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Sample records for antibiotic molecules bypassing

  1. New Antibiotic Molecules: Bypassing the Membrane Barrier of Gram Negative Bacteria Increases the Activity of Peptide Deformylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mamelli, Laurent; Petit, Sylvain; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Giglione, Carmela; Lieutaud, Aurélie; Meinnel, Thierry; Artaud, Isabelle; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Background Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria have become a major concern in hospitals worldwide and urgently require the development of new antibacterial molecules. Peptide deformylase is an intracellular target now well-recognized for the design of new antibiotics. The bacterial susceptibility to such a cytoplasmic target primarily depends on the capacity of the compound to reach and accumulate in the cytosol. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine the respective involvement of penetration (influx) and pumping out (efflux) mechanisms to peptide deformylase inhibitors (PDF-I) activity, the potency of various series was determined using various genetic contexts (efflux overproducers or efflux-deleted strains) and membrane permeabilizers. Depending on the structure of the tested molecules, two behaviors could be observed: (i) for actinonin the first PDF-I characterized, the AcrAB efflux system was the main parameter involved in the bacterial susceptibility, and (ii), for the lastest PDF-Is such as the derivatives of 2-(5-bromo-1H-indol-3-yl)-N-hydroxyacetamide, the penetration through the membrane was a important limiting step. Conclusions/Significance Our results clearly show that the bacterial membrane plays a key role in modulating the antibacterial activity of PDF-Is. The bacterial susceptibility for these new antibacterial molecules can be improved by two unrelated ways in MDR strains: by collapsing the Acr efflux activity or by increasing the uptake rate through the bacterial membrane. The efficiency of the second method is associated with the nature of the compound. PMID:19649280

  2. New antimicrobial molecules and new antibiotic strategies.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Castro, Felipe; Naranjo, Olga Rajas; Marco, Javier Aspa; Violán, Jordi Solé

    2009-04-01

    Drug options for treatment of infections are increasingly limited. The pharmaceutical industry has found it difficult to discover new antimicrobial agents, and only two novel classes of antibiotics, the oxazolidinones and the cyclic lipopeptides, have entered the market since the late 1960s. Few new agents have reached the market in the last decade with potential interest for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) treatment, including linezolid (the first oxazolidinone in clinical use), new fluoroquinolones, cefditoren, ertapenem, and telithromycin. Agents currently in clinical development include other novel quinolones and ketolides, broad-spectrum cephalosporin derivatives, faropenem, several glycopeptides, and iclaprim. Other molecules are considered to be promising candidates for the future. In addition to the foregoing agents, alternative treatment approaches have also been introduced into clinical practice, which include the administration of the appropriate antimicrobials in a timely manner and the consideration of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic properties of the agent(s). PMID:19296416

  3. Bypass of genetic constraints during mutator evolution to antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Couce, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Genetic constraints can block many mutational pathways to optimal genotypes in real fitness landscapes, yet the extent to which this can limit evolution remains to be determined. Interestingly, mutator bacteria elevate only specific types of mutations, and therefore could be very sensitive to genetic constraints. Testing this possibility is not only clinically relevant, but can also inform about the general impact of genetic constraints in adaptation. Here, we evolved 576 populations of two mutator and one wild-type Escherichia coli to doubling concentrations of the antibiotic cefotaxime. All strains carried TEM-1, a β-lactamase enzyme well known by its low availability of mutational pathways. Crucially, one of the mutators does not elevate any of the relevant first-step mutations known to improve cefatoximase activity. Despite this, both mutators displayed a similar ability to evolve more than 1000-fold resistance. Initial adaptation proceeded in parallel through general multi-drug resistance mechanisms. High-level resistance, in contrast, was achieved through divergent paths; with the a priori inferior mutator exploiting alternative mutational pathways in PBP3, the target of the antibiotic. These results have implications for mutator management in clinical infections and, more generally, illustrate that limits to natural selection in real organisms are alleviated by the existence of multiple loci contributing to fitness. PMID:25716795

  4. Identification of a small molecule that simultaneously suppresses virulence and antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qiaoyun; Wei, Yu; Xia, Bin; Jin, Yongxin; Liu, Chang; Pan, Xiaolei; Shi, Jing; Zhu, Feng; Li, Jinlong; Qian, Lei; Liu, Xinqi; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Lin, Jianping; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-01

    The rising antibiotic resistance of bacteria imposes a severe threat on human health. Inhibition of bacterial virulence is an alternative approach to develop new antimicrobials. Molecules targeting antibiotic resistant enzymes have been used in combination with cognate antibiotics. It might be ideal that a molecule can simultaneously suppress virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here we combined genetic and computer-aided inhibitor screening to search for such molecules against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To identify target proteins that control both virulence and antibiotic resistance, we screened for mutants with defective cytotoxicity and biofilm formation from 93 transposon insertion mutants previously reported with increased antibiotic susceptibility. A pyrD mutant displayed defects in cytotoxicity, biofilm formation, quorum sensing and virulence in an acute mouse pneumonia model. Next, we employed a computer-aided screening to identify potential inhibitors of the PyrD protein, a dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODase) involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. One of the predicted inhibitors was able to suppress the enzymatic activity of PyrD as well as bacterial cytotoxicity, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. A single administration of the compound reduced the bacterial colonization in the acute mouse pneumonia model. Therefore, we have developed a strategy to identify novel treatment targets and antimicrobial molecules. PMID:26751736

  5. Identification of a small molecule that simultaneously suppresses virulence and antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiaoyun; Wei, Yu; Xia, Bin; Jin, Yongxin; Liu, Chang; Pan, Xiaolei; Shi, Jing; Zhu, Feng; Li, Jinlong; Qian, Lei; Liu, Xinqi; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Lin, Jianping; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-01

    The rising antibiotic resistance of bacteria imposes a severe threat on human health. Inhibition of bacterial virulence is an alternative approach to develop new antimicrobials. Molecules targeting antibiotic resistant enzymes have been used in combination with cognate antibiotics. It might be ideal that a molecule can simultaneously suppress virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here we combined genetic and computer-aided inhibitor screening to search for such molecules against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To identify target proteins that control both virulence and antibiotic resistance, we screened for mutants with defective cytotoxicity and biofilm formation from 93 transposon insertion mutants previously reported with increased antibiotic susceptibility. A pyrD mutant displayed defects in cytotoxicity, biofilm formation, quorum sensing and virulence in an acute mouse pneumonia model. Next, we employed a computer-aided screening to identify potential inhibitors of the PyrD protein, a dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODase) involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. One of the predicted inhibitors was able to suppress the enzymatic activity of PyrD as well as bacterial cytotoxicity, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. A single administration of the compound reduced the bacterial colonization in the acute mouse pneumonia model. Therefore, we have developed a strategy to identify novel treatment targets and antimicrobial molecules. PMID:26751736

  6. Designed to penetrate: Time-resolved interaction of single antibiotic molecules with bacterial pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestorovich, Ekaterina M.; Danelon, Christophe; Winterhalter, Mathias; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2002-07-01

    Membrane permeability barriers are among the factors contributing to the intrinsic resistance of bacteria to antibiotics. We have been able to resolve single ampicillin molecules moving through a channel of the general bacterial porin, OmpF (outer membrane protein F), believed to be the principal pathway for the -lactam antibiotics. With ion channel reconstitution and high-resolution conductance recording, we find that ampicillin and several other efficient penicillins and cephalosporins strongly interact with the residues of the constriction zone of the OmpF channel. Therefore, we hypothesize that, in analogy to substrate-specific channels that evolved to bind certain metabolite molecules, antibiotics have "evolved" to be channel-specific. Molecular modeling suggests that the charge distribution of the ampicillin molecule complements the charge distribution at the narrowest part of the bacterial porin. Interaction of these charges creates a region of attraction inside the channel that facilitates drug translocation through the constriction zone and results in higher permeability rates.

  7. Improving the representation of peptide-like inhibitor and antibiotic molecules in the Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Shuchismita; Dimitropoulos, Dimitris; Feng, Zukang; Persikova, Irina; Sen, Sanchayita; Shao, Chenghua; Westbrook, John; Young, Jasmine; Zhuravleva, Marina A; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Berman, Helen M

    2014-06-01

    With the accumulation of a large number and variety of molecules in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) comes the need on occasion to review and improve their representation. The Worldwide PDB (wwPDB) partners have periodically updated various aspects of structural data representation to improve the integrity and consistency of the archive. The remediation effort described here was focused on improving the representation of peptide-like inhibitor and antibiotic molecules so that they can be easily identified and analyzed. Peptide-like inhibitors or antibiotics were identified in over 1000 PDB entries, systematically reviewed and represented either as peptides with polymer sequence or as single components. For the majority of the single-component molecules, their peptide-like composition was captured in a new representation, called the subcomponent sequence. A novel concept called "group" was developed for representing complex peptide-like antibiotics and inhibitors that are composed of multiple polymer and nonpolymer components. In addition, a reference dictionary was developed with detailed information about these peptide-like molecules to aid in their annotation, identification and analysis. Based on the experience gained in this remediation, guidelines, procedures, and tools were developed to annotate new depositions containing peptide-like inhibitors and antibiotics accurately and consistently. PMID:24173824

  8. Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... or not using them properly, can add to antibiotic resistance. This happens when bacteria change and become able ... survive and re-infect you. Do not save antibiotics for later or use someone else's prescription. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  9. Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Hariprasad, Seenu M; Mieler, William F

    2016-01-01

    The Endophthalmitis Vitrectomy Study (EVS) provided ophthalmologists with evidence-based management strategies to deal with endophthalmitis for the first time. However, since the completion of the EVS, numerous unresolved issues remain. The use of oral antibiotics has important implications for the ophthalmologist, particularly in the prophylaxis and/or management of postoperative, posttraumatic, or bleb-associated bacterial endophthalmitis. One can reasonably conclude that significant intraocular penetration of an antibiotic after oral administration may be a property unique to the newer-generation fluoroquinolones. Prophylactic use of mupirocin nasal ointment resulted in significant reduction of conjunctival flora with or without preoperative topical 5% povidone-iodine preparation. Ocular fungal infections have traditionally been very difficult to treat due to limited therapeutic options both systemically and intravitreally. Because of its broad spectrum of coverage, low MIC90 levels for the organisms of concern, good tolerability, and excellent bioavailability, voriconazole through various routes of administration may be useful to the ophthalmologist in the primary treatment of or as an adjunct to the current management of ocular fungal infections. PMID:26501865

  10. N-Heterocyclic molecule-capped gold nanoparticles as effective antibiotics against multi-drug resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yan; Chen, Wenwen; Jia, Yuexiao; Tian, Yue; Zhao, Yuyun; Long, Fei; Rui, Yukui; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that N-heterocyclic molecule-capped gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Optimized antibacterial activity can be achieved by using different initial molar ratios (1 : 1 and 10 : 1) of N-heterocyclic prodrugs and the precursor of Au NPs (HAuCl4). This work opens up new avenues for antibiotics based on Au NPs.We demonstrate that N-heterocyclic molecule-capped gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Optimized antibacterial activity can be achieved by using different initial molar ratios (1 : 1 and 10 : 1) of N-heterocyclic prodrugs and the precursor of Au NPs (HAuCl4). This work opens up new avenues for antibiotics based on Au NPs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03317b

  11. N-Heterocyclic molecule-capped gold nanoparticles as effective antibiotics against multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Chen, Wenwen; Jia, Yuexiao; Tian, Yue; Zhao, Yuyun; Long, Fei; Rui, Yukui; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-07-21

    We demonstrate that N-heterocyclic molecule-capped gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Optimized antibacterial activity can be achieved by using different initial molar ratios (1 : 1 and 10 : 1) of N-heterocyclic prodrugs and the precursor of Au NPs (HAuCl4). This work opens up new avenues for antibiotics based on Au NPs. PMID:27355451

  12. A novel antibiotic-delivery system by using ovotransferrin as targeting molecule.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hisham R; Tatsumoto, Sayuri; Ono, Hajime; Van Immerseel, Filip; Raspoet, Ruth; Miyata, Takeshi

    2015-01-23

    Synthetic antibiotics and antimicrobial agents, such as sulfonamide and triclosan (TCS), have provided new avenues in the treatment of bacterial infections, as they target lethal intracellular pathways. Sulfonamide antibiotics block synthesis of folic acid by inhibiting dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) while TCS block fatty acid synthesis through inhibition of enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI). They are water-insoluble agents and high doses are toxic, limiting their therapeutic efficiency. In this study, an antibiotic drug-targeting strategy based on utilizing ovotransferrin (OTf) as a carrier to allow specific targeting of the drug to microbial or mammalian cells via the transferrin receptor (TfR) is explored, with potential to alleviate insolubility and toxicity problems. Complexation, through non-covalent interaction, with OTf turned sulfa antibiotics or TCS into completely soluble in aqueous solution. OTf complexes showed superior bactericidal activity against several bacterial strains compared to the activity of free agents. Strikingly, a multi-drug resistant Salmonella strain become susceptible to antibiotics-OTf complexes while a tolC-knockout mutant strain become susceptible to OTf and more sensitive to the complexes. The antibiotic bound to OTf was, thus exported through the multi-drug efflux pump TolC in Salmonella wild-type strain. Further, antibiotics-OTf complexes were able to efficiently kill intracellular pathogens after infecting human colon carcinoma cells (HCT-116). The results demonstrate, for the first time, that the TfR mediated endocytosis of OTf can be utilized to specifically target drugs directly to pathogens or intracellularly infected cells and highlights the potency of the antibiotic-OTf complex for the treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:25315410

  13. Heparin-coated cardiopulmonary bypass circuits selectively deplete the pattern recognition molecule ficolin-2 of the lectin complement pathway in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hein, E; Munthe-Fog, L; Thiara, A S; Fiane, A E; Mollnes, T E; Garred, P

    2015-02-01

    The complement system can be activated via the lectin pathway by the recognition molecules mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and the ficolins. Ficolin-2 exhibits binding against a broad range of ligands, including biomaterials in vitro, and low ficolin-2 levels are associated with increased risk of infections. Thus, we investigated the biocompatibility of the recognition molecules of the lectin pathway in two different types of cardiopulmonary bypass circuits. Bloods were drawn at five time-points before, during and postoperatively from 30 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Patients were randomized into two groups using different coatings of cardiopulmonary bypass circuits, Phisio® (phosphorylcholine polymer coating) and Bioline® (albumin-heparin coating). Concentrations of MBL, ficolin-1, -2 and -3 and soluble C3a and terminal complement complex (TCC) in plasma samples were measured. Ficolin-3-mediated complement activation potential was evaluated with C4, C3 and TCC as output. There was no significant difference between the two circuit materials regarding MBL, ficolin-1 and -3. In the Bioline® group the ficolin-2 levels decreased significantly after initiation of surgery (P < 0.0001) and remained reduced throughout the sampling period. This was not seen for Phisio®-coated circuits. Ficolin-3-mediated complement activation potential was reduced significantly in both groups after start of operation (P < 0.0001), whereas soluble C3a and TCC in the samples were increased (P < 0.0001). Ficolin-2 was depleted from plasma during cardiac surgery when using heparin-coated bypass circuits and did not reach baseline level 24 h postoperation. These findings may have implications for the postoperative susceptibility to infections in patients undergoing extracorporeal circulation procedures. PMID:25174443

  14. Heparin-coated cardiopulmonary bypass circuits selectively deplete the pattern recognition molecule ficolin-2 of the lectin complement pathway in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hein, E; Munthe-Fog, L; Thiara, A S; Fiane, A E; Mollnes, T E; Garred, P

    2015-01-01

    The complement system can be activated via the lectin pathway by the recognition molecules mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and the ficolins. Ficolin-2 exhibits binding against a broad range of ligands, including biomaterials in vitro, and low ficolin-2 levels are associated with increased risk of infections. Thus, we investigated the biocompatibility of the recognition molecules of the lectin pathway in two different types of cardiopulmonary bypass circuits. Bloods were drawn at five time-points before, during and postoperatively from 30 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Patients were randomized into two groups using different coatings of cardiopulmonary bypass circuits, Phisio® (phosphorylcholine polymer coating) and Bioline® (albumin-heparin coating). Concentrations of MBL, ficolin-1, −2 and −3 and soluble C3a and terminal complement complex (TCC) in plasma samples were measured. Ficolin-3-mediated complement activation potential was evaluated with C4, C3 and TCC as output. There was no significant difference between the two circuit materials regarding MBL, ficolin-1 and −3. In the Bioline® group the ficolin-2 levels decreased significantly after initiation of surgery (P < 0·0001) and remained reduced throughout the sampling period. This was not seen for Phisio®-coated circuits. Ficolin-3-mediated complement activation potential was reduced significantly in both groups after start of operation (P < 0·0001), whereas soluble C3a and TCC in the samples were increased (P < 0·0001). Ficolin-2 was depleted from plasma during cardiac surgery when using heparin-coated bypass circuits and did not reach baseline level 24 h postoperation. These findings may have implications for the postoperative susceptibility to infections in patients undergoing extracorporeal circulation procedures. PMID:25174443

  15. Graphene laminated gold bipyramids as sensitive detection platforms for antibiotic molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghyun; Kumar, Prashant; Hu, Yaowu; Cheng, Gary J; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Atomic layers of graphene were optomechanically laminated onto gold bipyramids (length of ∼95 ± 3 nm and sharp tip radius less than 10 nm) using laser induced shock pressure. The fabricated graphene-gold bipyramid hybrids were employed as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrates for the detection of tetracycline, an antibiotic, at very low concentrations. PMID:26340316

  16. Graphene laminated gold bipyramids as sensitive detection platforms of antibiotic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seunghyun; Kumar, Prashant; Hu, Yaowu; Cheng, Gary J.; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Atomic layers of graphene were optomechanically laminated onto gold bipyramids (length of ~95±3 nm and sharp tips radius is less than 10 nm) using laser induced shock pressure. Fabricated graphene-gold bipyramid hybrids were employed as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrates for the detection of tetracycline, an antibiotic, at very low concentration. PMID:26340316

  17. Small Molecule Docking Supports Broad and Narrow Spectrum Potential for the Inhibition of the Novel Antibiotic Target Bacterial Pth1

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Paul P.; Holloway, W. Blake; Setzer, William N.; McFeeters, Hana; McFeeters, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolases (Pths) play ancillary yet essential roles in protein biosynthesis by recycling peptidyl-tRNA. In E. coli, inhibition of bacterial Pth1 leads to accumulation of peptidyl-tRNA, depletion of aminoacyl-tRNA, and cell death. Eukaryotes have multiple Pths and Pth1 knock out was shown to have no effect on viability in yeast. Thereby, bacterial Pth1 is a promising target for novel antibiotic development. With the abundance of Pth1 structural data, molecular docking was used for virtual screening of existing, commercially available antibiotics to map potential interactions with Pth enzymes. Overall, 83 compounds were docked to eight different bacterial Pth1 and three different Pth2 structures. A variety of compounds demonstrated favorable docking with Pths. Whereas, some compounds interacted favorably with all Pths (potential broad spectrum inhibition), more selective interactions were observed for Pth1 or Pth2 and even specificity for individual Pth1s. While the correlation between computational docking and experimentation still remains unknown, these findings support broad spectrum inhibition, but also point to the possibility of narrow spectrum Pth1 inhibition. Also suggested is that Pth1 can be distinguished from Pth2 by small molecule inhibitors. The findings support continued development of Pth1 as an antibiotic target. PMID:27171117

  18. Small Molecule Docking Supports Broad and Narrow Spectrum Potential for the Inhibition of the Novel Antibiotic Target Bacterial Pth1.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Paul P; Holloway, W Blake; Setzer, William N; McFeeters, Hana; McFeeters, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolases (Pths) play ancillary yet essential roles in protein biosynthesis by recycling peptidyl-tRNA. In E. coli, inhibition of bacterial Pth1 leads to accumulation of peptidyl-tRNA, depletion of aminoacyl-tRNA, and cell death. Eukaryotes have multiple Pths and Pth1 knock out was shown to have no effect on viability in yeast. Thereby, bacterial Pth1 is a promising target for novel antibiotic development. With the abundance of Pth1 structural data, molecular docking was used for virtual screening of existing, commercially available antibiotics to map potential interactions with Pth enzymes. Overall, 83 compounds were docked to eight different bacterial Pth1 and three different Pth2 structures. A variety of compounds demonstrated favorable docking with Pths. Whereas, some compounds interacted favorably with all Pths (potential broad spectrum inhibition), more selective interactions were observed for Pth1 or Pth2 and even specificity for individual Pth1s. While the correlation between computational docking and experimentation still remains unknown, these findings support broad spectrum inhibition, but also point to the possibility of narrow spectrum Pth1 inhibition. Also suggested is that Pth1 can be distinguished from Pth2 by small molecule inhibitors. The findings support continued development of Pth1 as an antibiotic target. PMID:27171117

  19. Protein-small molecule interactions in neocarzinostatin, the prototypical enediyne chromoprotein antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Baker, James R; Woolfson, Derek N; Muskett, Frederick W; Stoneman, Rhys G; Urbaniak, Michael D; Caddick, Stephen

    2007-05-01

    The enediyne chromoproteins are a class of potent antitumour antibiotics comprising a 1:1 complex of a protein and a noncovalently bound chromophore. The protein is required to protect and transport the highly labile chromophore, which acts as the cytotoxic component by reacting with DNA leading to strand cleavage. A derivative of the best-studied member of this class, neocarzinostatin (NCS), is currently in use as a chemotherapeutic in Japan. The application of the chromoproteins as therapeutics along with their unique mode of action has prompted widespread interest in this area. Notable developments include the discovery of non-natural ligands for the apoproteins and the observation that multiple binding modes are available for these ligands in the binding site. Mutation studies on the apoproteins have revealed much about their stability and variability, and the application of an in vitro evolution method has conferred new binding specificity for unrelated ligands. These investigations hold great promise for the application of the apoproteins for drug-delivery, transport and stabilisation systems. PMID:17451164

  20. Single-molecule analysis of the E. coli replisome and use of clamps to bypass replication barriers

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Roxana E.; Yao, Nina Y.; O’Donnell, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The process of chromosome duplication faces many obstacles. One way to circumvent blocks is to hop over them by placing a new clamp on a downstream primer. This resembles lagging strand synthesis, where the tight grip of polymerase to the clamp and DNA must be overcome upon completing each Okazaki fragment so it can transfer to new primed sites. This review focuses on recent single-molecule studies showing that E. coli Pol III can hop from one clamp to another without leaving the replication fork. This capability provides a means to circumvent obstacles like transcription or DNA lesions without fork collapse. PMID:20388515

  1. Peptides Presented by HLA-DR Molecules in Synovia of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis or Antibiotic-Refractory Lyme Arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Seward, Robert J.; Drouin, Elise E.; Steere, Allen C.; Costello, Catherine E.

    2011-01-01

    Disease-associated HLA-DR molecules, which may present autoantigens, constitute the greatest genetic risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis (LA). The peptides presented by HLA-DR molecules in synovia have not previously been defined. Using tandem mass spectrometry, rigorous database searches, and manual spectral interpretation, we identified 1,427 HLA-DR-presented peptides (220–464 per patient) from the synovia of four patients, two diagnosed with RA and two diagnosed with LA. The peptides were derived from 166 source proteins, including a wide range of intracellular and plasma proteins. A few epitopes were found only in RA or LA patients. However, two patients with different diseases who had the same HLA allele had the largest number of epitopes in common. In one RA patient, peptides were identified as originating from source proteins that have been reported to undergo citrullination under other circumstances, yet neither this post-translational modification nor anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were detected. Instead, peptides with the post-translational modification of S-cysteinylation were identified. We conclude that a wide range of proteins enter the HLA-DR pathway of antigen-presenting cells in the patients' synovial tissue, and their HLA-DR genotype, not the disease type, appears to be the primary determinant of their HLA-DR-peptide repertoire. New insights into the naturally presented HLA-DR epitope repertoire in target tissues may allow the identification of pathogenic T cell epitopes, and this could lead to innovative therapeutic interventions. PMID:21081667

  2. Novel anti-infective molecule from innate immune cells as an antibiotic-alternative to control infections caused by Apicomplexa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With increasing needs for the global animal industry to address the regulatory restrictions on the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) in animal production, there is much interest to find alternatives to AGPs. To develop alternatives to antibiotics against the major poultry parasitic disease, ...

  3. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart bypass surgery creates a new route, called a bypass, for blood and oxygen to go around a blockage to reach your heart. ... heart is still beating. This is called off-pump coronary artery bypass, or OPCAB. To create the bypass graft: The doctor will take a ...

  4. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able ... resistant to several common antibiotics. To help prevent antibiotic resistance Don't use antibiotics for viruses like colds ...

  5. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... t help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new path for blood to flow ... more than one bypass. The results of the surgery usually are excellent. Many people remain symptom-free ...

  6. Coronary Artery Bypass

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 3 days in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Life After Bypass After bypass surgery, your doctor will recommend that you join a cardiac rehabilitation program. These programs help you make lifestyle changes ...

  7. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Antibiotic Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... these products really help. To Learn More about Antibiotic Resistance Get Smart About Antibiotics (Video) Fact Sheets and ...

  8. Clogging the enrichment bypass

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The issue that has come to be known as the bypass is the latest dispute in the continuing saga of uranium trade between the United States and the Commonwealth of Indepenent States. Bypass deals now being conducted by US utilities have drawn heavy criticism from the US Department of Commerce but are perfectly legal under the terms of the Suspension Agreements. Urged on by the United States Enrichment Corporation, the US DOC intends to stop, or at least severely restrict, bypass deals. Using a recent agreement with Kazakhstan as a case study, this article reviews the implications of such bypass deals.

  9. Laparoscopic Revision of Jejunoileal Bypass to Gastric Bypass

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2009-12-28

    Clinically Severe Obesity; Metabolic Complications After Jejunoileal Bypass; Nutritional Complications After Jejunoileal Bypass; Obesity Recidivism; Inadequate Initial Weight Loss; Intestinal Malabsorptive Syndrome; Protein Malnutrition

  10. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotics are medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, they can save lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able to resist the effects of an antibiotic. Using antibiotics can lead to resistance. ...

  11. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Heart bypass surgery begins with an incision made in the chest, with the breastbone cut exposing the heart. Next, a portion of the saphenous vein is ... used to bypass the blocked arteries in the heart. The venous graft is sewn to the aorta ...

  12. Flood Bypass Capacity Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siclari, A.; Hui, R.; Lund, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Large river flows can damage adjacent flood-prone areas, by exceeding river channel and levee capacities. Particularly large floods are difficult to contain in leveed river banks alone. Flood bypasses often can efficiently reduce flood risks, where excess river flow is diverted over a weir to bypasses, that incur much less damage and cost. Additional benefits of bypasses include ecosystem protection, agriculture, groundwater recharge and recreation. Constructing or expanding an existing bypass costs in land purchase easements, and levee setbacks. Accounting for such benefits and costs, this study develops a simple mathematical model for optimizing flood bypass capacity using benefit-cost and risk analysis. Application to the Yolo Bypass, an existing bypass along the Sacramento River in California, estimates optimal capacity that economically reduces flood damage and increases various benefits, especially for agriculture. Land availability is likely to limit bypass expansion. Compensation for landowners could relax such limitations. Other economic values could affect the optimal results, which are shown by sensitivity analysis on major parameters. By including land geography into the model, location of promising capacity expansions can be identified.

  13. Phosphorylation of BlaR1 in Manifestation of Antibiotic Resistance in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Its Abrogation by Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Marc A; Fishovitz, Jennifer; Llarrull, Leticia I; Xiao, Qiaobin; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2015-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), an important human pathogen, has evolved an inducible mechanism for resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. We report herein that the integral membrane protein BlaR1, the β-lactam sensor/signal transducer protein, is phosphorylated on exposure to β-lactam antibiotics. This event is critical to the onset of the induction of antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, we document that BlaR1 phosphorylation and the antibiotic-resistance phenotype are both reversed in the presence of synthetic protein kinase inhibitors of our design, restoring susceptibility of the organism to a penicillin, resurrecting it from obsolescence in treatment of these intransigent bacteria. PMID:27623311

  14. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saswati; Chattopadhyay, Madhab K.; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in sub-inhibitory concentrations acting as signaling molecules supporting the process of quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host–parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell, and so on). The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behavior of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and the genes that confer resistance to antibiotics

  15. Antibiotic Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work Contact Us ABOUT THE ISSUE What is Antibiotic Resistance? General Background Science of Resistance Glossary References POLICY ... for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance Reservoirs of Antibiotic Resistance Project (ROAR) INTERNATIONAL CHAPTERS APUA Chapter Network Africa ...

  16. Antibiotic Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific to women Antibiotics can lead to vaginal yeast infections. This happens because antibiotics kill the normal bacteria in the vagina and this causes yeast to grow rapidly. Symptoms of a yeast infection ...

  17. Gastric bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... your legs to help prevent blood clots from forming. You will receive shots of medicine to prevent ... diversion with duodenal switch Dumping syndrome References Buchwald H. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. In: Buchwald ...

  18. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... of this great vein will be used to bypass the blocked arteries in the heart. The venous graft is sewn to the aorta and to the affected coronary artery past the blocked site. The internal mammary ...

  19. Bypass Flow Study

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Schultz

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the fluid dynamics experiments in the MIR (Matched Index of-Refraction) flow system at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing, and turbulence models for the flow ratios between coolant channels and bypass gaps in the interstitial regions of typical prismatic standard fuel element (SFE) or upper reflector block geometries of typical Modular High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (MHTGR) in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. The experiments use Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to measure the velocity fields that will populate the bypass flow study database.

  20. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... in 30-day outcomes in high-risk patients randomized to off-pump versus on-pump coronary bypass ... Thiele H, Neumann-Schniedewind P, Jacobs S, et al. Randomized comparison of minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass ...

  1. Laparoscopic bypass pyeloureterostomy.

    PubMed

    Noh, Paul H; Shah, Anish K

    2013-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been increasingly applied in paediatric urology, including the treatment of ureteropelvic junction obstruction. To the best of our knowledge, we describe the first laparoscopic bypass pyeloureterostomy in a 3-month-old male infant, with giant hydronephrosis and high insertion of the ureter into the renal pelvis. PMID:22889709

  2. Heart bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines. Chest . 2012;141:e637S-e68S. Read More Angina Coronary heart disease Heart bypass surgery Heart failure - overview High blood cholesterol levels Smoking - ...

  3. Cardiopulmonary bypass in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pomini, F; Mercogliano, D; Cavalletti, C; Caruso, A; Pomini, P

    1996-01-01

    The cardiopathic patient can sustain acute heart failure during pregnancy. In such cases, if open heart operation is necessary to save the patient's life, the fetus could be seriously compromised after exposure to cardiopulmonary bypass. From 1958 to 1992, 69 reports of cardiac operations during pregnancy with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass have been published. Maternal mortality was 2.9%. Embryofetal mortality was 20.2%. Examining only the last 40 patients, maternal and embryofetal mortality were 0.0% and 12.5%, respectively. Embryofetal mortality was 24.0% when hypothermia was used, compared with 0.0% while operating in normothermia. Maternal mortality did not change. The use of hypothermia during cardiopulmonary bypass provoked uterine contractions in several patients. Hypothermia decreases O2 exchange through the placenta. Pump flow and mean arterial pressure during cardiopulmonary bypass seem to be the most important parameters that influence fetal oxygenation. We speculate that cardiac operation is not a contraindication to pregnancy prolongation. PMID:8561577

  4. Multiple strategies to activate gold nanoparticles as antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuyun; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-08-01

    Widespread antibiotic resistance calls for new strategies. Nanotechnology provides a chance to overcome antibiotic resistance by multiple antibiotic mechanisms. This paper reviews the progress in activating gold nanoparticles with nonantibiotic or antibiotic molecules to combat bacterial resistance, analyzes the gap between experimental achievements and real clinical application, and suggests some potential directions in developing antibacterial nanodrugs.

  5. Multiple strategies to activate gold nanoparticles as antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuyun; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-09-21

    Widespread antibiotic resistance calls for new strategies. Nanotechnology provides a chance to overcome antibiotic resistance by multiple antibiotic mechanisms. This paper reviews the progress in activating gold nanoparticles with nonantibiotic or antibiotic molecules to combat bacterial resistance, analyzes the gap between experimental achievements and real clinical application, and suggests some potential directions in developing antibacterial nanodrugs. PMID:23893008

  6. [Antibiotic pharmacoeconomics].

    PubMed

    Jahnz-Rózyk, Karina

    2008-11-01

    Today more than ever, doctors in the ambulatory care and hospitals must effectively manage the use of antibiotics to control costs and preserve their usefulness. To achieve this goal, antibiotic management must evolve from simplistic antibiotic cost containment to more complex, appropriate use program that are founded on clinical outcomes-based pharmacoeconomic analyses. The successful application of pharmacoeconomic principles to antimicrobial therapy requires maximizing therapeutic effectiveness while minimizing costs, with the primary on pharmacokinetic considerations. This article reviews the various pharmacoeconomic factors that affect antibiotic costs in relation to patients and institutions. Cost-effectiveness studies of macrolides in pulmonary infections are presented in this study to illustrate the utility of these analyses. PMID:19177784

  7. Antibiotics Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Viruses b) Bacteria c) Viruses and Bacteria 2. Bacteria are germs that cause colds and flu. a) ... The Flu c) Cold d) Strep Throat 4. Bacteria that cause infections can become resistant to antibiotics. ...

  8. Low-Voltage Bypass Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved bypass device provides low-resistance current shunt around low-voltage power cell when cell fails in open-circuit condition during operation. In comparison with older bypass devices for same application, this one weighs less, generates less heat, and has lower voltage drop (less resistance). Bypass device connected in parallel with power cell. Draws very little current during normal operation of cell.

  9. Natural Product Screening Reveals Naphthoquinone Complex I Bypass Factors.

    PubMed

    Vafai, Scott B; Mevers, Emily; Higgins, Kathleen W; Fomina, Yevgenia; Zhang, Jianming; Mandinova, Anna; Newman, David; Shaw, Stanley Y; Clardy, Jon; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of mitochondrial complex I is encountered in both rare and common diseases, but we have limited therapeutic options to treat this lesion to the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Idebenone and menadione are redox-active molecules capable of rescuing OXPHOS activity by engaging complex I-independent pathways of entry, often referred to as "complex I bypass." In the present study, we created a cellular model of complex I deficiency by using CRISPR genome editing to knock out Ndufa9 in mouse myoblasts, and utilized this cell line to develop a high-throughput screening platform for novel complex I bypass factors. We screened a library of ~40,000 natural product extracts and performed bioassay-guided fractionation on a subset of the top scoring hits. We isolated four plant-derived 1,4-naphthoquinone complex I bypass factors with structural similarity to menadione: chimaphilin and 3-chloro-chimaphilin from Chimaphila umbellata and dehydro-α-lapachone and dehydroiso-α-lapachone from Stereospermum euphoroides. We also tested a small number of structurally related naphthoquinones from commercial sources and identified two additional compounds with complex I bypass activity: 2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and 2-methoxy-3-methyl-1,4,-naphthoquinone. The six novel complex I bypass factors reported here expand this class of molecules and will be useful as tool compounds for investigating complex I disease biology. PMID:27622560

  10. Spiritual Bypass: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashwell, Craig S.; Glosoff, Harriet L.; Hammond, Cheree

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of spiritual bypass has received limited attention in the transpersonal psychology and counseling literature and has not been subjected to empirical inquiry. This study examines the phenomenon of spiritual bypass by considering how spirituality, mindfulness, alexithymia (emotional restrictiveness), and narcissism work together to…

  11. The Double Life of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Mee-Ngan F.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a persistent health care problem worldwide. Evidence for the negative consequences of subtherapeutic feeding in livestock production has been mounting while the antibiotic pipeline is drying up. In recent years, there has been a paradigm shift in our perception of antibiotics. Apart from its roles in self-defense, antibiotics also serve as inter-microbial signaling molecules, regulators of gene expression, microbial food sources, and as mediators of host immune response. “The time may come when penicillin can be bought by anyone in the shops. Then there is the danger that the ignorant man may easily under-dose himself and by exposing his microbes to nonlethal quantities of the drug make them resistant.”~Alexander Fleming PMID:24003650

  12. Designing Safer and Greener Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Andrew; Gathergood, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Since the production of the first pharmaceutically active molecules at the beginning of the 1900s, drug molecules and their metabolites have been observed in the environment in significant concentrations. In this review, the persistence of antibiotics in the environment and their associated effects on ecosystems, bacterial resistance and health effects will be examined. Solutions to these problems will also be discussed, including the pharmaceutical industries input, green chemistry, computer modeling and representative ionic liquid research. PMID:27029311

  13. Breathless after bypass

    PubMed Central

    Pearse, Simon G; Missouris, Constantinos; Qureshi, Muhammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old normotensive, non-athletic man presented to the cardiology clinic with exertional dyspnoea and chest discomfort. Echocardiography revealed mild left ventricular hypertrophy with good systolic function but with regional wall motion abnormalities suggesting ischaemia. Coronary angiography showed significant three-vessel disease. He underwent coronary artery bypass surgery, which was complicated by recurrent pericardial and pleural effusions, requiring a pericardial window procedure. Over the following year he became increasingly oedematous and breathless. On ECG the complexes were low voltage with impaired R wave progression and atrial fibrillation. Echocardiography revealed progression of the left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) with a bright myocardium and restrictive filling pattern. MRI scanning confirmed the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis. He was referred for transplant but was considered unsuitable due to extensive mediastinal scarring. This case demonstrates the importance of a high index of suspicion for amyloidosis, especially in patients with unexplained LVH. Cardiac MRI or biopsy may expedite the diagnosis. PMID:24895396

  14. Cardiopulmonary Bypass Without Heparin.

    PubMed

    Rehfeldt, Kent H; Barbara, David W

    2016-03-01

    Due to familiarity, short half-life, ease of monitoring, and the availability of a reversal agent, heparin remains the anticoagulant of choice for cardiac operations requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, occasionally patients require CPB but should not receive heparin, most often because of acute or subacute heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). In these cases, if it is not feasible to wait for the disappearance of HIT antibodies, an alternative anticoagulant must be selected. A number of non-heparin anticoagulant options have been explored. However, current recommendations suggest the use of a direct thrombin inhibitor such as bivalirudin. This review describes the use of heparin alternatives for the conduct of CPB with a focus on the direct thrombin inhibitors. PMID:26872706

  15. Bypass diode integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Protective bypass diodes and mounting configurations which are applicable for use with photovoltaic modules having power dissipation requirements in the 5 to 50 watt range were investigated. Using PN silicon and Schottky diode characterization data on packaged diodes and diode chips, typical diodes were selected as representative for each range of current carrying capacity, an appropriate heat dissipating mounting concept along with its environmental enclosure was defined, and a thermal analysis relating junction temperature as a function of power dissipation was performed. In addition, the heat dissipating mounting device dimensions were varied to determine the effect on junction temperature. The results of the analysis are presented as a set of curves indicating junction temperature as a function of power dissipation for each diode package.

  16. Antibiotics From Microbes: Converging To Kill

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary As genetically encoded small molecules, antibiotics are phenotypes that have resulted from mutation and natural selection. Advances in genetics, biochemistry, and bioinformatics have connected hundreds of antibiotics to the gene clusters that encode them, allowing these molecules to be analyzed using the tools of evolutionary biology. This review surveys examples of convergent evolution from microbially produced antibiotics, including the convergence of distinct gene clusters on similar phenotypes and the merger of distinct gene clusters into a single functional unit. Examining antibiotics through an evolutionary lens highlights the versatility of biosynthetic pathways, reveals lessons for combating antibiotic resistance, and provides an entry point for studying the natural roles of these natural products. PMID:19695947

  17. Photovoltaic module bypass diode encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The design and processing techniques necessary to incorporate bypass diodes within the module encapsulant are presented. The Semicon PN junction diode cells were selected. Diode junction to heat spreader thermal resistance measurements, performed on a variety of mounted diode chip types and sizes, have yielded values which are consistently below 1 deg C per watt, but show some instability when thermally cycled over the temperature range from -40 to 150 deg C. Three representative experimental modules, each incorporating integral bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies of various sizes, were designed. Thermal testing of these modules enabled the formulation of a recommended heat spreader plate sizing relationship. The production cost of three encapsulated bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies were compared with similarly rated externally mounted packaged diodes. It is concluded that, when proper designed and installed, these bypass diode devices will improve the overall reliability of a terrestrial array over a 20 year design lifetime.

  18. How to accurately bypass damage

    PubMed Central

    Broyde, Suse; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation can cause cancer through DNA damage — specifically, by linking adjacent thymine bases. Crystal structures show how the enzyme DNA polymerase η accurately bypasses such lesions, offering protection. PMID:20577203

  19. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... MIDCAB; Robot assisted coronary artery bypass; RACAB; Keyhole heart surgery ... To perform this surgery: The heart surgeon will make a 3- to 5-inch-long surgical cut in the left part of your chest between your ribs ...

  20. Facts about Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trends and Cost Español: Datos breves Facts about Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotic resistance has been called one of the world’s most ... antibiotic use is a key strategy to control antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance in children is of particular concern ...

  1. Bypass rewiring and robustness of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Park, Junsang; Hahn, Sang Geun

    2016-08-01

    A concept of bypass rewiring is introduced, and random bypass rewiring is analytically and numerically investigated with simulations. Our results show that bypass rewiring makes networks robust against removal of nodes including random failures and attacks. In particular, random bypass rewiring connects all nodes except the removed nodes on an even degree infinite network and makes the percolation threshold 0 for arbitrary occupation probabilities. In our example, the even degree network is more robust than the original network with random bypass rewiring, while the original network is more robust than the even degree networks without random bypass. We propose a greedy bypass rewiring algorithm which guarantees the maximum size of the largest component at each step, assuming which node will be removed next is unknown. The simulation result shows that the greedy bypass rewiring algorithm improves the robustness of the autonomous system of the Internet under attacks more than random bypass rewiring. PMID:27627320

  2. Postoperative bypass bleeding: a bypass-associated dilutional (BAD) coagulopathy?

    PubMed

    Bull, Brian S; Hay, Karen L; Herrmann, Paul C

    2009-01-01

    A number of associations with post-bypass bleeding have been described in the accompanying paper. Herein we hypothesize that dilution is an underlying cause through a malign series of bypass-associated events. Heparinized blood behaves anomalously when diluted. Clotting times first shorten somewhat, then--as the dilution of whole blood approaches 50%--rapidly lengthen to unclottability. During cardiopulmonary bypass, low blood volume patients are at a significant risk of clotting factor dilution which will always be more severe than the level of whole blood dilution. If severe enough, this dilution may lower plasma clotting factors to a critical level and may result in excess protamine administration, secondary to overestimation of heparin. The presence of un-neutralized protamine combined with critically lowered clotting factors leads to marked coagulopathy. PMID:19699663

  3. Heat exchanger bypass test report

    SciTech Connect

    De Vries, M.L.

    1995-01-26

    This test report documents the results that were obtained while conducting the test procedure which bypassed the heat exchangers in the HC-21C sludge stabilization process. The test was performed on November 15, 1994 using WHC-SD-CP-TC-031, ``Heat Exchanger Bypass Test Procedure.`` The primary objective of the test procedure was to determine if the heat exchangers were contributing to condensation of moisture in the off-gas line. This condensation was observed in the rotameters. Also, a secondary objective was to determine if temperatures at the rotameters would be too high and damage them or make them inaccurate without the heat exchangers in place.

  4. Technology Solutions Case Study: Preventing Thermal Bypass

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-10-01

    This project highlights the importance of continuous air barriers in full alignment with insulation to prevent thermal bypasses and achieve high energy performance, and recommends use of ENERGY STAR's Thermal Bypass Inspection Checklist.

  5. POST CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS GRAFT STUDY (CABG)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relative effectiveness of moderate versus more aggressive lipid lowering, and of low dose anticoagulation versus placebo, in delaying saphenous vein coronary bypass graft atherosclerosis and preventing occlusion of saphenous grafts of patients with saphenous vein coronary bypass ...

  6. Psychological Effects of Intestinal Bypass Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wampler, Richard S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Preoperative and postoperative intestinal bypass patients were evaluated. Results suggest that postoperative bypass patients have improved psychological health and an increased sense of freedom and well-being but may need assistance in improving self-concepts. (Author)

  7. MedlinePlus: Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Blood Institute Start Here Coronary Artery Bypass (Texas Heart Institute) Also in Spanish Coronary Artery Bypass ... and Blood Institute) Specifics Limited-Access Heart Surgery (Texas Heart Institute) Also in Spanish Types of Coronary ...

  8. Colonic pseudo-obstruction: a new complication of jejunoileal bypass.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, R E; Benfield, J R; Nicell, P; Bray, G A

    1975-01-01

    Five female patients ranging in age from 25 to 44 years are reported in whom jejunoileal bypass (three end-to-side and two end-to end), performed for morbid obesity, was complicated 1 1/2 to three years later by symptoms of colonic pseudo-obstruction. In each size, the colon was markedly elongated, dilated, and atonic but with no demonstrate organic obstruction. The cause of this complication is not known. Full thickness rectal biopsy in one case showed normal intrinsic nervous plexuses and ganglia. Serum electrolytes were normal. Functional and defunctionalized small bowel were not involved. Symptoms varied from complete colonic paralysis to incapacitating crampy abdominal pain and distention. In the three patients with end-to-side bypass, dilatation affected the entire colon, while, in the two patients with end-to-end bypass, the dilatation was localized to colon distal to the anastomosis with the defunctionalized small bowel. Resection of the affected portion of colon in one case resulted in recurrence distal to the new site of drainage of defunctioned bowel. Treatment with anti-anaerobe antibiotics in two cases produced dramatic but temporary relief of symptoms. PMID:1238312

  9. [Forefoot gangrene and infra-crural bypass: simultaneous amputation].

    PubMed

    Jacobs, M J

    1996-01-01

    Patients presented for amputation mostly have chronic limb ischaemia caused by atherosclerosis, with signs of severe arterial insufficiency including rest pain, non-healing skin lesions, ulceration or gangrene. Foot infections, especially in diabetic patients, are often multimicrobial, deeply invasive and frequently require aggressive measures, like debridement and drainage or partial open forefoot amputation in addition to broad-spectrum antibiotics, in patients with critical limb ischaemia and limited necrosis and forefoot gangrene, distal bypass surgery is the treatment of choice. The main question is whether amputation should be performed simultaneously or in a secondary stage. Our own experience deals with 342 femorocrural and femoropedal bypass grafts for the treatment of critical limb ischaemia. The results showed no significant difference in graft patency between crural and pedal grafts. Clinical factors like diabetes mellitus, poor distal run-off and site of the distal anastomosis had no adverse effect on the functioning and patency of the graft. In this series we found that in diabetic patients significantly more amputations were required because of persistent foot infection. Since in these patients amputation was performed in a secondary stage, we changed our policy to simultaneous amputation. After completion of the bypass, closure and coverage of all the wounds, the gangrenous part is amputated. In case of deep, wet or infectious gangrene of the forefoot, an open transmetatarsal amputation is performed. Using this approach we have further increased limb-salvage and especially the number of usuable limbs. PMID:8713389

  10. Compact bypass-flow filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, W. G.; Ulanovsky, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Annular filter consisting of stacked rings separates particulates from bypass fluid passing through it in radial direction without slowing down main flow across unimpeded flow of fluid through its center. Applications include fluidized bed reactors, equipment for catalyst operations, and water purification.

  11. Interventions in Infrainguinal Bypass Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Huelsbeck, S. Order, B.-M.; Jahnke, T.

    2006-02-15

    The interventional radiologist plays an important role in the detection and prevention of infrainguinal bypass failure. Early detection and evaluation of flow-limiting lesions effectively preserve graft (venous bypass and polyester or expanded polytetrafluoroethylene bypass) patency by identifying stenoses before occlusion occurs. Delay in treatment of the at-risk graft may result in graft failure and a reduced chance of successful revascularization. For this reason, surveillance protocols form an important part of follow-up after infrainguinal bypass surgery. As well as having an understanding of the application of imaging techniques including ultrasound, MR angiography, CT angiography and digital subtraction angiography, the interventional radiologist should have detailed knowledge of the minimally invasive therapeutic options. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), or alternatively cutting balloon angioplasty, is the interventional treatment of choice in prevention of graft failure and occlusion. Further alternatives include metallic stent placement, fibrinolysis, and mechanical thrombectomy. Primary assisted patency rates following PTA can be up to 65% at 5 years. When the endovascular approach is unsuccessful, these therapeutic options are complemented by surgical procedures including vein patch revision, jump grafting, or placement of a new graft.

  12. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy studies on magnetite/Ag/antibiotic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, Olena; Jurga-Stopa, Justyna; Coy, Emerson; Peplinska, Barbara; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Jurga, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    This article presents a study on the detection of antibiotics in magnetite/Ag/antibiotic nanocomposites using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Antibiotics with different spectra of antimicrobial activities, including rifampicin, doxycycline, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone, were studied. Mechanical mixtures of antibiotics and magnetite/Ag nanocomposites, as well as antibiotics and magnetite nanopowder, were investigated in order to identify the origin of FTIR bands. FTIR spectroscopy was found to be an appropriate technique for this task. The spectra of the magnetite/Ag/antibiotic nanocomposites exhibited very weak (for doxycycline, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone) or even no (for rifampicin) antibiotic bands. This FTIR "invisibility" of antibiotics is ascribed to their adsorbed state. FTIR and Raman measurements show altered Csbnd O, Cdbnd O, and Csbnd S bonds, indicating adsorption of the antibiotic molecules on the magnetite/Ag nanocomposite structure. In addition, a potential mechanism through which antibiotic molecules interact with magnetite/Ag nanoparticle surfaces is proposed.

  13. Bacteria subsisting on antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Gautam; Sommer, Morten O A; Oluwasegun, Rantimi D; Church, George M

    2008-04-01

    Antibiotics are a crucial line of defense against bacterial infections. Nevertheless, several antibiotics are natural products of microorganisms that have as yet poorly appreciated ecological roles in the wider environment. We isolated hundreds of soil bacteria with the capacity to grow on antibiotics as a sole carbon source. Of 18 antibiotics tested, representing eight major classes of natural and synthetic origin, 13 to 17 supported the growth of clonal bacteria from each of 11 diverse soils. Bacteria subsisting on antibiotics are surprisingly phylogenetically diverse, and many are closely related to human pathogens. Furthermore, each antibiotic-consuming isolate was resistant to multiple antibiotics at clinically relevant concentrations. This phenomenon suggests that this unappreciated reservoir of antibiotic-resistance determinants can contribute to the increasing levels of multiple antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria. PMID:18388292

  14. Antibiotics and the burn patient.

    PubMed

    Ravat, François; Le-Floch, Ronan; Vinsonneau, Christophe; Ainaud, Pierre; Bertin-Maghit, Marc; Carsin, Hervé; Perro, Gérard

    2011-02-01

    Infection is a major problem in burn care and especially when it is due to bacteria with hospital-acquired multi-resistance to antibiotics. Moreover, when these bacteria are Gram-negative organisms, the most effective molecules are 20 years old and there is little hope of any new product available even in the distant future. Therefore, it is obvious that currently available antibiotics should not be misused. With this aim in mind, the following review was conducted by a group of experts from the French Society for Burn Injuries (SFETB). It examined key points addressing the management of antibiotics for burn patients: when to use or not, time of onset, bactericidia, combination, adaptation, de-escalation, treatment duration and regimen based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of these compounds. The authors also considered antibioprophylaxis and some other key points such as: infection diagnosis criteria, bacterial inoculae and local treatment. French guidelines for the use of antibiotics in burn patients have been designed up from this work. PMID:20510518

  15. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... induced by natural or human activity on the ecology and living organisms. Ecology The study of the relationships and interactions between ... antibiotics The Cost of Resistance Science of Resistance Ecology Antibiotics in Agriculture Antibacterial Agents Glossary References Web ...

  16. MedlinePlus: Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... or not using them properly, can add to antibiotic resistance . This happens when bacteria change and become able ... ports Pseudomembranous colitis Sensitivity analysis Related Health Topics Antibiotic Resistance Bacterial Infections Medicines National Institutes of Health The ...

  17. Antibiotic-associated encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Shamik; Darby, R Ryan; Raibagkar, Pooja; Gonzalez Castro, L Nicolas; Berkowitz, Aaron L

    2016-03-01

    Delirium is a common and costly complication of hospitalization. Although medications are a known cause of delirium, antibiotics are an underrecognized class of medications associated with delirium. In this article, we comprehensively review the clinical, radiologic, and electrophysiologic features of antibiotic-associated encephalopathy (AAE). AAE can be divided into 3 unique clinical phenotypes: encephalopathy commonly accompanied by seizures or myoclonus arising within days after antibiotic administration (caused by cephalosporins and penicillin); encephalopathy characterized by psychosis arising within days of antibiotic administration (caused by quinolones, macrolides, and procaine penicillin); and encephalopathy accompanied by cerebellar signs and MRI abnormalities emerging weeks after initiation of antibiotics (caused by metronidazole). We correlate these 3 clinical phenotypes with underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of antibiotic neurotoxicity. Familiarity with these types of antibiotic toxicity can improve timely diagnosis of AAE and prompt antibiotic discontinuation, reducing the time patients spend in the delirious state. PMID:26888997

  18. Combating Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... for infectious diseases. back to top Antibiotics Fight Bacteria, Not Viruses Antibiotics are meant to be used ... treat strep throat, which is caused by streptococcal bacteria, and skin infections caused by staphylococcal bacteria. Although ...

  19. Finding alternatives to antibiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens requires new treatments. The availability of new antibiotics has severely declined, and so alternatives to antibiotics need to be considered in both animal agriculture and human medicine. Products for disease prevention are different than products for d...

  20. Antibiotic resistant in microorganisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial agents are necessary for use in veterinary medicine including the production of food producing animals. Antibiotic use is indicated for the treatment of bacterial target organisms and/or disease for which the antibiotic was developed. However, an unintended consequence of antibiotic ...

  1. Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the Farm Get Smart About Antibiotics Week Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... Many ear infections Top of Page Questions about Antibiotic Resistance Examples of How Antibiotic Resistance Spreads Click for ...

  2. Noise analysis of antibiotic permeation through bacterial channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestorovich, Ekaterina M.; Danelon, Christophe; Winterhalter, Mathias; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2003-05-01

    Statistical analysis of high-resolution current recordings from a single ion channel reconstituted into a planar lipid membrane allows us to study transport of antibiotics at the molecular detail. Working with the general bacterial porin, OmpF, we demonstrate that addition of zwitterionic β-lactam antibiotics to the membrane-bathing solution introduces transient interruptions in the small-ion current through the channel. Time-resolved measurements reveal that one antibiotic molecule blocks one of the monomers in the OmpF trimer for characteristic times from microseconds to hundreds of microseconds. Spectral noise analysis enables us to perform measurements over a wide range of changing parameters. In all cases studied, the residence time of an antibiotic molecule in the channel exceeds the estimated time for free diffusion by orders of magnitude. This demonstrates that, in analogy to substrate-specific channels that evolved to bind specific metabolite molecules, antibiotics have 'evolved' to be channel-specific. The charge distribution of an efficient antibiotic complements the charge distribution at the narrowest part of the bacterial porin. Interaction of these charges creates a zone of attraction inside the channel and compensates the penetrating molecule's entropy loss and desolvation energy. This facilitates antibiotic translocation through the narrowest part of the channel and accounts for higher antibiotic permeability rates.

  3. Extraction and detection of antibiotics in the rhizosphere metabolome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important mechanism of natural disease suppression is the production of antibiotics by soil microbes. Antibiotics are small organic molecules of microbial origin that at low concentrations are deleterious to the growth or metabolism of other microorganisms. Soilborne pathogens are sensitive to ma...

  4. Bypass transition to turbulence and research Desiderata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morkovin, M. V.

    1985-01-01

    Bypass transitions are seldom mentioned in texts or meetings on instability and transition to wall turbulence. The nature of a number of bypass transitions is illustrated by example. Until this characteristics is truly understood predicting transition on the basis of theory or statistically inadequate correlations (as they all are) entails risks that should be considered in justifying any design involving transition. A historical overview of bypass transition identified on blunt bodies is given.

  5. Ramjet bypass duct and preburner configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlando, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A combined turbofan and ramjet aircraft engine includes a forward bypass duct which allows the engine to operate more efficiently during the turbofan mode of operation. By mounting a ramjet preburner in the forward duct and isolating this duct from the turbofan bypass air, a transition from turbofan operation to ramjet operation can take place at lower flight Mach numbers without incurring pressure losses or blockage in the turbofan bypass air.

  6. Molecular Regulation of Antibiotic Biosynthesis in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Chandra, Govind; Niu, Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptomycetes are the most abundant source of antibiotics. Typically, each species produces several antibiotics, with the profile being species specific. Streptomyces coelicolor, the model species, produces at least five different antibiotics. We review the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in S. coelicolor and other, nonmodel streptomycetes in the light of recent studies. The biosynthesis of each antibiotic is specified by a large gene cluster, usually including regulatory genes (cluster-situated regulators [CSRs]). These are the main point of connection with a plethora of generally conserved regulatory systems that monitor the organism's physiology, developmental state, population density, and environment to determine the onset and level of production of each antibiotic. Some CSRs may also be sensitive to the levels of different kinds of ligands, including products of the pathway itself, products of other antibiotic pathways in the same organism, and specialized regulatory small molecules such as gamma-butyrolactones. These interactions can result in self-reinforcing feed-forward circuitry and complex cross talk between pathways. The physiological signals and regulatory mechanisms may be of practical importance for the activation of the many cryptic secondary metabolic gene cluster pathways revealed by recent sequencing of numerous Streptomyces genomes. PMID:23471619

  7. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines. Chest . ... bypass surgery - minimally invasive Heart failure - overview High blood cholesterol ...

  8. Biotechnology of polyketides: New breath of life for the novel antibiotic genetic pathways discovery through metagenomics

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Elisângela Soares; Schuch, Viviane; de Macedo Lemos, Eliana Gertrudes

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of secondary metabolites produced by microorganisms (e.g., penicillin in 1928) and the beginning of their industrial application (1940) opened new doors to what has been the main medication source for the treatment of infectious diseases and tumors. In fact, approximately 80 years after the discovery of the first antibiotic compound, and despite all of the warnings about the failure of the “goose that laid the golden egg,” the potential of this wealth is still inexorable: simply adjust the focus from “micro” to “nano”, that means changing the look from microorganisms to nanograms of DNA. Then, the search for new drugs, driven by genetic engineering combined with metagenomic strategies, shows us a way to bypass the barriers imposed by methodologies limited to isolation and culturing. However, we are far from solving the problem of supplying new molecules that are effective against the plasticity of multi- or pan-drug-resistant pathogens. Although the first advances in genetic engineering date back to 1990, there is still a lack of high-throughput methods to speed up the screening of new genes and design new molecules by recombination of pathways. In addition, it is necessary an increase in the variety of heterologous hosts and improvements throughout the full drug discovery pipeline. Among numerous studies focused on this subject, those on polyketide antibiotics stand out for the large technical-scientific efforts that established novel solutions for the transfer/engineering of major metabolic pathways using transposons and other episomes, overcoming one of the main methodological constraints for the heterologous expression of major pathways. In silico prediction analysis of three-dimensional enzymatic structures and advances in sequencing technologies have expanded access to the metabolic potential of microorganisms. PMID:24688489

  9. Antibiotic resistance and virulence: Understanding the link and its consequences for prophylaxis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Guillard, Thomas; Pons, Stéphanie; Roux, Damien; Pier, Gerald B; Skurnik, David

    2016-07-01

    "Antibiotic resistance is usually associated with a fitness cost" is frequently accepted as common knowledge in the field of infectious diseases. However, with the advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing that allows for a comprehensive analysis of bacterial pathogenesis at the genome scale, including antibiotic resistance genes, it appears that this paradigm might not be as solid as previously thought. Recent studies indicate that antibiotic resistance is able to enhance bacterial fitness in vivo with a concomitant increase in virulence during infections. As a consequence, strategies to minimize antibiotic resistance turn out to be not as simple as initially believed. Indeed, decreased antibiotic use may not be sufficient to let susceptible strains outcompete the resistant ones. Here, we put in perspective these findings and review alternative approaches, such as preventive and therapeutic anti-bacterial immunotherapies that have the potential to by-pass the classic antibiotics. PMID:27248008

  10. Absence of a role for DNA polymerase II in SOS-induced translesion bypass of phi X174.

    PubMed Central

    Kow, Y W; Faundez, G; Hays, S; Bonner, C A; Goodman, M F; Wallace, S S

    1993-01-01

    In order to examine the possible role of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase II in SOS-induced translesion bypass, Weigle reactivation and mutation induction were measured with single-stranded phi X174 transfecting DNA containing individual lesions. No decrease in bypass of thymine glycol or cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the absence of DNA polymerase II was observed. Furthermore, DNA polymerase II did not affect bypass of abasic sites when either survival or mutagenesis was the endpoint. Lastly, repair of gapped DNA molecules, intermediates in methyl-directed mismatch repair, was also unaffected by the presence or absence of DNA polymerase II. PMID:8419305

  11. Electroencephalographic seizures during cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Stockard, J.; Calanchini, P.; Bickford, R.; Billinger, T.

    1974-01-01

    Eleven cardiac operations are reported in which there was electroencephalographic and/or clinical evidence of seizure activity during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). In four patients seizure activity appeared after acute episodes of cerebral ischaemia resulting from either hypotension or pump-generated emboli occurring at the beginning of CPB, or from air embolism occurring at the end of CPB when the myocardium was closed and defibrillated. In the remaining seven patients the seizures appeared to result from the synergistic action of a toxic substance in the perfusate with pre-existing or CPB-induced alterations in cerebral physiology. Images PMID:4819907

  12. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives.

    PubMed

    Diarra, Moussa S; Malouin, François

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics (growth promoters) in feed need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily be spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2600 regulated chicken producers who have access to several antibiotics approved as feed additives for poultry. Feed recipes and mixtures vary greatly geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While some reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens) have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno-stimulatory activities. PMID:24987390

  13. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Diarra, Moussa S.; Malouin, François

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics (growth promoters) in feed need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily be spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2600 regulated chicken producers who have access to several antibiotics approved as feed additives for poultry. Feed recipes and mixtures vary greatly geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While some reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens) have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno-stimulatory activities. PMID:24987390

  14. Bypassing An Open-Circuit Power Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannemacher, Harry E.

    1994-01-01

    Collection of bypass circuits enables battery consisting series string of cells to continue to function when one of its cells fails in open-circuit (high-resistance) condition. Basic idea simply to shunt current around defective cell to prevent open circuit from turning off battery altogether. Bypass circuits dissipate little power and are nearly immune to false activation.

  15. 40 CFR 403.17 - Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Bypass. 403.17 Section 403.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PRETREATMENT REGULATIONS FOR EXISTING AND NEW SOURCES OF POLLUTION § 403.17 Bypass....

  16. 40 CFR 403.17 - Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Bypass. 403.17 Section 403.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PRETREATMENT REGULATIONS FOR EXISTING AND NEW SOURCES OF POLLUTION § 403.17 Bypass....

  17. 40 CFR 403.17 - Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bypass. 403.17 Section 403.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PRETREATMENT REGULATIONS FOR EXISTING AND NEW SOURCES OF POLLUTION § 403.17 Bypass....

  18. 40 CFR 403.17 - Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Bypass. 403.17 Section 403.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PRE-TREAT-MENT REGULATIONS FOR EXIST-ING AND NEW SOURCES OF POLLUTION § 403.17 Bypass....

  19. 40 CFR 403.17 - Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Bypass. 403.17 Section 403.17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PRE-TREAT-MENT REGULATIONS FOR EXIST-ING AND NEW SOURCES OF POLLUTION § 403.17 Bypass....

  20. Antibiotic-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Vogel, L C

    1995-01-01

    Diarrhea is a common complication of antibiotic therapy and can range from mild soiling of a cast to severe and life-threatening pseudomembranous colitis. Although clindamycin is the most notorious, almost all antibiotics, particularly penicillins and cephalosporins, may also be responsible (Bartlett, 1992; Kelly, Pothoulakis, & LaMont, 1994). Because of the frequent use of these antibiotics in orthopaedic patients, antibiotic-associated enteric disease is a common problem in this population. About 15% to 25% of cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhea are caused by Clostridium difficile (Bartlett, 1992; George, 1984; Kelly et al., 1994). The majority of patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea have no identifiable etiologic agent. Salmonella, enterotoxin-producing Clostridium perfringens (Borriello et al., 1984) and Candida albicans (Danna et al., 1991) have rarely been identified as causative agents. This article describes the role of C. difficile as an enteric pathogen and its spectrum of clinical disease, including diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of nosocomial transmission. PMID:7761131

  1. Frontline antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    MacGowan, Alasdair; Albur, Maha

    2013-06-01

    The need to use front-line antibiotics wisely has never been greater. Antibiotic resistance and multi-drug resistant infection, driven by antibiotic use, remain major public health and professional concerns. To overcome these infection problems, use of older antibiotics active against multi drug-resistant pathogens is increasing - for example, colistin, fosfomycin, pivmecillinam, pristinamycin, temocillin and oral tetracyclines. The number of new antibacterials reaching clinical practice has reduced significantly in the last 20 years, most being focused on therapy of Gram-positive infection - eg linezolid, daptomycin, telavancin and ceftaroline. Recent guidance on antibiotic stewardship in NHS trusts in England is likely to provide a backdrop to antibiotic use in hospitals in the next 5 years. PMID:23760700

  2. Biotic acts of antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Aminov, Rustam I.

    2013-01-01

    Biological functions of antibiotics are not limited to killing. The most likely function of antibiotics in natural microbial ecosystems is signaling. Does this signaling function of antibiotics also extend to the eukaryotic – in particular mammalian – cells? In this review, the host modulating properties of three classes of antibiotics (macrolides, tetracyclines, and β-lactams) will be briefly discussed. Antibiotics can be effective in treatment of a broad spectrum of diseases and pathological conditions other than those of infectious etiology and, in this capacity, may find widespread applications beyond the intended antimicrobial use. This use, however, should not compromise the primary function antibiotics are used for. The biological background for this inter-kingdom signaling is also discussed. PMID:23966991

  3. [Rational use of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Walger, P

    2016-06-01

    International and national campaigns draw attention worldwide to the rational use of the available antibiotics. This has been stimulated by the high prevalence rates of drug-resistant pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), a threatening spread of development of resistance in Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria and the selection of Clostridium difficile with a simultaneous clear reduction in the development of new antibiotics. The implementation of antibiotic stewardship programs aims to maintain their effectiveness by a rational use of the available antibiotics. The essential target of therapy with antibiotics is successful treatment of individual patients with bacterial infections. The optimal clinical treatment results can only be achieved when the toxicity, selection of pathogens and development of resistance are minimized. This article presents the principles of a rational antibiotic therapy. PMID:27246321

  4. DNA-aptamers binding aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Nikolaus, Nadia; Strehlitz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given. PMID:24566637

  5. Engineered riboswitch as a gene-regulatory platform for reducing antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance (AR), the ability of a microorganism to withstand the effects of antibiotics, is a growing and increasingly serious global public health problem. Enzymatic activation of antibiotics though the production of β-lactamase is one of the main mechanisms causing AR. Synthetic riboswitch containing aptazyme is constructed in E. coli to regulate the expression of β-lactamase through small molecule-aptamer interactions, which sharply reduces the antibiotic resistance of the engineered bacteria. PMID:24549625

  6. Post-Gastric Bypass Hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Rariy, Chevon M; Rometo, David; Korytkowski, Mary

    2016-02-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem worldwide. Obesity-related illnesses, such as coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, stroke, sleep apnea, and several forms of cancer (endometrial, breast, and colon), contribute to a significant number of deaths in the USA. Bariatric surgery, including the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) procedure, has demonstrated significant improvements in obesity and obesity-related co-morbidities and is becoming more popular as the number of obese individuals rises. Despite the reported benefits of bariatric surgery, there are potential complications that physicians need to be aware of as the number of patients undergoing these procedures continues to increase. One challenging and potentially life-threatening complication that to date is not well understood is post-RYGB surgery hypoglycemia (PGBH). In this review, we will present the definition, historical perspective, diagnostic approach, currently available treatment options, and anecdotal assessment and treatment algorithm for this disorder. PMID:26868861

  7. Setamycin, a new antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Otoguro, K; Nishikiori, T; Oiwa, R; Iwai, Y

    1981-10-01

    A new antibiotic, setamycin, was extracted from the mycelia of a rare actinomycete strain KM-6054. The antibiotic, the molecular formula of which was found to be C42H61NO12 (tentative), is a yellow powder showing activity against some fungi, trichomonads and weakly against Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:7309621

  8. The future of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Spellberg, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to spread even as society is experiencing a market failure of new antibiotic research and development (R&D). Scientific, economic, and regulatory barriers all contribute to the antibiotic market failure. Scientific solutions to rekindle R&D include finding new screening strategies to identify novel antibiotic scaffolds and transforming the way we think about treating infections, such that the goal is to disarm the pathogen without killing it or modulate the host response to the organism without targeting the organism for destruction. Future economic strategies are likely to focus on 'push' incentives offered by public-private partnerships as well as increasing pricing by focusing development on areas of high unmet need. Such strategies can also help protect new antibiotics from overuse after marketing. Regulatory reform is needed to re-establish feasible and meaningful traditional antibiotic pathways, to create novel limited-use pathways that focus on highly resistant infections, and to harmonize regulatory standards across nations. We need new antibiotics with which to treat our patients. But we also need to protect those new antibiotics from misuse when they become available. If we want to break the cycle of resistance and change the current landscape, disruptive approaches that challenge long-standing dogma will be needed. PMID:25043962

  9. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  10. Replacement for antibiotics: Lysozyme

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics have been fed at subtherapeutic levels to swine as growth promoters for more than 60 years, and the majority of swine produced in the U.S. receive antibiotics in their feed at some point in their production cycle. These compounds benefit the producers by minimizing production losses by ...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4310 - Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure gauge is a device used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery to measure the pressure of the blood perfusing... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass coronary pressure...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4205 - Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector. 870.4205... bypass bubble detector. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass bubble detector is a device used to detect bubbles in the arterial return line of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. (b)...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4380 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump speed control is a... control the speed of blood pumps used in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  20. Antibiotic de-escalation.

    PubMed

    Masterton, Robert G

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic de-escalation is a mechanism whereby the provision of effective initial antibiotic treatment is achieved while avoiding unnecessary antibiotic use that would promote the development of resistance. It is a key element within antimicrobial stewardship programs and treatment paradigms for serious sepsis. The embodiment of de-escalation is that based on microbiology results around the day 3 therapy point; the empiric antibiotic(s) that were started are stopped or reduced in number and/or narrowed in spectrum. Data are presented here which demonstrate that de-escalation is clinically effective and appropriate. However, the need for further studies, particularly in terms of realization of full benefits as well as implementation tools, is highlighted. De-escalation ought now to form a part of routine antimicrobial management, though how best to do it and the full breadth and scope of benefits remain to be identified. PMID:21144991

  1. tRNAs as Antibiotic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Shaileja; Reader, John

    2014-01-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are central players in the protein translation machinery and as such are prominent targets for a large number of natural and synthetic antibiotics. This review focuses on the role of tRNAs in bacterial antibiosis. We will discuss examples of antibiotics that target multiple stages in tRNA biology from tRNA biogenesis and modification, mature tRNAs, aminoacylation of tRNA as well as prevention of proper tRNA function by small molecules binding to the ribosome. Finally, the role of deacylated tRNAs in the bacterial “stringent response” mechanism that can lead to bacteria displaying antibiotic persistence phenotypes will be discussed. PMID:25547494

  2. MHD Energy Bypass Scramjet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.; Bogdanoff, David W.; Park, Chul; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Revolutionary rather than evolutionary changes in propulsion systems are most likely to decrease cost of space transportation and to provide a global range capability. Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion is a revolutionary propulsion system. The performance of scramjet engines can be improved by the AJAX energy management concept. A magneto-hydro-dynamics (MHD) generator controls the flow and extracts flow energy in the engine inlet and a MHD accelerator downstream of the combustor accelerates the nozzle flow. A progress report toward developing the MHD technology is presented herein. Recent theoretical efforts are reviewed and ongoing experimental efforts are discussed. The latter efforts also include an ongoing collaboration between NASA, the US Air Force Research Laboratory, US industry, and Russian scientific organizations. Two of the critical technologies, the ionization of the air and the MHD accelerator, are briefly discussed. Examples of limiting the combustor entrance Mach number to a low supersonic value with a MHD energy bypass scheme are presented, demonstrating an improvement in scramjet performance. The results for a simplified design of an aerospace plane show that the specific impulse of the MHD-bypass system is better than the non-MHD system and typical rocket over a narrow region of flight speeds and design parameters. Equilibrium ionization and non-equilibrium ionization are discussed. The thermodynamic condition of air at the entrance of the engine inlet determines the method of ionization. The required external power for non-equilibrium ionization is computed. There have been many experiments in which electrical power generation has successfully been achieved by magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) means. However, relatively few experiments have been made to date for the reverse case of achieving gas acceleration by the MHD means. An experiment in a shock tunnel is described in which MHD acceleration is investigated experimentally. MHD has several

  3. Exhaust gas bypass valve control for thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Michael G; Yang, Jihui; Meisner, Greogry P.; Stabler, Francis R.; De Bock, Hendrik Pieter Jacobus; Anderson, Todd Alan

    2012-09-04

    A method of controlling engine exhaust flow through at least one of an exhaust bypass and a thermoelectric device via a bypass valve is provided. The method includes: determining a mass flow of exhaust exiting an engine; determining a desired exhaust pressure based on the mass flow of exhaust; comparing the desired exhaust pressure to a determined exhaust pressure; and determining a bypass valve control value based on the comparing, wherein the bypass valve control value is used to control the bypass valve.

  4. Bypass diode for a solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rim, Seung Bum; Kim, Taeseok; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter J.

    2012-03-13

    Bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a bypass diode for a solar cell includes a substrate of the solar cell. A first conductive region is disposed above the substrate, the first conductive region of a first conductivity type. A second conductive region is disposed on the first conductive region, the second conductive region of a second conductivity type opposite the first conductivity type.

  5. Solving the Antibiotic Crisis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gerard D

    2015-02-13

    Antibiotics are essential for both treating and preventing infectious diseases. Paradoxically, despite their importance as pillars of modern medicine, we are in danger of losing antibiotics because of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms throughout all pathogenic microbes. This fact, coupled with an inability to bring new drugs to market at a pace that matches resistance, has resulted in a crisis of global proportion. Solving this crisis requires the actions of many stakeholders, but chemists, chemical biologists, and microbiologists must drive the scientific innovation that is required to maintain our antibiotic arsenal. This innovation requires (1) a deep understanding of the evolution and reservoirs of resistance; (2) full knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic action and resistance; (3) the discovery of chemical and genetic probes of antibiotic action and resistance; (4) the integration of systems biology into antibiotic discovery; and (5) the discovery of new antimicrobial chemical matter. Addressing these pressing scientific gaps will ensure that we can meet the antibiotic crisis with creativity and purpose. PMID:27622298

  6. Thrust reverser for high bypass turbofan engine

    SciTech Connect

    Matta, R.K.; Bhutiani, P.K.

    1990-05-08

    This patent describes a thrust reverser for a gas turbine engine of the type which includes an outer wall spaced from the center body of a core engine to define a bypass duct therebetween. The thrust reverser comprising: circumferentially displaced blocker doors, each of the doors being movable between a normal position generally aligned with the outer wall and a thrust reversing position extending transversely of the bypass duct for blocking the exhaust of air through the bypass duct and directing the air through an opening in the outer wall for thrust reversal; each of the blocker doors being of lightweight construction and including a pit in the inner surface thereof in the normal position; means for covering the pit during normal flow of air through the bypass duct to reduce the pressure drop in the bypass duct and to reduce noise. The covering means including a pit cover hingedly mounted at one end thereof on the blocker door and means of biasing the pit cover away from the blocker door to a position providing smooth flow of air through the bypass duct during normal operation.

  7. Antibiotic bonding to polytetrafluoroethylene with tridodecylmethylammonium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.A.; Alcid, D.V.; Greco, R.S.

    1982-09-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) treated with the cationic surfactant, triodecylmethylammonium chloride (TDMAC), binds /sup 14/C-penicillin (1.5 to 2 mg antibiotic/cm graft), whereas untreated PTFE or PTFE treated with anionic detergents shows little binding of antibiotic. TDMAC-treated PTFE concomitantly binds penicillin and heparin, generating a surface that potentially can resist both infection and thrombosis. The retention of these biologically active molecules is not due to passive entrapment in the PTFE but reflects an ionic interaction between the anionic ligands and surface-bound TDMAC. Penicillin bound to PTFE is not removed by exhaustive washing in aqueous buffers but is slowly released in the presence of plasma or when the PTFE is placed in a muscle pouch in the rat. Muscle tissue adjacent to the treated PTFE shows elevated levels of antibiotic following implantation. PTFE treated with TDMAC and placed in a muscle pouch binds /sup 14/C-penicillin when it is locally irrigated with antibiotic or when penicillin is administered intravenously. Thus, the TDMAC surface treated either in vitro or in vivo with penicillin provides an effective in situ source for the timed release of antibiotic.

  8. Active Insolubilized Antibiotics Based on Cellulose-Metal Chelates1

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, J. F.; Barker, S. A.; Zamir, A.

    1974-01-01

    Cellulose was converted into a more reactive form by chelation with the transition metals titaniumIII, ironIII, tinIV, vanadiumIII, and zirconiumIV. The remaining unsubstituted ligands of the transition metal ions were found to be amenable to replacement by electron-donating groups of antibiotic molecules. Ampicillin, gentamicin, kanamycin, neomycin, paromomycin, polymyxin B, and streptomycin were used as antibacterial antibiotics, and amphotericin B and natamycin were used as antifungal antibiotics. Antibacterial activity of the products was tested against two gram-positive and two gram-negative bacteria, and antifungal activity was tested against four fungi. That the antibacterial antibiotics had complexed with the cellulose-metal chelates was demonstrated in that the product cellulose-metal-antibiotic chelates exhibited antibiotic activities whereas the metal chelates of cellulose themselves were inactive. Of 140 tests conducted, cellulose-metal-antibiotic chelates were active in 102 cases. Since the antibiotic derivatives were water insoluble and in fact retain some of the antibacterial activities of the parent compounds, the chelation method provides a facile way of rendering cellulose surfaces, etc., resistant to microbial attack over and above that degree of protection afforded by noncovalent adsorption of the antibiotic to cellulose itself. The underlying principles of the chelation reactions involved are discussed in detail. PMID:4451349

  9. [Azotobacter chroococcum, a producer of a new antifungal antibiotic].

    PubMed

    Pridachina, N N; Novogrudskaia, E D; Krugliak, E B; Chekasina, E V; Korchak, T S

    1982-01-01

    Strain 92 of Azotobacter chroococcum was obtained as result of natural selection. It produces an antibiotic active against phytopathogenic fungi. The antibiotic was isolated from the bacterial mass of the culture with ethanol extraction followed by column and thin-layer chromatography on silica gel. The pure antibiotic is a viscous oily substance of a yellowish colour, readily soluble in the majority of the organic solvents, not soluble in water, readily oxidized by air oxygen. The UV absorption spectrum of the antibiotic ethanol solution had bonds characteristic of the conjugated tetraene system. The presence of ketone and enol groups in the antibiotic molecule was shown with the colour reactions. It was confirmed by the data of the antibiotic IR spectrum investigation. According to the data of high resolution mass spectroscopy the empirical formula of the antibiotic is C20H30O4, the molecular weight is 334. It is suggested that the antibiotic is an ester of aliphatic tetraenic acid differing from the known antibiotics produced by Azotobacter. PMID:7059144

  10. Handling Time-dependent Variables: Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Price, L Silvia; Frencken, Jos F; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc

    2016-06-15

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods, antibiotics constitute time-dependent exposures. Cox regression models are suited for determining such associations. After explaining the concepts of hazard, hazard ratio, and proportional hazards, the effects of treating antibiotic exposure as fixed or time-dependent variables are illustrated and discussed. Wider acceptance of these techniques will improve quantification of the effects of antibiotics on antibiotic resistance development and provide better evidence for guideline recommendations. PMID:27025824

  11. Antibiotic / Antimicrobial Resistance Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the Farm Get Smart About Antibiotics Week File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  12. Targeting Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chellat, Mathieu F; Raguž, Luka; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    Finding strategies against the development of antibiotic resistance is a major global challenge for the life sciences community and for public health. The past decades have seen a dramatic worldwide increase in human-pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to one or multiple antibiotics. More and more infections caused by resistant microorganisms fail to respond to conventional treatment, and in some cases, even last-resort antibiotics have lost their power. In addition, industry pipelines for the development of novel antibiotics have run dry over the past decades. A recent world health day by the World Health Organization titled "Combat drug resistance: no action today means no cure tomorrow" triggered an increase in research activity, and several promising strategies have been developed to restore treatment options against infections by resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27000559

  13. Colds and flus - antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotics - colds and flu ... treat infections that are caused by a virus. Colds and flu are caused by viruses. If you ... Hamilton A. Treatments for symptoms of the common cold. Am Fam Physician. 2013;88(12):Online. PMID: ...

  14. Opportunities for synthetic biology in antibiotics: expanding glycopeptide chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Maulik N; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-03-20

    Synthetic biology offers a new path for the exploitation and improvement of natural products to address the growing crisis in antibiotic resistance. All antibiotics in clinical use are facing eventual obsolesce as a result of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms, yet there are few new drug leads forthcoming from the pharmaceutical sector. Natural products of microbial origin have proven over the past 70 years to be the wellspring of antimicrobial drugs. Harnessing synthetic biology thinking and strategies can provide new molecules and expand chemical diversity of known antibiotic scaffolds to provide much needed new drug leads. The glycopeptide antibiotics offer paradigmatic scaffolds suitable for such an approach. We review these strategies here using the glycopeptides as an example and demonstrate how synthetic biology can expand antibiotic chemical diversity to help address the growing resistance crisis. PMID:23654249

  15. Selective condensation of DNA by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kopaczynska, M; Schulz, A; Fraczkowska, K; Kraszewski, S; Podbielska, H; Fuhrhop, J H

    2016-05-01

    The condensing effect of aminoglycoside antibiotics on the structure of double-stranded DNA was examined. The selective condensation of DNA by small molecules is an interesting approach in biotechnology. Here, we present the interaction between calf thymus DNA and three types of antibiotic molecules: tobramycin, kanamycin, and neomycin. Several techniques were applied to study this effect. Atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy images, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra showed that the interaction of tobramycin with double-stranded DNA caused the rod, toroid, and sphere formation and very strong condensation of DNA strands, which was not observed in the case of other aminoglycosides used in the experiment. Studies on the mechanisms by which small molecules interact with DNA are important in understanding their functioning in cells, in designing new and efficient drugs, or in minimizing their adverse side effects. Specific interactions between tobramycin and DNA double helix was modeled using molecular dynamics simulations. Simulation study shows the aminoglycoside specificity to bend DNA double helix, shedding light on the origins of toroid formation. This phenomenon may lighten the ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity issues, but also other adverse reactions of aminoglycoside antibiotics in the human body. PMID:26646261

  16. Biosynthesis of enediyne antitumor antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Van Lanen, Steven G; Shen, Ben

    2008-01-01

    The enediyne polyketides are secondary metabolites isolated from a variety of Actinomycetes. All members share very potent anticancer and antibiotic activity, and prospects for the clinical application of the enediynes has been validated with the recent marketing of two enediyne derivatives as anticancer agents. The biosynthesis of these compounds is of interest because of the numerous structural features that are unique to the enediyne family. The gene cluster for five enediynes has now been cloned and sequenced, providing the foundation to understand natures' means to biosynthesize such complex, exotic molecules. Presented here is a review of the current progress in delineating the biosynthesis of the enediynes with an emphasis on the model enediyne, C-1027. PMID:18397168

  17. Adverse antibiotic drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Bint, A J; Burtt, I

    1980-07-01

    There is enormous potential for drug interactions in patients who, today, often receive many drugs. Antibiotics are prominent amongst the groups of drugs commonly prescribed. Many interactions take place at the absorption stage. Antacids and antidiarrhoeal preparations, in particular, can delay and reduce the absorption of antibiotics such as tetracyclines and clindamycin, by combining with them in the gastrointestinal tract to form chelates or complexes. Other drugs can affect gastric motility, which in turn often controls the rate at which antibiotics are absorbed. Some broad spectrum antibiotics can alter the bacterial flora of the gut which may be related to malabsorption states. The potentiation of toxic side effects of one drug by another is a common type of interaction. Antibiotics which are implicated in this type of interaction are those which themselves possess some toxicity such as aminoglycosides, some cephalosporins, tetracyclines and colistin. Some of the most important adverse interactions with antibiotics are those which involve other drugs which have a low toxicity/efficacy ratio. These include anticoagulants such as warfarin, anticonvulsants such as phenytoin and phenobarbitone and oral antidiabetic drugs like tolbutamide. Risk of interaction arises when the metabolism of these drugs is inhibited by liver microsomal enzyme inhibitors such as some sulphonamides and chloramphenicol, or is enhanced by enzyme inducers such as rifampicin. PMID:6995091

  18. [The history of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Yazdankhah, Siamak; Lassen, Jørgen; Midtvedt, Tore; Solberg, Claus Ola

    2013-12-10

    The development of chemical compounds for the treatment of infectious diseases may be divided into three phases: a) the discovery in the 1600s in South America of alkaloid extracts from the bark of the cinchona tree and from the dried root of the ipecacuanha bush, which proved effective against, respectively, malaria (quinine) and amoebic dysentery (emetine); b) the development of synthetic drugs, which mostly took place in Germany, starting with Paul Ehrlich's (1854-1915) discovery of salvarsan (1909), and crowned with Gerhard Domagk's (1895-1964) discovery of the sulfonamides (1930s); and c) the discovery of antibiotics. The prime example of the latter is the development of penicillin in the late 1920s following a discovery by a solitary research scientist who never worked in a team and never as part of a research programme. It took another ten years or so before drug-quality penicillin was produced, with research now dependent on being conducted in large collaborative teams, frequently between universities and wealthy industrial companies. The search for new antibiotics began in earnest in the latter half of the 1940s and was mostly based on soil microorganisms. Many new antibiotics were discovered in this period, which may be termed «the golden age of antibiotics». Over the past three decades, the development of new antibiotics has largely stalled, while antibiotic resistance has increased. This situation may require new strategies for the treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:24326504

  19. [Analysis of antibiotic usage].

    PubMed

    Balpataki, R; Balogh, J; Zelkó, R; Vincze, Z

    2001-01-01

    Economic analysis is founded on the assumption that resources are limited and that should be used in a way that maximizes the benefits gained. Pharmacoeconomics extends these assumptions to drug treatment. Therefore, a full pharmacoeconomic analysis must consider two or more alternative treatments and should be founded on measurement of incremental cost, incremental efficacy, and the value of successful outcome. Antibiotic policy based only on administrative restrictions is failed, instead of it disease formularies and infectologist consultation system are needed. Equally important are various programmes that encourage the cost-conscious use of the antibiotics chosen. Some of the methods evaluated in the literature include: streamlining from combination therapy to a single agent, early switching from parenteral to oral therapy, initiating treatment with oral agents, administering parenteral antibiotic at home from outset of therapy, and antibiotic streamlining programmes that are partnered with infectious disease physicians. The solution is the rational and adequate use of antibiotics, based on the modern theory and practice of antibiotic policy and infection control, that cannot be carried out without the activities of experts in this field. PMID:11769090

  20. [Prophylactic antibiotics in neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Iacob, G; Iacob, Simona; Cojocaru, Inimioara

    2007-01-01

    Because of a low risk of infection (around 2-3%), prophylactic use of antibiotics in neurosurgery is a controversial issue. Some neurosurgeons consider that there are strong arguments against the use of antimicrobials (promotion of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria, superinfection and adverse drug reactions) and meticulous aseptic techniques could be more usefully than prophylactic antibiotics. On the other hand, despite of being rare, the consequences of a neurosurgical infection can be dramatic and may result in a rapid death, caused by meningitis, cerebritis, abscess formation or sepsis. Clinical studies emphasized that the most important factors influencing the choice of antibiotic prophylaxis in neurosurgery is the patient's immune status, virulence of the pathogens and the type of surgery ("clean contaminated"--procedure that crosses the cranial sinuses, "clean non-implant"--procedure that does not cross the cranial sinuses, CSF shunt surgery, skull fracture). Prophylaxis has become the standard of care for contaminated and clean-contaminated surgery, also for surgery involving insertion of artificial devices. The antibiotic (first/second generation of cephalosporins or vancomycin in allergic patients) should recover only the cutaneous possibly contaminating flora (S. aureus, S. epidermidis) and should be administrated 30' before the surgical incision, intravenously in a single dose. Most studies pointed that identification of the risk factors for infections, correct asepsis and minimal prophylactic antibiotic regimen, help neurosurgeons to improve patient care and to decrease mortality without selecting resistant bacteria. PMID:18293694

  1. Oxidative stress in coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Amaury Edgardo Mont’Serrat Ávila Souza; Melnikov, Petr; Cônsolo, Lourdes Zélia Zanoni

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this prospective study was to assess the dynamics of oxidative stress during coronary artery bypass surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods Sixteen patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting were enrolled. Blood samples were collected from the systemic circulation during anesthesia induction (radial artery - A1), the systemic venous return (B1 and B2) four minutes after removal of the aortic cross-clamping, of the coronary sinus (CS1 and CS2) four minutes after removal of the aortic cross-clamping and the systemic circulation four minutes after completion of cardiopulmonary bypass (radial artery - A2). The marker of oxidative stress, malondialdehyde, was measured using spectrophotometry. Results The mean values of malondialdehyde were (ng/dl): A1 (265.1), B1 (490.0), CS1 (527.0), B2 (599.6), CS2 (685.0) and A2 (527.2). Comparisons between A1/B1, A1/CS1, A1/B2, A1/CS2, A1/A2 were significant, with ascending values (P<0.05). Comparisons between the measurements of the coronary sinus and venous reservoir after the two moments of reperfusion (B1/B2 and CS1/CS2) were higher when CS2 (P<0.05). Despite higher values ​​after the end of cardiopulmonary bypass (A2), when compared to samples of anesthesia (A1), those show a downward trend when compared to the samples of the second moment of reperfusion (CS2) (P<0.05). Conclusion The measurement of malondialdehyde shows that coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass is accompanied by increase of free radicals and this trend gradually decreases after its completion. Aortic clamping exacerbates oxidative stress but has sharper decline after reperfusion when compared to systemic metabolism. The behavior of thiobarbituric acid species indicates that oxidative stress is an inevitable pathophysiological component. PMID:27163415

  2. "Orpheus" cardiopulmonary bypass simulation system.

    PubMed

    Morris, Richard W; Pybus, David A

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we describe a high-fidelity perfusion simulation system intended for use in the training and continuing education of perfusionists. The system comprises a hydraulic simulator, an electronic interface unit and a controlling computer with associated real-time computer models. It is designed for use within an actual operating theatre, or within a specialized simulation facility. The hydraulic simulator can be positioned on an operating table and physically connected to the circuit of the institutional heart-lung machine. The institutional monitoring system is used to display the arterial and central venous pressures, the ECG and the nasopharyngeal temperature using appropriate connections. The simulator is able to reproduce the full spectrum of normal and abnormal events that may present during the course of cardiopulmonary bypass. The system incorporates a sophisticated blood gas model that accurately predicts the behavior of a modern, hollow-fiber oxygenator. Output from this model is displayed in the manner of an in-line blood gas electrode and is updated every 500 msecs. The perfusionist is able to administer a wide variety of drugs during a simulation session including: vasoconstrictors (metaraminol, epinephrine and phenylephrine), a vasodilator (sodium nitroprusside), chronotropes (epinephrine and atropine), an inotrope (epinephrine) and modifiers of coagulation (heparin and protamine). Each drug has a pharmacokinetic profile based on a three-compartment model plus an effect compartment. The simulation system has potential roles in the skill training of perfusionists, the development of crisis management protocols, the certification and accreditation of perfusionists and the evaluation of new perfusion equipment and/or techniques. PMID:18293807

  3. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Cho, Ill Hwan; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care), the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students) regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing). The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics. PMID:24036486

  4. Clinical experimentation with aerosol antibiotics: current and future methods of administration

    PubMed Central

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Kioumis, Ioannis; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Spyratos, Dionysios; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Turner, J Francis; Browning, Robert; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Currently almost all antibiotics are administered by the intravenous route. Since several systems and situations require more efficient methods of administration, investigation and experimentation in drug design has produced local treatment modalities. Administration of antibiotics in aerosol form is one of the treatment methods of increasing interest. As the field of drug nanotechnology grows, new molecules have been produced and combined with aerosol production systems. In the current review, we discuss the efficiency of aerosol antibiotic studies along with aerosol production systems. The different parts of the aerosol antibiotic methodology are presented. Additionally, information regarding the drug molecules used is presented and future applications of this method are discussed. PMID:24115836

  5. Natural and engineered biosynthesis of nucleoside antibiotics in Actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenqing; Qi, Jianzhao; Wu, Pan; Wan, Dan; Liu, Jin; Feng, Xuan; Deng, Zixin

    2016-03-01

    Nucleoside antibiotics constitute an important family of microbial natural products bearing diverse bioactivities and unusual structural features. Their biosynthetic logics are unique with involvement of complex multi-enzymatic reactions leading to the intricate molecules from simple building blocks. Understanding how nature builds this family of antibiotics in post-genomic era sets the stage for rational enhancement of their production, and also paves the way for targeted persuasion of the cell factories to make artificial designer nucleoside drugs and leads via synthetic biology approaches. In this review, we discuss the recent progress and perspectives on the natural and engineered biosynthesis of nucleoside antibiotics. PMID:26153500

  6. Antibiotic therapy for ocular infection.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R W; Glasser, D B

    1994-01-01

    Infections of the eye can rapidly damage important functional structures and lead to permanent vision loss or blindness. Broad-spectrum antibiotics should be administered to the appropriate site of infection as soon as a diagnosis is made. Topical drops are preferred for corneal and conjunctival infections. Intravitreal antibiotics, and possibly subconjunctival and parenteral antibiotics, are preferred for endophthalmitis. Parenteral antibiotics are recommended for infection in deep adnexal structures. We review specific aspects of antibiotic therapy for ocular and periocular infection. PMID:7856158

  7. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  8. Evaluating the Frequency of Postoperative Fever in Patients with Coronary Artery Bypass Surgey

    PubMed Central

    Mirmohammadsadeghi, Mohsen; Zohrenia, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Nowadays, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) is a frequent surgery in treatment of coronary artery disease. According to high expense of this surgery and its important role in patients’ quality of life, high survival rate of patients and success of surgery are necessary. The aim of this study was the evaluation of fever incidence (febrile events) due to incidence of pneumonia, wound infection, bacteremia, urinary tract infection and inflammatory response without infection after CABG. METHODS In an intergrades descriptive-analytical study, 107 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) were enrolled in the study. The patients then were examined by the febrile events and also their characteristics including age, sex, duration of surgery, underlying diseases, and frequency distribution of antibiotics consumptions in pre-surgical and postsurgical periods, and incidence of infectious syndromes. RESULTS Frequency distribution of febrile events after CABG was 29.9 percent. The most common administered antibiotic before the surgery was cephalothin (Keflin) and then, cefazolin. The most common administered antibiotic after the surgery was cephalothin (Keflin) and cephalexin (47.7%) and then, cephalothin-gentamicin-cephalexin (31.8%). The average age of patients without febrile syndrome was 60.53 years and in those with febrile syndrome was 59.31 years. In terms of gender, 74.8% of the patients were males. So that 32.5% of males and 22.2% of females had fever. The incidence time of fever in most cases was in the postoperative fourth day. In terms of underlying diseases, 13 percent of them had hypertension and hyperlipidemia, 14 percent had only hypertension, 11.2 percent had only hyperlipidemia and 6.5 percent had diabetes. CONCLUSION This study showed that the prevalence of fever in patients undergoing CABG was 29.9 percent and the most common cause of fever was sternal infections. There was a significant correlation between administered

  9. Ecological antibiotic policy.

    PubMed

    Høiby

    2000-08-01

    Development of resistance to antibiotics is a major problem worldwide. The normal oropharyngeal flora, the intestinal flora and the skin flora play important roles in this development. Within a few days after the onset of antibiotic therapy, resistant Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus epidermidis can be detected in the normal flora of volunteers or patients. Horizontal spread of the resistance genes to other species, e.g. SALMONELLA: spp., Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae, occurs by conjugation or transformation. An ecologically sound antibiotic policy favours the use of antibiotics with little or no impact on the normal flora. Prodrug antibiotics which are not active against the bacteria in the mouth and the intestine (before absorption) and which are not excreted to a significant degree via the intestine, saliva or skin are therefore preferred. Prodrugs such as pivampicillin, bacampicillin, pivmecillinam and cefuroxime axetil are favourable from an ecological point of view. Experience from Scandinavia supports this, since resistance to mecillinam after 20 years of use is low (about 5%) and stable. PMID:10969054

  10. Ecological antibiotic policy.

    PubMed

    Høiby, N

    2000-09-01

    Development of resistance to antibiotics is a major problem worldwide. The normal oropharyngeal flora, the intestinal flora and the skin flora play important roles in this development. Within a few days after the onset of antibiotic therapy, resistant Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus epidermidis can be detected in the normal flora of volunteers or patients. Horizontal spread of the resistance genes to other species, e.g. Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae, occurs by conjugation or transformation. An ecologically sound antibiotic policy favours the use of antibiotics with little or no impact on the normal flora. Prodrug antibiotics which are not active against the bacteria in the mouth and the intestine (before absorption) and which are not excreted to a significant degree via the intestine, saliva or skin are therefore preferred. Prodrugs such as pivampicillin, bacampicillin, pivmecillinam and cefuroxime axetil are favourable from an ecological point of view. Experience from Scandinavia supports this, since resistance to mecillinam after 20 years of use is low (about 5%) and stable. PMID:11051626

  11. Antibiotic cycling and marketing into the 21st century: a perspective from the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Lavin, B S

    2000-01-01

    Before the development of the first antimicrobial agents, bacteria already had demonstrated an ability to adapt to stress in the environment, resulting in the development of resistance that often makes the prevailing antibiotic treatment ineffective. The response to antimicrobial resistance in the medical community has been to use new or alternative antibiotics not previously used against the resistant bacteria. The pharmaceutical industry has responded to the resistance problem by producing newer antibiotics, either as modifications of currently existing compounds or as combinations of compounds that may inhibit or bypass the bacterial resistance mechanisms. The development of new antibiotics is a lengthy and costly process. To be successful, the pharmaceutical industry must anticipate the changing needs of the medical community, as well as the dynamic process of antimicrobial resistance. The marketing of new antimicrobial agents must be adaptable to the potential environmental pressures that induce bacterial resistance in order to ensure the longevity of the agents. PMID:10654633

  12. Battery Cell By-Pass Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumaw, Susan J. (Inventor); Evers, Jeffrey (Inventor); Craig, Calvin L., Jr. (Inventor); Walker, Stuart D. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The invention is a circuit and method of limiting the charging current voltage from a power supply net work applied to an individual cell of a plurality of cells making up a battery being charged in series. It is particularly designed for use with batteries that can be damaged by overcharging, such as Lithium-ion type batteries. In detail. the method includes the following steps: 1) sensing the actual voltage level of the individual cell; 2) comparing the actual voltage level of the individual cell with a reference value and providing an error signal representative thereof; and 3) by-passing the charging current around individual cell necessary to keep the individual cell voltage level generally equal a specific voltage level while continuing to charge the remaining cells. Preferably this is accomplished by by-passing the charging current around the individual cell if said actual voltage level is above the specific voltage level and allowing the charging current to the individual cell if the actual voltage level is equal or less than the specific voltage level. In the step of bypassing the charging current, the by-passed current is transferred at a proper voltage level to the power supply. The by-pass circuit a voltage comparison circuit is used to compare the actual voltage level of the individual cell with a reference value and to provide an error signal representative thereof. A third circuit, designed to be responsive to the error signal, is provided for maintaining the individual cell voltage level generally equal to the specific voltage level. Circuitry is provided in the third circuit for bypassing charging current around the individual cell if the actual voltage level is above the specific voltage level and transfers the excess charging current to the power supply net work. The circuitry also allows charging of the individual cell if the actual voltage level is equal or less than the specific voltage level.

  13. Quinolones: from antibiotics to autoinducers

    PubMed Central

    Heeb, Stephan; Fletcher, Matthew P; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Diggle, Stephen P; Williams, Paul; Cámara, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Since quinine was first isolated, animals, plants and microorganisms producing a wide variety of quinolone compounds have been discovered, several of which possess medicinally interesting properties ranging from antiallergenic and anticancer to antimicrobial activities. Over the years, these have served in the development of many synthetic drugs, including the successful fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and related bacteria produce a number of 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones, some of which exhibit antimicrobial activity. However, quinolones such as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline act as quorum-sensing signal molecules, controlling the expression of many virulence genes as a function of cell population density. Here, we review selectively this extensive family of bicyclic compounds, from natural and synthetic antimicrobials to signalling molecules, with a special emphasis on the biology of P. aeruginosa. In particular, we review their nomenclature and biochemistry, their multiple properties as membrane-interacting compounds, inhibitors of the cytochrome bc1 complex and iron chelators, as well as the regulation of their biosynthesis and their integration into the intricate quorum-sensing regulatory networks governing virulence and secondary metabolite gene expression. PMID:20738404

  14. Antibiotic activity in space.

    PubMed

    Lapchine, L; Moatti, N; Gasset, G; Richoilley, G; Templier, J; Tixador, R

    1986-01-01

    Environmental factors in space exert an influence on the behaviour of bacteria, particularly on their sensitivity to antibiotics. Thus, G. Taylor and S. Zaloguev observed that bacterial samples collected on the crew during flight in the Apollo-Soyouz Test Project Mission presented higher antibiotic resistance than controls. This paper presents the results of two experiments performed in 1982 and 1985 (Cytos 2 during the French-Soviet Mission and "Antibio" in the Biorack programme of the European Space Agency). The results show an increase of antibiotic resistance in bacteria growth in flight and a modification in the structure of the cell wall. All these modifications are transitory. Two hypotheses are put forward to explain the phenomenon. PMID:3569006

  15. Cardiac toxicities of antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, H R; Parker, J L; Durrett, L R

    1978-01-01

    Isolated heart muscle preparations are useful in the study of cardiac toxicities of drugs and environmental chemicals: such tissues allow assessment of chemical effects on heart muscle that is free from indirect in vivo influences that can mask or even accentuate cardiac responses measured in the intact animal. In the present study, left atria of guinea pigs were used to demonstrate a direct cardiac depressant effect of greater-than-therapeutic concentrations of several aminoglycoside antibiotics. The toxic effect of these antibiotics seems to be a calcium-dependent event, and may prove useful to characterize contractile responses of the heart. Other antibiotic agents can also depress cardiovascular function, as summarized in this report, but mechanisms of action have not been clearly defined. PMID:720315

  16. Coronary artery bypass surgery without cardiopulmonary bypass: short- and mid-term results.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Y; Mehta, Y; Kohli, V M; Kohli, V; Mairal, M; Mishra, A; Bapna, R K; Trehan, N

    1997-01-01

    From March 1994 to April 1997, 433 patients had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass in our institute. Sixty-eight patients had various organ dysfunctions and/or aortic atheroma or calcification and were regarded as high risk for cardiopulmonary bypass. In 277 patients surgery was performed through midline sternotomy, while in 156 minithoracotomy approach was used. In 361 patients single coronary artery bypass grafting was done, and in 72 two-coronary arteries were bypassed. In 63 patients who had graftable vessels in anterior wall and diffusely diseased ungraftable vessels in posterolateral and/or inferior wall, transmyocardial laser revascularisation was also done along with coronary artery bypass grafting to achieve complete myocardial revascularisation. Nine patients in this series were also subjected to simultaneous carotid endarterectomy along with myocardial revascularisation. In two patients complementary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty of left circumflex coronary artery was done five days after minithoracotomy and left internal mammary artery to left anterior descending coronary artery bypass grafting. Forty-two cases were extubated in operating room. Average blood loss was 260 ml. Six patients were reexplored for postoperative bleeding. Seven patients had perioperative myocardial infarction. One developed neurological complication. Hospital mortality was 2.3 percent (10/433 cases) and four deaths were due to malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Nine patients developed chest wound complications. Average hospital stay after operation was six days, 423 patients were discharged from hospital and all of them were asymptomatic. During three years follow-up (range 3 to 38 months) there were three known cardiac deaths. Ninety percent (391) patients reported to the follow-up clinic and 91 percent of them were angina-free. In patients who were subjected to transmyocardial laser revascularisation along with coronary

  17. 20 CFR 631.18 - Federal by-pass authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Secretary's intent to exercise by-pass authority and an opportunity to request and to receive a hearing.... (c) The Secretary will exercise by-pass authority only until such time as the affected State has...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4350 - Cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... bypass oxygenator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass oxygenator is a device used to exchange gases between blood and a gaseous environment to satisfy the gas exchange needs of a patient during...

  19. Antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ottoline, Ana Carolina Xavier; Tomita, Shiro; Marques, Marise da Penha Costa; Felix, Felippe; Ferraiolo, Priscila Novaes; Laurindo, Roberta Silveira Santos

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aim: Antibiotic prophylaxis aims to prevent infection of surgical sites before contamination or infection occurs. Prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis does not enhance the prevention of surgical infection and is associated with higher rates of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. This review of the literature concerning antibiotic prophylaxis, with an emphasis on otolaryngologic surgery, aims to develop a guide for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery in order to reduce the numbers of complications stemming from the indiscriminate use of antibiotics. PMID:25991999

  20. Modulation of RNA function by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, R; Waldsich, C; Wank, H

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important families of antibiotics are the aminoglycosides, including drugs such as neomycin B, paromomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. With the discovery of the catalytic potential of RNA, these antibiotics became very popular due to their RNA-binding capacity. They serve for the analysis of RNA function as well as for the study of RNA as a potential therapeutic target. Improvements in RNA structure determination recently provided first insights into the decoding site of the ribosome at high resolution and how aminoglycosides might induce misreading of the genetic code. In addition to inhibiting prokaryotic translation, aminoglycosides inhibit several catalytic RNAs such as self-splicing group I introns, RNase P and small ribozymes in vitro. Furthermore, these antibiotics interfere with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by disrupting essential RNA-protein contacts. Most exciting is the potential of many RNA-binding antibiotics to stimulate RNA activities, conceiving small-molecule partners for the hypothesis of an ancient RNA world. SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) has been used in this evolutionary game leading to small synthetic RNAs, whose NMR structures gave valuable information on how aminoglycosides interact with RNA, which could possibly be used in applied science. PMID:10619838

  1. Antibiotics in Animal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão, Amílcar C.

    The administration of antibiotics to animals to prevent or treat diseases led us to be concerned about the impact of these antibiotics on human health. In fact, animal products could be a potential vehicle to transfer drugs to humans. Using appropri ated mathematical and statistical models, one can predict the kinetic profile of drugs and their metabolites and, consequently, develop preventive procedures regarding drug transmission (i.e., determination of appropriate withdrawal periods). Nevertheless, in the present chapter the mathematical and statistical concepts for data interpretation are strictly given to allow understanding of some basic pharma-cokinetic principles and to illustrate the determination of withdrawal periods

  2. Tackling antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Karen; Courvalin, Patrice; Dantas, Gautam; Davies, Julian; Eisenstein, Barry; Huovinen, Pentti; Jacoby, George A.; Kishony, Roy; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Kutter, Elizabeth; Lerner, Stephen A.; Levy, Stuart; Lewis, Kim; Lomovskaya, Olga; Miller, Jeffrey H.; Mobashery, Shahriar; Piddock, Laura J. V.; Projan, Steven; Thomas, Christopher M.; Tomasz, Alexander; Tulkens, Paul M.; Walsh, Timothy R.; Watson, James D.; Witkowski, Jan; Witte, Wolfgang; Wright, Gerry; Yeh, Pamela; Zgurskaya, Helen I.

    2014-01-01

    The development and spread of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a universal threat to both humans and animals that is generally not preventable, but can nevertheless be controlled and must be tackled in the most effective ways possible. To explore how the problem of antibiotic resistance might best be addressed, a group of thirty scientists from academia and industry gathered at the Banbury Conference Centre in Cold Spring Harbor, New York, May 16-18, 2011. From these discussions emerged a priority list of steps that need to be taken to resolve this global crisis. PMID:22048738

  3. Antibiotic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Mast, Yvonne; Stegmann, Evi; Ziemert, Nadine

    2016-09-01

    Due to the threat posed by the increase of highly resistant pathogenic bacteria, there is an urgent need for new antibiotics; all the more so since in the last 20 years, the approval for new antibacterial agents had decreased. The field of natural product discovery has undergone a tremendous development over the past few years. This has been the consequence of several new and revolutionizing drug discovery and development techniques, which is initiating a 'New Age of Antibiotic Discovery'. In this review, we concentrate on the most significant discovery approaches during the last and present years and comment on the challenges facing the community in the coming years. PMID:27470984

  4. 46 CFR 56.20-20 - Valve bypasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Valves § 56.20-20 Valve bypasses. (a) Sizes of bypasses shall be in accordance with MSS SP-45 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Pipe for bypasses should be at least Schedule 80 seamless... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Valve bypasses. 56.20-20 Section 56.20-20 Shipping...

  5. 46 CFR 56.20-20 - Valve bypasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Valves § 56.20-20 Valve bypasses. (a) Sizes of bypasses shall be in accordance with MSS SP-45 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Pipe for bypasses should be at least Schedule 80 seamless... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Valve bypasses. 56.20-20 Section 56.20-20 Shipping...

  6. 46 CFR 56.20-20 - Valve bypasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Valves § 56.20-20 Valve bypasses. (a) Sizes of bypasses shall be in accordance with MSS SP-45 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Pipe for bypasses should be at least Schedule 80 seamless... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Valve bypasses. 56.20-20 Section 56.20-20 Shipping...

  7. 46 CFR 56.20-20 - Valve bypasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Valves § 56.20-20 Valve bypasses. (a) Sizes of bypasses shall be in accordance with MSS SP-45 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Pipe for bypasses should be at least Schedule 80 seamless... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Valve bypasses. 56.20-20 Section 56.20-20 Shipping...

  8. Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems: State of the science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review article proposes a simple causal model depicting relationships involved in dissemination of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems and potential effects on human health, functioning of natural ecosystems, and agricultural productivity. Available evidence for each causal ...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  10. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4400 - Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir. 870.4400... bypass blood reservoir. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass blood reservoir is a device used in conjunction with short-term extracorporeal circulation devices to hold a reserve supply of blood in the...

  15. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3545 Ventricular bypass (assist) device. (a) Identification. A ventricular bypass (assist) device is a device that assists... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device....

  16. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3545 Ventricular bypass (assist) device. (a) Identification. A ventricular bypass (assist) device is a device that assists... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device....

  17. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  18. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  19. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  20. 21 CFR 870.4250 - Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. 870... Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass temperature controller is a device used to control the temperature of the fluid entering and leaving a heat exchanger....

  1. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390 Section 870.4390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390 Section 870.4390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390 Section 870.4390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390 Section 870.4390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4390 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing. 870.4390 Section 870.4390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... bypass pump tubing. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pump tubing is polymeric tubing which...

  6. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3545 Ventricular bypass (assist) device. (a) Identification. A ventricular bypass (assist) device is a device that assists... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device....

  7. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  8. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  9. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow....

  10. Bypass apparatus and method for series connected energy storage devices

    DOEpatents

    Rouillard, Jean; Comte, Christophe; Daigle, Dominik

    2000-01-01

    A bypass apparatus and method for series connected energy storage devices. Each of the energy storage devices coupled to a common series connection has an associated bypass unit connected thereto in parallel. A current bypass unit includes a sensor which is coupled in parallel with an associated energy storage device or cell and senses an energy parameter indicative of an energy state of the cell, such as cell voltage. A bypass switch is coupled in parallel with the energy storage cell and operable between a non-activated state and an activated state. The bypass switch, when in the non-activated state, is substantially non-conductive with respect to current passing through the energy storage cell and, when in the activated state, provides a bypass current path for passing current to the series connection so as to bypass the associated cell. A controller controls activation of the bypass switch in response to the voltage of the cell deviating from a pre-established voltage setpoint. The controller may be included within the bypass unit or be disposed on a control platform external to the bypass unit. The bypass switch may, when activated, establish a permanent or a temporary bypass current path.

  11. Gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Do, Patrick H; Kang, Young S; Cahill, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Gastric infarction is an extremely rare occurrence owing to the stomach’s extensive vascular supply. We report an unusual case of gastric infarction following gastric bypass surgery. We describe the imaging findings and discuss possible causes of this condition. PMID:27200168

  12. Analysis and testing of electrorheological bypass dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindler, Jason E.; Wereley, Norman M.

    1998-06-01

    We experimentally validate nonlinear quasi-steady electrorheological (ER) and magnetorheological (MR) damper models, using an idealized Bingham plastic shear flow mechanism, for the flow mode of damper operation. An electrorheological valve or bypass damper was designed, and fabricated using predominantly commercial off-the-shelf hydraulic components. Both the hydraulic cylinder and the bypass duct have cylindrical geometry, and damping forces are developed in the annular bypass via Poiseuille (flow mode) flow. Damper models assume parallel plate geometry. Three nondimensional groups are used for damper analysis, namely, the Bingham number, Bi, the nondimensional plug thickness, (delta) , and the area coefficient defined as the ratio of the piston head area, A(rho ), to the cross-sectional area of the annular bypass, Ad. In the flow mode case, the damping coefficient, which is defined as the ratio of equivalent viscous damping of the Bingham plastic material, Ceq, to the Newtonian viscous damping, C, is a function of the nondimensional plug thickness only. The damper was tested using a mechanical damper dynamometer for sinusoidal stroke of 2 inches, over a range of frequencies below 0.63 Hz. The damping coefficient vs. nondimensional plug thickness diagram was experimentally validated using these data over a range of damper shaft velocities and applied electric field. Because the behaviors of ER and MR fluid are qualitatively similar, these ER damper modeling results may be extended to analysis of flow mode MR dampers.

  13. 30 CFR 77.302 - Bypass stacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bypass stacks. 77.302 Section 77.302 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers §...

  14. 30 CFR 77.302 - Bypass stacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bypass stacks. 77.302 Section 77.302 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers §...

  15. 30 CFR 77.302 - Bypass stacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bypass stacks. 77.302 Section 77.302 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers §...

  16. 30 CFR 77.302 - Bypass stacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bypass stacks. 77.302 Section 77.302 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers §...

  17. 30 CFR 77.302 - Bypass stacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bypass stacks. 77.302 Section 77.302 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Thermal Dryers §...

  18. [Antibiotical prophylaxy in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Záhumenský, J; Menzlová, E; Zmrhal, J; Kučera, E

    2013-08-01

    Gynecological surgery is considered to be clear with possible contamination by gram-positive cocci from the skin, gram-negatives from the perineum or groins or polymicrobial biocenosis from vagina, depending on the surgical approach. Antibiotical prophylaxy enforces the natural mechanisms of immunity and helps to exclude present infection. There were presented many studies comparing useful effect of prophylaxis in gynecological surgery. The benefits of antibiotical prophylaxy before IUD insertion, before the cervical surgery and before hysteroscopies were not verified. On the other hand the prophylaxy of vaginal surgery including vaginal hysterectomy decreases the number of postoperative febrile complications. The positive influence of prophylaxis before the simple laparoscopy and laparoscopy without bowel injury or the opening of the vagina was not evidently verified. In abdominal hysterectomy the antibiotical prophylaxy decreases the incidence of postoperative complications significantly. The administration of 2 g of cefazolin can be recommended. In procedures taking more than 3 hours the repeated administration of cefazolin is suitable. New urogynecological procedures, using mesh implants, were not sufficiently evaluated as for postoperative infections and the posible antibiotical effect. The presence of implant in possibly non sterile area should be considered as high risc of postoperative complications. PMID:24040985

  19. Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2016-04-01

    Emergence of resistance among the most important bacterial pathogens is recognized as a major public health threat affecting humans worldwide. Multidrug-resistant organisms have not only emerged in the hospital environment but are now often identified in community settings, suggesting that reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are present outside the hospital. The bacterial response to the antibiotic "attack" is the prime example of bacterial adaptation and the pinnacle of evolution. "Survival of the fittest" is a consequence of an immense genetic plasticity of bacterial pathogens that trigger specific responses that result in mutational adaptations, acquisition of genetic material, or alteration of gene expression producing resistance to virtually all antibiotics currently available in clinical practice. Therefore, understanding the biochemical and genetic basis of resistance is of paramount importance to design strategies to curtail the emergence and spread of resistance and to devise innovative therapeutic approaches against multidrug-resistant organisms. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the major mechanisms of antibiotic resistance encountered in clinical practice, providing specific examples in relevant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27227291

  20. Resistance-Resistant Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    New antibiotics are needed because as drug resistance is increasing, the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. Here, we discuss six possible approaches to develop ‘resistance-resistant’ antibiotics. First, multi-target inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy due to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, re-purposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multi-target therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and in some cases suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored, in otherwise drug resistant organisms. PMID:25458541

  1. Antibiotic therapy of cholera*

    PubMed Central

    Lindenbaum, John; Greenough, William B.; Islam, M. R.

    1967-01-01

    Recent clinical trials having established the value of tetracycline as an adjunct to fluid and electrolyte replacement in cholera treatment, a controlled trial of antibiotic therapy was conducted in Dacca on 318 adults hospitalized for cholera. The effects of 4 antibiotics orally administered in varying dosage schedules were studied. Cholera therapy with tetracycline or chloramphenicol caused a highly significant reduction in the duration of diarrhoea and of positive culture, in stool volume, and in intravenous fluid requirement as compared with the results in controls who received intravenous fluid therapy only. Streptomycin was also effective, but to a lesser degree; paromomycin was of little value. The severity of dehydration on admission was significantly related to subsequent duration of diarrhoea regardless of whether antibiotics were given. Increasing age was associated with more prolonged purging in patients receiving antibiotics. Increasing the dose of tetracycline to 2 to 3 times that usually administered, or prolonging treatment from 2 to 4 days, did not enhance the therapeutic results. The effect of tetracycline was apparent within a few hours of administration. Bacteriological relapses were seen after discontinuation of therapy in all treatment groups, but were not due to the development of resistant bacteria. PMID:4865453

  2. Antibiotics before surgery.

    PubMed

    Kaatz, B

    1996-01-01

    The antimicrobial era (along with greater surgical skill and precision) has brought us relative safety for procedures that previously were fraught with danger. Civil War amputation surgeries, for example, had an extraordinarily high incidence of infections and mortality. Staying aware of and avoiding the small, but real, risks associated with surgical antibiotic prophylaxis will help sustain the advances we enjoy today. PMID:8650524

  3. Lyme Disease 'Biofilm' Eludes Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_157467.html Lyme Disease 'Biofilm' Eludes Antibiotics: Report Germ forms slimy layer that makes it ... bacteria that causes Lyme disease protects itself from antibiotics by forming a slime-like layer called a ...

  4. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  5. Discovery research: the scientific challenge of finding new antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Livermore, David M

    2011-09-01

    The dwindling supply of new antibiotics largely reflects regulatory and commercial challenges, but also a failure of discovery. In the 1990s the pharmaceutical industry abandoned its classical ways of seeking antibiotics and instead adopted a strategy that combined genomics with high-throughput screening of existing compound libraries. Too much emphasis was placed on identifying targets and molecules that bound to them, and too little emphasis was placed on the ability of these molecules to permeate bacteria, evade efflux and avoid mutational resistance; moreover, the compound libraries were systematically biased against antibiotics. The sorry result is that no antibiotic found by this strategy has yet entered clinical use and many major pharmaceutical companies have abandoned antibiotic discovery. Although a raft of start-up companies-variously financed by venture capital, charity or public money--are now finding new antibiotic compounds (some of them very promising in vitro or in early trials), their development through Phase III depends on financial commitments from large pharmaceutical companies, where the discouraging regulatory environment and the poor likely return on investment remain paramount issues. PMID:21700626

  6. Fluid distribution kinetics during cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Törnudd, Mattias; Hahn, Robert G.; Zdolsek, Joachim H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the isovolumetric distribution kinetics of crystalloid fluid during cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS: Ten patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting participated in this prospective observational study. The blood hemoglobin and the serum albumin and sodium concentrations were measured repeatedly during the distribution of priming solution (Ringer's acetate 1470 ml and mannitol 15% 200 ml) and initial cardioplegia. The rate of crystalloid fluid distribution was calculated based on 3-min Hb changes. The preoperative blood volume was extrapolated from the marked hemodilution occurring during the onset of cardiopulmonary bypass. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01115166. RESULTS: The distribution half-time of Ringer's acetate averaged 8 minutes, corresponding to a transcapillary escape rate of 0.38 ml/kg/min. The intravascular albumin mass increased by 5.4% according to mass balance calculations. The preoperative blood volume, as extrapolated from the drop in hemoglobin concentration by 32% (mean) at the beginning of cardiopulmonary bypass, was 0.6-1.2 L less than that estimated by anthropometric methods (p<0.02). The mass balance of sodium indicated a translocation from the intracellular to the extracellular fluid space in 8 of the 10 patients, with a median volume of 236 ml. CONCLUSIONS: The distribution half-time of Ringer's solution during isovolumetric cardiopulmonary bypass was 8 minutes, which is the same as for crystalloid fluid infusions in healthy subjects. The intravascular albumin mass increased. Most patients were hypovolemic prior to the start of anesthesia. Intracellular edema did not occur. PMID:25141112

  7. A new strategy to fight antimicrobial resistance: the revival of old antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Cassir, Nadim; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Brouqui, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of hospital and community-acquired infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens is limiting the options for effective antibiotic therapy. Moreover, this alarming spread of antimicrobial resistance has not been paralleled by the development of novel antimicrobials. Resistance to the scarce new antibiotics is also emerging. In this context, the rational use of older antibiotics could represent an alternative to the treatment of MDR bacterial pathogens. It would help to optimize the armamentarium of antibiotics in the way to preserve new antibiotics and avoid the prescription of molecules known to favor the spread of resistance (i.e., quinolones). Furthermore, in a global economical perspective, this could represent a useful public health orientation knowing that several of these cheapest “forgotten” antibiotics are not available in many countries. We will review here the successful treatment of MDR bacterial infections with the use of old antibiotics and discuss their place in current practice. PMID:25368610

  8. Treponemycin, a nitrile antibiotic active against Treponema hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed

    Singh, S K; Gurusiddaiah, S; Whalen, J W

    1985-02-01

    Two strains of Streptomyces sp. (isolates 275 and 124) were isolated from soil samples collected from the fields around Lewiston, Idaho. Based on their cellular morphology and physiology, the two isolates were identified as Streptomyces albovinaceous. Both isolates produced an antibiotic when grown in liquid culture medium containing homogenized oats. The antibiotic (treponemycin) was isolated from the culture broth by solvent extraction and purified by silica gel column and preparative thin-layer chromatographies. Treponemycin is a crystalline light-yellow compound with an mp of 93 to 95 degrees C, levorotatory, and soluble in most organic solvents. It is sparingly soluble in water but insoluble in petroleum ether. On the basis of elemental analysis and mass spectral data, the molecular formula of the antibiotic was deduced to be C28H43O6N. The infrared spectrum of the antibiotic indicated the presence of unsaturation, nitrile, lactone, or ester or all three functions, and carbonyl functions in the molecule. A sharp infrared absorption band for nitrile at 2,220 cm-1 and the presence of an unsaturated group indicated that the nitrile function may be attached to an unsaturated carbon atom. The presence of dienenitrile functions was further supported by the UV absorption spectrum of the antibiotic, which gave a UVmax at 257 nm. The proton magnetic resonance spectrum of the antibiotic did not give any peak which could be exchanged with deuterated water, which is an indication of the absence of carboxylic and hydroxyl functions in the molecule. All of the functional groupings indicated by the infrared and UV spectra of the molecule were further confirmed by the 13C-magnetic resonance spectrum of the compound. A brief hydrogenation of the antibiotic yielded a biologically active tetrahydro derivative, whereas extended hydrogenation produced an inactive primary amine. Mild alkaline hydrolysis and subsequent esterification of the antibiotic with diazomethane produced an

  9. Investigating the Antibiotic Resistance Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Michael; Lawson, Amy L.

    1998-01-01

    Seeks to give teachers useful information on the extent of the problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, mechanisms bacteria use to resist antibiotics, the causes of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms, and practices that can prevent or reverse this trend. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  10. Polylactide-polyglycolide antibiotic implants.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Kevin; Feschuk, Connie

    2005-08-01

    Surgeons continually struggle to reduce orthopaedic infections, but no current treatment offers minimum side effects with maximum effectiveness. Antibiotics mixed in plaster of paris have been successful in treating large bony defects in patients with chronic osteomyelitis, and have the advantage of being well tolerated and absorbed by the body. Antibiotics impregnated in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) have offered local antibiotic delivery with some success. However, the effect of the antibiotic on the bone cement, the inconsistent elution of the antibiotic, and the need to remove the PMMA implant drives the need for a better system of antibiotic delivery. Polymers or copolymers of antibiotic-impregnated polylactic acid, polyglycolic acid or polyparadioxanone may provide an absorbable system for localized antibiotic delivery. Similar biodegradable systems used to treat small bone fractures have been successful with minimal side effects. In vitro studies have shown promising results of antibiotic elution from bioabsorbable microspheres and beads. Animal in vivo tests have shown that antibiotic impregnated polymers can successfully treat induced osteomyelitis in rabbits and dogs. These studies have provided consistent reproducible results, and now it is time to plan human trials to assess the efficacy of antibiotic microspheres implanted in infected bone and to plan in vivo and in vitro animal testing to investigate the feasibility of antibiotic-polymer-coated components. PMID:16056034

  11. Too Many People Still Take Unneeded Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotics Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotics About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us ...

  12. What Can Be Done about Antibiotic Resistance?

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotics for treating human disease. (See Antibiotics in agriculture .) Is there any international action on the antibiotic ... and reducing antibiotic use in animal farming and agriculture. Experts agree that a global system for tracking ...

  13. Detection of Antibiotics Produced by Soil and Rhizosphere Microbes In Situ

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics are small organic molecules of microbial origin that at low concentrations, are deleterious to the growth or metabolism of other microorganisms. More broadly, antibiotics constitute a functionally defined subset of the diverse array of bioactive metabolites produced by microorganisms in ...

  14. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really replace antibiotics remains a controversial issue. This review summarizes recent development and perspectives of alternatives to antibiotics. The mechanism of actions, applications, and prospectives of the alternatives such as immunity modulating agents, bacteriophages and their lysins, antimicrobial peptides, pro-, pre-, and synbiotics, plant extracts, inhibitors targeting pathogenicity (bacterial quorum sensing, biofilm, and virulence), and feeding enzymes are thoroughly discussed. Lastly, the feasibility of alternatives to antibiotics is deeply analyzed. It is hard to conclude that the alternatives might substitute antibiotics in veterinary medicine in the foreseeable future. At the present time, prudent use of antibiotics and the establishment of scientific monitoring systems are the best and fastest way to limit the adverse effects of the abuse of antibiotics and to ensure the safety of animal-derived food and environment. PMID:24860564

  15. Specialised metabolites regulating antibiotic biosynthesis in Streptomyces spp.

    PubMed

    Niu, Guoqing; Chater, Keith F; Tian, Yuqing; Zhang, Jihui; Tan, Huarong

    2016-07-01

    Streptomyces bacteria are the major source of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites. Various environmental and physiological conditions affect the onset and level of production of each antibiotic by influencing concentrations of the ligands for conserved global regulatory proteins. In addition, as reviewed here, well-known autoregulators such as γ-butyrolactones, themselves products of secondary metabolism, accumulate late in growth to concentrations allowing their effective interaction with cognate binding proteins, in a necessary prelude to antibiotic biosynthesis. Most autoregulator binding proteins target the conserved global regulatory gene adpA, and/or regulatory genes for 'cluster-situated regulators' (CSRs) linked to antibiotic biosynthetic gene clusters. It now appears that some CSRs bind intermediates and end products of antibiotic biosynthesis, with regulatory effects interwoven with those of autoregulators. These ligands can exert cross-pathway effects within producers of more than one antibiotic, and when excreted into the extracellular environment may have population-wide effects on production, and mediate interactions with neighbouring microorganisms in natural communities, influencing speciation. Greater understanding of these autoregulatory and cross-regulatory activities may aid the discovery of new signalling molecules and their use in activating cryptic antibiotic biosynthetic pathways. PMID:27288284

  16. Generic antibiotics in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Shigeru; Watanabe, Akira

    2012-08-01

    Generic drugs have been used extensively in many developed countries, although their use in Japan has been limited. Generic drugs reduce drug expenses and thereby national medical expenditure. Because generic drugs provide advantages for both public administration and consumers, it is expected that they will be more widely used in the future. However, the diffusion rate of generic drugs in Japan is quite low compared with that of other developed countries. An investigation on generic drugs conducted by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan revealed that 17.2 % of doctors and 37.2 % of patients had not used generic drugs. The major reasons for this low use rate included distrust of off-patent products and lower drug price margin compared with the brand name drug. The generic drugs available in the market include external drugs such as wet packs, antihypertensive agents, analgesics, anticancer drugs, and antibiotics. Among them, antibiotics are frequently used in cases of acute infectious diseases. When the treatment of these infections is delayed, the infection might be aggravated rapidly. The pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamics (PK-PD) theory has been adopted in recent chemotherapy, and in many cases, the most appropriate dosage and administration of antibiotics are determined for individual patients considering renal function; high-dosage antibiotics are used preferably for a short duration. Therefore, a highly detailed antimicrobial agent is necessary. However, some of the generic antibiotics have less antibacterial potency or solubility than the brand name products. We showed that the potency of the generic products of vancomycin and teicoplanin is lower than that of the branded drugs by 14.6 % and 17.3 %, respectively. Furthermore, we confirmed that a generic meropenem drug for injection required about 82 s to solubilize in saline, whereas the brand product required only about 21 s. It was thought that the cause may be the difference in size of bulk

  17. Novel TPP-riboswitch activators bypass metabolic enzyme dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Günter; Lünse, Christina; Suckling, Colin; Scott, Fraser

    2014-07-01

    Riboswitches are conserved regions within mRNA molecules that bind specific metabolites and regulate gene expression. TPP-riboswitches, which respond to thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), are involved in the regulation of thiamine metabolism in numerous bacteria. As these regulatory RNAs are often modulating essential biosynthesis pathways they have become increasingly interesting as promising antibacterial targets. Here, we describe thiamine analogs containing a central 1,2,3-triazole group to induce repression of thiM-riboswitch dependent gene expression in different E. coli strains. Additionally, we show that compound activation is dependent on proteins involved in the metabolic pathways of thiamine uptake and synthesis. The most promising molecule, triazolethiamine (TT), shows concentration dependent reporter gene repression that is dependent on the presence of thiamine kinase ThiK, whereas the effect of pyrithiamine (PT), a known TPP-riboswitch modulator, is ThiK independent. We further show that this dependence can be bypassed by triazolethiamine-derivatives that bear phosphate-mimicking moieties. As triazolethiamine reveals superior activity compared to pyrithiamine, it represents a very promising starting point for developing novel antibacterial compounds that target TPP-riboswitches. Riboswitch-targeting compounds engage diverse endogenous mechanisms to attain in vivo activity. These findings are of importance for the understanding of compounds that require metabolic activation to achieve effective riboswitch modulation and they enable the design of novel compound generations that are independent of endogenous activation mechanisms.

  18. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alan P.

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance involves the collection and analysis of data for the detection and monitoring of threats to public health. Surveillance should also inform as to the epidemiology of the threat and its burden in the population. A further key component of surveillance is the timely feedback of data to stakeholders with a view to generating action aimed at reducing or preventing the public health threat being monitored. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance involves the collection of antibiotic susceptibility test results undertaken by microbiology laboratories on bacteria isolated from clinical samples sent for investigation. Correlation of these data with demographic and clinical data for the patient populations from whom the pathogens were isolated gives insight into the underlying epidemiology and facilitates the formulation of rational interventions aimed at reducing the burden of resistance. This article describes a range of surveillance activities that have been undertaken in the UK over a number of years, together with current interventions being implemented. These activities are not only of national importance but form part of the international response to the global threat posed by antibiotic resistance. PMID:25918439

  19. Antibiotics and evolution: food for thought.

    PubMed

    Strachan, C R; Davies, J

    2016-03-01

    The role of secondary metabolites in effecting and modulating reactions during early biochemical evolution has been largely unappreciated. It is possible that low molecular weight effectors were gradually replaced by polypeptides as polymerizing reactions became more complex, but retained some ability to interact with original receptor sites. Indeed, by reviewing the era of antibiotics in this light we can begin to reconcile the ancient and contemporary activities of these molecules. The corollary being that secondary metabolites participate in a vast array of interactions in nature and investigating their intended receptors will be revealing in both pharmacological and evolutionary terms. PMID:26527578

  20. Interstellar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.

    1987-09-01

    Some 70 different molecular species have so far been detected variously in diffuse interstellar clouds, dense interstellar clouds, and circumstellar shells. Only simple (diatomic and triatomic) species exist in diffuse clouds because of the penetration of destructive UV radiations, whereas more complex (polyatomic) molecules survive in dense clouds as a result of the shielding against this UV radiation provided by dust grains. A current list of interstellar molecules is given together with a few other molecular species that have so far been detected only in circumstellar shells. Also listed are those interstellar species that contain rare isotopes of several elements. The gas phase ion chemistry is outlined via which the observed molecules are synthesized, and the process by which enrichment of the rare isotopes occurs in some interstellar molecules is described.

  1. Interstellar Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  2. Modeling Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The molecule modeling method known as Multibody Order (N) Dynamics, or MBO(N)D, was developed by Moldyn, Inc. at Goddard Space Flight Center through funding provided by the SBIR program. The software can model the dynamics of molecules through technology which stimulates low-frequency molecular motions and properties, such as movements among a molecule's constituent parts. With MBO(N)D, a molecule is substructured into a set of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies. These bodies replace the computation burden of mapping individual atoms. Moldyn's technology cuts computation time while increasing accuracy. The MBO(N)D technology is available as Insight II 97.0 from Molecular Simulations, Inc. Currently the technology is used to account for forces on spacecraft parts and to perform molecular analyses for pharmaceutical purposes. It permits the solution of molecular dynamics problems on a moderate workstation, as opposed to on a supercomputer.

  3. An update on coronary bypass graft intervention

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) remains one of the most common surgical procedures. In spite of great advancements like arterial grafts and off-pump bypass procedure, recurrent ischaemia may ensue with the lesions of the graft. Early postoperative ischaemia (<30 days) is due to graft occlusion or stenosis, and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is frequently feasible. Late postoperative ischaemia (>3 years) is most often due to a saphenous vein graft (SVG) lesion. Multiple diseased grafts, reduced left ventricular function, and available arterial conduits favour repeat CABG, whereas, a patent left internal mammary artery to left anterior descending favours PCI. Embolic protection reduces atheroembolic myocardial infarction during PCI of SVG and should be routinely used in treatment of SVG lesions. A variety of vasodilators may reduce the risk of or mitigate the consequences of no-reflow. Drug-eluting stents reduce restenosis in SVG grafts, and have become the default strategy for many interventionalists. PMID:27326165

  4. Enumerating molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  5. A variable current bypass shunt for electromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, M.M.; Lipari, J.J.

    1992-11-01

    An IGBT is used to control the current in bypass circuits that vary the relative strength of magnets connected in series. Each circuit consists of a water cooled assembly rated for continuous operation at 70 Volts and 0--50 Amperes DC, with 1 KV insulation between control/monitoring elements and magnets. The circuit operates as a 10KHz PWM switcher that includes filters and transient protection.

  6. TRAS principles blight arterial bypass and plasty.

    PubMed

    Kothari, M V; Mehta, L A; Kothari, V M

    1997-01-01

    A new concept--Tissue Requisitions (Principle I)/Relinquishes (Principle II) Arterial Supply--of TRAS principles is introduced to help appreciate the failures/successes of modern medicine's attempts at restoring arterial flow in luminally compromised coronary/carotid fields, an invasive branch rightly called vascular ReRheology, which comprises diagnosing/treating arterial blocks. The technical wizardry of arterial reconstruction (bypass) or lumen--restoration (plasty) has to reckon with the TRAS principles all the time. PMID:10740714

  7. [Robot-assisted Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Norihiko; Watanabe, Go

    2016-07-01

    The application for robot-assisted coronary surgery ranges from internal thoracic artery (ITA) harvesting with hand-sewn anastomoses to totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass grafting (TECAB), either on- or off-pump. The bilateral IMA can be harvested with the aid of a surgical robot and then multivessel bypass grafting can follow. Such robot-assisted minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting is called "ThoraCAB". Surgical robots cannot only endoscopically harvest the ITA but they can also anastomose the coronary artery in TECAB. But TECAB still has the difficulties, such as narrow surgical field in Japanese patients. Both procedures have the significant advantages of minimizing surgical trauma, such as reduced comlications, faster return back to normal activities and being improved cosmesis, and which have resulted in the development of minimally invasive surgery. Robot-assisted cardiac surgery for structural heart disease has been approved by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) since December 2015, however, robot-assisted cardiac surgery for TECAB has not been approved yet in Japan. PMID:27440015

  8. Vein harvesting and techniques for infrainguinal bypass.

    PubMed

    Albäck, Anders; Saarinen, Eva; Venermo, Maarit

    2016-04-01

    In order to achieve good long term results after bypass surgery, alongside with good inflow and outflow arteries, the bypass graft material also has an important role. The best patency and limb salvage rates are achieved with autologous vein. If great saphenous vein is not available, acceptable long-term results can be achieved with arm veins and lesser saphenous vein. The quality and size of the vein are important. A small-caliber vein, increased wall thickness, postphlebitic changes and varicosities are associated with a risk of early failure. Preoperative vein mapping with ultrasound reduces readmissions and postoperative surgical site infections. During the mapping, the vein to be used and its main tributaries are marked with a permanent marker pen. To reduce wound complication rates we recommend bridged incisions in vein harvesting. Endoscopic vein harvesting seems to have no benefit compared to open techniques in lower limb bypasses, and has been associated with higher risk of primary patency loss at one year. With deep tunneling of the graft the problems caused by wound infection can be avoided. PMID:26837257

  9. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions.

    PubMed

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This omission creates a skewed view, which emphasizes short-term efficacy and ignores the long-term consequences to the patient and other people. We offer a framework for addressing antibiotic resistance in systematic reviews. We suggest that the data on background resistance in the original trials should be reported and taken into account when interpreting results. Data on emergence of resistance (whether in the body reservoirs or in the bacteria causing infection) are important outcomes. Emergence of resistance should be taken into account when interpreting the evidence on antibiotic treatment in randomized controlled trials or systematic reviews. PMID:27169438

  10. Rationalizing antibiotic use to limit antibiotic resistance in India+

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance, a global concern, is particularly pressing in developing nations, including India, where the burden of infectious disease is high and healthcare spending is low. The Global Antibiotic Resistance Partnership (GARP) was established to develop actionable policy recommendations specifically relevant to low- and middle-income countries where suboptimal access to antibiotics - not a major concern in high-income countries - is possibly as severe a problem as is the spread of resistant organisms. This report summarizes the situation as it is known regarding antibiotic use and growing resistance in India and recommends short and long term actions. Recommendations aim at (i) reducing the need for antibiotics; (ii) lowering resistance-enhancing drug pressure through improved antibiotic targeting, and (iii) eliminating antibiotic use for growth promotion in agriculture. The highest priority needs to be given to (i) national surveillance of antibiotic resistance and antibiotic use - better information to underpin decisions on standard treatment guidelines, education and other actions, as well as to monitor changes over time; (ii) increasing the use of diagnostic tests, which necessitates behavioural changes and improvements in microbiology laboratory capacity; (iii) setting up and/or strengthening infection control committees in hospitals; and (iv) restricting the use of antibiotics for non-therapeutic uses in agriculture. These interventions should help to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance, improve public health directly, benefit the populace and reduce pressure on the healthcare system. Finally, increasing the types and coverage of childhood vaccines offered by the government would reduce the disease burden enormously and spare antibiotics. PMID:21985810

  11. Optimizing Antibiotic Use in Nursing Homes Through Antibiotic Stewardship.

    PubMed

    Sloane, Philip D; Huslage, Kirk; Kistler, Christine E; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic stewardship is becoming a requirement for nursing homes. Programs should be interdisciplinary and multifaceted; should have support from nursing home administrators; and should aim to promote antibiotics only when needed, not just in case. Recommended components include use of evidence-based guidelines; ongoing monitoring of antibiotic prescriptions, cultures, and study results; monitoring of health outcomes; use of nursing home-specific antibiograms; regular reporting and feedback to medical providers and nurses; and education of residents and families. PMID:27621341

  12. Antibiotic resistance in pediatric urology

    PubMed Central

    Copp, Hillary L.

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics are a mainstay in the treatment of bacterial infections, though their use is a primary risk factor for the development of antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem in pediatric urology as demonstrated by increased uropathogen resistance. Lack of urine testing, nonselective use of prophylaxis, and poor empiric prescribing practices exacerbate this problem. This article reviews antibiotic utilization in pediatric urology with emphasis on modifiable practice patterns to potentially help mitigate the growing rates of antibiotic resistance. This includes urine testing to only treat when indicated and tailor broad-spectrum therapy as able; selective application of antibiotic prophylaxis to patients with high-grade vesicoureteral reflux and hydronephrosis with counseling regarding the importance of compliance; and using local antiobiograms, particularly pediatric-specific antiobiograms, with inpatient versus outpatient data. PMID:24688601

  13. Topical antibiotics in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Hirschmann, J V

    1988-11-01

    Topical antibiotics are safe and effective in certain conditions, primarily acne, rosacea, and nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus. They are useful in impetigo only when it is of limited extent. Their efficacy in other pyodermas is unclear, although mupirocin is probably effective in many cases. In "infected eczema" that does not require systemic therapy they seem to add little to what topical corticosteroids alone achieve. They are ineffective in reducing the incidence of significant infection with indwelling intravenous catheters. They are safe preparations, but extensive use, especially in closed populations, may encourage the emergence of resistant bacteria. PMID:2972259

  14. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Korp, Juliane; Vela Gurovic, María S

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism. PMID:27340451

  15. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria.

    PubMed

    Korp, Juliane; Vela Gurovic, María S; Nett, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism. PMID:27340451

  16. Ultrathin antibiotic walled microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Khopade, Ajay J; Arulsudar, N; Khopade, Surekha A; Hartmann, J

    2005-01-01

    Ultrathin microcapsules comprised of anionic polyelectrolytes (PE) and a polycationic aminoglycoside (AmG) antibiotic drug were prepared by depositing PE/AmG multilayers on zinc oxide (ZnO) colloid particles using the layer-by-layer self-assembly technique and subsequently dissolving the ZnO templated cores. The polyelectrolytes, dextran sulfate sodium (DxS) and poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS), were selected owing to their different backbone structure. An aminoglycoside, tobramycin sulfate (TbS), was used for studying DxS/TbS or PSS/TbS multilayer films. The multilayer growth on ZnO cores was characterized by alternating zeta potential values that were different for the DxS/TbS and PSS/TbS multilayers due to the PE chemistry and its interaction with Zn(2+) ions. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy provide evidence of PE/TbS multilayer coating on ZnO core particles. The slow acid-decomposition of the ZnO cores using weak organic acids and the presence of sufficient quantity of Zn(2+) in the dispersion were required to produce antibiotic multilayer capsules. There was no difference in the morphological characteristics of the two types of capsules; although, the yield for [PSS/TbS](5) capsules was significantly higher than for [DxS/TbS](5) capsules which was related to the physicochemical properties of DxS/TbS/Zn(2+) and PSS/TbS/Zn(2+) complexes forming the capsule wall. The TbS quantity in the multilayer films was determined using a quartz crystal microbalance and high performance liquid chromatography techniques which showed less TbS loading in both, capsules and multilayers on planar gold substrate, than the theoretical DxS:TbS or PSS:TbS stoichiometric ratio. The decomposition of the [PE/TbS](6) multilayers was fastest in physiological buffer followed by mannitol and water. The decomposition rate of the [PSS/TbS](6) multilayers was slower than [DxS/TbS](6) monolayers. The incomplete decomposition of DxS/TbS under saline conditions suggests the major role of

  17. Treating appendicitis with antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2016-03-01

    A nonsurgical approach using antimicrobial agents has been advocated as the initial treatment of uncomplicated appendicitis. Several studies and meta-analyses explored this approach. Because many of these studies included individuals with resolving appendicitis, their results were biased. Antimicrobials, however, are warranted and needed for the management of surgical high-risk patients with perforated appendicitis and those with localized abscess or phlegmon. Randomized placebo-controlled trials that focus on early identification of complicated acute appendicitis patients needing surgery and that prospectively evaluate the optimal use of antibiotic treatment in patients with uncomplicated acute appendicitis are warranted. PMID:26689849

  18. 34 CFR 300.191 - Provisions for services under a by-pass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Provisions for services under a by-pass. 300.191 Section... Provisions for services under a by-pass. (a) Before implementing a by-pass, the Secretary consults with... under the by-pass. (b) After determining that a by-pass is required, the Secretary arranges for...

  19. 34 CFR 300.191 - Provisions for services under a by-pass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Provisions for services under a by-pass. 300.191... Provisions for services under a by-pass. (a) Before implementing a by-pass, the Secretary consults with... under the by-pass. (b) After determining that a by-pass is required, the Secretary arranges for...

  20. 34 CFR 300.191 - Provisions for services under a by-pass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Provisions for services under a by-pass. 300.191... Provisions for services under a by-pass. (a) Before implementing a by-pass, the Secretary consults with... under the by-pass. (b) After determining that a by-pass is required, the Secretary arranges for...

  1. 34 CFR 300.191 - Provisions for services under a by-pass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Provisions for services under a by-pass. 300.191... Provisions for services under a by-pass. (a) Before implementing a by-pass, the Secretary consults with... under the by-pass. (b) After determining that a by-pass is required, the Secretary arranges for...

  2. 34 CFR 300.191 - Provisions for services under a by-pass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Provisions for services under a by-pass. 300.191 Section... Provisions for services under a by-pass. (a) Before implementing a by-pass, the Secretary consults with... under the by-pass. (b) After determining that a by-pass is required, the Secretary arranges for...

  3. A new antitumor antibiotic, kazusamycin.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, I; Komiyama, K; Oka, H; Okada, K; Tomisaka, S; Miyano, T; Takano, S

    1984-07-01

    A new antibiotic kazusamycin, was isolated from the culture broth of Streptomyces sp. No. 81-484, which shows antitumor activity against experimental murine tumors. This antibiotic did not possess antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, but showed strong cytotoxic activity against HeLa cells in vitro. The chemical and physico-chemical properties of kazusamycin suggest that the molecular formula of this antibiotic is C33H48O7 (MW 556). PMID:6432763

  4. Prothracarcin, a novel antitumor antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, K; Kawamoto, I; Tomita, F; Morimoto, M; Fujimoto, K

    1982-08-01

    A novel antibiotic, prothracarcin was isolated from the culture broth of Streptomyces umbrosus subsp. raffinophilus DO-62. The antibiotic has the molecular formula of C14H14N2O and belongs to the pyrrolo [1,4]benzodiazepine antibiotics. Its structure has been elucidated by mass and NMR spectra. It is active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and experimental murine tumor sarcoma 180 and leukemia P388. PMID:7142014

  5. Liquid antibiotics in bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Y. H.; Tai, C. L.; Hsu, H. Y.; Hsieh, P. H.; Lee, M. S.; Ueng, S. W. N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to compare the elution characteristics, antimicrobial activity and mechanical properties of antibiotic-loaded bone cement (ALBC) loaded with powdered antibiotic, powdered antibiotic with inert filler (xylitol), or liquid antibiotic, particularly focusing on vancomycin and amphotericin B. Methods Cement specimens loaded with 2 g of vancomycin or amphotericin B powder (powder group), 2 g of antibiotic powder and 2 g of xylitol (xylitol group) or 12 ml of antibiotic solution containing 2 g of antibiotic (liquid group) were tested. Results Vancomycin elution was enhanced by 234% in the liquid group and by 12% in the xylitol group compared with the powder group. Amphotericin B elution was enhanced by 265% in the liquid group and by 65% in the xylitol group compared with the powder group. Based on the disk-diffusion assay, the eluate samples of vancomycin-loaded ALBC of the liquid group exhibited a significantly larger inhibitory zone than samples of the powder or the xylitol group. Regarding the ALBCs loaded with amphotericin B, only the eluate samples of the liquid group exhibited a clear inhibitory zone, which was not observed in either the xylitol or the powder groups. The ultimate compressive strength was significantly reduced in specimens containing liquid antibiotics. Conclusions Adding vancomycin or amphotericin B antibiotic powder in distilled water before mixing with bone cement can significantly improve the efficiency of antibiotic release than can loading ALBC with the same dose of antibiotic powder. This simple and effective method for preparation of ALBCs can significantly improve the efficiency of antibiotic release in ALBCs. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:246–51. PMID:25104836

  6. Antibiotic consumption and antibiotic stewardship in Swedish hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Skoog, Gunilla; Ternhag, Anders; Giske, Christian G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this paper was to describe and analyze the effect of antibiotic policy changes on antibiotic consumption in Swedish hospitals and to review antibiotic stewardship in Swedish hospitals. Results The main findings were: 1) Antibiotic consumption has significantly increased in Swedish hospitals over the last decade. The consumption of cephalosporins has decreased, whereas that of most other drugs including piperacillin-tazobactam, carbapenems, and penicillinase-sensitive and -resistant penicillins has increased and replaced cephalosporins. 2) Invasive infections caused by ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae have increased, but the proportion of pathogens resistant to third-generation cephalosporins causing invasive infections is still very low in a European and international perspective. Furthermore, the following gaps in knowledge were identified: 1) lack of national, regional, and local data on the incidence of antibiotic resistance among bacteria causing hospital-acquired infections e.g. bloodstream infections and hospital-acquired pneumonia—data on which standard treatment guidelines should be based; 2) lack of data on the incidence of Clostridium difficile infections and the effect of change of antibiotic policies on the incidence of C. difficile infections and infections caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens; and 3) lack of prospective surveillance programs regarding appropriate antibiotic treatment, including selection of optimal antimicrobial drug regimens, dosage, duration of therapy, and adverse ecological effects such as increases in C. difficile infections and emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Conclusions Evidence-based actions to improve antibiotic use and to slow down the problem of antibiotic resistance need to be strengthened. The effect of such actions should be analyzed, and standard treatment guidelines should be continuously updated at national, regional, and local levels. PMID:24724823

  7. A β-Lactamase-Imprinted Responsive Hydrogel for the Treatment of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Dong, Kai; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-07-01

    Antibiotics play important roles in infection treatment and prevention. However, the effectiveness of antibiotics is now threatened by the prevalence of drug-resistant bacteria. Furthermore, antibiotic abuse and residues in the environment cause serious health issues. In this study, a stimuli-responsive imprinted hydrogel was fabricated by using β-lactamase produced by bacteria for deactivating antibiotics as the template molecule. The imprinted hydrogel could initially trap β-lactamase excreted by drug-resistant bacteria, thus making bacteria sensitive to antibiotics. After the bactericidal treatment, the "imprinted sites" on the hydrogel could be reversibly abolished with a temperature stimulus, which resulted in the reactivation of β-lactamase to degrade antibiotic residues. We also present an example of the use of this antibacterial design to treat wound infection. PMID:27159893

  8. Ionomycin, a new polyether antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Liu, W C; Slusarchyk, D S; Astle, G; Trejo, W H; Brown, W E; Meyers, E

    1978-09-01

    Ionomycin, a new polyether antibiotic with a high affinity for calcium ions, is obtained in pure form from fermentation broths of Streptomyces conglobatus sp. nov. Trejo by solvent extraction. It is unique amongst known polyether antibiotics in that it has a UV absorption maximum at 300 nm. thereby distinguishing it from other antibiotics of its class. The Ca salt has the molecular formula C41H70O9Ca. Ionomycin is a narrow spectrum antibiotic being active against Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:711623

  9. Heat exchanger bypass system for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    A heat exchanger bypass system for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The bypass system operates to pass strong solution from the generator around the heat exchanger to the absorber of the absorption refrigeration system when strong solution builds up in the generator above a selected level indicative of solidification of strong solution in the heat exchanger or other such blockage. The bypass system includes a bypass line with a gooseneck located in the generator for controlling flow of strong solution into the bypass line and for preventing refrigerant vapor in the generator from entering the bypass line during normal operation of the refrigeration system. Also, the bypass line includes a trap section filled with liquid for providing a barrier to maintain the normal pressure difference between the generator and the absorber even when the gooseneck of the bypass line is exposed to refrigerant vapor in the generator. Strong solution, which may accumulate in the trap section of the bypass line, is diluted, to prevent solidification, by supplying weak solution to the trap section from a purge system for the absorption refrigeration system.

  10. Jejunioleal Bypass Procedures in Morbid Obesity: Preoperative Psychological Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Warren W.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Seventy patients who averaged 155 percent overweight and requested jejunioleal bypass surgery as a treatment intervention for morbid obesity were studied preoperatively for prominent psychological characteristics. (Author)

  11. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Rubin, D F

    1981-04-01

    Dermatologists often prescribe oral tetracycline for the control of acne, primarily, and to a much lesser extent, for the treatment of cutaneous infections. A number of the patients taking tetracycline are also taking birth control pills. A recent article in the British Medical Journal (1980;1:293) indicates that this combination can lead to a failure of the (OC) oral contraceptive. Such failure had been associated with ampicillin as well. It is believed that the mechanism for this was the disturbance in normal gut flora, with consequent effects on bacterial hydrolysis of steroid conjugates. This would interrupt the enterohepatic circulation of contraceptive steroids, resulting in a less than normal concentration of circulating steroids. It was recommended that women taking low-dose OCs take extra precautions against pregnancy during any cycle in which antibiotics are given. In regard to our care of and responsibilities to our patients, and in an era when malpractice suits for all types of reasons are more common, it certainly behooves dermatologists to recognize and be concerned about this potential consequence of prescribing oral antibiotics. PMID:7212735

  12. New Antibiotic Dosing

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Leslie C.; Watt, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Infection is common in premature infants and can cause significant morbidity and mortality. To prevent these devastating consequences, most infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are exposed to antibiotics. However, dosing regimens are often extrapolated from data in adults and older children, increasing the risk for drug toxicity and lack of clinical efficacy because they fail to account for developmental changes in infant physiology. Despite legislation promoting and, in some cases, requiring pediatric drug studies, infants remain therapeutic orphans who often receive drugs "off-label" without data from clinical trials. Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in premature infants have been scarce due to low study consent rates; limited blood volume available to conduct PK studies; difficulty in obtaining blood from infants; limited use of sensitive, low-volume drug concentration assays; and a lack of expertise in pediatric modeling and simulation. However, newer technologies are emerging with minimal-risk study designs, including ultra-low-volume assays, PK modeling and simulation, and opportunistic drug protocols. With minimal-risk study designs, PK data and dosing regimens for infants are now available for antibiotics commonly used in the NICU, including ampicillin, clindamycin, meropenem, metronidazole, and piperacillin/tazobactam. The discrepancy between previous dosing recommendations extrapolated from adult data and newer dosing regimens based on infant PK studies highlights the need to conduct PK studies in premature infants. PMID:25678003

  13. Embolic Activity During In Vivo Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    DeFoe, Gordon R.; Dame, Norman A.; Farrell, Mark S.; Ross, Cathy S.; Langner, Craig W.; Likosky, Donald S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Neurologic injury after cardiac surgery is principally associated with emboli. Although much work has focused on surgical sources of emboli, less attention has been focused on emboli associated with the heart–lung machine. We tested whether emboli are associated with discrete processes during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). One hundred patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery were enrolled between April 2008 and May 2011 at a single medical center. During each surgical procedure, emboli were counted in three CPB locations: the venous side (Channel 1), before the arterial line filter (Channel 2), and after the arterial line filter (Channel 3). We used prespecified event markers to identify perfusionist interventions. Identical circuits were used on all patients. Of the 100 patients enrolled, 62 underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), 17 underwent isolated valve operations, and 21 underwent CABG plus valve. Median counts across Channels 1, 2, and 3 were 69,853, 3,017, and 1,251, respectively. The greatest contributor to emboli in Channels 1, 2, and 3, respectively, were achieving the calculated CPB flow, opening of the electronic arterial line clamp, and introducing a hemofilter. The circuit technology was efficient in reducing total emboli counts from Channels 1–2 irrespective of the size of the emboli. Nearly 71% of all emboli 30–100 mm in size were removed from the circuit between Channels 2 and 3. No significant association was found between emboli counts and S100B release. Emboli occur frequently during CPB and are predominantly associated with the initiation of bypass, operation of the electronic arterial line clamp, and the initiation of a hemofilter. Continued work to reduce the occurrence of emboli is warranted. PMID:25208432

  14. Bypass diode for a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Rim, Seung Bum; Kim, Taeseok; Smith, David D; Cousins, Peter J

    2013-11-12

    Methods of fabricating bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In once embodiment, a method includes forming a first conductive region of a first conductivity type above a substrate of a solar cell. A second conductive region of a second conductivity type is formed on the first conductive region. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a first conductive region of a first conductivity type above a substrate of a solar cell. A second conductive region of a second conductivity type is formed within, and surrounded by, an uppermost portion of the first conductive region but is not formed in a lowermost portion of the first conductive region.

  15. Flow characteristics in narrowed coronary bypass graft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, S. I.; Bosioc, A.; Bernad, E. S.; Petre, I.; Totorean, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    Tortuous saphenous vein graft (SVG) hemodynamics was investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. Computed tomography (CT) technology is used for non-invasive bypass graft assessment 7 days after surgery. CT investigation shown two regions with severe shape remodelling first is an elbow type contortion and second is a severe curvature with tortuous area reduction. In conclusion, the helical flow induced by vessel torsion may stabilize the blood flow in the distal part of the SVG, reducing the flow disturbance and suppressing the flow separation, but in the distal end of the graft, promote the inflammatory processes in the vessels.

  16. Biotherapeutics as alternatives to antibiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing pressure to limit antibiotic use in agriculture is heightening the need for alternative methods to reduce the adverse effects of clinical and subclinical disease on livestock performance that are currently managed by in-feed antibiotic usage. Immunomodulators have long been sought as such...

  17. Do we need new antibiotics?

    PubMed

    Rolain, J-M; Abat, C; Jimeno, M-T; Fournier, P-E; Raoult, D

    2016-05-01

    For several years, alarmist articles both in mass media and in the scientific community have reported an increase in antibiotic resistance, even citing an inability to treat patients infected with multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDR) responsible for high mortality worldwide. In this review we summarize and discuss the key points associated with the reality of (i) the existence of pandrug-resistant bacteria, (ii) the increase of resistance worldwide, (iii) the link between resistance and death, and (iv) the need to develop new antibiotics. Data on antibiotic resistance in Europe for the main bacteria associated with invasive infections apparently demonstrate that apart from Klebsiella pneumoniae, which is resistant to carbapenems in three countries (Romania, Italy and Greece), the level of resistance to three or more classes of antibiotics (defined as MDR phenotype) has remained low and stable over the last 5 years and that therapeutic options exist both for reference antibiotics and for old antibiotics. The clinical outcome of patients infected by MDR bacteria remains controversial and death rates attributable to MDR bacteria versus non-MDR bacteria are still debated. The arsenal of antibiotics currently available (including 'old antibiotics') suffices for facing the waves of emergence of new bacterial resistance and should be considered as a World Heritage. This heritage should be managed in a non-profit model with international regulatory approval. PMID:27021418

  18. [Antibiotic stability in magistral collyria].

    PubMed

    Tihărău, A; Voiculescu, E; Vancea, S; Teodorescu, A; Cherecheş, S

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a study on physicochemical and and microbiological stability of collyria with such antibiotics as: Kanamicin, Oxacilin, Colistin, Erythromycin and Rifampicin. The authors insist on the necessity of preparing the ophthalmic solution with the antibiotics studies, with solvent for eye drops as provided for by RF IX and keeping at +4 degrees C, at dark. PMID:2101048

  19. Antibiotic use in livestock production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotic usage is a useful and commonly implemented practice in livestock and production agriculture that has progressively gained attention in recent years from consumers of animal products due to concerns about human and environmental health. Sub-therapeutic usage of antibiotics has led to a con...

  20. The Antibiotic Resistance Problem Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The term "antibiotic" was first proposed by Vuillemin in 1889 but was first used in the current sense by Walksman in 1941. An antibiotic is defined as a "derivative produced by the metabolism of microorganisms that possess antibacterial activity at low concentrations and is not toxic to the host." In this article, the author describes how…

  1. Antibiotic resistance: a physicist's view.

    PubMed

    Allen, Rosalind; Waclaw, Bartłomiej

    2016-01-01

    The problem of antibiotic resistance poses challenges across many disciplines. One such challenge is to understand the fundamental science of how antibiotics work, and how resistance to them can emerge. This is an area where physicists can make important contributions. Here, we highlight cases where this is already happening, and suggest directions for further physics involvement in antimicrobial research. PMID:27510596

  2. Prophylactic antibiotics in dermatological surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael R; Paver, Robert

    2016-05-01

    This is a review of the common pathogens of surgical site infections, antibiotic coverage for particular anatomical sites, mechanisms by which surgical site infections occur and the latest data and recommendations for prophylactic antibiotics in the prevention of surgical site infections, infective endocarditis and haematogenous joint infections. Recent evidence-based guidelines on surgical prophylaxis is for restricted indications and a shorter duration of antibiotic prophylaxis in situations where no clinical benefit of prolonged therapy has been proven, in order to minimise the potential adverse ecological and clinical effects associated with antibiotic therapy. This review recommends the cautious use of prophylactic antibiotics in dermatological surgery to help prevent the growing problem of bacterial resistance as well as other morbidity and health-care costs. PMID:25752777

  3. The Prehistory of Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Perry, Julie; Waglechner, Nicholas; Wright, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global problem that is reaching crisis levels. The global collection of resistance genes in clinical and environmental samples is the antibiotic "resistome," and is subject to the selective pressure of human activity. The origin of many modern resistance genes in pathogens is likely environmental bacteria, including antibiotic producing organisms that have existed for millennia. Recent work has uncovered resistance in ancient permafrost, isolated caves, and in human specimens preserved for hundreds of years. Together with bioinformatic analyses on modern-day sequences, these studies predict an ancient origin of resistance that long precedes the use of antibiotics in the clinic. Understanding the history of antibiotic resistance is important in predicting its future evolution. PMID:27252395

  4. Current status of carbapenem antibiotics.

    PubMed

    El-Gamal, Mohammed I; Oh, Chang-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    β-Lactam antibiotics are the most prescribed antibacterial agents. They comprise more than half of all antibiotics. They are considered as the cornerstone of the antibiotic armamentarium. By inhibiting bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, they are highly effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative pathogens in hospitals represents a dangerous threat to public health. Since many bacteria have developed resistance to older agents, new β-lactam antibiotics have been continuously developed. In the late 1970s, a new class of exceptionally broad-spectrum non-traditional β-lactams, carbapenems, was developed. This review article focuses on the new developments related to the field of carbapenems for treatment of bacterial infections, especially those caused by Gram-negative bacteria. The structural features, principal characteristics, and clinical implications of carbapenems including thienamycin, imipenem/cilastatin, panipenem/betamipron, biapenem, tebipenem, tebipenem pivoxil, meropenem, ertapenem, doripenem, lenapenem, and tomopenem are discussed herein. PMID:20615191

  5. Antibiotic delivery by nanobioceramics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ts Sampath; Madhumathi, K

    2016-08-01

    The role of nanotechnology has evinced remarkable interest in the field of drug delivery. Bioceramics are inorganic biomaterials which are frequently used as bone substitutes. They have been explored in drug delivery as carriers for antibiotics, anti-osteoporotic drugs and anticancer drugs. Bioceramic nanoparticles are excellent alternatives to polymers due to their bioactivity, pH and temperature stability, multifunctionality, biocompatibility and tunable biodegradability. The use of bioceramics for local drug delivery in the field of orthopedics offer an efficient, safe mode of drug delivery directly to the surgical site thereby overcoming the limitations of systemic drug delivery. This review focuses on the development and applications of various nanobioceramics employed as drug delivery systems for the treatment of bone infections. PMID:27444496

  6. A call for antibiotic alternatives research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The persistence and spread of antibiotic resistance and decreased profitability of new antibiotics have created the dangerous prospect of ineffective therapies against bacterial diseases. The discovery, development, and application of effective antibiotic alternatives, especially in agriculture, sho...

  7. Bypassing genomic imprinting allows seed development.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Moritz K; Shirzadi, Reza; Dissmeyer, Nico; Dolf, Andreas; Endl, Elmar; Grini, Paul E; Schnittger, Arp

    2007-05-17

    In developing progeny of mammals the two parental genomes are differentially expressed according to imprinting marks, and embryos with only a uniparental genetic contribution die. Gene expression that is dependent on the parent of origin has also been observed in the offspring of flowering plants, and mutations in the imprinting machinery lead to embryonic lethality, primarily affecting the development of the endosperm-a structure in the seed that nourishes the embryo, analogous to the function of the mammalian placenta. Here we have generated Arabidopsis thaliana seeds in which the endosperm is of uniparental, that is, maternal, origin. We demonstrate that imprinting in developing seeds can be bypassed and viable albeit smaller seedlings can develop from seeds lacking a paternal contribution to the endosperm. Bypassing is only possible if the mother is mutant for any of the FIS-class genes, which encode Polycomb group chromatin-modifying factors. Thus, these data provide functional evidence that the action of the FIS complex balances the contribution of the paternal genome. As flowering plants have evolved a special reproduction system with a parallel fusion of two female with two male gametes, our findings support the hypothesis that only with the evolution of double fertilization did the action of the FIS genes become a requirement for seed development. Furthermore, our data argue for a gametophytic origin of endosperm in flowering plants, thereby supporting a hypothesis raised in 1900 by Eduard Strasburger. PMID:17468744

  8. Previous gastric bypass surgery complicating total thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Bianca; Jacobson, Adam S; Alon, Eran E; Via, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Hypocalcemia is a well-known complication of total thyroidectomy. Patients who have previously undergone gastric bypass surgery may be at increased risk of hypocalcemia due to gastrointestinal malabsorption, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and an underlying vitamin D deficiency. We present the case of a 58-year-old woman who underwent a total thyroidectomy for the follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma. Her history included Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Following the thyroid surgery, she developed postoperative hypocalcemia that required large doses of oral calcium carbonate (7.5 g/day), oral calcitriol (up to 4 μg/day), intravenous calcium gluconate (2.0 g/day), calcium citrate (2.0 g/day), and ergocalciferol (50,000 IU/day). Her serum calcium levels remained normal on this regimen after hospital discharge despite persistent hypoparathyroidism. Bariatric surgery patients who undergo thyroid surgery require aggressive supplementation to maintain normal serum calcium levels. Preoperative supplementation with calcium and vitamin D is strongly recommended. PMID:25738720

  9. Antibiotic resistance to Propionobacterium acnes: worldwide scenario, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Sardana, Kabir; Gupta, Tanvi; Garg, Vijay K; Ghunawat, Sneha

    2015-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance in cutaneous Propionobacterium is a global problem. As a general rule, resistance levels are high to macrolides, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and clindamycin, while tetracyclines and levofloxacin have low resistance potential. Newer preparations like doxycycline MR and doxycycline 20 mg are subantimicrobial and may not lead to resistance. Sampling techniques are crucial to determine resistance. Genomic evaluation using 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing can be useful in diagnosing mutations and mapping phylotypes of Propionobacterium acnes. Resistance may lead to slow response and relapses. Apart from benzoyl peroxide, azelaic acid, topical dapsone, oral zinc and retinoids, novel molecules with little resistance potential include octadecenedioic acid, phytosphingosine, lauric acid, retapamulin, resveratrol, T-3912 and NB-003. The use of oral retinoids and non-antibiotics like zinc can prevent resistance and help reduce the dependence on antibiotics. PMID:26025191

  10. Antibiotics and Bacterial Resistance in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Fair, Richard J; Tor, Yitzhak

    2014-01-01

    Dangerous, antibiotic resistant bacteria have been observed with increasing frequency over the past several decades. In this review the factors that have been linked to this phenomenon are addressed. Profiles of bacterial species that are deemed to be particularly concerning at the present time are illustrated. Factors including economic impact, intrinsic and acquired drug resistance, morbidity and mortality rates, and means of infection are taken into account. Synchronously with the waxing of bacterial resistance there has been waning antibiotic development. The approaches that scientists are employing in the pursuit of new antibacterial agents are briefly described. The standings of established antibiotic classes as well as potentially emerging classes are assessed with an emphasis on molecules that have been clinically approved or are in advanced stages of development. Historical perspectives, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum of activity, and preeminent members of each class are discussed. PMID:25232278

  11. At 1050 Gallery, Block 65, view of coaster gate bypass ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    At 1050 Gallery, Block 65, view of coaster gate bypass valve (for turbine-generator unit G-10, this bypass-valve unit manufactured by Western Koppers Co., Fort Wayne, Ind., 1938), looking southeast. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  12. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery URL of this page: https://www.nlm. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features ...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4420 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy return sucker. 870.4420 Section 870.4420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4420 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy...

  14. 46 CFR 154.550 - Excess flow valve: Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Bypass. 154.550 Section 154.550 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... and Process Piping Systems § 154.550 Excess flow valve: Bypass. If the excess flow valve allowed...

  15. 46 CFR 154.550 - Excess flow valve: Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Bypass. 154.550 Section 154.550 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... and Process Piping Systems § 154.550 Excess flow valve: Bypass. If the excess flow valve allowed...

  16. 46 CFR 154.550 - Excess flow valve: Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Bypass. 154.550 Section 154.550 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... and Process Piping Systems § 154.550 Excess flow valve: Bypass. If the excess flow valve allowed...

  17. 46 CFR 154.550 - Excess flow valve: Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Bypass. 154.550 Section 154.550 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... and Process Piping Systems § 154.550 Excess flow valve: Bypass. If the excess flow valve allowed...

  18. 46 CFR 154.550 - Excess flow valve: Bypass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Excess flow valve: Bypass. 154.550 Section 154.550 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... and Process Piping Systems § 154.550 Excess flow valve: Bypass. If the excess flow valve allowed...

  19. 46 CFR 56.20-20 - Valve bypasses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Pipe for bypasses should be at least Schedule 80 seamless... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Valve bypasses. 56.20-20 Section 56.20-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND...

  20. Reverse bias protected solar array with integrated bypass battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for protecting the photovoltaic cells in a photovoltaic (PV) array from reverse bias damage by utilizing a rechargeable battery for bypassing current from a shaded photovoltaic cell or group of cells, avoiding the need for a bypass diode. Further, the method mitigates the voltage degradation of a PV array caused by shaded cells.

  1. Approval and withdrawal of new antibiotics and other antiinfectives in the U.S., 1980-2009.

    PubMed

    Outterson, Kevin; Powers, John H; Seoane-Vazquez, Enrique; Rodriguez-Monguio, Rosa; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2013-01-01

    Numerous reports have noted decreasing numbers of antibiotic approvals. To determine the context for this decline, we examined all new molecule entities (NMEs) and new biologic licenses (NBLs) approved by the FDA from 1980-2009, and compared approval rates of the 61 approved antibiotics to trends in other drug classes. We also tracked withdrawals of approved drugs and found more withdrawals for antibiotics than other drug classes. After adjusting for drugs subsequently withdrawn, the record for antibiotic innovation is less dire than previously reported. We also report problems with the quality of the approved antibiotics studied. Future policies providing incentives for new antibiotic development should not be based on simple numerical targets and key provisions should ensure appropriate quality as well as quantity of antibiotic drug innovation. PMID:24088160

  2. Cardiopulmonary bypass: development of John Gibbon's heart-lung machine

    PubMed Central

    Passaroni, Andréia Cristina; Silva, Marcos Augusto de Moraes; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide a brief review of the development of cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods A review of the literature on the development of extracorporeal circulation techniques, their essential role in cardiovascular surgery, and the complications associated with their use, including hemolysis and inflammation. Results The advancement of extracorporeal circulation techniques has played an essential role in minimizing the complications of cardiopulmonary bypass, which can range from various degrees of tissue injury to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Investigators have long researched the ways in which cardiopulmonary bypass may insult the human body. Potential solutions arose and laid the groundwork for development of safer postoperative care strategies. Conclusion Steady progress has been made in cardiopulmonary bypass in the decades since it was first conceived of by Gibbon. Despite the constant evolution of cardiopulmonary bypass techniques and attempts to minimize their complications, it is still essential that clinicians respect the particularities of each patient's physiological function. PMID:26107456

  3. Hypocupremia-related myeloneuropathy following gastrojejunal bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eric H; Strum, Williamson

    2010-01-01

    Gastrojejunal bypass surgery may be complicated by nutritional deficiencies, including trace elements. Copper, which is absorbed in the duodenum and proximal jejunum, is poorly absorbed when a significant portion of the proximal small intestine is bypassed. However, despite this theoretical risk of hypocupremia in the gastrojejunal bypass patient, reports of symptomatic copper deficiency are very rare, and even then the deficiency is often potentiated by an accelerant, such as concomitant zinc ingestion. We report a case of hypocupremia resulting in hematologic abnormalities and myeloneuropathy after gastrojejunal bypass surgery for morbid obesity. It stresses the importance of recognizing nutritional deficiencies, particularly copper deficiency, because of the possible and serious sequelae of bone marrow suppression and myeloneuropathy. The early recognition and treatment of the symptoms of hypocupremia is emphasized to avoid these long-term sequelae. With the rapidly growing number of patients undergoing gastrojejunal bypass surgery for morbid obesity, the index of suspicion for hypocupremia must be heightened. PMID:21088385

  4. Curing bacteria of antibiotic resistance: reverse antibiotics, a novel class of antibiotics in nature.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Morimoto, Yuh; Baba, Tadashi; Umekita, Maya; Akamatsu, Yuzuru

    2012-06-01

    By screening cultures of soil bacteria, we re-discovered an old antibiotic (nybomycin) as an antibiotic with a novel feature. Nybomycin is active against quinolone-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains with mutated gyrA genes but not against those with intact gyrA genes against which quinolone antibiotics are effective. Nybomycin-resistant mutant strains were generated from a quinolone-resistant, nybomycin-susceptible, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strain Mu 50. The mutants, occurring at an extremely low rate (<1 × 10(-11)/generation), were found to have their gyrA genes back-mutated and to have lost quinolone resistance. Here we describe nybomycin as the first member of a novel class of antibiotics designated 'reverse antibiotics'. PMID:22534508

  5. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Al-Jassim, Nada; Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Mackie, Roderick I

    2013-01-01

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the "perfect microbial storm". Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water. PMID:27029309

  6. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Al-Jassim, Nada; Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2013-01-01

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water. PMID:27029309

  7. Inhaled antibiotics: dry or wet?

    PubMed

    Tiddens, Harm A W M; Bos, Aukje C; Mouton, Johan W; Devadason, Sunalene; Janssens, Hettie M

    2014-11-01

    Dry powder inhalers (DPIs) delivering antibiotics for the suppressive treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients were developed recently and are now increasingly replacing time-consuming nebuliser therapy. Noninferiority studies have shown that the efficacy of inhaled tobramycin delivered by DPI was similar to that of wet nebulisation. However, there are many differences between inhaled antibiotic therapy delivered by DPI and by nebuliser. The question is whether and to what extent inhalation technique and other patient-related factors affect the efficacy of antibiotics delivered by DPI compared with nebulisers. Health professionals should be aware of the differences between dry and wet aerosols, and of patient-related factors that can influence efficacy, in order to personalise treatment, to give appropriate instructions to patients and to better understand the response to the treatment after switching. In this review, key issues of aerosol therapy are discussed in relation to inhaled antibiotic therapy with the aim of optimising the use of both nebulised and DPI antibiotics by patients. An example of these issues is the relationship between airway generation, structural lung changes and local concentrations of the inhaled antibiotics. The pros and cons of dry and wet modes of delivery for inhaled antibiotics are discussed. PMID:25323242

  8. Coupling of mRNA Structure Rearrangement to Ribosome Movement during Bypassing of Non-coding Regions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Coakley, Arthur; O'Connor, Michelle; Petrov, Alexey; O'Leary, Seán E; Atkins, John F; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2015-11-19

    Nearly half of the ribosomes translating a particular bacteriophage T4 mRNA bypass a region of 50 nt, resuming translation 3' of this gap. How this large-scale, specific hop occurs and what determines whether a ribosome bypasses remain unclear. We apply single-molecule fluorescence with zero-mode waveguides to track individual Escherichia coli ribosomes during translation of T4's gene 60 mRNA. Ribosomes that bypass are characterized by a 10- to 20-fold longer pause in a non-canonical rotated state at the take-off codon. During the pause, mRNA secondary structure rearrangements are coupled to ribosome forward movement, facilitated by nascent peptide interactions that disengage the ribosome anticodon-codon interactions for slippage. Close to the landing site, the ribosome then scans mRNA in search of optimal base-pairing interactions. Our results provide a mechanistic and conformational framework for bypassing, highlighting a non-canonical ribosomal state to allow for mRNA structure refolding to drive large-scale ribosome movements. PMID:26590426

  9. Endogenous pulmonary antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, M A; Bowdish, D M; Davidson, D J; Sallenave, J M; Simpson, A J

    2006-05-01

    The human lung produces a variety of peptides and proteins which have intrinsic antimicrobial activity. In general these molecules have broad spectra of antimicrobial activity, kill micro-organisms rapidly, and evade resistance generated by pathogens. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) simultaneously possess immunomodulatory functions, suggesting complex roles for these molecules in regulating the clearance of, and immune response to, invading pathogens. These collective properties have stimulated considerable interest in the potential clinical application of endogenous AMPs. This article outlines the biology of AMPs, their pattern of expression in the lung, and their functions, with reference to both antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activity. We then consider the biological importance of AMPs, before concentrating on the potential to use AMPs to therapeutic effect. The principles discussed in the article apply to innate immune defence throughout the body, but particular emphasis is placed on AMPs in the lung and the potential application to pulmonary infection. PMID:16722137

  10. Antibiotic Treatment of Hidradenitis Suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Bettoli, Vincenzo; Join-Lambert, Olivier; Nassif, Aude

    2016-01-01

    Although hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is not primarily an infectious disease, antibiotics are widely used to treat HS. Recent microbiological data show that HS suppurating lesions are associated with a polymorphous anaerobic flora, including actinomycetes and milleri group streptococci, and can therefore be considered as polymicrobial soft tissue and skin infections. Analysis of the literature provides little information on the efficacy of antibiotics in HS but suggests a beneficial effect of certain antimicrobial treatments, depending on the clinical severity of the disease. Patients must be informed and should agree with the treatment strategy before starting antibiotic treatments. PMID:26617361

  11. Antibiotic resistance in wild birds

    PubMed Central

    Bonnedahl, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Wild birds have been postulated as sentinels, reservoirs, and potential spreaders of antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria have been isolated from a multitude of wild bird species. Several studies strongly indicate transmission of resistant bacteria from human rest products to wild birds. There is evidence suggesting that wild birds can spread resistant bacteria through migration and that resistant bacteria can be transmitted from birds to humans and vice versa. Through further studies of the spatial and temporal distribution of resistant bacteria in wild birds, we can better assess their role and thereby help to mitigate the increasing global problem of antibiotic resistance. PMID:24697355

  12. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Anoop; Malhotra, Ranjan; Grover, Vishakha; Grover, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP), can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy. PMID:23559912

  13. Resistance mutations generate divergent antibiotic susceptibility profiles against translation inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cocozaki, Alexis I.; Altman, Roger B.; Huang, Jian; Buurman, Ed T.; Kazmirski, Steven L.; Doig, Peter; Prince, D. Bryan; Blanchard, Scott C.; Cate, Jamie H. D.; Ferguson, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations conferring resistance to translation inhibitors often alter the structure of rRNA. Reduced susceptibility to distinct structural antibiotic classes may, therefore, emerge when a common ribosomal binding site is perturbed, which significantly reduces the clinical utility of these agents. The translation inhibitors negamycin and tetracycline interfere with tRNA binding to the aminoacyl-tRNA site on the small 30S ribosomal subunit. However, two negamycin resistance mutations display unexpected differential antibiotic susceptibility profiles. Mutant U1060A in 16S Escherichia coli rRNA is resistant to both antibiotics, whereas mutant U1052G is simultaneously resistant to negamycin and hypersusceptible to tetracycline. Using a combination of microbiological, biochemical, single-molecule fluorescence transfer experiments, and X-ray crystallography, we define the specific structural defects in the U1052G mutant 70S E. coli ribosome that explain its divergent negamycin and tetracycline susceptibility profiles. Unexpectedly, the U1052G mutant ribosome possesses a second tetracycline binding site that correlates with its hypersusceptibility. The creation of a previously unidentified antibiotic binding site raises the prospect of identifying similar phenomena in antibiotic-resistant pathogens in the future. PMID:27382179

  14. Resistance mutations generate divergent antibiotic susceptibility profiles against translation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cocozaki, Alexis I; Altman, Roger B; Huang, Jian; Buurman, Ed T; Kazmirski, Steven L; Doig, Peter; Prince, D Bryan; Blanchard, Scott C; Cate, Jamie H D; Ferguson, Andrew D

    2016-07-19

    Mutations conferring resistance to translation inhibitors often alter the structure of rRNA. Reduced susceptibility to distinct structural antibiotic classes may, therefore, emerge when a common ribosomal binding site is perturbed, which significantly reduces the clinical utility of these agents. The translation inhibitors negamycin and tetracycline interfere with tRNA binding to the aminoacyl-tRNA site on the small 30S ribosomal subunit. However, two negamycin resistance mutations display unexpected differential antibiotic susceptibility profiles. Mutant U1060A in 16S Escherichia coli rRNA is resistant to both antibiotics, whereas mutant U1052G is simultaneously resistant to negamycin and hypersusceptible to tetracycline. Using a combination of microbiological, biochemical, single-molecule fluorescence transfer experiments, and X-ray crystallography, we define the specific structural defects in the U1052G mutant 70S E. coli ribosome that explain its divergent negamycin and tetracycline susceptibility profiles. Unexpectedly, the U1052G mutant ribosome possesses a second tetracycline binding site that correlates with its hypersusceptibility. The creation of a previously unidentified antibiotic binding site raises the prospect of identifying similar phenomena in antibiotic-resistant pathogens in the future. PMID:27382179

  15. Can pregnant women be safely placed on cardiopulmonary bypass?

    PubMed Central

    Sepehripour, Amir H.; Lo, Tammy T.; Shipolini, Alex R.; McCormack, David J.

    2012-01-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether cardiopulmonary bypass can be used safely with satisfactory maternal and foetal outcomes in pregnant patients undergoing cardiac surgery. A total of 679 papers were found using the reported searches of which 14 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, date, journal, study type, population, main outcome measures and results are tabulated. Reported measures were maternal and foetal mortality and complications, mode of delivery, cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times, perfusate flow rate and temperature and maternal NYHA functional class. The most recent of the best evidence studies, a retrospective observational study of 21 pregnant patients reported early and late maternal mortalities of 4.8 and 14.3%, respectively, and a foetal mortality of 14.3%. Median cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times were 53 and 35 min, respectively, and the median bypass temperature was 37°C. Three larger retrospective reviews of the literature reported maternal mortality rates of 2.9–5.1% and foetal mortality rates of 19–29%. Mean cardiopulmonary bypass times ranged from 50.5 to 77.8 min. Another retrospective observational study reported maternal mortality of 13.3% and foetal mortality of 38.5%. Mean cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times were 89.1 and 62.8 min, respectively, with a mean bypass temperature of 31.8°C. A retrospective case series reported no maternal mortality and one case of foetal mortality. Median cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times were 101 and 88 min, respectively. Eight case reports described 10 patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. There were no reports of maternal mortality and one report of foetal mortality. Mean cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times were 105 and 50 min, respectively. We conclude that while the use of cardiopulmonary bypass

  16. Urinary tract infection diagnosis and response to antibiotics using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastanos, Evdokia; Kyriakides, Alexandros; Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Pitris, Constantinos

    2009-02-01

    Urinary tract infection diagnosis and antibiogram require a 48 hour waiting period using conventional methods. This results in ineffective treatments, increased costs and most importantly in increased resistance to antibiotics. In this work, a novel method for classifying bacteria and determining their sensitivity to an antibiotic using Raman spectroscopy is described. Raman spectra of three species of gram negative Enterobacteria, most commonly responsible for urinary tract infections, were collected. The study included 25 samples each of E.coli, Klebsiella p. and Proteus spp. A novel algorithm based on spectral ratios followed by discriminant analysis resulted in classification with over 94% accuracy. Sensitivity and specificity for the three types of bacteria ranged from 88-100%. For the development of an antibiogram, bacterial samples were treated with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin to which they were all sensitive. Sensitivity to the antibiotic was evident after analysis of the Raman signatures of bacteria treated or not treated with this antibiotic as early as two hours after exposure. This technique can lead to the development of new technology for urinary tract infection diagnosis and antibiogram with same day results, bypassing urine cultures and avoiding all undesirable consequences of current practice.

  17. Early outcomes of coronary artery bypass with and without cardiopulmonary bypass in octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, AD; Bhatnagar, G; Cutrara, CA; Ahmed, SM; McKenzie, N; Quantz, M; Kiaii, B; Menkis, A; Fox, S; Stitt, L; Novick, RJ

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery has been successfully used in diverse patient populations and has been postulated to be safer than conventional coronary artery bypass (CCAB) surgery in some high-risk patients, including the elderly. OBJECTIVE To compare the safety of OPCAB surgery versus CCAB surgery in the octogenarian population of two large southwestern Ontario cardiac surgical units. RESULTS Two hundred thirty-six consecutive octogenarians underwent primary isolated coronary artery bypass sugery from November 2000 to March 2005. Patients undergoing OPCAB surgery tended to have higher Parsonnet scores, while patients undergoing CCAB surgery had a greater number of emergent operations. The Canadian Cardiovascular Network predicted that mortality risk was similar in both groups. In-hospital mortality was similar between groups, as was postoperative myocardial infarction and new onset of renal dysfunction. However, in the OPCAB group, there was a decreased incidence of postoperative neurological dysfunction (2.3% in the OPCAB group versus 10.5% in the CCAB group, P=0.01), in particular cerebrovascular accidents (1.5% in the OPCAB group versus 7.6% in the CCAB group, P=0.05), and a decreased incidence of prolonged intubation (5.3% in the OPCAB group versus 13.3% in the CCAB group, P=0.04). Multivariable analysis found that cardiopulmonary bypass had no significant impact on mortality or length of stay. CONCLUSIONS In octogenarian patients, OPCAB surgery is as safe as CCAB surgery in terms of mortality and major morbidity. Furthermore, a significant reduction in neurological dysfunction and prolonged intubation was seen in the OPCAB group compared with the CCAB group. PMID:16957802

  18. Trilinolein improves erythrocyte deformability during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, S K; Chan, P; Lee, T Y; Yung, J M; Hong, C Y

    1994-01-01

    The in vitro effect of trilinolein, a triglyceride with linoleic acid as the major fatty acid residue in the esterified positions of glycerol, on erythrocyte deformability was studied in blood samples collected from 12 patients before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Erythrocyte deformability was measured with a filtration method and expressed as red cell filtration rate (RFR). RFR was reduced after CPB and the reduction was time dependent. Trilinolein at a concentration of 10(-7) M significantly reversed the CPB-induced reduction of RFR when it was mixed with blood samples collected 30, 60 and 90 min from the start of CPB. This study confirmed the effect of CPB on erythrocyte deformability and showed that this damage could be significantly improved by mixing blood with trilinolein. PMID:8054252

  19. Factor V Leiden and Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Victor; Rosin, Mark; Marcoux, Jo-Anne; Olson, Marnie; Bezaire, Jennifer; Dalshaug, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: We present a case of a patient with factor V Leiden with an antithrombin III activity of 67% who received a successful aortic valve replacement supported by cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). A safe level of anticoagulation was achieved by monitoring activated clotting time (ACT) and heparin concentration ensuring adequate anticoagulation throughout the procedure. Results from ACT, heparin dose response, heparin protamine titration, and thrombelastography are given. Factor V Leiden patients can be safely anti-coagulated using heparin for CPB procedures when monitored with ACT, heparin protamine titration, and thrombelastography. Postoperative chest tube losses were 360 mL, less than half our institutional average. Anticoagulation for the pre-and post-operative phase is also discussed. PMID:26834284

  20. Innovative Double Bypass Engine for Increased Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, Sanjivan

    Engines continue to grow in size to meet the current thrust requirements of the civil aerospace industry. Large engines pose significant transportation problems and require them to be split in order to be shipped. Thus, large amounts of time have been spent in researching methods to increase thrust capabilities while maintaining a reasonable engine size. Unfortunately, much of this research has been focused on increasing the performance and efficiencies of individual components while limited research has been done on innovative engine configurations. This thesis focuses on an innovative engine configuration, the High Double Bypass Engine, aimed at increasing fuel efficiency and thrust while maintaining a competitive fan diameter and engine length. The 1-D analysis was done in Excel and then compared to the results from Numerical Propulsion Simulation System (NPSS) software and were found to be within 4% error. Flow performance characteristics were also determined and validated against their criteria.

  1. Enediyne antibiotics and their models: new potential of acetylene chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maretina, Irina A.; Trofimov, Boris A.

    2006-09-01

    Structures and chemical properties of enediynes, viz., compounds comprising a system of conjugated double and triple bonds, are surveyed. The presence of this system in the molecules of enediyne antitumour antibiotics ensures their high activity. The mechanism of biological action of enediynes is discussed based on cycloaromatisation of the enediyne chromophore resulting in highly active benzenoid 1,4-diradicals, which selectively cleave DNA. The key strategies of enediyne synthesis are analysed.

  2. Miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass: the Hammersmith technique

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Conventional Cardiopulmonary Bypass (cCPB) is a trigger of systemic inflammatory reactions, hemodilution, coagulopathy, and organ failure. Miniaturised Cardiopulmonary Bypass (mCPB) has the potential to reduce these deleterious effects. Here, we describe our standardised ‘Hammersmith’ mCPB technique, used in all types of adult cardiac operations including major aortic surgery. Methods The use of mCPB remains limited by the diversity of technologies which range from extremely complex, micro systems to ones very similar to cCPB. Our approach is designed around the principle of balancing the benefits of miniaturisation; reducing foreign surface area while maintaining patient safety. Results From January 2010 to March 2011, a single surgeon performed 184 consecutive operations (Euro score Logistic 8.4+/-9.9): 61 aortic valve replacements, 78 CABGs, 25 aortic valve replacement and CABG and 17 other procedures (major aortic surgery, re-do operations or double/triple valve replacements). Our clinical experience suggests that: i. Venous drainage is optimally maintained using kinetic energy. ii. Venous collapse pressure depends on the patient’s anatomy and cannula size, but most importantly on the negative pressure generated by venous drainage. iii. The patient-prime interaction is optimised with antegrade and retrograde autologous priming, which mixes the blood and prime away from the tissues and results in a reduced oncotic destabilization. iv. mCPB is a safe and reproducible technique Conclusion The Hammersmith mCPB is a “next generation” system which uses standard commercially available components. It aims to maintain safety margin and the benefit of miniaturised system whilst reducing the human factor demands. PMID:23731623

  3. Hypoglycaemia after gastric bypass: mechanisms and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ritz, P; Vaurs, C; Barigou, M; Hanaire, H

    2016-03-01

    Hypoglycaemia after gastric bypass can be severe, but is uncommon, and is sometimes only revealed through monitoring glucose concentrations. The published literature is limited by the heterogeneity of the criteria used for diagnosis, arguing in favour of the Whipple triad with a glycaemia threshold of 55 mg/dl as the diagnostic reference. Women who lost most of their excess weight after gastric bypass, long after the surgery was performed, and who did not have diabetes before surgery are at the greatest risk. In this context, hypoglycaemia results from hyperinsulinism, which is either generated by pancreas anomalies (nesidioblastosis) and/or caused by an overstimulation of β cells by incretins, mainly glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Glucose absorption is both accelerated and increased because of the direct communication between the gastric pouch and the jejunum. This is a post-surgical exaggeration of a natural adaptation that is seen in patients who have not undergone surgery in whom glucose is infused directly into the jejunum. There is not always a correspondence between symptoms and biological traits; however, hyperinsulinism is constant if hypoglycaemia is severe and there are neuroglucopenic symptoms. The treatment relies firstly on changes in eating habits, splitting food intake into five to six daily meals, slowing gastric emptying, reducing the glycaemic load and glycaemic index of foods, using fructose and avoiding stress at meals. Pharmacological treatment with acarbose is efficient, but other drugs still need to be validated in a greater number of subjects (insulin, glucagon, calcium channel blockers, somatostatin analogues and GLP-1 analogues). Lastly, if the surgical option has to be used, the benefits (efficient symptom relief) and the risks (weight regain, diabetes) should be weighed carefully. PMID:26508374

  4. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2010-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the sector grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  5. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the one-twelfth grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  6. THE NEWER ANTIBIOTICS IN DERMATOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Novy, Frederick G.

    1950-01-01

    From the experimental and clinical observations published to date it appears that three new antibiotics, polymyxin, chloramphenicol and aureomycin, will prove to be highly efficacious against many of the infectious dermatoses and venereal diseases. PMID:18731681

  7. [Pseudomembranous colitis caused by antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Meyer, B; Geering, P

    1978-11-11

    A case of antibiotic-induced pseudomembranous colitis is presented. Following resection of a carcinoma of the colon, an 81-year old man was treated with clindamycin for 9 days and with epicillin for another 9 days. One week after discontinuation of antibiotics the patient developed progressively severe diarrhea. Death from central pulmonary embolism ensued 10 days after the onset of diarrhea. Autopsy revealed severe pseudomembranous colitis of the entire large intestine. Pseudomembranous colitis is often observed as a complication after the administration of different antibiotics. The Anglo-American literature contains several recent reports of clindamycin-induced pseudomembranous colitis. The etiopathology of this drug-induced disease is still unclear. A possible interpretation is an antibiotic-induced change in the intestinal flora. Recent observations suggest that toxin-producing clostridia are responsible for the pseudomembranous colitis. PMID:568308

  8. Resistance-induced antibiotic substitution.

    PubMed

    Howard, David H

    2004-06-01

    In many cases, physicians prescribe antibiotics without knowing whether an individual patient is infected with a susceptible or resistant pathogen. As the proportion of resistant organisms in a community increases, physicians substitute away from older-inexpensive drugs to newer, more expensive agents as first line therapy. This paper explores the implications of resistance-induced antibiotic substitution for epidemiological models to predict future resistance levels, efforts to measure the health care costs associated with resistance, and policies to improve physicians' antibiotic prescribing decisions. The extent of resistance-induced substitution in outpatient settings is documented using a data set consisting of observations on initial physician office visits for otitis media in the US controlling for new product introductions and price increases, per prescription antibiotic spending increased by 22% between 1980 and 1996, corresponding to a steep increase in resistance levels over the same period. PMID:15185388

  9. β-Lactam Antibiotics Renaissance

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wenling; Panunzio, Mauro; Biondi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1940s β-lactam antibiotics have been used to treat bacterial infections. However, emergence and dissemination of β-lactam resistance has reached the point where many marketed β-lactams no longer are clinically effective. The increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria and the progressive withdrawal of pharmaceutical companies from antibiotic research have evoked a strong reaction from health authorities, who have implemented initiatives to encourage the discovery of new antibacterials. Despite this gloomy scenario, several novel β-lactam antibiotics and β-lactamase inhibitors have recently progressed into clinical trials, and many more such compounds are being investigated. Here we seek to provide highlights of recent developments relating to the discovery of novel β-lactam antibiotics and β-lactamase inhibitors. PMID:27025744

  10. Alongshore sediment bypassing as a control on river mouth morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhuis, Jaap H.; Ashton, Andrew D.; Nardin, William; Fagherazzi, Sergio; Giosan, Liviu

    2016-04-01

    River mouths, shoreline locations where fluvial and coastal sediments are partitioned via erosion, trapping, and redistribution, are responsible for the ultimate sedimentary architecture of deltas and, because of their dynamic nature, also pose great management and engineering challenges. To investigate the interaction between fluvial and littoral processes at wave-dominated river mouths, we modeled their morphologic evolution using the coupled hydrodynamic and morphodynamic model Delft3D-SWAN. Model experiments replicate alongshore migration of river mouths, river mouth spit development, and eventual spit breaching, suggesting that these are emergent phenomena that can develop even under constant fluvial and wave conditions. Furthermore, we find that sediment bypassing of a river mouth develops though feedbacks between waves and river mouth morphology, resulting in either continuous bypassing pathways or episodic bar bypassing pathways. Model results demonstrate that waves refracting into the river mouth bar create a zone of low alongshore sediment transport updrift of the river mouth, which reduces sediment bypassing. Sediment bypassing, in turn, controls the river mouth migration rate and the size of the river mouth spit. As a result, an intermediate amount of river discharge maximizes river mouth migration. The fraction of alongshore sediment bypassing can be predicted from the balance between the jet and the wave momentum flux. Quantitative comparisons show a match between our modeled predictions of river mouth bypassing and migration rates observed in natural settings.

  11. Monitoring microemboli during cardiopulmonary bypass with the EDAC quantifier.

    PubMed

    Lynch, John E; Wells, Christopher; Akers, Tom; Frantz, Paul; Garrett, Donna; Scott, M Lance; Williamson, Lisa; Agnew, Barbara; Lynch, John K

    2010-09-01

    Gaseous emboli may be introduced into the bypass circuit both from the surgical field and during perfusionist interventions. While circuits provide good protection against massive air embolism, they do not remove gaseous microemboli (GME) from the bypass circuit. The purpose of this preliminary study is to assess the incidence of GME during bypass surgery and determine if increased GME counts were associated with specific events during bypass surgery. In 30 cases divided between 15 coronary artery bypass grafts and 15 valve repairs, GME were counted and sizedt the three locations on the bypass circuit using the EDAC" Quantifier (Luna Innovations, Roanoke, VA). A mean of 45,276 GME were detected after the arterial line filter during these 30 cases, with significantly more detected (p = .04) post filter during valve cases (mean = 72,137 +/- 22,113) than coronary artery bypass graft cases (mean = 18,416 +/- 7831). GME detected post filter were significantly correlated in time with counts detected in the venous line (p < .001). Specific events associated with high counts included the initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass, heart manipulations, insertion and removal of clamps, and the administration of drugs. Global factors associated with increased counts post filter included higher venous line counts and higher post reservoir/bubble trap counts. The mean number of microemboli detected during bypass surgery was much higher than reported in other studies of emboli incidence, most likely due to the increased sensitivity of the EDAC Quantifier compared to other detection modalities. The results furthermore suggest the need for further study of the clinical significance of these microemboli and what practices may be used to reduce GME incidence. Increased in vitro testing of the air handling capability of different circuit designs, along with more clinical studies assessing best clinical practices for reducing GME activity, is recommended. PMID:21114224

  12. Expedient antibiotics production: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bienkowski, P.R.; Byers, C.H.; Lee, D.D.

    1988-05-01

    The literature on the manufacture, separation and purification, and clinical uses of antibiotics was reviewed, and a bibliography of the pertinent material was completed. Five antimicrobial drugs, penicillin V and G, (and amoxicillin with clavulanic acid), Cephalexin (a cephalosporin), tetracycline and oxytetracycline, Bacitracin (topical), and sulfonamide (chemically produced) were identified for emergency production. Plants that manufacture antibiotics in the continental United States, Mexico, and Puerto Rico have been identified along with potential alternate sites such as those where SCP, enzyme, and fermentation ethanol are produced. Detailed process flow sheets and process descriptions have been derived from the literature and documented. This investigation revealed that a typical antibiotic-manufacturing facility is composed of two main sections: (1) a highly specialized, but generic, fermentation unit and (2) a multistep, complex separation and purification unit which is specific to a particular antibiotic product. The fermentation section requires specialized equipment for operation in a sterile environment which is not usually available in other industries. The emergency production of antibiotics under austere conditions will be feasible only if a substantial reduction in the complexity and degree of separation and purity normally required can be realized. Detailed instructions were developed to assist state and federal officials who would be directing the resumption of antibiotic production after a nuclear attack. 182 refs., 54 figs., 26 tabs.

  13. Cognitive Impairment by Antibiotic-Induced Gut Dysbiosis: Analysis of Gut Microbiota-Brain Communication

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Esther E.; Farzi, Aitak; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Reichmann, Florian; Jačan, Angela; Wagner, Bernhard; Zinser, Erwin; Bordag, Natalie; Magnes, Christoph; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kashofer, Karl; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Holzer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that disruption of the gut microbial community (dysbiosis) impairs mental health. Germ-free mice and antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis are two approaches to establish causality in gut microbiota-brain relationships. However, both models have limitations, as germ-free mice display alterations in blood-brain barrier and brain ultrastructure and antibiotics may act directly on the brain. We hypothesized that the concerns related to antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis can only adequately be addressed if the effect of intragastric treatment of adult mice with multiple antibiotics on (i) gut microbial community, (ii) metabolite profile in the colon, (iii) circulating metabolites, (iv) expression of neuronal signaling molecules in distinct brain areas and (v) cognitive behavior is systematically investigated. Of the antibiotics used (ampicillin, bacitracin, meropenem, neomycin, vancomycin), ampicillin had some oral bioavailability but did not enter the brain. 16S rDNA sequencing confirmed antibiotic-induced microbial community disruption, and metabolomics revealed that gut dysbiosis was associated with depletion of bacteria-derived metabolites in the colon and alterations of lipid species and converted microbe-derived molecules in the plasma. Importantly, novel object recognition, but not spatial, memory was impaired in antibiotic-treated mice. This cognitive deficit was associated with brain region-specific changes in the expression of cognition-relevant signaling molecules, notably brain-derived neurotrophic factor, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B, serotonin transporter and neuropeptide Y system. We conclude that circulating metabolites and the cerebral neuropeptide Y system play an important role in the cognitive impairment and dysregulation of cerebral signaling molecules due to antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis. PMID:26923630

  14. Cognitive impairment by antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis: Analysis of gut microbiota-brain communication.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Esther E; Farzi, Aitak; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Reichmann, Florian; Jačan, Angela; Wagner, Bernhard; Zinser, Erwin; Bordag, Natalie; Magnes, Christoph; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kashofer, Karl; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Holzer, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that disruption of the gut microbial community (dysbiosis) impairs mental health. Germ-free mice and antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis are two approaches to establish causality in gut microbiota-brain relationships. However, both models have limitations, as germ-free mice display alterations in blood-brain barrier and brain ultrastructure and antibiotics may act directly on the brain. We hypothesized that the concerns related to antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis can only adequately be addressed if the effect of intragastric treatment of adult mice with multiple antibiotics on (i) gut microbial community, (ii) metabolite profile in the colon, (iii) circulating metabolites, (iv) expression of neuronal signaling molecules in distinct brain areas and (v) cognitive behavior is systematically investigated. Of the antibiotics used (ampicillin, bacitracin, meropenem, neomycin, vancomycin), ampicillin had some oral bioavailability but did not enter the brain. 16S rDNA sequencing confirmed antibiotic-induced microbial community disruption, and metabolomics revealed that gut dysbiosis was associated with depletion of bacteria-derived metabolites in the colon and alterations of lipid species and converted microbe-derived molecules in the plasma. Importantly, novel object recognition, but not spatial, memory was impaired in antibiotic-treated mice. This cognitive deficit was associated with brain region-specific changes in the expression of cognition-relevant signaling molecules, notably brain-derived neurotrophic factor, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2B, serotonin transporter and neuropeptide Y system. We conclude that circulating metabolites and the cerebral neuropeptide Y system play an important role in the cognitive impairment and dysregulation of cerebral signaling molecules due to antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis. PMID:26923630

  15. Coronary bypass using bilateral internal mammary arteries in an achondroplast.

    PubMed

    Alassal, Mohamed Abdulwahab; Youssef, Mostafa; Koudieh, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Coronary bypass grafting for ischemic heart disease in achondroplastic dwarfs is very rare. Shortage of veins and inadequate vein quality may cause difficulties during surgery. Only 2 cases of coronary bypass surgery in an achondroplastic dwarf, in which the left internal mammary artery and vein grafts were used, have been reported. We describe the case of a 55-year-old male achondroplastic dwarf who had triple-vessel coronary disease and underwent successful coronary bypass surgery using one saphenous vein graft and bilateral internal mammary artery grafts. The anatomic and surgical challenges in achondroplasia are highlighted. PMID:24887865

  16. Impact of cardiopulmonary bypass on acute kidney injury following coronary artery bypass grafting: a matched pair analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Postoperative Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is a common complication associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is accepted to contribute to the occurrence of AKI and is of particular importance as it can be avoided by using the off-pump technique. However the renoprotective properties of off-pump (CABG) are controversial. This analysis evaluates the impact of cardiopulmonary bypass on renal function. Methods A matched-pair analysis of 1428 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting was conducted. The patients were stratified according to their preoperative renal function and to risk factors for postoperative AKI. The development of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from before surgery until hospital discharge was analyzed. Incidence of AKI were analyzed. Furthermore the impact of CPB duration on postoperative GFR was assessed. Results The occurrence of AKI increases the risk of thirty-day mortality (odds ratio of 4.3). The postoperative GFR decreases significantly after coronary artery bypass grafting but does not differ between onpump and offpump CABG (60.2 ± 24.5 vs 60.7 ± 24.8; p = 0.54). No difference regarding the incidence (26.6% vs 25%) and severity of AKI between cardiopulmonary bypass and the off-pump technique could be found. Duration of cardiopulmonary bypass does not correlate with the decline in postoperative glomerular filtration rate (Pearson Product Moment Correlation; p > 0.050). Conclusion Neither the mere use nor duration of cardiopulmonary bypass proofed to be a risk factor for developing postoperative AKI in CABG patients with a comparable preoperative risk profile for postoperative renal dysfunction. Furthermore, the severity of postoperative AKI is not affected by the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:24438155

  17. Mind Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Solomon H.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific styles vary tremendously. For me, research is largely about the unfettered pursuit of novel ideas and experiments that can test multiple ideas in a day, not a year, an approach that I learned from my mentor Julius “Julie” Axelrod. This focus on creative conceptualizations has been my métier since working in the summers during medical school at the National Institutes of Health, during my two years in the Axelrod laboratory, and throughout my forty-five years at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Equally important has been the “high” that emerges from brainstorming with my students. Nothing can compare with the eureka moments when, together, we sense new insights and, better yet, when high-risk, high-payoff experiments succeed. Although I have studied many different questions over the years, a common theme emerges: simple biochemical approaches to understanding molecular messengers, usually small molecules. Equally important has been identifying, purifying, and cloning the messengers' relevant biosynthetic, degradative, or target proteins, at all times seeking potential therapeutic relevance in the form of drugs. In the interests of brevity, this Reflections article is highly selective, and, with a few exceptions, literature citations are only of findings of our laboratory that illustrate notable themes. PMID:21543333

  18. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Beatriz Espinosa; Altagracia Martínez, Marina; Sánchez Rodríguez, Martha A; Wertheimer, Albert I

    2009-01-01

    Background: The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community. Objectives: To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem. Methods: We conducted a MedLine search using the key words “determinants”, “antibiotic”, and “antibiotic resistance” to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded. Results: The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance. Conclusions: Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals. PMID:21694883

  19. What to Expect during Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    MedlinePlus

    ... support from an anesthesiologist, perfusionist (heart-lung bypass machine specialist), other surgeons, and nurses. There are several ... The tube will connect to a ventilator (a machine that supports breathing). The surgeon will make an ...

  20. Many Heart Bypass Patients Don't Take Needed Meds

    MedlinePlus

    ... need to continue appropriate prevention measures after successful heart surgery," said Savage, who is director of the Angioplasty ... More Health News on: Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery Heart Surgery Medicines Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics ...

  1. [Preliminary study of colloid osmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass].

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Xiang, L; Luo, J

    1996-12-01

    The ideal colloid osmotic pressure is beneficial to decrease the fluid accumulated in the pulmonary and other tissue during cardiopulmonary bypass. Schupbach reported the proper colloidosmotic pressure for cardiopulmonary bypass was 2.1 kPa (16 mmHg). Colloid osmotic pressures of blood and priming fluid during cardiopulmonary bypass were measured in 28 patients with heart disease by using colloid osmotic pressure detection apparatus. The value of colloid osmotic pressure suitable for the designed standard was apparently different among the Gelofusine group and other groups. P value was 0.005. Priming fluid for cardiopulmonary bypass needs to satisfy the quality and the quantity of colloid osmotic pressure. Using Albumin isn't economical. Whole blood and plazma are not suitable for increasing colloid osmotic pressure. Hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine is best choice in priming to get designed standard of colloid osmotic pressure. The ratio of hydroxyethyl starch or Gelofusine in priming fluid should beyond 1/2. PMID:9590779

  2. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of PDP is required. A PMA or notice... May 28, 1976. Any other cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator shall have an approved PMA...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Class III (premarket approval). (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of PDP is required. A PMA or notice... May 28, 1976. Any other cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator shall have an approved PMA...

  4. Protection of semiconductor converters for controlled bypass reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgopolov, A. G.; Akhmetzhanov, N. G.; Karmanov, V. F.

    2010-05-15

    Possible ways of protecting thyristor converters in systems for magnetizing 110 - 500 kV controlled bypass reactors during switching and automatic reclosing are examined based on experience with the development of equipment, line tests, and mathematical modelling.

  5. Left Subclavian Artery Occlusion: Femoro-Axillary Artery Retrograde Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Masaya; Kobayashi, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The treatment tactics for subclavian artery occlusion include the more commonly used endovascular therapy rather than surgical intervention. We present a case of a 61-year-old woman with dialysis-dependent chronic renal failure who experienced left finger necrosis in the left upper extremity. To salvage the limb, we performed femoro-axillary (fem-ax) artery bypass using an autologous saphenous vein graft. However, 10 months later, she experienced coldness in the left forearm. Angiography revealed chronic total occlusion of the venous bypass. Despite emergent thrombectomy, redo fem-ax artery bypass operation was performed using a prosthetic graft. Upper limb salvage can be achieved by fem-ax artery retrograde bypass. PMID:27386454

  6. VIEW OF ONEONTA TUNNEL, CURRENT BYPASS ROAD IS ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ONEONTA TUNNEL, CURRENT BYPASS ROAD IS ON THE LEFT - Historic Columbia River Highway, Oneonta Tunnel, Adjacent to Historic Columbia River Highway through Oneonta Point, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  7. 1. PLENUM INTERIOR, SHOWING HEATING COILS AND BYPASS Hot ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PLENUM INTERIOR, SHOWING HEATING COILS AND BY-PASS - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Fordyce Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  8. Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation - First Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Zirker, L.R.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-31

    This report details the initial activities to evaluate the performance of the oil bypass filter technology being tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight full-size, four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes have been equipped with oil bypass systems from the puraDYN Corporation. Each bus averages about 60,000 miles a year. The evaluation includes an oil analysis regime to monitor the presence of necessary additives in the oil and to detect undesirable contaminants. Very preliminary economic analysis suggests that the oil bypass system can reduce life-cycle costs. As the evaluation continues and oil avoidance costs are quantified, it is estimated that the bypass system economics may prove increasingly favorable, given the anticipated savings in operational costs and in reduced use of oil and waste oil avoidance.

  9. Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation - January 2003 Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence R. Zirker; James E. Francfort

    2003-01-01

    This report details the initial activities to evaluate the performance of the oil bypass filter technology being tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight full-size, four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes have been equipped with oil bypass systems from the puraDYN Corporation. Each bus averages about 60,000 miles a year. The evaluation includes an oil analysis regime to monitor the presence of necessary additives in the oil and to detect undesirable contaminants. Very preliminary economic analysis suggests that the oil bypass system can reduce life-cycle costs. As the evaluation continues and oil avoidance costs are quantified, it is estimated that the bypass system economics may prove increasingly favorable, given the anticipated savings in operational costs and in reduced use of oil and waste oil avoidance.

  10. 14. DRAGLINE BEGINNING CONSTRUCTION OF THE BYPASS CHANNEL CONNECTING THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DRAGLINE BEGINNING CONSTRUCTION OF THE BY-PASS CHANNEL CONNECTING THE DIVERSION GATE ALONG THE OUTLET CHANNEL WITH THE ORIGINAL CHANNEL OF THE SOURIS RIVER - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  11. Carburetor by-pass and fuel control system

    SciTech Connect

    Deboynton, W.L.

    1983-01-04

    A fuel-saving and emission reduction system for internal combustion engines includes electronic carburetor controlling circuitry and a carburetor by-pass system which stops fuel flow to the engine when power from combustion is not required. A normally open by-pass control butterfly valve in the fuel/air passage between the throttle valve and the engine intake manifold is operated by a motor, such as a solenoid or the like, under control of the controlling circuitry and is closed only upon release of the engine throttle and during the period that the vehicle has sufficient speed to assure restart upon reapplication of the fuel/air flow. A carburetor by-pass valve is held in a normally closed position by the combined effects of spring bias and the normal vacuum in the fuel/air passage. When the normally open by-pass control butterfly is closed, the fuel/air vacuum is reduced to permit the spring biased normally closed selfregulating carburetor by-pass valve to admit filtered air at a predetermined reduced vacuum to the engine manifold for continued operation of vacuum accessories and also for reducing the amount of oil drawn past combustion chamber seals and valve guides. Associated with the carburetor by-pass valve is a carburetor vent valve which is simultaneously opened to admit filtered air to the fuel/air passage between the throttle valve and the by-pass control butterfly to thereby eliminate all vacuum that will draw fuel from the carburetor. As a further feature, the electronic controlling circuitry operates to close the by-pass control butterfly for about one-half second upon the opening of the ignition switch to thereby eliminate self-ignition or dieseling and reduced hydrocarbon emissions.

  12. Electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass: a critical moment.

    PubMed

    Durukan, Ahmet Baris; Gurbuz, Hasan Alper; Ozcelik, Gokhan; Yorgancioglu, Cem

    2016-06-01

    Electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass is a crisis situation for the cardiac surgical team. Fortunately, it has a low incidence with low morbidity and mortality rates. Notwithstanding, institutional preventative and management measures should be taken. Here, we report a case of electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass, which was successfully managed during the surgery, allowing the patient to recover uneventfully. These unwanted complications can only be managed by promoting awareness and putting in place strategies against them. PMID:27516788

  13. Scintigraphic documentation of hemorrhage from coronary artery bypass graft

    SciTech Connect

    Orzel, J.A.; Baisden, C.E.

    1986-11-01

    Tc-99m labeled RBC imaging was used to conclusively demonstrate continuing intrathoracic hemorrhage from the anastomotic site of a coronary artery bypass graft. Demonstration of continuing hemorrhage and localization of the most likely site of bleeding resulted in timely and appropriate surgical intervention, which resulted in hemostasis and eventual patient recovery. Tc-99m RBC imaging may be an ideal noninvasive technique to investigate the site and activity of intrathoracic hemorrhage after coronary bypass surgery and other thoracic procedures.

  14. Electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass: a critical moment

    PubMed Central

    Gurbuz, Hasan Alper; Ozcelik, Gokhan; Yorgancioglu, Cem

    2016-01-01

    Electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass is a crisis situation for the cardiac surgical team. Fortunately, it has a low incidence with low morbidity and mortality rates. Notwithstanding, institutional preventative and management measures should be taken. Here, we report a case of electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass, which was successfully managed during the surgery, allowing the patient to recover uneventfully. These unwanted complications can only be managed by promoting awareness and putting in place strategies against them. PMID:27516788

  15. The use of platensimycin and platencin to fight antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Bagirova, Melahat; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Ates, Sezen Canim; Koc, Rabia Cakir; Miraloglu, Meral; Elcicek, Serhat; Yaman, Serkan; Unal, Gokce

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases are known as one of the most life-threatening disabilities worldwide. Approximately 13 million deaths related to infectious diseases are reported each year. The only way to combat infectious diseases is by chemotherapy using antimicrobial agents and antibiotics. However, due to uncontrolled and unnecessary use of antibiotics in particular, surviving bacteria have evolved resistance against several antibiotics. Emergence of multidrug resistance in bacteria over the past several decades has resulted in one of the most important clinical health problems in modern medicine. For instance, approximately 440,000 new cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis are reported every year leading to the deaths of 150,000 people worldwide. Management of multidrug resistance requires understanding its molecular basis and the evolution and dissemination of resistance; development of new antibiotic compounds in place of traditional antibiotics; and innovative strategies for extending the life of antibiotic molecules. Researchers have begun to develop new antimicrobials for overcoming this important problem. Recently, platensimycin - isolated from extracts of Streptomyces platensis - and its analog platencin have been defined as promising agents for fighting multidrug resistance. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that these new antimicrobials have great potential to inhibit methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae by targeting type II fatty acid synthesis in bacteria. Showing strong efficacy without any observed in vivo toxicity increases the significance of these antimicrobial agents for their use in humans. However, at the present time, clinical trials are insufficient and require more research. The strong antibacterial efficacies of platensimycin and platencin may be established in clinical trials and their use in humans for coping with multidrug resistance may be

  16. The use of platensimycin and platencin to fight antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Bagirova, Melahat; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Ates, Sezen Canim; Koc, Rabia Cakir; Miraloglu, Meral; Elcicek, Serhat; Yaman, Serkan; Unal, Gokce

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases are known as one of the most life-threatening disabilities worldwide. Approximately 13 million deaths related to infectious diseases are reported each year. The only way to combat infectious diseases is by chemotherapy using antimicrobial agents and antibiotics. However, due to uncontrolled and unnecessary use of antibiotics in particular, surviving bacteria have evolved resistance against several antibiotics. Emergence of multidrug resistance in bacteria over the past several decades has resulted in one of the most important clinical health problems in modern medicine. For instance, approximately 440,000 new cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis are reported every year leading to the deaths of 150,000 people worldwide. Management of multidrug resistance requires understanding its molecular basis and the evolution and dissemination of resistance; development of new antibiotic compounds in place of traditional antibiotics; and innovative strategies for extending the life of antibiotic molecules. Researchers have begun to develop new antimicrobials for overcoming this important problem. Recently, platensimycin – isolated from extracts of Streptomyces platensis – and its analog platencin have been defined as promising agents for fighting multidrug resistance. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that these new antimicrobials have great potential to inhibit methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae by targeting type II fatty acid synthesis in bacteria. Showing strong efficacy without any observed in vivo toxicity increases the significance of these antimicrobial agents for their use in humans. However, at the present time, clinical trials are insufficient and require more research. The strong antibacterial efficacies of platensimycin and platencin may be established in clinical trials and their use in humans for coping with multidrug resistance may be

  17. Management Options For Reducing The Release Of Antibiotics And Antibiotic Resistance Genes To The Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: There is growing concern worldwide about the role of polluted soil and water - 77 environments in the development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. 78 Objective: To identify management options for reducing the spread of antibiotics and 79 antibiotic resist...

  18. Background antibiotic resistance patterns in antibiotic-free pastured poultry production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a significant public health issue, and agroecosystems are often viewed as major environmental sources of antibiotic resistant foodborne pathogens. While the use of antibiotics in agroecosystems can potentially increase AR, appropriate background resistance levels in th...

  19. Antibiotic allergy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Parmar, J S; Nasser, S

    2005-06-01

    Allergic reactions to antibiotics are more common in cystic fibrosis (CF) than in the general population. This in part is due to the improving survival in adults with CF and the increased use of high dose intravenous antibiotics. While some are immediate anaphylaxis type (IgE mediated) reactions, the majority are late onset and may have non-specific features such as rash and fever. Piperacillin has consistently been found to have the highest rate of reported reactions (30-50%). There is a low risk of cross reactions between penicillins and other non-beta-lactam classes of antibiotics in penicillin skin prick positive patients. Carbapenems should only be used with extreme caution in patients with positive skin prick tests to penicillin. However, aztreonam can be used safely in patients who are penicillin allergic with positive skin prick reactions. The aminoglycosides are a relatively uncommon cause of allergic reactions, but patients who react to one member of the family may cross react with other aminoglycosides. Desensitisation relies on the incremental introduction of small quantities of the allergen and has been used for penicillins, ceftazidime, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin and must be repeated before each course. Personalized cards should be regularly updated for patients who develop allergic reactions. Written instructions on the emergency treatment of allergic reactions should be provided to patients self-administering intravenous antibiotics at home. Further research is required to identify risk factors and predictors for antibiotic allergy. PMID:15923254

  20. Progress on Complications of Direct Bypass for Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinlu; Shi, Lei; Guo, Yunbao; Xu, Baofeng; Xu, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) involves progressive occlusion of the intracranial internal carotid artery resulting in formation of moyamoya-like vessels at the base of the brain. It can be characterized by hemorrhage or ischemia. Direct vascular bypass is the main and most effective treatment of MMD. However, patients with MMD differ from those with normal cerebral vessels. MMD patients have unstable intracranial artery hemodynamics and a poor blood flow reserve; therefore, during the direct bypass of superficial temporal artery (STA)-middle cerebral artery (MCA) anastomosis, perioperative risk factors and anesthesia can affect the hemodynamics of these patients. When brain tissue cannot tolerate a high blood flow rate, it becomes prone to hyperperfusion syndrome, which leads to neurological function defects and can even cause intracranial hemorrhage in severe cases. The brain tissue is prone to infarction when hemodynamic equilibrium is affected. In addition, bypass vessels become susceptible to occlusion or atrophy when blood resistance increases. Even compression of the temporalis affects bypass vessels. Because the STA is used in MMD surgery, the scalp becomes ischemic and is likely to develop necrosis and infection. These complications of MMD surgery are difficult to manage and are not well understood. To date, no systematic studies of the complications that occur after direct bypass in MMD have been performed, and reported complications are hidden among various case studies; therefore, this paper presents a review and summary of the literature in PubMed on the complications of direct bypass in MMD. PMID:27499690

  1. Bypass flow computations on the LOFA transient in a VHTR

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Yu-Hsin; Johnson, Richard W.; Ferng, Yuh-Ming; Chieng, Ching-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Bypass flow in the prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is not intentionally designed to occur, but is present in the gaps between graphite blocks. Previous studies of the bypass flow in the core indicated that the cooling provided by flow in the bypass gaps had a significant effect on temperature and flow distributions for normal operating conditions. However, the flow and heat transports in the core are changed significantly after a Loss of Flow Accident (LOFA). This study aims to study the effect and role of the bypass flow after a LOFA in terms of the temperature and flow distributions and for the heat transport out of the core by natural convection of the coolant for a 1/12 symmetric section of the active core which is composed of images and mirror images of two sub-region models. The two sub-region models, 9 x 1/12 and 15 x 1/12 symmetric sectors of the active core, are employed as the CFD flow models using computational grid systems of 70.2 million and 117 million nodes, respectively. It is concluded that the effect of bypass flow is significant for the initial conditions and the beginning of LOFA, but the bypass flow has little effect after a long period of time in the transient computation of natural circulation.

  2. Ultra-High Bypass Ratio Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, John K. C.

    1994-01-01

    The jet noise from a 1/15 scale model of a Pratt and Whitney Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) was measured in the United Technology Research Center anechoic research tunnel (ART) under a range of operating conditions. Conditions were chosen to match engine operating conditions. Data were obtained at static conditions and at wind tunnel Mach numbers of 0.2, 0.27, and 0.35 to simulate inflight effects on jet noise. Due to a temperature dependence of the secondary nozzle area, the model nozzle secondary to primary area ratio varied from 7.12 at 100 percent thrust to 7.39 at 30 percent thrust. The bypass ratio varied from 10.2 to 11.8 respectively. Comparison of the data with predictions using the current Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Jet Noise Prediction Method showed that the current prediction method overpredicted the ADP jet noise by 6 decibels. The data suggest that a simple method of subtracting 6 decibels from the SAE Coaxial Jet Noise Prediction for the merged and secondary flow source components would result in good agreement between predicted and measured levels. The simulated jet noise flight effects with wind tunnel Mach numbers up to 0.35 produced jet noise inflight noise reductions up to 12 decibels. The reductions in jet noise levels were across the entire jet noise spectra, suggesting that the inflight effects affected all source noise components.

  3. Post-gastric bypass hypoglycaemia: a review.

    PubMed

    Shantavasinkul, Prapimporn C; Torquati, Alfonso; Corsino, Leonor

    2016-07-01

    Bariatric surgery is a highly effective treatment for severe obesity, resulting in substantial weight loss and normalizing obesity-related comorbidities. However, long-term consequences can occur, such as postbariatric surgery hypoglycaemia. This is a challenging medical problem, and the number of patients presenting with it has been increasing. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the most popular bariatric procedure, and it is the surgery most commonly associated with the development of postbariatric surgery hypoglycaemia. To date, the pathogenesis of this condition has not been completely established. However, various factors - particularly increased postprandial glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 secretion - have been considered as crucial mediator. The mechanisms responsible for diabetic remission after bariatric surgery may be responsible for the development of hypoglycaemia, which typically occurs 1-3 h after a meal and is concurrent with inappropriate hyperinsulinaemia. Carbohydrate-rich foods usually provoke hypoglycaemic symptoms, which can typically be alleviated by strict dietary modifications, including carbohydrate restriction and avoidance of high glycaemic index foods and simple sugars. Few patients require further medical intervention, such as medications, but some patients have required a pancreatectomy. Because this option is not always successful, it is no longer routinely recommended. Clinical trials are needed to further determine the pathophysiology of this condition as well as the best diagnostic and treatment approaches for these patients. PMID:26840207

  4. Fungal Biotransformation of Tetracycline Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shang, Zhuo; Salim, Angela A; Khalil, Zeinab; Bernhardt, Paul V; Capon, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    The commercial antibiotics tetracycline (3), minocycline (4), chlortetracycline (5), oxytetracycline (6), and doxycycline (7) were biotransformed by a marine-derived fungus Paecilomyces sp. to yield seco-cyclines A-H (9-14, 18 and 19) and hemi-cyclines A-E (20-24). Structures were assigned by detailed spectroscopic analysis, and in the case of 10 X-ray crystallography. Parallel mechanisms account for substrate-product specificity, where 3-5 yield seco-cyclines and 6 and 7 yield hemi-cyclines. The susceptibility of 3-7 to fungal biotransformation is indicative of an unexpected potential for tetracycline "degradation" (i.e., antibiotic resistance) in fungal genomes. Significantly, the fungal-derived tetracycline-like viridicatumtoxins are resistant to fungal biotransformation, providing chemical insights that could inform the development of new tetracycline antibiotics resistant to enzymatic degradation. PMID:27419475

  5. Antibacterial properties of cationic steroid antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Savage, Paul B; Li, Chunhong; Taotafa, Uale; Ding, Bangwei; Guan, Qunying

    2002-11-19

    Cationic steroid antibiotics have been developed that display broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. These compounds are comprised of steroids appended with amine groups arranged to yield facially amphiphilic morphology. Examples of these antibiotics are highly bactericidal, while related compounds effectively permeabilize the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria sensitizing these organisms to hydrophobic antibiotics. Cationic steroid antibiotics exhibit various levels of eukaryote vs. prokaryote cell selectivity, and cell selectivity can be increased via charge recognition of prokaryotic cells. Studies of the mechanism of action of these antibiotics suggest that they share mechanistic aspects with cationic peptide antibiotics. PMID:12445638

  6. Variations of Weight Loss Following Gastric Bypass and Gastric Band

    PubMed Central

    Puzziferri, Nancy; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Livingston, Edward H.; Carmody, Thomas J.; Provost, David A.; Rush, A. John

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare and describe the weight loss outcomes from gastric bypass and gastric band so as to define the variation of excess weight loss (EWL) among individual patients, the time to onset of effect, and the durability of weight loss in severely obese adults. Summary Background Data Gastric bypass and gastric band are the most common operations for obesity performed in the United States, but few reports have compared these 2 procedures. Methods Patients (N = 1733, aged 18–65 years) met National Institutes of Health criteria for obesity surgery and underwent either gastric bypass or gastric band between March 1997 and November 2006. The selection of bypass versus band was based on patient/surgeon discussion. The evaluable sample consisted of 1518 patients. The percentage of EWL was assessed over 2 years. Successful weight loss was defined a priori as ≥40% EWL in each of four 6-month postoperative measurement periods. The analyses included a mixed model and generalized estimating equation (GEE) model with repeated measures. Odds ratios and descriptive analyses were also provided. Results Gastric bypass was associated with less individual variation in weight loss than gastric band. Both procedures were associated with a significant EWL benefit (Treatment Group effect P < 0.0001), but they differed in terms of time to effect (Treatment Group × Period interaction effect P < 0.0001). The mean EWL for gastric bypass was greater at each measurement period (6, 12, 18, 24 months) compared with gastric band (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, at each of the postoperative measurement periods within each treatment group (bypass and band), the mean EWL was greater for those who had preoperative body mass index (BMI) ≤50 kg/m2 than for those who had preoperative BMI >50 kg/m2 (P < 0.0001). Gastric bypass was consistently associated with a greater likelihood of at least a 40% EWL in each of the 6-month postoperative measurement periods (GEE, P < 0.0001). The odds ratio

  7. Polar bears, antibiotics, and the evolving ribosome (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Yonath, Ada

    2010-06-14

    High-resolution structures of ribosomes, the cellular machines that translate the genetic code into proteins, revealed the decoding mechanism, detected the mRNA path, identified the sites of the tRNA molecules in the ribosome, elucidated the position and the nature of the nascent proteins exit tunnel, illuminated the interactions of the ribosome with non-ribosomal factors, such as the initiation, release and recycling factors, and provided valuable information on ribosomal antibiotics, their binding sites, modes of action, principles of selectivity and the mechanisms leading to their resistance. Notably, these structures proved that the ribosome is a ribozyme whose active site, namely where the peptide bonds are being formed, is situated within a universal symmetrical region that is embedded in the otherwise asymmetric ribosome structure. As this symmetrical region is highly conserved and provides the machinery required for peptide bond formation and for ribosome polymerase activity, it may be the remnant of the proto-ribosome, a dimeric prebiotic machine that formed peptide bonds and non-coded polypeptide chains. Structures of complexes of ribosomes with antibiotics targeting them revealed the principles allowing for their clinical use, identified resistance mechanisms and showed the structural bases for discriminating pathogenic bacteria from hosts, hence providing valuable structural information for antibiotics improvement and for the design of novel compounds that can serve as antibiotics. PMID:20535730

  8. Unexpected link between an antibiotic, pannexin channels, and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Ivan K. H.; Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Armstrong, Allison J.; Kinchen, Jason M.; Juncadella, Ignacio J.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Ravichandran, Kodi S.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma membrane pannexin 1 channels (PANX1) release nucleotide find-me signals from apoptotic cells to attract phagocytes. In a small molecule screen, we discovered the quinolone antibiotic trovafloxacin as a novel PANX1 inhibitor. Although quinolones are widely used to treat bacterial infections, some quinolones have unexplained side effects, including deaths among children. PANX1 is a direct target of trovafloxacin at drug concentrations seen in human plasma, and its inhibition led to dysregulated fragmentation of apoptotic cells. Genetic loss of PANX1 phenocopied trovafloxacin effects, revealing a non-redundant role for pannexin channels in regulating cellular disassembly during apoptosis. Increase in drug-resistant bacteria worldwide and the dearth of new antibiotics is a major human health challenge. Comparing different quinolone antibiotics suggests that certain structural features may contribute to PANX1 blockade. These data identify a novel linkage between an antibiotic, pannexin channels, and cellular integrity, and suggest that re-engineering certain quinolones might help develop newer antibacterials. PMID:24646995

  9. Antibiotic treatment for Helicobacter pylori: Is the end coming?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Young; Choi, Duck Joo; Chung, Jun-Won

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been associated with gastro-duodenal disease and the importance of H. pylori eradication is underscored by its designation as a group I carcinogen. The standard triple therapy consists of a proton pump inhibitor, amoxicillin and clarithromycin, although many other regimens are used, including quadruple, sequential and concomitant therapy regimens supplemented with metronidazole, clarithromycin and levofloxacin. Despite these efforts, current therapeutic regimens lack efficacy in eradication due to antibiotic resistance, drug compliance and antibiotic degradation by the acidic stomach environment. Antibiotic resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole is particularly problematic and several approaches have been proposed to overcome this issue, such as complementary probiotic therapy with Lactobacillus. Other studies have identified novel molecules with an anti-H. pylori effect, as well as tailored therapy and nanotechnology as viable alternative eradication strategies. This review discusses current antibiotic therapy for H. pylori infections, limitations of this type of therapy and predicts the availability of newly developed therapies for H. pylori eradication. PMID:26558152

  10. Bone with cement and antibiotic: antibiotic release in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gualdrini, G; Bassi, A; Fravisini, M; Giunti, A

    2005-01-01

    It was the purpose of the study to evaluate morcellized bone with cement and antibiotic release mixed with vancomycin and methylmethacrylate cement (PMMA). The aim of the study is part of a wider one aimed at verifying the possibility of using this composite for the treatment of chronic septic pathologies of the bone. Five cylinders 1 cm in height by 1 cm in diameter, formed by morcellized bone with cement and vancomycin were immersed in plasma and 5 in physiological solution. Three cylinders equal in size but formed by cement and antibiotic alone were immersed in plasma and 3 in physiological solution. All of the cylinders remained in immersion for 28 days at a temperature of 37 degrees C. The immersion fluids were changed every day during the first week and on days 14, 21 and 28. The quantity of vancomycin released was dosed in each specimen. The greatest and most constant release of antibiotic took place in the cylinders of morcellized bone, cement and antibiotic immersed in plasma. PMID:16422226

  11. The Challenge of Efflux-Mediated Antibiotic Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Plésiat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The global emergence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria is a growing threat to antibiotic therapy. The chromosomally encoded drug efflux mechanisms that are ubiquitous in these bacteria greatly contribute to antibiotic resistance and present a major challenge for antibiotic development. Multidrug pumps, particularly those represented by the clinically relevant AcrAB-TolC and Mex pumps of the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) superfamily, not only mediate intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) but also are involved in other functions, including the bacterial stress response and pathogenicity. Additionally, efflux pumps interact synergistically with other resistance mechanisms (e.g., with the outer membrane permeability barrier) to increase resistance levels. Since the discovery of RND pumps in the early 1990s, remarkable scientific and technological advances have allowed for an in-depth understanding of the structural and biochemical basis, substrate profiles, molecular regulation, and inhibition of MDR pumps. However, the development of clinically useful efflux pump inhibitors and/or new antibiotics that can bypass pump effects continues to be a challenge. Plasmid-borne efflux pump genes (including those for RND pumps) have increasingly been identified. This article highlights the recent progress obtained for organisms of clinical significance, together with methodological considerations for the characterization of MDR pumps. PMID:25788514

  12. Cofactor bypass variants reveal a conformational control mechanism governing cell wall polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Markovski, Monica; Bohrhunter, Jessica L; Lupoli, Tania J; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Walker, Suzanne; Kahne, Daniel E; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2016-04-26

    To fortify their cytoplasmic membrane and protect it from osmotic rupture, most bacteria surround themselves with a peptidoglycan (PG) exoskeleton synthesized by the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). As their name implies, these proteins are the targets of penicillin and related antibiotics. We and others have shown that the PG synthases PBP1b and PBP1a of Escherichia coli require the outer membrane lipoproteins LpoA and LpoB, respectively, for their in vivo function. Although it has been demonstrated that LpoB activates the PG polymerization activity of PBP1b in vitro, the mechanism of activation and its physiological relevance have remained unclear. We therefore selected for variants of PBP1b (PBP1b*) that bypass the LpoB requirement for in vivo function, reasoning that they would shed light on LpoB function and its activation mechanism. Several of these PBP1b variants were isolated and displayed elevated polymerization activity in vitro, indicating that the activation of glycan polymer growth is indeed one of the relevant functions of LpoB in vivo. Moreover, the location of amino acid substitutions causing the bypass phenotype on the PBP1b structure support a model in which polymerization activation proceeds via the induction of a conformational change in PBP1b initiated by LpoB binding to its UB2H domain, followed by its transmission to the glycosyl transferase active site. Finally, phenotypic analysis of strains carrying a PBP1b* variant revealed that the PBP1b-LpoB complex is most likely not providing an important physical link between the inner and outer membranes at the division site, as has been previously proposed. PMID:27071112

  13. Probiotic approach to prevent antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Ouwehand, Arthur C; Forssten, Sofia; Hibberd, Ashley A; Lyra, Anna; Stahl, Buffy

    2016-06-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, mainly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although also strain of other species are commercialized, that have a beneficial effect on the host. From the perspective of antibiotic use, probiotics have been observed to reduce the risk of certain infectious disease such as certain types of diarrhea and respiratory tract infection. This may be accompanied with a reduced need of antibiotics for secondary infections. Antibiotics tend to be effective against most common diseases, but increasingly resistance is being observed among pathogens. Probiotics are specifically selected to not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and not carry transferable antibiotic resistance. Concomitant use of probiotics with antibiotics has been observed to reduce the incidence, duration and/or severity of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. This contributes to better adherence to the antibiotic prescription and thereby reduces the evolution of resistance. To what extent probiotics directly reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance is still much under investigation; but maintaining a balanced microbiota during antibiotic use may certainly provide opportunities for reducing the spread of resistances. Key messages Probiotics may reduce the risk for certain infectious diseases and thereby reduce the need for antibiotics. Probiotics may reduce the risk for antibiotic-associated diarrhea Probiotics do not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and may even reduce it. PMID:27092975

  14. By-pass pigs for two-phase flow pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.L.; Spronsen, G. van; Klaus, E.H.; Stewart, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    Pigging two-phase pipelines normally leads to the generation of large liquid slug volumes in front of the pig requiring excessively large separators or slug catchers. The concept of using a high by-pass pig to disperse the liquid and reduce the maximum liquid production rate prior to pig arrival is under investigation by Shell Exploration and Production companies. A simulation model of the dynamics of the pig and related two-phase flow behavior in the pipeline was used to predict the performance of by-pass pigs. Field trials in a dry gas pipeline were carried out to provide friction data and to validate the model. It was then used to explore operating possibilities in a two-phase lie which led to the follow-up trial in a 15.6 km, 20 inch OD two-phase offshore interfield pipeline with risers. Whereas the volume of liquid swept in front of the pig would be 179 m{sup 3} if the by-pass fraction were zero, a reduction of 70% to 53m{sup 3} was achieved in the field with a by-pass fraction of 10%. The predicted mobility of the high by-pass pig in the pipeline and risers was verified and the beneficial effects due to the by-pass concept exceeded the prediction of the simplified model. The significant gains of using a by-pass pig in modifying gas and liquid production rates during pigging operation have been demonstrated. The method can widen the possibility of applying two-phase flow pipeline transportation to cases where separator or slug catcher capacity are limited for reasons of practicality or cost.

  15. Antibiotic Transport in Resistant Bacteria: Synchrotron UV Fluorescence Microscopy to Determine Antibiotic Accumulation with Single Cell Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Kaščáková, Slávka; Maigre, Laure; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    A molecular definition of the mechanism conferring bacterial multidrug resistance is clinically crucial and today methods for quantitative determination of the uptake of antimicrobial agents with single cell resolution are missing. Using the naturally occurring fluorescence of antibacterial agents after deep ultraviolet (DUV) excitation, we developed a method to non-invasively monitor the quinolones uptake in single bacteria. Our approach is based on a DUV fluorescence microscope coupled to a synchrotron beamline providing tuneable excitation from 200 to 600 nm. A full spectrum was acquired at each pixel of the image, to study the DUV excited fluorescence emitted from quinolones within single bacteria. Measuring spectra allowed us to separate the antibiotic fluorescence from the autofluorescence contribution. By performing spectroscopic analysis, the quantification of the antibiotic signal was possible. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the intracellular accumulation of a clinical antibitiotic could be determined and discussed in relation with the level of drug susceptibility for a multiresistant strain. This method is especially important to follow the behavior of quinolone molecules at individual cell level, to quantify the intracellular concentration of the antibiotic and develop new strategies to combat the dissemination of MDR-bacteria. In addition, this original approach also indicates the heterogeneity of bacterial population when the same strain is under environmental stress like antibiotic attack. PMID:22719907

  16. Annular MHD Physics for Turbojet Energy Bypass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    The use of annular Hall type MHD generator/accelerator ducts for turbojet energy bypass is evaluated assuming weakly ionized flows obtained from pulsed nanosecond discharges. The equations for a 1-D, axisymmetric MHD generator/accelerator are derived and numerically integrated to determine the generator/accelerator performance characteristics. The concept offers a shockless means of interacting with high speed inlet flows and potentially offers variable inlet geometry performance without the complexity of moving parts simply by varying the generator loading parameter. The cycle analysis conducted iteratively with a spike inlet and turbojet flying at M = 7 at 30 km altitude is estimated to have a positive thrust per unit mass flow of 185 N-s/kg. The turbojet allowable combustor temperature is set at an aggressive 2200 deg K. The annular MHD Hall generator/accelerator is L = 3 m in length with a B(sub r) = 5 Tesla magnetic field and a conductivity of sigma = 5 mho/m for the generator and sigma= 1.0 mho/m for the accelerator. The calculated isentropic efficiency for the generator is eta(sub sg) = 84 percent at an enthalpy extraction ratio, eta(sub Ng) = 0.63. The calculated isentropic efficiency for the accelerator is eta(sub sa) = 81 percent at an enthalpy addition ratio, eta(sub Na) = 0.62. An assessment of the ionization fraction necessary to achieve a conductivity of sigma = 1.0 mho/m is n(sub e)/n = 1.90 X 10(exp -6), and for sigma = 5.0 mho/m is n(sub e)/n = 9.52 X 10(exp -6).

  17. Hypogammaglobulinemia After Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Leslie A; Robert, Stephen M; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Dabal, Robert J; Mahdi, Alla M.; Alten, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypogammaglobulinemia has been reported after cardiac surgery and may be associated with adverse outcomes. We sought to define baseline immunoglobulin (Ig) concentration in neonates and infants with congenital heart disease, determine its course following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and determine if post-CPB hypogammaglobulinemia was associated with increased morbidity. Methods Single center, retrospective analysis of infants who underwent cardiac surgery with CPB between June 2010 and December 2011. Ig concentration obtained from banked plasma of 47 patients from a prior study (pre-CPB, immediately post-CPB, and 24- and 48-hours post-CPB). Additionally, any Ig levels drawn for clinical purposes after CPB were included. Ig levels were excluded if drawn after chylothorax diagnosis or intravenous immunoglobulin G administration. Results Median age was 7 days. Preoperative Ig concentration was similar to that described in healthy children. IgG level fell to less than 50% of preoperative concentration by 24-hr post-CPB and failed to recover by 7 days. 25/47 (53%) patients had low IgG after CPB (<248 mg/dl). Despite no difference in demographics or risk factors between patients with low and normal IgG, low IgG patients had more positive fluid balance at 24-hours, increased pro-inflammatory plasma cytokine levels, duration of mechanical ventilation, and CICU length of stay. Additionally, low IgG patients had increased incidence of post-operative infections (40% vs. 14%, p=0.056). Conclusions Hypogammaglobulinemia occurs in half of infants after CPB. Its association with fluid overload and increased inflammatory cytokines suggests it may result from capillary leak. Postoperative hypogammaglobulinemia is associated with increased morbidity, including more secondary infections. PMID:24035378

  18. A Snapshot of Coagulopathy After Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Höfer, Judith; Fries, Dietmar; Solomon, Cristina; Velik-Salchner, Corinna; Ausserer, Julia

    2016-09-01

    Cardiac surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is often associated with important blood loss, allogeneic blood product usage, morbidity, and mortality. Coagulopathy during CPB is complex, and the current lack of uniformity for triggers and hemostatic agents has led to a wide variability in bleeding treatment. The aim of this review is to provide a simplified picture of the data available on patients' coagulation status at the end of CPB in order to provide relevant information for the development of tailored transfusion algorithms. A nonsystematic literature review was carried out to identify changes in coagulation parameters during CPB. Both prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time increased during CPB, by a median of 33.3% and 17.9%, respectively. However, there was marked variability across the published studies, indicating these tests may be unreliable for guiding hemostatic therapy. Some thrombin generation (TG) parameters were affected, as indicated by a median increase in TG lag time of 55.0%, a decrease in TG peak of 17.5%, and only a slight decrease in endogenous thrombin potential of 7%. The most affected parameters were fibrinogen levels and platelet count/function. Both plasma fibrinogen concentration and FIBTEM maximum clot firmness decreased during CPB (median change of 36.4% and 33.3%, respectively) as did platelet count (44.5%) and platelet component (34.2%). This review provides initial information regarding changes in coagulation parameters during CPB but highlights the variability in the reported results. Further studies are warranted to guide physicians on the parameters most appropriate to guide hemostatic therapy. PMID:27268940

  19. Antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gueimonde, Miguel; Sánchez, Borja; G. de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara; Margolles, Abelardo

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The main probiotic bacteria are strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although other representatives, such as Bacillus or Escherichia coli strains, have also been used. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are two common inhabitants of the human intestinal microbiota. Also, some species are used in food fermentation processes as starters, or as adjunct cultures in the food industry. With some exceptions, antibiotic resistance in these beneficial microbes does not constitute a safety concern in itself, when mutations or intrinsic resistance mechanisms are responsible for the resistance phenotype. In fact, some probiotic strains with intrinsic antibiotic resistance could be useful for restoring the gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment. However, specific antibiotic resistance determinants carried on mobile genetic elements, such as tetracycline resistance genes, are often detected in the typical probiotic genera, and constitute a reservoir of resistance for potential food or gut pathogens, thus representing a serious safety issue. PMID:23882264

  20. Spatial mapping of antibiotic resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A serious concern for modern animal production is the fear that feed antimicrobials, such as monensin, increase the potential for high levels of antibiotic resistant (AR) gene prevalence in the manure, which may subsequently be shared with soil communities and eventually be taken up by human pathoge...

  1. Antibodies: an alternative for antibiotics?

    PubMed

    Berghman, L R; Abi-Ghanem, D; Waghela, S D; Ricke, S C

    2005-04-01

    In 1967, the success of vaccination programs, combined with the seemingly unstoppable triumph of antibiotics, prompted the US Surgeon General to declare that "it was time to close the books on infectious diseases." We now know that the prediction was overly optimistic and that the fight against infectious diseases is here to stay. During the last 20 yr, infectious diseases have indeed made a staggering comeback for a variety of reasons, including resistance against existing antibiotics. As a consequence, several alternatives to antibiotics are currently being considered or reconsidered. Passive immunization (i.e., the administration of more or less pathogen-specific antibodies to the patient) prior to or after exposure to the disease-causing agent is one of those alternative strategies that was almost entirely abandoned with the introduction of chemical antibiotics but that is now gaining interest again. This review will discuss the early successes and limitations of passive immunization, formerly referred to as "serum therapy," the current use of antibody administration for prophylaxis or treatment of infectious diseases in agriculture, and, finally, recent developments in the field of antibody engineering and "molecular farming" of antibodies in various expression systems. Especially the potential of producing therapeutic antibodies in crops that are routine dietary components of farm animals, such as corn and soy beans, seems to hold promise for future application in the fight against infectious diseases. PMID:15844826

  2. Antibiotics May Blunt Breast-Feeding's Benefits

    MedlinePlus

    ... how it helps a baby develop intestinal bacteria (microbiota), and that antibiotics disturb that development, she said. ... the mother guides the development of the infant's microbiota," she said. "Antibiotic use disrupts the natural microbiota ...

  3. Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Competencies Current Projects Completed Projects The Center for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance Reservoirs of Antibiotic Resistance ... visit our partner lab at the Center for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance . Antibiotic Resistance in the ...

  4. A New Antibiotic to the Rescue?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159417.html A New Antibiotic to the Rescue? Experimental drug shows promise against ... THURSDAY, June 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental antibiotic has shown promise against a dangerous drug-resistant ...

  5. Antibiotics Overprescribed for Possible STDs: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159296.html Antibiotics Overprescribed for Possible STDs: Study 3 in 4 ... Three-quarters of emergency room patients who received antibiotics to treat suspected sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) tested ...

  6. When and How to Take Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work Contact Us ABOUT THE ISSUE What is Antibiotic Resistance? General Background Science of Resistance Glossary References POLICY ... for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance Reservoirs of Antibiotic Resistance Project (ROAR) INTERNATIONAL CHAPTERS APUA Chapter Network Africa ...

  7. Origins and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Julian; Davies, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Antibiotics have always been considered one of the wonder discoveries of the 20th century. This is true, but the real wonder is the rise of antibiotic resistance in hospitals, communities, and the environment concomitant with their use. The extraordinary genetic capacities of microbes have benefitted from man's overuse of antibiotics to exploit every source of resistance genes and every means of horizontal gene transmission to develop multiple mechanisms of resistance for each and every antibiotic introduced into practice clinically, agriculturally, or otherwise. This review presents the salient aspects of antibiotic resistance development over the past half-century, with the oft-restated conclusion that it is time to act. To achieve complete restitution of therapeutic applications of antibiotics, there is a need for more information on the role of environmental microbiomes in the rise of antibiotic resistance. In particular, creative approaches to the discovery of novel antibiotics and their expedited and controlled introduction to therapy are obligatory. PMID:20805405

  8. Antibiotic 'Report Card' Drills Guidelines into Dentists

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160702.html Antibiotic 'Report Card' Drills Guidelines Into Dentists Seeing their prescription rates ... prescribe antibiotics for patients after seeing a "report card" on their past prescription rates, a new study ...

  9. Antibiotics May Blunt Breast-Feeding's Benefits

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159339.html Antibiotics May Blunt Breast-Feeding's Benefits Infants given the drugs were prone to infections ... use of antibiotics may dampen some of the benefits of breast-feeding, a new study suggests. Researchers ...

  10. FDA Bolsters Warnings about Class of Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... html FDA Bolsters Warnings About Class of Antibiotics Fluoroquinolones such as Cipro, Levaquin should be reserved for ... label warnings on a class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones because the drugs can lead to disabling side ...

  11. Antibiotics Overprescribed for Possible STDs: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... There is a tricky balance between not furthering antibiotic resistance by over-prescribing, but also still getting people ... a national and international priority to help prevent antibiotic resistance, which would threaten our ability to treat even ...

  12. [Rational antibiotic treatment of mediastinitis].

    PubMed

    Ambrosch, A

    2016-06-01

    Mediastinitis occurs as a severe complication of thoracic and cardiac surgical interventions and is the result of traumatic esophageal perforation, conducted infections or as a result of lymphogenic and hematogenic spread of specific infective pathogens. Treatment must as a rule be accompanied by antibiotics, whereby knowledge of the spectrum of pathogens depending on the pathogenesis is indispensable for successful antibiotic therapy. Polymicrobial infections with a high proportion of anaerobes are found in conducted infections of the mediastinum and after esophageal perforation. After cardiac surgery Staphylococci are the dominant pathogens and a nasal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus seems to be a predisposing risk factor. Fungi are the predominant pathogens in immunocompromised patients with consumptive underlying illnesses and can cause acute or chronic forms with granulomatous inflammation. Resistant pathogens are increasingly being found in high-risk patient cohorts, which must be considered for a calculated therapy. For calculated antibiotic therapy the administration of broad spectrum antibiotics, mostly beta-lactams alone or combined with metronidazole is the therapy of choice for both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria inclusive of anaerobes. For patients at risk, additional antibiotic classes with a spectrum against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) can be administered. Increasing rates of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (e.g. Enterobacteriaceae) and non-fermenting bacteria (e.g. Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter) in individual cases necessitates the use of polymyxins (e.g. colistin), new tetracyclines (e.g. glycylglycines) and newly developed combinations of beta-lactams and beta-lactam inhibitors. For treatment of fungal infections (e.g. Candida, Aspergillus and Histoplasma) established and novel azoles, amphotericin B and echinocandins seem to be successful; however

  13. HA14-1, a small molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2, bypasses chemoresistance in leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Lisa; Mahé, Béatrice; Gréé, René; Vallette, François M; Juin, Philippe

    2007-06-01

    We analyzed the biological activity of HA14-1, a small organic compound inhibitor of Bcl-2, against established leukaemia cell lines and blasts from acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients. HA14-1 had a potent killing activity against the leukaemia cell line that expressed endogenous or ectopic Bcl-2. This activity was mostly caspase-independent and was not altered by the expression of a multidrug-resistant phenotype. Moreover, HA14-1 efficiently induced cell death in a broad spectrum of AML blasts but not in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes. Thus, single-agent regimens using Bcl-2 inhibitors such as HA14-1 may be advantageous in overcoming some forms of chemoresistance in AML. PMID:17224180

  14. New and alternative approaches to tackling antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Nicolette

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacteria are becoming more common and due to their multiplicity of mechanisms, they are frequently resistant to many if not all of the current antibiotics. This daunting spectre has been the target of many research efforts into conventional antibiotics and alternative approaches. This review focuses on the more recent advances in these fields with an overview on peptidomimetics, nanoparticles and their derivatives, FimH inhibitors, quorum sensing inhibition molecules, neoglycosides and phage therapies. These various approaches are at different stages of development, some are closer to the clinic than others, but recent regulatory guidance and re-awakened interest from the pharmaceutical companies gives us some optimism for the future. PMID:24381727

  15. Mechanisms of Resistance to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: Overview and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotics are used to treat many Gram-negative and some Gram-positive infections and, importantly, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Among various bacterial species, resistance to AGs arises through a variety of intrinsic and acquired mechanisms. The bacterial cell wall serves as a natural barrier for small molecules such as AGs and may be further fortified via acquired mutations. Efflux pumps work to expel AGs from bacterial cells, and modifications here too may cause further resistance to AGs. Mutations in the ribosomal target of AGs, while rare, also contribute to resistance. Of growing clinical prominence is resistance caused by ribosome methyltransferases. By far the most widespread mechanism of resistance to AGs is the inactivation of these antibiotics by AG-modifying enzymes. We provide here an overview of these mechanisms by which bacteria become resistant to AGs and discuss their prevalence and potential for clinical relevance. PMID:26877861

  16. Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity Of Antibiotics Mixed With Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Neeraj; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Thakur, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2011-12-01

    Current producers of antimicrobial technology have a long lasting, environmentally safe, non-leaching, water soluble solution that will eventually replace all poisons and heavy metals. The transition metal ions inevitably exist as metal complexes in biological systems by interaction with the numerous molecules possessing groupings capable of complexation or chelation. Nanoparticles of metal oxides offer a wide variety of potential applications in medicine due to the unprecedented advances in nanobiotechnology research. the bacterial action of antibiotics like penicillin, erythryomycin, ampicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin etc. and that of a mixture of antibiotics and metal and metal oxide nanoparticles like zinc oxide, zirconium, silver and gold on microbes was examined by the agar-well-diffusion method, enumeration of colony-forming units (CFU) and turbidimetry.

  17. Minimally invasive coronary artery bypass grafting: initial Connecticut experience.

    PubMed

    Tellides, G; Maragh, M R; Smith, J M; Kopf, G S; Ezekowitz, M; Remetz, M; Elefteriades, J A

    1997-03-01

    We report the initial Connecticut experience with minimally invasive coronary artery bypass grafting. This procedure allows bypass grafting to the left anterior descending coronary artery utilizing the internal mammary artery as the conduit. The procedure is minimally invasive because it is performed through a mini-thoracotomy incision in the fourth anterior intercostal space and it is conducted without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. The procedure has been applied to 13 patients operated between February and October 1996. All but one patient selected were poor candidates for conventional coronary artery bypass surgery because of advanced age (6), chronic renal failure/dialysis/kidney transplant (4), redo status with vulnerable grafts (1), severe peripheral vascular disease (6), severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (4). All patients survived operation and were discharged in good condition. Mean postoperative intubation time was seven hours and mean hospital stay was 4.5 days despite the very high pre-existing comorbidity of these patients. All patients are alive at the current follow-up time. Two patients required a conventional bypass procedure for occlusion of the minimally invasive graft, the first because of diffuse disease in the target artery and the second attributable to the technical limitations of minimally invasive coronary artery bypass grafting; both tolerated the subsequent procedure well. All patients are now angina-free. All four grafts studied by routine postoperative angiography were widely patent. Routine post-operative exercise nuclear imaging was normal in an additional patient. This procedure of minimally invasive coronary artery bypass grafting offers significant advantages compared to the conventional bypass procedure (short hospital stay, quick recovery, and, especially, avoidance of cerebrovascular accidents caused by the heart-lung machine). This minimally invasive procedure is expected to apply to a growing percentage of

  18. Entry overload, emergency department overcrowding, and ambulance bypass

    PubMed Central

    Fatovich, D; Hirsch, R

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To describe an experience of emergency department (ED) overcrowding and ambulance bypass. Methods: A prospective observational study at Royal Perth Hospital, a major teaching hospital. Episodes of ambulance bypass and their characteristics were recorded. Results: From 1 July 1999 to 30 June 2001, there were 141 episodes of ambulance bypass (mean duration 187 min, range 35–995). Monday was the most common day with 39 (28%) episodes. Entry block alone was the most common reason bypass was activated (n=38, 30.4%). The mean number of patients in ED at these times was 40 (occupancy 174%), including nine in the corridor, seven awaiting admission, and 14 waiting to be seen. Episodes attributable to entry block were typically preceded by a presentation rate of ⩾10 patients per hour for ⩾2 hours (OR 6.2, 95% CI 4.3 to 8.5). Mid-afternoon to early evening was the most common time for activation. Ambulance bypass is increasing in frequency and duration. Conclusions: Entry overload resulting in entry block results from overwhelming numbers of patients presenting to the ED in a short space of time. Entry block impairs access to emergency care. Unless something is done in the near future, the general public may no longer be able to rely on EDs for quality and timely emergency care. A "whole of system" approach is necessary to tackle the problem. PMID:12954675

  19. Emergency conversion in off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Minoru; Takanashi, Shuichiro; Horai, Tetsuya; Fukui, Toshihiro; Hosoda, Yasuyuki

    2006-10-01

    Emergency conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass in off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting is recognized to increase operative mortality and morbidity. We conducted a retrospective review of 616 consecutive patients who were planned for off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting from April 2001 to July 2004. Fourteen patients (2.3%) required emergency conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. Operative mortality was 13.3% in the conversion group and 1.2% in the non-conversion group (P<0.001). The incidence of reoperation for bleeding was 7.1% and 1.0%, respectively (P=0.032) and that of respiratory failure was 35.7% and 3.3%, respectively (P<0.001). Multivariable analysis showed that mitral regurgitation and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were predictors of emergency conversion with all causes except for bleeding, and that mitral regurgitation and no use of a heart positioning device were predictors of emergency conversion due to hemodynamic compromise during distal anastomosis of the circumflex artery territory. In conclusion, emergency conversion in off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting increases operative mortality and morbidity. Mitral regurgitation and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are risk factors for emergency conversion. Use of a heart positioning device decreases hemodynamic compromise during anastomosis of the circumflex artery territory. PMID:17670644

  20. Photovoltaic-module bypass-diode encapsulation. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-20

    The design and processing techniques necessary to incorporate bypass diodes within the module encapsulant are presented in this annual report. A comprehensive survey of available pad-mounted PN junction and Schottky diodes led to the selection of Semicon PN junction diode cells for this application. Diode junction-to-heat spreader thermal resistance measurements, performed on a variety of mounted diode chip types and sizes, have yielded values which are consistently below 1/sup 0/C per watt, but show some instability when thermally cycled over the temperature range from -40 to 150/sup 0/C. Based on the results of a detailed thermal analysis, which covered the range of bypass currents from 2 to 20 amperes, three representative experimental modules, each incorporating integral bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies of various sizes, were designed and fabricated. Thermal testing of these modules has enabled the formation of a recommended heat spreader plate sizing relationship. The production cost of three encapsulated bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies were compared with similarly rated externally-mounted packaged diodes. An assessment of bypass diode reliability, which relies heavily on rectifying diode failure rate data, leads to the general conclusion that, when proper designed and installed, these devices will improve the overall reliability of a terrestrial array over a 20 year design lifetime.

  1. A remote augmentor lift system with a turbine bypass engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.; Franciscus, L. C.

    1982-01-01

    Two supersonic vertical takeoff or landing (VTOL) aircraft engine types, a conventional medium bypass ratio turbofan, and a turbine bypass turbojet were studied. The aircraft assumed was a clipped delta wing with canard configuration. A VTOL deck launched intercept, DLI, mission with Mach 1.6 dash and cruise segments was used as the design mission. Several alternate missions requiring extended subsonic capabilities were analyzed. Comparisons were made between the turbofan (TF) and the turbine bypass turbojet (TBE) engines in airplane types using a Remote Augmented Lift Systems, RALS and a Lift plus Lift Cruise system (L+LC). The figure of merit was takeoff gross weight for the VTOL DLI mission. The results of the study show that the turbine bypass turbojet and the conventional turbofan are competitive engines for both type of aircraft in terms of takeoff gross weight and range. However, the turbine bypass turbojet would be a simpler engine and may result in more attractive life cycle costs and reduced maintenance. The RALS and L+LC airplane types with either TBE or TF engines have approximately the same aircraft takeoff gross weight.

  2. Pipeline of Known Chemical Classes of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    d’Urso de Souza Mendes, Cristina; de Souza Antunes, Adelaide Maria

    2013-01-01

    Many approaches are used to discover new antibiotic compounds, one of the most widespread being the chemical modification of known antibiotics. This type of discovery has been so important in the development of new antibiotics that most antibiotics used today belong to the same chemical classes as antibiotics discovered in the 1950s and 1960s. Even though the discovery of new classes of antibiotics is urgently needed, the chemical modification of antibiotics in known classes is still widely used to discover new antibiotics, resulting in a great number of compounds in the discovery and clinical pipeline that belong to existing classes. In this scenario, the present article presents an overview of the R&D pipeline of new antibiotics in known classes of antibiotics, from discovery to clinical trial, in order to map out the technological trends in this type of antibiotic R&D, aiming to identify the chemical classes attracting most interest, their spectrum of activity, and the new subclasses under development. The result of the study shows that the new antibiotics in the pipeline belong to the following chemical classes: quinolones, aminoglycosides, macrolides, oxazolidinones, tetracyclines, pleuromutilins, beta-lactams, lipoglycopeptides, polymyxins and cyclic lipopeptides. PMID:27029317

  3. Overcoming the current deadlock in antibiotic research.

    PubMed

    Schäberle, Till F; Hack, Ingrid M

    2014-04-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are on the rise, making it harder to treat bacterial infections. The situation is aggravated by the shrinking of the antibiotic development pipeline. To finance urgently needed incentives for antibiotic research, creative financing solutions are needed. Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are a successful model for moving forward. PMID:24698433

  4. New business models for antibiotic innovation.

    PubMed

    So, Anthony D; Shah, Tejen A

    2014-05-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistance and the dearth of novel antibiotics have become a growing concern among policy-makers. A combination of financial, scientific, and regulatory challenges poses barriers to antibiotic innovation. However, each of these three challenges provides an opportunity to develop pathways for new business models to bring novel antibiotics to market. Pull-incentives that pay for the outputs of research and development (R&D) and push-incentives that pay for the inputs of R&D can be used to increase innovation for antibiotics. Financial incentives might be structured to promote delinkage of a company's return on investment from revenues of antibiotics. This delinkage strategy might not only increase innovation, but also reinforce rational use of antibiotics. Regulatory approval, however, should not and need not compromise safety and efficacy standards to bring antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action to market. Instead regulatory agencies could encourage development of companion diagnostics, test antibiotic combinations in parallel, and pool and make transparent clinical trial data to lower R&D costs. A tax on non-human use of antibiotics might also create a disincentive for non-therapeutic use of these drugs. Finally, the new business model for antibiotic innovation should apply the 3Rs strategy for encouraging collaborative approaches to R&D in innovating novel antibiotics: sharing resources, risks, and rewards. PMID:24646116

  5. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - What Everyone Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Everyone Should Know What You Can Do Antibiotic Resistance Q&As Fast Facts Antibiotics Quiz Glossary For ... Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship Interventions That Work ...

  6. Small Molecules Take A Big Step Against Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Beilhartz, Greg L; Tam, John; Melnyk, Roman A

    2015-12-01

    Effective treatment of Clostridium difficile infections demands a shift away from antibiotics towards toxin-neutralizing agents. Work by Bender et al., using a drug that attenuates toxin action in vivo without affecting bacterial survival, demonstrates the exciting potential of small molecules as a new modality in the fight against C. difficile. PMID:26547239

  7. Clinical consequences and cost of limiting use of vancomycin for perioperative prophylaxis: example of coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, G.; Goldie, S. J.; Platt, R.

    2001-01-01

    Routine us of vancomycin for perioperative prophylaxis is discouraged, principally to minimize microbial resistance to it. However, outcomes and costs of this recommendation have not been assessed. We used decision-analytic models to compare clinical results and cost-effectiveness of no prophylaxis, cefazolin, and vancomycin, in coronary artery bypass graft surgery. In the base case, vancomycin resulted in 7% fewer surgical site infections and 1% lower all-cause mortality and saved $117 per procedure, compared with cefazolin. Cefazolin, in turn, resulted in substantially fewer infections and deaths and lower costs than no prophylaxis. We conclude that perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis with vancomycin is usually more effective and less expensive than cefazolin. Data on vancomycin's impact on resistance are needed to quantify the trade-off between individual patients' improved clinical outcomes and lower costs and the future long-term consequences to society. PMID:11747694

  8. Design of dual action antibiotics as an approach to search for new promising drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tevyashova, A. N.; Olsufyeva, E. N.; Preobrazhenskaya, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    The review is devoted to the latest achievements in the design of dual action antibiotics — heterodimeric (chimeric) structures based on antibacterial agents of different classes (fluoroquinolones, anthracyclines, oxazolidines, macrolides and so on). Covalent binding can make the pharmacokinetic characteristics of these molecules more predictable and improve the penetration of each component into the cell. Consequently, not only does the drug efficacy increase owing to inhibition of two targets but also the resistance to one or both antibiotics can be overcome. The theoretical grounds of elaboration, design principles and methods for the synthesis of dual action antibiotics are considered. The structures are classified according to the type of covalent spacer (cleavable or not) connecting the moieties of two agents. Dual action antibiotics with a spacer that can be cleaved in a living cell are considered as dual action prodrugs. Data on the biological action of heterodimeric compounds are presented and structure-activity relationships are analyzed. The bibliography includes 225 references.

  9. Insights into novel antimicrobial compounds and antibiotic resistance genes from soil metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Alinne P.; Fernandes, Gabriel da R.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years a major worldwide problem has arisen with regard to infectious diseases caused by resistant bacteria. Resistant pathogens are related to high mortality and also to enormous healthcare costs. In this field, cultured microorganisms have been commonly focused in attempts to isolate antibiotic resistance genes or to identify antimicrobial compounds. Although this strategy has been successful in many cases, most of the microbial diversity and related antimicrobial molecules have been completely lost. As an alternative, metagenomics has been used as a reliable approach to reveal the prospective reservoir of antimicrobial compounds and antibiotic resistance genes in the uncultured microbial community that inhabits a number of environments. In this context, this review will focus on resistance genes as well as on novel antibiotics revealed by a metagenomics approach from the soil environment. Biotechnology prospects are also discussed, opening new frontiers for antibiotic development. PMID:25278933

  10. Antibiotic resistance breakers: can repurposed drugs fill the antibiotic discovery void?

    PubMed

    Brown, David

    2015-12-01

    Concern over antibiotic resistance is growing, and new classes of antibiotics, particularly against Gram-negative bacteria, are needed. However, even if the scientific hurdles can be overcome, it could take decades for sufficient numbers of such antibiotics to become available. As an interim solution, antibiotic resistance could be 'broken' by co-administering appropriate non-antibiotic drugs with failing antibiotics. Several marketed drugs that do not currently have antibacterial indications can either directly kill bacteria, reduce the antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration when used in combination with existing antibiotics and/or modulate host defence through effects on host innate immunity, in particular by altering inflammation and autophagy. This article discusses how such 'antibiotic resistance breakers' could contribute to reducing the antibiotic resistance problem, and analyses a priority list of candidates for further investigation. PMID:26493767

  11. A role for the bacterial GATC methylome in antibiotic stress survival.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Nadia R; Ross, Christian A; Jain, Saloni; Shapiro, Rebecca S; Gutierrez, Arnaud; Belenky, Peter; Li, Hu; Collins, James J

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasingly serious public health threat. Understanding pathways allowing bacteria to survive antibiotic stress may unveil new therapeutic targets. We explore the role of the bacterial epigenome in antibiotic stress survival using classical genetic tools and single-molecule real-time sequencing to characterize genomic methylation kinetics. We find that Escherichia coli survival under antibiotic pressure is severely compromised without adenine methylation at GATC sites. Although the adenine methylome remains stable during drug stress, without GATC methylation, methyl-dependent mismatch repair (MMR) is deleterious and, fueled by the drug-induced error-prone polymerase Pol IV, overwhelms cells with toxic DNA breaks. In multiple E. coli strains, including pathogenic and drug-resistant clinical isolates, DNA adenine methyltransferase deficiency potentiates antibiotics from the β-lactam and quinolone classes. This work indicates that the GATC methylome provides structural support for bacterial survival during antibiotic stress and suggests targeting bacterial DNA methylation as a viable approach to enhancing antibiotic activity. PMID:26998690

  12. Structures of the orthosomycin antibiotics avilamycin and evernimicin in complex with the bacterial 70S ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Arenz, Stefan; Graf, Michael; Nguyen, Fabian; Huter, Paul; Polikanov, Yury S.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2016-01-01

    The ribosome is one of the major targets for therapeutic antibiotics; however, the rise in multidrug resistance is a growing threat to the utility of our current arsenal. The orthosomycin antibiotics evernimicin (EVN) and avilamycin (AVI) target the ribosome and do not display cross-resistance with any other classes of antibiotics, suggesting that they bind to a unique site on the ribosome and may therefore represent an avenue for development of new antimicrobial agents. Here we present cryo-EM structures of EVN and AVI in complex with the Escherichia coli ribosome at 3.6- to 3.9-Å resolution. The structures reveal that EVN and AVI bind to a single site on the large subunit that is distinct from other known antibiotic binding sites on the ribosome. Both antibiotics adopt an extended conformation spanning the minor grooves of helices 89 and 91 of the 23S rRNA and interacting with arginine residues of ribosomal protein L16. This binding site overlaps with the elbow region of A-site bound tRNA. Consistent with this finding, single-molecule FRET (smFRET) experiments show that both antibiotics interfere with late steps in the accommodation process, wherein aminoacyl-tRNA enters the peptidyltransferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. These data provide a structural and mechanistic rationale for how these antibiotics inhibit the elongation phase of protein synthesis. PMID:27330110

  13. Structures of the orthosomycin antibiotics avilamycin and evernimicin in complex with the bacterial 70S ribosome.

    PubMed

    Arenz, Stefan; Juette, Manuel F; Graf, Michael; Nguyen, Fabian; Huter, Paul; Polikanov, Yury S; Blanchard, Scott C; Wilson, Daniel N

    2016-07-01

    The ribosome is one of the major targets for therapeutic antibiotics; however, the rise in multidrug resistance is a growing threat to the utility of our current arsenal. The orthosomycin antibiotics evernimicin (EVN) and avilamycin (AVI) target the ribosome and do not display cross-resistance with any other classes of antibiotics, suggesting that they bind to a unique site on the ribosome and may therefore represent an avenue for development of new antimicrobial agents. Here we present cryo-EM structures of EVN and AVI in complex with the Escherichia coli ribosome at 3.6- to 3.9-Å resolution. The structures reveal that EVN and AVI bind to a single site on the large subunit that is distinct from other known antibiotic binding sites on the ribosome. Both antibiotics adopt an extended conformation spanning the minor grooves of helices 89 and 91 of the 23S rRNA and interacting with arginine residues of ribosomal protein L16. This binding site overlaps with the elbow region of A-site bound tRNA. Consistent with this finding, single-molecule FRET (smFRET) experiments show that both antibiotics interfere with late steps in the accommodation process, wherein aminoacyl-tRNA enters the peptidyltransferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. These data provide a structural and mechanistic rationale for how these antibiotics inhibit the elongation phase of protein synthesis. PMID:27330110

  14. A case of ruptured infectious anterior cerebral artery aneurysm treated by interposition graft bypass using the superficial temporal artery

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Takatsugu; Endo, Hidenori; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Fujimura, Miki; Endo, Toshiki; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Mika; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Background: To describe the application of an interposition graft bypass using superficial temporal artery (STA) for the treatment of a ruptured anterior cerebral artery (ACA) infectious aneurysm. Case Description: A 30-year-old male suffered from severe headache with high fever. The patient's diagnosis was ruptured infectious ACA aneurysm at the A3 segment with a maximum diameter of 4.5 mm, caused by infectious endocarditis. The patient was initially treated with high-dose intravenous antibiotics. Follow-up digital subtraction angiography (DSA) revealed that the fusiform aneurysm had enlarged to a maximum diameter of 14.0 mm. A left paracentral artery, supplying the motor area of the left lower extremity, originated from the body of this aneurysm. Because the angiographic findings suggested a risk of recurrent bleeding, the patient underwent open surgery. Interposition graft bypass using the STA was performed to reconstruct the left A3 segment in an end-to-side manner (left proximal callosomarginal artery – STA graft – left distal pericallosal artery). Then, the origin of the left paracentral artery was cut and anastomosed to the STA graft in an end-to-side manner. The affected parent artery was trapped, and the aneurysm was resected. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed no ischemic or hemorrhagic complications, and postoperative DSA revealed the patency of the interposition graft. Pathological diagnosis of the resected aneurysm revealed features corresponding to infectious cerebral aneurysm. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged without any neurological deficits. Conclusion: In the treatment of infectious cerebral aneurysms, revascularization should be considered when the affected artery supplies the eloquent area. Interposition graft bypass using the STA is one of the options for revascularization surgery for the treatment of infectious ACA aneurysms. PMID:26862444

  15. Robotically assisted totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Canale, Leonardo Secchin; Mick, Stephanie; Mihaljevic, Tomislav; Nair, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Robotically assisted totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass surgery has emerged as a feasible and efficient alternative to conventional full sternotomy coronary artery bypass graft surgery in selected patients. This minimally invasive approach using the daVinci robotic system allows fine intrathoracic maneuvers and excellent view of the coronary arteries. Both on-pump and off-pump operations can be performed to treat single and multivessel disease. Hybrid approaches have the potential of offering complete revascularization with the “best of both worlds” from surgery (internal mammary artery anastomosis in less invasive fashion) and percutaneous coronary intervention (least invasive approach). In this article we review the indications, techniques, short and long term results, as well as current developments in totally endoscopic robotic coronary artery bypass operations. PMID:24251021

  16. Rankine cycle load limiting through use of a recuperator bypass

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Timothy C.

    2011-08-16

    A system for converting heat from an engine into work includes a boiler coupled to a heat source for transferring heat to a working fluid, a turbine that transforms the heat into work, a condenser that transforms the working fluid into liquid, a recuperator with one flow path that routes working fluid from the turbine to the condenser, and another flow path that routes liquid working fluid from the condenser to the boiler, the recuperator being configured to transfer heat to the liquid working fluid, and a bypass valve in parallel with the second flow path. The bypass valve is movable between a closed position, permitting flow through the second flow path and an opened position, under high engine load conditions, bypassing the second flow path.

  17. Proposal of bypass in heat recovery system with sucking air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siažik, Ján; Malcho, Milan; Rezničák, Štefan

    2016-06-01

    Waste heat is utilized in a wide variety of technologies for a number of reasons. But the significant one such reason is use of the energy contained for example in waste water or waste heat that would otherwise left unused. Other considerable reason it is also reduces primary costs to operate the technology. The article deals with the arrangement section of the unit in heat recovery systems where the entry of waste gases into defluorinastion device. The technologies re-use heat often use the bypass. Bypass fulfill their duty in equipment failures, for example heat exchanger where it is not possible to stop the operationimmediately and the hot combustion gases can flow bypass without interrupting operation.

  18. Refractory Vascular Spasm Associated with Coronary Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Sam; Yoon, Yong Han; Kim, Jeoung Taek; Shinn, Helen Ki; Woo, Seong Ill; Baek, Wan Ki

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse refractory vascular spasms associated with coronary bypass artery grafting (CABG) are rare but devastating. A 42-year-old male patient with a past history of stent insertion was referred for the surgical treatment of a recurrent left main coronary artery disease. A hemodynamic derangement developed during graft harvesting, necessitating a hurried initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Although CABG was carried out as planned, the patient could not be weaned from the bypass. An emergency coronary angiography demonstrated a diffuse spasm of both native coronary arteries and grafts. CPB was switched to the femorofemoral extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (ECMO). Although he managed to recover from heart failure, his discharge was delayed due to the ischemic injury of the lower limb secondary to cannulation for ECMO. We reviewed the case and literature, placing emphasis on the predisposing factors and appropriate management. PMID:25346903

  19. Smokers' rights to coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    PubMed

    Heath, Janie; Braun, Mary Ann; Brindle, Margaret

    2002-06-01

    Imagine a health maintenance organization creating a policy to deny all smokers access to nonemergent coronary artery bypass graft surgery. The cost savings to the organization and society would be potentially significant. Now envision the smoker, a hardworking father with daily angina, and the provider, writing costly prescriptions to manage the angina. What ethical and legal questions do you suppose would present in that setting? Now imagine how you would respond if given this scenario of denying smokers access to nonemergent coronary artery bypass graft. This article discusses the implications of resource allocation with self-inflicted health behaviors such as smoking. Tough questions are raised that explore both the pros and the cons of smokers' rights to coronary artery bypass graft. PMID:12042677

  20. An alkylaminoquinazoline restores antibiotic activity in Gram-negative resistant isolates.

    PubMed

    Mahamoud, Abdallah; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Baitiche, Milad; Adam, Elissavet; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2011-02-01

    To date, various bacterial drug efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) have been described. They exhibit variability in their activity spectrum with respect to antibiotic structural class and bacterial species. Among the various 4-alkylaminoquinazoline derivatives synthesized and studied in this work, one molecule, 1167, increased the susceptibility of important human-pathogenic, resistant, Gram-negative bacteria towards different antibiotic classes. This 4-(3-morpholinopropylamino)-quinazoline induced an increase in the activity of chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin and sparfloxacin, which are substrates of the AcrAB-TolC and MexAB-OprM efflux pumps that act in these multidrug-resistant isolates. In addition, 1167 increased the intracellular concentration of chloramphenicol in efflux pump-overproducing strains. The rate of restoration depended on the structure of the antibiotic, suggesting that different sites in the efflux pumps may be involved. A molecule exhibiting a morpholine functional group and a propyl extension of the side chain was more active. PMID:21071494

  1. Surface modeling of soil antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen-jiao; Yue, Tian-xiang; Du, Zheng-ping; Wang, Zong; Li, Xue-wen

    2016-02-01

    Large numbers of livestock and poultry feces are continuously applied into soils in intensive vegetable cultivation areas, and then some veterinary antibiotics are persistent existed in soils and cause health risk. For the spatial heterogeneity of antibiotic residues, developing a suitable technique to interpolate soil antibiotic residues is still a challenge. In this study, we developed an effective interpolator, high accuracy surface modeling (HASM) combined vegetable types, to predict the spatial patterns of soil antibiotics, using 100 surface soil samples collected from an intensive vegetable cultivation area located in east of China, and the fluoroquinolones (FQs), including ciprofloxacin (CFX), enrofloxacin (EFX) and norfloxacin (NFX), were analyzed as the target antibiotics. The results show that vegetable type is an effective factor to be combined to improve the interpolator performance. HASM achieves less mean absolute errors (MAEs) and root mean square errors (RMSEs) for total FQs (NFX+CFX+EFX), NFX, CFX and EFX than kriging with external drift (KED), stratified kriging (StK), ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW). The MAE of HASM for FQs is 55.1 μg/kg, and the MAEs of KED, StK, OK and IDW are 99.0 μg/kg, 102.8 μg/kg, 106.3 μg/kg and 108.7 μg/kg, respectively. Further, RMSE simulated by HASM for FQs (CFX, EFX and NFX) are 106.2 μg/kg (88.6 μg/kg, 20.4 μg/kg and 39.2 μg/kg), and less 30% (27%, 22% and 36%), 33% (27%, 27% and 43%), 38% (34%, 23% and 41%) and 42% (32%, 35% and 51%) than the ones by KED, StK, OK and IDW, respectively. HASM also provides better maps with more details and more consistent maximum and minimum values of soil antibiotics compared with the measured data. The better performance can be concluded that HASM takes the vegetable type information as global approximate information, and takes local sampling data as its optimum control constraints. PMID:26613514

  2. Impaired microcirculatory perfusion in a rat model of cardiopulmonary bypass: the role of hemodilution.

    PubMed

    Koning, Nick J; de Lange, Fellery; Vonk, Alexander B A; Ahmed, Yunus; van den Brom, Charissa E; Bogaards, Sylvia; van Meurs, Matijs; Jongman, Rianne M; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Begieneman, Mark P V; Niessen, Hans W; Baufreton, Christophe; Boer, Christa

    2016-03-01

    Although hemodilution is attributed as the main cause of microcirculatory impairment during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), this relationship has never been investigated. We investigated the distinct effects of hemodilution with or without CPB on microvascular perfusion and subsequent renal tissue injury in a rat model. Male Wistar rats (375-425 g) were anesthetized, prepared for cremaster muscle intravital microscopy, and subjected to CPB (n = 9), hemodilution alone (n = 9), or a sham procedure (n = 6). Microcirculatory recordings were performed at multiple time points and analyzed for perfusion characteristics. Kidney and lung tissue were investigated for mRNA expression for genes regulating inflammation and endothelial adhesion molecule expression. Renal injury was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Hematocrit levels dropped to 0.24 ± 0.03 l/l and 0.22 ± 0.02 l/l after onset of hemodilution with or without CPB. Microcirculatory perfusion remained unaltered in sham rats. Hemodilution alone induced a 13% decrease in perfused capillaries, after which recovery was observed. Onset of CPB reduced the perfused capillaries by 40% (9.2 ± 0.9 to 5.5 ± 1.5 perfused capillaries per microscope field; P < 0.001), and this reduction persisted throughout the experiment. Endothelial and inflammatory activation and renal histological injury were increased after CPB compared with hemodilution or sham procedure. Hemodilution leads to minor and transient disturbances in microcirculatory perfusion, which cannot fully explain impaired microcirculation following cardiopulmonary bypass. CPB led to increased renal injury and endothelial adhesion molecule expression in the kidney and lung compared with hemodilution. Our findings suggest that microcirculatory impairment during CPB may play a role in the development of kidney injury. PMID:26747506

  3. Use of antibiotic-loaded cement in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hinarejos, Pedro; Guirro, Pau; Puig-Verdie, Lluis; Torres-Claramunt, Raul; Leal-Blanquet, Joan; Sanchez-Soler, Juan; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2015-01-01

    Bone cement has the capacity to release antibiotic molecules if any antibiotic is included in it, and these elution properties are improved as cement porosity is increased. In vitro studies have shown high local antibiotic concentration for many hours or few days after its use. Antibiotic loaded bone cement (ALBC) is helpful when treating an infection in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) revision surgery. The purpose of this paper was to review the evidence for the routine use of ALBC in TKA in the literature, its pros and cons. Many authors have recommended the use of ALBC also in primary TKA for infection prophylaxis, but the evidence based on data from National Registries, randomized clinical trials and meta-analysis suggest a protective effect of ALBC against infection when used in hips, but not (or only mild) in knees. A possible explanation to this finding is that the duration and quantity of locally elevated antibiotic levels after surgery are smaller in TKA, due to the smaller amount of cement used for fixation in TKA-only a layer in the bone surface. There are some concerns about the routine use of ALBC in primary TKA as prophylaxis against infection: Firstly, there is a risk of hypersensivity or toxicity even when the chance is highly improbable. Secondly, there is a reduction in the mechanical properties of the cement, but this can be probably neglected if the antibiotic is used in low doses, not more than 1 g per 40 g cement package. Another significant concern is the increased economic cost, which could be overlooked if there were enough savings in treating fewer prosthetic infections. Finally, there is also a risk of selection of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria and this could be the main concern. If used, the choice of the antibiotic mixed in ALBC should consider microbiological aspects (broad antimicrobial spectrum and low rate of resistant bacteria), physical and chemical aspects (thermal stability, high water solubility), pharmacological

  4. Antibiotic effectiveness: balancing conservation against innovation.

    PubMed

    Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2014-09-12

    Antibiotic effectiveness is a natural societal resource that is diminished by antibiotic use. As with other such assets, keeping it available requires both conservation and innovation. Conservation encompasses making the best use of current antibiotic effectiveness by reducing demand through vaccination, infection control, diagnostics, public education, incentives for clinicians to prescribe fewer antibiotics, and restrictions on access to newer, last-resort antibiotics. Innovation includes improving the efficacy of current drugs and replenishing effectiveness by developing new drugs. In this paper, I assess the relative benefits and costs of these two approaches to maintaining our ability to treat infections. PMID:25214620

  5. Total Synthesis and Structural Revision of Antibiotic CJ-16,264**

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaou, K. C.; Shah, Akshay A.; Korman, Henry; Khan, Tabrez; Shi, Lei; Worawalai, Wisuttaya; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A.

    2015-01-01

    The total synthesis and structural revision of antibiotic CJ-16,264 is described. Starting with citronellal, the quest for the target molecule featured a novel bis-transannular Diels–Alder reaction that casted stereoselectively the decalin system and included the synthesis of six isomers before demystification of its true structure. PMID:26096055

  6. 78 FR 46594 - Prospective Grant of Start-up Exclusive License: Topical Antibiotic With Immune Stimulating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... Antibiotic With Immune Stimulating Oligodeoxynucleotide Molecules To Speed Wound Healing; and Use of CpG... issued as US patent 8,466,116, each entitled ``Use of CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides to Induce Epithelial Cell... requirements of 35 U.S.C. 209 and 37 CFR part 404. These technologies relate to relate to use of...

  7. Coronary artery bypass grafting in cold-induced urticaria.

    PubMed

    Bakay, Cihat; Onan, Burak; Onan, Ismihan Selen; Ozkara, Ahmet

    2010-03-01

    Cold-induced urticaria is an unusual systemic disorder that develops in response to exposures to cold temperatures in susceptible individuals. Patients with cold urticaria are potentially at risk of severe systemic anaphylactic shock-like reactions. This disorder is of unique clinical importance in cardiac surgery, considering the use of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia. Contact of blood with hypothermia and subsequent warming can be associated with hemodynamic instability, hypotension, and cardiovascular collapse, mainly during the period of rewarming. We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with chronic cold-induced urticaria, who underwent a successful coronary bypass grafting, and describe perioperative management of this rare disorder. PMID:20172161

  8. Exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy in evaluating aortocoronary bypass surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Haaz, W.; Segal, B.L.; Kane, S.A.

    1981-07-01

    Thirty patients with recurrent symptoms after aortocoronary bypass graft surgery underwent angiography as well as exercise thallium 201 imaging. Exercise imaging has been shown to be highly specific (100 percent in our study) in evaluating patients after bypass surgery. Patients with complete revascularization have normal thallium 201 images. Similarly, exercise-induced defects are seen only in the presence of incomplete revascularization. There are patients, however, with incomplete revascularization with normal exercise images, but these generally limited to the right coronary artery or the diagonal vessels or their grafts.

  9. Divertor bypass in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitcher, C. S.; LaBombard, B.; Danforth, R.; Pina, W.; Silveira, M.; Parkin, B.

    2001-01-01

    The Alcator C-Mod divertor bypass has for the first time allowed in situ variations to the mechanical baffle design in a tokamak. The design utilizes small coils which interact with the ambient magnetic field inside the vessel to provide the torque required to control small flaps of a Venetian blind geometry. Plasma physics experiments with the bypass have revealed the importance of the divertor baffling to maintain high divertor gas pressures. These experiments have also indicated that the divertor baffling has only a limited effect on the main chamber pressure in C-Mod.

  10. Surgical cartographic navigation system for endoscopic bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Voruganti, Arun; Mayoral, Rafael; Jacobs, Stephan; Grunert, Ronny; Moeckel, Hendrik; Korb, Werner

    2007-01-01

    Endoscopic bypass grafting with the da Vinci system is still challenging and needs high level of experience and skill of the surgeon. Therefore, it is necessary to support the surgeon with enhanced vision and augmented reality. The augmentation of the patient model into the view of the endoscope is a direct approach to enhance support. The results of a preclinical study are shown in this paper. The method applied is suitable for endoscopic bypass grafting and in general applicable to minimal invasive surgery. The system was designed as an open architecture to facilitate easy transfer of the methodology into other surgical domain applications. PMID:18002243

  11. Cerebral blood flow and autoregulation during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, P.; Messeter, K.; Ryding, E.; Nordstroem, L.S.; Stahl, E.

    1987-04-01

    Mean hemispheric cerebral blood flow (CBF) was studied following intravenous or intraarterial administration of xenon-133, in 10 men admitted for coronary artery bypass grafting. Repeated CBF measurements were performed to evaluate autoregulation before, during, and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). During CPB mean CBF remained unchanged compared with the pre-CPB level, without evidence of cerebral hyperemia or impairment of autoregulation. A marked increase in CBF occurred after CPB and was followed by a time-dependent reduction toward the pre-CPB level. The data support the alpha-stat regulation theory but cannot explain the cerebral vasodilation observed after CPB.

  12. Biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Mah, Thien-Fah

    2012-09-01

    Bacterial biofilms are the basis of many persistent diseases. The persistence of these infections is primarily attributed to the increased antibiotic resistance exhibited by the cells within the biofilms. This resistance is multifactorial; there are multiple mechanisms of resistance that act together in order to provide an increased overall level of resistance to the biofilm. These mechanisms are based on the function of wild-type genes and are not the result of mutations. This article reviews the known mechanisms of resistance, including the ability of the biofilm matrix to prevent antibiotics from reaching the cells and the function of individual genes that are preferentially expressed in biofilms. Evidence suggests that these mechanisms have been developed as a general stress response of biofilms that enables the cells in the biofilm to respond to all of the changes in the environment that they may encounter. PMID:22953707

  13. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with mirror-imaging dextrocardia.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xin; Sun, Hansong; Wang, Xianqiang

    2015-08-01

    Dextrocardia requires alterations in techniques during coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. We report two cases undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCAB) surgery and discuss techniques for the operative management of these patients. PMID:26059016

  14. Antibiotic prescribing practices by dentists: a review

    PubMed Central

    Dar-Odeh, Najla Saeed; Abu-Hammad, Osama Abdalla; Al-Omiri, Mahmoud Khaled; Khraisat, Ameen Sameh; Shehabi, Asem Ata

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotics are prescribed by dentists for treatment as well as prevention of infection. Indications for the use of systemic antibiotics in dentistry are limited, since most dental and periodontal diseases are best managed by operative intervention and oral hygiene measures. However, the literature provides evidence of inadequate prescribing practices by dentists, due to a number of factors ranging from inadequate knowledge to social factors. Here we review studies that investigated the pattern of antibiotic use by dentists worldwide. The main defects in the knowledge of antibiotic prescribing are outlined. The main conclusion is that, unfortunately, the prescribing practices of dentists are inadequate and this is manifested by over-prescribing. Recommendations to improve antibiotic prescribing practices are presented in an attempt to curb the increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance and other side effects of antibiotic abuse. PMID:20668712

  15. Antibiotic prescribing practices by dentists: a review.

    PubMed

    Dar-Odeh, Najla Saeed; Abu-Hammad, Osama Abdalla; Al-Omiri, Mahmoud Khaled; Khraisat, Ameen Sameh; Shehabi, Asem Ata

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotics are prescribed by dentists for treatment as well as prevention of infection. Indications for the use of systemic antibiotics in dentistry are limited, since most dental and periodontal diseases are best managed by operative intervention and oral hygiene measures. However, the literature provides evidence of inadequate prescribing practices by dentists, due to a number of factors ranging from inadequate knowledge to social factors. Here we review studies that investigated the pattern of antibiotic use by dentists worldwide. The main defects in the knowledge of antibiotic prescribing are outlined. The main conclusion is that, unfortunately, the prescribing practices of dentists are inadequate and this is manifested by over-prescribing. Recommendations to improve antibiotic prescribing practices are presented in an attempt to curb the increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance and other side effects of antibiotic abuse. PMID:20668712

  16. Resistance to Antibiotics Mediated by Target Alterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spratt, Brian G.

    1994-04-01

    The development of resistance to antibiotics by reductions in the affinities of their enzymatic targets occurs most rapidly for antibiotics that inactivate a single target and that are not analogs of substrate. In these cases of resistance (for example, resistance to rifampicin), numerous single amino acid substitutions may provide large decreases in the affinity of the target for the antibiotic, leading to clinically significant levels of resistance. Resistance due to target alterations should occur much more slowly for those antibiotics (penicillin, for example) that inactivate multiple targets irreversibly by acting as close analogs of substrate. Resistance to penicillin because of target changes has emerged, by unexpected mechanisms, only in a limited number of species. However, inactivating enzymes commonly provide resistance to antibiotics that, like penicillin, are derived from natural products, although such enzymes have not been found for synthetic antibiotics. Thus, the ideal antibiotic would be produced by rational design, rather than by the modification of a natural product.

  17. Use of antibiotics in plant agriculture.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, V O; Duffy, B

    2012-04-01

    Antibiotics are essential for control of bacterial diseases of plants, especially fire blight of pear and apple and bacterial spot of peach. Streptomycin is used in several countries; the use of oxytetracycline, oxolinic acid and gentamicin is limited to only a few countries. Springtime antibiotic sprays suppress pathogen growth on flowers and leaf surfaces before infection; after infection, antibiotics are ineffective. Antibiotics are applied when disease risk is high, and consequently the majority of orchards are not treated annually. In 2009 in the United States, 16,465 kg (active ingredient) was applied to orchards, which is 0.12% of the total antibiotics used in animal agriculture. Antibiotics are active on plants for less than a week, and significant residues have not been found on harvested fruit. Antibiotics have been indispensable for crop protection in the United States for more than 50 years without reports of adverse effects on human health or persistent impacts on the environment. PMID:22849276

  18. Outer Membrane Permeability and Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Delcour, Anne H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary To date most antibiotics are targeted at intracellular processes, and must be able to penetrate the bacterial cell envelope. In particular, the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria provides a formidable barrier that must be overcome. There are essentially two pathways that antibiotics can take through the outer membrane: a lipid-mediated pathway for hydrophobic antibiotics, and general diffusion porins for hydrophilic antibiotics. The lipid and protein compositions of the outer membrane have a strong impact on the sensitivity of bacteria to many types of antibiotics, and drug resistance involving modifications of these macromolecules is common. This review will describe the molecular mechanisms for permeation of antibiotics through the outer membrane, and the strategies that bacteria have deployed to resist antibiotics by modifications of these pathways. PMID:19100346

  19. Bacterial infections: antibiotics and decontamination.

    PubMed

    Gould, Dinah

    Infectious disease is caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa and micro-organisms including the mycoplasmas, rickettsiae and chlamydiae. Most of the infections commonly encountered in the UK are caused either by bacteria or viruses. This article describes bacterial structure and function to explain how antibiotics work and the processes of decontamination such as cleaning, disinfection and sterilisation, which are important in infection control. PMID:15224613

  20. Uncialamycin, a new enediyne antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Davies, Julian; Wang, Hao; Taylor, Terry; Warabi, Kaoru; Huang, Xin-Hui; Andersen, Raymond J

    2005-11-10

    [structure: see text] Laboratory cultures of an undescribed streptomycete obtained from the surface of a British Columbia lichen produce uncialamycin (1), a new enediyne antibiotic. The structure of uncialamycin (1) has been elucidated by analysis of spectroscopic data. Uncialamycin (1) exhibits potent in vitro antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative human pathogens, including Burkholderia cepacia, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:16268546

  1. Anesthetic vaporizer mount malfunction resulting in oxygenation failure after initiating cardiopulmonary bypass: specific recommendations for the pre-bypass checklist.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Nischal K; Schmitz, Michael L; Zabala, Luis M; White, Michael W; Mckamie, Wesley A; Lutz, Alyssa; Johnson, Charles E

    2009-09-01

    Modern technologic advances in medicine have allowed commonly used machines to perform safely with very low risk and a high degree of success. To detect or prevent potential malfunctions, professionals routinely perform pre-use checks for equipment such as anesthesia machines and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) machines. These machine checklists are not only critical for a safe operation but also have large impacts on outcomes. For example, when malfunctions are encountered that could have potential negative ramifications or adverse outcomes, multi-approach strategies should be used to identify rectifiable causes and find solutions that are practical. This information can be used to promulgate safe practice guidelines. This case report identifies a machine-based contributing factor to precipitous hypoxia on initiation of bypass in one of our patients. After a detailed approach to identify preventable root causes, we made simple additions to our pre-bypass checklist and recommend these changes to other institutions. PMID:19806803

  2. On Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery Versus Off Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Yousuf-ul; Ahmed, Muhammad Umer; Khan, Muhammad Shahzeb; Bawany, Faizan Imran; Khan, Asadullah; Arshad, Mohammad Hussham

    2014-01-01

    There are two basic ways of performing coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG): on pump CABG and off pump CABG. Off pump CABG is relatively a newer procedure to on-pump CABG and does not require the use of the cardiopulmonary bypass machine. On pump CABG is the more traditional method of performing bypass surgery. However its resultant inflammatory effects cause renal dysfunction, gastrointestinal distress and cardiac abnormalities which have forced the surgeons to look for alternatives to the procedure. An extensive literature search revealed that on pump CABG causes better revascularization as compared to off pump CABG while off pump CABG has a much lower post operative morbidity and mortality especially in high risk patients. We suggest that the technique used should depend on the ease of the surgeon doing the operation as both the methods seem almost equally efficient according to the review. PMID:24762361

  3. Antibiotic resistance in Burkholderia species.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Katherine A; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2016-09-01

    The genus Burkholderia comprises metabolically diverse and adaptable Gram-negative bacteria, which thrive in often adversarial environments. A few members of the genus are prominent opportunistic pathogens. These include Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei of the B. pseudomallei complex, which cause glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Burkholderia cenocepacia, Burkholderia multivorans, and Burkholderia vietnamiensis belong to the Burkholderia cepacia complex and affect mostly cystic fibrosis patients. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. The first line of defense against antimicrobials in Burkholderia species is the outer membrane penetration barrier. Most Burkholderia contain a modified lipopolysaccharide that causes intrinsic polymyxin resistance. Contributing to reduced drug penetration are restrictive porin proteins. Efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division family are major players in Burkholderia multidrug resistance. Third and fourth generation β-lactam antibiotics are seminal for treatment of Burkholderia infections, but therapeutic efficacy is compromised by expression of several β-lactamases and ceftazidime target mutations. Altered DNA gyrase and dihydrofolate reductase targets cause fluoroquinolone and trimethoprim resistance, respectively. Although antibiotic resistance hampers therapy of Burkholderia infections, the characterization of resistance mechanisms lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens, especially ESKAPE bacteria such as Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:27620956

  4. [Antibiotic treatment of clostridial colitis].

    PubMed

    Beneš, J; Polívková, S

    2016-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of various antibiotics used in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) are compared with respect to their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Recommendations are made for their optimal use in clinical practice. Metronidazole is suitable for the treatment of mild forms of CDI which are essentially self-limiting. Vancomycin kills clostridia reliably but the treatment is encumbered with considerable risk of recurrence. This can be decreased by shortening the treatment to seven days and then switching to a (pulse, taper, chaser) regimen to prevent recurrence or by active restoration of the intestinal ecosystem (fecal transplant). Fidaxomicin works faster than vancomycin and is associated with a lower risk of recurrence. Thus, it can be profitably used in patients with impending ileus and also in those whose medical condition does not allow prolonged treatment. The duration of fidaxomicin treatment could be reduced to as few as five days. Rifaximin does not have a clear place in the treatment of CDI because no compelling data are available on its efficacy in this disease. The risk of resistance is also important. Tigecycline is a promising antibiotic for parenteral use. According to the available data, it should be more effective than intravenous metronidazole which has been considered the drug of choice.Clostridial colitis is associated with intestinal dysmicrobia which is the major cause of recurrence. Severe dysmicrobia cannot be treated by antibiotics but only by gut flora restoration; stool transplant from a healthy donor is the only proven therapy for this condition. PMID:27246640

  5. Collective antibiotic treatment of trachoma

    PubMed Central

    Reinhards, J.; Weber, A.; Maxwell-Lyons, F.

    1959-01-01

    By the early 1950's, it was clear from numerous independent reports that certain of the broad-spectrum antibiotics were effective against the agent of trachoma. It seemed, however, that treatment had to be continued over long periods to effect a cure of the average case. With the assistance of WHO, comparative trials on a scale hitherto unprecedented in the disease—involving more than 9000 schoolchildren with active trachoma—have been conducted in Morocco since 1953 in order to assess the value of local treatment of trachoma with chlortetracycline and to develop simple and economic methods of treatment, for which there was a pressing need. Local application of 1% chlortetracycline ointment two or three times daily for 60 days gave almost 80% cures under reasonably favourable conditions and nearly 100% cures after re-treatment of cases not cured by the first course. Equally good results followed intermittent short-term treatment over longer periods. Relapse and reinfection rates were low. Collective mass treatment with antibiotics is clearly a valuable method of trachoma control. The use of intermittent treatment allows for a great economy both in antibiotics and in staff and other campaign expenses and makes possible the wide expansion of mass treatment programmes. PMID:14437176

  6. Antibiotics and the gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Sheetal R.; Collins, James J.; Relman, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics have been a cornerstone of innovation in the fields of public health, agriculture, and medicine. However, recent studies have shed new light on the collateral damage they impart on the indigenous host-associated communities. These drugs have been found to alter the taxonomic, genomic, and functional capacity of the human gut microbiota, with effects that are rapid and sometimes persistent. Broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce bacterial diversity while expanding and collapsing membership of specific indigenous taxa. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment selects for resistant bacteria, increases opportunities for horizontal gene transfer, and enables intrusion of pathogenic organisms through depletion of occupied natural niches, with profound implications for the emergence of resistance. Because these pervasive alterations can be viewed as an uncoupling of mutualistic host-microbe relationships, it is valuable to reconsider antimicrobial therapies in the context of an ecological framework. Understanding the biology of competitive exclusion, interspecies protection, and gene flow of adaptive functions in the gut environment may inform the design of new strategies that treat infections while preserving the ecology of our beneficial constituents. PMID:25271726

  7. Beta- Lactam Antibiotics Stimulate Biofilm Formation in Non-Typeable Haemophilus influenzae by Up-Regulating Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Siva; Li, Xiaojin; Gunawardana, Manjula; Maguire, Kathleen; Guerrero-Given, Debbie; Schaudinn, Christoph; Wang, Charles; Baum, Marc M.; Webster, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a common acute otitis media pathogen, with an incidence that is increased by previous antibiotic treatment. NTHi is also an emerging causative agent of other chronic infections in humans, some linked to morbidity, and all of which impose substantial treatment costs. In this study we explore the possibility that antibiotic exposure may stimulate biofilm formation by NTHi bacteria. We discovered that sub-inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotic (i.e., amounts that partially inhibit bacterial growth) stimulated the biofilm-forming ability of NTHi strains, an effect that was strain and antibiotic dependent. When exposed to sub-inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics NTHi strains produced tightly packed biofilms with decreased numbers of culturable bacteria but increased biomass. The ratio of protein per unit weight of biofilm decreased as a result of antibiotic exposure. Antibiotic-stimulated biofilms had altered ultrastructure, and genes involved in glycogen production and transporter function were up regulated in response to antibiotic exposure. Down-regulated genes were linked to multiple metabolic processes but not those involved in stress response. Antibiotic-stimulated biofilm bacteria were more resistant to a lethal dose (10 µg/mL) of cefuroxime. Our results suggest that beta-lactam antibiotic exposure may act as a signaling molecule that promotes transformation into the biofilm phenotype. Loss of viable bacteria, increase in biofilm biomass and decreased protein production coupled with a concomitant up-regulation of genes involved with glycogen production might result in a biofilm of sessile, metabolically inactive bacteria sustained by stored glycogen. These biofilms may protect surviving bacteria from subsequent antibiotic challenges, and act as a reservoir of viable bacteria once antibiotic exposure has ended. PMID:25007395

  8. Internal Maxillary Artery-Middle Cerebral Artery Bypass: Infratemporal Approach for Subcranial-Intracranial (SC-IC) Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Nossek, Erez; Costantino, Peter D.; Eisenberg, Mark; Dehdashti, Amir R.; Setton, Avi; Chalif, David J.; Ortiz, Rafael A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Internal maxillary artery (IMax)–middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass has been recently described as an alternative to cervical extracranial-intracranial bypass. This technique uses a “keyhole” craniectomy in the temporal fossa that requires a technically challenging end-to-side anastomosis. OBJECTIVE: To describe a lateral subtemporal craniectomy of the middle cranial fossa floor to facilitate wide exposure of the IMax to facilitate bypass. METHODS: Orbitozygomatic osteotomy is used followed by frontotemporal craniotomy and subsequently laterotemporal fossa craniectomy, reaching its medial border at a virtual line connecting the foramen rotundum and foramen ovale. The IMax was identified by using established anatomic landmarks, neuronavigation, and micro Doppler probe (Mizuho Inc. Tokyo, Japan). Additionally, we studied the approach in a cadaveric specimen in preparation for microsurgical bypass. RESULTS: There were 4 cases in which the technique was used. One bypass was performed for flow augmentation in a hypoperfused hemisphere. The other 3 were performed as part of treatment paradigms for giant middle cerebral artery aneurysms. Vein grafts were used in all patients. The proximal anastomosis was performed in an end-to-side fashion in 1 patient and end-to-end in 3 patients. Intraoperative graft flow measured with the Transonic flow probe ranged from 20 to 60 mL/min. Postoperative angiography demonstrated good filling of the graft with robust distal flow in all cases. All patients tolerated the procedure well. CONCLUSION: IMax to middle cerebral artery subcranial-intracranial bypass is safe and efficacious. The laterotemporal fossa craniectomy technique resulted in reliable identification and wide exposure of the IMax, facilitating the proximal anastomosis. ABBREVIATIONS: EC-IC, extracranial-intracranial IMax, internal maxillary artery MCA, middle cerebral artery SC-IC, subcranial-intracranial STA, superficial temporal artery PMID:24618804

  9. Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis and coronary atherosclerosis. Results of coronary artery bypass alone and myectomy combined with coronary artery bypass.

    PubMed

    Gill, C C; Duda, A M; Kitazume, H; Kramer, J R; Loop, F D

    1982-12-01

    Twenty-one patients with combined coronary artery disease and idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis (IHSS) have had coronary artery bypass grafting alone (Group I, n = 7) or in combination with left ventricular septal myectomy (Group II, n = 14). Patients ranged in age from 46 to 73 years (mean 59 years). There were no operative deaths, but one Group I patient died 16 months after operation. Patients in Group I have had continuing symptoms after the operation, whereas Group II patients have had consistent relief of symptoms. Patients with documented IHSS and coronary atherosclerosis should undergo combined coronary bypass and septal myectomy if symptoms recur with medical management. PMID:6983006

  10. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4370 - Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. 870... Roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A roller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a revolving roller mechanism to pump the blood through...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4260 - Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter... Cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass arterial line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange (oxygenator) system to filter...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4330 - Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor... Cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass on-line blood gas monitor is a device used in conjunction with a blood gas sensor to measure the level of gases in the...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4360 - Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump... Nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump. (a) Identification. A nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump is a device that uses a method other than revolving rollers to pump the blood...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  13. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  14. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  15. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4340 - Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and... Devices § 870.4340 Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control is a device used to monitor and/or control the...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4340 - Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and... Devices § 870.4340 Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control is a device used to monitor and/or control the...

  19. 21 CFR 870.4340 - Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and... Devices § 870.4340 Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control is a device used to monitor and/or control the...

  20. 21 CFR 870.4340 - Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and... Devices § 870.4340 Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control is a device used to monitor and/or control the...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4340 - Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and... Devices § 870.4340 Cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass level sensing monitor and/or control is a device used to monitor and/or control the...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4410 - Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor... Cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass in-line blood gas sensor is a transducer that measures the level of gases in the blood. (b) Classification. Class...

  5. Patient Bypass Behavior and Critical Access Hospitals: Implications for Patient Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jiexin (Jason); Bellamy, Gail R.; McCormick, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the extent of bypass for inpatient care among patients living in Critical Access Hospital (CAH) service areas, and to determine factors associated with bypass, the reasons for bypass, and what CAHs can do to retain patients locally. Methods: Six hundred and forty-seven subjects, aged 18 years and older, who had been admitted to…

  6. Bacterial Enzymes and Antibiotic Resistance- Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Maltz, Lauren

    2015-08-25

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β-lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes.

  7. Physics of Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Many varieties of molecule have been detected in the Milky Way and in other galaxies. The processes by which these molecules are formed and destroyed are now broadly understood (see INTERSTELLAR CHEMISTRY). These molecules are important components of galaxies in two ways. Firstly, radiation emitted by molecules enables us to trace the presence of diffuse gas, to infer its physical properties and ...

  8. Integral bypass diodes in an amorphous silicon alloy photovoltaic module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, J. J.; Flaisher, H.

    1991-01-01

    Thin-film, tandem-junction, amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic modules were constructed in which a part of the a-Si alloy cell material is used to form bypass protection diodes. This integral design circumvents the need for incorporating external, conventional diodes, thus simplifying the manufacturing process and reducing module weight.

  9. Bypass control valve seal and bearing life cycle test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundback, A. V.

    1972-01-01

    The operating characteristics of a bypass control valve seal and bearing life cycle tests are reported. Data from the initial assembly, leak, torque, and deflection tests are included along with the cycle life test results and conclusions. The equipment involved was to be used in the nuclear engine for the rocket vehicles program.

  10. Thermal Reliability Study of Bypass Diodes in Photovoltaic Modules (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the result of high-temperature durability and thermal cycling testing and analysis for the selected diodes to study the detail of the thermal design and relative long-term reliability of the bypass diodes used to limit the detrimental effects of module hot-spot susceptibility.

  11. A device for a noninvasive evaluation of coronary bypass grafts.

    PubMed

    McInerney, J J; Lamser, D G; Herr, M D

    1994-01-01

    A new device is presented for evaluating the patency of coronary bypass grafts. Bypass grafts are located within the chest cavity using a Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) technique that creates frontal plane tomographic images. The tomographic image pixels are mapped into computer memory and displayed. A display pointer is used to mark the position of the bypass graft. The computer uses that information to subsequently position a radiation detector, such that it "looks" at the location of the bypass graft within the closed chest. The patency of the graft is then evaluated by monitoring an X-ray induced iodine fluorescence transient in the graft, subsequent to a peripheral intravenous contrast injection. This imaging and graft evaluation device is relatively inexpensive and its application does not require cutdowns or catheterization. The associated radiation dose is 1/10 to 1/50 of that associated with alternative X-ray graft patency evaluation techniques. Preliminary testing has been performed on mechanical and animal models. PMID:18218544

  12. Cycling firing method for bypass operation of bridge converters

    DOEpatents

    Zabar, Zivan

    1982-01-01

    The bridge converter comprises a number of switching elements and an electronic logic system which regulated the electric power levels by controlling the firing, i.e., the initiation of the conduction period of the switching elements. Cyclic firing of said elements allows the direct current to bypass the alternating current system with high power factor and negligible losses.

  13. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting: a case report.

    PubMed

    Behny, Leanne R

    2006-02-01

    It is easy to take for granted the seemingly effortless way cardiovascular surgeons are able to bypass atherosclerotic coronary arteries. The process used today was developed over many years of rigorous study, experimentation, success, and failure. Early cardiac surgery was performed blindly, through small incisions, on a beating heart. Advances in medicine allowed surgery to be performed on hearts stilled by cardioplegic arrest, while the circulation was continued through the use of a cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) machine. The development of the CPB machine allowed surgeons to perform the delicate work of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), first attempted on dogs, and then humans. This article briefly outlines the historical evolution of cardiac surgery that led to the development of the technology necessary to perform off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). A case report of a 72-year-old female who underwent OPCAB is outlined. Included is a discussion of some of the benefits and potential complications of CABG and OPCAB. Anesthetic considerations for OPCAB procedures also are presented. PMID:16483067

  14. Role of radionuclide cardiac imaging in coronary artery bypass surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Heo, J.; Mostel, E.

    1987-01-01

    The main applications of cardiac nuclear imaging in coronary artery bypass surgery include: patient selection, prediction of improvement in resting LV function after revascularization, diagnosis of perioperative myocardial infarction, assessment of the results of revascularization, evaluation of new or recurrent symptoms, and in risk stratification. Proper understanding of which test to be used, when, and why may be important to optimize patient management.

  15. Esophageal exclusion and bypass for corrosive injury: The lessons learnt

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Richa; Behari, Anu; Reddy, Jayanth; Poddar, Banani

    2014-01-01

    While it is always preferable to excise and replace the diseased esophagus in corrosive injuries, the surgeon may be compelled to exclude and bypass it by a substernal conduit in select situations wherein excision is technically hazardous. This case illustrates the lessons learnt from a potentially life-threatening complication of bipolar esophageal exclusion. PMID:24604986

  16. Bypassing the Local Rural Hospital for Outpatient Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Charles; Bellamy, Gail R.; Menachemi, Nir; Chukmaitov, Askar S.; Brooks, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the amount of local rural hospital outpatient department (HOPD) bypass for outpatient procedures. Methods: We analyzed data on colonoscopies and upper gastrointestinal endoscopies performed in the state of Florida over the period 1997-2004. Findings: Approximately, 53% of colonoscopy and 45% of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy…

  17. Psychological Adjustment Following Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Janet W.

    1991-01-01

    Identified patterns of psychological adjustment following coronary bypass surgery in 100 individuals, 1 to 2 years postsurgery. Profiles were clustered into three groups based on level of distress (low, moderate, high). Findings revealed that over one-half of participants reported levels of psychological distress following surgery that were one or…

  18. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device. 870.3545 Section 870.3545 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3545...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device. 870.3545 Section 870.3545 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3545...

  20. Intravascular stenting following bypass grafting in terminal coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vecht, R J; Sigwart, U

    1995-01-01

    Reoperation after coronary artery bypass grafting in terminal coronary artery disease is associated with a substantial risk. Advances in coronary artery angioplasty offer alternative treatment with low morbidity and acceptable mortality. Images Figure 1 (a) Figure 1 (b) Figure 2 (a) Figure 2 (b) Figure 1 PMID:7884772

  1. National campaigns to improve antibiotic use.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Herman; Guillemot, Didier; Ferech, Matus; Schlemmer, Benoit; Costers, Michiel; van Breda, Marije; Baker, Lee J; Cars, Otto; Davey, Peter G

    2006-05-01

    High levels of antibiotic consumption are driving levels of bacterial resistance that threaten public health. Nonetheless, antibiotics still provide highly effective treatments for common diseases with important implications for human health. The challenge for public education is to achieve a meaningful reduction in unnecessary antibiotic use without adversely affecting the management of bacterial infections. This paper focuses on the lessons learned from national campaigns in countries (Belgium and France) with high antibiotic use. Evaluation of these national campaigns showed the importance of television advertising as a powerful medium to change attitudes and perhaps also behaviour with regard to antibiotics. Moreover, in both countries, strong evidence suggested reduced antibiotic prescribing. However, adverse effects associated with a reduction in antibiotic prescribing were not monitored. We conclude that carefully designed mass education campaigns could improve antibiotic use nationally and should be considered in countries with high antibiotic use. However, these campaigns should employ techniques of social marketing and use appropriate outcome measures. The benefits and risks of such campaigns have been less well established in countries where antibiotic use is already low or declining. PMID:16568344

  2. Development of antibiotics and the future of marine microorganisms to stem the tide of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kasanah, Noer; Hamann, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics remain essential tools in the control of infectious diseases. With the emergence of new diseases, resistant forms of diseases such as tuberculosis and malaria, as well as the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria, it has become essential to develop novel antibiotics. Development of the existing antibiotics involved three strategies, including discovery of new target sites, modification of existing antibiotic structures, and the identification of new resources for novel antibiotics. Marine microorganisms have clearly become an essential new resource in the discovery of new antibiotic leads. PMID:15600239

  3. Atrial Fibrillation, Neurocognitive Decline and Gene Expression After Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Rahul S.; Sabe, Ashraf A.; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y.; Ramlawi, Basel; Sellke, Frank W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline are common complications after cardiopulmonary bypass. By utilizing genomic microarrays we investigate whether gene expression is associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline. METHODS Twenty one cardiac surgery patients were prospectively matched and underwent neurocognitive assessments pre-operatively and four days postoperatively. The whole blood collected in the pre-cardiopulmonary bypass, 6 hours after-cardiopulmonary bypass, and on the 4th postoperative day was hybridized to Affymetrix Gene Chip U133 Plus 2.0 Microarrays. Gene expression in patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline (n=6; POAF+NCD) was compared with gene expression in patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation and normal cognitive function (n=5; POAF+NORM) and patients with sinus rhythm and normal cognitive function (n=10; SR+NORM). Regulated genes were identified using JMP Genomics 4.0 with a false discovery rate of 0.05 and fold change of >1.5 or <-1.5. RESULTS Eleven patients developed postoperative atrial fibrillation. Six of these also developed neurocognitive decline. Of the 12 patients with sinus rhythm, only 2 developed neurocognitive decline. POAF+NCD patients had unique regulation of 17 named genes preoperatively, 60 named genes six hours after cardiopulmonary bypass, and 34 named genes four days postoperatively (P<0.05) compared with normal patients. Pathway analysis demonstrated that these genes are involved in cell death, inflammation, cardiac remodeling and nervous system function. CONCLUSION Patients who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation and neurocognitive decline after cardiopulmonary bypass may have differential genomic responses compared to normal patients and patients with only postoperative atrial fibrillation, suggesting common pathophysiology for these conditions. Further exploration of these genes may provide insight into the

  4. Computer-assisted LAD bypass grafting at the open heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, Christine; Gnahm, Claudia; Friedl, Reinhard; Hoffmann, Martin; Dietmayer, Klaus

    2009-02-01

    Open heart bypass surgery is the standard treatment in advanced coronary heart diseases. For an effective revascularization procedure, optimal placement of the bypass is very important. To accelerate the intraoperative localization of the anastomosis site and to increase the precision of the procedure, a concept for computer assistance in open heart bypass surgery has been developed comprising the following steps: 1. Preprocedural planning: A patient-specific coronary map with information on vessel paths and wall plaque formations is extracted from a multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT). On this basis, the heart surgeon and the cardiac radiologist define the optimal anastomosis site prior to surgery. 2. Intraoperative navigation: During surgery, data are recorded at the beating heart using a stereo camera system. After registering the pre- and intraoperative data sets, preprocedural information can be transferred to the surgical site by overlaying the coronary map and the planned anastomosis site on the live video stream. With this visual guidance system, the surgeon can navigate to the planned anastomosis site. In this work, the proposed surgical assistance system has been validated for the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). The accuracy of the registration mechanism has been evaluated in retrospective on patient data sets and the effects of breathing motion were quantified. The promising results of the retrospective evaluation led to the in-vivo application of the computer assistance system during several bypass grafting procedures. Intraoperative navigation has been performed successfully and postoperative evaluation confirms that the bypass grafts were accurately positioned to the preoperatively planned anastomosis sites.

  5. Mass transfer from bypassed zones during gas injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.E.; Mohanty, K.K.

    1995-12-31

    Gasflooding in oil reservoirs leads to bypassing of the oil due to gravitational, viscous and/or heterogeneity effects. The bypassed oil can be recovered by the flowing solvent by pressure-driven, gravity-driven, dispersion/diffusion-driven and capillarity-driven crossflow/mass transfer. It is difficult to represent all of these mechanisms explicitly in large-scale simulations. In this work, we have studied the effect of the orientation of the bypassed region and the enrichment of the solvent on the mass transfer. Laboratory-scale mass transfer and coreflood experiments were conducted. Numerical simulation was used to identify the role of the different mechanisms. Results indicate that the mass transfer is the least for the vertical orientation, intermediate for the inverted orientation and the highest for the horizontal orientation. The mass transfer increases with enrichment for all orientations. Liquid phase diffusion controls vertical orientation mass transfer for the fluids studied. Phase behavior determines the liquid phase saturation. Capillary pumping does not contribute to the mass transfer of oil because the interfacial tension decreases towards the flowing region. Gravity-driven flow contributes the most to the mass transfer in the horizontal and the inverted orientations. The gravity-driven flow, however, is impeded by the capillarity whose magnitude decreases with solvent enrichment. Oil recovery in the horizontal gasfloods is nonmonotonic with enrichment for this fluid system in an almost homogeneous Berea core. Multiphase flow in the near-miscible floods leads to less gravity override compared to the FCM floods. In the heterogeneous core studied, the heterogeneity is very strong and the capillary forces do not prevent bypassing. The capillary forces, in fact, reduce oil recovery by diminishing mass transfer from the bypassed regions.

  6. A non-target approach to identify disinfection byproducts of structurally similar sulfonamide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mian; Helbling, Damian E

    2016-10-01

    There is growing concern over the formation of new types of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) from pharmaceuticals and other emerging contaminants during drinking water production. Free chlorine is a widely used disinfectant that reacts non-selectively with organic molecules to form a variety of byproducts. In this research, we aimed to investigate the DBPs formed from three structurally similar sulfonamide antibiotics (sulfamethoxazole, sulfathiazole, and sulfadimethoxine) to determine how chemical structure influences the types of chlorination reactions observed. We conducted free chlorination experiments and developed a non-target approach to extract masses from the experimental dataset that represent the masses of candidate DBPs. Structures were assigned to the candidate DBPs based on analytical data and knowledge of chlorine chemistry. Confidence levels were assigned to each proposed structure according to conventions in the field. In total, 11, 12, and 15 DBP structures were proposed for sulfamethoxazole, sulfathiazole, and sulfadimethoxine, respectively. The structures of the products suggest a variety of reaction types including chlorine substitution, SC cleavage, SN hydrolysis, desulfonation, oxidation/hydroxylation, and conjugation reactions. Some reaction types were common to all of the sulfonamide antibiotics, but unique reaction types were also observed for each sulfonamide antibiotic suggesting that selective prediction of DBP structures of other sulfonamide antibiotics based on chemical structure is unlikely to be possible based on these data alone. This research offers an approach to comprehensively identify DBPs of organic molecules and fills in much needed data on the formation of specific DBPs from three environmentally relevant sulfonamide antibiotics. PMID:27348196

  7. Assembly and clustering of natural antibiotics guides target identification.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Chad W; Skinnider, Michael A; Dejong, Chris A; Rees, Philip N; Chen, Gregory M; Walker, Chelsea G; French, Shawn; Brown, Eric D; Bérdy, János; Liu, Dennis Y; Magarvey, Nathan A

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics are essential for numerous medical procedures, including the treatment of bacterial infections, but their widespread use has led to the accumulation of resistance, prompting calls for the discovery of antibacterial agents with new targets. A majority of clinically approved antibacterial scaffolds are derived from microbial natural products, but these valuable molecules are not well annotated or organized, limiting the efficacy of modern informatic analyses. Here, we provide a comprehensive resource defining the targets, chemical origins and families of the natural antibacterial collective through a retrobiosynthetic algorithm. From this we also detail the directed mining of biosynthetic scaffolds and resistance determinants to reveal structures with a high likelihood of having previously unknown modes of action. Implementing this pipeline led to investigations of the telomycin family of natural products from Streptomyces canus, revealing that these bactericidal molecules possess a new antibacterial mode of action dependent on the bacterial phospholipid cardiolipin. PMID:26829473

  8. A Role for Antibiotics in Mineral Dissolution and Biofilm Physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, D. K.

    2002-12-01

    Respiration by bacteria is remarkable due to their ability to use a variety of compounds, including insoluble minerals, as terminal electron acceptors. How bacteria solve the problem of breathing something that is solid is poorly understood, but recent evidence points to the role of redox active natural products in shuttling electrons between microbes and minerals. Given the ubiquity of these substances in natural waters and soils, we must now revisit previous conclusions about whether direct contact between microbes and minerals is necessary to promote reductive mineral dissolution. To explore the degree to which extracellular electron transfer catalyzes important biogeochemical processes, we are studying the types of molecules that function as electron shuttles, including redox active antibiotics. I will discuss my laboratory's current understanding of how interspecies exchange of these molecules promotes mineral dissolution, as well as our emerging hypotheses regarding their function in biofilms.

  9. Antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhalt, John P.

    A 28-year-old man was transferred to our hospital and underwent surgery for resection of an aortic graft infected with Klebsiella pneumoniae. Antimicrobial therapy consisted of amikacin, cefazolin, chloramphenicol, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim. A request for amikacin and sulfamethoxazole assays was received by the laboratory along with information that the patient had received tobramycin until 24 h before the serum was obtained.

  10. Bypassing Bypass Surgery and Other Success Stories from the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Nijhara, Ruchika; Tidwell, J Lille; Ferguson, Steven; Balakrishnan, Krishna

    2005-01-01

    After a heart attack, patients often undergo a procedure to open up the clogged artery and install a tiny meshlike device called a stent to keep the artery propped open. In most cases, the body reacts to this foreign object with scar-tissue formation, and the artery narrows again. To combat this re-clogging process, National Institutes of Health inventors developed paclitaxel-coated stents and later licensed it to Angiotech. Approved by the Food and Drug Administration in March 2004, these stents are expected to substantially reduce the use of coronary artery bypass surgery, an expensive operation now performed annually on 350,000-plus Americans. This and three other examples of NIH licensing success stories are described in this paper: (a) Kepivance, which improves the quality of life for cancer patients by eliminating mouth sores, (b) AIDS drug ddI, an important component of many combination drug therapies, and (c) Vitravene, the first and only antisense drug to be approved by FDA. These four examples will illustrate the success not only of the NIH licensing program, but also the innovative approaches taken by NIH inventors and the persistence of its commercial partners. This paper also highlights the business and legal lessons learned from these four cases. PMID:23730679

  11. Tailored Antibiotic Combination Powders for Inhaled Rotational Antibiotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sie Huey; Teo, Jeanette; Heng, Desmond; Ng, Wai Kiong; Zhao, Yanli; Tan, Reginald B H

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory lung infections due to multidrug-resistant (MDR) superbugs are on a global upsurge and have very grim clinical outcomes. Their MDR profile makes therapeutic options extremely limited. Although a highly toxic antibiotic, colistin, is favored today as a "last-line" therapeutic against these hard-to-treat MDR pathogens, it is fast losing its effectiveness. This work therefore seeks to identify and tailor-make useful combination regimens (that are potentially rotatable and synergistic) as attractive alternative strategies to address the rising rates of drug resistance. Three potentially rotatable ternary dry powder inhaler constructs (each involving colistin and 2 other different-classed antibiotics chosen from rifampicin, meropenem, and tigecycline) were identified (with distinct complementary killing mechanisms), coformulated via spray drying, evaluated on their aerosol performance using a Next-Generation Impactor and tested for their efficacies against a number of MDR pathogens. The powder particles were of respirable size (d50, 3.1 ± 0.3 μm-3.4 ± 0.1 μm) and predominantly crumpled in morphology. When dispersed via a model dry powder inhaler (Aerolizer(®)) at 60 L/min, the powders showed concomitant in vitro deposition with fine particle fractions of ∼53%-70%. All formulations were successfully tested in the laboratory to be highly effective against the MDR pathogens. In addition, a favorable synergistic interaction was detected across all 3 formulations when tested against MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:27019964

  12. 75 FR 71145 - San Joaquin River Restoration Program: Reach 4B, Eastside Bypass, and Mariposa Bypass Channel and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Bureau of Reclamation San Joaquin River Restoration Program: Reach 4B, Eastside Bypass, and Mariposa... the San Joaquin River Restoration Program. The original notice of intent was published in the Federal Register on September 9, 2009 (74 FR 46453). This revised proposal would include measures for...

  13. Antibiotic Use in Facial Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    González-Castro, Javier; Lighthall, Jessyka G

    2016-08-01

    Prophylactic antibiotic use in facial plastic surgery is a highly controversial topic primarily due to the lack of evidence in support of or against antibiotic use. In this section the authors present the available literature on the most commonly performed procedures within facial plastic surgery in an attempt to see if the data support or contradict the need for antibiotic prophylaxis in facial plastic surgery. PMID:27400848

  14. Sensitivity of cellulolytic bacteria to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Szegi, J; El-Din, H G

    1977-01-01

    The sensitivity of eight cellulolytic bacterial strains to eight antibiotics was tested. The results showed that, in general, the strains belonging to Cytophaga, Cellvibrio, and Cellfalcicula are more sensitive to antibiotics than those strains that belong to Sporocytophaga and Cellulomonas. The inhibitory activity of the tested antibiotics, though differing with different strains, showed the following categories: tetracycline, erythromycin, and chloromycetin were most active, kanamycin, streptomycin, and neomycin were intermediate, while novobiocin and penicillin showed low activity. PMID:414477

  15. Membrane-active macromolecules resensitize NDM-1 gram-negative clinical isolates to tetracycline antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Manjunath, Goutham B; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Kaviyil, Jyothi E; Ravikumar, Raju; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Shome, Bibek R; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative 'superbugs' such as New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (blaNDM-1) producing pathogens have become world's major public health threats. Development of molecular strategies that can rehabilitate the 'old antibiotics' and halt the antibiotic resistance is a promising approach to target them. We report membrane-active macromolecules (MAMs) that restore the antibacterial efficacy (enhancement by >80-1250 fold) of tetracycline antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 Klebsiella pneumonia and blaNDM-1 Escherichia coli clinical isolates. Organismic studies showed that bacteria had an increased and faster uptake of tetracycline in the presence of MAMs which is attributed to the mechanism of re-sensitization. Moreover, bacteria did not develop resistance to MAMs and MAMs stalled the development of bacterial resistance to tetracycline. MAMs displayed membrane-active properties such as dissipation of membrane potential and membrane-permeabilization that enabled higher uptake of tetracycline in bacteria. In-vivo toxicity studies displayed good safety profiles and preliminary in-vivo antibacterial efficacy studies showed that mice treated with MAMs in combination with antibiotics had significantly decreased bacterial burden compared to the untreated mice. This report of re-instating the efficacy of the antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 pathogens using membrane-active molecules advocates their potential for synergistic co-delivery of antibiotics to combat Gram-negative superbugs. PMID:25789871

  16. Low Concentrations of Nitric Oxide Modulate Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Metabolism and Antibiotic Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Allan, Raymond N; Morgan, Samantha; Brito-Mutunayagam, Sanjita; Skipp, Paul; Feelisch, Martin; Hayes, Stephen M; Hellier, William; Clarke, Stuart C; Stoodley, Paul; Burgess, Andrea; Ismail-Koch, Hasnaa; Salib, Rami J; Webb, Jeremy S; Faust, Saul N; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniaeis one of the key pathogens responsible for otitis media (OM), the most common infection in children and the largest cause of childhood antibiotic prescription. Novel therapeutic strategies that reduce the overall antibiotic consumption due to OM are required because, although widespread pneumococcal conjugate immunization has controlled invasive pneumococcal disease, overall OM incidence has not decreased. Biofilm formation represents an important phenotype contributing to the antibiotic tolerance and persistence ofS. pneumoniaein chronic or recurrent OM. We investigated the treatment of pneumococcal biofilms with nitric oxide (NO), an endogenous signaling molecule and therapeutic agent that has been demonstrated to trigger biofilm dispersal in other bacterial species. We hypothesized that addition of low concentrations of NO to pneumococcal biofilms would improve antibiotic efficacy and that higher concentrations exert direct antibacterial effects. Unlike in many other bacterial species, low concentrations of NO did not result inS. pneumoniaebiofilm dispersal. Instead, treatment of bothin vitrobiofilms andex vivoadenoid tissue samples (a reservoir forS. pneumoniaebiofilms) with low concentrations of NO enhanced pneumococcal killing when combined with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, an antibiotic commonly used to treat chronic OM. Quantitative proteomic analysis using iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation) identified 13 proteins that were differentially expressed following low-concentration NO treatment, 85% of which function in metabolism or translation. Treatment with low-concentration NO, therefore, appears to modulate pneumococcal metabolism and may represent a novel therapeutic approach to reduce antibiotic tolerance in pneumococcal biofilms. PMID:26856845

  17. A mathematical model for expected time to extinction of pathogenic bacteria through antibiotic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, M. K.; Nandi, S.; Roy, P. K.

    2016-04-01

    Application of antibiotics in human system to prevent bacterial diseases like Gastritis, Ulcers, Meningitis, Pneumonia and Gonorrhea are indispensable. Antibiotics saved innumerable lives and continue to be a strong support for therapeutic application against pathogenic bacteria. In human system, bacterial diseases occur when pathogenic bacteria gets into the body and begin to reproduce and crowd out healthy bacteria. In this process, immature bacteria releases enzyme which is essential for bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis. After complete formation of cell wall, immature bacteria are converted to mature or virulent bacteria which are harmful to us during bacterial infections. Use of antibiotics as drug inhibits the bacterial cell wall formation. After application of antibiotics within body, the released bacterial enzyme binds with antibiotic molecule instead of its functional site during the cell wall synthesis in a competitive inhibition approach. As a consequence, the bacterial cell-wall formation as well as maturation process of pathogenic bacteria is halted and the disease is cured with lysis of bacterial cells. With this idea, a mathematical model has been developed in the present research investigation to review the inhibition of biosynthesis of bacterial cell wall by the application of antibiotics as drug in the light of enzyme kinetics. This approach helps to estimate the expected time to extinction of the pathogenic bacteria. Our mathematical approach based on the enzyme kinetic model for finding out expected time to extinction contributes favorable results for understanding of disease dynamics. Analytical and numerical results based on simulated findings validate our mathematical model.

  18. New antibiotics for bad bugs: where are we?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is growing up day by day in both community and hospital setting, with a significant impact on the mortality and morbidity rates and the financial burden that is associated. In the last two decades multi drug resistant microorganisms (both hospital- and community-acquired) challenged the scientific groups into developing new antimicrobial compounds that can provide safety in use according to the new regulation, good efficacy patterns, and low resistance profile. In this review we made an evaluation of present data regarding the new classes and the new molecules from already existing classes of antibiotics and the ongoing trends in antimicrobial development. Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) supported a proGram, called “the ′10 × ´20′ initiative”, to develop ten new systemic antibacterial drugs within 2020. The microorganisms mainly involved in the resistance process, so called the ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and enterobacteriaceae) were the main targets. In the era of antimicrobial resistance the new antimicrobial agents like fifth generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, monobactams, β-lactamases inhibitors, aminoglycosides, quinolones, oxazolidones, glycopeptides, and tetracyclines active against Gram-positive pathogens, like vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) and MRSA, penicillin-resistant streptococci, and vancomycin resistant Enterococcus (VRE) but also against highly resistant Gram-negative organisms are more than welcome. Of these compounds some are already approved by official agencies, some are still in study, but the need of new antibiotics still does not cover the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. Therefore the management of antimicrobial resistance should also include fostering coordinated actions by all stakeholders, creating policy guidance, support

  19. New antibiotics for bad bugs: where are we?

    PubMed

    Bassetti, Matteo; Merelli, Maria; Temperoni, Chiara; Astilean, Augusta

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is growing up day by day in both community and hospital setting, with a significant impact on the mortality and morbidity rates and the financial burden that is associated. In the last two decades multi drug resistant microorganisms (both hospital- and community-acquired) challenged the scientific groups into developing new antimicrobial compounds that can provide safety in use according to the new regulation, good efficacy patterns, and low resistance profile. In this review we made an evaluation of present data regarding the new classes and the new molecules from already existing classes of antibiotics and the ongoing trends in antimicrobial development. Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) supported a proGram, called "the '10 × ´20' initiative", to develop ten new systemic antibacterial drugs within 2020. The microorganisms mainly involved in the resistance process, so called the ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and enterobacteriaceae) were the main targets. In the era of antimicrobial resistance the new antimicrobial agents like fifth generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, monobactams, β-lactamases inhibitors, aminoglycosides, quinolones, oxazolidones, glycopeptides, and tetracyclines active against Gram-positive pathogens, like vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) and MRSA, penicillin-resistant streptococci, and vancomycin resistant Enterococcus (VRE) but also against highly resistant Gram-negative organisms are more than welcome. Of these compounds some are already approved by official agencies, some are still in study, but the need of new antibiotics still does not cover the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. Therefore the management of antimicrobial resistance should also include fostering coordinated actions by all stakeholders, creating policy guidance, support for

  20. Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems: Cultural methods and gaps in knowledge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Varying cultural methodologies are used in assessment of antibiotic resistance in environmental samples. Culture based methods commonly involve isolation of target bacteria on general or selective media, and assessing growth in response to specific concentrations of antibiotics. Though time consumin...