spasticity, optic atrophy and seizures that had commenced at the age of 2 years. Both patients showed generalized neuroaxonal dystrophy (NAD), marked by numerous spheroids, iron-positive pigment and lipophanerosis of the pallidum. NAD can be classified as a generalized form without pigmentation of the pallidum (infantile type of Seitelberger), a juvenile type of Rozdilsky, a generalized form with pigmentation (cases described here), and localized forms (infantile, late infantile, juvenile = classic Hallervorden-Spatz disease, adult types). PMID:183173

  13. Susceptibility of Treponema pallidum to the toxic products of oxygen reduction and the non-treponemal nature of its catalase.

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, B; Wong, G H; Graves, S

    1984-01-01

    We examined the sensitivity of Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) to toxic products of oxygen reduction. T pallidum was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide at concentrations similar to those to which obligate anaerobes are sensitive. Accelerated death of T pallidum occurred at hydrogen peroxide concentrations below 50 mumol/l. Agents protective against hydrogen peroxide and the hydroxyl free radical (catalase, peroxidase, and mannitol) significantly enhanced treponemal survival in vitro under all three conditions of aerobiosis tested--that is, air, 3% oxygen, and 3% oxygen in conjunction with a reduced medium. Superoxide dismutase (which provides protection against superoxide radicals) did not enhance treponemal survival in normal media. When superoxide radicals were generated in the medium by means of a xanthine and xanthine oxidase system, however, the enzyme did protect T pallidum. A possible toxic involvement of singlet oxygen was also indicated by enhanced treponemal survival in air in the presence of histidine. Extracts of T pallidum from infected rabbit testes showed catalase activity which, on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had the same relative mobility as purified rabbit catalase. The treponemal catalase activity was neutralised by anti rabbit catalase antiserum (raised in guinea pigs). This confirmed that the catalase was of rabbit origin and not an endogenous enzyme of T pallidum. We discuss the relation of these results to the obligate parasitism of T pallidum. Images PMID:6421449

  14. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3830 - Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treponema pallidum tre-ponemal test reagents. 866.3830 Section 866.3830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3820 - Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treponema pallidum non-treponemal test reagents. 866.3820 Section 866.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  4. Two Mutations associated with Macrolide Resistance in Treponema pallidum: Increasing Prevalence and Correlation with Molecular Strain Type in Seattle, Washington

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, Matthew; Sahi, Sharon K.; Godornes, B. Charmie; Tantalo, Lauren C.; Roberts, Neal; Bostick, David; Marra, Christina M.; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although azithromycin promised to be a safe and effective single dose oral treatment for early syphilis, azithromycin treatment failure has been documented and is associated with mutations in the 23S rDNA of corresponding Treponema pallidum strains. The prevalence of strains harboring these mutations varies throughout the US and the world. We examined T. pallidum strains circulating in Seattle, Washington, from 2001–2010 to determine the prevalence of two mutations associated with macrolide resistance, and to determine whether these mutations were associated with certain T. pallidum strain types. Methods Subjects were enrolled in a separate ongoing study of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) abnormalities in patients with syphilis. T. pallidum DNA purified from blood and T. pallidum strains isolated from blood or CSF were analyzed for two 23S rDNA mutations and for the molecular targets used in an enhanced molecular stain typing system. Results Nine molecular strain types of T. pallidum were identified in Seattle from 2001–2010. Both macrolide resistance mutations were identified in Seattle strains, and the prevalence of resistant T. pallidum exceeded 80% in 2005 and increased through 2010. Resistance mutations were associated with discrete molecular strain types of T. pallidum. Conclusions Macrolide resistant T. pallidum strains are highly prevalent in Seattle, and each mutation is associated with discrete strain types. Macrolides should not be considered for treatment of syphilis in regions where prevalence of the mutations is high. Combining the resistance mutations with molecular strain typing permits a finer analysis of the epidemiology of syphilis in a community. PMID:23191949

  5. Evaluation of FlaB1, FlaB2, FlaB3, and Tp0463 of Treponema pallidum for serodiagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chuanhao; Xiao, Jinhong; Xie, Yafeng; Xiao, Yongjian; Wang, Chuan; Kuang, Xingxing; Xu, Man; Li, Ranhui; Zeng, Tiebing; Liu, Shuanquan; Yu, Jian; Zhao, Feijun; Wu, Yimou

    2016-02-01

    Syphilis is a multistage disease caused by the invasive spirochete Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, and accurate diagnosis is important for the prevention and treatment of syphilis. Here, to identify appropriate diagnostic antigens for serodiagnosis of syphilis, 6 recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified, including flagellins (FlaB1 [Tp0868], FlaB2 [Tp0792], and FlaB3 [Tp0870]), Tp0463, Tp0751, and Tp1038. The sensitivities were determined by screening sera from individuals with primary (n=82), secondary (n=115), latent (n=105), and congenital (n=65) syphilis. The specificities were determined by screening sera from uninfected controls (n=30) and potentially cross-reactive infections including Lyme disease (n=30), leptospirosis (n=5), and hepatitis B (n=30). Our data showed that FlaB1, FlaB2, FlaB3, Tp0463, and Tp1038 exhibited higher overall sensitivities and specificities for detecting IgG antibody, with 95.4% and 98.9%, 92.6% and 95.8%, 95.1% and 95.8%, 92.6% and 97.9%, and 95.9% and 98.9%, respectively. In contrast, Tp0751 demonstrated only an overall sensitivity of 39.2%. For comparison, the sensitivity and specificity of Architect Syphilis TP were determined to be 98.1% and 93.7%, respectively. In addition, FlaB1, FlaB2, FlaB3, and Tp0463 demonstrated excellent performance for detecting IgM antibody in primary and congenital syphilis, with sensitivities of 76.8% and 83.1%, 72.0% and 87.7%, 74.4% and 89.2%, and 64.6% and 75.3%, respectively. These results indicate that FlaB1, FlaB2, FlaB3, and Tp0463 could be as novel diagnostic candidates for serodiagnosis of syphilis. PMID:26607421

  6. Performance Evaluation of the Elecsys Syphilis Assay for the Detection of Total Antibodies to Treponema pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Enders, Martin; Hunjet, Andrea; Gleich, Michael; Imdahl, Roland; Mühlbacher, Annelies; Schennach, Harald; Chaiwong, Kriangsak; Sakuldamrongpanich, Tasanee; Turhan, Ajda; Sertöz, Rüchan; Wolf, Eva; Mayer, Wolfgang; Tao, Chuanmin; Wang, Lan Lan; Semprini, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Syphilis is a health problem of increasing incidence in recent years that may have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. There are many diagnostic tests available for syphilis, but there is no gold standard, and diagnosis therefore usually relies upon a combination of tests. In this multicenter study, we evaluated the treponemal Elecsys syphilis assay for use in the diagnosis of syphilis in routine samples, i.e., when syphilis is suspected or during antenatal or blood donation screening. The sensitivity and specificity of the Elecsys syphilis assay were compared head to head with those of other treponemal assays used in routine clinical practice and were assessed in potentially cross-reactive samples from patients with Epstein-Barr virus, HIV, and Lyme disease. In a total of 8,063 syphilis-negative samples collected from routine diagnostic requests and blood donations, the Elecsys syphilis assay had a specificity of 99.88%. In 928 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 99.57 to 100% (the result is presented as a range depending on whether four initially indeterminate samples are included in the assessment). The specificity of the Elecsys syphilis assay in patients with other infections was 100%; no false-positive samples were identified. PMID:25355799

  7. Evaluation of the recombinant protein TpF1 of Treponema pallidum for serodiagnosis of syphilis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chuanhao; Zhao, Feijun; Xiao, Jinhong; Zeng, Tiebing; Yu, Jian; Ma, Xiaohua; Wu, Haiying; Wu, Yimou

    2013-10-01

    Syphilis is a chronic infection caused by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, and diagnosis with sensitive and specific methods is a challenging process that is important for its prevention and treatment. In the present study, we established a recombinant protein TpF1-based indirect immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and a Western blot assay for human and rabbit sera. The 20-kDa recombinant protein TpF1 was detected by Western blotting performed with sera from rabbits immunized with recombinant TpF1 and infected with the T. pallidum Nichols strain and T. pallidum clinical isolates but was not detected by Western blotting with sera from uninfected rabbits. The sensitivity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from individuals with primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis (n = 82). The specificity of the recombinant protein was determined by screening sera from uninfected controls (n = 30) and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections, including Lyme disease (n = 30) and leptospirosis (n = 5). The sensitivities of TpF1-based ELISAs were 93.3%, 100%, 100%, and 100% for primary, secondary, latent, and congenital syphilis, respectively, and the specificities were all 100% for sera from uninfected controls and individuals with potentially cross-reactive infections. In Western blot assays, the sensitivities and specificities of TpF1 for human sera were all 100%. The reactivities of TpF1 with syphilitic sera were proportional to the titers of the T. pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) assay. These data indicate that the recombinant protein TpF1 is a highly immunogenic protein in human and rabbit infections and a promising marker for the screening of syphilis. PMID:23945159

  8. HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum infections among blood donors and Transfusion-related complications among recipients at the Laquintinie hospital in Douala, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs) pose a major health risk in Cameroon given the high prevalence of such pathogens and increased demands for blood donations in the local communities. This study aims at establishing the prevalence of commonly encountered TTIs among blood donors and transfusion-related complications among recipients in an urban center of Cameroon. Methods A total of 477 blood donors and 83 blood recipients were recruited by consecutive sampling at the Laquintinie Hospital in Douala (LHD), Cameroon. Serum samples from blood donors were tested by quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and/or using various Rapid diagnostic test (RDT) for presence of Hepatits B (HBV) viral antigens, and antibodies to human immunodeficiency (HIV-1/2), Hepatits B (HCV) and Treponema pallidum. Recipient’s medical records were also analyzed for possible transfusion-associated complications. Results The male/female sex ratio of the blood donors was 4/1 with a mean age of 30.2 (Sd = 8.3) years. Of all blood donors, 64/467 (13.7%) were infected by at least one of the four TTIs. Infected volunteer donors represented 8.3% while infected family donors comprised 14.3% of the donor population. The prevalence of HCV, HIV, HBV and T. pallidum were 1.3%, 1.8%, 3.5%, and 8.1%, respectively. More than half of the blood recipients were female (78.3%) and the mean age was 20.6 (SD = 16.1) years. The causes of severe anemia indicative of transfusion in recipients varied with wards (postpartum hemorrhage, caesarean section, uterine or cervical lacerations, abortions, urinary tract infections, severe malaria, vaso-occlusive attacks, wounds and gastrointestinal bleeding). The most frequent complications were chills and hematuria, which represented 46.1% of all observed complications. Other complications such as nausea, vomiting, jaundice, sudden diarrhea, anxiety, tachycardia, or hyperthermia were also found in recipients. Three cases of deaths occurred during the study, including a girl of less than one year. Conclusion This study confirms the presence of blood-borne infectious diseases in blood donors at the LHD, identifying T. pallidum as the greatest threat to blood safety in the region, and hematuria as the most common immunological complications in blood recipients. PMID:24517107

  9. NUTRITION OF CELLULAR SLIME MOLDS II. Growth of Polysphondylium pallidum in Axenic Culture

    PubMed Central

    Hohl, Hans-Rudolf; Raper, Kenneth B.

    1963-01-01

    Hohl, Hans-Rudolf (University of Wisconsin, Madison) and Kenneth B. Raper. Nutrition of cellular slime molds. II. Growth of Polysphondylium pallidum in axenic culture. J. Bacteriol. 85:199206. 1963.Several strains of Polysphondylium pallidum were grown on a liquid soluble medium in axenic culture. The medium contained embryo extract, serum albumin, Tryptose, dextrose, vitamins, and salts. The final cell yield was about 611 106 cells/ml, depending on the strain. The generation time was usually about 5 to 6 hr. The myxamoebae were grown for over 125 generations on this soluble complex medium without decrease in growth vigor or loss of their capacity to form normal fructifications when removed to an appropriate surface (e.g., agar). Thus the whole life cycle of this species was completed in the absence of any bacteria or bacterial products. Other species of the Dictyosteleaceae grew less well or failed to grow in the liquid medium described. PMID:13961229

  10. Treponema pallidum Putative Novel Drug Target Identification and Validation: Rethinking Syphilis Therapeutics with Plant-Derived Terpenoids

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Sameeksha; Singh, Priyanka; Singh, Swati; Awasthi, Manika; Pandey, Veda P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Syphilis, a slow progressive and the third most common sexually transmitted disease found worldwide, is caused by a spirochete gram negative bacteria Treponema pallidum. Emergence of antibiotic resistant T. pallidum has led to a search for novel drugs and their targets. Subtractive genomics analyses of pathogen T. pallidum and host Homo sapiens resulted in identification of 126 proteins essential for survival and viability of the pathogen. Metabolic pathway analyses of these essential proteins led to discovery of nineteen proteins distributed among six metabolic pathways unique to T. pallidum. One hundred plant-derived terpenoids, as potential therapeutic molecules against T. pallidum, were screened for their drug likeness and ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity) properties. Subsequently the resulting nine terpenoids were docked with five unique T. pallidum targets through molecular modeling approaches. Out of five targets analyzed, D-alanine:D-alanine ligase was found to be the most promising target, while terpenoid salvicine was the most potent inhibitor. A comparison of the inhibitory potential of the best docked readily available natural compound, namely pomiferin (flavonoid) with that of the best docked terpenoid salvicine, revealed that salvicine was a more potent inhibitor than that of pomiferin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a terpenoid as a potential therapeutic molecule against T. pallidum with D-alanine:D-alanine ligase as a novel target. Further studies are warranted to evaluate and explore the potential clinical ramifications of these findings in relation to syphilis that has public health importance worldwide. PMID:25683888

  11. Clovamide-rich extract from Trifolium pallidum reduces oxidative stress-induced damage to blood platelets and plasma.

    PubMed

    Kolodziejczyk, Joanna; Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Szajwaj, Barbara; Stochmal, Anna; Oleszek, Wieslaw

    2011-09-01

    Numerous plants (including clovers) have been widely used in folk medicine for the treatment of different disorders. This in vitro study was designed to examine the antioxidative effects of the clovamide-rich fraction, obtained from aerial parts of Trifolium pallidum, in the protection of blood platelets and plasma against the nitrative and oxidative damage, caused by peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). Carbonyl groups and 3-nitrotyrosine in blood platelet and plasma proteins were determined by ELISA tests. Thiol groups level was estimated by using 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitro-benzoic acid, DTNB). Plasma lipid peroxidation was measured spectrophotometrically as the production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. The results from our work indicate that clovamide-rich T. pallidum extract may reveal the protective properties in the prevention against oxidative stress. The presence of clovamide-rich T. pallidum extract (12.5-100?g/ml) partly inhibited ONOO(-)-mediated protein carbonylation and nitration. All the used concentrations of T. pallidum extract reduced lipid peroxidation in plasma. The antioxidative action of the tested extract in the protection of blood platelet lipids was less effective; the extract at the lowest final concentration (12.5?g/ml) had no protective effect against lipid peroxidation. The present results indicate that the extract from T. pallidum is likely to be a source of compounds with the antioxidative properties, useful in the prevention against the oxidative stress-related diseases. PMID:21465272

  12. [Application of the immunofluorescente (fluorescent antibody technique) in clinical immunology.--II. Application and significance (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Arnold, W

    1976-06-01

    The fluorescent antibody technique is nowadays mainly a technique, which is routinely carried out in all clinical-immunological laboratories. The main fields of application in clinical immunology are the determination of autoantibodies (e.g. ANA, AMA, smooth muscle antibodies, parietal cell antibodies), detection of B-lymphocytes as well as bacterial antigens (e.g. Treponema pallidum). Furthermore the demonstration of deposits of immune complexes in tissues (e.g. glomerulonephritis, periarteriitis nodosa). The presented paper shows the different fields of application of the fluorescent antibody technique. It is pointed out that the FAT could be only one out of the variety of methods in clinical-immunological investigations. PMID:134971

  13. Molecular Differentiation of Treponema pallidum Subspecies in Skin Ulceration Clinically Suspected as Yaws in Vanuatu Using Real-Time Multiplex PCR and Serological Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Kai-Hua; Danavall, Damien; Taleo, Fasihah; Pillay, Allan; Ye, Tun; Nachamkin, Eli; Kool, Jacob L.; Fegan, David; Asiedu, Kingsley; Vestergaard, Lasse S.; Ballard, Ronald C.; Chen, Cheng-Yen

    2015-01-01

    We developed a TaqMan-based real-time quadriplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to simultaneously detect Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, T. pallidum subsp. pertenue, and T. pallidum subsp. endemicum, the causative agents of venereal syphilis, yaws, and bejel, respectively. The PCR assay was applied to samples from skin ulcerations of clinically presumptive yaws cases among children on Tanna Island, Vanuatu. Another real-time triplex PCR was used to screen for the point mutations in the 23S rRNA genes that have previously been associated with azithromycin resistance in T. pallidum subsp. pallidum strains. Seropositivity by the classical syphilis serological tests was 35.5% among children with skin ulcerations clinically suspected with yaws, whereas the presence of T. pallidum subsp. pertenue DNA was only found in lesions from 15.5% of children. No evidence of T. pallidum subsp. pertenue infection, by either PCR or serology was found in ∼59% of cases indicating alternative causes of yaws-like lesions in this endemic area. PMID:25404075

  14. Molecular differentiation of Treponema pallidum subspecies in skin ulceration clinically suspected as yaws in Vanuatu using real-time multiplex PCR and serological methods.

    PubMed

    Chi, Kai-Hua; Danavall, Damien; Taleo, Fasihah; Pillay, Allan; Ye, Tun; Nachamkin, Eli; Kool, Jacob L; Fegan, David; Asiedu, Kingsley; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Ballard, Ronald C; Chen, Cheng-Yen

    2015-01-01

    We developed a TaqMan-based real-time quadriplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to simultaneously detect Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, T. pallidum subsp. pertenue, and T. pallidum subsp. endemicum, the causative agents of venereal syphilis, yaws, and bejel, respectively. The PCR assay was applied to samples from skin ulcerations of clinically presumptive yaws cases among children on Tanna Island, Vanuatu. Another real-time triplex PCR was used to screen for the point mutations in the 23S rRNA genes that have previously been associated with azithromycin resistance in T. pallidum subsp. pallidum strains. Seropositivity by the classical syphilis serological tests was 35.5% among children with skin ulcerations clinically suspected with yaws, whereas the presence of T. pallidum subsp. pertenue DNA was only found in lesions from 15.5% of children. No evidence of T. pallidum subsp. pertenue infection, by either PCR or serology was found in ?59% of cases indicating alternative causes of yaws-like lesions in this endemic area. PMID:25404075

  15. Optimum concentration of dissolved oxygen for the survival of virulent Treponema pallidum under conditions of low oxidation-reduction potential.

    PubMed Central

    Graves, S; Billington, T

    1979-01-01

    A maintenance medium with a low oxidation-reduction (redox) potential, when gently bubbled with 5% oxygen in nitrogen or with air for various periods of time, gave a range of dissolved oxygen concentrations between 1.6 and 5.8 micrograms/l. Virulent Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) inoculated into these media were assayed 24 and 48 hours later for motility and virulence and were compared with samples taken at zero time. Virulent T. pallidum survived best in the presence of 2.4 micrograms/l dissolved oxygen over a 48-hour period, which corresponded to a gaseous mixture of 3% oxygen in nitrogen. Higher concentrations of oxygen did not give significantly different results from anaerobic conditions over this period. Thus, until it can be grown in vitro, T. pallidum would appear to be a microaerophilic bacterium. PMID:393360

  16. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of TP0435 (Tp17) from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Brautigam, Chad A; Deka, Ranjit K; Norgard, Michael V

    2013-04-01

    Syphilis, caused by the bacterial spirochete Treponema pallidum, remains a prominent sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Despite sequencing of the genome of this obligate human pathogen 15 years ago, the functions of a large number of the gene products of T. pallidum are still unknown, particularly with respect to those of the organism's periplasmic lipoproteins. To better understand their functions, a structural biology approach has been pursued. To this end, the soluble portion of the T. pallidum TP0435 lipoprotein (also known as Tp17) was cloned, hyper-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to apparent homogeneity. The protein crystals obtained from this preparation diffracted to 2.4 resolution and had the symmetry of space group R3. In the hexagonal setting, the unit-cell parameters were a = b = 85.7, c = 85.4 . PMID:23545658

  17. Evidence that TP_0144 of Treponema pallidum is a thiamine-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Bian, Jiang; Tu, Youbin; Wang, Song-Mei; Wang, Xuan-Yi; Li, Chunhao

    2015-04-01

    Thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), the biologically active form of thiamine (also known as vitamin B1), is an essential cofactor for several important enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, and therefore, it is required for all living organisms. We recently found that a thiamine-binding protein (TDE_0143) is essential for the survival of Treponema denticola, an important bacterial pathogen that is associated with human periodontitis. In this report, we provide experimental evidence showing that TP_0144, a homolog of TDE_0143 from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum, is a thiamine-binding protein that has biochemical features and functions that are similar to those of TDE_0143. First, structural modeling analysis reveal that both TDE_0143 and TP_0144 contain a conserved TPP-binding site and share similar structures to the thiamine-binding protein of Escherichia coli. Second, biochemical analysis shows that these two proteins bind to TPP with similar dissociation constant (Kd) values (TDE_0143, Kd of 36.50 nM; TP_0144, Kd of 32.62 nM). Finally, heterologous expression of TP_0144 in a ?TDE_0143 strain, a previously constructed TDE_0143 mutant of T. denticola, fully restores its growth and TPP uptake when exogenous thiamine is limited. Collectively, these results indicate that TP_0144 is a thiamine-binding protein that is indispensable for T. pallidum to acquire exogenous thiamine, a key nutrient for bacterial survival. In addition, the studies shown in this report further underscore the feasibility of using T. denticola as a platform to study the biology and pathogenicity of T. pallidum and probably other uncultivable treponemal species as well. PMID:25605310

  18. Mucopolysaccharide Material Resulting from the Interaction of Treponema pallidum (Nichols Strain) with Cultured Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, T. J.; Johnson, R. C.; Wolff, E. T.

    1978-01-01

    During incubation of Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain) with cultured mammlian cells derived from normal rabbit testes (NRT), an amorphous material accumulated at the surface of the cultured cells. This material was randomly distributed on all tissue cells within the culture chambers. The amount of amorphous material was dependent on the treponemal inocula. With 3 108 organisms per ml, this material was readily apparent within 2 days; with 4 107 organisms per ml, this material was detectable within 4 to 5 days; with lower inocula, the accumulation of amorphous material was far less apparent. Deposition of this surface-associated material required attachment of treponemes to the cultured cells, and the amount deposited was related to the number of treponemes attached per cell. This amorphous material was not detected when NRT cells were incubated with preparations of T. pallidum that were heat or air inactivated. In addition, the accumulaton of amorphous material was not due to a soluble component from host testicular tissue or to a soluble component developing during treponemal infection. This was demonstrated by the inability of membrane filtered preparations of T. pallidum to induce the deposition of amorphous material at the surface of the cultured cells. The nature of this material appeared to be acidic mucopolysaccharide as indicated by its metachromatic staining properties, its stainability with ruthenium red, and its partial degradation by bovine and streptomyces hyaluronidase. This amorphous material that accumulated in vitro at the surface of cultured cells may be similar to the mucoid material that accumulates in vivo during syphilitic infection. Images PMID:153334

  19. A longitudinal evaluation of Treponema pallidum PCR testing in early syphilis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Syphilis is a growing public health problem among men who have sex with men (MSM) globally. Rapid and accurate detection of syphilis is vital to ensure patients and their contacts receive timely treatment and reduce ongoing transmission. Methods We evaluated a PCR assay for the diagnosis of Treponema pallidum using swabs of suspected early syphilis lesions in longitudinally assessed MSM. Results We tested 260 MSM for T pallidum by PCR on 288 occasions: 77 (26.7%) had early syphilis that was serologically confirmed at baseline or within six weeks, and 211 (73.3%) remained seronegative for syphilis. Of 55 men with primary syphilis, 49 were PCR positive, giving a sensitivity of 89.1% (95% CI: 77.8%-95.9%) and a specificity of 99.1% (95% CI: 96.5%-99.9%). Of 22 men with secondary syphilis, 11 were PCR positive, giving a sensitivity of 50% (95% CI: 28.2%-71.8%) and a specificity of 100% (95% CI: 66.4%-71.8%). Of the 77 syphilis cases, 43 (56%) were HIV positive and the sensitivity and specificity of the PCR test did not vary by HIV status. The PCR test was able to detect up to five (10%) primary infections that were initially seronegative, including one HIV positive man with delayed seroconversion to syphilis (72 to 140 days) and one HIV positive man who did not seroconvert to syphilis over 14 months follow-up. Both men had been treated for syphilis within a week of the PCR test. Conclusions T pallidum PCR is a potentially powerful tool for the early diagnosis of primary syphilis, particularly where a serological response has yet to develop. PMID:23241398

  20. [Biological activity of lipids and photosynthetic pigments of Sargassum pallidum C. Agardh].

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, N I; Martyias, E A; Logvinov, S V; Busarova, N G

    2014-01-01

    The biological activity of lipids and photosynthetic pigments of the kelp Sargassum pallidum (Turner) C. Agardh has been studied. Free fatty acids and their esters demonstrated considerable antimicrobial activity against bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus[ital] and Escherichia coli), yeast-like fungi (Candida albicans), and opportunistic pathogenic (Aspergilius niger) and phytopathogenic (Fusarium oxysporum, and Septoria glycines) fungi. Glyceroglycolipids and neutral lipids demonstrated moderate activity. Fucoxanthin and chlorophylls weakly suppressed the growth of microorganisms. None of the studied substances demonstrated activity against Ehrlich's carcinoma. It was shown that the season of weed harvesting affected both antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of different lipids due to changes in their fatty acid composition. PMID:25272757

  1. Structural, Bioinformatic, and In Vivo Analyses of Two Treponema pallidum Lipoproteins Reveal a Unique TRAP Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Goldberg, Martin; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-05-25

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, is predicted to encode one tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter (TRAP-T). TRAP-Ts typically employ a periplasmic substrate-binding protein (SBP) to deliver the cognate ligand to the transmembrane symporter. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes encoding the putative TRAP-T components from T. pallidum, tp0957 (the SBP), and tp0958 (the symporter), are in an operon with an uncharacterized third gene, tp0956. We determined the crystal structure of recombinant Tp0956; the protein is trimeric and perforated by a pore. Part of Tp0956 forms an assembly similar to those of 'tetratricopeptide repeat' (TPR) motifs. The crystal structure of recombinant Tp0957 was also determined; like the SBPs of other TRAP-Ts, there are two lobes separated by a cleft. In these other SBPs, the cleft binds a negatively charged ligand. However, the cleft of Tp0957 has a strikingly hydrophobic chemical composition, indicating that its ligand may be substantially different and likely hydrophobic. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the recombinant versions of Tp0956 and Tp0957 established that these proteins associate avidly. This unprecedented interaction was confirmed for the native molecules using in vivo cross-linking experiments. Finally, bioinformatic analyses suggested that this transporter exemplifies a new subfamily of TPATs (TPR-protein-associated TRAP-Ts) that require the action of a TPR-containing accessory protein for the periplasmic transport of a potentially hydrophobic ligand(s).

  2. Structural, bioinformatic, and in vivo analyses of two Treponema pallidum lipoproteins reveal a unique TRAP transporter

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Goldberg, Martin; Schuck, Peter; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, the bacterial agent of syphilis, is predicted to encode one tripartite ATP- independent periplasmic transporter (TRAP-T). TRAP-Ts typically employ a periplasmic substrate-binding protein (SBP) to deliver the cognate ligand to the transmembrane symporter. Herein, we demonstrate that the genes encoding the putative TRAP-T components from T. pallidum, tp0957 (the SBP) and tp0958 (the symporter) are in an operon with an uncharacterized third gene, tp0956. We determined the crystal structure of recombinant Tp0956; the protein is trimeric and perforated by a pore. Part of Tp0956 forms an assembly similar to those of tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs. The crystal structure of recombinant Tp0957 was also determined; like the SBPs of other TRAP-Ts, there are two lobes separated by a cleft. In these other SBPs, the cleft binds a negatively charged ligand. However, the cleft of Tp0957 has a strikingly hydrophobic chemical composition, indicating that its ligand may be substantially different and likely hydrophobic. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the recombinant versions of Tp0956 and Tp0957 established that these proteins associate avidly. This unprecedented interaction was confirmed for the native molecules using in vivo cross-linking experiments. Finally, bioinformatic analyses suggested that this transporter exemplifies a new subfamily of TPR-protein associated TRAP transporters (TPATs) that require the action of a TPR-containing accessory protein for the periplasmic transport of a potentially hydrophobic ligand(s). PMID:22306465

  3. Comparison of the locomotor activating effects of bicuculline infusions into the preoptic area and ventral pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Zahm, Daniel S.; Schwartz, Zachary M.; Lavezzi, Heather N.; Yetnikoff, Leora; Parsley, Kenneth P.

    2013-01-01

    Ambulatory locomotion in the rodent is robustly activated by unilateral infusions into the basal forebrain of type A gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor antagonists, such as bicuculline and picrotoxin. The present study was carried out to better localize the neuroanatomical substrate(s) underlying this effect. To accomplish this, differences in total locomotion accumulated during a 20 minute test period following bicuculline versus saline infusions in male Sprague-Dawley rats were calculated, rank ordered and mapped on a diagram of basal forebrain transposed from immunoprocessed sections. The most robust locomotor activation was elicited by bicuculline infusions clustered in rostral parts of the preoptic area. Unilateral infusions of bicuculline into the ventral pallidum produced an unanticipatedly diminutive activation of locomotion, which led us to evaluate bilateral ventral pallidal infusions, and these also produced only a small activation of locomotion, and, interestingly, a non-significant trend toward suppression of rearing. Subjects with bicuculline infused bilaterally into the ventral pallidum also exhibited persistent bouts of abnormal movements. Bicuculline infused unilaterally into other forebrain structures, including the bed nucleus of stria terminalis, caudate-putamen, globus pallidus, sublenticular extended amygdala and sublenticular substantia innominata, did not produce significant locomotor activation. Our data identify the rostral preoptic area as the main substrate for the locomotor activating effects of basal forebrain bicuculline infusions. In contrast, slight activation of locomotion and no effect on rearing accompanied unilateral and bilateral ventral pallidal infusions. Implications of these findings for forebrain processing of reward are discussed. PMID:23423460

  4. Striatal and ventral pallidum dynorphin concentrations are markedly increased in human chronic cocaine users

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Paul S.; Alburges, Mario E.; Bush, Lloyd; Hanson, Glen R.; Kish, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Interest in development of therapeutics targeting brain neuropeptide systems for treatment of cocaine addiction (e.g., κ opioid agonists) is based on animal data showing interactions between the neuropeptides, brain dopamine, and cocaine. In this autopsied brain study, our major objective was to establish by radioimmunoassay whether levels of dynorphin and other neuropeptides (e.g. metenkephalin, neurotensin and substance P) are increased in the dopamine-rich caudate, putamen, and nucleus accumbens of human chronic cocaine users (n=12) vs. matched control subjects (n=17) as predicted by animal findings. Changes were limited to markedly increased dynorphin immunoreactivity in caudate (+92%), decreased caudate neurotensin (−49%), and a trend for increased dynorphin (+75%) in putamen. In other examined subcortical/cerebral cortical areas dynorphin levels were normal with the striking exception of the ventral pallidum (+346% ), whereas cerebral cortical metekephalin levels were generally decreased and neurotensin variably changed. Our finding that, in contradistinction to animal data, the other striatal neuropeptides were not increased in human cocaine users could be explained by differences in pattern and contingency between human drug users and the animal models. However, the human dynorphin observations parallel well animal findings and suggest that the dynorphin system is upregulated manifested as elevated neuropeptide levels after chronic drug exposure in striatum and ventral pallidum. Our postmortem brain data suggest involvement of striatal dynorphin systems in human cocaine users and should add to the interest in the testing of new dynorphin-related therapeutics for the treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:18538358

  5. Evaluation of Macrolide Resistance and Enhanced Molecular Typing of Treponema pallidum in Patients with Syphilis in Taiwan: a Prospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsiu; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Lee, Nan-Yao; Huang, Wen-Chi; Wu, Bing-Ru; Yang, Chia-Jui; Liang, Shiou-Haur; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Ko, Wen-Chien; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Liu, Wen-Chun; Su, Yi-Ching; Hsieh, Chia-Yin; Wu, Pei-Ying

    2012-01-01

    Studies of macrolide resistance mutations and molecular typing using the newly proposed enhanced typing system for Treponema pallidum isolates obtained from HIV-infected patients in the Asia-Pacific region are scarce. Between September 2009 and December 2011, we conducted a survey to detect T. pallidum using a PCR assay using clinical specimens from patients with syphilis at six major designated hospitals for HIV care in Taiwan. The T. pallidum strains were genotyped by following the enhanced molecular typing methodology, which analyzed the number of 60-bp repeats in the acidic repeat protein (arp) gene, T. pallidum repeat (tpr) polymorphism, and the sequence of base pairs 131 to 215 in the tp0548 open reading frame of T. pallidum. Detection of A2058G and A2059G point mutations in the T. pallidum 23S rRNA was performed with the use of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). During the 2-year study period, 211 clinical specimens were obtained from 136 patients with syphilis. T. pallidum DNA was isolated from 105 (49.8%) of the specimens, with swab specimens obtained from chancres having the highest yield rate (63.2%), followed by plasma (49.4%), serum (35.7%), and cerebrospinal fluid or vitreous fluid (18.2%) specimens. Among the 40 fully typed specimens, 11 subtypes of T. pallidum were identified. Subtype 14f/f (18 isolates) was the most common isolates, followed by 14f/c (3), 14b/c (3), and 14k/f (3). Among the isolates examined for macrolide resistance, none had the A2058G or A2059G mutation. In conclusion, we found that type 14 f/f was the most common T. pallidum strain in this multicenter study on syphilis in Taiwan and that none of the isolates exhibited 23S rRNA mutations causing resistance to macrolides. PMID:22518868

  6. Molecular Typing of Treponema pallidum in Denmark: A Nationwide Study of Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten; Cowan, Susan; Gerstoft, Jan; Larsen, Helle Kiellberg; Hoffmann, Steen; Knudsen, Troels Bygum; Katzenstein, Terese Lea; Jensen, Jrgen Skov

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this nationwide study is to determine the strain type diversity among patients diagnosed with syphilis by PCR during a 4-year period in Denmark. Epidemiological data, including HIV status, for all patients were obtained from the Danish national syphilis registration system. Molecular strain typing was based on characterization of 3 variable treponemal genes, arp, tpr and tp0548. A total of 278 specimens from 269 patients were included. Among the fully typeable specimens (n = 197), 22 strain types were identified, with 1 type, 14d/g, accounting for 54%. The majority (93%) of the patients reported acquiring syphilis in Denmark. Among patients with concurrent HIV, 9 full strain types were identified and no difference in strain type was found by HIV status (p = 0.197). In conclusion, the majority of patients were infected in Denmark and the HIV-infected syphilis patients were diagnosed with a wide spectrum of different strain types of Treponema pallidum. PMID:26122912

  7. Designer Receptors Show Role for Ventral Pallidum Input to Ventral Tegmental Area in Cocaine Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Stephen V.; Vazey, Elena M.; Beckley, Jacob T; Keistler, Colby R.; McGlinchey, Ellen M.; Kaufling, Jennifer; Wilson, Steven P.; Deisseroth, Karl; Woodward, John J.; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Ventral pallidum (VP) is centrally positioned within mesocorticolimbic reward circuits, and its dense projection to ventral tegmental area (VTA) regulates neuronal activity there. However, VP is a heterogeneous structure, and how this complexity affects its role within wider reward circuits is unclear. Here we demonstrate that projections to VTA from rostral (RVP), but not caudal VP (CVP) are robustly Fos-activated during cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking—a rat model of relapse in addiction. Moreover, designer receptor-mediated transient inactivation of RVP neurons, their terminals in VTA, or functional connectivity between RVP and VTA dopamine neurons blocks the ability of drug-associated cues (but not a cocaine prime) to reinstate cocaine seeking. In contrast, CVP neuronal inhibition instead blocked cocaine-primed, but not cue-induced reinstatement. This novel double dissociation in VP sub-regional roles in drug seeking is likely important for understanding mesocorticolimbic circuits underlying reward seeking and addiction. PMID:24584054

  8. Genetic characterization and partial sequence determination of a Treponema pallidum operon expressing two immunogenic membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, E B; Pedersen, P E; Schouls, L M; Severin, E; van Embden, J D

    1985-01-01

    A detailed physical and genetic map of a previously cloned 5.5-kilobase segment of Treponema pallidum DNA is described. This segment expressed two proteins that are cell membrane associated in Escherichia coli. The structural genes of these treponemal membrane proteins, tmpA and tmpB, are coordinately expressed, and transcription in E. coli can start from at least two different treponemal promoters. The tmpA and tmpB proteins are the products of in vivo proteolytic cleavage from precursor proteins which are 2 and 4 kilodaltons larger, respectively, than the mature proteins. Because the sizes of the corresponding proteins produced in T. pallidum were identical to those of the mature membrane proteins in E. coli, we concluded that a similar proteolytic processing takes place in both E. coli and T. pallidum. Although tmpA and tmpB were controlled by the same transcription signals, tmpB was expressed to a higher extent than tmpA, and only the tmpB product could be overproduced by placing the left lambda promoter in front of the structural genes. The nucleotide sequence of the T. pallidum tmpA gene was established. This is the first T. pallidum gene sequenced. Codon usage and the nature of transcriptional and translational signals are discussed. The deduced amino acid sequence indicated the presence of a sequence that was characteristic for a signal peptide. This sequence information allowed the construction of hybrid genes coding for proteins having beta-galactosidase enzyme activity as well as TmpA epitopes. The enzyme-linked antigen was expressed at a high level in E. coli when transcriptional and translational signals from coliphage lambda were used. In this case the protein produced was a sandwich protein consisting of 21 amino acids of the lambda cro protein, 204 amino acids of the T. pallidum TmpA protein, and 1,020 amino acids of the E. coli lambda-galactosidase. The potential use of this enzyme-linked antigen for the serodiagnosis of syphilis is discussed. Images PMID:3922944

  9. Excessive disgust caused by brain lesions or temporary inactivations: Mapping hotspots of nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chao-Yi; Berridge, Kent C.

    2014-01-01

    Disgust is a prototypical type of negative affect. In animal models of excessive disgust, only a few brain sites are known in which localized dysfunction (lesions or neural inactivations) can induce intense ‘disgust reactions’ (e.g., gapes) to a normally pleasant sensation such as sweetness. Here we aimed to map forebrain candidates more precisely to identify where either local neuronal damage (excitotoxin lesions) or local pharmacological inactivation (muscimol-baclofen microinjections) caused rats to emit excessive sensory disgust reactions to sucrose. Our study compared subregions of nucleus accumbens shell, ventral pallidum, lateral hypothalamus and adjacent extended amygdala. Results indicated the posterior half of ventral pallidum to be the only forebrain site where intense sensory disgust gapes to sucrose were induced by both lesions and temporary inactivations (this site was previously identified as a hedonic hotspot for enhancements of sweetness ‘liking’). By comparison, for the nucleus accumbens, temporary GABA inactivations in the caudal half of the medial shell also generated sensory disgust but lesions never did at any site. Further, even inactivations failed to induce disgust in the rostral half of accumbens shell (which also contains a hedonic hotspot). In other structures, neither lesions nor inactivations induced disgust as long as the posterior ventral pallidum remained spared. We conclude that the posterior ventral pallidum is an especially crucial hotspot for producing excessive sensory disgust by local pharmacological/lesion dysfunction. By comparison, the nucleus accumbens appears to segregate sites for pharmacological disgust induction and hedonic enhancement into separate posterior versus rostral halves of medial shell. PMID:25229197

  10. Development of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for the Detection of Treponema pallidum, HCV, HIV-1, and HBV.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Gong, Rui; Lu, Xuan; Zhang, Yi; Tang, Jingfeng

    2015-11-20

    Treponema pallidum, hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, and hepatitis B virus (HBV) are major causes of sexually transmitted diseases passed through blood contact. The development of a sensitive and efficient method for detection is critical for early diagnosis and for large-scale screening of blood specimens in China. This study aims to establish an assay to detect these pathogens in clinical serum specimens. We established a TaqMan-locked nucleic acid (LNA) real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for rapid, sensitive, specific, quantitative, and simultaneous detection and identification. The copy numbers of standards of these 4 pathogens were quantified. Standard curves were generated by determining the mean cycle threshold values versus 10-fold serial dilutions of standards over a range of 10(6) to 10(1) copies/?L, with the lowest detection limit of the assay being 10(1) copies/?L. The assay was applied to 328 clinical specimens and compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and commercial nucleic acid testing (NAT) methods. The assay identified 39 T. pallidum-, 96 HCV-, 13 HIV-1-, 123 HBV-, 5 HBV/HCV-, 1 T. pallidum/HBV-, 1 HIV-1/HCV-, and 1 HIV-1/T. pallidum-positive specimens. The high sensitivity of the assay confers strong potential for its use as a highly reliable, cost-effective, and useful molecular diagnostic tool for large-scale screening of clinical specimens. This assay will assist in the study of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of sexually transmitted blood diseases. PMID:25866106

  11. Ventral pallidum projections to mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus: an anatomical and electrophysiological investigation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mogenson, G J; Ciriello, J; Garland, J; Wu, M

    1987-02-24

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and single unit recording experiments were done in rats to investigate neural connections from the ventral pallidal region to the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus (MD). In the first series, following the diffusion or iontophoretic injection of HRP into the MD, retrogradely labeled neurons were observed throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the ipsilateral ventral pallidum. Most of the labeled neurons were found in an area between the nucleus of the diagonal band and the ventral aspect of the substantia innominata subcommissuralis. Additional labeled neurons were found in the ventral aspect of the globus pallidus and substantia innominata sublenticularis. In the second series, the region shown to contain labeled neurons was explored for single units antidromically activated by single pulse stimulation of the MD in urethane anesthetized rats. One hundred and fifty-nine single units in the subpallidal area were antidromically activated with latencies corresponding to conduction velocities of 0.2-3.9 m/s. A greater percentage of units in the subcommissural region (50.3%) were activated antidromically as compared to the sublenticular region (27.4%). In the third series, the MD was explored for single units which responded orthodromically to stimulation of the ventral pallidum. Fifty-eight percent (40/69) of MD units responded to stimulation of the subcommissural substantia innominata, whereas 90% (72/80) MD units responded to stimulation of the sublenticular substantia innominata. The most frequent type of orthodromic response observed in MD neurons was inhibition with short onset latencies (less than 10 ms). These data provide anatomical and electrophysiological evidence for the existence of direct pathways from the ventral pallidum to the MD and suggest that this projection is part of a corticosubcortical loop through which the frontal cortex with the ventral striatum and pallidum may contribute to motor function. PMID:3032332

  12. Treponema pallidum (syphilis) antigen TpF1 induces angiogenesis through the activation of the IL-8 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pozzobon, Tommaso; Facchinello, Nicola; Bossi, Fleur; Capitani, Nagaja; Benagiano, Marisa; Di Benedetto, Giulietta; Zennaro, Cristina; West, Nicole; Codolo, Gaia; Bernardini, Marialina; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; D’Elios, Mario Milco; Pellegrini, Luca; Argenton, Francesco; de Bernard, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Over 10 million people every year become infected by Treponema pallidum and develop syphilis, a disease with broad symptomatology that, due to the difficulty to eradicate the pathogen from the highly vascularized secondary sites of infection, is still treated with injections of penicillin. Unlike most other bacterial pathogens, T. pallidum infection produces indeed a strong angiogenic response whose mechanism of activation, however, remains unknown. Here, we report that one of the major antigen of T. pallidum, the TpF1 protein, has growth factor-like activity on primary cultures of human endothelial cells and activates specific T cells able to promote tissue factor production. The growth factor-like activity is mediated by the secretion of IL-8 but not of VEGF, two known angiogenic factors. The pathogen’s factor signals IL-8 secretion through the activation of the CREB/NF-κB signalling pathway. These findings are recapitulated in an animal model, zebrafish, where we observed that TpF1 injection stimulates angiogenesis and IL-8, but not VEGF, secretion. This study suggests that the angiogenic response observed during secondary syphilis is triggered by TpF1 and that pharmacological therapies directed to inhibit IL-8 response in patients should be explored to treat this disease. PMID:26728351

  13. Recombinant Treponema pallidum Protein Tp0965 Activates Endothelial Cells and Increases the Permeability of Endothelial Cell Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui-Li; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Wang, Qian-Qiu

    2014-01-01

    The recombinant Treponema pallidum protein Tp0965 (rTp0965), one of the many proteins derived from the genome of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, shows strong immunogenicity and immunoreactivity. In this study, we investigated the effects of rTp0965 on the endothelial barrier. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with rTp0965 resulted in increased levels of ICAM-1, E-selectin, and MCP-1 mRNA and protein expression. These increases contributed to the adhesion and chemataxis of monocytes (THP-1 cells) to HUVECs preincubated with rTp0965. In addition, rTp0965 induced reorganization of F-actin and decreased expression of claudin-1 in HUVECs. Interestingly, inhibition of the RhoA/ROCK signal pathway protected against rTp0965-induced higher endothelial permeability as well as transendothelial migration of monocytes. These data indicate that Tp0965 protein may play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of syphilis. PMID:25514584

  14. Treponema pallidum (syphilis) antigen TpF1 induces angiogenesis through the activation of the IL-8 pathway.

    PubMed

    Pozzobon, Tommaso; Facchinello, Nicola; Bossi, Fleur; Capitani, Nagaja; Benagiano, Marisa; Di Benedetto, Giulietta; Zennaro, Cristina; West, Nicole; Codolo, Gaia; Bernardini, Marialina; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; D'Elios, Mario Milco; Pellegrini, Luca; Argenton, Francesco; de Bernard, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Over 10 million people every year become infected by Treponema pallidum and develop syphilis, a disease with broad symptomatology that, due to the difficulty to eradicate the pathogen from the highly vascularized secondary sites of infection, is still treated with injections of penicillin. Unlike most other bacterial pathogens, T. pallidum infection produces indeed a strong angiogenic response whose mechanism of activation, however, remains unknown. Here, we report that one of the major antigen of T. pallidum, the TpF1 protein, has growth factor-like activity on primary cultures of human endothelial cells and activates specific T cells able to promote tissue factor production. The growth factor-like activity is mediated by the secretion of IL-8 but not of VEGF, two known angiogenic factors. The pathogen's factor signals IL-8 secretion through the activation of the CREB/NF-?B signalling pathway. These findings are recapitulated in an animal model, zebrafish, where we observed that TpF1 injection stimulates angiogenesis and IL-8, but not VEGF, secretion. This study suggests that the angiogenic response observed during secondary syphilis is triggered by TpF1 and that pharmacological therapies directed to inhibit IL-8 response in patients should be explored to treat this disease. PMID:26728351

  15. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  16. Positive reinforcing effect of neurotensin microinjection into the ventral pallidum in conditioned place preference test.

    PubMed

    Ollmann, Tams; Pczely, Lszl; Lszl, Kristf; Kovcs, Anita; Glosi, Rita; Berente, Eszter; Kardi, Zoltn; Lnrd, Lszl

    2015-02-01

    The ventral pallidum (VP) is innervated by the mesolimbic dopaminergic system and it has a key role in motivation, reward, and memory processes. Neurotensin (NT) is an important neuromodulator which has been shown to modulate reinforcement in the ventral tegmental area, in the ventral mesencephalic region and in the central nucleus of amygdala. Neurotensin receptor 1 (NTR1) has already been detected in the VP in abundance, but its role in rewarding and reinforcing processes is not fully understood yet. In our present experiments, the effects of NT on positive reinforcement were investigated in the VP. In conditioned place preference (CPP) test, male Wistar rats were microinjected bilaterally with 100 ng or 250 ng NT in the volume of 0.4 ?l. In other groups of animals, 35 ng NTR1 antagonist SR 48692 was applied by itself, or microinjected 15 min before 100 ng NT treatment. One hundred ng dose of NT induced CPP, whereas animals injected with 250 ng NT did not exhibit significant differences from the vehicle group. Antagonist pretreatment inhibited the effect of NT, while the antagonist applied by itself had no effect. Our results show that NT injected into the VP is involved in positive reinforcement. This effect is specific to NTR1 receptors because the development of CPP can be prevented by specific antagonist. PMID:25447302

  17. The ventral pallidum: Subregion-specific functional anatomy and roles in motivated behaviors.

    PubMed

    Root, David H; Melendez, Roberto I; Zaborszky, Laszlo; Napier, T Celeste

    2015-07-01

    The ventral pallidum (VP) plays a critical role in the processing and execution of motivated behaviors. Yet this brain region is often overlooked in published discussions of the neurobiology of mental health (e.g., addiction, depression). This contributes to a gap in understanding the neurobiological mechanisms of psychiatric disorders. This review is presented to help bridge the gap by providing a resource for current knowledge of VP anatomy, projection patterns and subregional circuits, and how this organization relates to the function of VP neurons and ultimately behavior. For example, ventromedial (VPvm) and dorsolateral (VPdl) VP subregions receive projections from nucleus accumbens shell and core, respectively. Inhibitory GABAergic neurons of the VPvm project to mediodorsal thalamus, lateral hypothalamus, and ventral tegmental area, and this VP subregion helps discriminate the appropriate conditions to acquire natural rewards or drugs of abuse, consume preferred foods, and perform working memory tasks. GABAergic neurons of the VPdl project to subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata, and this VP subregion is modulated by, and is necessary for, drug-seeking behavior. Additional circuits arise from nonGABAergic neuronal phenotypes that are likely to excite rather than inhibit their targets. These subregional and neuronal phenotypic circuits place the VP in a unique position to process motivationally relevant stimuli and coherent adaptive behaviors. PMID:25857550

  18. A role for the ventral pallidum in context-induced and primed reinstatement of alcohol seeking.

    PubMed

    Perry, Christina J; McNally, Gavan P

    2013-09-01

    The ventral pallidum (VP) is a major target of projections from the nucleus accumbens, and has been implicated in the reinstatement of psychostimulant seeking as part of a cortical-striatal-pallidal 'final common pathway' for relapse. Here, we studied the role of the VP in context-induced and primed reinstatement of alcoholic beer seeking, using a combination of microinjections and tract tracing studies. In experiment 1, rats were trained to respond to alcoholic beer in one context (A), and then extinguished in a second context (B), prior to testing for reinstatement (ABA renewal) and extinction (ABB). VP microinjection of the ?-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist CTAP prevented reinstatement. In experiment 2, VP microinjection of CTAP also prevented the primed reinstatement of alcoholic beer seeking after rats were trained, extinguished, and tested in the same context. In experiment 3, we employed retrograde neural tract tracing together with c-Fos immunohistochemistry to identify the VP afferents recruited during context-induced reinstatement of alcoholic beer seeking. There was evidence for the recruitment of accumbens core?VP, basolateral amygdala?VP and paraventricular thalamus?VP pathways during context-induced reinstatement. These results indicate that the VP MORs are critical for context-induced reinstatement, and that the VP receives inputs from a number of regions known to be important in reinstatement of drug seeking. PMID:23773238

  19. Morphological alterations in the caudate, putamen, pallidum, and thalamus in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Amanmeet; Appel-Cresswell, Silke; Popuri, Karteek; McKeown, Martin J.; Beg, Mirza Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Like many neurodegenerative diseases, the clinical symptoms of Parkinsons disease (PD) do not manifest until significant progression of the disease has already taken place, motivating the need for sensitive biomarkers of the disease. While structural imaging is a potentially attractive method due to its widespread availability and non-invasive nature, global morphometric measures (e.g., volume) have proven insensitive to subtle disease change. Here we use individual surface displacements from deformations of an average surface model to capture disease related changes in shape of the subcortical structures in PD. Data were obtained from both the University of British Columbia (UBC) [n = 54 healthy controls (HC) and n = 55 Parkinsons disease (PD) patients] and the publicly available Parkinsons Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) [n = 137 (HC) and n = 189 (PD)] database. A high dimensional non-rigid registration algorithm was used to register target segmentation labels (caudate, putamen, pallidum, and thalamus) to a set of segmentation labels defined on the average-template. The vertex-wise surface displacements were significantly different between PD and HC in thalamic and caudate structures. However, overall displacements did not correlate with disease severity, as assessed by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). The results from this study suggest disease-relevant shape abnormalities can be robustly detected in subcortical structures in PD. Future studies will be required to determine if shape changes in subcortical structures are seen in the prodromal phases of the disease. PMID:25873854

  20. Seroprevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and Treponema pallidum Infections among Blood Donors on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang-Tao; Eyi, Urbano Monsuy; Matesa, Rocio Apicante; Obono, Maximo Miko Ondo; Ehapo, Carlos Sala; Yang, Li-Ye; Yang, Hui; Yang, Hui-Tian; Lin, Min

    2015-01-01

    Background Regular screening of transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs), such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus (HBV and HCV, respectively), and Treponema pallidum, in blood donors is essential to guaranteeing clinical transfusion safety. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of four TTIs among blood donors on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea (EG). Methods A retrospective survey of blood donors from January 2011 to April 2013 was conducted to assess the presence of HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum. The medical records were analyzed to verify the seroprevalence of these TTIs among blood donations stratified by gender, age and geographical region. Results Of the total 2937 consecutive blood donors, 1098 (37.39%) had a minimum of one TTI and 185 (6.29%) harbored co-infections. The general seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum were 7.83%, 10.01%, 3.71% and 21.51%, respectively. The most frequent TTI co-infections were HBV-T. pallidum 60 (2.04%) and HIV-T. pallidum 46 (1.57%). The seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum were highest among blood donors 38 to 47 years, 18 to 27 years and ? 48 years age, respectively (P<0.05). The seroprevalence of TTIs varied according to the population from which the blood was collected on Bioko Island. Conclusions Our results firstly provide a comprehensive overview of TTIs among blood donors on Bioko Island. Strict screening of blood donors and improved hematological examinations using standard operating procedures are recommended. PMID:26448460

  1. Transcription of TP0126, Treponema pallidum putative OmpW homolog, is regulated by the length of a homopolymeric guanosine repeat.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Brandt, Stephanie L; Ke, Wujian; Reid, Tara B; Molini, Barbara J; Iverson-Cabral, Stefanie; Ciccarese, Giulia; Drago, Francesco; Lukehart, Sheila A; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2015-06-01

    An effective mechanism for introduction of phenotypic diversity within a bacterial population exploits changes in the length of repetitive DNA elements located within gene promoters. This phenomenon, known as phase variation, causes rapid activation or silencing of gene expression and fosters bacterial adaptation to new or changing environments. Phase variation often occurs in surface-exposed proteins, and in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the syphilis agent, it was reported to affect transcription of three putative outer membrane protein (OMP)-encoding genes. When the T. pallidum subsp. pallidum Nichols strain genome was initially annotated, the TP0126 open reading frame was predicted to include a poly(G) tract and did not appear to have a predicted signal sequence that might suggest the possibility of its being an OMP. Here we show that the initial annotation was incorrect, that this poly(G) is instead located within the TP0126 promoter, and that it varies in length in vivo during experimental syphilis. Additionally, we show that TP0126 transcription is affected by changes in the poly(G) length consistent with regulation by phase variation. In silico analysis of the TP0126 open reading frame based on the experimentally identified transcriptional start site shortens this hypothetical protein by 69 amino acids, reveals a predicted cleavable signal peptide, and suggests structural homology with the OmpW family of porins. Circular dichroism of recombinant TP0126 supports structural homology to OmpW. Together with the evidence that TP0126 is fully conserved among T. pallidum subspecies and strains, these data suggest an important role for TP0126 in T. pallidum biology and syphilis pathogenesis. PMID:25802057

  2. Transcription of TP0126, Treponema pallidum Putative OmpW Homolog, Is Regulated by the Length of a Homopolymeric Guanosine Repeat

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Stephanie L.; Ke, Wujian; Reid, Tara B.; Molini, Barbara J.; Iverson-Cabral, Stefanie; Ciccarese, Giulia; Drago, Francesco; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    An effective mechanism for introduction of phenotypic diversity within a bacterial population exploits changes in the length of repetitive DNA elements located within gene promoters. This phenomenon, known as phase variation, causes rapid activation or silencing of gene expression and fosters bacterial adaptation to new or changing environments. Phase variation often occurs in surface-exposed proteins, and in Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the syphilis agent, it was reported to affect transcription of three putative outer membrane protein (OMP)-encoding genes. When the T. pallidum subsp. pallidum Nichols strain genome was initially annotated, the TP0126 open reading frame was predicted to include a poly(G) tract and did not appear to have a predicted signal sequence that might suggest the possibility of its being an OMP. Here we show that the initial annotation was incorrect, that this poly(G) is instead located within the TP0126 promoter, and that it varies in length in vivo during experimental syphilis. Additionally, we show that TP0126 transcription is affected by changes in the poly(G) length consistent with regulation by phase variation. In silico analysis of the TP0126 open reading frame based on the experimentally identified transcriptional start site shortens this hypothetical protein by 69 amino acids, reveals a predicted cleavable signal peptide, and suggests structural homology with the OmpW family of porins. Circular dichroism of recombinant TP0126 supports structural homology to OmpW. Together with the evidence that TP0126 is fully conserved among T. pallidum subspecies and strains, these data suggest an important role for TP0126 in T. pallidum biology and syphilis pathogenesis. PMID:25802057

  3. FOREBRAIN CIRCUITRY INVOLVED IN EFFORT-RELATED CHOICE: INJECTIONS OF THE GABAA AGONIST MUSCIMOL INTO VENTRAL PALLIDUM ALTER RESPONSE ALLOCATION IN FOOD-SEEKING BEHAVIOR

    PubMed Central

    FARRAR, A. M.; FONT, L.; PEREIRA, M.; MINGOTE, S.; BUNCE, J. G.; CHROBAK, J. J.; SALAMONE, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    Organisms often make effort-related choices based upon assessments of motivational value and work requirements. Nucleus accumbens dopamine is a critical component of the brain circuitry regulating work output in reinforcement-seeking behavior. Rats with accumbens dopamine depletions reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead they select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. The ventral pallidum is a brain area that receives substantial GABAergic input from nucleus accumbens. It was hypothesized that stimulation of GABAA receptors in the ventral pallidum would result in behavioral effects that resemble those produced by interference with accumbens dopamine transmission. The present studies employed a concurrent choice lever pressing/chow intake procedure; with this task, interference with accumbens dopamine transmission shifts choice behavior such that lever pressing for food is decreased but chow intake is increased. In the present experiments, infusions of the GABAA agonist muscimol (5.0–10.0 ng) into the ventral pallidum decreased lever pressing for preferred food, but increased consumption of the less preferred chow. In contrast, ventral pallidal infusions of muscimol (10.0 ng) had no significant effect on preference for the palatable food in free-feeding choice tests. Furthermore, injections of muscimol into a control site dorsal to the ventral pallidum produced no significant effects on lever pressing and chow intake. These data indicate that stimulation of GABA receptors in ventral pallidum produces behavioral effects similar to those produced by accumbens dopamine depletions. Ventral pallidum appears to be a component of the brain circuitry regulating response allocation and effort-related choice behavior, and may act to convey information from nucleus accumbens to other parts of this circuitry. This research may have implications for understanding the brain mechanisms involved in energy-related psychiatric dysfunctions such as psychomotor retardation in depression, anergia, and apathy. PMID:18272291

  4. Mitochondrial tRNA 5'-editing in Dictyostelium discoideum and Polysphondylium pallidum.

    PubMed

    Abad, Maria G; Long, Yicheng; Kinchen, R Dimitri; Schindel, Elinor T; Gray, Michael W; Jackman, Jane E

    2014-05-30

    Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) 5'-editing was first described more than 20 years ago; however, the first candidates for 5'-editing enzymes were only recently identified in a eukaryotic microbe (protist), the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. In this organism, eight of 18 mt-tRNAs are predicted to be edited based on the presence of genomically encoded mismatched nucleotides in their aminoacyl-acceptor stem sequences. Here, we demonstrate that mt-tRNA 5'-editing occurs at all predicted sites in D. discoideum as evidenced by changes in the sequences of isolated mt-tRNAs compared with the expected sequences encoded by the mitochondrial genome. We also identify two previously unpredicted editing events in which G-U base pairs are edited in the absence of any other genomically encoded mismatches. A comparison of 5'-editing in D. discoideum with 5'-editing in another slime mold, Polysphondylium pallidum, suggests organism-specific idiosyncrasies in the treatment of U-G/G-U pairs. In vitro activities of putative D. discoideum editing enzymes are consistent with the observed editing reactions and suggest an overall lack of tRNA substrate specificity exhibited by the repair component of the editing enzyme. Although the presence of terminal mismatches in mt-tRNA sequences is highly predictive of the occurrence of mt-tRNA 5'-editing, the variability in treatment of U-G/G-U base pairs observed here indicates that direct experimental evidence of 5'-editing must be obtained to understand the complete spectrum of mt-tRNA editing events in any species. PMID:24737330

  5. Mitochondrial tRNA 5′-Editing in Dictyostelium discoideum and Polysphondylium pallidum*

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Maria G.; Long, Yicheng; Kinchen, R. Dimitri; Schindel, Elinor T.; Gray, Michael W.; Jackman, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) 5′-editing was first described more than 20 years ago; however, the first candidates for 5′-editing enzymes were only recently identified in a eukaryotic microbe (protist), the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. In this organism, eight of 18 mt-tRNAs are predicted to be edited based on the presence of genomically encoded mismatched nucleotides in their aminoacyl-acceptor stem sequences. Here, we demonstrate that mt-tRNA 5′-editing occurs at all predicted sites in D. discoideum as evidenced by changes in the sequences of isolated mt-tRNAs compared with the expected sequences encoded by the mitochondrial genome. We also identify two previously unpredicted editing events in which G-U base pairs are edited in the absence of any other genomically encoded mismatches. A comparison of 5′-editing in D. discoideum with 5′-editing in another slime mold, Polysphondylium pallidum, suggests organism-specific idiosyncrasies in the treatment of U-G/G-U pairs. In vitro activities of putative D. discoideum editing enzymes are consistent with the observed editing reactions and suggest an overall lack of tRNA substrate specificity exhibited by the repair component of the editing enzyme. Although the presence of terminal mismatches in mt-tRNA sequences is highly predictive of the occurrence of mt-tRNA 5′-editing, the variability in treatment of U-G/G-U base pairs observed here indicates that direct experimental evidence of 5′-editing must be obtained to understand the complete spectrum of mt-tRNA editing events in any species. PMID:24737330

  6. Differential roles of ventral pallidum subregions during cocaine self-administration behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Root, David H.; Ma, Sisi; Barker, David J.; Megehee, Laura; Striano, Brendan M.; Ralston, Carla M.; Fabbricatore, Anthony T.; West, Mark O.

    2012-01-01

    The ventral pallidum (VP) is necessary for drug-seeking behavior. VP contains ventromedial (VPvm) and dorsolateral (VPdl) subregions which receive projections from the nucleus accumbens shell and core, respectively. To date, no study has investigated the behavioral functions of the VPdl and VPvm subregions. To address this issue, we investigated whether changes in firing rate (FR) differed between VP subregions during four events: approaching toward, responding on, or retreating away from a cocaine-reinforced operandum, and a cocaine-associated cue. Baseline FR and waveform characteristics did not differ between subregions. VPdl neurons exhibited a greater change in FR compared to VPvm neurons during approaches toward, as well as responses on, the cocaine-reinforced operandum. VPdl neurons were more likely to exhibit a similar change in FR (direction and magnitude) during approach and response than VPvm neurons. In contrast, VPvm firing patterns were heterogeneous, changing FRs during approach or response alone, or both. VP neurons did not discriminate cued behaviors from uncued behaviors. No differences were found between subregions during the retreat and no VP neurons exhibited patterned changes in FR in response to the cocaine-associated cue. The stronger, sustained FR changes of VPdl neurons during approach and response may implicate VPdl in the processing of drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior via projections to subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata. In contrast, heterogeneous firing patterns of VPvm neurons may implicate VPvm in facilitating mesocortical structures with information related to the sequence of behaviors predicting cocaine self-infusions via projections to mediodorsal thalamus and ventral tegmental area. PMID:22806483

  7. Fowl antibody

    PubMed Central

    Orlans, Eva

    1967-01-01

    Despite some quantitative differences, the `natural' antibody to erythrocytes present in normal fowl serum was found to be transmitted to yolk and chick in the same manner as induced antibody to sheep red cells. Estimations of direct and indirect agglutination titres and of haemolytic activity in the sera and yolks of hens after one and two injections of sheep red cells showed differences between the antibodies of sera and yolks, and also between those produced during the primary and secondary responses. The proportion of non-agglutinating antibodies was higher, and the haemolytic activity lower, after the second injection. Antibodies transferred to yolk and chick were mainly non-agglutinating and not haemolytic. PMID:6066790

  8. Comparison of the locomotor-activating effects of bicuculline infusions into the preoptic area and ventral pallidum.

    PubMed

    Zahm, Daniel S; Schwartz, Zachary M; Lavezzi, Heather N; Yetnikoff, Leora; Parsley, Kenneth P

    2014-03-01

    Ambulatory locomotion in the rodent is robustly activated by unilateral infusions into the basal forebrain of type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor antagonists, such as bicuculline and picrotoxin. The present study was carried out to better localize the neuroanatomical substrate(s) underlying this effect. To accomplish this, differences in total locomotion accumulated during a 20-min test period following bicuculline versus saline infusions in male Sprague-Dawley rats were calculated, rank ordered and mapped on a diagram of basal forebrain transposed from immunoprocessed sections. The most robust locomotor activation was elicited by bicuculline infusions clustered in rostral parts of the preoptic area. Unilateral infusions of bicuculline into the ventral pallidum produced an unanticipatedly diminutive activation of locomotion, which led us to evaluate bilateral ventral pallidal infusions, and these also produced only a small activation of locomotion, and, interestingly, a non-significant trend toward suppression of rearing. Subjects with bicuculline infused bilaterally into the ventral pallidum also exhibited persistent bouts of abnormal movements. Bicuculline infused unilaterally into other forebrain structures, including the bed nucleus of stria terminalis, caudate-putamen, globus pallidus, sublenticular extended amygdala and sublenticular substantia innominata, did not produce significant locomotor activation. Our data identify the rostral preoptic area as the main substrate for the locomotor-activating effects of basal forebrain bicuculline infusions. In contrast, slight activation of locomotion and no effect on rearing accompanied unilateral and bilateral ventral pallidal infusions. Implications of these findings for forebrain processing of reward are discussed. PMID:23423460

  9. Estimation of the genome sizes of the chigger mites Leptotrombidium pallidum and Leptotrombidium scutellare based on quantitative PCR and k-mer analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Leptotrombidium pallidum and Leptotrombidium scutellare are the major vector mites for Orientia tsutsugamushi, the causative agent of scrub typhus. Before these organisms can be subjected to whole-genome sequencing, it is necessary to estimate their genome sizes to obtain basic information for establishing the strategies that should be used for genome sequencing and assembly. Method The genome sizes of L. pallidum and L. scutellare were estimated by a method based on quantitative real-time PCR. In addition, a k-mer analysis of the whole-genome sequences obtained through Illumina sequencing was conducted to verify the mutual compatibility and reliability of the results. Results The genome sizes estimated using qPCR were 191??7Mb for L. pallidum and 262??13Mb for L. scutellare. The k-mer analysis-based genome lengths were estimated to be 175Mb for L. pallidum and 286Mb for L. scutellare. The estimates from these two independent methods were mutually complementary and within a similar range to those of other Acariform mites. Conclusions The estimation method based on qPCR appears to be a useful alternative when the standard methods, such as flow cytometry, are impractical. The relatively small estimated genome sizes should facilitate whole-genome analysis, which could contribute to our understanding of Arachnida genome evolution and provide key information for scrub typhus prevention and mite vector competence. PMID:24947244

  10. Structure of rrn operons in pathogenic non-cultivable treponemes: sequence but not genomic position of intergenic spacers correlates with classification of Treponema pallidum and Treponema paraluiscuniculi strains

    PubMed Central

    Čejková, Darina; Zobaníková, Marie; Pospíšilová, Petra; Strouhal, Michal; Mikalová, Lenka; Weinstock, George M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the sequences of the two rRNA (rrn) operons of pathogenic non-cultivable treponemes, comprising 11 strains of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum (TPA), five strains of T. pallidum ssp. pertenue (TPE), two strains of T. pallidum ssp. endemicum (TEN), a simian Fribourg-Blanc strain and a rabbit T. paraluiscuniculi (TPc) strain. PCR was used to determine the type of 16S–23S ribosomal intergenic spacers in the rrn operons from 30 clinical samples belonging to five different genotypes. When compared with the TPA strains, TPc Cuniculi A strain had a 17 bp deletion, and the TPE, TEN and Fribourg-Blanc isolates had a deletion of 33 bp. Other than these deletions, only 17 heterogeneous sites were found within the entire region (excluding the 16S–23S intergenic spacer region encoding tRNA-Ile or tRNA-Ala). The pattern of nucleotide changes in the rrn operons corresponded to the classification of treponemal strains, whilst two different rrn spacer patterns (Ile/Ala and Ala/Ile) appeared to be distributed randomly across species/subspecies classification, time and geographical source of the treponemal strains. It is suggested that the random distribution of tRNA genes is caused by reciprocal translocation between repetitive sequences mediated by a recBCD-like system. PMID:23082031

  11. Conservation of the Host-Interacting Proteins Tp0750 and Pallilysin among Treponemes and Restriction of Proteolytic Capacity to Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed

    Houston, Simon; Taylor, John S; Denchev, Yavor; Hof, Rebecca; Zuerner, Richard L; Cameron, Caroline E

    2015-11-01

    The spirochete Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a chronic, sexually transmitted infection characterized by multiple symptomatic and asymptomatic stages. Although several other species in the genus are able to cause or contribute to disease, T. pallidum differs in that it is able to rapidly disseminate via the bloodstream to tissue sites distant from the site of initial infection. It is also the only Treponema species able to cross both the blood-brain and placental barriers. Previously, the T. pallidum proteins, Tp0750 and Tp0751 (also called pallilysin), were shown to degrade host proteins central to blood coagulation and basement membrane integrity, suggesting a role for these proteins in T. pallidum dissemination and tissue invasion. In the present study, we characterized Tp0750 and Tp0751 sequence variation in a diversity of pathogenic and nonpathogenic treponemes. We also determined the proteolytic potential of the orthologs from the less invasive species Treponema denticola and Treponema phagedenis. These analyses showed high levels of sequence similarity among Tp0750 orthologs from pathogenic species. For pallilysin, lower levels of sequence conservation were observed between this protein and orthologs from other treponemes, except for the ortholog from the highly invasive rabbit venereal syphilis-causing Treponema paraluiscuniculi. In vitro host component binding and degradation assays demonstrated that pallilysin and Tp0750 orthologs from the less invasive treponemes tested were not capable of binding or degrading host proteins. The results show that pallilysin and Tp0750 host protein binding and degradative capability is positively correlated with treponemal invasiveness. PMID:26283341

  12. Bispecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kontermann, Roland E; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) combine specificities of two antibodies and simultaneously address different antigens or epitopes. BsAbs with 'two-target' functionality can interfere with multiple surface receptors or ligands associated, for example with cancer, proliferation or inflammatory processes. BsAbs can also place targets into close proximity, either to support protein complex formation on one cell, or to trigger contacts between cells. Examples of 'forced-connection' functionalities are bsAbs that support protein complexation in the clotting cascade, or tumor-targeted immune cell recruiters and/or activators. Following years of research and development (R&D), the first bsAb was approved in 2009. Another bsAb entered the market in December 2014 and several more are in clinical trials. Here, we describe the potentials of bsAbs to become the next wave of antibody-based therapies, focusing on molecules in clinical development. PMID:25728220

  13. Array-in-well platform-based multiplex assay for the simultaneous detection of anti-HIV- and treponemal-antibodies, and Hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Talha, Sheikh M; Saviranta, Petri; Hattara, Liisa; Vuorinen, Tytti; Hytönen, Jukka; Khanna, Navin; Pettersson, Kim

    2016-02-01

    Multiplex assays detecting sets of related clinical analytes simultaneously can save considerable amount of time and resources. Array-in-well (AIW) is a powerful platform for the multiplex detection of different analytes where microarrays can be printed at the bottom of microtiter wells, thus combining the potential of microarrays with the ease of handling microtiter wells. We have developed a single-step AIW assay for the simultaneous screening of HIV, Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum (causing syphilis) and Hepatitis B virus infections targeting the specific detection of anti-HIV- and treponemal-antibodies and Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), respectively, using two different fluorescent label technologies i.e. DyLight 633 and europium nanoparticle. Double-antigen assay formats were used for anti-HIV- and treponemal-antibody detection that can simultaneously detect both IgG and IgM, and thus reduce the window period of detection. AIW assay was evaluated with well characterized serum/plasma samples (n=111), and the qualitative results were in near complete agreement with those of the reference assays. The AIW assay exhibited 100% sensitivities for all three analytes, and 100% specificities for anti-HIV antibodies and HBsAg, and 98.6% specificity for treponemal antibodies. The limit of detection of HBsAg in AIW assay was 0.18ng/ml. This high performing AIW assay has the potential to be used as a multiplex screening test for these three infections. PMID:26711310

  14. Europium Nanoparticle-Based High Performing Immunoassay for the Screening of Treponemal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Talha, Sheikh M.; Hytnen, Jukka; Westhorpe, Adam; Kumar, Sushil; Khanna, Navin; Pettersson, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum (Tp) is the causative agent of syphilis which mainly spreads through sexual contact, blood transfusion and perinatal route. In order to curtail the spread of the infection and to clinically manage the disease, timely, accurate and reliable diagnosis is very important. We have developed an immunoassay for the detection of treponemal antibodies in human serum or plasma samples. In vivo biotinylated and non-biotinylated versions of the recombinant antigen were designed by the fusion of three Tp-specific antigens namely Tp15, Tp17 and Tp47. These fusion antigens were expressed in E. coli and purified using single-step metal affinity chromatography. Biotinylated fusion antigen immobilized on streptavidin coated plate was used to capture the treponemal antibodies and the non-biotinylated antigen coated on europium nanoparticles was used as tracer. Assays with two different incubation times of 10 min and 1 h were developed, and following the incubation the europium fluorescence was measured using time-resolved fluorometry. The developed time-resolved fluorometric (TRF) immunoassays were evaluated with in-house and commercial serum/plasma sample panels. For well-established treponemal antibodies positive or negative samples, the sensitivity of TRF immunoassay with 10 min incubation time was 97.4%, and of TRF immunoassay with 1 h incubation time was 98.7%, and the specificities of both the TRF immunoassays were 99.2%. For the samples with discordant results with the reference assays, both the TRF immunoassays showed better specificity than the Enzygnost syphilis enzyme immunoassay as a screening test. The two different incubation times did not have any significant effect on the signal to cutoff (S/Co) ratios obtained with the two immunoassays (p?=?0.06). Our results indicate that the developed immunoassay with a short incubation time of 10 min has the potential to be used in clinical laboratories and in blood-bank settings as a screening test for treponemal antibodies. PMID:24386329

  15. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redoxmore » system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg²⁺-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg²⁺-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg²⁺ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.« less

  16. Evidence for Posttranslational Protein Flavinylation in the Syphilis Spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and Biochemical Insights from the Catalytic Core of a Periplasmic Flavin-Trafficking Protein

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg2+-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg2+-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg2+ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm. PMID:25944861

  17. Ultrastructural Studies of Treponemes: Location of Axial Filaments and Some Dimensions of Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain), Treponema denticola, and Treponema reiteri

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, John A.; Miller, James N.

    1973-01-01

    Ultrathin sections of Treponema pallidum (Nichols strain), T. denticola (microdentium), and T. reiteri have been studied in the electron microscope to determine the location of the axial filaments and some of the dimensions of these organisms. The axial filaments of T. pallidum (Nichols strain) have been seen to be tubular in cross section with an overall diameter of 21.0 0.73 nm, and an electron-lucent core of 8.0 nm. The filaments were found to lie on the outside of the organism which had only one membranous structure surrounding the protoplasmic core. These findings were in contrast to those obtained for T. denticola and T. reiteri where the axial filaments did not exhibit a hollow core and were located between an outer membrane and an inner membrane surrounding the protoplasmic core. The outside diameter of T. denticola was determined to be 224.9 2.83 nm, and that of T. reiteri as 331.0 4.15 nm, contrasting with T. pallidum (Nichols strain) which had a diameter of 163.0 1.9 nm. Images PMID:4570277

  18. Use of polymerase chain reaction and rabbit infectivity testing to detect Treponema pallidum in amniotic fluid, fetal and neonatal sera, and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Grimprel, E; Sanchez, P J; Wendel, G D; Burstain, J M; McCracken, G H; Radolf, J D; Norgard, M V

    1991-01-01

    The diagnosis of congenital syphilis continues to pose a difficult clinical challenge. Because the serodiagnosis of congenital syphilis has significant limitations, the direct detection of Treponema pallidum in suspect neonatal tissues or body fluids represents a desirable alternate diagnostic strategy. We developed and applied the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of T. pallidum in clinical material relevant to the diagnosis of congenital syphilis but which typically contain factors inhibitory for the PCR. Four methods of specimen processing were examined to circumvent PCR inhibition; clinical materials included amniotic fluids, neonatal sera, and neonatal cerebrospinal fluids. The PCR was 100% specific for T. T. pallidum compared with the sensitive rabbit infectivity test (RIT) for all clinical materials tested. For amniotic fluids, the PCR was 100% sensitive when correlated with the RIT but had a lesser sensitivity when applied to sera or cerebrospinal fluids, which typically contain few treponemes. The combined sensitivity of the PCR for all clinical samples was 78%. Positive PCR results also were obtained among some clinical specimens for which RIT was not performed; these results correlated well with either stigmata or risk factors for congenital syphilis. The combined results suggest that the PCR can be a useful adjunct to the diagnosis and clinical management of congenital syphilis and that it will provide a valuable tool for investigations of the pathogenesis of the disorder. Images PMID:1761693

  19. Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay seroreactivity among healthy Indian donors and its association with other transfusion transmitted diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pahuja, Sangeeta; Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Pujani, Mukta; Jain, Manjula

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of syphilis infection by Treponema pallidum hemagglutination assay (TPHA) among blood donors in Delhi and to study their correlation with other markers of transfusion transmitted infections such as hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) so as to establish the utility of TPHA over and above venereal diseases research laboratory test (VDRL), not only as a marker for testing T. pallidum infection, but also as a marker of high risk behavior. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was carried out in the Regional Blood Transfusion Centre, Lady Hardinge Medical College and associated Sucheta Kriplani Hospital, New Delhi for a period of 2 years. Donated blood was screened for TPHA seroreactivity along with screening for anti HIV I and II, anti-HCV, HBsAg by third generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. A total of 8082 serum samples of blood donors were collected from healthy blood donors in our blood bank. They were classified into two groups- test group and control group based on TPHA positivity. The co-occurrence of HBsAg, HIV and HCV infection were determined in TPHA positive blood donors (test group) in comparison with TPHA negative blood donors (control group). Results: We found the TPHA seroreactivity to be 4.4% in Delhi's blood donors. Nearly 8.2% (663/8082) of the donated blood had serological evidence of infection by at least one pathogen (syphilis/HIV/hepatitis B virus/HCV) and 6.63% (44/663) donors with positive serology had multiple infections (two or more). Quadruple infection was seen in one donor, triple infection was seen in three donors and double infection was seen in 40 donors. Prevalence of HIV seroreactivity was found to be statistically significant and HCV seroreactivity statistically insignificant in TPHA positive group in comparison to TPHA negative group. Discussion: In our study, the TPHA seropositivity correlated with higher HIV and HCV seropositivity and the same correlation has been observed by several other studies also. In view of these observations, we propose that testing for syphilis by more sensitive and specific treponemal markers like TPHA rather than VDRL, rapid plasma reagin tests; as TPHA also has the added advantage of picking up all the high risk donors, whereas, VDRL picks up only currently infected donors. Moreover, TPHA should be continued as a marker of high risk behavior especially in high prevalence areas like India where we don’t have universal access to markers like nucleic acid amplification technique. PMID:25161350

  20. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  1. The Social Amoeba Polysphondylium pallidum Loses Encystation and Sporulation, but Can Still Erect Fruiting Bodies in the Absence of Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Du, Qingyou; Schaap, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    Amoebas and other freely moving protists differentiate into walled cysts when exposed to stress. As cysts, amoeba pathogens are resistant to biocides, preventing treatment and eradication. Lack of gene modification procedures has left the mechanisms of encystation largely unexplored. Genetically tractable Dictyostelium discoideum amoebas require cellulose synthase for formation of multicellular fructifications with cellulose-rich stalk and spore cells. Amoebas of its distant relative Polysphondylium pallidum (Ppal), can additionally encyst individually in response to stress. Ppal has two cellulose synthase genes, DcsA and DcsB, which we deleted individually and in combination. Dcsa- mutants formed fruiting bodies with normal stalks, but their spore and cyst walls lacked cellulose, which obliterated stress-resistance of spores and rendered cysts entirely non-viable. A dcsa-/dcsb- mutant made no walled spores, stalk cells or cysts, although simple fruiting structures were formed with a droplet of amoeboid cells resting on an sheathed column of decaying cells. DcsB is expressed in prestalk and stalk cells, while DcsA is additionally expressed in spores and cysts. We conclude that cellulose is essential for encystation and that cellulose synthase may be a suitable target for drugs to prevent encystation and render amoeba pathogens susceptible to conventional antibiotics. PMID:25113829

  2. Lateral hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, and ventral pallidum roles in eating and hunger: interactions between homeostatic and reward circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Daniel C.; Cole, Shannon L.; Berridge, Kent C.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the neural bases of eating behavior, hunger, and reward has consistently implicated the lateral hypothalamus (LH) and its interactions with mesocorticolimbic circuitry, such as mesolimbic dopamine projections to nucleus accumbens (NAc) and ventral pallidum (VP), in controlling motivation to eat. The NAc and VP play special roles in mediating the hedonic impact (liking) and motivational incentive salience (wanting) of food rewards, and their interactions with LH help permit regulatory hunger/satiety modulation of food motivation and reward. Here, we review some progress that has been made regarding this circuitry and its functions: the identification of localized anatomical hedonic hotspots within NAc and VP for enhancing hedonic impact; interactions of NAc/VP hedonic hotspots with specific LH signals such as orexin; an anterior-posterior gradient of sites in NAc shell for producing intense appetitive eating vs. intense fearful reactions; and anatomically distributed appetitive functions of dopamine and mu opioid signals in NAc shell and related structures. Such findings help improve our understanding of NAc, VP, and LH interactions in mediating affective and motivation functions, including liking and wanting for food rewards. PMID:26124708

  3. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePLUS

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Screen Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Indirect Coombs Test; Indirect Anti-human Globulin Test; Antibody Screen Formal name: Red Blood Cell Antibody Screen ...

  4. Newly available antibodies with practical applications in surgical pathology.

    PubMed

    Chan, John K C

    2013-12-01

    Selected antibodies that have become available in recent years and have applications in diagnostic pathology are discussed. They include antibodies that are organ-related, provide information on cellular differentiation or histogenetic type, have predictive value in tumors, and highlight infective agents. PAX8 (paired box gene 8) is a marker expressed in the lower female genital tract, thyroid, and kidney and their tumors. Napsin A is expressed in the lung and kidney and is an alternative marker for pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Arginase A is a sensitive and specific marker for liver tumors. ERG (Ets-related gene) is an excellent marker for endothelium and vascular tumors as well as prostatic cancer (about 50% of cases). SOX10 (SRY-related HMG box) is expressed predominantly in melanocytic and Schwann cells and the corresponding tumors. DOG1 (discovered on GIST 1) is an excellent marker for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and acinic cell carcinoma. OCT3/4 is a pan-germ cell tumor marker, except yolk sac tumor. SALL4 is positive in various types of germ cell tumors, including yolk sac tumor. MUC4 (mucin-related antigen 4) is a sensitive and specific marker for low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma. Langerin is a specific marker for Langerhans cells and their tumors. SOX11 is a sensitive marker for mantle cell lymphoma. New generation antibodies against anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) are required to reliably demonstrate ALK gene translocation in pulmonary carcinomas. Lack of expression of succinate dehydrogenase B is seen in paragangliomas of the hereditary form and in the pediatric type of GIST. Antibodies against Trepenoma pallidum can facilitate the diagnosis of syphilis, whereas those against SV40 (simian virus 40) are helpful for diagnosis of BK virus infection and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. PMID:24225578

  5. Enhanced Extracellular Glutamate and Dopamine in the Ventral Pallidum of Alcohol-Preferring AA and Alcohol-Avoiding ANA Rats after Morphine

    PubMed Central

    Kemppainen, Heidi; Nurmi, Harri; Raivio, Noora; Kiianmaa, Kalervo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of ventral pallidal opioidergic mechanisms in the control of ethanol intake by studying the effects of acute administration of morphine on the levels of GABA, glutamate, and dopamine in the ventral pallidum. The study was conducted using the alcohol-preferring Alko Alcohol (AA) and alcohol-avoiding Alko Non-Alcohol (ANA) rat lines that have well-documented differences in their voluntary ethanol intake and brain opioidergic systems. Therefore, examination of neurobiological differences between the lines is supposed to help to identify the neuronal mechanisms underlying ethanol intake, since selection pressure is assumed gradually to lead to enrichment of alleles promoting high or low ethanol intake, respectively. The effects of an acute dose of morphine (1 or 10 mg/kg s.c.) on the extracellular levels of GABA and glutamate in the ventral pallidum were monitored with in vivo microdialysis. The concentrations of GABA and glutamate in the dialyzates were determined with a high performance liquid chromatography system using fluorescent detection, while electrochemical detection was used for dopamine. The levels of glutamate in the rats injected with morphine 1 mg/kg were significantly above the levels found in the controls and in the rats receiving morphine 10 mg/kg. Morphine 10 mg/kg also increased the levels of dopamine. Morphine could not, however, modify the levels of GABA. The rat lines did not differ in any of the effects of morphine. The data suggest that the glutamatergic and dopaminergic systems in the ventral pallidum may mediate some effects of morphine. Since there were no differences between the AA and ANA lines, the basic hypothesis underlying the use of the genetic animal model suggests that the effects of morphine detected probably do not underlie the different intake of ethanol by the lines and contribute to the control of ethanol intake in these animals. PMID:25653621

  6. Whole Genome Sequences of Three Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue Strains: Yaws and Syphilis Treponemes Differ in Less than 0.2% of the Genome Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Pospilov, Petra; Strouhal, Michal; Qin, Xiang; Mikalov, Lenka; Norris, Steven J.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Sodergren, Erica; Weinstock, George M.; majs, David

    2012-01-01

    Background The yaws treponemes, Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue (TPE) strains, are closely related to syphilis causing strains of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum (TPA). Both yaws and syphilis are distinguished on the basis of epidemiological characteristics, clinical symptoms, and several genetic signatures of the corresponding causative agents. Methodology/Principal Findings To precisely define genetic differences between TPA and TPE, high-quality whole genome sequences of three TPE strains (Samoa D, CDC-2, Gauthier) were determined using next-generation sequencing techniques. TPE genome sequences were compared to four genomes of TPA strains (Nichols, DAL-1, SS14, Chicago). The genome structure was identical in all three TPE strains with similar length ranging between 1,139,330 bp and 1,139,744 bp. No major genome rearrangements were found when compared to the four TPA genomes. The whole genome nucleotide divergence (dA) between TPA and TPE subspecies was 4.7 and 4.8 times higher than the observed nucleotide diversity (?) among TPA and TPE strains, respectively, corresponding to 99.8% identity between TPA and TPE genomes. A set of 97 (9.9%) TPE genes encoded proteins containing two or more amino acid replacements or other major sequence changes. The TPE divergent genes were mostly from the group encoding potential virulence factors and genes encoding proteins with unknown function. Conclusions/Significance Hypothetical genes, with genetic differences, consistently found between TPE and TPA strains are candidates for syphilitic treponemes virulence factors. Seventeen TPE genes were predicted under positive selection, and eleven of them coded either for predicted exported proteins or membrane proteins suggesting their possible association with the cell surface. Sequence changes between TPE and TPA strains and changes specific to individual strains represent suitable targets for subspecies- and strain-specific molecular diagnostics. PMID:22292095

  7. Structural and biochemical basis for polyamine binding to the Tp0655 lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum: putative role for Tp0655 (TpPotD) as a polyamine receptor.

    PubMed

    Machius, Mischa; Brautigam, Chad A; Tomchick, Diana R; Ward, Patrick; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Blevins, Jon S; Deka, Ranjit K; Norgard, Michael V

    2007-10-26

    Tp0655 of Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, is predicted to be a 40 kDa membrane lipoprotein. Previous sequence analysis of Tp0655 noted its homology to polyamine-binding proteins of the bacterial PotD family, which serve as periplasmic ligand-binding proteins of ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transport systems. Here, the 1.8 A crystal structure of Tp0655 demonstrated structural homology to Escherichia coli PotD and PotF. The latter two proteins preferentially bind spermidine and putrescine, respectively. All of these proteins contain two domains that sandwich the ligand between them. The ligand-binding site of Tp0655 can be occupied by 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfanoic acid, a component of the crystallization medium. To discern the polyamine binding preferences of Tp0655, the protein was subjected to isothermal titration calorimetric experiments. The titrations established that Tp0655 binds polyamines avidly, with a marked preference for putrescine (Kd=10 nM) over spermidine (Kd=430 nM), but the related compounds cadaverine and spermine did not bind. Structural comparisons and structure-based sequence analyses provide insights into how polyamine-binding proteins recognize their ligands. In particular, these comparisons allow the derivation of rules that may be used to predict the function of other members of the PotD family. The sequential, structural, and functional homology of Tp0655 to PotD and PotF prompt the conclusion that the former likely is the polyamine-binding component of an ABC-type polyamine transport system in T. pallidum. We thus rename Tp0655 as TpPotD. The ramifications of TpPotD as a polyamine-binding protein to the parasitic strategy of T. pallidum are discussed. PMID:17868688

  8. The cutaneous response in humans to Treponema pallidum lipoprotein analogues involves cellular elements of both innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Sellati, T J; Waldrop, S L; Salazar, J C; Bergstresser, P R; Picker, L J; Radolf, J D

    2001-03-15

    To extend prior studies implicating treponemal lipoproteins as major proinflammatory agonists of syphilitic infection, we examined the responses induced by intradermal injection of human subjects with synthetic lipoprotein analogues (lipopeptides) corresponding to the N termini of the 17- and 47-kDa lipoproteins of Treponema pallidum. Responses were assessed visually and by flow cytometric analysis of dermal leukocyte populations within fluids aspirated from suction blisters raised over the injection sites. Lipopeptides elicited dose-dependent increases in erythema/induration and cellular infiltrates. Compared with peripheral blood, blister fluids were highly enriched for monocytes/macrophages, cutaneous lymphocyte Ag-positive memory T cells, and dendritic cells. PB and blister fluids contained highly similar ratios of CD123(-)/CD11c(+) (DC1) and CD123(+)/CD11c(-) (DC2) dendritic cells. Staining for maturation/differentiation markers (CD83, CD1a) and costimulatory molecules (CD80/CD86) revealed that blister fluid DC1, but not DC2, cells were more developmentally advanced than their peripheral blood counterparts. Of particular relevance to the ability of syphilitic lesions to facilitate the transmission of M-tropic strains of HIV-1 was a marked enhancement of CCR5 positivity among mononuclear cells in the blister fluids. Treponemal lipopeptides have the capacity to induce an inflammatory milieu reminiscent of that found in early syphilis lesions. In contrast with in vitro studies, which have focused upon the ability of these agonists to stimulate isolated innate immune effector cells, in this study we show that in a complex tissue environment these molecules have the capacity to recruit cellular elements representing the adaptive as well as the innate arm of the cellular immune response. PMID:11238663

  9. Delta-opioid receptor blockade in the ventral pallidum increases perceived palatability and consumption of saccharin solution in rats.

    PubMed

    Inui, Tadashi; Shimura, Tsuyoshi

    2014-08-01

    The ventral pallidum (VP) is involved in ingestive behaviour. It receives dense GABAergic projections from the nucleus accumbens. GABAergic terminals in the VP co-express enkephalin, an endogenous ligand of delta-opioid receptors. The role of the delta-opioid receptors in the VP in the context of ingestive behaviour remains unclear, in contrast to the well-understood involvement of the mu-opioid receptors. We used the single-bottle test to examine the effects of VP microinjections of the delta-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole on consumption of a saccharin solution. Naltrindole injections significantly increased the intake of saccharin, but not water, during a 2-h test session. We also investigated perceived palatability of saccharin using a taste reactivity test. The drug treatments increased ingestive responses to intraorally infused saccharin. Further experimentation explored the role of VP delta-opioid receptors in behavioural responses to saccharin that were previously paired with malaise upon the retrieval of conditioned taste aversion (CTA). Naltrindole-injected rats exhibited longer latency for the first occurrence of aversive responses than vehicle-injected control rats. However, there was no between-group difference in total aversive responses. These results suggest that naltrindole injections into the VP induce an enhancement of perceived palatability of a normally preferred saccharin solution, and thereby facilitate consumption of the solution. On the other hand, delayed aversive responses to the conditioned aversive saccharin suggest that the delta-opioid receptors in the VP mediate the initiation of aversive taste reactivity responses to the conditioned stimulus upon CTA retrieval. PMID:24739358

  10. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    PubMed

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA. PMID:21794718

  11. Vitros 5600 Syphilis TPA assay: evaluation of an automated chemiluminescence assay for detection of Treponema pallidum antibodies in a high prevalence setting.

    PubMed

    Van den Bossche, Dorien; Florence, Eric; Kenyon, Christopher; Van Esbroeck, Marjan

    2014-11-01

    The performance of the Syphilis TPA assay (Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics) on Vitros 5600 Integrated System was evaluated and demonstrated excellent results. Our data support the use of this assay for test confirmation in the traditional algorithm and for screening for syphilis in a routine automated laboratory setting when using the reverse algorithm. PMID:25299416

  12. The TP0796 Lipoprotein of Treponema pallidum Is a Bimetal-dependent FAD Pyrophosphatase with a Potential Role in Flavin Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, an obligate parasite of humans and the causative agent of syphilis, has evolved the capacity to exploit host-derived metabolites for its survival. Flavin-containing compounds are essential cofactors that are required for metabolic processes in all living organisms, and riboflavin is a direct precursor of the cofactors FMN and FAD. Unlike many pathogenic bacteria, Treponema pallidum cannot synthesize riboflavin; we recently described a flavin-uptake mechanism composed of an ABC-type transporter. However, there is a paucity of information about flavin utilization in bacterial periplasms. Using a discovery-driven approach, we have identified the TP0796 lipoprotein as a previously uncharacterized Mg2+-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase within the ApbE superfamily. TP0796 probably plays a central role in flavin turnover by hydrolyzing exogenously acquired FAD, yielding AMP and FMN. Biochemical and structural investigations revealed that the enzyme has a unique bimetal Mg2+ catalytic center. Furthermore, the pyrophosphatase activity is product-inhibited by AMP, indicating a possible role for this molecule in modulating FMN and FAD levels in the treponemal periplasm. The ApbE superfamily was previously thought to be involved in thiamine biosynthesis, but our characterization of TP0796 prompts a renaming of this superfamily as a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein (Ftp). TP0796 is the first structurally and biochemically characterized FAD pyrophosphate enzyme in bacteria. This new paradigm for a bacterial flavin utilization pathway may prove to be useful for future inhibitor design. PMID:23447540

  13. The Multifunctional Role of the Pallilysin-Associated Treponema pallidum Protein, Tp0750, in Promoting Fibrinolysis and Extracellular Matrix Component Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Simon; Russell, Shannon; Hof, Rebecca; Roberts, Alanna K.; Cullen, Paul; Irvine, Kyle; Smith, Derek S.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Tonkin, Michelle L.; Boulanger, Martin J.; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms that facilitate dissemination of the highly invasive spirochete, Treponema pallidum, are incompletely understood. Previous studies showed the treponemal metalloprotease pallilysin (Tp0751) possesses fibrin clot degradation capability, suggesting a role in treponemal dissemination. In the current study we report characterization of the functionally-linked protein Tp0750. Structural modelling predicts Tp0750 contains a von Willebrand factor type A (vWFA) domain, a protein-protein interaction domain commonly observed in extracellular matrix (ECM)-binding proteins. We report Tp0750 is a serine protease that degrades the major clot components fibrinogen and fibronectin. We also demonstrate Tp0750 cleaves a matrix metalloprotease (MMP) peptide substrate that is targeted by several MMPs, enzymes central to ECM remodelling. Through proteomic analyses we show Tp0750 binds the endothelial fibrinolytic receptor, annexin A2, in a specific and dose-dependent manner. These results suggest Tp0750 constitutes a multifunctional protein that is able to (1) degrade infection-limiting clots by both inhibiting clot formation through degradation of host coagulation cascade proteins and promoting clot dissolution by complexing with host proteins involved in the fibrinolytic cascade and (2) facilitate ECM degradation via MMP-like proteolysis of host components. We propose that through these activities Tp0750 functions in concert with pallilysin to enable T. pallidum dissemination. PMID:24303899

  14. Superoxide reductase from the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: crystallization and structure determination using soft X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Silva, Teresa; Trinco, Jos; Carvalho, Ana L.; Bonifcio, Ceclia; Auchre, Franoise; Moura, Isabel; Moura, Jos J. G.; Romo, Maria J.

    2005-11-01

    Superoxide reductase is a non-haem iron-containing protein involved in resistance to oxidative stress. The oxidized form of the protein has been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure solved. A highly redundant X-ray diffraction data set was collected on a rotating-anode generator using Cu K? X-ray radiation. Four Fe atoms were located in the asymmetric unit corresponding to four protein molecules arranged as a dimer of homodimers. Superoxide reductase is a 14 kDa metalloprotein containing a catalytic non-haem iron centre [Fe(His){sub 4}Cys]. It is involved in defence mechanisms against oxygen toxicity, scavenging superoxide radicals from the cell. The oxidized form of Treponema pallidum superoxide reductase was crystallized in the presence of polyethylene glycol and magnesium chloride. Two crystal forms were obtained depending on the oxidizing agents used after purification: crystals grown in the presence of K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} belonged to space group P2{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 60.3, b = 59.9, c = 64.8 , ? = 106.9) and diffracted beyond 1.60 resolution, while crystals grown in the presence of Na{sub 2}IrCl{sub 6} belonged to space group C2 (a = 119.4, b = 60.1, c = 65.6 , ? = 104.9) and diffracted beyond 1.55 . A highly redundant X-ray diffraction data set from the C2 crystal form collected on a copper rotating-anode generator (? = 1.542 ) clearly defined the positions of the four Fe atoms present in the asymmetric unit by SAD methods. A MAD experiment at the iron absorption edge confirmed the positions of the previously determined iron sites and provided better phases for model building and refinement. Molecular replacement using the P2{sub 1} data set was successful using a preliminary trace as a search model. A similar arrangement of the four protein molecules could be observed.

  15. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  16. Proposal of a new halobacterial genus Natrinema gen. nov., with two species Natrinema pellirubrum nom. nov. and Natrinema pallidum nom. nov.

    PubMed

    McGenity, T J; Gemmell, R T; Grant, W D

    1998-10-01

    A phylogenetic analysis of 69 halobacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences has been carried out, integrating data from new isolates, previously described halobacteria and cloned sequences from uncultivated halobacteria. Halobacterium halobium NCIMB 777, Halobacterium trapanicum NCIMB 784 and Halobacterium salinarium NCIMB 786, together with several other strains (strains T5.7, L11 and Halobacterium trapanicum NCIMB 767) constitute a distinct lineage with at least 98.2% sequence similarity. These strains have been incorrectly assigned to the genus Halobacterium. Therefore, based on a variety of taxonomic criteria, it is proposed that Halobacterium salinarium NCIMB 786 is renamed as Natrinema pellirubrum nom. nov., the type species of the new genus Natrinema gen. nov., and that Halobacterium halobium NCIMB 777 and Halobacterium trapanicum NCIMB 784 are renamed as a single species, Natrinema pallidum nom. nov. It was notable that halobacteria closely related to the proposed new genus have been isolated from relatively low-salt environments. PMID:9828420

  17. Advances in Antibody Design.

    PubMed

    Tiller, Kathryn E; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics requires optimizing several of their key attributes. These include binding affinity and specificity, folding stability, solubility, pharmacokinetics, effector functions, and compatibility with the attachment of additional antibody domains (bispecific antibodies) and cytotoxic drugs (antibody-drug conjugates). Addressing these and other challenges requires the use of systematic design methods that complement powerful immunization and in vitro screening methods. We review advances in designing the binding loops, scaffolds, domain interfaces, constant regions, post-translational and chemical modifications, and bispecific architectures of antibodies and fragments thereof to improve their bioactivity. We also highlight unmet challenges in antibody design that must be overcome to generate potent antibody therapeutics. PMID:26274600

  18. Development of a real-time PCR assay to detect Treponema pallidum in clinical specimens and assessment of the assay's performance by comparison with serological testing.

    PubMed

    Leslie, David E; Azzato, Franca; Karapanagiotidis, Theo; Leydon, Jennie; Fyfe, Janet

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of infectious syphilis in men who have sex with men and human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients has increased steadily in Victoria, Australia, since 2002. A TaqMan real-time PCR assay targeting the polA gene of Treponema pallidum (TpPCR) was developed. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was estimated to be 1.75 target copies per reaction. Initially, the assay was used to test a variety of specimens (excluding blood) from 598 patients. Of the 660 tests performed, positive PCR results were obtained for 55 patients. TpPCR results were compared with serology results for 301 patients being investigated for early syphilis. Of these patients, 41 were positive by both TpPCR and serology, 246 were negative by both TpPCR and serology, 4 were TpPCR positive but negative by serology, and 10 were TpPCR negative but showed evidence of recent or active infection by serology. Directly compared with serology, TpPCR showed 95% agreement, with a sensitivity of 80.39% and a specificity of 98.40%. Potential factors leading to the discrepant results are discussed. Concurrent serology on 21 patients with TpPCR-positive primary syphilitic lesions demonstrated that a panel of current syphilis serological tests has high sensitivity for the detection of early syphilis. We found that TpPCR is a useful addition to serology for the diagnosis of infectious syphilis. Direct comparison with other T. pallidum PCR assays will be required to fully assess the limitations of the assay. PMID:17065262

  19. Development of a Real-Time PCR Assay To Detect Treponema pallidum in Clinical Specimens and Assessment of the Assay's Performance by Comparison with Serological Testing▿

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, David E.; Azzato, Franca; Karapanagiotidis, Theo; Leydon, Jennie; Fyfe, Janet

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of infectious syphilis in men who have sex with men and human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients has increased steadily in Victoria, Australia, since 2002. A TaqMan real-time PCR assay targeting the polA gene of Treponema pallidum (TpPCR) was developed. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was estimated to be 1.75 target copies per reaction. Initially, the assay was used to test a variety of specimens (excluding blood) from 598 patients. Of the 660 tests performed, positive PCR results were obtained for 55 patients. TpPCR results were compared with serology results for 301 patients being investigated for early syphilis. Of these patients, 41 were positive by both TpPCR and serology, 246 were negative by both TpPCR and serology, 4 were TpPCR positive but negative by serology, and 10 were TpPCR negative but showed evidence of recent or active infection by serology. Directly compared with serology, TpPCR showed 95% agreement, with a sensitivity of 80.39% and a specificity of 98.40%. Potential factors leading to the discrepant results are discussed. Concurrent serology on 21 patients with TpPCR-positive primary syphilitic lesions demonstrated that a panel of current syphilis serological tests has high sensitivity for the detection of early syphilis. We found that TpPCR is a useful addition to serology for the diagnosis of infectious syphilis. Direct comparison with other T. pallidum PCR assays will be required to fully assess the limitations of the assay. PMID:17065262

  20. Evidence for posttranslational protein flavinylation in the syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and biochemical insights from the catalytic core of a periplasmic flavin-trafficking protein

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Ranjit K.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Liu, Wei Z.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Norgard, Michael V.

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete’s periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg²⁺-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg²⁺-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp’s dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg²⁺ in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm.

  1. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  2. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  3. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products. PMID:25530082

  4. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to

  5. Affinity purification of antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  6. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D’Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew RM

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products. PMID:25530082

  7. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  8. Antibodies in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The expression of antibodies in plants has several promising applications that are currently being developed. Plants are being considered for the large scale production of antibodies needed for medical purposes. The benefit of using plants is that they are able to perform post-translational modifi...

  9. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  10. Blue-Fluorescent Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, Anton; Matsushita, Masayuki; Juban, Eric A.; Thompson, Elizabeth H. Z.; Hoffman, Timothy Z.; Beuscher, Albert E.; Taylor, Matthew J.; Wirsching, Peter; Rettig, Wolfgang; McCusker, James K.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Millar, David P.; Schultz, Peter G.; Lerner, Richard A.; Janda, Kim D.

    2000-10-01

    The forte of catalytic antibodies has resided in the control of the ground-state reaction coordinate. A principle and method are now described in which antibodies can direct the outcome of photophysical and photochemical events that take place on excited-state potential energy surfaces. The key component is a chemically reactive optical sensor that provides a direct report of the dynamic interplay between protein and ligand at the active site. To illustrate the concept, we used a trans-stilbene hapten to elicit a panel of monoclonal antibodies that displayed a range of fluorescent spectral behavior when bound to a trans-stilbene substrate. Several antibodies yielded a blue fluorescence indicative of an excited-state complex or ``exciplex'' between trans-stilbene and the antibody. The antibodies controlled the isomerization coordinate of trans-stilbene and dynamically coupled this manifold with an active-site residue. A step was taken toward the use of antibody-based photochemical sensors for diagnostic and clinical applications.

  11. Insights into the potential function and membrane organization of the TP0435 (Tp17) lipoprotein from Treponema pallidum derived from structural and biophysical analyses

    PubMed Central

    Brautigam, Chad A; Deka, Ranjit K; Liu, Wei Z; Norgard, Michael V

    2015-01-01

    The sexually transmitted disease syphilis is caused by the bacterial spirochete Treponema pallidum. This microorganism is genetically intractable, accounting for the large number of putative and undercharacterized members of the pathogen's proteome. In an effort to ascribe a function(s) to the TP0435 (Tp17) lipoprotein, we engineered a soluble variant of the protein (rTP0435) and determined its crystal structure at a resolution of 2.42 . The structure is characterized by an eight-stranded ?-barrel protein with a shallow basin at one end of the barrel and an ?-helix stacked on the opposite end. Furthermore, there is a disulfide-linked dimer of the protein in the asymmetric unit of the crystals. Solution hydrodynamic experiments established that purified rTP0435 is monomeric, but specifically forms the disulfide-stabilized dimer observed in the crystal structure. The data herein, when considered with previous work on TP0435, imply plausible roles for the protein in either ligand binding, treponemal membrane architecture, and/or pathogenesis. PMID:25287511

  12. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R. (Berkeley, CA); Kehoe, John (Saint Davids, PA); Bradbury, Andrew M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  13. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to confirm the cause of thyroid problems, including Hashimoto thyroiditis . The test is also used to find out ... positive test may be due to: Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been ...

  14. Antibody tumor penetration

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  15. Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Global Sites Search Help? Heparin-induced Thrombocytopenia PF4 Antibody Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Heparin-PF4 Antibody; HIT Antibody; HIT PF4 Antibody; Heparin Induced Antibody; ...

  16. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  17. Design of synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Benhar, Itai

    2007-05-01

    Antibody libraries came into existence 15 years ago when the accumulating sequence data of immunoglobulin genes and the advent of polymerase chain reaction technology made it possible to clone antibody gene repertoires. Since then, virtually hundreds of antibody libraries have been constructed, employing limitless maneuvers from the antibody engineering molecular bag of tricks towards the crucial parameters that determine library quality, library size, diversity and robustness. Phage and additional display and screening technologies were applied to pan out desired binding specificities from antibody libraries. Several biotech companies established themselves as key operators in the multibillion-dollar field of recombinant antibody technology. Out of nineteen FDA-approved therapeutic antibodies, one was isolated from an antibody library and many more are in various stages of clinical evaluation. This review highlights key milestones in the short history of antibody libraries and attempts to predict the future impact of antibody libraries on drug discovery. PMID:17477812

  18. Bradykinin antibodies: New developments

    SciTech Connect

    Hilgenfeldt, U.; Linke, R.; Koenig, W.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Because all antibodies to bradykinin described to date more or less cross-react with larger and smaller bradykinin derivatives, the aim of the present study was the induction of a specific antibody against bradykinin. A bradykinin derivative, containing a Cys residue at position 6 instead of Ser, was linked to BSA by using a new heterobifunctional cross-linking reagent, the N-maleimido-6-aminocaproyl ester of 1-hydroxy-2-nitro-4-benzenesulfonic acid (mal-sac-HNSA). The Cys6-bradykinin derivative conjugated via the SH group to BSA was used to elicit bradykinin-specific antibodies in rabbits. After the fifth booster injection, the cross-reactivity of this antiserum with kallidin is 4 X 10(-3) when compared with bradykinin. The cross-reactivity of the de-Arg1-bradykinin derivative was 2 X 10(-4), indicating that the antibody requires the free N-terminus. The cross-reactivity of bradykinin and de-Arg9-bradykinin was nearly identical. However, de-Arg9-de-Phe8-bradykinin has a binding of 6 X 10(-3). From these data, it can be concluded that due to the ring-like structure of bradykinin, the coupling of bradykinin in the center of the molecule will elicit an antiserum that needs both the free N-terminal as well as the C-terminal phenylalanine and arginine residues for antibody recognition.

  19. [Production of antibodies to aflatoxins].

    PubMed

    Kalinichenko, A A; Toporova, V A; Panina, A A; Aliev, T K; Kriukova, E A; Shemchukova, O B; Solopova, O N; Pozdniakova, L P; Sveshnikov, P G; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2010-01-01

    A panel of ten monoclonal antibodies to aflatoxins B1, B2, and G2 was produced and comprehensively characterized. The affinity and cross reactivity of these antibodies were determined using the methods of direct, indirect, and competitive ELISA. The structures of monoclonal antibody genes were comprehensively studied and the variable and constant domains of the antibody genes were cloned and sequenced. Sequencing analysis confirmed the results of isotyping the light and heavy antibody chains obtained by ELISA. Variable and constant fragments of the antibody genes were cloned into a bicistron expression vector for the recombinant Fab' fragment for one of the antibodies expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Thus, data were obtained that can be useful for the development of an aflatoxin detection system on the basis of the described monoclonal antibodies and the creation of recombinant antibodies with changed parameters of specificity using protein engineering methods. PMID:20386586

  20. Radiolabeled antibody fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolotti, R.A.

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes an antibody conjugate of the formula: wherein Ab is the residue of a Fab fragment of a monoclonal antibody. The antibody being one which retains antigen-binding activity following enzymatic removal for the F/sub c/ fragment and reductive cleavage of the disulfide bond joining the heavy chains; -S- is the residue of the free sulfhydryl group of the Fab' fragment; R is a divalent organic linker; and R' is a nontoxic, weakly acidic chelating group capable of forming a chelate with a radionuclide metal ion that is thermodynamically stable under physiological conditions and has a higher stability constant than a chelate of the radionuclide with transferrin in vivo.

  1. Assessments of antibody biodistribution.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Patrick M; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Balthasar, Joseph P

    2015-03-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics are in use for several disease conditions, and have generally shown excellent clinical benefit, in large part due to their high specificity and affinity for target proteins. As this therapeutic class continues to grow in size, improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling mAb biodistribution and protein binding may be expected to allow better prediction of safety and efficacy. Due to the large size and polarity of antibodies, rates of mAb distribution and elimination are typically much slower than those reported for small molecule drugs. Additionally, high affinity interaction with target proteins will often influence mAb pharmacokinetics, leading to complex, nonlinear tissue distribution and elimination. In this report, we summarize key determinants of mAb disposition, methods for assessing antibody exposure and protein binding, and model-based approaches that may be utilized to predict mAb pharmacokinetics. PMID:25707961

  2. Selection of recombinant antibodies from antibody gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Dübel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are indispensable detection reagents for research and diagnostics and represent the biggest class of biological therapeutics on the market. In vitro antibody selection systems offer many advantages over animal-based technologies because the whole selection process is independent of the in vivo immune response. In the last two decades antibody phage display has evolved to the most robust and widely used method and has already yielded thousands of antibodies. The selection of binders by phage display is also referred to as "panning" and based on the specific molecular interaction of antibody phage with an immobilized antigen thus allowing the enrichment and isolation of antigen-specific monoclonal binders from very large antibody gene libraries. Here, we give detailed protocols for the selection of recombinant antibody fragments from antibody gene libraries in microtiter plates. PMID:24233787

  3. Reshaping Antibody Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Ekiert, Damian C.; Ahmad, Insha; Yu, Wenli; Zhang, Yong; Bazirgan, Omar; Torkamani, Ali; Raudsepp, Terje; Mwangi, Waithaka; Criscitiello, Michael F.; Wilson, Ian A.; Schultz, Peter G.; Smider, Vaughn V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Unlike humans or mice, some species have limited genome encoded combinatorial diversity potential, yet mount a robust antibody response. Cows are unusual in having exceptionally long CDR H3 loops and few V-regions, but the mechanism for creating diversity is not understood. Deep sequencing revealed that ultralong CDR H3s contain a remarkable complexity of cysteines, suggesting that disulfide-bonded mini-domains may arise during repertoire development. Indeed, crystal structures of two cow antibodies reveal that these CDR H3s form a very unusual architecture composed of a ?-strand stalk that supports a structurally diverse, disulfide-bonded, knob domain. Sequence analysis suggests that diversity arises from somatic hypermutation of an ultralong DH with a severe codon bias towards mutation to cysteine. These unusual antibodies can be elicited to recognize defined antigens through the knob domain. Thus, the bovine immune system produces an antibody repertoire composed of CDR H3s of unprecedented length that fold into a diversity of mini-domains generated through combinations of somatically generated disulfides. PMID:23746848

  4. Monoclonal antibodies in haematopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Grignani, F.; Martelli, M.F.; Mason, D.Y.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: Oncogene (c-myc, c-myb) amplification in acute myelogenous leukaemia; Ultrastructural characterization of leukaemic cells with monoloclonal antibodies; Origin of B-cell malignancies; Immunohistology of gut lymphomas; and Spurious evidence of lineage infidelity in monocytic leukaemia.

  5. Therapeutic antibody engineering

    PubMed Central

    Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Lugovskoy, Alexey A.

    2013-01-01

    It is an important event in any knowledge area when an authority in the field decides that it is time to share all accumulated knowledge and learnings by writing a text book. This does not occur often in the biopharmaceutical industry, likely due to both the highly dynamic environment with tight timelines and policies and procedures at many pharmaceutical companies that hamper knowledge sharing. To take on a task like this successfully, a strong drive combined with a desire and talent to teach, but also an accommodating and stimulating environment is required. Luckily for those interested in therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, Dr. William R. Strohl decided about two years ago that the time was right to write a book about the past, present and future of these fascinating molecules. Dr. Strohls great expertise and passion for biotechnology is evident from his life story and his strong academic and industry track record. Dr. Strohl pioneered natural product biotechnology, first in academia as a full professor of microbiology and biochemistry at Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio and later in industry while at Merck. Despite his notable advances in recombinant natural products, industry interest in this area waned and in 2001 Dr. Strohl sought new opportunities by entering the field of antibody therapeutics. He initiated antibody discovery through phage display at Merck, and then moved to Centocor Research and Development Inc. (now Janssen Biotech, Inc.) in 2008 to head Biologics Research, where he now directs the discovery of innovative therapeutic antibody candidates.

  6. Antibody Blood Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Tests Researchers have discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of certain antibodies ... on a gluten-containing diet. Those concerned about celiac disease are ... from starting a gluten-free diet without having had a firm diagnosis. ...

  7. The Art of Making Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headon, Denis R.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the nature and production of antibodies. Points out that the production of monoclonal antibodies blends the malignant with the beneficial to create a medical tool of exciting potential. (JN)

  8. Humanized Antibodies for Antiviral Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Co, Man Sung; Deschamps, Marguerite; Whitley, Richard J.; Queen, Cary

    1991-04-01

    Antibody therapy holds great promise for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections. Murine monoclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce but are severely restricted for therapeutic use by their immunogenicity in humans. Production of human monoclonal antibodies has been problematic. Humanized antibodies can be generated by introducing the six hypervariable regions from the heavy and light chains of a murine antibody into a human framework sequence and combining it with human constant regions. We humanized, with the aid of computer modeling, two murine monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus gB and gD glycoproteins. The binding, virus neutralization, and cell protection results all indicate that both humanized antibodies have retained the binding activities and the biological properties of the murine monoclonal antibodies.

  9. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePLUS

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  10. Trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab

    PubMed Central

    Diermeier-Daucher, Simone; Ortmann, Olaf; Buchholz, Stefan; Brockhoff, Gero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab bivalently targets the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) on epithelial (tumor) cells and the T cell specific CD3 antigen, and its Fc region is selectively recognized by Fc? type I/III receptor-positive immune cells. As a trifunctional immunoglobulin, ertumaxomab therefore not only targets Her2 on cancer cells, but also triggers immunological effector mechanisms mediated by T and accessory cells (e.g., macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells). Whether molecular effects, however, might contribute to the cellular antitumor efficiency of ertumaxomab are largely unknown. Methods: Potential molecular effects of ertumaxomab on Her2-overexpressing BT474 and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells were evaluated. The dissociation constant Kd of ertumaxomab was calculated from titration curves that were recorded by flow cytometry. Treatment-induced changes in Her2 homodimerization were determined by flow cytometric fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements on a cell-by-cell basis. Potential activation / deactivation of Her2, ERK1/2, AKT and STAT3 were analyzed by western blotting, Immunochemistry and immunofluorescent cell staining. Results: The Kd of ertumaxomab for Her2-binding was determined at 265 nM and the ertumaxomab binding epitope was found to not overlap with that of the therapeutic anti-Her2 monoclonal antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Ertumaxomab caused an increase in Her2 phosphorylation at higher antibody concentrations, but changed neither the rate of Her2-homodimerization /-phosphorylation nor the activation state of key downstream signaling proteins analyzed. Conclusions: The unique mode of action of ertumaxomab, which relies more on activation of immune-mediated mechanisms against tumor cells compared with currently available therapeutic antibodies for breast cancer treatment, suggests that modular or sequential treatment with the trifunctional bivalent antibody might complement the therapeutic activity of other anti-Her2/anti-ErbB receptor reagents. PMID:22820509

  11. [Specific antibody deficiency: cases serie].

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Diana; D'Alessandro, Virginia; Diez, Graciela; Regairaz, Lorena

    2014-12-01

    Specific antibody deficiency is a common antibody immunodeficiency defined as a poor antibody response to pneumococcal polysaccharides antigens present in the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine, with normal immunoglobulins and normal response to protein antigens. Clinical manifestations include recurrent sinopulmonary infections, severe infections and asthma. The aim of this presentation is to describe clinical manifestations and evolution of a cohort of children with specific antibody deficiency diagnosed and followed in our center between 1998 and 2012. PMID:25362922

  12. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  13. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-04-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed. PMID:25264572

  14. Construction of human naive antibody gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Hust, Michael; Frenzel, Andr; Meyer, Torsten; Schirrmann, Thomas; Dbel, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Human antibodies are valuable tools for proteome research and diagnostics. Furthermore, antibodies are a rapidly growing class of therapeutic agents, mainly for inflammation and cancer therapy. The first therapeutic antibodies are of murine origin and were chimerized or humanized. The later-developed antibodies are fully human antibodies. Here, two technologies are competing the hybridoma technology using transgenic mice with human antibody gene loci and antibody phage display. The starting point for the selection of human antibodies against any target is the construction of an antibody phage display gene library.In this review we describe the construction of human naive and immune antibody gene libraries for antibody phage display. PMID:22907347

  15. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Scott, Jamie; Larrick, James W; Plückthun, Andreas; Veldman, Trudi; Adams, Gregory P; Parren, Paul WHI; Chester, Kerry A; Bradbury, Andrew; Reichert, Janice M; Huston, James S

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Biology), who will discuss a systems approach for studying disease that is enabled by emerging technology; Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), who will discuss systems analysis of cell communication network dynamics for therapeutic biologics design; David Baker (University of Washington), who will describe computer-based design of smart protein therapeutics; and William Schief (The Scripps Research Institute), who will discuss epitope-focused immunogen design.   In this preview of the conference, the workshop and session chairs share their thoughts on what conference participants may learn in sessions on: (1) three-dimensional structure antibody modeling; (2) identifying clonal lineages from next-generation data sets of expressed VH gene sequences; (3) antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; (4) the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on the antibody response; (5) directed evolution; (6) antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; (7) use of knowledge-based design to guide development of complementarity-determining regions and epitopes to engineer or elicit the desired antibody; (8) optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; (9) antibodies in a complex environment; (10) polyclonal, oligoclonal and bispecific antibodies; (11) antibodies to watch in 2014; and (12) polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity.

  16. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially. PMID:22277519

  17. Therapeutic antibodies against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Mark J.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics against cancer are highly successful in clinic and currently enjoy unprecedented recognition of their potential; 13 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for clinical use in the European Union and in the United States (one, mylotarg, was withdrawn from market in 2010). Three of the mAbs (bevacizumab, rituximab, trastuzumab) are in the top six selling protein therapeutics with sales in 2010 of more than $5 bln each. Hundreds of mAbs including bispecific mAbs and multispecific fusion proteins, mAbs conjugated with small molecule drugs and mAbs with optimized pharmacokinetics are in clinical trials. However, challenges remain and it appears that deeper understanding of mechanisms is needed to overcome major problems including resistance to therapy, access to targets, complexity of biological systems and individual variations. PMID:22520975

  18. How antibodies fold

    PubMed Central

    Feige, Matthias J.; Hendershot, Linda M.; Buchner, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    B cells use unusual strategies to enable the production of a seemingly unlimited number of antibodies from a very limited amount of DNA; however this approach also dramatically increases the likelihood that proteins will be produced that are unable to fold or assemble properly. Thus these cells are particularly dependent on quality control mechanisms to oversee the production of antibodies. Recent in vitro experiments demonstrate that Ig domains have evolved diverse folding strategies ranging from robust spontaneous folding to intrinsically disordered domains that require assembly with their partner domains in order to fold, and in vivo experiments reveal that these different folding characteristics form the basis for cellular checkpoints in Ig transport. Together these reports provide a detailed understanding of how B cells monitor and ensure the functional fidelity of Ig proteins. PMID:20022755

  19. Antibody Therapy for Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M.; Hamilton, Andrew J.; Guimarães, Allan J.

    2012-01-01

    The endemic human pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum is a major fungal pathogen with a broad variety of clinical presentations, ranging from mild, focal pulmonary disease to life-threatening systemic infections. Although azoles, such as itraconazole and voriconazole, and amphotericin B have significant activity against H. capsulatum, about 1 in 10 patients hospitalized due to histoplasmosis die. Hence, new approaches for managing disease are being sought. Over the past 10 years, studies have demonstrated that monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can modify the pathogenesis of histoplasmosis. Disease has been shown to be impacted by mAbs targeting either fungal cell surface proteins or host co-stimulatory molecules. This review will detail our current knowledge regarding the impact of antibody therapy on histoplasmosis. PMID:22347215

  20. Antibody-mediated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, W.D.; Lipsztein, R.; Dalton, J.F.

    1985-05-01

    Antibodies that react with antigens on the surface of tumor cells but not normal cells have great potential for cancer detection and therapy. If radiolabeled without loss of immunologic specificity, such antibodies may be able to deliver cytoxic amounts of radiation. Target- cell specificity and a high extraction coefficient are necessary with any radionuclide in order to minimize normal tissue irradiation. Tumor- cell-retention time and the rate of catabolized radionuclide will also influence ultimate applicability. Among the unanswered questions for choosing a radionuclide is the choice of particle emitter. Although classic beta emitters have been used in a number of clinical situations, they have not had a major impact on disease outcome except in diseases of the thyroid. Unfortunately, Auger emitters such as iodine 125 are cytotoxic only when localized within close proximity to the genome. On the other hand, alpha emitters such as astatine 211 eliminate the need for subcellular sequestration but not cell-specific localization. 34 references.

  1. nkx2.1 and nkx2.4 genes function partially redundant during development of the zebrafish hypothalamus, preoptic region, and pallidum

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Martha; Driever, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    During ventral forebrain development, orthologs of the homeodomain transcription factor Nkx2.1 control patterning of hypothalamus, preoptic region, and ventral telencephalon. However, the relative contributions of Nkx2.1 and Nkx2.4 to prosencephalon development are poorly understood. Therefore, we analyzed functions of the previously uncharacterized nkx2.4-like zgc:171531 as well as of the presumed nkx2.1 orthologs nkx2.1a and nkx2.1b in zebrafish forebrain development. Our results show that zgc:171531 and nkx2.1a display overlapping expression patterns and a high sequence similarity. Together with a high degree of synteny conservation, these findings indicate that both these genes indeed are paralogs of nkx2.4. As a result, we name zgc:171531 now nkx2.4a, and changed the name of nkx2.1a to nkx2.4b, and of nkx2.1b to nkx2.1. In nkx2.1, nkx2.4a, and nkx2.4b triple morpholino knockdown (nkx2TKD) embryos we observed a loss of the rostral part of prosomere 3 and its derivative posterior tubercular and hypothalamic structures. Furthermore, there was a loss of rostral and intermediate hypothalamus, while a residual preoptic region still develops. The reduction of the ventral diencephalon was accompanied by a ventral expansion of the dorsally expressed pax6, revealing a dorsalization of the basal hypothalamus. Within the telencephalon we observed a loss of pallidal markers, while striatum and pallium are forming. At the neuronal level, nkx2TKD morphants lacked several neurosecretory neuron types, including avp, crh, and pomc expressing cells in the hypothalamus, but still form oxt neurons in the preoptic region. Our data reveals that, while nkx2.1, nkx2.4a, and nkx2.4b genes act partially redundant in hypothalamic development, nkx2.1 is specifically involved in the development of rostral ventral forebrain including the pallidum and preoptic regions, whereas nkx2.4a and nkx2.4b control the intermediate and caudal hypothalamus. PMID:25520628

  2. Antibody-drug conjugate targets.

    PubMed

    Teicher, B A

    2009-12-01

    The requirements for a cell surface molecule to be suitable as an antibody-drug conjugate target are stringent. The notion that antibodies-directed toward targets on the surface of malignant cells could be used for drug delivery is not new. The history of antibody-drug conjugates has been marked by hurdles identified and overcome. Early conjugates used mouse antibodies, drugs that were either not sufficiently potent, were immunogenic (proteins) or were too toxic and linkers that were not sufficiently stable in circulation. Three main avenues have been explored using antibodies to target cytotoxic species to malignant cells, antibody-protein toxin conjugates (or antibody fragment-protein toxin fusion proteins), antibody-small molecule drug conjugates and antibody-enzyme conjugates administered along with small molecule prodrugs requiring metabolism by the conjugated enzyme to release the activate species. This review focuses on cell surface proteins that have been targeted primarily by antibody-small molecule drug conjugates and briefly discusses 34 targets being investigated. While only one antibody-drug conjugate has reached regulatory approval, there are nearly 20 of these in clinical trial. The time may have come for this technology to become a major contributor to improving treatment for cancer patients. PMID:20025606

  3. Commercial antibodies and their validation.

    PubMed

    Voskuil, Jla

    2014-01-01

    Despite an impressive growth in the business of research antibodies a general lack of trust in commercial antibodies remains in place. A variety of issues, each one potentially causing an antibody to fail, underpin the frustrations that scientists endure. Lots of money goes to waste in buying and trying one failing antibody after the other without realizing all the pitfalls that come with the product: Antibodies can get inactivated, both the biological material and the assay itself can potentially be flawed, a single antibody featuring in many different catalogues can be deemed as a set of different products, and a bad choice of antibody type, wrong dilutions, and lack of proper validation can all jeopardize the intended experiments. Antibodies endorsed by scientific research papers do not always meet the scientist's requirements either due to flawed specifications, or due to batch-to-batch variations. Antibodies can be found with Quality Control data obtained from previous batches that no longer represent the batch on sale. In addition, one cannot assume that every antibody is fit for every application. The best chance of success is to try an antibody that already was confirmed to perform correctly in the required platform. PMID:25324967

  4. Commercial antibodies and their validation

    PubMed Central

    Voskuil, JLA

    2014-01-01

    Despite an impressive growth in the business of research antibodies a general lack of trust in commercial antibodies remains in place. A variety of issues, each one potentially causing an antibody to fail, underpin the frustrations that scientists endure. Lots of money goes to waste in buying and trying one failing antibody after the other without realizing all the pitfalls that come with the product: Antibodies can get inactivated, both the biological material and the assay itself can potentially be flawed, a single antibody featuring in many different catalogues can be deemed as a set of different products, and a bad choice of antibody type, wrong dilutions, and lack of proper validation can all jeopardize the intended experiments. Antibodies endorsed by scientific research papers do not always meet the scientist’s requirements either due to flawed specifications, or due to batch-to-batch variations. Antibodies can be found with Quality Control data obtained from previous batches that no longer represent the batch on sale. In addition, one cannot assume that every antibody is fit for every application. The best chance of success is to try an antibody that already was confirmed to perform correctly in the required platform. PMID:25324967

  5. Microbials for the production of monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments

    PubMed Central

    Spadiut, Oliver; Capone, Simona; Krainer, Florian; Glieder, Anton; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody fragments represent the most important biopharmaceutical products today. Because full length antibodies are glycosylated, mammalian cells, which allow human-like N-glycosylation, are currently used for their production. However, mammalian cells have several drawbacks when it comes to bioprocessing and scale-up, resulting in long processing times and elevated costs. By contrast, antibody fragments, that are not glycosylated but still exhibit antigen binding properties, can be produced in microbial organisms, which are easy to manipulate and cultivate. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the expression systems, strain engineering, and production processes for the three main microbials used in antibody and antibody fragment production, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, and Escherichia coli. PMID:24183828

  6. Antibody Therapy for Pediatric Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vedi, Aditi; Ziegler, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing cure rates for pediatric leukemia, relapsed disease still carries a poor prognosis with significant morbidity and mortality. Novel targeted therapies are currently being investigated in an attempt to reduce adverse events and improve survival outcomes. Antibody therapies represent a form of targeted therapy that offers a new treatment paradigm. Monoclonal antibodies are active in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are currently in Phase III trials. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are the next generation of antibodies where a highly potent cytotoxic agent is bound to an antibody by a linker, resulting in selective targeting of leukemia cells. ADCs are currently being tested in clinical trials for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and ALL. Bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) antibodies are a construct whereby each antibody contains two binding sites, with one designed to engage the patient’s own immune system and the other to target malignant cells. BiTE antibodies show great promise as a novel and effective therapy for childhood leukemia. This review will outline recent developments in targeted agents for pediatric leukemia including monoclonal antibodies, ADCs, and BiTE antibodies. PMID:24795859

  7. Therapeutic antibodies, vaccines and antibodyomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The potential for antibodies to act as magic bullets for treatment of human disease was recognized a century ago, but its full realization has began to occur only during the last decade. A key to their current success is the ability to make libraries of antibodies/B cells, isolate a single species, and engineer it to be safe, efficacious and of high quality. Despite this progress, major challenges to the effective prevention, diagnosis and treatment of a vast majority of diseases remain. Limited success in the development of effective vaccines against diseases such as AIDS and cancer reflects our incomplete understanding of how antibodies are generated and function. Only a miniscule number of antibodies are characterized out of the universe of antibodies generated by the immune system. Knowledge of antibodyomesthe complete sets of antibodiescould help solve these and other challenges. PMID:20400863

  8. Guinea-pig reaginic antibody

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R. A.; Hajos, Silvia E.

    1973-01-01

    The physicochemical and biological properties of purified guinea-pig reaginic antibody were studied. It is a labile protein different to ?1. Its antibody activity is completely destroyed by heating at 56 for 6 hours and by treatment with mercaptoethanol. The capacity to give PCA is decreased by repeated freezing and thawing. It is a bivalent antibody, haemagglutinating, does not fix complement and is capable of sensitizing guinea-pig skin for PCA reaction after a latent period of a week but not after 3 hours. Reaginic antibody appears on day 78 after the first inoculation and the higher levels (PCA reaction) are obtained at the eleventh to thirteenth days. After the fifteenth to seventeenth days the PCA is negative. The reaginic antibody does not pass the placenta. Higher levels of reaginic antibody were obtained when the guinea-pigs were inoculated with the antigen in saline with simultaneous inoculation, intraperitoneally, of killed Bordetella pertussis, phase I. PMID:4354828

  9. Cancer imaging with radiolabeled antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenberg, D.M. )

    1990-01-01

    This book presents a perspective of the use of antibodies to target diagnostic isotopes to tumors. Antibodies with reasonable specificity can be developed against almost any substance. If selective targeting to cancer cells can be achieved, the prospects for a selective therapy are equally intriguing. But the development of cancer detection, or imaging, with radiolabeled antibodies has depended upon advances in a number of different areas, including cancer immunology and immunochemistry for identifying suitable antigen targets and antibodies to these targets, tumor biology for model systems, radiochemistry for he attachment of radionuclides to antibodies, molecular biology for reengineering the antibodies for safer and more effective use in humans, and nuclear medicine for providing the best imaging protocols and instrumentation to detect minute amounts of elevated radioactivity against a background of considerable noise. Accordingly, this book has been organized to address the advances that are being made in many of these areas.

  10. The future of monoclonal antibody technology

    PubMed Central

    Zider, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid growth of monoclonal antibody-based products, new technologies have emerged for creating modified forms of antibodies, including fragments, conjugates and multi-specific antibodies. We created a database of 450 therapeutic antibodies in development to determine which technologies and indications will constitute the next generation of antibody products. We conclude that the antibodies of the future will closely resemble the antibodies that have already been approved for commercial sale. PMID:20676053

  11. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O. )

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references.

  12. Antibodies: Protective, destructive and regulatory role

    SciTech Connect

    Milgrom, F.; Abeyounis, C.J.; Albini, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers under 10 subject headings. The headings are: Production and Function of Antibodies, Protective Role of Antibodies, Antibodies to Foreign and Neoplastic Cells, Autoantibodies, Regulatory Mechanisms, Allergy, Immune Complexes, Antibodies in Pregnancy and Aging, Administration of Antibodies for Prevention and Therapy, and Abstracts of Poster Presentations.

  13. High frequency of the 23S rRNA A2058G mutation of Treponema pallidum in Shanghai is associated with a current strategy for the treatment of syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haikong; Li, Kang; Gong, Weimin; Yan, Limeng; Gu, Xin; Chai, Ze; Guan, Zhifang; Zhou, Pingyu

    2015-01-01

    The preferred drugs for the treatment of syphilis, benzathine and procaine penicillin, have not been available in Shanghai for many years, and currently, the incidence of syphilis is increasing. Alternative antibiotics for patients with syphilis during the benzathine and procaine penicillin shortage include macrolides. The failure of macrolide treatment in syphilis patients has been reported in Shanghai, but the reason for this treatment failure remains unclear. We used polymerase chain reaction technology to detect a 23S rRNA A2058G mutation in Treponema pallidum in 109 specimens from syphilis patients. The use of azithromycin/erythromycin in the syphilis patients and the physicians' prescription habits were also assessed based on two questionnaires regarding the use of macrolides. A total of 104 specimens (95.4%) were positive for the A2058G mutation in both copies of the 23S rRNA gene, indicating macrolide resistance. A questionnaire provided to 122 dermatologists showed that during the penicillin shortage, they prescribed erythromycin and azithromycin for 8.24±13.95% and 3.21±6.37% of their patients, respectively, and in the case of penicillin allergy, erythromycin and azithromycin were prescribed 15.24±22.89% and 7.23±16.60% of the time, respectively. A second questionnaire provided to the syphilis patients showed that 150 (33.7%), 106 (23.8%) and 34 (7.6%) individuals had used azithromycin, erythromycin or both, respectively, although the majority did not use the drugs for syphilis treatment. Our findings suggest that macrolide resistance in Treponema pallidum is widespread in Shanghai. More than half of the syphilis patients had a history of macrolide use for other treatment purposes, which may have led to the high prevalence of macrolide resistance. Physicians in China are advised to not use azithromycin for early syphilis. PMID:26038763

  14. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of PCR Targeting the 47-Kilodalton Protein Membrane Gene of Treponema pallidum and PCR Targeting the DNA Polymerase I Gene: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gayet-Ageron, Angle; Combescure, Christophe; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ninet, Batrice; Perneger, Thomas V

    2015-11-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) testing now is recommended as a valid tool for the diagnosis of primary or secondary syphilis. The objectives were to systematically review and determine the optimal specific target gene to be used for Tp-PCR. Comparisons of the performance of the two main targets are tpp47 and polA genes were done using meta-analysis. Three electronic bibliographic databases, representing abstract books from five conferences specialized in infectious diseases from January 1990 to March 2015, were searched. Search keywords included ("syphilis" OR "Treponema pallidum" OR "neurosyphilis") AND ("PCR" OR "PCR" OR "molecular amplification"). We included diagnostic studies assessing the performance of Tp-PCR targeting tpp47 (tpp47-Tp-PCR) or the polA gene (polA-Tp-PCR) in ulcers from early syphilis. All studies were assessed against quality criteria using the QUADAS-2 tool. Of 37 studies identified, 62.2% were judged at low risk of bias or applicability. Most used the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) case definitions for primary or secondary (early) syphilis (89.2%; n = 33); 15 (40.5%) used darkfield microscopy (DFM). We did not find differences in sensitivity and specificity between the two Tp-PCR methods in the subgroup of studies using adequate reference tests. Among studies using DFM as the reference test, sensitivities were 79.8% (95% confidence intervals [CI], 72.7 to 85.4%) and 71.4% (46.0 to 88.0%) for tpp47-Tp-PCR and polA-Tp-PCR (P = 0.217), respectively; respective specificities were 95.3% (93.5 to 96.6%) and 93.7% (91.8 to 95.2%) (P = 0.304). Our findings suggest that the two Tp-PCR methods have similar accuracy and could be used interchangeably. PMID:26311859

  15. Antiphospholipid antibodies and infertility.

    PubMed

    Chighizola, C B; de Jesus, G R

    2014-10-01

    Since the late 1980s some publications have proposed that antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) may have some relationship with infertility, considering reported deleterious effects that aPL exert on trophoblast proliferation and growth. Although not included in current classification criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome, many physicians investigate for aPL in patients with a history of infertility, including antibodies not listed in classification criteria, and most of those patients will receive anticoagulant therapy if any of those antibodies have a result considered positive. A review of literature was conducted searching for studies that investigated the association of aPL and infertility and if aPL positivity alters in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome. The definition of infertility, routine work-up to exclude other causes of infertility, definition of IVF failure as inclusion criteria and control populations were heterogeneous among studies. Most of them enrolled women over 40 years of age, and exclusion of other confounding factors was also inconsistent. Of 29 studies that assessed aPL positivity rates in infertile women, the majority had small sample sizes, implying a lack of power, and 13 (44.8%) reported higher frequency of aPL in infertile patients compared to controls, but most of them investigated a panel of non-criteria aPL tests, whose clinical significance is highly controversial. Only two studies investigated all three criteria tests, and medium-high titer of anticardiolipin cut-off conforming to international guidelines was used in one study. Considering IVF outcome, there was also disparity in this definition: few studies assessed the live birth rate, others the implantation rate. Of 14 publications that addressed the relationship between aPL and IVF outcome, only two described a detrimental effect of these autoantibodies. In conclusion, available data do not support an association between aPL and infertility, and aPL positivity does not seem to influence IVF outcome. Well-designed clinical studies recruiting women with a clear diagnosis of infertility and a high-risk aPL profile should be performed to test whether clinically relevant aPL do-or not-exert an effect on human fertility. PMID:25228713

  16. The generation of antibody diversity

    PubMed Central

    Werblin, T. P.; Kim, Y. T.; Mage, Rose; Benacerraf, B.; Siskind, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    A genetically diverse population of sixty-four rabbits has been studied with respect to the concentration and affinity of anti-DNP antibody produced over the course of a year following a single injection of DNP-BGG. It was found that the responses of male and female members of the population were essentially identical throughout the entire course of the immune response. The effect of allotype on the concentration and affinity of the antibody produced was examined. It was observed that the b6 allotype was associated with the production of decreased concentrations of antibody, the b5 allotype with the production of increased concentrations of antibody, the a1 allotype with the production of high affinity antibody and the a2 allotype with the production of low affinity antibody when compared to the remainder of the population. A tendency was also seen for individuals to maintain, over the course of time, their relative position in the population with respect to the concentration and affinity of the antibody they produce. Finally, it was observed that the mean affinity of the population continually shifted towards high affinity over the period of observation and that the standard deviation of the population with regard to the affinity of the antibody produced decreased with time. PMID:4124705

  17. Micromechanical antibody sensor

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Jacobson, K. Bruce (Oak Ridge, TN); Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Knoxville, TN); Kennel, Stephen J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Warmack, Robert J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A sensor apparatus is provided using a microcantilevered spring element having a coating of a detector molecule such as an antibody or antigen. A sample containing a target molecule or substrate is provided to the coating. The spring element bends in response to the stress induced by the binding which occurs between the detector and target molecules. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers.

  18. Novel Point-of-Care Test for Simultaneous Detection of Nontreponemal and Treponemal Antibodies in Patients with Syphilis ?

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Arnold R.; Esfandiari, Javan; Kumar, Shailendra; Ashton, Matthew; Kikkert, Susan E.; Park, Mahin M.; Ballard, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a point-of-care immunochromatographic test for the simultaneous detection of both nontreponemal and treponemal antibodies in the sera of patients with syphilis that acts as both a screening and a confirmatory test. A total of 1,601 banked serum samples were examined by the dual test, and the results were compared to those obtained using a quantitative rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test and the Treponema pallidum passive particle agglutination (TP-PA) assay. Compared to the RPR test, the reactive concordance of the dual test nontreponemal line was 98.4% when the RPR titers of sera were ?1:2 and the nonreactive concordance was 98.6%. Compared to the TP-PA assay, the reactive and nonreactive concordances of the treponemal line were 96.5% and 95.5%, respectively. These results indicate that the dual test could be used for the serological diagnosis of syphilis in primary health care clinics or resource-poor settings and therefore improve rates of treatment where patients may fail to return for their laboratory results. PMID:20881177

  19. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed. PMID:20930555

  20. Endogenous Antibodies for Tumor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Barrie S.; Honeyman, Joshua N.; Darcy, David G.; Smith, Peter T.; Williams, Andrew R.; Lim, Irene Isabel P.; Johnson, Linda K.; Gnen, Mithat; Simon, Joel S.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer immunology has provided diagnostic and therapeutic instruments through serum autoantibody biomarkers and exogenous monoclonal antibodies. While some endogenous antibodies are found within or surrounding transformed tissue, the extent to which this exists has not been entirely characterized. We find that in transgenic and xenograft mouse models of cancer, endogenous gamma immunoglobulin (IgG) is present at higher concentration in malignantly transformed organs compared to non-transformed organs in the same mouse or organs of cognate wild-type mice. The enrichment of endogenous antibodies within the malignant tissue provides a potential means of identifying and tracking malignant cells in vivo as they mutate and diversify. Exploiting these antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes is possible through the use of agents that bind endogenous antibodies. PMID:24875800

  1. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed. PMID:20930555

  2. Antibodies - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    NCI announces the release of monoclonal antipeptide antibodies from rabbit for distribution on the antibody portal. There are 60 recently added monoclonal antibodies, with 56 generated from mouse and 4 generated from rabbit.

  3. Platelet-associated antibodies blood test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a part of the blood that help ... be a harmful substance. In the case of platelet antibodies, your body created antibodies to attack platelets. ...

  4. Radiolabeled antibodies in cancer. Oncology Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories through the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiolabeled antibodies--labeling and imaging techniques; Radiolabeled antibodies--carcinoembryonic antigen; Radiolabeled antibodies--alpha-fetoprotein; Radiolabeled antibodies--human chorionic gonadotropin; Radiolabeled antibodies--ferritin; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of colorectal tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of malignant melanoma; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of urogenital tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of thyroid tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--other clinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--selected preclinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--reviews.

  5. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ∼ four new products per year, ∼70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion. PMID:25529996

  6. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ∼ four new products per year, ∼ 70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion. PMID:25529996

  7. Reducing heterophilic antibody interference in immunoassays using single chain antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Tan, Ruimin; Fischer, Christopher J.; Victry, Kristin D.; Zangar, Richard C.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2011-12-15

    Sandwich ELISA microarrays have the potential to simultaneously quantify the levels of multiple diagnostic targets in a biological sample. However, as seen with traditional ELISA diagnostics, heterophilic antibodies (HA) in patient sera have the potential to cause interference in these assays. We demonstrate here that reducing the diagnostic capture antibody to its minimal functional unit, the variable heavy and light domains artificially connected with a short polypeptide linker (scFv), is an effective strategy for reducing the HA assay interference.

  8. Marketed therapeutic antibodies compendium

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M.

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently being approved for marketing in Europe and the United States, as well as other countries, on a regular basis. As more mAbs become available to physicians and patients, keeping track of the number, types, production cell lines, antigenic targets, and dates and locations of approvals has become challenging. Data are presented here for 34 mAbs that were approved in either Europe or the United States (US) as of March 2012, and nimotuzumab, which is marketed outside Europe and the US. Of the 34 mAbs, 28 (abciximab, rituximab, basiliximab, palivizumab, infliximab, trastuzumab, alemtuzumab, adalimumab, tositumomab-I131, cetuximab, ibrituximab tiuxetan, omalizumab, bevacizumab, natalizumab, ranibizumab, panitumumab, eculizumab, certolizumab pegol, golimumab, canakinumab, catumaxomab, ustekinumab, tocilizumab, ofatumumab, denosumab, belimumab, ipilimumab, brentuximab) are currently marketed in Europe or the US. Data for six therapeutic mAbs (muromonab-CD3, nebacumab, edrecolomab, daclizumab, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, efalizumab) that were approved but have been withdrawn or discontinued from marketing in Europe or the US are also included. PMID:22531442

  9. Heterophilic antibodies: a problem for all immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Boscato, L M; Stuart, M C

    1988-01-01

    We verified that antibody-binding substances in serum that interfere in two-site immunoassays involving murine antibodies are heterophilic antibodies. Incubation of serum containing heterophilic antibodies and a murine monoclonal antibody to human choriogonadotropin (hCG) leads to formation of a series of soluble immune complexes. We investigated the recognition of hCG by reagent antibody in the presence of heterophilic antibodies and found this recognition to be diminished. Consequently, about 30% of serum samples containing heterophilic antibodies falsely appear to contain increased concentrations of hCG. The effect on analyte recognition probably results from steric inhibition of hCG binding to complexed antibody. Heterophilic antibodies detected with a murine antibody also bound immunoglobulin from several other species but did not bind all of those tested. PMID:3338181

  10. Surface chemistries for antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays promise to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The original technology for printing ELISA microarray chips and capturing antibodies on slides was derived from the DNA microarray field. However, due to the need to maintain antibody structure and function when immobilized, surface chemistries used for DNA microarrays are not always appropriate for ELISA microarrays. In order to identify better surface chemistries for antibody capture, a number of commercial companies and academic research groups have developed new slide types that could improve antibody function in microarray applications. In this review we compare and contrast the commercially available slide chemistries, as well as highlight some promising recent advances in the field.

  11. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePLUS

    ... but may react with a broad range of different red blood cell antigen types, including the person's own. These types of antibodies can occur in association with autoimmune disorders , lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukemia , ...

  12. Hybridoma technologies for antibody production.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Masahiro; Tsumoto, Kanta

    2011-03-01

    Hybridoma technology features effective usage of innate functions of both immune cells and cancers, allowing production of hybridoma cells, which continuously generate monoclonal antibodies specific to antigens of interest. For standard generation of hybridoma cells, B lymphocytes must be somatically fused with myeloma cells using various technologies. However, the methods generally do not necessarily result in selective fusion of target B lymphocytes with myeloma cells. To overcome this problem, we have developed a new hybridoma technology that involves preselection of B lymphocytes with target antigens based on immunoglobulin receptors and selective fusion of B cell-myeloma cell complexes with electrical pulses. The advanced methodology, termed B-cell targeting, multitargeting and stereospecific targeting, may be applicable to simultaneous production of monoclonal antibodies, selective production of stereospecific monoclonal antibodies, and also to efficient generation of human monoclonal antibodies for clinical purposes. PMID:21395379

  13. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    MedlinePLUS

    Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining of cells. These substances prevent blood clotting in ... Most often lupus anticoagulants and aPL are found in people with ... as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Lupus anticoagulants and ...

  14. Antibody immobilization using heterobifunctional crosslinkers.

    PubMed

    Shriver-Lake, L C; Donner, B; Edelstein, R; Breslin, K; Bhatia, S K; Ligler, F S

    1997-01-01

    Covalent attachment of functional proteins to a solid support is important for biosensors. One method employs thiol-terminal silanes and heterobifunctional crosslinkers such as N-succinimidyl 4-maleimidobutyrate (GMBS) to immobilize proteins through amino groups onto glass, silica, silicon or platinum surfaces. In this report, several heterobifunctional crosslinkers are compared to GMBS for their ability to immobilize active antibodies onto glass cover slips at a high density. Antibodies were immobilized at densities of 74-220 ng/cm2 with high levels of specific antigen binding. Carbohydrate-reactive crosslinkers were also compared to GMBS using a fiber optic biosensor to detect fluorescently-labeled antigen. At the concentrations tested, the antibodies immobilized with carbohydrate-reactive crosslinkers bound more antigen than GMBS immobilized antibodies as indicated by the fluorescence signal. PMID:9451798

  15. Fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Vlasak, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Fragmentation is a degradation pathway ubiquitously observed in proteins despite the remarkable stability of peptide bond; proteins differ only by how much and where cleavage occurs. The goal of this review is to summarize reports regarding the non-enzymatic fragmentation of the peptide backbone of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The sites in the polypeptide chain susceptible to fragmentation are determined by a multitude of factors. Insights are provided on the intimate chemical mechanisms that can make some bonds prone to cleavage due to the presence of specific side-chains. In addition to primary structure, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures have a significant impact in modulating the distribution of cleavage sites by altering local flexibility, accessibility to solvent or bringing in close proximity side chains that are remote in sequence. This review focuses on cleavage sites observed in the constant regions of mAbs, with special emphasis on hinge fragmentation. The mechanisms responsible for backbone cleavage are strongly dependent on pH and can be catalyzed by metals or radicals. The distribution of cleavage sites are different under acidic compared to basic conditions, with fragmentation rates exhibiting a minimum in the pH range 56; therefore, the overall fragmentation pattern observed for a mAb is a complex result of structural and solvent conditions. A critical review of the techniques used to monitor fragmentation is also presented; usually a compromise has to be made between a highly sensitive method with good fragment separation and the capability to identify the cleavage site. The effect of fragmentation on the function of a mAb must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on whether cleavage sites are observed in the variable or constant regions, and on the mechanism of action of the molecule. PMID:21487244

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to mitotic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, F M; Tsao, T Y; Fowler, S K; Rao, P N

    1983-01-01

    Certain proteins or activities are present in mitotic cells but not in interphase cells. These proteins may be synthesized or activated, or both, just prior to mitosis and are responsible for the breakdown of the nuclear envelope and the condensation of chromosomes. To learn more about the nature of these proteins, we raised monoclonal antibodies to mitotic cells. Spleen cells from mice immunized with a 0.15 M NaCl extract of synchronized mitotic HeLa cells were fused with SP2/0-Ag14 mouse myeloma cells, and hybrids were selected in medium containing hypoxanthine, methotrexate, thymidine, and glycine. Two different hybridoma clones secreting antibodies reactive with mitotic and meiotic cells from every species tested were isolated. Chromosomes as well as cytoplasm in mitotic cells reacted with the antibodies, as detected by indirect immunofluorescence. The proteins from mitotic cells were separated by electrophoresis in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide slab gels, transferred to nitrocellulose sheets, and stained immunochemically. The two antibodies, designated MPM-1 and MPM-2, recognize a family of polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 0.40 to greater than 200 kilodaltons (kDa). Both antibodies reacted strongly with three polypeptide bands of 182 kDa, 118 kDa, and 70 kDa. Only mitotic cells exhibited the protein bands that were recognized by the antibodies. All these bands were found to be phosphoproteins as shown by 32P labeling and autoradiography and their removal by alkaline phosphatase treatment. Images PMID:6574461

  17. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, David Sherman

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  18. Computer-aided antibody design

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Daisuke; Shirai, Hiroki; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Nakamura, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    Recent clinical trials using antibodies with low toxicity and high efficiency have raised expectations for the development of next-generation protein therapeutics. However, the process of obtaining therapeutic antibodies remains time consuming and empirical. This review summarizes recent progresses in the field of computer-aided antibody development mainly focusing on antibody modeling, which is divided essentially into two parts: (i) modeling the antigen-binding site, also called the complementarity determining regions (CDRs), and (ii) predicting the relative orientations of the variable heavy (VH) and light (VL) chains. Among the six CDR loops, the greatest challenge is predicting the conformation of CDR-H3, which is the most important in antigen recognition. Further computational methods could be used in drug development based on crystal structures or homology models, including antibody–antigen dockings and energy calculations with approximate potential functions. These methods should guide experimental studies to improve the affinities and physicochemical properties of antibodies. Finally, several successful examples of in silico structure-based antibody designs are reviewed. We also briefly review structure-based antigen or immunogen design, with application to rational vaccine development. PMID:22661385

  19. Neutralising Antibodies against Ricin Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Prigent, Julie; Panigai, Laetitia; Lamourette, Patricia; Sauvaire, Didier; Devilliers, Karine; Plaisance, Marc; Volland, Herv; Crminon, Christophe; Simon, Stphanie

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have listed the potential bioweapon ricin as a Category B Agent. Ricin is a so-called A/B toxin produced by plants and is one of the deadliest molecules known. It is easy to prepare and no curative treatment is available. An immunotherapeutic approach could be of interest to attenuate or neutralise the effects of the toxin. We sought to characterise neutralising monoclonal antibodies against ricin and to develop an effective therapy. For this purpose, mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced against the two chains of ricin toxin (RTA and RTB). Seven mAbs were selected for their capacity to neutralise the cytotoxic effects of ricin in vitro. Three of these, two anti-RTB (RB34 and RB37) and one anti-RTA (RA36), when used in combination improved neutralising capacity in vitro with an IC50 of 31 ng/ml. Passive administration of association of these three mixed mAbs (4.7 g) protected mice from intranasal challenges with ricin (5 LD50). Among those three antibodies, anti-RTB antibodies protected mice more efficiently than the anti-RTA antibody. The combination of the three antibodies protected mice up to 7.5 hours after ricin challenge. The strong in vivo neutralising capacity of this three mAbs combination makes it potentially useful for immunotherapeutic purposes in the case of ricin poisoning or possibly for prevention. PMID:21633505

  20. Antibodies to watch in 2015.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    The commercial pipeline of recombinant antibody therapeutics is robust and dynamic. As of early December 2014, a total of 6 such products (vedolizumab, siltuximab, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, blinatumomab) were granted first marketing approvals in 2014. As discussed in this perspective on antibodies in late-stage development, the outlook for additional approvals, potentially still in 2014 and certainly in 2015, is excellent as marketing applications for 7 antibody therapeutics (secukinumab, evolocumab, mepolizumab, dinutuximab, nivolumab, blinatumomab, necitumumab) are undergoing a first regulatory review in the EU or US. Of the 39 novel mAbs currently in Phase 3 studies, a marketing application for one (alirocumab) may be submitted in late 2014, and marketing application submissions for at least 4 (reslizumab, ixekizumab, ocrelizumab, obiltoxaximab) are expected in 2015. Other 'antibodies to watch' are those in Phase 3 studies with estimated primary completion dates in late 2014 or 2015, which includes 13 for non-cancer indications (brodalumab, bimagrumab, bococizumab, MABp1, gevokizumab, dupilumab, sirukumab, sarilumab, tildrakizumab, guselkumab, epratuzumab, combination of actoxumab + bezlotoxumab, romosozumab) and 2 (racotumomab and clivatuzumab tetraxetan) undergoing evaluation as treatments for cancer. In addition to the novel antibody therapeutics mentioned, biosimilar infliximab and biosimilar trastuzumab are 'antibodies to watch' in 2015 because of their potential for entry into the US market and regulatory review, respectively. PMID:25484055

  1. Antibodies to watch in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industrys progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the Antibodies to watch series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administrations Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed. PMID:24284914

  2. Antibodies to watch in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    The commercial pipeline of recombinant antibody therapeutics is robust and dynamic. As of early December 2014, a total of 6 such products (vedolizumab, siltuximab, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, blinatumomab) were granted first marketing approvals in 2014. As discussed in this perspective on antibodies in late-stage development, the outlook for additional approvals, potentially still in 2014 and certainly in 2015, is excellent as marketing applications for 6 antibody therapeutics (secukinumab, evolocumab, mepolizumab, dinutuximab, nivolumab, necitumumab) are undergoing a first regulatory review in the EU or US. Of the 39 novel mAbs currently in Phase 3 studies, a marketing application for one (alirocumab) may be submitted in late 2014, and marketing application submissions for at least 4 (reslizumab, ixekizumab, ocrelizumab, obiltoxaximab) are expected in 2015. Other ‘antibodies to watch’ are those in Phase 3 studies with estimated primary completion dates in late 2014 or 2015, which includes 13 for non-cancer indications (brodalumab, bimagrumab, bococizumab, MABp1, gevokizumab, dupilumab, sirukumab, sarilumab, tildrakizumab, guselkumab, epratuzumab, combination of actoxumab + bezlotoxumab, romosozumab) and 2 (racotumomab and clivatuzumab tetraxetan) undergoing evaluation as treatments for cancer. In addition to the novel antibody therapeutics mentioned, biosimilar infliximab and biosimilar trastuzumab are ‘antibodies to watch’ in 2015 because of their potential for entry into the US market and regulatory review, respectively. PMID:25484055

  3. Rab antibody characterization: comparison of Rab14 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Andrew J; McCaffrey, Mary W

    2015-01-01

    Rab14 functions in the endocytic recycling pathway, having been implicated in the trafficking of the ADAM10 protease, GLUT4, and components of cell-cell junctions to the plasma membrane. It localizes predominantly to endocytic membranes with a pool also found on trans-Golgi network (TGN) membranes, and is most closely related to the Rab11 subfamily of GTPases. Certain intracellular bacteria such as Legionella pneumophila, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Salmonella enterica utilize Rab14 to promote their maturation and replication. Furthermore, the HIV envelope glycoprotein complex subverts the function of Rab14, and its effector the Rab Coupling Protein (RCP), in order to direct its transport to the plasma membrane. Since the use of antibodies is critical for the functional characterization of cellular proteins and their specificity and sensitivity is crucial in drawing reliable conclusions, it is important to rigorously characterize antibodies prior to their use in cell biology or biochemistry experiments. This is all the more critical in the case of antibodies raised to a protein which belongs to a protein family. In this chapter, we present our evaluation of the specificity and sensitivity of a number of commercially available Rab14 antibodies. We hope that this analysis provides guidance for researchers for antibody characterization prior to its use in cellular biology or biochemistry. PMID:25800840

  4. The Antibody Two-Step Solution

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Problems with antibody quality have been described in numerous recent publications. In the present commentary it is argued that these quality problems are due primarily to issues of antibody variability and antibody validation. Further it is argued that the problem of antibody variability must be solved before validation can be useful. A two-step solution to the antibody problem is thus proposed. PMID:26834990

  5. Validating Antibodies to the Cannabinoid CB2 Receptor: Antibody Sensitivity Is Not Evidence of Antibody Specificity.

    PubMed

    Marchalant, Yannick; Brownjohn, Philip W; Bonnet, Amandine; Kleffmann, Torsten; Ashton, John C

    2014-03-26

    Antibody-based methods for the detection and quantification of membrane integral proteins, in particular, the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), have been plagued with issues of primary antibody specificity. In this report, we investigate one of the most commonly utilized commercial antibodies for the cannabinoid CB2 receptor, a GPCR, using immunoblotting in combination with mass spectrometry. In this way, we were able to develop powerful negative and novel positive controls. By doing this, we are able to demonstrate that it is possible for an antibody to be sensitive for a protein of interest-in this case CB2-but still cross-react with other proteins and therefore lack specificity. Specifically, we were able to use western blotting combined with mass spectrometry to unequivocally identify CB2 protein in over-expressing cell lines. This shows that a common practice of validating antibodies with positive controls only is insufficient to ensure antibody reliability. In addition, our work is the first to develop a label-free method of protein detection using mass spectrometry that, with further refinement, could provide unequivocal identification of CB2 receptor protein in native tissues. PMID:24670796

  6. Antibody conjugate therapeutics: challenges and potential.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Chari, Ravi V J

    2011-10-15

    Antibody conjugates are a diverse class of therapeutics consisting of a cytotoxic agent linked covalently to an antibody or antibody fragment directed toward a specific cell surface target expressed by tumor cells. The notion that antibodies directed toward targets on the surface of malignant cells could be used for drug delivery is not new. The history of antibody conjugates is marked by hurdles that have been identified and overcome. Early conjugates used mouse antibodies; cytotoxic agents that were immunogenic (proteins), too toxic, or not sufficiently potent; and linkers that were not sufficiently stable in circulation. Investigators have explored 4 main avenues using antibodies to target cytotoxic agents to malignant cells: antibody-protein toxin (or antibody fragment-protein toxin fusion) conjugates, antibody-chelated radionuclide conjugates, antibody-small-molecule drug conjugates, and antibody-enzyme conjugates administered along with small-molecule prodrugs that require metabolism by the conjugated enzyme to release the activated species. Only antibody-radionuclide conjugates and antibody-drug conjugates have reached the regulatory approval stage, and nearly 20 antibody conjugates are currently in clinical trials. The time may have come for this technology to become a major contributor to improving treatment for cancer patients. PMID:22003066

  7. Antibodies to watch in 2016.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2016-01-01

    The number of novel antibody therapeutics that received first marketing approvals in 2015 met expectations, with 6 (alirocumab (Praluent®), evolocumab (Repatha®), daratumumab (Darzalex®), dinutuximab (Unituxin®), idarucizumab (Praxbind®), mepolizumab (Nucala®)) granted first approvals as of mid-November*. Seven novel antibody therapeutics (begelomab, brodalumab, elotuzumab, ixekizumab, necitumumab, obiltoxaximab, reslizumab) are in regulatory review, and thus a similar number, if not more, are projected to gain first approvals in 2016. Commercial late-stage antibody therapeutics development exceeded expectations by increasing from 39 candidates in Phase 3 studies as of late 2014 to 53 as of late 2015. Of the 53 candidates, transitions to regulatory review by the end of 2016 are projected for 8 (atezolizumab, benralizumab, bimagrumab, durvalumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, lebrikizumab, ocrelizumab, tremelimumab). Other "antibodies to watch" include 15 candidates (bavituximab, bococizumab, dupilumab, fasinumab, fulranumab, gevokizumab, guselkumab, ibalizumab, LY2951742, onartuzumab, REGN2222, roledumab, romosozumab, sirukumab, Xilonix) undergoing evaluation in Phase 3 studies that have estimated primary completion dates in 2016. As evidenced by the antibody therapeutics discussed in this perspective, the biopharmaceutical industry has a highly active late-stage clinical pipeline that may deliver numerous new products to the global market in the near future. *See Note added in proof for updates through December 31, 2015. PMID:26651519

  8. Antibodies: an alternative for antibiotics?

    PubMed

    Berghman, L R; Abi-Ghanem, D; Waghela, S D; Ricke, S C

    2005-04-01

    In 1967, the success of vaccination programs, combined with the seemingly unstoppable triumph of antibiotics, prompted the US Surgeon General to declare that "it was time to close the books on infectious diseases." We now know that the prediction was overly optimistic and that the fight against infectious diseases is here to stay. During the last 20 yr, infectious diseases have indeed made a staggering comeback for a variety of reasons, including resistance against existing antibiotics. As a consequence, several alternatives to antibiotics are currently being considered or reconsidered. Passive immunization (i.e., the administration of more or less pathogen-specific antibodies to the patient) prior to or after exposure to the disease-causing agent is one of those alternative strategies that was almost entirely abandoned with the introduction of chemical antibiotics but that is now gaining interest again. This review will discuss the early successes and limitations of passive immunization, formerly referred to as "serum therapy," the current use of antibody administration for prophylaxis or treatment of infectious diseases in agriculture, and, finally, recent developments in the field of antibody engineering and "molecular farming" of antibodies in various expression systems. Especially the potential of producing therapeutic antibodies in crops that are routine dietary components of farm animals, such as corn and soy beans, seems to hold promise for future application in the fight against infectious diseases. PMID:15844826

  9. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-22

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  10. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  11. Communication: Antibody stability and behavior on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Derek B.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2015-08-01

    Antibody microarrays have the potential to revolutionize molecular detection in scientific, medical, and other biosensor applications, but their current use is limited because of poor reliability. It is hypothesized that one reason for their poor performance results from strong antibody-surface interactions that destabilize the antibody structure and create steric interference for antigen recognition. Using a recently developed coarse-grain protein-surface model that has been parameterized against experimental data, antibody-surface interactions for two antibody orientations on two types of surfaces have been investigated. The results show that regardless of attachment geometry, antibodies tend to collapse onto hydrophobic surfaces and exhibit lower overall stability compared to antibodies on hydrophilic surfaces or in bulk solution. The results provide an unprecedented view into the dynamics of antibodies on surfaces and offer new insights into the poor performance exhibited by current antibody microarrays.

  12. STUDIES ON THE CONTROL OF ANTIBODY SYNTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Siskind, Gregory W.; Dunn, Philip; Walker, J. Geoffrey

    1968-01-01

    The effect of antigen dose on the kinetics of circulating antibody synthesis and on antibody affinity was studied in a haptenic system. High doses of antigen resulted, early in immunization, in higher concentrations of antibody followed later in the immune response by decreased serum levels of antibody as compared with lower doses of antigen. The affinity of the initial antibody synthesized was very similar over a wide antigen dose range. Subsequently, however, a rapid rise in affinity was seen in animals immunized with low doses of antigen, while relatively little change in affinity was seen in animals immunized with higher antigen doses. Suppression of active antibody formation by passive antiserum led to an increase in antibody affinity. The results are discussed in terms of the mechanisms involved in the selection of a population of cells to participate in the immune response and the mechanisms whereby antigen dose and circulating antibody function to control antibody synthesis. PMID:4169440

  13. Production of recombinant antibodies using bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Shukra, A. M.; Sridevi, N. V.; Dev Chandran

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant antibody fragments such as Fab, scFv, diabodies, triabodies, single domain antibodies and minibodies have recently emerged as potential alternatives to monoclonal antibodies, which can be engineered using phage display technology. These antibodies match the strengths of conventionally produced monoclonal antibodies and offer advantages for the development of immunodiagnostic kits and assays. These fragments not only retain the specificity of the whole monoclonal antibodies but also easy to express and produce in prokaryotic expression system. Further, these antibody fragments are genetically stable, less expensive, easy to modify in response to viral mutations and safer than monoclonal antibodies for use in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This review describes the potential of antibody fragments generated using phage display and their use as diagnostic reagents. PMID:24883194

  14. Autologous antibodies that bind neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujing; Sholler, Giselle S; Shukla, Girja S; Pero, Stephanie C; Carman, Chelsea L; Zhao, Ping; Krag, David N

    2015-11-01

    Antibody therapy of neuroblastoma is promising and our goal is to derive antibodies from patients with neuroblastoma for developing new therapeutic antibodies. The feasibility of using residual bone marrow obtained for clinical indications as a source of tumor cells and a source of antibodies was assessed. From marrow samples, neuroblastoma cells were recovered, grown in cell culture and also implanted into mice to create xenografts. Mononuclear cells from the marrow were used as a source to generate phage display antibody libraries and also hybridomas. Growth of neuroblastoma patient cells was possible both in vitro and as xenografts. Antibodies from the phage libraries and from the monoclonal hybridomas bound autologous neuroblastoma cells with some selectivity. It appears feasible to recover neuroblastoma cells from residual marrow specimens and to generate human antibodies that bind autologous neuroblastoma cells. Expansion of this approach is underway to collect more specimens, optimize methods to generate antibodies, and to evaluate the bioactivity of neuroblastoma-binding antibodies. PMID:26210205

  15. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  16. Antibody recognition of carbohydrate epitopes.

    PubMed

    Haji-Ghassemi, Omid; Blackler, Ryan J; Martin Young, N; Evans, Stephen V

    2015-09-01

    Carbohydrate antigens are valuable as components of vaccines for bacterial infectious agents and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and for generating immunotherapeutics against cancer. The crystal structures of anti-carbohydrate antibodies in complex with antigen reveal the key features of antigen recognition and provide information that can guide the design of vaccines, particularly synthetic ones. This review summarizes structural features of anti-carbohydrate antibodies to over 20 antigens, based on six categories of glyco-antigen: (i) the glycan shield of HIV glycoproteins; (ii) tumor epitopes; (iii) glycolipids and blood group A antigen; (iv) internal epitopes of bacterial lipopolysaccharides; (v) terminal epitopes on polysaccharides and oligosaccharides, including a group of antibodies to Kdo-containing Chlamydia epitopes; and (vi) linear homopolysaccharides. PMID:26033938

  17. Emerging antibody-based products.

    PubMed

    Whaley, Kevin J; Morton, Josh; Hume, Steve; Hiatt, Ernie; Bratcher, Barry; Klimyuk, Victor; Hiatt, Andrew; Pauly, Michael; Zeitlin, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-based products are not widely available to address many global health challenges due to high costs, limited manufacturing capacity, and long manufacturing lead times. There are now tremendous opportunities to address these industrialization challenges as a result of revolutionary advances in plant virus-based transient expression. This review focuses on some antibody-based products that are in preclinical and clinical development, and have scaled up manufacturing and purification (mg of purified mAb/kg of biomass). Plant virus-based antibody products provide lower upfront cost, shorter time to clinical and market supply, and lower cost of goods (COGs). Further, some plant virus-based mAbs may provide improvements in pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy. PMID:22772797

  18. Antibodies to watch in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The transitions of antibody therapeutics to late-stage clinical development, regulatory review and the market are proceeding at a rapid pace in 2013. Since late 2012, two monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics (itolizumab, trastuzumab emtansine) received their first approvals, first marketing applications for three mAbs (vedolizumab, ramucirumab, obinutuzumab) were submitted to regulatory agencies, and five mAbs (brodalumab, MABp1, moxetumomab pasudotox, tildrakizumab, rilotumumab) entered their first Phase 3 studies. The current total of commercially-sponsored antibody therapeutics undergoing evaluation in late-stage studies is 30. Recently announced study results for farletuzumab, naptumomab estafenatox, and tabalumab indicate that clinical endpoints were not met in some Phase 3 studies of these product candidates. PMID:23727858

  19. Novel Antibody Vectors for Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Olafsen, Tove; Wu, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    Non-invasive molecular imaging approaches include nuclear, optical, MRI, CT, ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging, which require accumulation of a signal delivered by a probe at the target site. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are high affinity molecules that can be used for specific, high signal delivery to cell surface molecules. However, their long circulation time in blood makes them unsuitable as imaging probes. Efforts to improve antibodies pharmacokinetics without compromising affinity and specificity have been made through protein engineering. Antibody variants that differ in antigen binding sites and size have been generated and evaluated as imaging probes to target tissues of interest. Fast clearing fragments such as single-chain Fv (scFv; 25 kDa) with one antigen binding site (monovalent) demonstrated low accumulation in tumors due the low exposure time to the target. Using scFv as building block to produce larger, bivalent fragments such as scFv dimers (diabodies, 50 kDa) and scFv-fusion proteins (80 kDa minibodies and 105 kDa scFv-Fc) resulted in higher tumor accumulation due to their longer residence time in blood. Imaging studies with these fragments following radiolabeling have demonstrated excellent, high contrast images in gamma cameras and PET scanners. Several studies have also investigated antibody fragments conjugated to fluorescence (near infrared dyes), bioluminescence (luciferases) and quantum dots for optical imaging and iron oxides nanoparticles for MRI. However, these studies indicate that there are several factors that influence successful targeting and imaging. These include stability of the antibody fragment, the labeling chemistry (direct or indirect), whether critical residues are modified, the number of antigen expressed on the cell, and whether the target has a rapid recycling rate or internalizes upon binding. The preclinical data presented are compelling and it is evident that antibody-based molecular imaging tracers will play an important future role in the diagnosis and management of cancer and other diseases. PMID:20350626

  20. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    DOEpatents

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  1. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    DOEpatents

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shuptrine, Casey; Surana, Rishi; Weiner, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, the clinical utility of monoclonal antibodies has been realized and antibodies are now a mainstay for the treatment of cancer. Antibodies have the unique capacity to target and kill tumor cells while simultaneously activating immune effectors to kill tumor cells through the complement cascade or antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). This multifaceted mechanism of action combined with target specificity underlies the capacity of antibodies to elicit anti-tumor responses while minimizing the frequency and magnitude of adverse events. This review will focus on mechanisms of action, clinical applications and putative mechanisms of resistance to monoclonal antibody therapy in the context of cancer. PMID:22245472

  3. The European antibody network's practical guide to finding and validating suitable antibodies for research.

    PubMed

    Roncador, Giovanna; Engel, Pablo; Maestre, Lorena; Anderson, Amanda P; Cordell, Jacqueline L; Cragg, Mark S; erbec, Vladka ?; Jones, Margaret; Lisnic, Vanda J; Kremer, Leonor; Li, Demin; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Pascual, Nria; Rodrguez-Barbosa, Jose-Ignacio; Torensma, Ruurd; Turley, Helen; Pulford, Karen; Banham, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are widely exploited as research/diagnostic tools and therapeutics. Despite providing exciting research opportunities, the multitude of available antibodies also offers a bewildering array of choice. Importantly, not all companies comply with the highest standards, and thus many reagents fail basic validation tests. The responsibility for antibodies being fit for purpose rests, surprisingly, with their user. This paper condenses the extensive experience of the European Monoclonal Antibody Network to help researchers identify antibodies specific for their target antigen. A stepwise strategy is provided for prioritising antibodies and making informed decisions regarding further essential validation requirements. Web-based antibody validation guides provide practical approaches for testing antibody activity and specificity. We aim to enable researchers with little or no prior experience of antibody characterization to understand how to determine the suitability of their antibody for its intended purpose, enabling both time and cost effective generation of high quality antibody-based data fit for publication. PMID:26418356

  4. Emerging antibody combinations in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, Kandasamy

    2011-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has become a general approach for specifically targeting and treating human disease. In oncology, the therapeutic utility of mAbs is usually evaluated in the context of treatment with standard of care, as well as other small molecule targeted therapies. Many anti-cancer antibody modalities have achieved validation, including the targeting of growth factor and angiogenesis pathways, the induction of tumor cell killing or apoptosis and the blocking of immune inhibitory mechanisms to stimulate anti-tumor responses. But, as with other targeted therapies, few antibodies are curative because of biological complexities that underlie tumor formation and redundancies in molecular pathways that enable tumors to adapt and show resistance to treatment. This review discusses the combinations of antibody therapeutics that are emerging to improve efficacy and durability within a specific biological mechanism (e.g., immunomodulation or the inhibition of angiogenesis) and across multiple biological pathways (e.g., inhibition of tumor growth and induction of tumor cell apoptosis). PMID:21697653

  5. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  6. Chemical engineering of cell penetrating antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Lou, D; Burkett, J; Kohler, H

    2001-08-01

    Antibodies, being exquisitely specific tools in biology, are routinely used to detect and identify intra-cellular structures. However, current intra-cellular application of antibodies requires that the membrane be rendered leaky, resulting in the death of cells. Here, we present a novel method to allow antibodies to penetrate the cellular membrane of living cells without affecting cell viability. A peptide (MTS, membrane transport sequence) that facilitates transport across membranes has been site-specifically attached to antibodies. MTS-antibodies enter the living cells in culture and can be detected by immunofluorescence and ELISA after extraction. Cellular structures are visualized in living cells using a specific MTS-antibody. Antibodies with membrane penetrating properties can become an important tool for the study of intra-cellular processes in living cells. Furthermore, such membrane penetrating antibodies can be used to selectively stimulate or suppress functions of the cellular machinery. PMID:11406159

  7. Humanization and simultaneous optimization of monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Kuramochi, T; Igawa, T; Tsunoda, H; Hattori, K

    2014-01-01

    Antibody humanization is an essential technology for reducing the potential risk of immunogenicity associated with animal-derived antibodies and has been applied to a majority of the therapeutic antibodies on the market. For developing an antibody molecule as a pharmaceutical at the current biotechnology level, however, other properties also have to be considered in parallel with humanization in antibody generation and optimization. This section describes the critical properties of therapeutic antibodies that should be sufficiently qualified, including immunogenicity, binding affinity, physiochemical stability, expression in host cells and pharmacokinetics, and the basic methodologies of antibody engineering involved. By simultaneously optimizing the antibody molecule in the light of these properties, it should prove possible to shorten the research and development period necessary to identify a highly qualified clinical candidate and consequently accelerate the start of the clinical trial. PMID:24037839

  8. Abnormal Glycoprotein Antibodies Possible Detection Biomarkers

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have found that cancer patients produce antibodies that target abnormal glycoproteins (proteins with sugar molecules attached) made by their tumors. The result of this work suggests that antitumor antibodies in the blood may provide a fruitful

  9. Methods to Make Homogenous Antibody Drug Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Kline, Toni; Steiner, Alexander R; Penta, Kalyani; Sato, Aaron K; Hallam, Trevor J; Yin, Gang

    2015-11-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) have progressed from hypothesis to approved therapeutics in less than 30years, and the technologies available to modify both the antibodies and the cytotoxic drugs are expanding rapidly. For reasons well reviewed previously, the field is trending strongly toward homogeneous, defined antibody conjugation. In this review we present the antibody and small molecule chemistries that are currently used and being explored to develop specific, homogenous ADCs. PMID:25511917

  10. Anti-DNA antibodies in SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 8 chapters. Some of the titles are: Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE: Historical Perspective; Specificity of Anti-DNA Antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Monoclonial Autoimmune Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Structure--Function Analyses of Anti-DNA Autoantibodies.

  11. Effects of medium concentration on antibody production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J.

    1984-01-01

    Antibody production by two different cell lines was measured as the media were supplemented with varied amounts of glucose and fetal bovine serum. Both cell lines elaborated antidinitrophenyl hapten antibodies. Two basic media were used: RPMI 1640 and Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. The production of antibodies was followed from 0 to 180 h and was assayed by radioimmunoassay.

  12. Antibody biosimilars: Fears or opportunities?

    PubMed Central

    Guillon-Munos, Audrey; Daguet, Arnaud; Watier, Herv

    2014-01-01

    The annual LabEx MAbImprove industrial workshops are primarily intended to provide scientists involved in therapeutic antibodies, a comprehensive view about topics of interest for the pharmaceutical industry. They are organized by the LabEx MAbImprove industrial committee, for this first edition especially in partnership with ARITT, the regional agency for innovation and technology transfer which operates in the French Rgion Centre, the 1st French region for pharmaceutical production. The 2013 edition, held May 28 at the Vinci Center of Tours, was dedicated to antibody biosimilars. Depending on opinions, the impending expiry of antibody patents and the imminent marketing approval of competitors to blockbusters can be perceived as good or bad things. Fears or opportunities? Risks for patients? Breath of fresh air for the health systems? Opportunity for re-industrializing France? In this context, it is necessary for people to form a fair and informed opinion on the current landscape of antibody biosimilars. In particular, this is especially important for scientists from the academic world, from the industry or from the regulation agencies, for pharmacists, for pharmacovigilance specialists, for health authorities, and staff from health insurance and decision makers. The first session was devoted to market and regulatory issues, and included both an overview of the evolution of the patent landscape and a description of biosimilars regulation in the European Union (EU). This session was closed by a talk on manufacturing processes for biosimilars. In the next session, quality control attributes of biosimilars were discussed and compared with the consistent quality of biotechnology products to raise the question: How close is close enough? In vitro assays for evaluating the Fc function of therapeutic antibodies were also discussed. The third session focused on development of biosimilars and primarily on the stepwise process for introducing an antibody biosimilar on the EU market, and included a presentation of the ongoing clinical evaluation of an infliximab biosimilar. The session concluded with a rich debate on the indication extrapolation of a biosimilar compared to the originator. The last session was dedicated to societal issues and focused on two aspects: (1) the need of biosimilars for EU health economy; and (2) last but not least, the ethical issues about clinical evaluation of biosimilars. All speakers and attendees enjoyed this very stimulating and rewarding meeting, which gathered many people with divergent scientific backgrounds from the academic or industrial world. PMID:24714167

  13. Renaissance mummies in Italy.

    PubMed

    Fornaciari, G

    1999-01-01

    The paleopathological study of 40 Italian Renaissance mummies has allowed us to perform about 20 diagnoses, of which 5 concern infectious (smallpox, hepatitis, condyloma, syphilis and pneumonia), 4 metabolic (obesity, atherosclerosis, gallstones and uric acid nephrolithiasis), 2 articular (DISH and rheumatoid arthritis) and 2 neoplastic (skin apithelioma and colon adenocarcinoma) diseases. The mummy of an anonymous child, dated back to the 16th century (C14=1569 +/- 60), presented a diffuse vesiculo-pustular exanthema. Macroscopic aspects and regional distribution suggested smallpox, while EM reavealed many egg-shaped, virus-like particles (250 x 50 nm), with a central dense core. Following incubation with anti-smallpox virus antiserum and protein A-gold complex immunostaining, the particles resulted completely covered with protein A-gold. These results clearly show that this Neapolitan child died of a severe form of smallpox some four centuries ago. The mummy of Maria of Aragon, Marquise of Vasto (1503-1568), reavealed on the left arm an oval, cutaneous ulcer (15x10 nm) with linen dressing. Indirect immunofluorescence with anti-treponema pallidum antibody identified a large number of filaments with the morphological characteristics of fluorescent treponemes. EM evidenced typical spirochetes, with axial fibril. These findings clearly demonstrate a treponemal, probably venereal, infection. The mummy of Ferrante I of Aragon, King of Naples (1431-1494), revealed an adenocarcinoma extensively infiltrating the muscles of the small pelvis. A molecular study of the neoplastic tissue evidenced a typical mutation of the K-ras gene codon 12:the normal sequence GGT (glycine) was altered into GAT (aspartic acid). At present this genetic change is the most frequent mutation of the K-ras gene in sporadic colorectal cancer. The alimentary "environment" of the Neapolitan court of the XV century, with its abundance of natural alimentary alkylating agents, well explains this acquired mutation. These and other diseases as, for example, a fatal puerperal complication, a thyroid goiter, a case of Wilson's cirrhosis, some cases of anthracosis and other peculiar traumatic conditions, such as a mortal stab-wound, can elucidate the pathocenosis of the wealthy classes of the Italian Renaissance. PMID:11624203

  14. Therapeutic antibodies: Discovery, design and deployment.

    PubMed

    Ramsland, Paul A; Hutchinson, Andrew T; Carter, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have come of age with major progress being made in cancer, autoimmunity and chronic inflammation, as well as a wide range of other human diseases. Antibody engineering is further driving development of novel antibody formats and genetically modified cell-based therapies that harness the power of the immune system to progress cures in otherwise intractable human diseases. Nevertheless, there are still significant challenges ahead for basic and applied research relating to therapeutic antibodies. This special issue of the journal provides reviews and opinions that relate to the discovery, design and deployment of antibodies as therapeutics. PMID:25990602

  15. Phenotypic screening: the future of antibody discovery.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Munoz, Andrea L; Minter, Ralph R; Rust, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Most antibody therapeutics have been isolated from high throughput target-based screening. However, as the number of validated targets diminishes and the target space becomes increasingly competitive, alternative strategies, such as phenotypic screening, are gaining momentum. Here, we review successful phenotypic screens, including those used to isolate antibodies against cancer and infectious agents. We also consider exciting advances in the expression and phenotypic screening of antibody repertoires in single cell autocrine systems. As technologies continue to develop, we believe that antibody phenotypic screening will increase further in popularity and has the potential to provide the next generation of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:26440132

  16. Incidence of Rubella Antibodies in Female Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Givan, Kathleen F.; Rozee, K. R.; Rhodes, A. J.

    1965-01-01

    Sera from females aged 1 to 40 years were assayed for rubella virus antibodies. Results showed that by age 14 years, 60% had antibodies and that by 19 years, 70% were positive. This figure rose to 80% by 24 years of age and remained unchanged in older age groups. A comparison of the incidence of high and low levels of antibodies in each age group revealed that antibody levels fell between ages 20 and 40 years. Only 20% of individuals in the latter group had a high antibody level compared to 80% in the former. These results are discussed as they relate to the problems of reinfection and possible vaccination procedures. PMID:14232185

  17. Antibody engineering and therapeutics conference

    PubMed Central

    Larrick, James W; Parren, Paul WHI; Huston, James S; Plückthun, Andreas; Bradbury, Andrew; Tomlinson, Ian M; Chester, Kerry A; Burton, Dennis R; Adams, Gregory P; Weiner, Louis M; Scott, Jamie K; Alfenito, Mark R; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    The 25th anniversary of the Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics Conference, the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA, December 7–11, 2014. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the event will celebrate past successes, educate participants on current activities and offer a vision of future progress in the field. Keynote addresses will be given by academic and industry experts Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Ira Pastan (National Cancer Institute), James Wells (University of California, San Francisco), Ian Tomlinson (GlaxoSmithKline) and Anthony Rees (Rees Consulting AB and Emeritus Professor, University of Bath). These speakers will provide updates of their work, placed in the context of the substantial growth of the industry over the past 25 years. PMID:25517297

  18. Antinuclear antibodies in rosacea patients

    PubMed Central

    Salamon, Małgorzata; McCauliffe, Daniel; Sysa-Jędrzejowska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Rosacea is a common inflammatory disorder, characterized by a spectrum of facial manifestations. The clinical similarity to other dermatoses, like lupus erythematosus, might lead to misdiagnosis, particularly in patients with elevated antinuclear antibody titers. Aim To assess the frequency, titer and specificity of antinuclear antibodies in rosacea patients and correlate these findings with clinical features. Material and methods The study included 101 rosacea patients and 26 sex- and age-matched controls. Immunofluorescence antinuclear antibody testing was performed on HEp-2 substrates. Patients’ sera with ANA titers of 1 : 160 or higher were evaluated by Euroline analysis. Results Over a half (53.5%) of rosacea patients had an ANA titer greater than or equal to 1 : 160. Within this group 13.86% had a titer of 1 : 320, 8.91% had a titer of 1 : 640, and 6.93% had a titer of 1 : 1,280 or higher. The specificity of these antibodies could not be identified. Elevated ANA titers were present more often in women (55.8%) than in men (44.15%). Only two of 26 healthy volunteers had elevated ANA titers. One had a titer of 1 : 160 and the other of 1 : 320. During a two-year observation period, after the initial ANA testing, none of the patients with ANA titers above 1 : 640 developed an apparent autoimmune disorder. Conclusions Elevated ANA titers are commonly found in rosacea patients, what with simultaneously existing facial erythema and photosensitivity might lead to misdiagnosis of lupus erythematosus. Clinicians should beware of these findings to avoid misdiagnosing lupus erythematosus in rosacea patients with elevated ANA titers. PMID:24278039

  19. Production of therapeutic antibodies with controlled fucosylation

    PubMed Central

    Yamane-Ohnuki, Naoko

    2009-01-01

    The clinical success of therapeutic antibodies is demonstrated by the number of antibody therapeutics that have been brought to market and the increasing number of therapeutic antibodies in development. Recombinant antibodies are molecular-targeted therapeutic agents and represent a major new class of drugs. However, it is still very important to optimize and maximize the clinical efficacy of therapeutic antibodies, in part to help lower the cost of therapeutic antibodies by potentially reducing the dose or the duration of treatment. Clinical trials using therapeutic antibodies fully lacking core fucose residue in the Fc oligosaccharides are currently underway, and their remarkable physiological activities in humans in vivo have attracted attention as next-generation therapeutic antibody approaches with improved efficacy. Thus, an industrially applicable antibody production process that provides consistent yields of fully non-fucosylated antibody therapeutics with fixed quality has become a key goal in the successful development of next-generation therapeutic agents. In this article, we review the current technologies for production of therapeutic antibodies with control of fucosylation of the Fc N-glycans. PMID:20065644

  20. Single-Chain Antibody Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Baird, Cheryl

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have constructed a nonimmune library consisting of 109 human antibody scFv fragments, which have been cloned and expressed on the surface of yeast. Nanomolar-affinity scFvs are routinely obtained by magnetic bead screening and flow cytometric sorting. The yeast library can be amplified 1010 fold without measurable loss of clonal diversity. This allows for indefinite expansion of the library. All scFv clones can be assessed directly on the yeast cell surface by immunofluorescent labeling and flow cytometry, obviating separate subcloning, expression, and purification steps. The ability to use multiplex library screening demonstrates the utility of this approach for high-throughput antibody isolation for proteomic applications. The yeast library may be used for research projects or teaching performed for U.S. Government purposes only. If you would like to request an aliquot of the single-chain antibody library for your research, please print and fill out the Materials Transfer Agreement (MTA) [PDF, 20K]. The website provides the contact information for mailing the MTA. [copied from http://www.sysbio.org/dataresources/singlechain.stm

  1. Improved monoclonal antibodies to halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, M.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.; Thomas, C.B.

    1983-10-18

    The development, method of production, characterization and methods of use of two hybridomas, CIdU-1 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8321) and CIdU-2 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8320), are described. These secrete IgG/sub 1/(K) immunoglobulins that react with halodeoxyuridine (HdU or halodU) such as bromo, chloro, fluoro and iodo deoxyuridine (BrdU, CldU, FdU and IdU), whether these are free in solution or incorporated into single stranded DNA in whole cells. The antibodies do not react with naturally occurring free nucleic acids or with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymers. These antibodies are suitable for use in enzyme immunoassays for free CldU, FdU, IdU and BrdU and for detecting cells with these nucleotides incorporated into them. The monoclonal antibodies are useful in the detection of the sensitivity of tumor cells to specific chemotherapeutic agents, in the measurement of the rate of cellular DNA synthesis, in the measurement of the rate of proliferation of normal and malignant cells and in the detection of HPRT deficiency in cells. 1 tab.

  2. Bovine milk antibodies for health.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, H; Marnila, P; Gill, H S

    2000-11-01

    The immunoglobulins of bovine colostrum provide the major antimicrobial protection against microbial infections and confer a passive immunity to the newborn calf until its own immune system matures. The concentration in colostrum of specific antibodies against pathogens can be raised by immunising cows with these pathogens or their antigens. Immune milk products are preparations made of such hyperimmune colostrum or antibodies enriched from it. These preparations can be used to give effective specific protection against different enteric diseases in calves and suckling pigs. Colostral immunoglobulin supplements designed for farm animals are commercially available in many countries. Also, some immune milk products containing specific antibodies against certain pathogens have been launched on the market. A number of clinical studies are currently in progress to evaluate the efficacy of immune milks in the prevention and treatment of various human infections, including those caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria. Bovine colostrum-based immune milk products have proven effective in prophylaxis against various infectious diseases in humans. Good results have been obtained with products targeted against rotavirus, Shigella flexneri, Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile, Streptococcus mutans, Cryptosporidium parvum and Helicobacter pylori. Some successful attempts have been made to use immune milk in balancing gastrointestinal microbial flora. Immune milk products are promising examples of health-promoting functional foods, or nutraceuticals. This review summarises the recent progress in the development of these products and evaluates their potential as dietary supplements and in clinical nutrition. PMID:11242458

  3. Immunologic and pharmacologic concepts of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zuckier, L S; Rodriguez, L D; Scharff, M D

    1989-07-01

    While monoclonal antibodies have solved many of the difficulties of using immunologic reagents for radioimmunodiagnosis and therapy, in the 13 years since their introduction a number of persistent problems remain, most notably a low yield of antibody-producing cells from the fusion process, difficulty in obtaining high-affinity antibodies, and the potential immunogenicity of murine immunoglobulins (Igs). Several solutions are under development, including fusion techniques that enrich for cells producing desired antibodies, production of human-mouse chimeric antibodies by recombinant DNA technology, and the generation of human monoclonal antibodies by promising new approaches. Until these upcoming methodologies are established, and to better direct their development and application, a sound understanding of the pharmacology of presently available native and modified monoclonal antibodies is crucial. Although much has been already determined in this area, a great deal of further clarification remains necessary. PMID:2669128

  4. Antibody labeling with radioiodine and radiometals.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Suprit; Batra, Surinder; Jain, Maneesh

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies have been conjugated to radionuclides for various in vitro and in vivo applications. Radiolabeled antibodies have been used in clinics and research for diagnostic applications both in vitro as reagents in bioassays and in vivo as imaging agents. Further, radiolabeled antibodies are used as direct therapeutic agents for cancer radioimmunotherapy or as tracers for studying the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of therapeutic antibodies. Antibodies are labeled with radiohalogens or radiometals, and the choice of candidate radionuclides for a given application is dictated by their emission range and half-life. The conjugation chemistry for the coupling of MAbs with the radiometals requires a chelator, whereas radiohalogens can be incorporated directly in the antibody backbone. In this chapter, we describe the commonly used methods for radiolabeling and characterizing the antibodies most commonly used radiohalogens (125I/131I) and radiometals (177Lu/99mTc). PMID:24567137

  5. Antibodies directed against receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    FAUVEL, Bénédicte; Yasri, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30 therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have already been approved for cancers and inflammatory diseases, and monoclonal antibodies continue to be one of the fastest growing classes of therapeutic molecules. Because aberrant signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is a commonly observed factor in cancer, most of the subclasses of RTKs are being extensively studied as potential targets for treating malignancies. The first two RTKs that have been targeted by antibody therapy, with five currently marketed antibodies, are the growth factor receptors EGFR and HER2. However, due to systemic side effects, refractory patients and the development of drug resistance, these treatments are being challenged by emerging therapeutics. This review examines current monoclonal antibody therapies against RTKs. After an analysis of agents that have already been approved, we present an analysis of antibodies in clinical development that target RTKs. Finally, we highlight promising RTKs that are emerging as new oncological targets for antibody-based therapy. PMID:24859229

  6. Antibodies against viruses: passive and active immunization

    PubMed Central

    Law, Mansun; Hangartner, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Summary of recent advances Antibodies, through passive or active immunization, play a central role in prophylaxis against many infectious agents. While neutralization is a primary function of antibodies in protection against most viruses, the relative contribution of Fc-dependent and complement-dependent antiviral activities of antibodies was found to vary between different viruses in recent studies. The multiple hit model explains how antibodies neutralize viruses and recent data on the stoichiometry of antibody neutralization suggest that the organization of viral surface proteins on viruses, in addition to virus size, influences the level of antibody occupancy required for neutralization. These new findings will improve our strategies in therapeutic antibody engineering and rational vaccine design. PMID:18577455

  7. Nanoliposome-mediated targeting of antibodies to tumors: IVIG antibodies as a model.

    PubMed

    Nikpoor, Amin Reza; Tavakkol-Afshari, Jalil; Gholizadeh, Zahra; Sadri, Kayvan; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Chamani, Jamshidkhan; Badiee, Ali; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-11-10

    Monoclonal antibodies are routinely used as tools in immunotherapies against solid tumors. However, administration of monoclonal antibodies may cause undesired side effects due to their accumulation in non-targeted organs. Nanoliposomes of less than 200 nm can target antibodies to tumors by enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) mechanisms. To direct monoclonal antibodies to tumors, nanoliposomes encapsulating intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) as a model antibody were prepared. The liposomes had average diameters of 100 nm and encapsulation efficiencies of 31 to 46%. They showed less than 10% release in plasma at 37°C up to seven days. The secondary and tertiary structures of liposome-encapsulated antibodies were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The near and far-UV spectra analyses revealed no obvious conformational changes in the structures of the encapsulated antibodies. The biodistribution of free and liposome-encapsulated iodinated antibodies was investigated in mice bearing C-26 colon carcinoma tumors. The accumulation of liposome-encapsulated antibodies in tumors was significantly greater than that of free antibodies due to the EPR effect. The PEGylated liposomes were more efficient in the delivery of antibodies to the tumor site than non-PEGylated liposomes. We conclude that administration of monoclonal antibodies in PEGylated liposomes is more efficient than administration of non-encapsulated monoclonal antibodies for solid tumor immunotherapy. PMID:26302860

  8. [Improved IgG Antibody Diagnostics of Feather Duvet Lung by an Antibody Screening Test].

    PubMed

    Sennekamp, J; Lehmann, E

    2015-11-01

    The underdiagnosed feather duvet lung, an extrinsic allergic alveolitis (hypersensitivity pneumonitis) caused by duck and goose feathers, can be more frequently diagnosed, if duck and goose feather antibodies are included in the panel of the routinely applied IgG antibody screening test. This does not necessarily require extending the screening test to include duck and goose feather antigens. By analysing 100 sera with duck and goose antibodies we found that the commonly used pigeon and budgerigar antibodies can also screen for feather duvet antibodies. All examined sera lacking pigeon and budgerigar antibodies also lacked clear-cut duck and goose feather antibodies. The examined sera with strong pigeon or budgerigar antibodies always also contained feather duvet antibodies. However, sera with medium or low concentrated pigeon or budgerigar antibodies are not always associated with feather duvet antibodies. In the light of these observations, we find that 71% of the duck and goose antibody analyses would be dispensable without essential loss of quality, if the results of screening for pigeon and budgerigar antibodies were incorporated into the procedure of a step-by- step diagnostics. PMID:26458127

  9. Antibody Based Imaging Strategies of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Warram, Jason M; de Boer, Esther; Sorace, Anna G; Chung, Thomas K; Kim, Hyunki; Pleijhuis, Rick G; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2014-01-01

    Although mainly developed for preclinical research and therapeutic use, antibodies have high antigen specificity, which can be used as a courier to selectively deliver a diagnostic probe or therapeutic agent to cancer. It is generally accepted that the optimal antigen for imaging will depend on both the expression in the tumor relative to normal tissue and the homogeneity of expression throughout the tumor mass and between patients. For the purpose of diagnostic imaging, novel antibodies can be developed to target antigens for disease detection, or current FDA-approved antibodies can be repurposed with the covalent addition of an imaging probe. Reuse of therapeutic antibodies for diagnostic purposes reduces translational costs since the safety profile of the antibody is well defined and the agent is already available under conditions suitable for human use. In this review, we will explore a wide range of antibodies and imaging modalities that are being translated to the clinic for cancer identification and surgical treatment. PMID:24913898

  10. Controlled delivery of antibodies from injectable hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Nathan A; Babcock, Lyndsey R; Murray, Ellen A; Krebs, Melissa D

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are currently used for the treatment of various diseases, but large doses delivered systemically are typically required. Localized controlled delivery techniques would afford major benefits such as decreasing side effects and required doses. Injectable biopolymer systems are an attractive solution due to their minimally invasive potential for controlled release in a localized area. Here, alginate-chitosan hydrogels are demonstrated to provide controlled delivery of IgG model antibodies and also of Fab antibody fragments. Also, an alternate delivery system comprised of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loaded with antibodies and encapsulated in alginate was shown to successfully provide another level of control over release. These biopolymer systems that offer controlled delivery for antibodies and antibody fragments will be promising for many applications in drug delivery and regenerative medicine. PMID:26652435

  11. Factors determining antibody distribution in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    The development of antibody therapies for cancer is increasing rapidly, primarily owing to their specificity. Antibody distribution in tumors is often extremely uneven, however, leading to some malignant cells being exposed to saturating concentrations of antibody, whereas others are completely untargeted. This is detrimental because large regions of cells escape therapy, whereas other regions might be exposed to suboptimal concentrations that promote a selection of resistant mutants. The distribution of antibody depends on a variety of factors, including dose, affinity, antigens per cell and molecular size. Because these parameters are often known or easily estimated, a quick calculation based on simple modeling considerations can predict the uniformity of targeting within a tumor. Such analyses should enable experimental researchers to identify in a straightforward way the limitations in achieving evenly distributed antibody, and design and test improved antibody therapeutics more rationally. PMID:18179828

  12. Antibody-based imaging strategies for cancer.

    PubMed

    Warram, Jason M; de Boer, Esther; Sorace, Anna G; Chung, Thomas K; Kim, Hyunki; Pleijhuis, Rick G; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2014-09-01

    Although mainly developed for preclinical research and therapeutic use, antibodies have high antigen specificity, which can be used as a courier to selectively deliver a diagnostic probe or therapeutic agent to cancer. It is generally accepted that the optimal antigen for imaging will depend on both the expression in the tumor relative to normal tissue and the homogeneity of expression throughout the tumor mass and between patients. For the purpose of diagnostic imaging, novel antibodies can be developed to target antigens for disease detection, or current FDA-approved antibodies can be repurposed with the covalent addition of an imaging probe. Reuse of therapeutic antibodies for diagnostic purposes reduces translational costs since the safety profile of the antibody is well defined and the agent is already available under conditions suitable for human use. In this review, we will explore a wide range of antibodies and imaging modalities that are being translated to the clinic for cancer identification and surgical treatment. PMID:24913898

  13. [Human mini-antibodies to orthopoxviruses].

    PubMed

    Morozova, V V; Tikunova, N V; Batanova, T A; Iun, T E; Bovshik, E I; Zhirakovskaia, E V; Voronina, V V; Bobko, D I; Belanov, E F; Il'ichev, A A; Sandakhchiev, L S

    2004-01-01

    A library of human scFv antibodies displayed on the surface of bacteriophages (MRC, Cambridge, England) was panned against the Elstree strain of vaccinia virus (VACV), which resulted in the phage repertoire enriched with clones positive to the strain. Individual clones from the repertoire were screened for binding, independently, to the vaccinia and ectromelia viruses; phage antibodies to the orthopoxviruses were selected. Ten unique antibodies were identified after their Vh- and Vl-genes were sequenced. All selected antibodies were assayed by ELISA for binding to the vaccinia, cowpox and ectromelia viruses. Furthermore, all selected antibodies were assayed for binding with major alastrim strains of the live variola virus. According to the results, the above phage antibodies recognized genus-specific epitopes, some of which differed in their conformation. PMID:15455687

  14. Antibodies to laminin in Chagas' disease

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We have found that sera from humans with Chagas' disease and Rhesus monkeys infected with Trypanosoma cruzi contain IgM and IgG antibodies, which react with structures in a variety of connective tissues. These antibodies react with laminin but not with various other purified connective tissue components like collagen types I, III, IV, and V, fibronectin, heparan sulfate (BM-1) proteoglycan, or chondronectin. The tissue-reacting antibodies were isolated by absorption to a laminin- Sepharose column. The bound fraction contained all the tissue-reacting antibodies. These antibodies strongly stained trypomastigotes and amastigotes, but weakly stained epimastigotes. These studies show that sera from T. cruzi-infected primates contain antilaminin antibodies, which may be produced by those host in response to a laminin-like molecule present in the parasite. PMID:6801186

  15. Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in Eurasian badgers.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Ali; Knaggs, Joanna; Service, Katrina M; McLaren, Graeme W; Riordan, Philip; Newman, Chris; Delahay, Richard J; Cheesman, Chris; Macdonald, David W

    2006-01-01

    Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii were detected in samples collected from 90 live-trapped adult Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) sampled at three sites (two agricultural and one woodland) in southern England. Serum was tested using a qualitative latex agglutination test procedure and 63 of 90 (70%) badgers tested positive for T. gondii antibodies. Antibody prevalence varied between the sites; 67% and 77% of badgers from agricultural sites and 39% from a nonagricultural site tested positive. PMID:16699163

  16. Nature and nurture of catalytic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Paul, Sudhir; Planque, Stephanie A; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Hanson, Carl V; Massey, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (antibodies) frequently express constitutive functions. Two such functions are nucleophilic catalysis and the reversible binding to B-cell superantigens. Constitutive or "naturally-occurring" antibodies are produced spontaneously from germline genetic information. The antibody structural elements mediating the constitutive functions have originated over millions of years of phylogenic evolution, contrasting with antigen-driven, somatic sequence diversification of the complementarity determining regions (CDR) that underlies the better-known high affinity antigen binding function of antibodies. Often, the framework regions (FRs) play a dominant role in antibody constitutive functions. Catalytic antibody subsets with promiscuous, autoantigen-directed and microbe-directed specificities have been identified. Mucosal antibodies may be specialized to express high-level catalytic activity against microbes transmitted by the mucosal route, exemplified by constitutive production of IgA class antibodies in mucosal secretions that catalyze the cleavage of HIV gp120. Catalytic specificity can be gained by constitutive noncovalent superantigen binding at the FRs and by adaptive development of noncovalent classical antigen or superantigen binding, respectively, at the CDRs and FRs. Growing evidence suggests important functional roles for catalytic antibodies in homeostasis, autoimmune disease and protection against infection. Adaptive antibody responses to microbial superantigens are proscribed underphysiological circumstances. Covalent electrophilic immunogen binding to constitutively expressed nucleophilic sites in B-cell receptors bypasses the restriction on adaptive antibody production, and simultaneous occupancy of the CDR binding site by a stimulatory antigenic epitope can also overcome the downregulatory effect of superantigen binding at the FRs. These concepts may be useful for developing novel vaccines that capitalize and improve on constitutive antibody functions for protection against microbes. PMID:22903666

  17. Antibody engineering and therapeutics, The Annual Meeting of the Antibody Society: December 8-12, 2013, Huntington Beach, CA.

    PubMed

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul W H I; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  18. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  19. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-15

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  20. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations

    PubMed Central

    Gearhart, Patricia J.; Castiblanco, Diana P.; Russell Knode, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations. PMID:26641938

  1. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations.

    PubMed

    Gearhart, Patricia J; Castiblanco, Diana P; Russell Knode, Lisa M

    2015-12-01

    Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations. PMID:26641938

  2. Monoclonal Antibody That Defines Human Myoepithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dairkee, Shahnaz Hashmi; Blayney, Carlene; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1985-11-01

    We have isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody that, upon immunohistochemical localization in frozen sections, displays specificity for human myoepithelial cells in the resting mammary gland, sweat glands, and salivary glands. Furthermore, this antibody was strongly and homogeneously reactive with frozen sections of 3 of 60 breast carcinoma specimens. Using immunolocalization techniques in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have determined that the reactivity of this monoclonal antibody is directed toward a 51,000-dalton keratin polypeptide. The potential uses of this antibody in the prognosis of human mammary carcinoma and in understanding the role of the myoepithelium in development and differentiation are discussed.

  3. Studies on the control of antibody synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Werblin, T. P.; Kim, Young Tai; Quagliata, F.; Siskind, G. W.

    1973-01-01

    The distribution and heterogeneity of antibody affinity has been followed with time after immunization. Initially, a symmetrical distribution of heterogeneous low affinity antibody molecules is present. With time the population becomes skewed towards the high affinity end of the distribution, the average affinity increases, and the bulk of the antibody generally comes to be present in a subpopulation of high affinity and of relatively restricted heterogeneity. Still later after immunization, the proportion of high affinity antibody decreases and a highly heterogeneous population of antibody molecules is present with a somewhat decreased average affinity. Low affinity subpopulations were found to persist throughout the course of the immune response. In addition it was noted that by day 42 after immunization a significant amount of the highest affinity antibody that a given rabbit would synthesize at any time during its immune response was already present. Thus, changes in average affinity can be accounted for by shifts in the relative amounts of those antibody subpopulations already present by day 42 and do not require the appearance of any new antibody species. The results can be interpreted as consistent with a selection theory of antibody synthesis in which cells of high affinity are preferentially selected in what amounts to a micro-evolutionary system. PMID:4574576

  4. Measles antibodies and autoantibodies in autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Triger, D R; Gamlen, T R; Paraskevas, E; Lloyd, R S; Wright, R

    1976-01-01

    Measles CF antibodies have been examined in the sera of patients with a variety of clinical disorders associated with the production of autoantibodies. Previous reports of high-titre reactions in DLE and chronic active hepatitis have been confirmed, the titres in the latter disorder being particularly elevated. Mean antibody titres to measles in patients with rheumatoid arthritis were significantly lower than in matched controls, and an inverse correlation between measles antibody levels and serum globulin levels was found. Measles antibody titres in patients with myasthenia gravis and primary biliary cirrhosis did not differ significantly from those found in controls. However, subdivision of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, myasthenia gravis and primary biliary cirrhosis showed that the presence of anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) was associated with significantly increased measles antibody levels compared with the ANA-negative sera. The presence of gastric parietal cell antibody or thyroid microsomal antibody did not appear to be associated with increased measles antibody levels, whether or not they occurred in association with previous anaemia or thyroid disease. Possible explanations for these findings in terms of immune complex formation and immune hyper-reactivity are discussed. PMID:1084820

  5. Single-domain antibodies for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Krah, Simon; Schröter, Christian; Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Valldorf, Bernhard; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-02-01

    Single-domain antibodies are the smallest antigen-binding units of antibodies, consisting either only of one variable domain or one engineered constant domain that solely facilitates target binding. This class of antibody derivatives comprises naturally occurring variable domains derived from camelids and sharks as well as engineered human variable or constant antibody domains of the heavy or light chain. Because of their high affinity and specificity as well as stability, small size and benefit of multiple re-formatting opportunities, those molecules emerged as promising candidates for biomedical applications and some of these entities have already proven to be successful in clinical development. PMID:26551147

  6. Immunogenicity of an engineered internal image antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Billetta, R; Hollingdale, M R; Zanetti, M

    1991-01-01

    We engineered an antibody expressing in the third complementarity-determining region of its heavy chain variable region a "foreign" epitope, the repetitive tetrapeptide Asn-Ala-Asn-Pro (NANP) of the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium falciparum parasite, one of the etiologic agents of malaria in humans. A monoclonal antibody to P. falciparum specific for the (NANP)n amino acid sequence bound to the engineered antibody, and a synthetic (NANP)3 peptide blocked this interaction. Immunization of rabbits and mice with the engineered antibody resulted in the elicitation of a humoral response to (NANP)3 synthetic peptide and P. falciparum parasite. In mice, in which immunity to the (NANP)n epitope is highly restricted by immune response genes, antibodies were induced in responder and nonresponder haplotypes of the major histocompatibility complex. Rabbit antibodies efficiently inhibited the in vitro invasion of cultured liver cells by P. falciparum parasite. Collectively, this study indicates that immunity to malaria in the absence of the parasite can be induced using antibody variable regions engineered to mimic the parasite's molecular structure. In general terms, the results suggest that antibody (idiotype) mimicry of an exogenous antigen is possible and may only require a discrete stretch of identity between the two molecules. The implication for the preparation of antibody-based vaccines and idiotype regulation of immunity are discussed. Images PMID:1905014

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies as Diagnostics; an Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, M. Z.

    2010-01-01

    Ever since the development of Hybridoma Technology in 1975 by Kohler and Milstein, our vision for antibodies as tools for research for prevention, detection and treatment of diseases, vaccine production, antigenic characterization of pathogens and in the study of genetic regulation of immune responses and disease susceptibility has been revolutionized. The monoclonal antibodies being directed against single epitopes are homogeneous, highly specific and can be produced in unlimited quantities. In animal disease diagnosis, they are very useful for identification and antigenic characterization of pathogens. Monoclonal antibodies have tremendous applications in the field of diagnostics, therapeutics and targeted drug delivery systems, not only for infectious diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and protozoa but also for cancer, metabolic and hormonal disorders. They are also used in the diagnosis of lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, tissue typing, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, radio immunoassay, serotyping of microorganisms, immunological intervention with passive antibody, antiidiotype inhibition, or magic bullet therapy with cytotoxic agents coupled with anti mouse specific antibody. Recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology through genetic engineering has successfully led to the possibility of reconstruction of monoclonal antibodies viz. chimeric antibodies, humanized antibodies and complementarily determining region grafted antibodies and their enormous therapeutic use. PMID:20582184

  8. Preparation of astatine-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Milesz, S.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Szucs, Z. |

    1995-07-01

    In the cationic state astatine forms a stable complex with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Thanks to this complex, astatine can be bound to monoclonal antibodies of the RYa{sub 1} type. The most favorable conditions for preparing astatine-labeled antibodies are established. The chromatographic analysis and electromigration experiments showed that astatine is firmly linked to a biomolecule in vitro and it did not escape from labeled monoclonal antibodies even under treatment with such highly effective astatine-complexing agent as thiourea. The immune activity of astatine-labeled antibodies did not change even after 20 h.

  9. Reconciling the Structural Attributes of Avian Antibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, Paul J.; Law, Ruby H. P.; Gilgunn, Sarah; Hearty, Stephen; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Lloyd, Gordon; O'Kennedy, Richard J.; Whisstock, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are high value therapeutic, diagnostic, biotechnological, and research tools. Combinatorial approaches to antibody discovery have facilitated access to unique antibodies by surpassing the diversity limitations of the natural repertoire, exploitation of immune repertoires from multiple species, and tailoring selections to isolate antibodies with desirable biophysical attributes. The V-gene repertoire of the chicken does not utilize highly diverse sequence and structures, which is in stark contrast to the mechanism employed by humans, mice, and primates. Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has generated high quality, high affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic, diagnostic and biotechnological applications. Furthermore, extensive examination of the amino acid characteristics of the chicken repertoire has provided significant insight into mechanisms employed by the avian immune system. A paucity of avian antibody crystal structures has limited our understanding of the structural consequences of these uniquely chicken features. This paper presents the crystal structure of two chicken single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies generated from large libraries by phage display against important human antigen targets, which capture two unique CDRL1 canonical classes in the presence and absence of a non-canonical disulfide constrained CDRH3. These structures cast light on the unique structural features of chicken antibodies and contribute further to our collective understanding of the unique mechanisms of diversity and biochemical attributes that render the chicken repertoire of particular value for antibody generation. PMID:24737329

  10. Monoclonal antibodies that detect live salmonellae.

    PubMed Central

    Torensma, R; Visser, M J; Aarsman, C J; Poppelier, M J; van Beurden, R; Fluit, A C; Verhoef, J

    1992-01-01

    Nine immunoglobulin G and nine immunoglobulin M murine monoclonal antibody-producing hybridomas reactive with live Salmonella bacteria were obtained from several fusions of immune spleen cells and Sp2/0 myeloma cells. The antibodies were selected by the magnetic immunoluminescence assay. The monoclonal antibodies were reactive with serogroups A, B, C1, C2, D, E, and K and Salmonella choleraesuis subsp. diarizonae. Each monoclonal antibody proved to be reactive with a distinct serotype. Clinical isolates belonging to these Salmonella serogroups could be detected. Reactivity with non-Salmonella bacteria proved to be minor. Images PMID:1476430

  11. Monoclonal antibodies with group specificity toward sulfonamides: Selection of hapten and antibody selectivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although many antibodies to sulfonamides have been generated, immunoassays based on the current available antibodies for large multi-sulfonamide screening programs have properties dependent on the immunizing hapten structure and have always suffered from high selectivity for individual sulfonamides....

  12. Somatic diversification of antibody responses

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, B.; Kelsoe, G.; Han, S.

    1996-01-01

    The humoral immune response is the culmination of a complex series of cellular interactions and migrations that define specific pathways of antigen-driven B cell differentiation. There are about 5 x 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 12} B lymphocyte lineage cells in the mouse and human, respectively, after the immune system has been established. B lymphocytes perceive antigen in their environment by virtue of their surface receptors (B cell receptor; BCR), in which membrane-associated immunoglobulin (mIg) is the antigen recognition substructure and the associated Ig{alpha} and Ig{beta} molecules transduce the activation signal. mIgs have extensive structural homology to immunoglobulins which are secreted by differentiated daughter cells following antigen stimulation. The specificity of a given BCR or antibody is created by a programmed successive process of gene rearrangements, first of D to J segments, then of V to DJ segments of the Ig heavy (H)-chain gene loci, and finally, of V to J segments of the Ig light (L)-chain gene loci. V,D, and J elements are assembled in a enormous number of combinations; variability is further achieved at the break-points of joining segments, including the insertion of non-germline-encoded nucleotide (N)sequences at the borders of V(D)J points, hence the almost unlimited specificities of the B cells or antibody repertoire. 129 refs.

  13. [Determination of drug antibody ratio in an antibody-drug conjugate].

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuan-Fei; Li, Meng; Guo, Wei; Wang, Lan; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Chun-Yu; Wang, Wen-Bo; Wang, Jun-Zhi; Gao, Kai

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports the determination of the drug antibody ratio in an antibody-drug conjugate with two methods, i.e. LC-MS and UV/VIS, and to provide a reliable method to scientifically evaluate and effectively control the drug antibody ratio. Deglycosylated sample was analyzed with C4 column followed by MS, and the number of conjugated drugs in the antibody was determined by the molecular weight increase due to the addition of different number of drugs to the antibody, and then drug antibody ratio was calculated by weighted average of different number of drugs conjugated to the antibody. Optical density at 252 and 280 nm was measured with UV/VIS, and due to the difference of extinction coefficients between the antibody and the drug, the drug antibody ratio was calculated from linear equation with two unknowns. The drug antibody ratio was 3.21 and 3.25 respectively measured by the two methods, and the results were similar with the two methods. Our study indicated that both methods, LC-MS and UV/VIS, could be applied to the analysis of drug antibody ratio of the antibody drug conjugate. PMID:24961108

  14. Passive antibody transfer in chickens to model maternal antibody after avian influenza vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Birds transfer maternal antibodies (MAb) to their offspring through the egg yolk where the antibody is absorbed and enters the circulatory system. These maternal antibodies, depending on the pathogen, can provide early protection from some diseases, but it may also interfere with the vaccination re...

  15. Passive antibody transfer in chickens to model maternal antibody after avian influenza vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Birds transfer maternal antibodies (MAb) to their offspring through the egg yolk where the antibody is absorbed and enters the circulatory system. Maternal antibodies provide early protection from disease, but may interfere with the vaccination efficacy in the chick. MAb are thought to interfere wit...

  16. IBC’s 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society

    PubMed Central

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H.J.; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3–6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3–5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4–5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society’s special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5–6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy. PMID:23575266

  17. Fc-Small Molecule Antibody Mimetics.

    PubMed

    Wold, Erik D; Axup, Jun Y; Felding, Brunhilde H; Smider, Vaughn V

    2015-12-16

    Antibody therapeutics are a promising drug class due to their high specificity and favorable pharmacokinetics. While there are many methods for the development of antibodies specific to disease associated antigens, selecting antibodies against functional epitopes with high specificity and affinity can be difficult for certain epitopes. We describe a generalizable method for synthesizing antibody mimetics by site specifically conjugating small molecules (with high affinity and specificity to disease associated antigens) to an Fc fragment to develop drugs with the benefits of an antibody. As a proof of concept, an E269pAcPhe Fc antibody Fc fragment was produced and subsequently site-specifically labeled with a linker-modified folic acid compound to generate an Fc-folic acid antibody-mimetic. This was chosen as the model system because the high-affinity folate receptor FR-? is highly expressed in a number of cancer types including breast and ovarian cancer. The specificity of the Fc-folic acid conjugate was assessed via flowcytometry with the folate-receptor positive breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 by measuring Fc-folic acid binding in both the absence and presence of an excess of folic acid. Fc-small molecule conjugates could be developed into a unique class of antibody-like therapeutics. PMID:26536496

  18. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric P; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E; Chan, Ying N; Lai, Jennifer I; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2015-10-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain. PMID:26078040

  19. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  20. 7th Annual European Antibody Congress 2011

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The 7th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapin Ltd., was again held in Geneva, Switzerland, following on the tradition established with the 4th EAC. The 2011 version of the EAC was attended by nearly 250 delegates who learned of the latest advances and trends in the global development of antibody-based therapeutics. The first day focused on advances in understanding structure-function relationships, choosing the best format, glycoengineering biobetter antibodies, improving the efficacy and drugability of mAbs and epitope mapping. On the second day, the discovery of novel targets for mAb therapy, clinical pipeline updates, use of antibody combinations to address resistance, generation and identification of mAbs against new targets and biosimilar mAb development were discussed. Antibody-drug conjugates, domain antibodies and new scaffolds and bispecific antibodies were the topics of the third day. In total, nearly 50 speakers provided updates of programs related to antibody research and development on-going in the academic, government and commercial sectors. PMID:22453093

  1. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional crosslinkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  2. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  3. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  4. How to successfully patent therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lahrtz, Fritz

    2015-04-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have become an established class of drugs for the treatment of a variety of diseases, especially cancer and autoimmune/inflammatory disorders, and a sufficient patent protection is a prerequisite for their successful commercialization. As monoclonal antibodies and their therapeutic potential have been well known for decades, the mere production of yet another therapeutic antibody is in many jurisdictions not considered a patentable invention. In contrast, antibodies with novel structural features and/or improved properties may be patentable. When drafting the claims, care should be taken to obtain a broad patent scope that protects both the antibody of interest and related antibodies having the same functional features, thereby preventing competitors from marketing a functionally equivalent antibody. Furthermore, the application should contain experimental evidence showing the improved properties of the claimed antibody. After the filing of a priority patent application, patent protection should be initiated at least in countries that are of particular commercial importance. Subsequent inventions relating to novel uses, formulations, dosage regimens, and combinations with other treatment modalities should be protected by further patent applications to extend patent term. PMID:25614506

  5. Mechanisms of Neonatal Mucosal Antibody Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following an abrupt transition at birth from the sterile uterus to an environment with abundant commensal and pathogenic microbes, neonatal mammals are protected by maternal antibodies at mucosal surfaces. We show in mice that different antibody isotypes work in distinct ways to protect the neonatal...

  6. The therapeutic antibodies market to 2008.

    PubMed

    Pavlou, Alex K; Belsey, Mark J

    2005-04-01

    The therapeutic biologics market is currently dominated by recombinant protein products. However, many of these products are mature, and growth of the biologics market will increasingly rely on the expansion of the therapeutic monoclonal antibody sector. Successive technology waves have driven the growth of the monoclonal antibody sector, which is currently dominated by chimeric antibodies. Chimeric products, led by Remicade and Rituxan, will continue to drive market share through to 2008. However, over the forecast period, humanized and fully human monoclonal antibodies, together with technologies such as Fabs and conjugated antibodies, will play an increasingly important role, driving monoclonal antibody market growth at a forecast compound annual growth rate of 20.9%, to reach $16.7 billion by 2008. In terms of therapeutic focus, the monoclonal antibody market is heavily focused on oncology and arthritis, immune and inflammatory disorders, and products within these therapeutic areas are set to continue to be the key growth drivers over the forecast period. Underlying the growth of the market is the evolution of the monoclonal antibody company business model, set to transition towards the highly successful innovator model. PMID:15760719

  7. 8th Annual European Antibody Congress 2012

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Alain; Carter, Paul J.; Gerber, Hans-Peter; Lugovskoy, Alexey A.; Wurch, Thierry; Junutula, Jagath R.; Kontermann, Roland E; Mabry, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The 8th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapin Ltd., was again held in Geneva, Switzerland, following on the tradition established with the 4th EAC. The new agenda format for 2012 included three parallel tracks on: (1) naked antibodies; (2) antibody drug conjugates (ADCs); and (3) bispecific antibodies and alternative scaffolds. The meeting started and closed with three plenary lectures to give common background and to share the final panel discussion and conclusions. The two day event included case studies and networking for nearly 250 delegates who learned of the latest advances and trends in the global development of antibody-based therapeutics. The monoclonal antibody track was focused on understanding the structure-function relationships, optimization of antibody design and developability, and processes that allow better therapeutic candidates to move through the clinic. Discussions on novel target identification and validation were also included. The ADC track was dedicated to evaluation of the ongoing success of the established ADC formats alongside the rise of the next generation drug-conjugates. The bispecific and alternative scaffold track was focused on taking stock of the multitude of bispecific formats being investigated and gaining insight into recent innovations and advancements. Mechanistic understanding, progression into the clinic and the exploration of multispecifics, redirected T cell killing and alternative scaffolds were extensively discussed. In total, nearly 50 speakers provided updates of programs related to antibody research and development on-going in the academic, government and commercial sectors. PMID:23493119

  8. Antibody-drug conjugates: Intellectual property considerations.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates are highly complex entities that combine an antibody, a linker and a toxin. This complexity makes them demanding both technically and from a regulatory point of view, and difficult to deal with in their patent aspects. This article discusses different issues of patent protection and freedom to operate with regard to this promising new class of drugs. PMID:26292154

  9. Neuropsychiatric presentations of antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gris, Jean-Christophe; Nobile, Bendicte; Bouvier, Sylvie

    2015-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a systemic disease which can affect the central nervous system (CNS) through thrombotic mechanisms prone to induce vascular damage: stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) on the arterial side, cerebral venous thrombosis on the venous side. Beside these academic syndromic manifestations, some nonvascular neurological manifestations of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLAbs) are progressively emerging, being associated with a wide range of polymorphic neurological, psychological and psychiatric manifestations. Animal models and in vitro experimental data support an immune-mediated pathogenesis, with direct binding and effect of aPLAbs on neurons and glial cells which are thought to occur after a disruption or a permeability alteration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The magnitude of the association and cellular and molecular mechanisms involved need to be further elucidated. No standard treatment is available for nonvascular neuropsychiatric manifestations associated with positive aPLAbs and specific developments are warranted. PMID:25903539

  10. Quality Issues of Research Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    According to several recent studies, an unexpectedly high number of landmark papers seem to be not reproducible by independent laboratories. Nontherapeutic antibodies used for research, diagnostic, food analytical, environmental, and other purposes play a significant role in this matter. Although some papers have been published offering suggestions to improve the situation, they do not seem to be comprehensive enough to cover the full complexity of this issue. In addition, no obvious improvements could be noticed in the field as yet. This article tries to consolidate the remarkable variety of conclusions and suggested activities into a more coherent conception. It is concluded that funding agencies and journal publishers need to take first and immediate measures to resolve these problems and lead the way to a more sustainable way of bioanalytical research, on which all can rely with confidence. PMID:27013861

  11. B Cells, Antibodies, and More.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G; Chalasani, Geetha

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell-targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell-targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  12. Clinical considerations for biosimilar antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mellstedt, Hkan

    2013-01-01

    Biosimilar agents are approximate copies of branded biologic therapies. Since the first biosimilar was authorized in the European Union in 2006, fifteen additional agents have been approved by the European Medicines Agency, including two biosimilar monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Biosimilar mAbs represent a distinct class given their large molecular size, complex protein structure, and post-translational modifications. While guidelines have been established for the development, approval, and use of biosimilars, further scrutiny and discussion is necessary to fully understand their potential impact on clinical outcomes. This review takes a critical look at the structural complexity of biosimilar mABs, the feasibility of indication extrapolation, the impact of product variability on immunogenicity, the importance of comprehensive pharmacovigilance, and the potential for ongoing pharmacoeconomic impact. PMID:26217160

  13. B Cells, Antibodies, and More

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell–targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell–targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  14. [Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies--ANCA].

    PubMed

    Vencovsk, J; Paleckov, A; Becvr, R

    1992-10-01

    Antibodies against cytoplasm of neutrophil leucocytes (ANCA) with a high sensitivity are found in idiopathic necrotizing vasculitis and idiopathic glomerulonephritis with formation of sickles (IGS). C-ANCA are directed against the myeloid lysosomal enzyme--proteinase 3 and are found above all in Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyarteritis. P-ANCA are directed mainly against myeloperoxidase, less against leucocytic elastase or lactoferrin and are found above all in microscopic polyarteritis, IGS, polyarteritis nodosa or Churg-Strauss syndrome. The elevated ANCA level correlates with the activity of the disease or precedes a relapse. These autoantibodies activate probably neutrophil leucocytes for respiratory exacerbation and degranulation which may lead to extensive tissue damage. PMID:1464072

  15. Anti-miroestrol polyclonal antibodies: a comparison of immunogen preparations used to obtain desired antibody properties.

    PubMed

    Kitisripanya, Tharita; Jutathis, Kamonthip; Inyai, Chadathorn; Komaikul, Jukrapun; Udomsin, Orapin; Yusakul, Gorawit; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Putalun, Waraporn

    2016-04-01

    Immunogen quality is one important factor that contributes to desirable antibody characteristics. Highly specific antibodies against miroestrol can be used to develop a quality control immunoassay for Pueraria candollei products. In this study, we investigated how various immunogen preparations affect antibody properties. The results show that immunogen prepared using the Mannich reaction provides antibodies with higher specificity and sensitivity against miroestrol than immunogen prepared with the periodate reaction. The results suggest the Mannich reaction maintains the original structure of miroestrol and generates useful antibodies for developing immunoassays. PMID:26563142

  16. Synthetic Antibodies for Reversible Cell Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing Zhou

    2011-12-01

    Antibody-mediated cell recognition plays a critical role in various biological and biomedical applications. However, strong antibody-cell interactions can lead to the difficulty of separating antibodies from the bound cells in a simple and non-destructive manner, which is often necessary to numerous applications such as cell sorting or separation. Thus, this thesis research is aimed to create an antibody-like nanomaterial with the function of reversible cell recognition It was hypothesized that nucleic acid aptamer and dendrimer could be used as fundamental structural components to develop an antibody-like nanomaterial. The aptamer functions as the binding site of an antibody; the dendrimer is used as a robust, defined nano-scaffold to support the aptamer and to carry small molecules (e.g., fluorophores). To test this hypothesis, a novel method was first developed to discover the essential nucleotides of full-length aptamers to mimic the binding sites of antibodies. The essential nucleotides were further conjugated with a dendrimer to synthesize a monovalent aptamer-dendrimer nanomaterial. The results clearly showed that the essential nucleotides could maintain high affinity and specificity after tethered on dendrimer surface. To further test the hypothesis that antibody-like nanomaterials can be rationally designed to acquire the capability of reversible cell recognition, an aptamer that was selected at 0 C was used as a model to synthesize a "Y-shaped" nanomaterial by conjugating two aptamers to the same dendrimer. The results showed that the nanomaterial-cell interaction could be affected by the distance between two binding aptamers. In addition, the "Y-shaped" antibody-like nanomaterial could bind target cells more strongly than its monovalent control. Importantly, the strong cell-nanomaterial interaction could be rapidly reversed when the temperature was shifted from 0 C to 37 C. In summary, we developed a synthetic antibody that can not only mimic the functional structure and cell recognition capability of antibodies, but also possess specific features that natural antibodies do not possess. This study has opened a new avenue for developing synthetic antibodies and has also advanced the understanding of the functionality of multivalent nanomaterials. This novel synthetic antibody holds great potential for various biological and biomedical applications such as cell separation.

  17. Pathogen-specific antibodies: codependent no longer

    PubMed Central

    Janoff, Edward N.; Frank, Daniel N.

    2010-01-01

    Antibody-mediated defense against pathogens typically requires complex interactions between antibodies and other constituents of the humoral and cellular immune systems. However, recent evidence indicates that some antibodies alone can inhibit pathogen function in the absence of complement, phagocytes, or NK cells. In this issue of the JCI, McClelland et al. have begun to elucidate the molecular bases by which antibodies alone can impact pathogen growth and metabolism. They show that mAbs specific for the polysaccharide capsule of the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans elicit diverse effects on fungal gene expression, lipid biosynthesis, susceptibility to amphotericin B, cellular metabolism, and protein phosphorylation. These data suggest that pathogens have the capacity to generate broad metabolic responses as a result of surface binding by pathogen-specific antibodies, effects that may hold therapeutic promise. PMID:20335652

  18. Dual targeting strategies with bispecific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are widely used for the treatment of cancer, inflammatory and infectious diseases and other disorders. Most of the marketed antibodies are monospecific and therefore capable of interacting and interfering with a single target. However, complex diseases are often multifactorial in nature, and involve redundant or synergistic action of disease mediators or upregulation of different receptors, including crosstalk between their signaling networks. Consequently, blockade of multiple, different pathological factors and pathways may result in improved therapeutic efficacy. This result can be achieved by combining different drugs, or use of the dual targeting strategies applying bispecific antibodies that have emerged as an alternative to combination therapy. This review discusses the various dual targeting strategies for which bispecific antibodies have been developed and provides an overview of the established bispecific antibody formats. PMID:22453100

  19. Genetically engineered antibody molecules and their application.

    PubMed

    Morrison, S L; Wims, L; Wallick, S; Tan, L; Oi, V T

    1987-01-01

    Immunoglobulin genes can be efficiently expressed following transfection into myeloma cells. Using protoplast fusion, transfection frequencies greater than 10(-3) can be achieved. Compatible plasmids containing two different selectible markers are used to simultaneously deliver heavy and light chain genes to the same cell. To produce molecules with differing specificities the rearranged and expressed variable regions can be cloned from the appropriate hybridoma. In some cases, variable regions from cDNAs can be inserted into the expression vectors. It is possible to manipulate the immunoglobulin genes and produce novel antibody molecules. Antibodies have been produced in which the variable regions from mouse antibodies have been joined to human constant regions. In addition, antibodies with altered constant regions have been produced. These genetically engineered antibodies provide a unique set of reagents to study structure-function relationships within the molecule. They also can potentially be used in the diagnosis and therapy of human disease. PMID:3327412

  20. Antichlamydial Antibodies, Human Fertility, and Pregnancy Wastage

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Amanda J.; Aubuchon, Mira; Schust, Danny J.

    2011-01-01

    Genital infections with Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) continue to be a worldwide epidemic. Immune response to chlamydia is important to both clearance of the disease and disease pathogenesis. Interindividual responses and current chlamydial control programs will have enormous effects on this disease and its control strategies. Humoral immune response to C. trachomatis occurs in humans and persistent antibody levels appear to be most directly correlated with more severe and longstanding disease and with reinfection. There is a close correlation between the presence of antichlamydial antibodies in females and tubal factor infertility; the closest associations have been found for antibodies against chlamydial heat shock proteins. The latter antibodies have also been shown to be useful among infertile patients with prior ectopic pregnancy, and their presence has been correlated with poor IVF outcomes, including early pregnancy loss. We review the existing literature on chlamydial antibody testing in infertile patients and present an algorithm for such testing in the infertile couple. PMID:21949601

  1. Edelman's view on the discovery of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2015-04-01

    Gerald M. Edelman began working to the structure of antibodies when joined as graduate student the laboratory of Henry Kunkel in 1958 at the "Rockefeller University" in New York, obtaining his doctorate in 1960. Edelman's focus on the structure of antibodies led to the 1972 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine along with Rodney R. Porter. Edelman and Porter decided to approach the problem of antibodies structure by splitting. In 1959, Porter published a report in which he used the enzyme papain to cleave the antibody molecule into three pieces of about 50,000 Da, corresponding to the two Fab (antigen-binding) and constant Fc (crystallizable) fragments. In the same year, Edelman showed that reduction of the disulfide bonds of antibodies in the presence of denaturizing agents led to dissociation of the molecule into smaller pieces, now known to be the light (L) and heavy (H) chains. PMID:25712466

  2. Development and Detection of Kidd Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Kimberly Williams; Bourikian, Seda; McClain, Aryn; Curtis, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Kidd antibodies have a reputation for causing hemolytic transfusion reactions and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. We present a case of an untransfused male patient who developed anti-Kidd(a) (Jk(a)) antibodies after receiving an allogenic renal transplant. The formation of this antibody was associated with exposure to the Kidd antigen expressed on the tubular epithelium of the transplanted kidney. The 59-year-old white male patient had received a cadaveric renal transplant at our clinic and returned 5 years later with proteinuria and elevated serum creatinine levels, consistent with nephrotic syndrome. We review the expression of Kidd antigens and the development and detection of Kidd antibodies, and discuss the case reports from the literature of Kidd antibodies associated with kidney-graft rejection that suggest Kidd antigens play a role as a minor histocompatibility antigen. PMID:26199265

  3. Affinity of FVIII-specific antibodies reveals major differences between neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies in humans.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Christoph J; Whelan, Shawn F J; Hirschler, Maria; Allacher, Peter; Horling, Frank M; Lawo, John-Philip; Oldenburg, Johannes; Tiede, Andreas; Male, Christoph; Windyga, Jerzy; Greinacher, Andreas; Knbl, Paul N; Schrenk, Gerald; Koehn, Jadranka; Scheiflinger, Friedrich; Reipert, Birgit M

    2015-02-12

    Recently, we reported that distinct immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes and IgG subclasses of factor VIII (FVIII)-specific antibodies are found in different cohorts of patients with hemophilia A and in healthy individuals. Prompted by these findings, we further investigated the distinguishing properties among the different populations of FVIII-specific antibodies. We hypothesized that the affinity of antibodies would discriminate between the neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies found in different study cohorts. To test this idea, we established a competition-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technology to assess the apparent affinities for each isotype and IgG subclass of FVIII-specific antibodies without the need for antibody purification. We present a unique data set of apparent affinities of FVIII-specific antibodies found in healthy individuals, patients with congenital hemophilia A with and without FVIII inhibitors, and patients with acquired hemophilia A. Our data indicate that FVIII-specific antibodies found in patients with FVIII inhibitors have an up to 100-fold higher apparent affinity than that of antibodies found in patients without inhibitors and in healthy individuals. High-affinity FVIII-specific antibodies could be retrospectively detected in longitudinal samples of an individual patient with FVIII inhibitors 543 days before the first positive Bethesda assay. This finding suggests that these antibodies might serve as potential biomarkers for evolving FVIII inhibitor responses. PMID:25515962

  4. Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network laboratory guidelines for the use of direct tests to detect syphilis in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Raymond SW; Morshed, Muhammad; Chernesky, Max A; Jayaraman, Gayatri C; Kadkhoda, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and/or its nucleic acid can be detected by various methods such as microscopy, rabbit infectivity test or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. The rabbit infectivity test for T. pallidum, although very sensitive, has been discontinued from most laboratories due to ethical issues related to the need for animal inoculation with live T. pallidum, the technically demanding procedure and long turnaround time for results, thus making it impractical for routine diagnostic use. Dark-field and phase-contrast microscopy are still useful at clinic- or hospital-based laboratories for near-bedside detection of T. pallidum in genital, skin or mucous lesions although their availability is decreasing. The lack of reliable and specific anti-T. pallidum antibodies and its inferior sensitivity to PCR may explain why the direct fluorescent antibody test for T. pallidum is not widely available for clinical use. Immunohistochemical staining for T. pallidum also depends on the availability of specific antibodies, and the method is only applicable for histopathological examination of biopsy and autopsy specimens necessitating an invasive specimen collection approach. With recent advances in molecular diagnostics, PCR is considered to be the most reliable, versatile and practical for laboratories to implement. In addition to being an objective and sensitive test for direct detection of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum DNA in skin and mucous membrane lesions, the resulting PCR amplicons from selected gene targets can be further characterized for antimicrobial (macrolide) susceptibility testing, strain typing and identification of T. pallidum subspecies. PMID:25798160

  5. The role of antibodies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Weber, Martin S; Hemmer, Bernhard; Cepok, Sabine

    2011-02-01

    B cells, plasma cells, and antibodies are commonly found in active central nervous system (CNS) lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). B cells isolated from CNS lesions as well as from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) show signs of clonal expansion and hypermutation, suggesting their local activation. Plasma blasts and plasma cells maturating from these B cells were recently identified to contribute to the development of oligoclonal antibodies produced within the CSF, which remain a diagnostic hallmark finding in MS. Within the CNS, antibody deposition is associated with complement activation and demyelination, indicating antigen recognition-associated effector function. While some studies indeed implied a disease-intrinsic and possibly pathogenic role of antibodies directed against components of the myelin sheath, no unequivocal results on a decisive target antigen within the CNS persisted to date. The notion of a pathogenic role for antibodies in MS is nevertheless empirically supported by the clinical benefit of plasma exchange in patients with histologic signs of antibody deposition within the CNS. Further, such evidence derives from the animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In transgenic mice endogenously producing myelin-specific antibodies, EAE severity was substantially increased accompanied by enhanced CNS demyelination. Further, genetic engineering in mice adding T cells that recognize the same myelin antigen resulted in spontaneous EAE development, indicating that the coexistence of myelin-specific B cells, T cells, and antibodies was sufficient to trigger CNS autoimmune disease. In conclusion, various pathological, clinical, immunological, and experimental findings collectively indicate a pathogenic role of antibodies in MS, whereas several conceptual challenges, above all uncovering potential target antigens of the antibody response within the CNS, remain to be overcome. PMID:20600871

  6. Immobilization of antibodies and enzyme-labeled antibodies by radiation polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.; Suzuki, M.; Adachi, S.

    1983-04-01

    Immobilization of antibodies and enzyme-labeled antibodies by radiation polymerization at low temperatures was studied. The antibody activity of antibody was not affected by irradiation at an irradiation dose of below 8 MR and low temperatures. Immobilization of peroxidase-labeled anti-rabbit IgG goat IgG, anti-peroxidase, peroxidase, and anti-alpha-fetoprotein was carried out with hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers. The activity of the immobilized enzyme-labeled antibody membranes varied with the thickness of the membranes and increased with decreasing membrane thickness. The activity of the immobilized antibody particles was varied by particle size. Immobilized anti-alpha-fetoprotein particles and membranes can be used for the assay of alpha-fetoprotein by the antigen-antibody reaction, such as a solid-phase sandwich method with high sensitivity.

  7. Recombinant human polyclonal antibodies: A new class of therapeutic antibodies against viral infections.

    PubMed

    Bregenholt, Sren; Jensen, Allan; Lantto, Johan; Hyldig, Sara; Haurum, John S

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian immune system eliminates pathogens by generating a specific antibody response. Polyclonality is a key feature of this immune response: the immune system produces antibodies which bind to different structures on a given pathogen thereby increasing the likelihood of its elimination. The vast majority of current recombinant antibody drugs rely on monospecific monoclonal antibodies. Inherently, such antibodies do not represent the benefits of polyclonality utilized by a natural immune system and this has impeded the identification of efficacious antibody drugs against infectious agents, including viruses. The development of novel technologies has allowed the identification and manufacturing of antigen-specific recombinant polyclonal human antibodies, so-called symphobodies. This review describes the rationale for designing drugs based on symphobodies against pathogenic viruses, including HIV, vaccinia and smallpox virus, and respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:16787244

  8. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    DOEpatents

    Kassis, Amin I. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Khawli, Leslie A. (Newton Centre, MA)

    1991-01-01

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabelled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody.

  9. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    DOEpatents

    Kassis, A.I.; Khawli, L.A.

    1991-02-19

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabeled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody. No Drawings

  10. NEW GLIOMA-ASSOCIATED AUTO-ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Fueyo, Juan; Conrad, Charles; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Yung, WK Alfred; Tufaro, Frank; Lang, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that the immune system can recognize the antigenic changes in cancer cells, and further develop autoantibodies against these tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Therefore, these cancer-associated autoantibodies might be used to identify the antigenic changes of cellular proteins involved in the transformation process. Antibodies to tumor antigens have advantages over other serum proteins as potential cancer biomarkers as they are highly specific and easily identified with high quality secondary reagents. Currently, there is a paucity of studies on autoantibodies against TAAs in gliomas. Here we examined the antibodies against TAAs in a Phase I clinical trial of patients with recurrent gliomas treated with the intratumoral injection of Delta-24-RGD oncolytic adenovirus (Fred Lang, Neurosurgery, MDACC, Director of the Trial). METHODS: Sera from 37 patients were analysed before the administration of Delta-24-RGD and then at several time points after the administration of the adenovirus. A solid phase-modified ELISA was used to assess antibodies against the following 31 antigens: BRAF, CABYR, CRISP3, CSAG2, DHFR, FHLT17, GAGE1, LDHC, MAGEA1, MAGEA3, MAGEA4, MAGEB6, MAPK1, MUC1, NLRP4, NYESO1, p53, PBK, PRAME, SOX2, SPANXA1,SSX2, TSGA10, TSSK6, TULP2, XAGE2, ZNF165. Expression of the proteins in tumors was confirmed using western blot and/or immunohistochemistry. Data were the result of at least two independent experiments. RESULTS: 1. The majority of the patients with recurrent gliomas harbor antibodies against TAAs. 2. The titer of antibodies against TAAs drastically decreased after total resection of the tumor. 3. After surgery the antibodies became again detectable predicting relapse. 4. 80% of patients' sera have antibodies against cancer testis antigens including NYESO1 and MAGE. 5. 60% of the patients showed antibodies against MAGEA1 o MAGEA3. 6. 40% of patients were positive for NYESO1 antibodies. 7. A small percentage of patients have antibodies against BRAF or SOX2. CONCLUSIONS: We report for the first time a systematic analysis of cancer-associated antibodies in patients with recurrent gliomas treated with oncolytic adenoviruses. As illustrated in this study, the serological screening of patients using solid phase ELISA for well characterized antigens offers new opportunities for analyzing the repertoire of the humoral immune response to human gliomas. Many of the listed antibodies were never analyzed before in gliomas. More intensive screening of patients after surgery may include frequent antibody screening (i.e. every 3–6 months) as an adjunct to serial MRIs. Of further clinical relevance several of the cancer/testis antigens identified are promising targets for cancer vaccines. SECONDARY CATEGORY: Tumor Biology.

  11. Progress towards recombinant anti-infective antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Jennifer C.; Sutherland, Jamie N.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    The global market for monoclonal antibody therapeutics reached a total of $11.2 billion in 2004, with an impressive 42% growth rate over the previous five years and is expected to reach ~$34 billion by 2010. Coupled with this growth are stream-lined product development, production scale-up and regulatory approval processes for the highly conserved antibody structure. While only one of the 21 current FDA-approved antibodies, and one of the 38 products in advanced clinical trials target infectious diseases, there is increasing academic, government and commercial interest in this area. Synagis, an antibody neutralizing respiratory syncitial virus (RSV), garnered impressive sales of $1.1 billion in 2006 in spite of its high cost and undocumented effects on viral titres in human patients. The success of anti-RSV passive immunization has motivated the continued development of anti-infectives to treat a number of other infectious diseases, including those mediated by viruses, toxins and bacterial/fungal cells. Concurrently, advances in antibody technology suggest that cocktails of several monoclonal antibodies with unique epitope specificity or single monoclonal antibodies with broad serotype specificity may be the most successful format. Recent patents and patent applications in these areas will be discussed as predictors of future anti-infective therapeutics. PMID:19149692

  12. Antibodies in the Pathogenesis of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Christopher T.; Lieu, Maggie; Toh, Ban-Hock; Kyaw, Tin S.; Bobik, Alexander; Sobey, Christopher G.; Drummond, Grant R.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that circulating levels of IgG and IgM antibodies are elevated in patients with essential and pregnancy-related hypertension. Recent studies indicate these antibodies target, and in many cases activate, G-protein coupled receptors and ion channels. Prominent among these protein targets are AT1 receptors, ?1-adrenoceptors, ?1-adrenoceptors, and L-type voltage operated Ca2+ channels, all of which are known to play key roles in the regulation of blood pressure through modulation of vascular tone, cardiac output, and/or Na+/water reabsorption in the kidneys. This suggests that elevated antibody production may be a causal mechanism in at least some cases of hypertension. In this brief review, we will further describe the protein targets of the antibodies that are elevated in individuals with essential and pregnancy-related hypertension and the likely pathophysiological consequences of antibody binding to these targets. We will speculate on the potential mechanisms that underlie elevated antibody levels in hypertensive individuals and, finally, we will outline the therapeutic opportunities that could arise with a better understanding of how and why antibodies are produced in hypertension. PMID:25050352

  13. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    Potential uses of monoclonal antibodies in anti-cancer treatment include passive serotherapy, radioisotope conjugates, toxin-linked conjugates, and chemotherapy-monoclonal antibody conjugates. The bases for these applications have been founded in research with heterologous antisera, and in some cases with monoclonal antibodies in animal tumor models. Human trials with passive serotherapy have already begun in both hematopoietic and solid tumor malignancies. Promising results have been reported in cutaneous T cell lymphoma with anti-T cell monoclonal antibody, and in nodular lymphoma with anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody. Radioisotope conjugate work appears promising for imaging in both animals and humans, and this work will lay the foundation for possible therapeutic application of radio-immunotherapy. Toxin-linked conjugates are promising in vitro and may have application in autologous bone marrow transplantation. Research with chemotherapy conjugates is also underway. Preliminary results suggest that murine monoclonal antibodies will be well tolerated clinically except in the setting of circulating cells which bear the target antigen, where rapid infusions may be associated with intolerable side effects. In certain diseases, production of endogenous anti-mouse antibodies may also limit application. Advances in the technology for human-human hybridoma production may help solve some of these problems. 132 references.

  14. Progress towards recombinant anti-infective antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pai, Jennifer C; Sutherland, Jamie N; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2009-01-01

    The global market for monoclonal antibody therapeutics reached a total of $11.2 billion in 2004, with an impressive 42% growth rate over the previous five years and is expected to reach approximately $34 billion by 2010. Coupled with this growth are stream-lined product development, production scale-up and regulatory approval processes for the highly conserved antibody structure. While only one of the 21 current FDA-approved antibodies, and one of the 38 products in advanced clinical trials target infectious diseases, there is increasing academic, government and commercial interest in this area. Synagis, an antibody neutralizing respiratory syncitial virus (RSV), garnered impressive sales of $1.1 billion in 2006 in spite of its high cost and undocumented effects on viral titres in human patients. The success of anti-RSV passive immunization has motivated the continued development of anti-infectives to treat a number of other infectious diseases, including those mediated by viruses, toxins and bacterial/ fungal cells. Concurrently, advances in antibody technology suggest that cocktails of several monoclonal antibodies with unique epitope specificity or single monoclonal antibodies with broad serotype specificity may be the most successful format. Recent patents and patent applications in these areas will be discussed as predictors of future anti-infective therapeutics. PMID:19149692

  15. Antibody-based immunotherapy of cryptosporidiosis.

    PubMed

    Crabb, J H

    1998-01-01

    Passive antibody immunotherapy (PAI) for cryptosporidiosis is a treatment strategy that has been actively pursued in laboratory studies and early-stage clinical studies for the last decade. Several experimental approaches have been initiated, including use of bovine colostrum and colostral antibodies (hyperimmune and natural), monoclonal antibodies, chicken egg yolk antibodies, and even orally administered human plasma antibodies. Most studies have employed oral administration to treat or prevent this intestinal infection. The interest in this treatment strategy has been sparked by the lack of an effective or approved therapy, increased awareness of the widespread nature of this parasite, epidemiological evidence that humoral immunity plays an important role in host resistance, and several early case reports of antibody therapy in which remarkable resolution of the disease was observed. Most studies using a variety of preparations of antibodies administered to animals and humans have shown some degree of efficacy, though the responses have been, for the most part, partial rather than complete resolution of the disease. This chapter examines critically the scientific rationale and the evidence for PAI for cryptosporidiosis, including practical considerations and future approaches. PMID:9554072

  16. Immunoperoxidase inhibition assay for rabies antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Batista, H B C R; Lima, F E S; Maletich, D; Silva, A C R; Vicentini, F K; Roehe, L R; Spilki, F R; Franco, A C; Roehe, P M

    2011-06-01

    An immunoperoxidase inhibition assay (IIA) for detection of rabies antibodies in human sera is described. Diluted test sera are added to microplates with paraformaldehyde-fixed, CER cells infected with rabies virus. Antibodies in test sera compete with a rabies polyclonal rabbit antiserum which was added subsequently. Next, an anti-rabbit IgG-peroxidase conjugate is added and the reaction developed by the addition of the substrate 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC). The performance of the assay was compared to that of the "simplified fluorescence inhibition microtest" (SFIMT), an established virus neutralization assay, by testing 422 human sera. The IIA displayed 97.6% sensitivity, 98% specificity and 97.6% accuracy (Kappa correlation coefficient=0.9). The IIA results can be read by standard light microscopy, where the clearly identifiable specific staining is visible in antibody-negative sera, in contrast to the absence of staining in antibody-positive samples. The assay does not require monoclonal antibodies or production of large amounts of virus; furthermore, protein purification steps or specialized equipment are not necessary for its performance. The IIA was shown to be suitable for detection of rabies antibodies in human sera, with sensitivity, specificity and accuracy comparable to that of a neutralization-based assay. This assay may be advantageous over other similar methods designed to detect rabies-specific binding antibodies, in that it can be easily introduced into laboratories, provided basic cell culture facilities are available. PMID:21458492

  17. Conformational isomerism of IgG antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hansson, U B; Wingren, C; Alkner, U

    1997-06-20

    The purpose of this study was to determine why apparently homogeneous IgG antibodies were, in some cases, fractionated into at least two components by liquid-liquid partition chromatography (LLPC) in an aqueous two-phase system. Four mouse monoclonal IgG antibodies, two against albumin, one against IgG and one against thyroxine, were shown to adopt different conformational isomeric forms. The four antibodies existed in an equilibrium between two or three conformational forms, the proportion of which could also be estimated by LLPC. Since LLPC detects mainly conformational differences within the antigen-binding sites of IgG antibodies, it could be concluded that the conformational forms differed with respect to their combining sites. Moreover, the isomeric forms of an antibody directed against a protein antigen, formed antigen-antibody complexes with almost identical surface properties. In contrast, complexes with different surface properties were formed when the hapten or hapten conjugated to BSA was bound. Thus, both the conformational isomers could bind antigen, at least when the antigen was a small hapten or a hapten conjugated to a carrier protein. Our results suggest that six out of 57 monoclonal IgG antibodies exist in equilibrium between at least two conformational forms and the biological significance of this isomerism is discussed. PMID:9217014

  18. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, K K; Acharya, S A

    1989-07-01

    Antibodies, specifically monoclonal antibodies, are potentially very useful and powerful carriers of therapeutic agents to target tissues and diagnostic agents. The loading or charging of antibodies with agents, especially radiotracers, is reviewed here. The choice of radioisotope for immunodetection and/or immunotherapy is based on its availability, half-life, nature of the radiation emitted, and the metabolic pathways of the radionuclide in the body. Most important of all are the derivatization techniques available for labeling the antibody with the given radionuclide. Isotopes of iodine and divalent metal ions are the most commonly used radionuclides. Antibodies labeled with iodine at tyrosine residues are metabolized rapidly in vivo. This leads to the incorporation of metabolized radioactive iodine into various tissues, mainly the thyroid gland and stomach, and to the accumulation of high levels of circulating iodine in the blood, which masks tumor uptake considerably. To overcome these limitations, the use of iodohippurate as an iodine-anchoring molecule to the protein should be considered. When divalent or multivalent metal ions are used as the preferred radionuclide, bifunctional chelating reagents such as ethylenediaminepentaacetic acid (EDTA) or diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are first coupled to the protein or antibody. These chelating molecules are attached to the protein by formation of an isopeptide linkage between the carboxylate of the chelating reagent and the amino group of the protein. Several procedures are available to generate the isopeptide linkage. When the anchoring of the chelating agent through isopeptide linkage results in the inactivation of the antibody, periodate oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the antibody, followed by reductive coupling of chelator, could be considered as an alternative. There is still a need for better, simpler, and more direct methods for labeling antibodies with radionuclides. PMID:2503873

  19. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, K.K.; Acharya, S.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Antibodies, specifically monoclonal antibodies, are potentially very useful and powerful carriers of therapeutic agents to target tissues and diagnostic agents. The loading or charging of antibodies with agents, especially radiotracers, is reviewed here. The choice of radioisotope for immunodetection and/or immunotherapy is based on its availability, half-life, nature of the radiation emitted, and the metabolic pathways of the radionuclide in the body. Most important of all are the derivatization techniques available for labeling the antibody with the given radionuclide. Isotopes of iodine and divalent metal ions are the most commonly used radionuclides. Antibodies labeled with iodine at tyrosine residues are metabolized rapidly in vivo. This leads to the incorporation of metabolized radioactive iodine into various tissues, mainly the thyroid gland and stomach, and to the accumulation of high levels of circulating iodine in the blood, which masks tumor uptake considerably. To overcome these limitations, the use of iodohippurate as an iodine-anchoring molecule to the protein should be considered. When divalent or multivalent metal ions are used as the preferred radionuclide, bifunctional chelating reagents such as EDTA or DTPA are first coupled to the protein or antibody. These chelating molecules are attached to the protein by formation of an isopeptide linkage between the carboxylate of the chelating reagent and the amino group of the protein. Several procedures are available to generate the isopeptide linkage. When the anchoring of the chelating agent through isopeptide linkage results in the inactivation of the antibody, periodate oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the antibody, followed by reductive coupling of chelator, could be considered as an alternative. There is still a need for better, simpler, and more direct methods for labeling antibodies with radionuclides. 78 references.

  20. Antibodies Against Three Forms of Urokinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Atassi, M. Zouhair

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies that bind to preselected regions of the urokinase molecule have been developed. These antibodies can be used to measure small quantities of each of three molecular forms of urokinase that could be contained in microsamples or conditioned media harvested from cultures of mammalian cells. Previously available antibodies and assay techniques do not yield both clear distinctions among, and measurements of, all three forms. Urokinase is a zymogen that is synthesized in a single-chain form, called ScuPA, which is composed of 411 amino acid residues (see figure). ScuPA has very little enzyme activity, but it can be activated in two ways: (1) by cleavage of the peptide bond lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the loss of lysine 158 to obtain the high molecular-weight (HMW) form of the enzyme or (2) by cleavage of the bond lysine 135/lysine 136 to obtain the low-molecular-weight (LMW) form of the enzyme. The antibodies in question were produced in mice and rabbits by use of peptides as immunogens. The peptides were selected to obtain antibodies that bind to regions of ScuPA that include the lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the lysine 135/lysine 136 bonds. The antibodies include monoclonal and polyclonal ones that yield indications as to whether either of these bonds is intact. The polyclonal antibodies include ones that preferentially bind to the HMW or LMW forms of the urokinase molecule. The monoclonal antibodies include ones that discriminate between the ScuPA and the HMW form. A combination of these molecular-specific antibodies will enable simultaneous assays of the ScuPA, HMW, and LMW forms in the same specimen of culture medium.

  1. Oral delivery of antibodies. Future pharmacokinetic trends.

    PubMed

    Reilly, R M; Domingo, R; Sandhu, J

    1997-04-01

    Antibodies have been investigated as specific targeting agents for cancer diagnosis and therapy, to inactivate toxic substances including drugs and also as passive immunotherapy for neoplastic or infectious diseases. In most cases the antibodies were administered systemically by the intravenous route. More recently, however, there has been increasing interest in the oral administration of antibodies for localised treatment of infections or other conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. The normal physiological handling of ingested proteins is degradation by proteases in the stomach and intestine into small peptides or amino acids which are subsequently absorbed. Proteolytic enzymes involved in the degradation of orally administered immunoglobulins include pepsin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase and elastase. These enzymes initially degrade the antibodies to F(ab')2. Fab and Fc fragments. The F(ab')2 and Fab fragments, however, retain some of their neutralising activity locally in the gastrointestinal tract. Various approaches are possible to increase the stability of orally administered antibodies against proteolysis, including formulation in liposomes, coating with polymers and genetic engineering of resistant forms. The clinical application of orally administered antibodies includes the treatment and prevention of gastrointestinal infections caused by enteric pathogens such as rotavirus, Escherichia coli or Vibrio cholerae in susceptible individuals including those with immunodeficiency diseases and patients with bone marrow transplants. There is also a suggestion that such agents may be useful in preventing chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis. Future opportunities for research include the design of oral dosage forms of antibodies which resist proteolysis and can deliver a greater fraction of immunoreactive antibody locally in the gastrointestinal tract for the treatment of infections or perhaps even to allow the absorption of antibodies for the treatment or prevention of systemic conditions. PMID:9113439

  2. Coeliac Disease-Associated Antibodies in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Akbulut, Sabiye; Gür, Günes; Topal, Firdevs; Topal, Fatih Esad; Alli, Nuran; Saritas, Ülkü

    2013-01-01

    Background The possible relationship between psoriasis and coeliac disease (CD) has been attributed to the common pathogenic mechanisms of the two diseases and the presence of antigliadin antibodies in patients has been reported to increase the incidence of CD. Objective The aim of this report was to study CD-associated antibodies serum antigliadin antibody immunoglobulin (Ig)A, IgG, anti-endomysial antibody IgA and anti-transglutaminase antibody IgA and to demonstrate whether there is an increase in the frequency of those markers of CD in patients with psoriasis. Methods Serum antigliadin antibody IgG and IgA, antiendomysial antibody IgA and anti-transglutaminase antibody IgA were studied in 37 (19 males) patients with psoriasis and 50 (23 males) healthy controls. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and duodenal biopsies were performed in patients with at least one positive marker. Results Antigliadin IgA was statistically higher in the psoriasis group than in the controls (p<0.05). Serological markers were found positive in 6 patients with psoriasis and 1 person from the control group. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed in all these persons, with biopsies collected from the duodenum. The diagnosis of CD was reported in only one patient with psoriasis following the pathological examination of the biopsies. Whereas one person of the control group was found to be positive for antigliadin antibody IgA, pathological examination of the duodenal biopsies obtain from this patient were found to be normal. Conclusion Antigliadin IgA prominently increases in patients diagnosed with psoriasis. Patients with psoriasis should be investigated for latent CD and should be followed up. PMID:24003271

  3. X antigen/antibody markers in hepadnavirus infections. Antibodies to the X gene product(s).

    PubMed

    Feitelson, M A; Clayton, M M

    1990-08-01

    Antibodies to the X antigen of hepatitis B virus and woodchuck hepatitis virus were assayed in serial sera from infected individuals and compared with other markers of infection. Antibody to the X antigen was found in 11 of 17 (65%) patients and 17 of 40 (42%) woodchucks that were surface-antigen positive. In comparison, this antibody was found in 5 of 14 (36%) patients and in none of 4 woodchucks that were surface-antigen negative. In 5 of 6 patients showing seroconversion from hepatitis B e antigen to antibody, antibody to X appeared at or near the time of seroconversion. In patients persistently positive for e antigen, X antibody often appeared when viral DNA became undetectable in the serum. In 14 of 17 (82%) woodchucks positive for antibody to X antigen, it also appeared near or after the time that viral DNA in serum disappeared. X antibodies were detected with great frequency only in populations with high frequencies of other hepatitis B virus markers. The results are consistent with the conclusion that antibody to X antigen is a marker of hepadnavirus infections that seems to be associated with a decrease in viral replication. Antibodies to the X antigen, then, may be a host response to the replication complex of the virus. PMID:2365196

  4. SAbDab: the structural antibody database.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, James; Krawczyk, Konrad; Leem, Jinwoo; Baker, Terry; Fuchs, Angelika; Georges, Guy; Shi, Jiye; Deane, Charlotte M

    2014-01-01

    Structural antibody database (SAbDab; http://opig.stats.ox.ac.uk/webapps/sabdab) is an online resource containing all the publicly available antibody structures annotated and presented in a consistent fashion. The data are annotated with several properties including experimental information, gene details, correct heavy and light chain pairings, antigen details and, where available, antibody-antigen binding affinity. The user can select structures, according to these attributes as well as structural properties such as complementarity determining region loop conformation and variable domain orientation. Individual structures, datasets and the complete database can be downloaded. PMID:24214988

  5. [Hepatitis C antibodies in health personnel].

    PubMed

    Pazdiora, P; Topolcan, O; Herynkov, R

    1994-03-01

    Using the second generation test, the authors examined 320 health professionals of the Faculty Hospital in Plzen and dialyzation centres in Karlovy Vary and Sokolov for the presence of antibodies against the hepatitis C virus. Antibodies were detected in 7 of them (2.2%). Serum positivity was confirmed only in paramedical workers, the highest herd immunity was recorded in workers in the dialyzation centre in Plzen. The authors evaluate the prevalence of antibodies in relation to age and period of practice in the health services. PMID:7513266

  6. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  7. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  8. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  9. HIT-antibodies promote their own antigen.

    PubMed

    Greinacher, Andreas; Krauel, Krystin; Jensch, Inga

    2012-08-01

    Antiplatelet factor 4 (PF4) antibodies have an important role in the most frequent drug-induced immune disorder, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). In this issue of Blood, Sachais and coworkers propose a new feature that may explain why only some anti-PF4 antibodies are pathogenic.(1) In addition to epitope specificity-determining affinity and a high titer, the ability of antibodies to promote formation of their own target antigens seems to be a key factor for pathogenicity. PMID:22859710

  10. Reshaping Human Antibodies: Grafting an Antilysozyme Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeyen, Martine; Milstein, Cesar; Winter, Greg

    1988-03-01

    The production of therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies by hybridoma technology has proved difficult, and this has prompted the ``humanizing'' of mouse monoclonal antibodies by recombinant DNA techniques. It was shown previously that the binding site for a small hapten could be grafted from the heavy-chain variable domain of a mouse antibody to that of a human myeloma protein by transplanting the hypervariable loops. It is now shown that a large binding site for a protein antigen (lysozyme) can also be transplanted from mouse to human heavy chain. The success of such constructions may be facilitated by an induced-fit mechanism.

  11. Status of antithyroid antibodies in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hasanat, M; Rumi, M; Alam, M; Hasan, K; Salimullah, M; Salam, M; Fariduddin, M; Mahtab, H.; Khan, A

    2000-01-01

    To study autoimmunity among thyroid diseases, 397 thyroid patients (age 30 (13) years; M/F 75/322) from two referral centres in Bangladesh and 94 healthy controls (age 30 (13) years; M/F 24/70) were studied for antimicrosomal and antithyroglobulin antibodies. Thyroid patients were clinically grouped as suspected autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), non-autoimmune, or indeterminate groups (where no decision could be reached). Antimicrosomal antibody was strongly positive in 19.4% and weakly positive in 7.3% of patients but only 4.3% and 2.1% respectively in the controls (χ2 = 17.852; p = 0.000) whereas strong and weak positivity were 27.2% and 6.8% in patients compared with 8.5% and 4.3% respectively in the controls (χ2 = 16.916; p = 0.000) for antithyroglobulin antibody. Antibodies were positive in 63.0% with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 36.4% with Graves' disease, and 44.7% with atrophic thyroiditis among the autoimmune group. In the non-autoimmune group antibodies were positive in 100% with multinodular hypothyroidism, 46.7% with subacute thyroiditis, 40.0% with suspected iodine deficiency goitre, 31.3% with toxic multinodular goitre, 30.8% with non-toxic solitary nodules, and 19.4% with simple diffuse goitre. None was positive for antimicrosomal antibody without being positive for antithyroglobulin antibody. The two antibodies strongly correlated in both patients (r = 0.977, p = 0.000) and controls (r = 0.986, p = 0.000). About 9% (36/397) of patients were mismatched with the final diagnosis on antibody measurement; most of them had Hashimoto's thyroiditis (33/36). Prevalence of AITD among thyroid patients was 48.36%. Specificity of antimicrosomal and antithyroglobulin antibodies were 93% and 87%. It was concluded that AITD is not uncommon in Bangladesh; antimicrosomal antibody is a useful marker for AITD and unless antibodies are checked, an appreciable number of patients with AITDs will remain undetected.


Keywords: thyroid autoimmunity; diagnostic dilemma PMID:10824048

  12. Uses of monoclonial antibody 8H9

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-06-23

    This invention provides an antibody that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the heavy chain CDR (Complementary Determining Region)1 comprises NYDIN, heavy chain CDR2 comprises WIFPGDGSTQY, heavy chain CDR3 comprises QTTATWFAY, and the light chain CDR1 comprises RASQSISDYLH, light chain CDR2 comprises YASQSIS, and light chain CDR3 comprises QNGHSFPLT. In another embodiment, there is provided a polypeptide that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the polypeptide comprises NYDIN, WIFPGDGSTQY, QTTATWFAY, RASQSISDYLH, YASQSIS, and QNGHSFPLT.

  13. Antibodies to watch in 2010

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a burgeoning class of therapeutics, with more than 25 approved in countries worldwide. Novel molecules are entering clinical study at a rate of nearly 40 per year, and the commercial pipeline includes approximately 240 mAb therapeutics in clinical studies that have not yet progressed to regulatory approval or been approved. Of particular interest are the 26 mAbs that are currently at Phase 3, when safety and efficacy data critical to approval is established. Phase 3 study lengths are typically two to four years, so results for some studies might be announced in 2010, but data from others might not be presented until 2014. This overview of the 26 candidates provides a brief description of the background and the on-going Phase 3 studies of each mAb. Additional mAbs that have progressed to regulatory review or been approved may also be in Phase 3 studies, but these, as well as Fc fusion proteins, have been excluded. Due to the large body of primary literature about the 26 candidates, only selected references are given, with a focus on recent publications and articles that were relevant to Phase 3 studies. Current as of October 2009, the results presented here will serve as a baseline against which future progress can be measured. PMID:20065640

  14. Advances in recombinant antibody manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Kunert, Renate; Reinhart, David

    2016-04-01

    Since the first use of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for recombinant protein expression, production processes have steadily improved through numerous advances. In this review, we have highlighted several key milestones that have contributed to the success of CHO cells from the beginning of their use for monoclonal antibody (mAb) expression until today. The main factors influencing the yield of a production process are the time to accumulate a desired amount of biomass, the process duration, and the specific productivity. By comparing maximum cell densities and specific growth rates of various expression systems, we have emphasized the limiting parameters of different cellular systems and comprehensively described scientific approaches and techniques to improve host cell lines. Besides the quantitative evaluation of current systems, the quality-determining properties of a host cell line, namely post-translational modifications, were analyzed and compared to naturally occurring polyclonal immunoglobulin fractions from human plasma. In summary, numerous different expression systems for mAbs are available and also under scientific investigation. However, CHO cells are the most frequently investigated cell lines and remain the workhorse for mAb production until today. PMID:26936774

  15. [Anti-basal ganglia antibody].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaharu

    2013-04-01

    Sydenham's chorea (SC) is a major manifestation of rheumatic fever, and the production of anti-basal ganglia antibodies (ABGA) has been proposed in SC. The pathogenesis is hypothesized as autoimmune targeting of the basal ganglia via molecular mimicry, triggered by streptococcal infection. The spectrum of diseases in which ABGA may be involved has been broadened to include other extrapyramidal movement disorders, such as tics, dystonia, and Parkinsonism, as well as other psychiatric disorders. The autoimmune hypothesis in the presence and absence of ABGA has been suggested in Tourette's syndrome (TS), early onset obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD), and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Recently, the relationship between ABGA and dopamine neurons in the basal ganglia has been examined, and autoantibodies against dopamine receptors were detected in the sera from patients with basal ganglia encephalitis. In Japan, the occurrence of subacute encephalitis, where patients suffer from episodes of altered behavior and involuntary movements, has increased. Immune-modulating treatments are effective, indicating the involvement of an autoimmune mechanism. We aimed to detect the anti-neuronal autoantibodies in such encephalitis, using immunohistochemical assessment of patient sera. The sera from patients showing involuntary movements had immunoreactivity for basal ganglia neurons. Further epitopes for ABGA will be investigated in basal ganglia disorders other than SC, TS, OCD, and PANDAS. PMID:23568985

  16. Antibody deficiency in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Herriot, R; Miedzybrodzka, Z

    2016-03-01

    The developmental disorder Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is frequently complicated by recurrent respiratory infections. In many cases this is likely to be the result of microaspiration or gastro-oesophageal reflux but, in a proportion, underlying antibody deficiency is a potentially modifiable susceptibility factor for infection. Relatively subtle, specific defects of pneumococcal antibody production have previously been described in the context of RTS. Here, we report a rare association between the syndrome and an overt, major primary antibody deficiency disorder (common variable immune deficiency) which was successfully managed with immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Early recognition and investigation for antibody deficiency associated with RTS allied to effective and optimized treatment are essential to minimize morbidity and mortality and improve quality and duration of life. PMID:26307339

  17. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology.

    PubMed

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2015-11-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease. PMID:26494046

  18. An Immunosuppressive Antibody-Drug Conjugate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongsheng E.; Liu, Tao; Wang, Ying; Cao, Yu; Du, Jintang; Luo, Xiaozhou; Deshmukh, Vishal; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Lawson, Brian R.; Tremblay, Matthew S.; Young, Travis S.; Kazane, Stephanie A.; Wang, Feng; Schultz, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a novel antibody drug-conjugate (ADC) which can selectively deliver the Lck inhibitor dasatinib to human T lymphocytes. This ADC is based on a humanized antibody which selectively binds with high affinity to CXCR4, an antigen that is selectively expressed on hematopoietic cells. The resulting dasatinib-antibody conjugate suppresses T-cell-receptor (TCR)-mediated T cell activation and cytokine expression with low nM EC50 and has minimal effects on cell viability. This ADC may lead to a new class of selective immunosuppressive drugs with improved safety, and extends the antibody-drug conjugate strategy to the targeted delivery of kinase inhibitors for indications beyond oncology. PMID:25699419

  19. Polynucleotides encoding anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R. (Berkeley, CA); Kehoe, John (Saint Davids, PA); Bradbury, Andrew M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2011-01-11

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  20. Detection of rabies antibodies in dog sera.

    PubMed

    Ondrejkov, A; Sli, J; Ondrejka, R; Slepeck, E; Proke, M; ?echvala, P; Supuka, P

    2015-01-01

    In the presented work, we compared the results of determination of rabies antibodies using three in vitro methods: rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT), fluorescent antibody virus neutralisation test (FAVNT) and the immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA). 196 dog sera samples were examined with FAVNT, RFFIT methods and the ELISA test. Sera with low and sufficiently high titre of antibodies had a similar result in determining by all methods. A critical level of rabies antibodies close to the required protection level (0.5 IU/cm3) was seen in sera of 18 dogs (9.18%); these were the sera obtained after primary vaccination of dogs. At this level, even small differences can cause a change in the assessment of the patient's serum seronegativity or seropositivity. Therefore, it is important to choose the appropriate method that has sufficiently strict criteria while having a good reproducibility. PMID:25928909

  1. Antibodies against the calcium-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Mei; Jensen, K.G.; Sjolund, R.D. ); Krause, K.H.; Campbell, K.P. )

    1989-12-01

    Plant microsomes contain a protein clearly related to a calcium-binding protein, calsequestrin, originally found in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells, responsible for the rapid release and uptake of Ca{sup 2+} within the cells. The location and role of calsequestrin in plant cells is unknown. To generate monoclonal antibodies specific to plant calsequestrin, mice were immunized with a microsomal fraction from cultured cells of Streptanthus tortuosus (Brassicaceae). Two clones cross-reacted with one protein band with a molecular weight equal to that of calsequestrin (57 kilodaltons) by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. This band is able to bind {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} and can be recognized by a polyclonal antibody against the canine cardiac muscle calsequestrin. Rabbit skeletal muscle calsequestrin cross-reacted with the plant monoclonal antibodies. The plant monoclonal antibodies generated here are specific to calsequestrin protein.

  2. New haptens and antibodies for ractopamine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanhui; Liu, Meixuan; Shi, Weimin; Li, Chenglong; Zhang, Suxia; Shen, Jianzhong

    2015-09-15

    In this work, three unreported immunizing haptens of ractopamine (RAC) were synthesized and used to produce highly sensitive and specific polyclonal antibody. The spacer arms of haptens for coupling to protein carrier were located on different position of RAC with different length. High affinity polyclonal antibodies were obtained and characterized in terms of titer and sensitivity by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The best antibody employed in a heterologous competitive ELISA exhibited an IC50 value as low as 0.12ngmL(-1) and could not recognize other 10 ?-agonists including clenbuterol and salbutamol. The heterologous competitive ELISA was preliminary applied to swine urine and the results showed the new antibody was sufficiently sensitive and specific, and potentially used for the detection of RAC at trace level in real samples. PMID:25863617

  3. Brain-Reactive Antibodies and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, B.; Honig, G.; Mader, S.; Brimberg, L.; Volpe, B.T.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases currently affect 5–7% of the world's population; in most diseases there are circulating autoantibodies. Brain-reactive antibodies are present in approximately 2–3% of the general population but do not usually contribute to brain pathology. These antibodies penetrate brain tissue only early in development or under pathologic conditions. This restriction on their pathogenicity and the lack of correlation between serum titers and brain pathology have, no doubt, contributed to a delayed appreciation of the contribution of autoantibodies in diseases of the central nervous system. Nonetheless, it is increasingly clear that antibodies can cause damage in the brain and likely initiate or aggravate multiple neurologic conditions; brain-reactive antibodies contribute to symptomatology in autoimmune disease, infectious disease, and malignancy. PMID:23516983

  4. Chemical biology: How to minimalize antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    The success of antibodies as pharmaceuticals has triggered interest in crafting much smaller mimics. A crucial step forward has been taken with the chemical synthesis of small molecules that recruit immune cells to attack cancer cells.

  5. Myopathy with anti-HMGCR antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Ali; Choksi, Rati; Bucelli, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze clinical features and myopathology changes in muscle fibers, connective tissue, and vessels in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) antibodyassociated myopathies. Methods: Retrospective review of records and myopathologic features of 49 consecutive patients with myopathies and serum HMGCR antibodies. Results: Clinical features included onset age from 12 to 83 years, female predominance (67%), proximal, symmetric weakness (84%), muscle discomfort (78%), dysphagia (35%), systemic features, including skin rash and interstitial lung disease (37%), statin use (38%), and a high serum creatine kinase (83%). Myopathology included muscle fiber necrosis or regeneration (66%), myonuclear pathology (43%), perimysial connective tissue damage (61%), and lymphocytic foci (27%). Conclusions: Patients with HMGCR antibodyassociated myopathies present with weakness and muscle discomfort and often have damage to both perimysial connective tissue and muscle fibers, with necrosis and myonuclear pathology. Only a minority of patients with HMGCR antibodyassociated myopathies have a history of statin exposure. PMID:26090508

  6. Antibody Fc: Linking Adaptive and Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M.

    2014-01-01

    Antibody Fc: Linking Adaptive and Innate Immunity, edited by Margaret E. Ackerman and Falk Nimmerjahn and published by Academic Press, provides a highly detailed examination of the involvement of the antibody Fc in mechanisms critical to both innate and adaptive immune responses. Despite a recent increase in format diversity, most marketed antibodies are full-length IgG molecules and the majority of the commercial clinical pipeline of antibody therapeutics is composed of Fc-containing IgG molecules, which underscores the importance of understanding how the Fc domain affects biological responses. The book is divided into six sections that include a total of 20 chapters. In order of their appearance, the sections provide extensive coverage of effector mechanisms, effector cells, Fc receptors, variability of the Fc domain, genetic associations, and evolving areas.

  7. Primary Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hanjagi, Siddaraya Y

    2015-01-01

    Primary Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a rare disease associated with thromboembolic events which may affect either the arterial or the venous vasculature. It presents with an increased risk of thrombosis in pregnant woman leading to repeated fetal losses. We present here a case of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in young women who had previous event of gangrene of toes leading to their amputation and repeated fetal losses. PMID:26557558

  8. Antibody transport and internalization into tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Matzku, S.; Moldenhauer, G.; Kalthoff, H.; Canevari, S.; Colnaghi, M.; Schuhmacher, J.; Bihl, H.

    1990-01-01

    Internalization of monoclonal antibody (MAb) conjugates is an important feature of tumour targeting, both with respect to the therapeutic action of substances coupled to the antibody and to retention of radionuclides. Problems of analysing internalization in vitro and in vivo, of manipulating internalization, and of evaluating the involvement of normal tissues are illustrated by recent experimental data and are discussed in the light of published evidence. Images Figure 4 PMID:2383472

  9. Autoimmune Hepatitis with Anti Centromere Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lodh, Moushumi; Pradhan, Debkant; Parida, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    We present the case report of a 49-year-old type 2 diabetes mellitus patient presenting with abdominal pain and black stool for 15 days. A proper workup of laboratory investigations helped us diagnose autoimmune hepatitis with anticentromere antibodies. The authors would like to highlight that screening AIH patients for anticentromere antibody is not mandatory but can be considered, especially in the presence of disease-related symptomatology for quicker, more accurate diagnosis and optimum management. PMID:25379307

  10. Autoimmune hepatitis with anti centromere antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lodh, Moushumi; Pradhan, Debkant; Parida, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    We present the case report of a 49-year-old type 2 diabetes mellitus patient presenting with abdominal pain and black stool for 15 days. A proper workup of laboratory investigations helped us diagnose autoimmune hepatitis with anticentromere antibodies. The authors would like to highlight that screening AIH patients for anticentromere antibody is not mandatory but can be considered, especially in the presence of disease-related symptomatology for quicker, more accurate diagnosis and optimum management. PMID:25379307

  11. Autoimmune encephalitis: Clinical diagnosis versus antibody confirmation

    PubMed Central

    Cyril, Asha Caroline; Nair, Sruthi S.; Mathai, Annamma; Kannoth, Sudheeran; Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Autoimmune encephalitis is a heterogeneous disorder which is being diagnosed with increasing frequency. The diagnosis of these disorders is based on the detection of autoantibodies and characteristic clinical profiles. Aims: We aimed to study the antibody profile in encephalitis patients with suspected autoimmune etiology presenting to a tertiary care center. Settings and Design: The subjects were selected by screening all patients with clinical profile suggesting autoimmune encephalitis admitted in the neuromedical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care center in South India. Materials and Methods: Patients who fulfilled modified Zuliani et al.'s, criteria for autoimmune encephalitis were identified during the period December 2009June 2013. Blood samples from these subjects were screened for six neuronal antibodies. Statistical analysis used: Chi-square test was applied to compare the antibody positive and negative patients. Results: Out of 1,227 patients screened, 39 subjects (14 males: 25 females) were identified with a mean age of 15.95 years and 19 cases were assessed in the acute and 20 in the convalescent phase of the illness. Seizure (87.8 %) was the most common presenting symptom; status epilepticus occurred in 23 (60.5%) patients during the course of the illness. Fourteen (35.9%) patients were N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibody-positive and all were negative for the other antibodies tested. Conclusions: One-third of patients presenting with acute noninfective encephalitis would be positive for NMDAR antibodies with the remaining two-thirds with clinically suspected autoimmune encephalitis being antibody-negative. There are few markers in the clinical and investigative profiles to distinguish antibody-positive and -negative patients. PMID:26713011

  12. Antibody production in human malaria as determined by the fluorescent antibody technique.

    PubMed

    KUVIN, S F; TOBIE, J E; EVANS, C B; COATNEY, G R; CONTACOS, P G

    1962-03-30

    No reliable serological test has been available in the past to follow the course of antibody production in malarial infections. The indirect method of immunofluorescence was utilized in this investigation to study antibody response to sporozoite-induced Plasmodium vivax infections in two human volunteers. Malarial antibody was demonstrated approximately 3 weeks after infection, and has persisted thus far for 121 days. These preliminary results suggest that this method of serological testing is specific and provides a sensitive means of titrating antibody produced in malarial infections. PMID:14460984

  13. A novel strategy for generating monoclonal antibodies from single, isolated lymphocytes producing antibodies of defined specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Babcook, J S; Leslie, K B; Olsen, O A; Salmon, R A; Schrader, J W

    1996-01-01

    We report a novel approach to the generation of monoclonal antibodies based on the molecular cloning and expression of immunoglobulin variable region cDNAs generated from single rabbit or murine lymphocytes that were selected for the production of specific antibodies. Single cells secreting antibodies for a specific peptide either from gp116 of the human cytomegalovirus or from gp120 of HIV-1 or for sheep red blood cells were selected using antigen-specific hemolytic plaque assays. Sheep red blood cells were coated with specific peptides in a procedure applicable to any antigen that can be biotinylated. Heavy- and light-chain variable region cDNAs were rescued from single cells by reverse transcription-PCR and expressed in the context of human immunoglobulin constant regions. These chimeric murine and rabbit monoclonal antibodies replicated the target specificities of the original antibody-forming cells. The selected lymphocyte antibody method exploits the in vivo mechanisms that generate high-affinity antibodies. This method can use lymphocytes from peripheral blood, can exploit a variety of procedures that identify individual lymphocytes producing a particular antibody, and is applicable to the generation of monoclonal antibodies from many species, including humans. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8755564

  14. [Screening serum response special antibodies of U251 cell line from surface display phage antibody library].

    PubMed

    Yu, Min; Tan, De-Yong; Qian, Wei; Lai, Jian-Hua; Sun, Gui-Lin

    2004-05-01

    U251 cell is a sensitive cell line to serum, which stops at G0 phase of cell cycle in no-serum medium, and recovers growth when the serum is added into no-serum medium. The cell can express corresponding proteins in different phase of cell cycle. Therefore it is very signification for the study of cell cycle regulation mechanism that explores these proteins. In this paper, the mouse antibody phage display library was added into the bottle in which the serum starvation U251 cells had been cultured, and the special antibody phages were absorbed. Then the absorbed antibody phages were amplified by adding E. coli TG1 and helper phage M13K07. Amplified antibody phages were added into bottle in which the serum cultured cell after serum starvation (follow named as serum recovered cells) were incubated, so that the cell absorbed the no-special antibody phages for the serum starvation cell and the special antibody phages were in supernatant. The remaining no-special antibody phages in the supernatant were discarded by repeating above program 3-4 times. The pure special antibody phages were gotten, and amplified by adding the host cell E. coli TG1 and helper phage M13K07. Then the host bacterium infected special antibody phage was spread on the plate medium with ampicillin, and the monoclonal antibody phages were gotten. Using same as above program, the monoclonal antibody phages absorbed specially for serum recovered U251 cells were obtained when the serum recovered cells instead of serum starvation cells and serum starvation cells instead of serum recovered cells. In this study, ninety-six positive monoclonal antibody phages that absorbed specially the serum starvation cells and eighty-two positive monoclonal antibody phages that absorbed specially the serum recovered cells were obtained. By using cell immunochemistry assay, two special signification antibodies were obtained. one (No.11) was the strong response in serum starvation cells, the other (No.2) was the strong response in serum recovered cells. The antibody No.2 had the distinctive response to the serum recovered cells in different incubation time (15min, 30min, 1h, 2h, 4h, 8h, 12h and 48h) after serum starvation. The results showed that No.2 antibody would be useful to research the factors of cell cycle regulation and apply to tumor diagnosis. PMID:15971605

  15. Generation of novel recombinant antibodies against nitrotyrosine by antibody phage display.

    PubMed

    Hof, Danielle; Cooksley-Decasper, Seraina; Moergeli, Sandra; von Eckardstein, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Nitrotyrosine is a posttranslational protein modification that occurs under oxidative and nitrosative stress, and plays an important role in numerous pathological conditions. To analyse nitrotyrosine formation several commercial monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies reacting with 3-nitrotyrosine have been developed which however do not work properly in all required assays. Here, antibody phage display was used to select recombinant antibodies that specifically react with nitrotyrosine in various protein contexts. Nine initial selections were carried out, using synthetic peptides, peroxynitrite-modified proteins and conjugated proteins as antigens. Four antibodies were isolated that each exhibited a characteristic binding reactivity that greatly depended on the antigens that were used for their selections. In general, the selections using small, synthetic and biotinylated peptides were the most successful approach. Subsequently, antibody 11B1 was affinity matured by error prone mutagenesis, resulting in the isolation of two antibodies, designated 47A7 and 47B1. Competition ELISA and immunoblotting after treatment with sodium dithionite further demonstrated the specificity of antibody 47B1 for nitrotyrosine. The results presented here demonstrate that antibody phage display is a useful method to isolate antibodies against posttranslational modifications, which are powerful tools in the proteomic era. PMID:21558620

  16. Competitive exclusion by autologous antibodies can prevent broad HIV-1 antibodies from arising

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-08-31

    The past decade has seen the discovery of numerous broad and potent monoclonal antibodies against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Eliciting these antibodies via vaccination appears to be remarkably difficult, not least because they arise late in infection and are highly mutated relative to germline antibody sequences. Here, using a computational model, we show that broad antibodies could in fact emerge earlier and be less mutated, but that they may be prevented from doing so as a result of competitive exclusion by the autologous antibody response. We further find that this competitive exclusion is weaker in infections founded by multiple distinct strains, with broadly neutralizing antibodies emerging earlier than in infections founded by a single strain. Our computational model simulates coevolving multitype virus and antibody populations. Broadly neutralizing antibodies may therefore be easier for the adaptive immune system to generate than previously thought. As a result, if less mutated broad antibodies exist, it may be possible to elicit them with a vaccine containing a mixture of diverse virus strains.

  17. Competitive exclusion by autologous antibodies can prevent broad HIV-1 antibodies from arising

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-08-31

    The past decade has seen the discovery of numerous broad and potent monoclonal antibodies against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Eliciting these antibodies via vaccination appears to be remarkably difficult, not least because they arise late in infection and are highly mutated relative to germline antibody sequences. Here, using a computational model, we show that broad antibodies could in fact emerge earlier and be less mutated, but that they may be prevented from doing so as a result of competitive exclusion by the autologous antibody response. We further find that this competitive exclusion is weaker in infections founded by multiple distinctmore » strains, with broadly neutralizing antibodies emerging earlier than in infections founded by a single strain. Our computational model simulates coevolving multitype virus and antibody populations. Broadly neutralizing antibodies may therefore be easier for the adaptive immune system to generate than previously thought. As a result, if less mutated broad antibodies exist, it may be possible to elicit them with a vaccine containing a mixture of diverse virus strains.« less

  18. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research. PMID:26482034

  19. Working towards a consensus for antibody validation.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Peter D; Min, Danxi; Leung, Mei Y

    2014-01-01

    Commercial research antibodies are the most commonly used product in the life science tools market, and their applications represent a significant investment of time and resources for researchers. Frequently however, the quality of antibodies does not meet the expectations of consumers, causing loss of valuable time and money. This can delay research efforts and scientific discovery, or even lead to false, irreproducible results to be published in the scientific literature. This raises the question of whether there should be universal standards for validating antibodies. During the 1 (st) International Antibody Validation Forum, hosted by St John's Laboratory Ltd on October 15 (th) 2014 at Queen Mary University of London, scientists from academia and industry presented data highlighting quality issues arising from lack of antibody validation. While the forum identified significant current problems in the antibody market, it also discussed future opportunities for improved quality and transparency by encouraging data disclosure and data sharing. This article highlights the key issues and conclusions reached at the forum. PMID:25580232

  20. Antiovarian antibody in premature ovarian failure.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, D; Sen, M R; Katiyar, P; Pandey, L K

    1999-06-01

    Premature ovarian failure is a syndrome consisting of primary or secondary amenorrhoea, hypergonodotropiremia and hypoestrogenemia in women under the age of 40. An autoimmune mechanism was suggested as possible etiology when Vallolton and Forbes in 1966-67 found antibodies to the cytoplasm of rabbit ova in 29 of 232 tested sera. Immune mechanism in the pathogenesis of premature ovarian failure (POF) is suggested by association of autoimmune phenomenon with POF in some cases and demonstration of circulating antibodies to ovary in serum samples from women with POF. The incidence of presence of antiovarian antibody of POF patients has been reported earlier. Evidence of autoimmunity is present in 18-92% of patients with POF. In the present study we have studied 18 cases of POF without any overt manifestation of autoimmune disorder but the antiovarian antibody was detected, with the idea that this autoantibody might be the cause of ovarian dysfunction which is evident in POF. Presence of antiovarian antibody in 16.67% cases with POF in our study that ovarian antibodies may play a role in or reflect an autoimmune process responsible for the development of POF. PMID:10776506

  1. Delivery of antibodies to the cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Andrea LJ; Zhang, Congcong; Frenzel, Andr; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Perez, Franck; Dbel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibodies to target their antigens in living cells is a powerful analytical tool for cell biology research. Not only can molecules be localized and visualized in living cells, but interference with cellular processes by antibodies may allow functional analysis down to the level of individual post-translational modifications and splice variants, which is not possible with genetic or RNA-based methods. To utilize the vast resource of available antibodies, an efficient system to deliver them into the cytosol from the outside is needed. Numerous strategies have been proposed, but the most robust and widely applicable procedure still remains to be identified, since a quantitative ranking of the efficiencies has not yet been done. To achieve this, we developed a novel efficiency evaluation method for antibody delivery based on a fusion protein consisting of a human IgG1 Fc and the recombination enzyme Cre (Fc-Cre). Applied to suitable GFP reporter cells, it allows the important distinction between proteins trapped in endosomes and those delivered to the cytosol. Further, it ensures viability of positive cells and is unsusceptible to fixation artifacts and misinterpretation of cellular localization in microscopy and flow cytometry. Very low cytoplasmic delivery efficiencies were found for various profection reagents and membrane penetrating peptides, leaving electroporation as the only practically useful delivery method for antibodies. This was further verified by the successful application of this method to bind antibodies to cytosolic components in living cells. PMID:24848507

  2. Antibodies to AMPA receptors in Rasmussen's encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Nibber, Anjan; Clover, Linda; Pettingill, Philippa; Waters, Patrick; Elger, Christian E; Bien, Christian G; Vincent, Angela; Lang, Bethan

    2016-03-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis is a rare progressive childhood disorder characterized by frequent severe seizures, hemiparesis, encephalitis and mental deterioration, and associated with severe unilateral neuroinflammation. Autoantibodies, particularly to the GluA3 subtype of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propinonic acid receptor (AMPAR) were reported in the 1990s but not always confirmed. To explore further, sera from 52 patients with Rasmussen's encephalitis were tested by cell-based assays for antibodies to AMPAR GluA1/2/3, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA NR1/2b), ?-aminobutyric acid type A and B (GABAAR ?1/?2/?2 and GABABR b1/b2) receptors, for potassium channel complex proteins, and for binding to live cortical and hippocampal neuronal cultures. Two patients' sera (3.8%) bound to HEK cells co-transfected with the GluA2 and GluA3 subunits. One additional patient had a low level of VGKC-complex antibodies. These three, and seven additional, sera bound to hippocampal cultures. No other antibodies were detected. Thus, despite the rarity of GluA2/3 antibodies, 10 patients (19.2%) had evidence of antibodies to neuronal antigens. Whether these antibodies play a primary role in RE, or appear secondary to the neuro-inflammatory damage in this highly destructive disease, requires further study. PMID:26785913

  3. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    David Bradley

    2011-03-31

    During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

  4. Antibody response of swine experimentally infected with Mycoplasma hyosynoviae.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, B J; Ross, R F

    1982-05-01

    Antibody responses of swine inoculated intranasally with M. hyosynoviae were determined using complement-fixation, latex-agglutination, metabolic-inhibition, and mycoplasmacidal tests. The infected swine developed latex-agglutinating antibodies by 6 days postinoculation, complement-fixing and metabolic-inhibiting antibodies by 9-12 days, and mycoplasmacidal antibodies which were first detected from 12 days to 8 weeks postinoculation. Antibody titers persisted for as long as 6 months postinoculation. Complement-fixing and mycoplasmacidal antibodies were mainly IgG, and latex-agglutinating antibodies were IgM. Early metabolic-inhibiting antibodies were IgM while later antibodies were mainly IgG. None of the pigs had detectable complement-fixing antibodies to Mycoplasma hyorhinis. PMID:7112893

  5. [Advances in the study of natural small molecular antibody].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Da-peng

    2012-10-01

    Small molecule antibodies are naturally existed and well functioned but not structurally related to the conventional antibodies. They are only composed of heavy protein chains or light chains, much smaller than common antibody. The first small molecule antibody, called Nanobody was engineered from heavy-chain antibodies found in camelids. Cartilaginous fishes also have heavy-chain antibodies (IgNAR, "immunoglobulin new antigen receptor"), from which single-domain antibodies called Vnar fragments can be obtained. In addition, free light chain (FLC) antibodies in human bodies are being developed as therapeutic and diagnostic agents. Comparing to intact antibodies, common advantages of small molecule antibodies are with better solubility, tissue penetration, stability towards heat and enzymes, and comparatively low production costs. This article reviews the structural characteristics and mechanism of action of the Nanobody, IgNAR and FLC. PMID:23289139

  6. [Progress in monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy for cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yajun

    2015-06-01

    More than 100 years ago, Paul Ehrlich first proposed the "magic bullets" concept in which antibody targeting disease related antigen can fight against human disease. Since then, with the development of hybridoma technology for monoclonal antibody production and cancer serum therapy, immunotherapy based monoclonal antibody bas been used in chinical practice to treat hematological and solid tumor. Up to now, more than 20 recombinant antibody drugs were approved for cancer treatment worldwide. In recent years, the next-generation antibody drug, including immune checkpoint antagonists, bi-specific antibody, and antibody drug conjugates have successfully cured various malignant tumor. This review recalled the history of monoclonal antibody as potent immunotherapy of cancer firstly, and focused on the next-generation antibody drug's mechanism of action, construction strategies, and the side effects in clinic. Lastly, the future trend of anti-tumor antibody drug was also discussed. PMID:26672362

  7. Engineering the variable region of therapeutic IgG antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Tsunoda, Hiroyuki; Kuramochi, Taichi; Sampei, Zenjiro; Ishii, Shinya; Hattori, Kunihiro

    2011-01-01

    Since the first generation of humanized IgG1 antibodies reached the market in the late 1990s, IgG antibody molecules have been extensively engineered. The success of antibody therapeutics has introduced severe competition in developing novel therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, especially for promising or clinically validated targets. Such competition has led researchers to generate so-called second or third generation antibodies with clinical differentiation utilizing various engineering and optimization technologies. Parent IgG antibodies can be engineered to have improved antigen binding properties, effector functions, pharmacokinetics, pharmaceutical properties and safety issues. Although the primary role of the antibody variable region is to bind to the antigen, it is also the main source of antibody diversity and its sequence affects various properties important for developing antibody therapeutics. Here we review recent research activity in variable region engineering to generate superior antibody therapeutics. PMID:21406966

  8. [Current situations and the future prospect of monoclonal antibody products].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody products and monoclonal antibody-based biopharmaceuticals have shown considerable effectiveness in the treatment for variety of diseases; cancer, auto-immune/auto-inflammation diseases and so on. Significant advance in monoclonal antibody products for cancer treatments was made with antibody-drug conjugates (ADC), and antibodies for blockade of immune checkpoints. Already 3 ADCs and 2 anti-immune-checkpoint antibodies products have been approved, and these monoclonal antibody-related product pipelines reach over 30. On the other hand, EU approved first monoclonal-antibody biosimilar, RemsimaTM (infliximab), suggesting that other monoclonal-antibody biosmilars will follow to the market. In this paper, several new issues about monoclonal antibody products will be discussed. PMID:25707201

  9. Antibodies and cancer therapy: versatile platforms for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Surana, Rishi; Wang, Shangzi

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies have emerged as important therapeutics for cancer. Recently, it has become clear that antibodies possess multiple clinically relevant mechanisms of action. Many clinically useful antibodies can manipulate tumour-related signalling. In addition, antibodies exhibit various immunomodulatory properties and, by directly activating or inhibiting molecules of the immune system, antibodies can promote the induction of anti-tumour immune responses. These immunomodulatory properties can form the basis for new cancer treatment strategies. PMID:20414205

  10. Cytokine Binding by Polysaccharide-Antibody Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liang Tso; Bucholz, Kyle; Lotze, Michael T.; Washburn, Newell R.

    2010-01-01

    Cytokine-neutralizing antibodies are used in treating a broad range of inflammatory conditions. We demonstrate that monoclonal antibodies against interleukin-1? and tumor necrosis factor-? were still active when conjugated to high molecular weight polysaccharides. These polysaccharides are hydrophilic but their size makes them unable to circulate in the blood stream when delivered to tissues, opening up the possibility of localized treatment of inflammatory conditions. To explore this new class of protein-polysaccharide conjugates, we covalently modified interleukin-1? and tumor necrosis factor-? monoclonal antibodies with high molecular weight hyaluronic acid and carboxymethylcellulose. Rigorous purification using dialysis with a 300 kDa-cut-off membrane removed unconjugated monoclonal antibodies. We characterized the composition of the constructs and demonstrated using molecular binding affinity measurements and cell assays that the conjugates were capable of binding pro-inflammatory cytokines. The binding affinities of both the unconjugated antibodies for their cytokines were measured to be approximately 120 pM. While all conjugates had pM-level binding constants, they ranged from 40 pM for the hyaluronic acid-(anti-interleukin-1?) conjugate to 412 pM for the carboxymethylcellulose-(anti-interleukin-1?) conjugate. Interestingly, the dissociation time constants varied more than the associated time constants, suggesting that conjugation to a high molecular weight polysaccharide did not interfere with the formation of the antibody-cytokine complex but could stabilize or destabilize it once formed. Conjugation of cytokine-neutralizing antibodies to high molecular weight polymers represents a novel method of delivering anti-cytokine therapeutics that may avoid many of the complications associated with systemic delivery. PMID:20726535

  11. Antibodies to Trichomonas vaginalis surface glycolipid

    PubMed Central

    Bastida-Corcuera, F D; Singh, B N; Gray, G C; Stamper, P D; Davuluri, M; Schlangen, K; Corbeil, R R; Corbeil, L B

    2015-01-01

    Background Human trichomoniasis is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease, yet immune responses are not well studied. Methods Since the Trichomonas vaginalis lipophosphoglycan (TvLPG) is an important virulence factor, a bank of eight monoclonal antibodies was generated to define the antigen in clinical isolates. The TvLPG-specific antibody response of women who were culture positive (n=33) or negative (n=33) for T vaginalis infection was determined by isotype-specific ELISA. Results The bank of monoclonal antibodies reacted with conserved surface TvLPG epitopes in 27 isolates from pregnant women at their first prenatal visit. Conserved TvLPG epitopes were shown to be surface exposed by immunofluorescence. Sera collected from the same patients at the same time were assayed for specific antibodies. Serum and vaginal secretions from 33 T vaginalis-positive women had statistically higher IgG anti-TvLPG levels than age-matched and race-matched negative controls in the same clinical study (p<0.01). Vaginal IgA anti-TvLPG levels of the women with trichomoniasis were almost significantly higher than controls (p=0.055). Infected women with normal pregnancies had significantly higher vaginal IgG anti-TvLPG values than infected women with adverse outcomes of pregnancy. Conclusions These antibody responses show that infected women can respond to the conserved TvLPG antigen. Since antibodies to trichomonad surface LPG protect in a bovine model of trichomoniasis, the role of these antibodies in the human disease should be investigated. PMID:23785040

  12. The antibody mining toolbox: an open source tool for the rapid analysis of antibody repertoires.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Sara; Glanville, Jacob; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Gleasner, Cheryl D; Shen, Xiaohong; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Kiss, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    In vitro selection has been an essential tool in the development of recombinant antibodies against various antigen targets. Deep sequencing has recently been gaining ground as an alternative and valuable method to analyze such antibody selections. The analysis provides a novel and extremely detailed view of selected antibody populations, and allows the identification of specific antibodies using only sequencing data, potentially eliminating the need for expensive and laborious low-throughput screening methods such as enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. The high cost and the need for bioinformatics experts and powerful computer clusters, however, have limited the general use of deep sequencing in antibody selections. Here, we describe the AbMining ToolBox, an open source software package for the straightforward analysis of antibody libraries sequenced by the three main next generation sequencing platforms (454, Ion Torrent, MiSeq). The ToolBox is able to identify heavy chain CDR3s as effectively as more computationally intense software, and can be easily adapted to analyze other portions of antibody variable genes, as well as the selection outputs of libraries based on different scaffolds. The software runs on all common operating systems (Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), on standard personal computers, and sequence analysis of 1-2 million reads can be accomplished in 10-15 min, a fraction of the time of competing software. Use of the ToolBox will allow the average researcher to incorporate deep sequence analysis into routine selections from antibody display libraries. PMID:24423623

  13. Higher cytotoxicity of divalent antibody-toxins than monovalent antibody-toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Won, JaeSeon; Nam, PilWon; Lee, YongChan; Choe, MuHyeon

    2009-04-24

    Recombinant antibody-toxins are constructed via the fusion of a 'carcinoma-specific' antibody fragment to a toxin. Due to the high affinity and high selectivity of the antibody fragments, antibody-toxins can bind to surface antigens on cancer cells and kill them without harming normal cells [L.H. Pai, J.K. Batra, D.J. FitzGerald, M.C. Willingham, I. Pastan, Anti-tumor activities of immunotoxins made of monoclonal antibody B3 and various forms of Pseudomonas exotoxin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88 (1991) 3358-3362]. In this study, we constructed the antibody-toxin, Fab-SWn-PE38, with SWn (n = 3, 6, 9) sequences containing n-time repeated (G{sub 4}S) between the Fab fragment and PE38 (38 kDa truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A). The SWn sequence also harbored one cysteine residue that could form a disulfide bridge between two Fab-SWn-PE38 monomers. We assessed the cytotoxicity of the monovalent (Fab-SWn-PE38), and divalent ([Fab-SWn-PE38]{sub 2}) antibody-toxins. The cytotoxicity of the dimer against the CRL1739 cell line was approximately 18.8-fold higher than that of the monomer on the ng/ml scale, which was approximately 37.6-fold higher on the pM scale. These results strongly indicate that divalency provides higher cytotoxicity for an antibody-toxin.

  14. Passive antibody transfer in chickens to model maternal antibody after avian influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Olivia B; Estevez, Carlos; Yu, Qingzhong; Suarez, David L

    2013-04-15

    Birds transfer maternal antibodies (MAb) to their offspring through the egg yolk where the antibody is absorbed and enters the circulatory system. Maternal antibodies provide early protection from disease, but may interfere with the vaccination efficacy in the chick. MAb are thought to interfere with vaccine antigen processing that reduces the subsequent immune response. Once MAb titers are depleted, the chick will respond to vaccination, but they are also susceptible to viral infection. This study examines the effect of MAb on seroconversion to different viral-vectored avian influenza virus (AIV) vaccines. Chicks were given passively transferred antibodies (PTA) using AIV hyperimmunized serum, and subsequently vaccinated with a fowlpox-AIV recombinant vaccine (FPr) or a Newcastle disease virus-AIV recombinant vaccine (NDVr). Our results indicate that passively transferred antibodies led to significant reduction of seroconversion and clinical protection from virulent challenge in recombinant virus vaccinated chicks thus demonstrating maternal antibody interference to vaccination. The passive antibody transfer model system provides an important tool to evaluate maternal antibody interference to vaccination. PMID:23398721

  15. High level transient production of recombinant antibodies and antibody fusion proteins in HEK293 cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand of monospecific high affinity binding reagents, particularly monoclonal antibodies, has been steadily increasing over the last years. Enhanced throughput of antibody generation has been addressed by optimizing in vitro selection using phage display which moved the major bottleneck to the production and purification of recombinant antibodies in an end-user friendly format. Single chain (sc)Fv antibody fragments require additional tags for detection and are not as suitable as immunoglobulins (Ig)G in many immunoassays. In contrast, the bivalent scFv-Fc antibody format shares many properties with IgG and has a very high application compatibility. Results In this study transient expression of scFv-Fc antibodies in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells was optimized. Production levels of 10-20mg/L scFv-Fc antibody were achieved in adherent HEK293T cells. Employment of HEK293-6E suspension cells expressing a truncated variant of the Epstein Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen (EBNA) 1 in combination with production under serum free conditions increased the volumetric yield up to 10-fold to more than 140mg/L scFv-Fc antibody. After vector optimization and process optimization the yield of an scFv-Fc antibody and a cytotoxic antibody-RNase fusion protein further increased 3-4-fold to more than 450mg/L. Finally, an entirely new mammalian expression vector was constructed for single step in frame cloning of scFv genes from antibody phage display libraries. Transient expression of more than 20 different scFv-Fc antibodies resulted in volumetric yields of up to 600mg/L and 400mg/L in average. Conclusion Transient production of recombinant scFv-Fc antibodies in HEK293-6E in combination with optimized vectors and fed batch shake flasks cultivation is efficient and robust, and integrates well into a high-throughput recombinant antibody generation pipeline. PMID:23802841

  16. Antibody phage display technology and its applications.

    PubMed

    Hoogenboom, H R; de Brune, A P; Hufton, S E; Hoet, R M; Arends, J W; Roovers, R C

    1998-06-01

    In recent years, the use of display vectors and in vitro selection technologies has transformed the way in which we generate ligands, such as antibodies and peptides, for a given target. Using this technology, we are now able to design repertoires of ligands from scratch and use the power of phage selection to select those ligands having the desired (biological) properties. With phage display, tailor-made antibodies may be synthesized and selected to acquire the desired affinity of binding and specificity for in vitro and in vivo diagnosis, or for immunotherapy of human disease. This review addresses recent progress in the construction of, and selection from phage antibody libraries, together with novel approaches for screening phage antibodies. As the quality of large nave and synthetic antibody repertoires improves and libraries becomes more generally available, new and exciting applications are pioneered such as the identification of novel antigens using differential selection and the generation of receptor a(nta)gonists. A combination of the design and generation of millions to billions of different ligands, together with phage display for the isolation of binding ligands and with functional assays for identifying (and possibly selecting) bio-active ligands, will open even more challenging applications of this inspiring technology, and provide a powerful tool for drug and target discovery well into the next decade. PMID:9661810

  17. Monoclonal antibody disulfide reduction during manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Hutterer, Katariina M.; Hong, Robert W.; Lull, Jonathon; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Wang, Tian; Pei, Rex; Le, M. Eleanor; Borisov, Oleg; Piper, Rob; Liu, Yaoqing Diana; Petty, Krista; Apostol, Izydor; Flynn, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Manufacturing-induced disulfide reduction has recently been reported for monoclonal human immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) antibodies, a widely used modality in the biopharmaceutical industry. This effect has been tied to components of the intracellular thioredoxin reduction system that are released upon cell breakage. Here, we describe the effect of process parameters and intrinsic molecule properties on the extent of reduction. Material taken from cell cultures at the end of production displayed large variations in the extent of antibody reduction between different products, including no reduction, when subjected to the same reduction-promoting harvest conditions. Additionally, in a reconstituted model in which process variables could be isolated from product properties, we found that antibody reduction was dependent on the cell line (clone) and cell culture process. A bench-scale model using a thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase regeneration system revealed that reduction susceptibility depended on not only antibody class but also light chain type; the model further demonstrates that the trend in reducibility was identical to DTT reduction sensitivity following the order IgG1λ > IgG1κ > IgG2λ > IgG2κ. Thus, both product attributes and process parameters contribute to the extent of antibody reduction during production. PMID:23751615

  18. The Structure of Natural and Recombinant Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) isotypes A, D, E, G, and M are glycoproteins which are mainly composed of a "Y"-shaped Ig monomer (~150 kDa), consisting of two light and two heavy chains. Both light and heavy chains contain variable (N-terminal) and constant regions (C-terminal). Each light chain consists of one variable domain and one constant domain, whereas each heavy chain has one variable domain and three constant domains. However, heavy-chain antibodies consisting of only heavy chains and lacking the light chains are found in camelids and cartilaginous fishes. Unlike other immunoglobulins, the heavy chain of avian antibody IgY (~180 kDa) consists of four constant domains. The single-chain variable fragment (scFv; ~25 kDa) of an antibody contains variable regions of antibody heavy and light chains. The fragment antigen-binding (Fab; ~50 kDa) region has the full antibody light chain but the heavy chain is composed of a variable region and one constant domain. PMID:26424258

  19. HLA antibodies and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Moncharmont, P; Dubois, V; Obegi, C; Vignal, M; Mérieux, Y; Gebuhrer, L; Rigal, D

    2004-01-01

    A female baby with a severe thrombocytopenia at 18 x 10(9)/l was born to a 29-year-old (gestation 2/partum 2) mother. Scattered petechiae were present on her legs, arms, chest and face, but there was no bleeding, infection, fever or hepatosplenomegaly. A platelet antibody screening immunocapture test was positive, which was performed on the mother's serum 3, 12 and 38 days after delivery, but no platelet-specific antibodies were found by the monoclonal-antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigen assay. The baby's platelets and lymphocytes and the father's platelets reacted strongly with the HLA antibodies present in the mother's serum. The neonate was treated with intravenous human immunoglobulin (Tegeline), 1 g/kg per day) 1, 2 and 3 days after delivery. The platelet count rose from 18 x 10(9)/l on day 0 to 37 x 10(9)/l on day 3 and to 227 x 10(9)/l on day 12. No platelet transfusion was needed. Several factors which developed hereafter lead us to think that this neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is due to the transplacental passage of maternal HLA antibodies to the baby. PMID:15153714

  20. Adaptive responses to antibody based therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodems, Tamara S; Iida, Mari; Brand, Toni M; Pearson, Hannah E; Orbuch, Rachel A; Flanigan, Bailey G; Wheeler, Deric L

    2016-02-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) represent a large class of protein kinases that span the cellular membrane. There are 58 human RTKs identified which are grouped into 20 distinct families based upon their ligand binding, sequence homology and structure. They are controlled by ligand binding which activates intrinsic tyrosine-kinase activity. This activity leads to the phosphorylation of distinct tyrosines on the cytoplasmic tail, leading to the activation of cell signaling cascades. These signaling cascades ultimately regulate cellular proliferation, apopotosis, migration, survival and homeostasis of the cell. The vast majority of RTKs have been directly tied to the etiology and progression of cancer. Thus, using antibodies to target RTKs as a cancer therapeutic strategy has been intensely pursued. Although antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have shown promise in the clinical arena, the development of both intrinsic and acquired resistance to antibody-based therapies is now well appreciated. In this review we provide an overview of the RTK family, the biology of EGFR and HER2, as well as an in-depth review of the adaptive responses undertaken by cells in response to antibody based therapies directed against these receptors. A greater understanding of these mechanisms and their relevance in human models will lead to molecular insights in overcoming and circumventing resistance to antibody based therapy. PMID:26808665

  1. Single-domain antibodies and their utility.

    PubMed

    Baral, Toya Nath; MacKenzie, Roger; Arbabi Ghahroudi, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Engineered monoclonal antibody fragments have gained market attention due to their versatility and tailor-made potential and are now considered to be an important part of future immunobiotherapeutics. Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs), also known as nanobodies, are derived from VHHs [variable domains (V) of heavy-chain-only antibodies (HCAb)] of camelid heavy-chain antibodies. These nature-made sdAbs are well suited for various applications due to their favorable characteristics such as small size, ease of genetic manipulation, high affinity and solubility, overall stability, resistance to harsh conditions (e.g., low pH, high temperature), and low immunogenicity. Most importantly, sdAbs have the feature of penetrating into cavities and recognizing hidden epitopes normally inaccessible to conventional antibodies, mainly due to their protruding CDR3/H3 loops. In this unit, we will present and discuss comprehensive and step-by-step protocols routinely practiced in our laboratory for isolating sdAbs from immunized llamas (or other members of the Camelidae family) against target antigens using phage-display technology. Expression, purification, and characterization of the isolated sdAbs will then be described, followed by presentation of several examples of applications of sdAbs previously characterized in our laboratory and elsewhere. PMID:24510545

  2. Antibody Phage Display Libraries: Contributions to Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Dantas-Barbosa, Carmela; de Macedo Brigido, Marcelo; Maranhao, Andrea Queiroz

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of phage display technology, dating back to 1985, antibody libraries displayed on filamentous phage surfaces have been used to identify specific binders for many different purposes, including the recognition of tumors. Phage display represents a high-throughput technique for screening billions of random fusion antibodies against virtually any target on the surface or inside cancer cells, or even soluble markers found in patient serum. Many phage display derived binders targeting important tumor markers have been identified. Selection directed to tumoral cells surfaces lead to the identification of unknown tumoral markers. Also the improvement of methods that require smaller amounts of cells has opened the possibility to use this approach on patient samples. Robust techniques combining an antibody library displayed on the phage surface and protein microarray allowed the identification of auto antibodies recognized by patient sera. Many Ab molecules directly or indirectly targeting angiogenesis have been identified, and one of them, ramucirumab, has been tested in 27 phase IIII clinical trials in a broad array of cancers. Examples of such antibodies will be discussed here with emphasis on those used as probes for molecular imaging and other clinical trials. PMID:22754305

  3. Identification of antibody glycosylation structures that predict monoclonal antibody Fc-effector function

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Amy W.; Crispin, Max; Pritchard, Laura; Robinson, Hannah; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Yu, Xiaojie; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Scanlan, Chris; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Alter, Galit

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine monoclonal antibody (mAb) features that predict fragment crystalizable (Fc)-mediated effector functions against HIV. Design Monoclonal antibodies, derived from Chinese hamster ovary cells or EpsteinBarr virus-immortalized mouse heteromyelomas, with specificity to key regions of the HIV envelope including gp120-V2, gp120-V3 loop, gp120-CD4+ binding site, and gp41-specific antibodies, were functionally profiled to determine the relative contribution of the variable and constant domain features of the antibodies in driving robust Fc-effector functions. Methods Each mAb was assayed for antibody-binding affinity to gp140SF162, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and for the ability to bind to FcgRIIa, FcgRIIb and FcgRIIIa receptors. Antibody glycan profiles were determined by HPLC. Results Neither the specificity nor the affinity of the mAbs determined the potency of Fc-effector function. FcgRIIIa binding strongly predicted ADCC and decreased galactose content inversely correlated with ADCP, whereas N-glycolylneuraminic acid-containing structures exhibited enhanced ADCP. Additionally, the bi-antenary glycan arm onto which galactose was added predicted enhanced binding to FcgRIIIa and ADCC activity, independent of the specificity of the mAb. Conclusions Our studies point to the specific Fc-glycan structures that can selectively promote Fc-effector functions independently of the antibody specificity. Furthermore, we demonstrated antibody glycan structures associated with enhanced ADCP activity, an emerging Fc-effector function that may aid in the control and clearance of HIV infection. PMID:25160934

  4. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-zhe; Coljee, Vincent W.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  5. [Big data: the progress and applications of antibody repertoire sequencing].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zai-Bao; Guan, Qian; Zhang, Zhen-Hai

    2015-04-01

    Antibody, the major effector in adaptive immunity, plays key roles in protective and pathogenic immune responses. Integrative analyses of antibody development, differentiation, and maturation promote the research in immune mechanism, vaccine design, and therapies for autoimmune disorders. The development of next generation sequencing technologies has enabled large-scale characterization of functional antibody repertoires. With the advantages of next generation sequencing, antibody and antibody repertoire analysis have been successfully used in identification of HIV-1-broadly neutralizing antibodies, design of rationale structure-based vaccine, and development of immunology. With increasing sequence length and precision, improvement of experimental protocols and bioinformatics analyses, and development of single cell sequencing technology, antibody repertoire sequencing will expedite the research in antibody-related immune response, and thus facilitates vaccine design for infectious diseases, clinical diagnosis and interference of autoimmune diseases. This review introduces the technologies, progresses, applications, and caveats of antibody repertoire sequencing. PMID:25907926

  6. Anti-DNA antibodies - quintessential biomarkers of SLE.

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, David S

    2016-02-01

    Antibodies that recognize and bind to DNA (anti-DNA antibodies) are serological hallmarks of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and key markers for diagnosis and disease activity. In addition to common use in the clinic, anti-DNA antibody testing now also determines eligibility for clinical trials, raising important questions about the nature of the antibody-antigen interaction. At present, no 'gold standard' for serological assessment exists, and anti-DNA antibody binding can be measured with a variety of assay formats, which differ in the nature of the DNA substrates and in the conditions for binding and detection of antibodies. A mechanism called monogamous bivalency - in which high avidity results from simultaneous interaction of IgG Fab sites with a single polynucleotide chain - determines anti-DNA antibody binding; this mechanism might affect antibody detection in different assay formats. Although anti-DNA antibodies can promote pathogenesis by depositing in the kidney or driving cytokine production, they are not all alike, pathologically, and anti-DNA antibody expression does not necessarily correlate with active disease. Levels of anti-DNA antibodies in patients with SLE can vary over time, distinguishing anti-DNA antibodies from other pathogenic antinuclear antibodies. Elucidation of the binding specificities and the pathogenic roles of anti-DNA antibodies in SLE should enable improvements in the design of informative assays for both clinical and research purposes. PMID:26581343

  7. Antibody-Mediated Pathogen Resistance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Peschen, Dieter; Schillberg, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The methods described in this chapter were developed in order to produce transgenic plants expressing pathogen-specific single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies fused to antifungal peptides (AFPs), conferring resistance against fungal pathogens. We describe the selection from a phage display library of avian scFv antibodies that recognize cell surface proteins on fungi from the genus Fusarium, and the construction of scFv-AFP fusion protein constructs followed by their transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana spp.) plants and stable expression in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Using these techniques, the antibody fusion with the most promising in vitro activity can be used to generate transgenic plants that are resistant to pathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. matthiolae. PMID:26614296

  8. Antidrug Antibodies: B Cell Immunity Against Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fogdell-Hahn, A

    2015-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are now treated with a range of different biopharmaceuticals, often requiring lifelong parenteral administrations. This exposure to drugs is unnatural and can trigger the immune system and result in the formation of antidrug antibodies. Drug-specific antibodies will, if of sufficiently high titre and affinity, block the intended effect of the drug, increase its clearance and make continued treatment worthless. We expect the immune system to react towards therapies against which tolerance has never been established, which is the case for factor VIII treatment in patients with haemophilia A. However, even biopharmaceutical molecules that we should be tolerant against can elicit antidrug antibodies, for instance in treatment of multiple sclerosis patients with recombinant human interferon-beta. Possible immunological mechanisms behind the breaking of tolerance against drugs, the impact this has on continuous treatment success, clinical practice and drug development, will be discussed in this review. PMID:26098690

  9. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1991-05-01

    The accurate determination of the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) is important for calculation of dosimetry and evaluation of pharmacokinetic variables such as antibody dose and route of administration. A major long-term objective of this proposal is to determine the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for quantifying the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies labeled with the clinically relevant radionuclide iodine-123 (I-123). The pharmacokinetics of I-123 labeled MoAbs will be determined by the SPECT in non-human primates. The errors associated with the SPECT measurements will be assessed with Monte Carlo simulations and by scanning phantoms containing I-123 activity in regions of uniform and nonuniform attenuation. The ability of SPECT to quantify I-123 distributions will be assessed, and new acquisition geometries and reconstruction algorithms for improved quantification will be evaluated. 33 refs.

  10. Antibody-based bacterial toxin detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menking, Darrell E.; Heitz, Jonathon M.; Anis, Nabil A.; Thompson, Roy G.

    1994-03-01

    Fiber optic evanescent fluorosensors are under investigation in our laboratory for the study of drug-receptor interactions for detection of threat agents and antibody-antigen interactions for detection of biological toxins. In a one step assay, antibodies against Cholera toxin or Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B were noncovalently immobilized on quartz fibers and probed with fluorescein-isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled toxins. In the two-step assay, Cholera toxin or Botulinum toxoid A was immobilized onto the fiber, followed by incubation in an antiserum or partially purified antitoxin IgG. These were then probed with FITC-anti-IgG antibodies. Unlabeled toxins competed with labeled toxins or antitoxin IgG in a dose-dependent manner and the detection of the toxins was in the nanomolar range.

  11. Method for altering antibody light chain interactions

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J. (Naperville, IL); Stevens, Priscilla Wilkins (Evanston, IL); Raffen, Rosemarie (Elmhurst, IL); Schiffer, Marianne (Downers Grove, IL)

    2002-01-01

    A method for recombinant antibody subunit dimerization including modifying at least one codon of a nucleic acid sequence to replace an amino acid occurring naturally in the antibody with a charged amino acid at a position in the interface segment of the light polypeptide variable region, the charged amino acid having a first polarity; and modifying at least one codon of the nucleic acid sequence to replace an amino acid occurring naturally in the antibody with a charged amino acid at a position in an interface segment of the heavy polypeptide variable region corresponding to a position in the light polypeptide variable region, the charged amino acid having a second polarity opposite the first polarity. Nucleic acid sequences which code for novel light chain proteins, the latter of which are used in conjunction with the inventive method, are also provided.

  12. Current status of antibody therapy in ALL.

    PubMed

    Ai, Jing; Advani, Anjali

    2015-02-01

    Despite the significant advances in modern chemotherapy, it remains challenging to treat adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The relapse rate remains high, and the outcome at the time of relapse is dismal. Antibody-based therapies have demonstrated promising results in this patient group. Variable mechanisms have been applied to target surface antigens (CD20 [also termed MS4A1], CD22, CD52 and CD19) that are commonly expressed on malignant leukaemia cells. In this review, we will focus on the clinical application of such therapies in adult ALL, including the naked antibodies: Rituximab, Ofatumumab, Epratuzumab and Alemtuzumab; the immunotoxins: BL22 and Combotox; the immunoconjugates: inotuzumab and SAR 3419; as well as the Bi-specific T cell engaging (BiTE)-specific antibody, Blinatumomab. PMID:25382151

  13. Method for preparation of single chain antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V. (New York, NY); Guo, Hong-fen (New York, NY)

    2012-04-03

    This invention provides a method for identifying cells expressing a target single chain antibody (scFv) directed against a target antigen from a collection of cells that includes cells that do not express the target scFv, comprising the step of combining the collection of cells with an anti-idiotype directed to an antibody specific for the target antigen and detecting interaction, if any, of the anti-idiotype with the cells, wherein the occurrence of an interaction identifies the cell as one which expresses the target scFv. This invention also provides a method for making a single chain antibody (scFv) directed against an antigen, wherein the selection of clones is made based upon interaction of those clones with an appropriate anti-idiotype, and heretofore inaccessible scFv so made. This invention provides the above methods or any combination thereof. Finally, this invention provides various uses of these methods.

  14. Methods for conjugating antibodies to nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Wagh, Anil; Law, Benedict

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are one of the most commonly used targeting ligands for nanocarriers, mainly because they are specific, have a strong binding affinity, and are available for a number of disease biomarkers. The bioconjugation chemistry can be a crucial factor in determining the targeting efficiency of drug delivery and should be chosen on a case-by-case basis. An antibody consists of a number of functional groups which offer many flexible options for bioconjugation. This chapter focuses on discussing some of the approaches including periodate oxidation, carbodiimide, maleimide, and heterofunctional linkers, for conjugating antibodies to different nanocarriers. The advantages and limitations are described herein. Specific examples are selected to demonstrate the experimental procedures and to illustrate the potential for applying to other nanocarrier system. PMID:23913152

  15. Immunocytochemistry with internally labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Cuello, A.C.; Priestley, J.V.; Milstein, C.

    1982-01-01

    One of the advantages of the production of monoclonal antibodies by tissue culture methods is that they can be internally labeled by using appropriate radioactive amino acid in the culture fluid. Thus, radioactive immunological probes of high specific activity can be prepared. Here we report applications of these internally labeled monoclonal antibodies for the direct localization of immunoreactive sites in the central nervous system of the rat at both light and electron microscopic levels (radioimmunocytochemistry). We explored the combined use of radioimmunocytochemistry with immunoenzymatic methods for the simultaneous detection of two antigenic sites: substance P and serotonin or substance P and enkephalin. In neurobiology this procedure could help to clarify certain aspects of transmitter-specific synaptic interactions and the coexistence of neuroactive substances in single neuronal cell bodies or nerve terminals. We also describe the application of radioimmunocytochemistry with internally labeled monoclonal antibodies to quantify the immunoreactions in discrete microscopic areas.

  16. Antibody-based biological toxin detection

    SciTech Connect

    Menking, D.E.; Goode, M.T.

    1995-12-01

    Fiber optic evanescent fluorosensors are under investigation in our laboratory for the study of drug-receptor interactions for detection of threat agents and antibody-antigen interactions for detection of biological toxins. In a direct competition assay, antibodies against Cholera toxin, Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B or ricin were noncovalently immobilized on quartz fibers and probed with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) - labeled toxins. In the indirect competition assay, Cholera toxin or Botulinum toxoid A was immobilized onto the fiber, followed by incubation in an antiserum or partially purified anti-toxin IgG. These were then probed with FITC-anti-IgG antibodies. Unlabeled toxins competed with labeled toxins or anti-toxin IgG in a dose dependent manner and the detection of the toxins was in the nanomolar range.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  18. Antibody-Specific Model of Amino Acid Substitution for Immunological Inferences from Alignments of Antibody Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mirsky, Alexander; Kazandjian, Linda; Anisimova, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins produced by the immune system as a dynamically adaptive line of defense against invading pathogens. Very elegant and specific mutational mechanisms allow B lymphocytes to produce a large and diversified repertoire of antibodies, which is modified and enhanced throughout all adulthood. One of these mechanisms is somatic hypermutation, which stochastically mutates nucleotides in the antibody genes, forming new sequences with different properties and, eventually, higher affinity and selectivity to the pathogenic target. As somatic hypermutation involves fast mutation of antibody sequences, this process can be described using a Markov substitution model of molecular evolution. Here, using large sets of antibody sequences from mice and humans, we infer an empirical amino acid substitution model AB, which is specific to antibody sequences. Compared with existing general amino acid models, we show that the AB model provides significantly better description for the somatic evolution of mice and human antibody sequences, as demonstrated on large next generation sequencing (NGS) antibody data. General amino acid models are reflective of conservation at the protein level due to functional constraints, with most frequent amino acids exchanges taking place between residues with the same or similar physicochemical properties. In contrast, within the variable part of antibody sequences we observed an elevated frequency of exchanges between amino acids with distinct physicochemical properties. This is indicative of a sui generis mutational mechanism, specific to antibody somatic hypermutation. We illustrate this property of antibody sequences by a comparative analysis of the network modularity implied by the AB model and general amino acid substitution models. We recommend using the new model for computational studies of antibody sequence maturation, including inference of alignments and phylogenetic trees describing antibody somatic hypermutation in large NGS data sets. The AB model is implemented in the open-source software CodonPhyML (http://sourceforge.net/projects/codonphyml) and can be downloaded and supplied by the user to ProGraphMSA (http://sourceforge.net/projects/prographmsa) or other alignment and phylogeny reconstruction programs that allow for user-defined substitution models. PMID:25534034

  19. Antibody-specific model of amino acid substitution for immunological inferences from alignments of antibody sequences.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Alexander; Kazandjian, Linda; Anisimova, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins produced by the immune system as a dynamically adaptive line of defense against invading pathogens. Very elegant and specific mutational mechanisms allow B lymphocytes to produce a large and diversified repertoire of antibodies, which is modified and enhanced throughout all adulthood. One of these mechanisms is somatic hypermutation, which stochastically mutates nucleotides in the antibody genes, forming new sequences with different properties and, eventually, higher affinity and selectivity to the pathogenic target. As somatic hypermutation involves fast mutation of antibody sequences, this process can be described using a Markov substitution model of molecular evolution. Here, using large sets of antibody sequences from mice and humans, we infer an empirical amino acid substitution model AB, which is specific to antibody sequences. Compared with existing general amino acid models, we show that the AB model provides significantly better description for the somatic evolution of mice and human antibody sequences, as demonstrated on large next generation sequencing (NGS) antibody data. General amino acid models are reflective of conservation at the protein level due to functional constraints, with most frequent amino acids exchanges taking place between residues with the same or similar physicochemical properties. In contrast, within the variable part of antibody sequences we observed an elevated frequency of exchanges between amino acids with distinct physicochemical properties. This is indicative of a sui generis mutational mechanism, specific to antibody somatic hypermutation. We illustrate this property of antibody sequences by a comparative analysis of the network modularity implied by the AB model and general amino acid substitution models. We recommend using the new model for computational studies of antibody sequence maturation, including inference of alignments and phylogenetic trees describing antibody somatic hypermutation in large NGS data sets. The AB model is implemented in the open-source software CodonPhyML (http://sourceforge.net/projects/codonphyml) and can be downloaded and supplied by the user to ProGraphMSA (http://sourceforge.net/projects/prographmsa) or other alignment and phylogeny reconstruction programs that allow for user-defined substitution models. PMID:25534034

  20. Antibody engineering & therapeutics, the annual meeting of the antibody society December 7-10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA.

    PubMed

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Carter, Paul J; Melis, Joost P M

    2016-04-01

    The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6-10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on "Antibodies to watch" in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  1. Molecular Imaging of Pancreatic Cancer with Antibodies.

    PubMed

    England, Christopher G; Hernandez, Reinier; Eddine, Savo Bou Zein; Cai, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Development of novel imaging probes for cancer diagnostics remains critical for early detection of disease, yet most imaging agents are hindered by suboptimal tumor accumulation. To overcome these limitations, researchers have adapted antibodies for imaging purposes. As cancerous malignancies express atypical patterns of cell surface proteins in comparison to noncancerous tissues, novel antibody-based imaging agents can be constructed to target individual cancer cells or surrounding vasculature. Using molecular imaging techniques, these agents may be utilized for detection of malignancies and monitoring of therapeutic response. Currently, there are several imaging modalities commonly employed for molecular imaging. These imaging modalities include positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (fluorescence and bioluminescence), and photoacoustic (PA) imaging. While antibody-based imaging agents may be employed for a broad range of diseases, this review focuses on the molecular imaging of pancreatic cancer, as there are limited resources for imaging and treatment of pancreatic malignancies. Additionally, pancreatic cancer remains the most lethal cancer with an overall 5-year survival rate of approximately 7%, despite significant advances in the imaging and treatment of many other cancers. In this review, we discuss recent advances in molecular imaging of pancreatic cancer using antibody-based imaging agents. This task is accomplished by summarizing the current progress in each type of molecular imaging modality described above. Also, several considerations for designing and synthesizing novel antibody-based imaging agents are discussed. Lastly, the future directions of antibody-based imaging agents are discussed, emphasizing the potential applications for personalized medicine. PMID:26620581

  2. Fourth World Antibody-Drug Conjugate Summit

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Alain; Lambert, John; Sun, Michael; Lin, Kedan

    2012-01-01

    The 4th World Antibody Drug Conjugate (WADC) Summit, organized by Hanson Wade was held on February 29‑March 1, 2012 in Frankfurt, Germany, which was also the location for the Antibody Drug Conjugate Summit Europe held in February 2011. During the one year between these meetings, antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) have confirmed their technological maturity and their clinical efficacy in oncology. Brentuximab vedotin (ADCETRISTM) gained approval by the US Food and Drug Administration in August 2011 and trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) confirmed impressive clinical efficacy responses in a large cohort of breast cancer patients. During the 4th WADC meeting, antibody-maytansinoid conjugates were showcased by representatives of ImmunoGen (T-DM1, SAR3419, lorvotuzumab mertansine/IMGN801, IMGN529 and IMG853) and Biotest (BT-062). Data on antibody-auristatin conjugates were presented by scientists and clinicians from Seattle Genetics and Takeda (brentuximab vedotin), Pfizer (5T4-MMAF), Agensys/Astella (AGS-16M8F), Progenics (PSMA-ADC) and Genmab (anti-TF ADCs). Alternative payloads such as calicheamicins and duocarmycin used for preparation of ADCs were discussed by Pfizer and Synthon representatives, respectively. In addition, emerging technologies, including site-directed conjugation (Ambrx), a protein toxin as payload (Viventia), hapten-binding bispecific antibodies (Roche), and use of light activated drugs (Photobiotics), were also presented. Last but not least, progresses in solving Chemistry Manufacturing and Control, and pharmacokinetic issues were addressed by scientists from Genentech, Pfizer, Novartis and Pierre Fabre. PMID:22909934

  3. Utility of feline coronavirus antibody tests.

    PubMed

    Addie, Diane D; le Poder, Sophie; Burr, Paul; Decaro, Nicola; Graham, Elizabeth; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Jarrett, Oswald; McDonald, Michael; Meli, Marina L

    2015-02-01

    Eight different tests for antibodies to feline coronavirus (FCoV) were evaluated for attributes that are important in situations in veterinary practice. We compared four indirect immunofluorescent antibody tests (IFAT), one enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (FCoV Immunocomb; Biogal) and three rapid immunochromatographic (RIM) tests against a panel of samples designated by consensus as positive or negative. Specificity was 100% for all but the two IFATs based on transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), at 83.3% and 97.5%. The IFAT and ELISA tests were best for obtaining an antibody titre and for working in the presence of virus. The RIM tests were the best for obtaining a result quickly (10-15 mins); of these, the Speed F-Corona was the most sensitive, at 92.4%, followed by FASTest feline infectious peritonitis (FIP; 84.6%) and Anigen Rapid FCoV antibody test (64.1%). Sensitivity was 100% for the ELISA, one FCoV IFAT and one TGEV IFAT; and 98.2% for a second TGEV IFA and 96.1% for a second FCoV IFAT. All tests worked with effusions, even when only blood products were stipulated in the instruction manual. The ELISA and Anigen RIM tests were best for small quantities of sample. The most appropriate FCoV antibody test to use depends on the reason for testing: in excluding a diagnosis of FIP, sensitivity, specificity, small sample quantity, rapidity and ability to work in the presence of virus all matter. For FCoV screening, speed and sensitivity are important, and for FCoV elimination antibody titre is essential. PMID:24966245

  4. Human antibody production in transgenic animals.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Marianne; Osborn, Michael J; Ma, Biao; Hayre, Jasvinder; Avis, Suzanne; Lundstrom, Brian; Buelow, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Fully human antibodies from transgenic animals account for an increasing number of new therapeutics. After immunization, diverse human monoclonal antibodies of high affinity can be obtained from transgenic rodents, while large animals, such as transchromosomic cattle, have produced respectable amounts of specific human immunoglobulin (Ig) in serum. Several strategies to derive animals expressing human antibody repertoires have been successful. In rodents, gene loci on bacterial artificial chromosomes or yeast artificial chromosomes were integrated by oocyte microinjection or transfection of embryonic stem (ES) cells, while ruminants were derived from manipulated fibroblasts with integrated human chromosome fragments or human artificial chromosomes. In all strains, the endogenous Ig loci have been silenced by gene targeting, either in ES or fibroblast cells, or by zinc finger technology via DNA microinjection; this was essential for optimal production. However, comparisons showed that fully human antibodies were not as efficiently produced as wild-type Ig. This suboptimal performance, with respect to immune response and antibody yield, was attributed to imperfect interaction of the human constant region with endogenous signaling components such as the Igα/β in mouse, rat or cattle. Significant improvements were obtained when the human V-region genes were linked to the endogenous CH-region, either on large constructs or, separately, by site-specific integration, which could also silence the endogenous Ig locus by gene replacement or inversion. In animals with knocked-out endogenous Ig loci and integrated large IgH loci, containing many human Vs, all D and all J segments linked to endogenous C genes, highly diverse human antibody production similar to normal animals was obtained. PMID:25467949

  5. Molecular Imaging of Pancreatic Cancer with Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Development of novel imaging probes for cancer diagnostics remains critical for early detection of disease, yet most imaging agents are hindered by suboptimal tumor accumulation. To overcome these limitations, researchers have adapted antibodies for imaging purposes. As cancerous malignancies express atypical patterns of cell surface proteins in comparison to noncancerous tissues, novel antibody-based imaging agents can be constructed to target individual cancer cells or surrounding vasculature. Using molecular imaging techniques, these agents may be utilized for detection of malignancies and monitoring of therapeutic response. Currently, there are several imaging modalities commonly employed for molecular imaging. These imaging modalities include positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (fluorescence and bioluminescence), and photoacoustic (PA) imaging. While antibody-based imaging agents may be employed for a broad range of diseases, this review focuses on the molecular imaging of pancreatic cancer, as there are limited resources for imaging and treatment of pancreatic malignancies. Additionally, pancreatic cancer remains the most lethal cancer with an overall 5-year survival rate of approximately 7%, despite significant advances in the imaging and treatment of many other cancers. In this review, we discuss recent advances in molecular imaging of pancreatic cancer using antibody-based imaging agents. This task is accomplished by summarizing the current progress in each type of molecular imaging modality described above. Also, several considerations for designing and synthesizing novel antibody-based imaging agents are discussed. Lastly, the future directions of antibody-based imaging agents are discussed, emphasizing the potential applications for personalized medicine. PMID:26620581

  6. Behaviour of Non-Donor Specific Antibodies during Rapid Re-Synthesis of Donor Specific HLA Antibodies after Antibody Incompatible Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Nithya S.; Zehnder, Daniel; Daga, Sunil; Lowe, Dave; Lam, F. T.; Kashi, Habib; Tan, Lam Chin; Imray, Christopher; Hamer, Rizwan; Briggs, David; Raymond, Neil; Higgins, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Background HLA directed antibodies play an important role in acute and chronic allograft rejection. During viral infection of a patient with HLA antibodies, the HLA antibody levels may rise even though there is no new immunization with antigen. However it is not known whether the converse occurs, and whether changes on non-donor specific antibodies are associated with any outcomes following HLA antibody incompatible renal transplantation. Methods 55 patients, 31 women and 24 men, who underwent HLAi renal transplant in our center from September 2005 to September 2010 were included in the studies. We analysed the data using two different approaches, based on; i) DSA levels and ii) rejection episode post transplant. HLA antibody levels were measured during the early post transplant period and corresponding CMV, VZV and Anti-HBs IgG antibody levels and blood group IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies were quantified. Results Despite a significant DSA antibody rise no significant non-donor specific HLA antibody, viral or blood group antibody rise was found. In rejection episode analyses, multiple logistic regression modelling showed that change in the DSA was significantly associated with rejection (p?=?0.002), even when adjusted for other antibody levels. No other antibody levels were predictive of rejection. Increase in DSA from pre treatment to a post transplant peak of 1000 was equivalent to an increased chance of rejection with an odds ratio of 1.47 (1.08, 2.00). Conclusion In spite of increases or decreases in the DSA levels, there were no changes in the viral or the blood group antibodies in these patients. Thus the DSA rise is specific in contrast to the viral, blood group or third party antibodies post transplantation. Increases in the DSA post transplant in comparison to pre-treatment are strongly associated with occurrence of rejection. PMID:23922659

  7. Vaccination strategies to promote mucosal antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Cerutti, Andrea

    2010-10-29

    There are great interest and demand for the development of vaccines to prevent and treat diverse microbial infections. Mucosal vaccines elicit immune protection by stimulating the production of antibodies at mucosal surfaces and systemic districts. Being positioned in close proximity to a large community of commensal microbes, the mucosal immune system deploys a heterogeneous population of cells and a complex regulatory network to maintain the balance between surveillance and tolerance. A successful mucosal vaccine relies on leveraging the functions of these immune cells and regulatory components. We review the important cellular interactions and molecular pathways underlying the induction and regulation of mucosal antibody responses and discuss their implications on mucosal vaccination. PMID:21029959

  8. Antibodies for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) have been demonstrated to be effective in the research and clinical environments. Early uncertainties about molecular and treatment modalities now appear to have converged upon the systemic dosing of mixtures of human IgG1. Although multiple examples of high-potency monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) exist, significant difficulties were initially encountered in their discovery. This minireview describes historical and contemporary MAbs and highlights differences between the most potent MAbs, which may offer insight into the pathogenesis and treatment of CDI. PMID:24789799

  9. Effects of interferon on antibody formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of the effects of interferon on primary and secondary antibody responses and of the relationship of interferon to other cytokines, or cell products, are presented. Dosage- and timing-dependent immunoenhancing and immunosuppressive activities of interferon are documented for mouse spleen cell cultures and for mice infected with murine hepatitis virus (MHV-3). A possibility that altered interferon production might lead to immunopathological disorders, such as lupus erythematosus, AIDS, arthritis, etc., is discussed. Latest technological developments are presented that indicate that interferon does apparently play a major role in the regulation of antibody responses.

  10. [Systemic lupus erythematosus, polymyositis and toxoplasma antibodies].

    PubMed

    Hamza, M; Maalej, A; Ayed, K; Moalla, M; Ben Rachid, M; Ben Ayed, H

    1983-01-01

    High toxoplasma antibody titers have been reported in polymyositis and other connectivitis with myositis. The authors describe a case of systemic lupus erythematosus with polymyositis and high titers of IgG toxoplasma antibodies. Studies of muscle biopsy specimens by immunofluorescence and inoculation of mice with muscle extracts failed to demonstrate the presence of Toxoplasma gondii. The nature of the toxoplasmic agression is discussed. It may be that reactivation of a previous infection due to the rupture of cysts was promoted by the immunologic disorders and complement deficiency related to systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:6297086

  11. Process analytics for purification of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Flatman, Stephen; Alam, Imtiaz; Gerard, Jeffery; Mussa, Nesredin

    2007-03-15

    The application of appropriate analytical methods is an essential requirement for the purification of therapeutic antibodies. A range of analytical methods need to be employed to effectively determine the purity, identity, integrity and activity of these important class of pharmaceuticals. These include notably electrophoresis, high performance liquid chromatography and immunoassays. Regulatory and industry demands in recent years have brought the need for improvements and many have been successfully implemented. This article reviews the current analytical methods applied to support the purification of monoclonal antibodies. PMID:17161664

  12. Antibody-drug conjugates: present and future.

    PubMed

    Beck, Alain; Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are becoming an increasingly important sub-class of antibody-related therapeutics. Two ADCs, brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris) and ado-trastuzumab emtansine (Kadcyla), were recently approved for marketing both by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicine Agency (EMA). Brentuximab vedotin is marketed as therapy for hematological malignancies (Hodgkin lymphoma, systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma), while ado-trastuzumab emtansine is marketed for treatment of a solid tumor (breast cancer). The approvals of these two ADCs followed the mitigated success of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (Mylotarg), which was withdrawn from the US market in 2010, ten years after approval by the FDA. PMID:24423577

  13. Analysis of acetylcholine receptor phosphorylation sites using antibodies to synthetic peptides and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Safran, A; Neumann, D; Fuchs, S

    1986-01-01

    Three peptides corresponding to residues 354-367, 364-374, 373-387 of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) delta subunit were synthesized. These peptides represent the proposed phosphorylation sites of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, the tyrosine-specific protein kinase and the calcium/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase respectively. Using these peptides as substrates for phosphorylation by the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase it was shown that only peptides 354-367 was phosphorylated whereas the other two were not. These results verify the location of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site within the AChR delta subunit. Antibodies elicited against these peptides reacted with the delta subunit. The antipeptide antibodies and two monoclonal antibodies (7F2, 5.46) specific for the delta subunit were tested for their binding to non-phosphorylated receptor and to receptor phosphorylated by the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Antibodies to peptide 354-367 were found to react preferentially with non-phosphorylated receptor whereas the two other anti-peptide antibodies bound equally to phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated receptors. Monoclonal antibody 7F2 reacted preferentially with the phosphorylated form of the receptor whereas monoclonal antibody 5.46 did not distinguish between the two forms. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3816758

  14. Anti-transferrin receptor antibody and antibody-drug conjugates cross the blood-brain barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Friden, P.M.; Walus, L.R.; Musso, G.F.; Taylor, M.A.; Malfroy, B.; Starzyk, R.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Delivery of nonlipophilic drugs to the brain is hindered by the tightly apposed capillary endothelial cells that make up the blood-brain barrier. The authors have examined the ability of a monoclonal antibody (OX-26), which recognizes the rat transferrin receptor, to function as a carrier for the delivery of drugs across the blood-brain barrier. This antibody, which was previously shown to bind preferentially to capillary endothelial cells in the brain after intravenous administration, labels the entire cerebrovascular bed in a dose-dependent manner. The initially uniform labeling of brain capillaries becomes extremely punctate {approximately} 4 hr after injection, suggesting a time-dependent sequestering of the antibody. Capillary-depletion experiments, in which the brain is separated into capillary and parenchymal fractions, show a time-dependent migration of radiolabeled antibody from the capillaries into the brain parenchyma, which is consistent with the transcytosis of compounds across the blood-brain barrier. Antibody-methotrexate conjugates were tested in vivo to assess the carrier ability of this antibody. Immunohistochemical staining for either component of an OX-26-methotrexate conjugate revealed patterns of cerebrovascular labeling identical to those observed with the unaltered antibody. Accumulation of radiolabeled methotrexate in the brain parenchyma is greatly enhanced when the drug is conjugated to OX-26.

  15. Lower antibody response to tetanus toxoid associated with higher auto-anti-idiotypic antibody in old compared with young humans.

    PubMed Central

    Arreaza, E E; Gibbons, J J; Siskind, G W; Weksler, M E

    1993-01-01

    The production of anti-tetanus toxoid (TT) antibody and anti-anti-TT (auto-anti-Id) antibody has been measured in three young and three old persons. Both antibodies were measured using ELISA. We found that: (i) the anti-TT response of old subjects was lower than that of young subjects, (ii) serum auto-anti-Id antibody concentration was higher in old compared with young humans before boosting with TT, and (iii) anti-TT antibodies from different humans shared Id cross-reactivity when tested with a rabbit anti-Id antibody. Thus, the serum anti-TT antibody response to boosting was inversely correlated with the serum level of auto-anti-Id. This conclusion is consistent with the view that the higher level of auto-anti-antibody in older subjects contributes to their impaired antibody response to TT. PMID:8467560

  16. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies from single rhesus macaque antibody secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Weixu; Li, Leike; Xiong, Wei; Fan, Xuejun; Deng, Hui; Bett, Andrew J; Chen, Zhifeng; Tang, Aimin; Cox, Kara S; Joyce, Joseph G; Freed, Daniel C; Thoryk, Elizabeth; Fu, Tong-Ming; Casimiro, Danilo R; Zhang, Ningyan; A Vora, Kalpit; An, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are used as a preclinical model for vaccine development, and the antibody profiles to experimental vaccines in NHPs can provide critical information for both vaccine design and translation to clinical efficacy. However, an efficient protocol for generating monoclonal antibodies from single antibody secreting cells of NHPs is currently lacking. In this study we established a robust protocol for cloning immunoglobulin (IG) variable domain genes from single rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) antibody secreting cells. A sorting strategy was developed using a panel of molecular markers (CD3, CD19, CD20, surface IgG, intracellular IgG, CD27, Ki67 and CD38) to identify the kinetics of B cell response after vaccination. Specific primers for the rhesus macaque IG genes were designed and validated using cDNA isolated from macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cloning efficiency was averaged at 90% for variable heavy (VH) and light (VL) domains, and 78.5% of the clones (n = 335) were matched VH and VL pairs. Sequence analysis revealed that diverse IGHV subgroups (for VH) and IGKV and IGLV subgroups (for VL) were represented in the cloned antibodies. The protocol was tested in a study using an experimental dengue vaccine candidate. About 26.6% of the monoclonal antibodies cloned from the vaccinated rhesus macaques react with the dengue vaccine antigens. These results validate the protocol for cloning monoclonal antibodies in response to vaccination from single macaque antibody secreting cells, which have general applicability for determining monoclonal antibody profiles in response to other immunogens or vaccine studies of interest in NHPs. PMID:25996084

  17. Studies on the control of antibody synthesis. XII. Genetic influences on antibody affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y T; Siskind, G W

    1978-01-01

    Genetic controls on the concentration and affinity of the anti-dinitrophenyl antibodies produced by different inbred strains of mice in response to immunization with dinitrophenylated bovine gamma globulin in Freund's complete adjuvant were demonstrated. Based upon data on F1 hybrids and backcrosses, it can be concluded that there are genetic controls on antibody affinity which are not linked to the major histocompatibility complex. In addition, the genetic controls on affinity which were studied here appear to be inherited independently of genetic controls on antibody concentration. PMID:721135

  18. The production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi

    PubMed Central

    Joosten, Vivi; Lokman, Christien; van den Hondel, Cees AMJJ; Punt, Peter J

    2003-01-01

    In this review we will focus on the current status and views concerning the production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi. We will focus on single-chain antibody fragment production (scFv and VHH) by these lower eukaryotes and the possible applications of these proteins. Also the coupling of fragments to relevant enzymes or other components will be discussed. As an example of the fusion protein strategy, the 'magic bullet' approach for industrial applications, will be highlighted. PMID:12605725

  19. Phase Transitions in Antibody Solutions: from Pharmaceuticals to Human Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Benedek, George; Dana Farber Cancer Institute Collaboration; Amgen Inc. Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Antibodies are very important proteins. Natural antibodies play essential role in the immune system of human body. Pharmaceutical antibodies are used as drugs. Antibodies are also indispensable tools in biomedical research and diagnostics. Recently, a number of observations of phase transitions of pharmaceutical antibodies have been reported. These phase transitions are undesirable from the perspective of colloid stability of drug solutions in processing and storage, but can be used for protein purification, X-ray crystallography, and improving pharmokinetics of drugs. Phase transitions of antibodies can also take place in human body, particularly in multiple myeloma patients who overproduce monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies, in some cases, crystallize at body temperature and cause severe complications called cryoglobulinemia. I will present the results of our current studies on phase transitions of both pharmaceutical antibodies and cryoglobulinemia-associated antibodies. These studies have shown that different antibodies have different propensity to undergo phase transitions, but their phase behavior has universal features which are remarkably different from those of spherical proteins. I will discuss how studies of phase behavior can be useful in assessing colloid stability of pharmaceutical antibodies and in early diagnostics of cryoglobulinemia, as well as general implications of the fact that some antibodies can precipitate at physiological conditions.

  20. IgA Antibodies in Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, K. L.; Skjeldal, O.

    2006-01-01

    The level of IgA antibodies to gluten and gliadin proteins found in grains and to casein found in milk, as well as the level of IgG to gluten and gliadin, have been examined in 23 girls with Rett syndrome and 53 controls. Highly statistically significant increases were found for the Rett population compared to the controls. The reason for this…

  1. Ethanol precipitation for purification of recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tscheliessnig, Anne; Satzer, Peter; Hammerschmidt, Nikolaus; Schulz, Henk; Helk, Bernhard; Jungbauer, Alois

    2014-10-20

    Currently, the golden standard for the purification of recombinant humanized antibodies (rhAbs) from CHO cell culture is protein A chromatography. However, due to increasing rhAbs titers alternative methods have come into focus. A new strategy for purification of recombinant human antibodies from CHO cell culture supernatant based on cold ethanol precipitation (CEP) and CaCl2 precipitation has been developed. This method is based on the cold ethanol precipitation, the process used for purification of antibodies and other components from blood plasma. We proof the applicability of the developed process for four different antibodies resulting in similar yield and purity as a protein A chromatography based process. This process can be further improved using an anion-exchange chromatography in flowthrough mode e.g. a monolith as last step so that residual host cell protein is reduced to a minimum. Beside the ethanol based process, our data also suggest that ethanol could be replaced with methanol or isopropanol. The process is suited for continuous operation. PMID:25087738

  2. JDIP Genomics, Antibodies, and Proteomics Core Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The JDIP Genomics, Proteomics, and Antibodies Core has developed several resources that are available for use by JDIP researchers. Five tasks have been completed or are in progress: Task 1 Transposon mutants: Nearly 24,000 gene disruption M. paratuberculosis mutants are now available for JDIP re...

  3. Viral antibody dynamics in a chiropteran host

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kate S; Suu-Ire, Richard; Barr, Jennifer; Hayman, David T S; Broder, Christopher C; Horton, Daniel L; Durrant, Christopher; Murcia, Pablo R; Cunningham, Andrew A; Wood, James L N

    2014-01-01

    Bats host many viruses that are significant for human and domestic animal health, but the dynamics of these infections in their natural reservoir hosts remain poorly elucidated. In these, and other, systems, there is evidence that seasonal life-cycle events drive infection dynamics, directly impacting the risk of exposure to spillover hosts. Understanding these dynamics improves our ability to predict zoonotic spillover from the reservoir hosts. To this end, we followed henipavirus antibody levels of >100 individual E.helvum in a closed, captive, breeding population over a 30-month period, using a powerful novel antibody quantitation method. We demonstrate the presence of maternal antibodies in this system and accurately determine their longevity. We also present evidence of population-level persistence of viral infection and demonstrate periods of increased horizontal virus transmission associated with the pregnancy/lactation period. The novel findings of infection persistence and the effect of pregnancy on viral transmission, as well as an accurate quantitation of chiropteran maternal antiviral antibody half-life, provide fundamental baseline data for the continued study of viral infections in these important reservoir hosts. PMID:24111634

  4. Developing recombinant antibodies for biomarker detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Miller, Keith D.; Kagen, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.

    2010-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have an essential role in biomarker validation and diagnostic assays. A barrier to pursuing these applications is the reliance on immunization and hybridomas to produce mAbs, which is time-consuming and may not yield the desired mAb. We recommend a process flow for affinity reagent production that utilizes combinatorial protein display systems (eg, yeast surface display or phage display) rather than hybridomas. These systems link a selectable phenotype-binding conferred by an antibody fragment-with a means for recovering the encoding gene. Recombinant libraries obtained from immunizations can produce high-affinity antibodies (<10 nM) more quickly than other methods. Non-immune libraries provide an alternate route when immunizations are not possible, or when suitable mAbs are not recovered from an immune library. Directed molecular evolution (DME) is an integral part of optimizing mAbs obtained from combinatorial protein display, but can also be used on hybridoma-derived mAbs. Variants can easily be obtained and screened to increase the affinity of the parent mAb (affinity maturation). We discuss examples where DME has been used to tailor affinity reagents to specific applications. Combinatorial protein display also provides an accessible method for identifying antibody pairs, which are necessary for sandwich-type diagnostic assays.

  5. Antibody-drug conjugates in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Eric L; Senter, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    An antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) provides the possibility of selectively ablating cancer cells by combining the specificity of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) for a target antigen with the delivery of a highly potent cytotoxic agent. ADC target antigens are typically highly expressed on the surface of cancer cells compared to normal cells. The tumor target, the cytotoxic agent, and the manner in which the agent is attached to the antibody are key determinants of clinical activity and tolerability. Recently, several clinical trials have demonstrated that ADCs achieve higher clinical response rates than unconjugated mAbs targeting the same cell surface antigen. Brentuximab vedotin represents one such ADC that has recently been approved for the treatment of relapsed Hodgkin and systemic anaplastic large cell lymphomas--both characterized by high expression of the target antigen, CD30, on the surface of malignant cells. This review summarizes key characteristics of current, clinically active ADCs and highlights recent clinical data illustrating the benefit of antibody-targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents to cancer cells. PMID:23043493

  6. World Antibody Drug Conjugate Summit Europe

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The World Antibody Drug Conjugate Summit Europe, organized by Biorbis/Hanson Wade was held in Frankfurt, Germany February 2123, 2011. Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), also called immunoconjugates, are becoming an increasingly important class of therapeutics as demonstrated by the attendance of nearly 100 delegates at this highly focused meeting. Updates on three ADCs that are in late-stage clinical development, trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), brentuximab vedotin (SGN-35) and inotuzumab ozogamicin (CMC-544), were presented by speakers from ImmunoGen, Genentech, Roche, Seattle Genetics and Pfizer. These ADCs have shown encouraging therapeutic effects against solid tumors (T-DM1) and hematological malignancies (SGN-35, CMC-544). The key feature of the new generation of ADCs is the effective combination of the cytotoxicity of natural or synthetic highly potent antineoplastic agents, tumor selective monoclonal antibodies and blood-stable optimized linkers. Early clinical data for ADCs were showcased by Progenics Pharmaceuticals (PSMA ADC), Celldex (CDX-011) and Biotest (BT-062). Takeda, MedImmune and sanofi-aventis outlined their strategies for process development and analytical characterization. In addition, presentations on duocarmycin based-ADCs, ? emitting immunoconjugates and antibody-conjugated nanoparticles were given by representatives from Syntarga, Algeta and the University of Stuttgart, respectively. PMID:21691144

  7. International intellectual property strategies for therapeutic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies need international patent protection as their markets expand to include industrialized and emerging countries. Because international intellectual property strategies are frequently complex and costly, applicants require sound information as a basis for decisions regarding the countries in which to pursue patents. While the most important factor is the size of a given market, other factors should also be considered. PMID:22123063

  8. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with chicken interleukin-17

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In our previous study chicken interleukin -17 (chIL-17) gene was cloned from the expressed sequence tag (EST) cDNA library and initially analyzed. To further investigate biological properties of chicken IL-17, six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against bacterially expressed protein were produced and c...

  9. Coronavirus Antibodies in African Bat Species

    PubMed Central

    Paweska, Janusz T.; Leman, Patricia A.; Drosten, Christian; Grywna, Klaus; Kemp, Alan; Braack, Leo; Sonnenberg, Karen; Niedrig, Matthias; Swanepoel, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Asian bats have been identified as potential reservoir hosts of coronaviruses associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV). We detected antibody reactive with SARS-CoV antigen in 47 (6.7%) of 705 bat serum specimens comprising 26 species collected in Africa; thus, African bats may harbor agents related to putative group 4 CoV. PMID:18252111

  10. Coronavirus antibodies in African bat species.

    PubMed

    Mller, Marcel A; Paweska, Janusz T; Leman, Patricia A; Drosten, Christian; Grywna, Klaus; Kemp, Alan; Braack, Leo; Sonnenberg, Karen; Niedrig, Matthias; Swanepoel, Robert

    2007-09-01

    Asian bats have been identified as potential reservoir hosts of coronaviruses associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV). We detected antibody reactive with SARS-CoV antigen in 47 (6.7%) of 705 bat serum specimens comprising 26 species collected in Africa; thus, African bats may harbor agents related to putative group 4 CoV. PMID:18252111

  11. Orthobunyavirus Antibodies in Humans, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Saiyasombat, Rungrat; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes G.; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E.; Farfan-Ale, Jose A.; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Loroo-Pino, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    We performed a serologic investigation to determine whether orthobunyaviruses commonly infect humans in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. Orthobunyavirus-specific antibodies were detected by plaque reduction neutralization test in 146 (18%) of 823 persons tested. Further studies are needed to determine health risks for humans from this potentially deadly group of viruses. PMID:23017592

  12. Platelet antibody: review of detection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, K.A.

    1988-10-01

    The driving force behind development of in vitro methods for platelet antibodies is identification of plasma factors causing platelet destruction. Early methods relied on measurement of platelet activation. Current methods are more specific and use a purified antibody against immunoglobulin or complement, which is usually labeled with /sup 125/I or tagged with an enzyme or fluorescein. Comparisons of quantitation of platelet-associated IgG show wide variability between different methods. The disparate results can be related both to differences in binding of secondary antibodies to immunoglobulin in solution compared to immunoglobulins attached to platelets and to the improper assumption that the binding ratio between the secondary detecting and primary antiplatelet antibody is one. Most assays can 1) identify neonatal isoimmune thrombocytopenia and posttransfusion purpura, 2) help to differentiate between immune and nonimmune thrombocytopenias, 3) help to sort out the offending drug when drug-induced thrombocytopenia is suspected, and 4) identify platelet alloantibodies and potential platelet donors via a cross match assay for refractory patients. However, the advantages of quantitative assays over qualitative methods with respect to predictions of patients clinical course and response to different treatments remain to be investigated. 61 references.

  13. Reversal of digoxin toxicity with specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, D H; Butler, V P

    1971-08-01

    To determine whether digoxin-specific antibodies can reverse established digoxin toxicity in the dog, digoxin intoxication was produced by the intramuscular administration of digoxin, 0.09 mg/kg, on each of 3 consecutive days. All animals developed toxic arrhythmias (atrioventricular block, ventricular premature contractions and/or ventricular tachycardia). In control animals not receiving antidigoxin antibodies, the arrhythmias persisted throughout a 6 hr study period. Seven of the nine control dogs were dead within 24 hr and one moribund animal was sacrificed at that time; the last animal died within 48 hr.In contrast, in six of eight dogs given digoxin-specific antibodies in canine plasma and/or rabbit serum, the arrhythmias reverted to a sinus mechanism within 30-90 min after the start of the infusion. At the end of a 6 hr period of study, these six dogs were in normal sinus rhythm and all eight were alive and in normal sinus rhythm at the end of 72 hr. This study provides evidence that digoxin-specific antibodies can reverse severe established digoxin toxicity in the dog. PMID:4106462

  14. Purification of antibodies using affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Darcy, Elaine; Leonard, Paul; Fitzgerald, Jenny; Danaher, Martin; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Affinity chromatography permits the isolation of a target analyte from a complex mixture and can be utilised to purify proteins, carbohydrates, drugs, haptens, or any analyte of interest once an affinity pair is available. It involves the exploitation of specific interactions between a binding affinity pair, such as those between an antibody and its associated antigen, or between any ligand and its associated binding receptor/protein. With the discovery of protein A in 1970, and, subsequently proteins G and L, immuno-affinity chromatography has grown in popularity and is now the standard methodology for the purification of antibodies which may be implemented for a selection of different applications such as immunodiagnostics. This chapter is designed to inform the researcher about the basic techniques involved in the affinity chromatography-based purification of monoclonal, polyclonal, and recombinant antibodies. Examples are provided for the use of proteins A and G. In addition, tables are provided that allow the reader to select the most appropriate protein for use in the isolation of their antibody. PMID:20978976

  15. IgA Antibodies in Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, K. L.; Skjeldal, O.

    2006-01-01

    The level of IgA antibodies to gluten and gliadin proteins found in grains and to casein found in milk, as well as the level of IgG to gluten and gliadin, have been examined in 23 girls with Rett syndrome and 53 controls. Highly statistically significant increases were found for the Rett population compared to the controls. The reason for this

  16. Monoclonal antibodies against chicken interleukin-6

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were produced against a recombinant (r) chicken interleukin-6 (IL-6). Eight mAbs that were produced were tested for isotype; ability to inhibit recombinant forms of chicken (ch), human (h) and murine (m) IL-6; and recognition of rchIL-6 by Western immunoblotting. The mA...

  17. Pharmacokinetic considerations for antibody drug conjugates.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kedan; Tibbitts, Jay

    2012-09-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) are a class of therapeutics that combine the target specificity of an antibody with the potency of a chemotherapeutic. This therapeutic strategy can significantly expand the therapeutic index of a chemotherapeutic by minimizing the systemic exposure and associated toxicity of the chemotherapeutic agent, while simultaneously maximizing the delivery of the chemotherapeutic to the target. The abundance of antibody targets, coupled with advances in antibody engineering, conjugation chemistry, and examples of early clinical success, have stimulated interest in developing ADCs. However, developing and optimizing the highly complex components of ADCs remain challenging. Understanding the pharmacokinetics (PK) and consequently the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) properties of ADCs is critical for their successful development. This review discusses the PK properties of ADCs, with a focus on ADC-specific characteristics, including molecular heterogeneity, in vivo processing, and the implications of multiple analytes. The disposition of ADCs and the utility of PKPD modeling are discussed in the context of providing guidance to assist in the successful development of these complex molecules. PMID:22740180

  18. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The accurate determination of the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) is important for calculation of dosimetry and evaluation of pharmacokinetic variables such as antibody dose and route of administration. The hypothesis of this application is that the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) can be quantitatively determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The major thrusts during the third year include the continued development and evaluation of improved 3D SPECT acquisition and reconstruction approaches to improve quantitative imaging of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), and the implementation and evaluation of algorithms to register serial SPECT image data sets, or to register 3D SPECT images with 3D image data sets acquired from positron emission tomography (PEI) and magnetic resonance images (MRI). The research has involved the investigation of statistical models and iterative reconstruction algorithms that accurately account for the physical characteristics of the SPECT acquisition system. It is our belief that SPECT quantification can be improved by accurately modeling the physical processes such as attenuation, scatter, geometric collimator response, and other factors that affect the measured projection data.

  19. Subcutaneous Administration of Monoclonal Antibodies in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Jackisch, C.; Mller, V.; Maintz, C.; Hell, S.; Ataseven, B.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment with monoclonal antibodies (mabs) has become an established component of oncological therapy. The monoclonal antibodies available for this purpose are mainly administered intravenously in individually adapted doses according to body weight over longer treatment times. For other chronic diseases such as, for example, diabetes mellitus, the subcutaneous administration of drugs is an established therapy option. For the subcutaneous administration of larger volumes as needed for mab solutions the extracellular matrix of the subcutaneous tissue represents a problem. The co-formulation with recombinant human hyaluronidase makes the relatively pain-free administration of larger fluid volumes and thus the subcutaneous administration of monoclonal antibodies possible, as illustrated by the development of a subcutaneous formulation of trastuzumab. This constitutes a less invasive, time-optimised and flexible form of administration for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer that, with its fixed dosing possibilities, contributes to therapeutic safety. The example of trastuzumab shows that the subcutaneous administration of monoclonal antibodies can simplify oncological long-term therapy not only for the patients but also for the medical personnel. PMID:25076790

  20. Reversal of Digoxin Toxicity with Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Donald H.; Butler, Vincent P.

    1971-01-01

    To determine whether digoxin-specific antibodies can reverse established digoxin toxicity in the dog, digoxin intoxication was produced by the intramuscular administration of digoxin, 0.09 mg/kg, on each of 3 consecutive days. All animals developed toxic arrhythmias (atrioventricular block, ventricular premature contractions and/or ventricular tachycardia). In control animals not receiving antidigoxin antibodies, the arrhythmias persisted throughout a 6 hr study period. Seven of the nine control dogs were dead within 24 hr and one moribund animal was sacrificed at that time; the last animal died within 48 hr. In contrast, in six of eight dogs given digoxin-specific antibodies in canine plasma and/or rabbit serum, the arrhythmias reverted to a sinus mechanism within 30-90 min after the start of the infusion. At the end of a 6 hr period of study, these six dogs were in normal sinus rhythm and all eight were alive and in normal sinus rhythm at the end of 72 hr. This study provides evidence that digoxin-specific antibodies can reverse severe established digoxin toxicity in the dog. PMID:4106462

  1. Pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent catalytic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gramatikova, Svetlana; Mouratou, Barbara; Stetefeld, Jrg; Mehta, Perdeep K; Christen, Philipp

    2002-11-01

    Strategies for expanding the catalytic scope of antibodies include the incorporation of inorganic or organic cofactors into their binding sites. An obvious choice is pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP), which is probably the most versatile organic cofactor of enzymes. Monoclonal antibodies against the hapten N(alpha)-(5'-phosphopyridoxyl)-L-lysine, a stable analog of the covalent coenzyme-substrate adducts were screened by a competition ELISA for binding of the PLP-amino acid Schiff base adduct. The Schiff base with its C4'-N alpha double bond is, in contrast to the hapten, a planar compound and is an obligatory intermediate in all PLP-dependent reactions of amino acids. This highly discriminating screening step eliminated all but 5 of 24 hapten-binding antibodies. The five remaining antibodies were tested for catalysis of the PLP-dependent alpha,beta-elimination reaction of beta-chloroalanine. Antibody 15A9 complied with this selection criterion and catalyzed in addition the cofactor-dependent transamination reaction of hydrophobic D-amino acids and oxo acids (k(cat)'=0.42 min(-1) with D-alanine at 25 degrees C). Homology modeling together with alanine scanning yielded a 3D model of Fab 15A9. The striking analogy between antibody 15A9 and PLP-dependent enzymes includes the following features: (1) The binding sites accommodate the planar coenzyme-amino acid adduct. (2) The bond at C alpha to be broken lies together with the C alpha-N bond in a plane orthogonal to the plane of coenzyme and imine bond. (3) The alpha-carboxylate group of the substrate is bound by an arginine residue. (4) The coenzyme-substrate adduct assumes a cisoid conformation. (5) PLP markedly contributes to catalytic efficiency, being a 10(4) times more efficient amino group acceptor than pyruvate. The protein moiety, however, ensures reaction as well as substrate specificity, and further accelerates the reaction (in 15A9 k(cat (Ab x PLP))'/k(cat (PLP))'=5 x 10(3)). The analogies of antibody 15A9 with PLP-dependent enzymes suggest that the selection criteria in the screening protocol were similar to those that have been operative in the molecular evolution of enzyme-assisted pyridoxal catalysis. PMID:12379355

  2. Chorea Associated with High Titers of Antiphospholipid Antibodies in the Absence of Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Safarpour, Damoun; Buckingham, Sarah; Jabbari, Bahman

    2015-01-01

    Background Chorea associated with high titers of antiphospholipid antibodies in the absence of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome has been seldom reported. Case report An 89-year-old female developed persistent right side chorea associated with high titers of anticardiolipin antibody (antiphospholipid antibosies immunoglobulin (Ig)M, 45 MPL and 112 IgM aCL (MPL) after 3 months) but normal lupus anticoagulants. Her magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no abnormality, but positron emission tomography (PET) demonstrated increased bilateral striatal metabolic activity, more on the left side. Her MRI showed no cause for chorea. The PET scan demonstrated a marked increase in the metabolic activity of the left basal ganglia. Discussion Her chorea remained unchanged over a 9-month follow-up period. The literature on chorea associated with high titers of antiphospholipid antibodies in the absence of antiphospholipid syndrome is reviewed. PMID:25774325

  3. Sperm auto - antibodies and anti-nuclear antigen antibodies in chronic dioxin - exposed veterans.

    PubMed

    Chinh, T T; Phi, P T; Thuy, N T

    1996-02-01

    The authors studied anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) in 25 chronic dioxin - exposed veterans by IIF technics with Hep-2 cell line and sperm autoantibodies by agglutination test of Franklin-Dukes. The site of antibody binding on spermatozoon is detected by IIF test. The control group for ANA detection is 63 healthy persons of the same age as that of dioxin - exposed veterans and the control group for sperm autoantibodies is 36 healthy males of 28-63 years old, having 1-2 children. Obtained results show that the rate of ANA positive in veterans group is normal, and sperm auto-antibodies is also at normal range. The site of antibody binding on spermatozoon is predominantly head - head, rarely head - neck or tail - tail. PMID:8907229

  4. Antibody Request - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  5. Lessons from babies: inducing HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Tomaras, Georgia D; Haynes, Barton F

    2016-01-01

    A new study in infants shows that broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against HIV can be found early in life, demonstrating for the first time that these antibodies can be induced by the infant immune system. PMID:24901564

  6. Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... historical) Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis Two types of antibody molecules act in concert to stimulate inflammation in people with rheumatoid arthritis, according to research funded in part by the ...

  7. Monoclonal antibodies: new agents for cancer detection and targeted therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.W.; Byers, V.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Antibodies directed against markers on cancer cells are gaining in importance for the purpose of targeting diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In the past, this approach has had very limited success principally because the classical methods for producing antibodies from blood serum of animals immunized with cancer cells or extracts were unsatisfactory. The situation has changed dramatically since 1975 following the design of procedures for 'immortalizing' antibody-producing cells (lymphocytes) by fusing them with cultured myeloma cells to form hybridomas which continuously secrete antibodies. Since these hybridomas produce antibodies coded for by a single antibody-producing cell, the antibodies are called monoclonal. Building on these advances in biomedical research, it is now possible to reproducibly manufacture monoclonal antibodies on a scale suitable for use in cancer detection and therapy.

  8. NCI Requests Cancer Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization

    Cancer.gov

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  9. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test... immunochemical techniques the antimitochondrial antibodies in human serum. The measurements aid in the diagnosis of diseases that produce a spectrum of autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test... immunochemical techniques the antimitochondrial antibodies in human serum. The measurements aid in the diagnosis of diseases that produce a spectrum of autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test... immunochemical techniques the antimitochondrial antibodies in human serum. The measurements aid in the diagnosis of diseases that produce a spectrum of autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test... immunochemical techniques the antimitochondrial antibodies in human serum. The measurements aid in the diagnosis of diseases that produce a spectrum of autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test... immunochemical techniques the antimitochondrial antibodies in human serum. The measurements aid in the diagnosis of diseases that produce a spectrum of autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's...

  14. Antibody-based therapies for emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Casadevall, A.

    1996-01-01

    In the 19th century, it was discovered that immune sera were useful in treating infectious diseases. Serum therapy was largely abandoned in the 1940s because of the toxicity associated with the administration of heterologous sera and the introduction of effective antimicrobial chemotherapy. Recent advances in the technology of monoclonal antibody production provide the means to generate human antibody reagents and reintroduce antibody therapies, while avoiding the toxicities associated with serum therapy. Because of the versatility of antibodies, antibody-based therapies could, in theory, be developed against any existing pathogen. The advantages of antibody-based therapies include versatility, low toxicity, pathogen specificity, enhancement of immune function, and favorable pharmacokinetics; the disadvantages include high cost, limited usefulness against mixed infections, and the need for early and precise microbiologic diagnosis. The potential of antibodies as antiinfective agents has not been fully tapped. Antibody-based therapies constitute a potentially useful option against newly emergent pathogens. PMID:8903230

  15. A new tool for monoclonal antibody analysis

    PubMed Central

    An, Yan; Zhang, Ying; Mueller, Hans-Martin; Shameem, Mohammed; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) products are extraordinarily heterogeneous due to the presence of a variety of enzymatic and chemical modifications, such as deamidation, isomerization, oxidation, glycosylation, glycation, and terminal cyclization. The modifications in different domains of the antibody molecule can result in different biological consequences. Therefore, characterization and routine monitoring of domain-specific modifications are essential to ensure the quality of the therapeutic antibody products. For this purpose, a rapid and informative methodology was developed to examine the heterogeneity of individual domains in mAb products. A recently discovered endopeptidase, IdeS, cleaves heavy chains below the hinge region, producing F(ab')2 and Fc fragments. Following reduction of disulfide bonds, three antibody domains (LC, Fd, and Fc/2) can be released for further characterization. Subsequent analyses by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, capillary isoelectric focusing, and glycan mapping enable domain-specific profiling of oxidation, charge heterogeneity, and glycoform distribution. When coupled with reversed phase chromatography, the unique chromatographic profile of each molecule offers a simple strategy for an identity test, which is an important formal test for biopharmaceutical quality control purposes. This methodology is demonstrated for a number of IgGs of different subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG4), as well as an Fc fusion protein. The presented technique provides a convenient platform approach for scientific and formal therapeutic mAb product characterization. It can also be applied in regulated drug substance batch release and stability testing of antibody and Fc fusion protein products, in particular for identity and routine monitoring of domain-specific modifications. PMID:24927271

  16. Expression and purification of recombinant antibody formats and antibody fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Siegemund, Martin; Richter, Fabian; Seifert, Oliver; Unverdorben, Felix; Kontermann, Roland E

    2014-01-01

    In the laboratory-scale production of antibody fragments or antibody fusion proteins, it is often difficult to keep track on the most suitable affinity tags for protein purification from either prokaryotic or eukaryotic host systems. Here, we describe how such recombinant proteins derived from Escherichia coli lysates as well as HEK293 cell culture supernatants are purified by IMAC and by different affinity chromatography methods based on fusions to FLAG-tag, Strep-tag, and Fc domains. PMID:24515473

  17. Anti-infective antibodies--reviving an old paradigm.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, Peter

    2009-12-30

    Antibody therapy for infections has a long history and the development of monoclonal antibody technologies, and of increasingly ingenious techniques for making these products, has brought about a major revival in interest. In this paper the field is reviewed with particular emphasis on two topics: the role that antibodies may have in combating pandemic flu; and the prospects for giving, as a food, antibodies derived from the ovalbumin of transgenic chicken eggs, as a prophylactic against diarrhoeal disease. PMID:20006138

  18. Renewable, recombinant antibodies to histone post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Taft, Joseph M.; Swist, Kalina M.; Luo, Hao; Witt, Heather; Slattery, Matthew; Koide, Akiko; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; White, Kevin P.; Farnham, Peggy J.; Zhao, Yingming; Koide, Shohei

    2013-01-01

    Variability in the quality of antibodies to histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) presents widely recognized hindrance in epigenetics research. Here, by using antibody engineering technologies we produced recombinant antibodies directed to the trimethylated lysine residues of histone H3 with high specificity and affinity and no lot-to-lot variation. These recombinant antibodies performed well in common epigenetics applications, and their high specificity enabled us to identify positive and negative correlations among histone PTMs. PMID:23955773

  19. An Interactive Database for the Assessment of Histone Antibody Specificity.

    PubMed

    Rothbart, Scott B; Dickson, Bradley M; Raab, Jesse R; Grzybowski, Adrian T; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Guo, Angela H; Shanle, Erin K; Josefowicz, Steven Z; Fuchs, Stephen M; Allis, C David; Magnuson, Terry R; Ruthenburg, Alexander J; Strahl, Brian D

    2015-08-01

    Access to high-quality antibodies is a necessity for the study of histones and their posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Here we debut the Histone Antibody Specificity Database (http://www.histoneantibodies.com), an online and expanding resource cataloging the behavior of widely used, commercially available histone antibodies by peptide microarray. This interactive web portal provides a critical resource to the biological research community that routinely uses these antibodies as detection reagents for a wide range of applications. PMID:26212453

  20. Quality of histone modification antibodies undermines chromatin biology research

    PubMed Central

    Kungulovski, Goran; Jeltsch, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modification (PTM) antibodies are essential research reagents in chromatin biology. However, they suffer from variable properties and insufficient documentation of quality. Antibody manufacturers and vendors should provide detailed lot-specific documentation of quality, rendering further quality checks by end-customers unnecessary. A shift from polyclonal antibodies towards sustainable reagents like monoclonal or recombinant antibodies or histone binding domains would help to improve the reproducibility of experimental work in this field. PMID:26834995

  1. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in antimyelin antibody-induced oligodendrocyte damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Griot-Wenk, M; Griot, C; Pfister, H; Vandevelde, M

    1991-08-01

    Treatment of dissociated murine brain cell cultures with an antibody recognizing galactocerebroside (GalC) led to degeneration of oligodendrocytes with loss of their cell processes. F(ab')2 fragments prepared from this antibody showed no effect. The anti-GalC antibody--but not its F(ab')2 fragments b2 was able to stimulate macrophages in these cultures as seen in a chemiluminescence assay. Therefore, antibodies bound to oligodendrocytes stimulated nearby macrophages by interacting with their Fc receptors. The oligodendroglial damage coincided with the release of toxic compounds by the stimulated macrophages, since treatment of the cultures with the anti-GalC antibody and a variety of other macrophage stimulating agents led to secretion of reactive oxygen species and--in some experiments--tumor necrosis factor, both known to be toxic for oligodendrocytes. These in vitro experiments show evidence that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity may be an important mechanism of tissue destruction in inflammatory demyelinating diseases. PMID:2066397

  2. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section..., Or Any Combination of These Tests 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to attain... proficiency testing event. (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  3. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section..., Or Any Combination of These Tests 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to attain... proficiency testing event. (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  4. Monoclonal antibody specific for a pigmentation associated antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, T.M.; Mattes, M.J.; Old, L.J.; Lloyd, K.O

    1989-01-17

    Monoclonal antibody TA99, which specifically binds to a pigmentation associated antigen present on melanoma cells is described. Additionally, the hybridoma cell line deposited with the ATCC under Accession Number HB 8704 from which the antibody is derived, as well as methods for using the antibody are described.

  5. Antibodies to the acetylcholine receptor in myasthenic dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Garlepp, M; Farrow, B; Kay, P; Dawkins, R L

    1979-01-01

    Antibodies to the AChR and anti-striational antibodies have been detected in dogs suffering from myasthenia gravis. The detection of these antibodies adds to the known similarities between the human and canine disease. This animal model will facilitate investigation of agents involved in the induction of spontaneous myasthenia gravis. PMID:500127

  6. Synthetic approach to the generation of antibody diversity.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyunbo

    2015-09-01

    The in vitro antibody discovery technologies revolutionized the generation of target-specific antibodies that traditionally relied on the humoral response of immunized animals. An antibody library, a large collection of diverse, pre-constructed antibodies, can be rapidly screened using in vitro display technologies such as phage display. One of the keys to successful in vitro antibody discovery is the quality of the library diversity. Antibody diversity can be obtained either from natural B-cell sources or by the synthetic methods that combinatorially generate random nucleotide sequences. While the functionality of a natural antibody library depends largely upon the library size, various other factors can affect the quality of a synthetic antibody library, making the design and construction of synthetic antibody libraries complicated and challenging. In this review, we present various library designs and diversification methods for synthetic antibody library. From simple degenerate oligonucleotide synthesis to trinucleotide synthesis to physicochemically optimized library design, the synthetic approach is evolving beyond the simple emulation of natural antibodies, into a highly sophisticated method that is capable of producing high quality antibodies suitable for therapeutic, diagnostic, and other demanding applications. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 489-494]. PMID:26129672

  7. Prevalence of antibody to the Norwalk virus in various countries.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, H B; Valdesuso, J; Kapikian, A Z; Chanock, R M; Wyatt, R G; Szmuness, W; Larrick, J; Kaplan, J; Gilman, R H; Sack, D A

    1979-10-01

    Serum samples from children and adults from several countries were tested by radioimmunoassay for antibody to the Norwalk virus. Antibody was commonly found in adults from all the countries tested. Antibody appears to be acquired more rapidly in children from underdeveloped countries than in children from the United States. PMID:227798

  8. Prevalence of antibody to the Norwalk virus in various countries.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, H B; Valdesuso, J; Kapikian, A Z; Chanock, R M; Wyatt, R G; Szmuness, W; Larrick, J; Kaplan, J; Gilman, R H; Sack, D A

    1979-01-01

    Serum samples from children and adults from several countries were tested by radioimmunoassay for antibody to the Norwalk virus. Antibody was commonly found in adults from all the countries tested. Antibody appears to be acquired more rapidly in children from underdeveloped countries than in children from the United States. PMID:227798

  9. Have we overestimated the benefit of human(ized) antibodies?

    PubMed Central

    Getts, Meghann T; McCarthy, Derrick P; Chastain, Emily ML; Miller, Stephen D

    2010-01-01

    The infusion of animal-derived antibodies has been known for some time to trigger the generation of antibodies directed at the foreign protein as well as adverse events including cytokine release syndrome. These immunological phenomena drove the development of humanized and fully human monoclonal antibodies. The ability to generate human(ized) antibodies has been both a blessing and a curse. While incremental gains in the clinical efficacy and safety for some agents have been realized, a positive effect has not been observed for all human(ized) antibodies. Many human(ized) antibodies trigger the development of anti-drug antibody responses and infusion reactions. The current belief that antibodies need to be human(ized) to have enhanced therapeutic utility may slow the development of novel animal-derived monoclonal antibody therapeutics for use in clinical indications. In the case of murine antibodies, greater than 20% induce tolerable/negligible immunogenicity, suggesting that in these cases humanization may not offer significant gains in therapeutic utility. Furthermore, humanization of some murine antibodies may reduce their clinical effectiveness. The available data suggest that the utility of human(ized) antibodies needs to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, taking a cost-benefit approach, taking both biochemical characteristics and the targeted therapeutic indication into account. PMID:20935511

  10. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section..., Or Any Combination of These Tests 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to attain... proficiency testing event. (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  11. Behavioral and Psychological Responses to HIV Antibody Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Paul B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Considers effects of informing individuals of their antibody status as determined by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody testing. Reviews research examining changes in psychological distress and in behaviors associated with HIV infections among individuals who have undergone antibody testing. Identifies methodological issues in studying

  12. A Simple Model System to Demonstrate Antibody Structure and Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Kennedy, Richard

    1991-01-01

    A model that can be used to show the arrangement of light and heavy chains, disulfide linkages, domains, and subclass variations in antibodies is given. It can be constructed and modified to illustrate Fab, F(ab')2, and Fc fragments, single domain and bifunctional antibodies, and labeling of antibodies. (Author)

  13. Monoclonal antibodies and method for detecting dioxins and dibenzofurans

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, Martin (San Ramon, CA); Stanker, Larry H. (Livermore, CA); Watkins, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Bailey, Nina R. (Berkley, CA)

    1989-01-01

    Compositions of matter are described which include five monoclonal antibodies that react with dioxins and dibenzofurans, and the five hybridomas that produce these monoclonal antibodies. In addition, a method for the use of these antibodies in a sensitive immunoassay for dioxins and dibenzofurans is given, which permits detection of these pollutants in samples at concentrations in the range of a few parts per billion.

  14. Synthetic approach to the generation of antibody diversity

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hyunbo

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro antibody discovery technologies revolutionized the generation of target-specific antibodies that traditionally relied on the humoral response of immunized animals. An antibody library, a large collection of diverse, pre-constructed antibodies, can be rapidly screened using in vitro display technologies such as phage display. One of the keys to successful in vitro antibody discovery is the quality of the library diversity. Antibody diversity can be obtained either from natural B-cell sources or by the synthetic methods that combinatorially generate random nucleotide sequences. While the functionality of a natural antibody library depends largely upon the library size, various other factors can affect the quality of a synthetic antibody library, making the design and construction of synthetic antibody libraries complicated and challenging. In this review, we present various library designs and diversification methods for synthetic antibody library. From simple degenerate oligonucleotide synthesis to trinucleotide synthesis to physicochemically optimized library design, the synthetic approach is evolving beyond the simple emulation of natural antibodies, into a highly sophisticated method that is capable of producing high quality antibodies suitable for therapeutic, diagnostic, and other demanding applications. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 489-494] PMID:26129672

  15. Potent Antibody Protection against an Emerging Alphavirus Threat.

    PubMed

    Kielian, Margaret; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2015-11-19

    Chikungunya virus recently caused large outbreaks world-wide. In this issue of Cell, Fox et al. describe several potently neutralizing antibodies against multiple alphaviruses. The structure of the virus in complex with one of the antibodies reveals the antibody-induced rearrangement and crosslinking of the viral surface proteins that result in neutralization. PMID:26590413

  16. Single-chain antibodies as diagnostic tools and therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Hagemeyer, Christoph E; von Zur Muhlen, Constantin; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Peter, Karlheinz

    2009-06-01

    Over three decades after the generation of the first mouse monoclonal antibodies by Kohler and Milstein, recombinant antibodies are the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Furthermore, antibodies are key detection reagents in research and diagnostics. Technology improvements have provided several approaches to manufacturing human antibodies with high affinity for biologically relevant targets. Approximately 300 development programs for therapeutic antibodies have been reported in industrial and academic laboratories, and this clearly demonstrates the expectations towards antibody technology. Antibody fragments are a subclass with growing clinical importance. This review focuses on single-chain antibodies as one of the smallest possible format for recombinant antibodies and their use as diagnostic tools and therapeutic agents. We describe the structure, selection and production of single-chain antibodies. Furthermore, we review current applications of antibody fragments focusing on thrombus targeting using fibrin- and platelet-specific single-chain antibodies as well as describing novel noninvasive imaging approaches for the diagnosis of thrombosis and inflammation. PMID:19492141

  17. FINAL REPORT. ENGINEERED ANTIBODIES FOR MONITORING OF POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project was conducted to remove the major barrier to the timely development and use of more versatile antibody-based detection and sample cleanup methods. The main objective was to adapt combinatorial antibody library and antibody engineering methods for preparing a panel of...

  18. Organ-specific Antibodies in Patients with Lichen Sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    Goolamali, S. K.; Barnes, E. W.; Irvine, W. J.; Shuster, Sam

    1974-01-01

    Organ-specific antibodies were looked for in 26 patients with lichen sclerosus. Ten of the 25 female patients (40%) had organ-specific antibodies to thyroid cytoplasm and 11 (44%) had organ-specific antibodies to gastric parietal cells. Both values were significantly greater than those obtained in age-matched controls. None of the sera from patients with lichen sclerosus contained antibodies to steroid-producing tissues. No organ-specific antibodies were found in the one male patient. The findings suggest that lichen sclerosus may be related to an autoimmune process. PMID:4414943

  19. Immunologically driven chemical engineering of antibodies for catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Dias, Sonia; Jovic, Florence; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Taran, Frderic; Crminon, Christophe; Mioskowski, Charles; Grassi, Jacques

    2002-11-01

    We describe a new strategy for the preparation of catalytic antibodies based on a two-step procedure. Firstly, monoclonal antibodies are selected only if displaying the following binding features: binding both the substrate and a reactive group in such a way that the two groups are in a reactive position towards each other. Secondly, the selected monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are chemically engineered by covalently binding the reactive group into the binding pocket of the antibody. Using previously isolated monoclonal antibodies, we have focused our studies on the control of this second step. PMID:12379354

  20. Production of antibodies which recognize opiate receptors on murine leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.J.J.; Bost, K.L.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    An antibody has been developed which recognizes opiate receptors on cells of the immune system. This antibody blocks specific binding of the radiolabeled opiate receptor ligand, /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine, to receptors on murine splenocytes. Additionally, the anti-receptor antibody competes with ..beta..-endorphin, meta-enkephalin, and naloxone for the same binding site on the leukocytes. Moreover, the anti-receptor antibody possesses agonist activity similar to ..beta..-endorphin in suppressing cAMP production by lymphocytes. These results suggest the development of an antibody which recognizes classical opiate receptors on cells of the immune system.