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Sample records for antibody concentrations confers

  1. Empowered Antibody Therapies - IBC conference.

    PubMed

    Herold, Jens

    2010-10-01

    The Empowered Antibody Therapies conference, held in Burlingame, CA, USA, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of multispecific antibodies. This conference report highlights selected presentations on DVD-Igs from Abbott Laboratories, ImmTACs from Immunocore, 'Dock-and-Lock' technology from Immunomedics, the bispecific BiTE antibody blinatumomab from Micromet, and Triomabs from TRION Pharma and Fresenius Biotech. PMID:20878591

  2. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Scott, Jamie; Larrick, James W; Plückthun, Andreas; Veldman, Trudi; Adams, Gregory P; Parren, Paul WHI; Chester, Kerry A; Bradbury, Andrew; Reichert, Janice M; Huston, James S

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Biology), who will discuss a systems approach for studying disease that is enabled by emerging technology; Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), who will discuss systems analysis of cell communication network dynamics for therapeutic biologics design; David Baker (University of Washington), who will describe computer-based design of smart protein therapeutics; and William Schief (The Scripps Research Institute), who will discuss epitope-focused immunogen design.   In this preview of the conference, the workshop and session chairs share their thoughts on what conference participants may learn in sessions on: (1) three-dimensional structure antibody modeling; (2) identifying clonal lineages from next-generation data sets of expressed VH gene sequences; (3) antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; (4) the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on the antibody response; (5) directed evolution; (6) antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; (7) use of knowledge-based design to guide development of complementarity-determining regions and epitopes to engineer or elicit the desired antibody; (8) optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; (9) antibodies in a complex environment; (10) polyclonal, oligoclonal and bispecific antibodies; (11) antibodies to watch in 2014; and (12) polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity.

  3. Antibody engineering and therapeutics conference

    PubMed Central

    Larrick, James W; Parren, Paul WHI; Huston, James S; Plückthun, Andreas; Bradbury, Andrew; Tomlinson, Ian M; Chester, Kerry A; Burton, Dennis R; Adams, Gregory P; Weiner, Louis M; Scott, Jamie K; Alfenito, Mark R; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    The 25th anniversary of the Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics Conference, the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA, December 7–11, 2014. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the event will celebrate past successes, educate participants on current activities and offer a vision of future progress in the field. Keynote addresses will be given by academic and industry experts Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Ira Pastan (National Cancer Institute), James Wells (University of California, San Francisco), Ian Tomlinson (GlaxoSmithKline) and Anthony Rees (Rees Consulting AB and Emeritus Professor, University of Bath). These speakers will provide updates of their work, placed in the context of the substantial growth of the industry over the past 25 years. PMID:25517297

  4. 5th Annual Monoclonal Antibodies Conference

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The conference, which was organized by Visiongain and held at the BSG Conference Center in London, provided an excellent opportunity for participants to exchange views on the development, production and marketing of therapeutic antibodies, and discuss the current business environment. The conference included numerous interactive panel and group discussions on topics such as isotyping for therapeutic antibodies (panel chair: Nick Pullen, Pfizer), prospects for fully human monoclonal antibodies (chair: Christian Rohlff, Oxford BioTherapeutics), perspectives on antibody manufacturing and development (chair: Bo Kara, Avecia), market impact and post-marketing issues (chair: Keith Rodgers, Bodiam Consulting) and angiogenesis inhibitors (chair: David Blakey, AstraZeneca). PMID:20073132

  5. Conference report: hot topics in antibody-drug conjugate development.

    PubMed

    Thudium, Karen; Bilic, Sanela

    2013-12-01

    American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists National Biotechnology Conference Sheraton San Diego Hotel and Marina, San Diego, CA, USA, 19-23 May 2013 The National Biotechnology Conference, is a premier meeting for biotechnology professionals covering a broad range of hot topics in the biotechnology industry. Attracting participants from academia, industry and regulatory, this meeting features sessions that aim to address emerging subjects of interest and allows for open exchange between scientists. The 2013 conference featured leading researchers in the fields of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and immunogenicity. Herein, we present a summary of the ADC hot topics, including bioanalytical and PK considerations, quantitative evaluation of the impact of immunogenicity and ADME to understand ADC drug-drug interactions, and clinical considerations for ADC development. This article aims to summarize the recommendations that were made by the speakers during various sessions throughout the conference. PMID:24320125

  6. IBC’s 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society

    PubMed Central

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H.J.; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3–6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3–5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4–5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society’s special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5–6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy. PMID:23575266

  7. Effects of medium concentration on antibody production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J.

    1984-01-01

    Antibody production by two different cell lines was measured as the media were supplemented with varied amounts of glucose and fetal bovine serum. Both cell lines elaborated antidinitrophenyl hapten antibodies. Two basic media were used: RPMI 1640 and Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. The production of antibodies was followed from 0 to 180 h and was assayed by radioimmunoassay.

  8. HIV-1 resistance to neutralizing antibodies: Determination of antibody concentrations leading to escape mutant evolution.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Carsten; Reh, Lucia; Trkola, Alexandra

    2016-06-15

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are considered vital components of novel therapeutics and blueprints for vaccine research. Yet escape to even the most potent of these antibodies is imminent in natural infection. Measures to define antibody efficacy and prevent mutant selection are thus urgently needed. Here, we derive a mathematical framework to predict the concentration ranges for which antibody escape variants can outcompete their viral ancestors, referred to as mutant selection window (MSW). When determining the MSW, we focus on the differential efficacy of neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in two canonical infection routes, free-virus infection and cell-cell transmission. The latter has proven highly effective in vitro suggesting its importance for both in vivo spread as well as for escaping targeted intervention strategies. We observed a range of MSW patterns that highlight the potential of mutants to arise in both transmission pathways and over wide concentration ranges. Most importantly, we found that only when the arising mutant has both, residual sensitivity to the neutralizing antibody and reduced infectivity compared to the parental virus, antibody dosing outside of the MSW to restrict mutant selection is possible. Emergence of mutants that provide complete escape and have no considerable fitness loss cannot be prevented by adjusting antibody doses. The latter may in part explain the ubiquitous resistance to neutralizing antibodies observed in natural infection and antibody treatment. Based on our findings, combinations of antibodies targeting different epitopes should be favored for antibody-based interventions as this may render complete resistance less likely to occur and also increase chances that multiple escapes result in severe fitness loss of the virus making longer-term antibody treatment more feasible. PMID:26494166

  9. IBC's 23rd Antibody Engineering and 10th Antibody Therapeutics Conferences and the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society: December 2-6, 2012, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, John; Begent, Richard H J; Chester, Kerry; Huston, James S; Bradbury, Andrew; Scott, Jamie K; Thorpe, Philip E; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M; Weiner, Louis M

    2012-01-01

    Now in its 23rd and 10th years, respectively, the Antibody Engineering and Antibody Therapeutics conferences are the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society. The scientific program covers the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development from basic science through clinical development. In this preview of the conferences, the chairs provide their thoughts on sessions that will allow participants to track emerging trends in (1) the development of next-generation immunomodulatory antibodies; (2) the complexity of the environment in which antibodies must function; (3) antibody-targeted central nervous system (CNS) therapies that cross the blood brain barrier; (4) the extension of antibody half-life for improved efficacy and pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD); and (5) the application of next generation DNA sequencing to accelerate antibody research. A pre-conference workshop on Sunday, December 2, 2012 will update participants on recent intellectual property (IP) law changes that affect antibody research, including biosimilar legislation, the America Invents Act and recent court cases. Keynote presentations will be given by Andreas Plückthun (University of Zürich), who will speak on engineering receptor ligands with powerful cellular responses; Gregory Friberg (Amgen Inc.), who will provide clinical updates of bispecific antibodies; James D. Marks (University of California, San Francisco), who will discuss a systems approach to generating tumor targeting antibodies; Dario Neri (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich), who will speak about delivering immune modulators at the sites of disease; William M. Pardridge (University of California, Los Angeles), who will discuss delivery across the blood-brain barrier; and Peter Senter (Seattle Genetics, Inc.), who will present his vision for the future of antibody-drug conjugates. For more information on these meetings or to register to attend, please visit www.IBCLifeSciences.com/Antibody

  10. IBC’s 23rd Antibody Engineering and 10th Antibody Therapeutics Conferences and the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, John; Begent, Richard H.J.; Chester, Kerry; Huston, James S.; Bradbury, Andrew; Scott, Jamie K.; Thorpe, Philip E.; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M.; Weiner, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    Now in its 23rd and 10th years, respectively, the Antibody Engineering and Antibody Therapeutics conferences are the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society. The scientific program covers the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development from basic science through clinical development. In this preview of the conferences, the chairs provide their thoughts on sessions that will allow participants to track emerging trends in (1) the development of next-generation immunomodulatory antibodies; (2) the complexity of the environment in which antibodies must function; (3) antibody-targeted central nervous system (CNS) therapies that cross the blood brain barrier; (4) the extension of antibody half-life for improved efficacy and pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD); and (5) the application of next generation DNA sequencing to accelerate antibody research. A pre-conference workshop on Sunday, December 2, 2012 will update participants on recent intellectual property (IP) law changes that affect antibody research, including biosimilar legislation, the America Invents Act and recent court cases. Keynote presentations will be given by Andreas Plückthun (University of Zürich), who will speak on engineering receptor ligands with powerful cellular responses; Gregory Friberg (Amgen Inc.), who will provide clinical updates of bispecific antibodies; James D. Marks (University of California, San Francisco), who will discuss a systems approach to generating tumor targeting antibodies; Dario Neri (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich), who will speak about delivering immune modulators at the sites of disease; William M. Pardridge (University of California, Los Angeles), who will discuss delivery across the blood-brain barrier; and Peter Senter (Seattle Genetics, Inc.), who will present his vision for the future of antibody-drug conjugates. For more information on these meetings or to register to attend, please visit www.IBCLifeSciences.com/Antibody

  11. IBC's 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, December 5–8, 2011, San Diego, CA

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Dunlop, D Cameron; Sircar, Aroop; Wurch, Thierry; Falkowska, Emilia; Helguera, Gustavo; Piccione, Emily C; Brack, Simon; Berger, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The 22nd Annual Antibody Engineering and 9th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2011 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 5–8, 2011 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew ∼800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a preview to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 4, 2011 focused on antibodies as probes of structure. The Antibody Engineering Conference comprised eight sessions: (1) structure and dynamics of antibodies and their membrane receptor targets; (2) model-guided generation of binding sites; (3) novel selection strategies; (4) antibodies in a complex environment: targeting intracellular and misfolded proteins; (5) rational vaccine design; (6) viral retargeting with engineered binding molecules; (7) the biology behind potential blockbuster antibodies and (8) antibodies as signaling modifiers: where did we go right, and can we learn from success? The Antibody Therapeutics Conference comprised five sessions: (1) Twenty-five years of therapeutic antibodies: lessons learned and future challenges; (2) preclinical and early stage development of antibody therapeutics; (3) next generation anti-angiogenics; (4) updates of clinical stage antibody therapeutics and (5) antibody drug conjugates and bispecific antibodies. PMID:22453091

  12. Molecular basis of high viscosity in concentrated antibody solutions: Strategies for high concentration drug product development.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Satish K; Goswami, Sumit; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Effective translation of breakthrough discoveries into innovative products in the clinic requires proactive mitigation or elimination of several drug development challenges. These challenges can vary depending upon the type of drug molecule. In the case of therapeutic antibody candidates, a commonly encountered challenge is high viscosity of the concentrated antibody solutions. Concentration-dependent viscosity behaviors of mAbs and other biologic entities may depend on pairwise and higher-order intermolecular interactions, non-native aggregation, and concentration-dependent fluctuations of various antibody regions. This article reviews our current understanding of molecular origins of viscosity behaviors of antibody solutions. We discuss general strategies and guidelines to select low viscosity candidates or optimize lead candidates for lower viscosity at early drug discovery stages. Moreover, strategies for formulation optimization and excipient design are also presented for candidates already in advanced product development stages. Potential future directions for research in this field are also explored. PMID:26736022

  13. IBC's 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society: December 3-6, 2012, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H J; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3-6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3-5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4-5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society's special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5-6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy. PMID:23575266

  14. Single domain antibody multimers confer protection against rabies infection.

    PubMed

    Boruah, Bhargavi M; Liu, Dawei; Ye, Duan; Gu, Tie-Jun; Jiang, Chun-Lai; Qu, Mingsheng; Wright, Edward; Wang, Wei; He, Wen; Liu, Changzhen; Gao, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Post-exposure prophylactic (PEP) neutralizing antibodies against Rabies are the most effective way to prevent infection-related fatality. The outer envelope glycoprotein of the Rabies virus (RABV) is the most significant surface antigen for generating virus-neutralizing antibodies. The small size and uncompromised functional specificity of single domain antibodies (sdAbs) can be exploited in the fields of experimental therapeutic applications for infectious diseases through formatting flexibilities to increase their avidity towards target antigens. In this study, we used phage display technique to select and identify sdAbs that were specific for the RABV glycoprotein from a naïve llama-derived antibody library. To increase their neutralizing potencies, the sdAbs were fused with a coiled-coil peptide derived from the human cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP48) to form homogenous pentavalent multimers, known as combodies. Compared to monovalent sdAbs, the combodies, namely 26424 and 26434, exhibited high avidity and were able to neutralize 85-fold higher input of RABV (CVS-11 strain) pseudotypes in vitro, as a result of multimerization, while retaining their specificities for target antigen. 26424 and 26434 were capable of neutralizing CVS-11 pseudotypes in vitro by 90-95% as compared to human rabies immunoglobulin (HRIG), currently used for PEP in Rabies. The multimeric sdAbs were also demonstrated to be partially protective for mice that were infected with lethal doses of rabies virus in vivo. The results demonstrate that the combodies could be valuable tools in understanding viral mechanisms, diagnosis and possible anti-viral candidate for RABV infection. PMID:23977032

  15. Hierarchical Cluster Formation in Concentrated Monoclonal Antibody Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Zarzar, Jonathan; Zarraga, Isidro Dan; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Wagner, Norman; Liu, Yun

    Reversible cluster formation has been identified as an underlying cause of large solution viscosities observed in some concentrated monoclonal antibody (mAb) formulations. As high solution viscosity prevents the use of subcutaneous injection as a delivery method for some mAbs, a fundamental understanding of the interactions responsible for high viscosities in concentrated mAb solutions is of significant relevance to mAb applications in human health care as well as of intellectual interest. Here, we present a detailed investigation of a well-studied IgG1 based mAb to relate the short time dynamics and microstructure to significant viscosity changes over a range of pharmaceutically relevant physiochemical conditions. Using a combination of experimental techniques, it is found that upon adding Na2SO4, these antibodies dimerize in solution. Proteins form strongly bounded reversible dimers at dilute concentrations that, when concentrated, interact with each other to form loosely bounded, large, transient clusters. The combined effect of forming strongly bounded dimers and a large transient network is a significant increase in the solution viscosity. Strongly bounded, reversible dimers may exist in many IgG1 based mAb systems such that these results contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the physical mechanisms producing high viscosities in concentrated protein solutions.

  16. Report from a consensus conference on antibody-mediated rejection in heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kobashigawa, Jon; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G.; Ensminger, Stephan M.; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Angelini, Annalisa; Berry, Gerald; Burke, Margaret; Czer, Lawrence; Hiemann, Nicola; Kfoury, Abdallah G.; Mancini, Donna; Mohacsi, Paul; Patel, Jignesh; Pereira, Naveen; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Reed, Elaine F.; Reinsmoen, Nancy; Rodriguez, E. Rene; Rose, Marlene L.; Russell, Stuart D.; Starling, Randy; Suciu-Foca, Nicole; Tallaj, Jose; Taylor, David O.; Van Bakel, Adrian; West, Lori; Zeevi, Adriana; Zuckermann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The problem of AMR remains unsolved because standardized schemes for diagnosis and treatment remains contentious. Therefore, a consensus conference was organized to discuss the current status of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in heart transplantation. METHODS The conference included 83 participants (transplant cardiologists, surgeons, immunologists and pathologists) representing 67 heart transplant centers from North America, Europe, and Asia who all participated in smaller break-out sessions to discuss the various topics of AMR and attempt to achieve consensus. RESULTS A tentative pathology diagnosis of AMR was established, however, the pathologist felt that further discussion was needed prior to a formal recommendation for AMR diagnosis. One of the most important outcomes of this conference was that a clinical definition for AMR (cardiac dysfunction and/or circulating donor-specific antibody) was no longer believed to be required due to recent publications demonstrating that asymptomatic (no cardiac dysfunction) biopsy-proven AMR is associated with subsequent greater mortality and greater development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy. It was also noted that donor-specific antibody is not always detected during AMR episodes as the antibody may be adhered to the donor heart. Finally, recommendations were made for the timing for specific staining of endomyocardial biopsy specimens and the frequency by which circulating antibodies should be assessed. Recommendations for management and future clinical trials were also provided. CONCLUSIONS The AMR Consensus Conference brought together clinicians, pathologists and immunologists to further the understanding of AMR. Progress was made toward a pathology AMR grading scale and consensus was accomplished regarding several clinical issues. PMID:21300295

  17. Reversible cluster formation in concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Zarraga, Isidro; Wagner, Norm; Liu, Yun

    2015-03-01

    Protein cluster formation in solution is of fundamental interest for both academic research and industrial applications. Recently, industrial scientists are also exploring the effect of reversible cluster formation on biopharmaceutical processing and delivery. However, despite of its importance, the understanding of protein clusters at concentrated solutions remains scientifically very challenging. Using the neutron spin echo technique to study the short time dynamics of proteins in solutions, we have recently systematically studied cluster formation in a few monoclonal antibody (mAb) solutions and their relation with solution viscosity. We show that the existence of anisotropic attraction can cause the formation of finite sized clusters, which increases the solution viscosity. Interestingly, once clusters form at relatively low concentrations, the average size of clusters in solutions remains almost constant over a wide range of concentrations similar to that of micelle formation. For a different mAb we have also investigated, the attraction is mostly induced by hydrophobic patches. As a result, these mAbs form large clusters with loosely linked proteins. In both cases, the formation of clusters all increases the solution viscosity substantially. However, due to different physics origins of cluster formation, solutions viscosities for these two different types of mAbs need to be controlled by different ways.

  18. An antibody that confers plant disease resistance targets a membrane-bound glyoxal oxidase in Fusarium.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiu-Shi; Xing, Shu; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Qu, Bo; Jiang, Jin-He; Fan, Chao; Yang, Peng; Liu, Jin-Long; Hu, Zu-Quan; Xue, Sheng; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2016-05-01

    Plant germplasm resources with natural resistance against globally important toxigenic Fusarium are inadequate. CWP2, a Fusarium genus-specific antibody, confers durable resistance to different Fusarium pathogens that infect cereals and other crops, producing mycotoxins. However, the nature of the CWP2 target is not known. Thus, investigation of the gene coding for the CWP2 antibody target will likely provide critical insights into the mechanism underlying the resistance mediated by this disease-resistance antibody. Immunoblots and mass spectrometry analysis of two-dimensional electrophoresis gels containing cell wall proteins from Fusarium graminearum (Fg) revealed that a glyoxal oxidase (GLX) is the CWP2 antigen. Cellular localization studies showed that GLX is localized to the plasma membrane. This GLX efficiently catalyzes hydrogen peroxide production; this enzymatic activity was specifically inhibited by the CWP2 antibody. GLX-deletion strains of Fg, F. verticillioides (Fv) and F. oxysporum had significantly reduced virulence on plants. The GLX-deletion Fg and Fv strains had markedly reduced mycotoxin accumulation, and the expression of key genes in mycotoxin metabolism was downregulated. This study reveals a single gene-encoded and highly conserved cellular surface antigen that is specifically recognized by the disease-resistance antibody CWP2 and regulates both virulence and mycotoxin biosynthesis in Fusarium species. PMID:26720747

  19. A method to confer Protein L binding ability to any antibody fragment

    PubMed Central

    Lakhrif, Zineb; Pugnière, Martine; Henriquet, Corinne; di Tommaso, Anne; Dimier-Poisson, Isabelle; Billiald, Philippe; Juste, Matthieu O.; Aubrey, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    abstract Recombinant antibody single-chain variable fragments (scFv) are difficult to purify homogeneously from a protein complex mixture. The most effective, specific and fastest method of purification is an affinity chromatography on Protein L (PpL) matrix. This protein is a multi-domain bacterial surface protein that is able to interact with conformational patterns on kappa light chains. It mainly recognizes amino acid residues located at the VL FR1 and some residues in the variable and constant (CL) domain. Not all kappa chains are recognized, however, and the lack of CL can reduce the interaction. From a scFv composed of IGKV10-94 according to IMGT®, it is possible, with several mutations, to transfer the motif from the IGKV12-46 naturally recognized by the PpL, and, with the single mutation T8P, to confer PpL recognition with a higher affinity. A second mutation S24R greatly improves the affinity, in particular by modifying the dissociation rate (kd). The equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) was measured at 7.2 10-11 M by surface plasmon resonance. It was possible to confer PpL recognition to all kappa chains. This protein interaction can be modulated according to the characteristics of scFv (e.g., stability) and their use with conjugated PpL. This work could be extrapolated to recombinant monoclonal antibodies, and offers an alternative for protein A purification and detection. PMID:26683650

  20. Response of a Concentrated Monoclonal Antibody Formulation to High Shear

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Jared S.; Stevenson, Jennifer L.; Mehta, Bhavya; Svitel, Juraj; Pollastrini, Joey; Platz, Robert; Freund, Erwin; Carpenter, John F.

    2009-01-01

    There is concern that shear could cause protein unfolding or aggregation during commercial biopharmaceutical production. In this work we exposed two concentrated immunoglobulin-G1 (IgG1) monoclonal antibody (mAb, at >100 mg/mL) formulations to shear rates of between 20,000 and 250,000 s-1 for between 5 minutes and 30 ms using a parallel-plate and capillary rheometer respectively. The maximum shear and force exposures were far in excess of those expected during normal processing operations (20,000 s-1 and 0.06 pN respectively). We used multiple characterization techniques to determine if there was any detectable aggregation. We found that shear alone did not cause aggregation, but that prolonged exposure to shear in the stainless steel parallel-plate rheometer caused a very minor reversible aggregation (<0.3%). Additionally, shear did not alter aggregate populations in formulations containing 17% preformed heat-induced aggregates of a mAb. We calculate that that the forces applied to a protein by production shear exposures (<0.06 pN) are small when compared with the 140 pN force expected at the air-water interface or the 20 to 150 pN forces required to mechanically unfold proteins described in the atomic force microscope (AFM) literature. Therefore, we suggest that in many cases air-bubble entrainment, adsorption to solid surfaces (with possible shear synergy), contamination by particulates, or pump cavitation stresses could be much more important causes of aggregation than shear exposure during production. PMID:19370772

  1. Antibody against viruses in maternal and cord sera: specific antibody is concentrated on the fetal side of the circulation.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, P. D.; Berney, S. I.; Argent, S.; Heath, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    Paired maternal and cord sera from 100 pregnancies were tested for antibodies against herpes simplex virus, measles virus and respiratory syncytial virus by complement fixation and for antibodies against rubella virus, influenza A virus and influenza B virus by haemagglutination-inhibition. For four viruses (herpes simplex, measles, respiratory syncytial and rubella) higher levels of antibody were found in cord than in maternal sera. There was no difference between maternal and cord serum titres against influenza B virus but significantly higher levels of antibody against influenza A virus were found in maternal sera than in cord sera. This discrepancy was investigated by measuring antibodies against the surface antigens of influenza A by a complement fixation technique, and by single radial haemolysis. Both methods showed a preponderance of virus-specific antibody in cord sera. We conclude that IgG antibodies against most, if not all, viruses are concentrated on the fetal side of the circulation, but the conventional haemagglutination-inhibition techniques may fail to detect this difference. PMID:7130705

  2. Increased Efficacy of HIV-1 Neutralization by Antibodies at Low CCR5 Surface Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Vidita; Zhang, Mei-Yun; Harris, Ilia; Sidorov, Igor A.; Vu, Bang; Dimitrov, Antony S.; Fouts, Timothy; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2007-01-01

    It has been observed that some antibodies, including the CD4-induced (CD4i) antibody IgG X5 and the gp41-specific antibody IgG 2F5, exhibit higher neutralizing activity in PBMC-based assays than in cell line based assays (Binley et al., J. Virology, 2004, 78: 13232). It has been hypothesized that the lower CCR5 concentration on the surface of the CD4 T lymphocyte compared to that on cell lines used for the neutralization assays could be a contributing factor to the observed differences in neutralizing activity. To test this hypothesis and to further elucidate the contribution of CCR5 concentration differences on antibody neutralizing activity, we used a panel of HeLa cell lines with well-defined and differential surface concentrations of CCR5 and CD4 in a pseudovirus-based assay. We observed that the CCR5 cell surface concentration but not the CD4 concentration had a significant effect on the inhibitory activity of X5 and several other CD4i antibodies including 17b and m9, as well as that of the gp41-specifc antibodies 2F5 and 4E10 but not on that of the CD4 binding site antibody (CD4bs), b12. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) decreased up to two orders of magnitude in cell lines with low CCR5 concentration corresponding to that in CD4 T cells used in PBMC-based assays (about 103 per cell) compared to cell lines with high CCR5 concentration (about 104 or more). Our results suggest that the CCR5 cell surface concentration could be a contributing factor to the high neutralizing activities of some antibodies in PBMC-based-assays but other factors could also play an important role. These findings could have implications for development of vaccine immunogens based on the epitopes of X5 and other CD4i antibodies, for elucidation of the mechanisms of HIV-1 neutralization by antibodies, and for design of novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:16904645

  3. 15th International Conference on Human Antibodies and Hybridomas. 14-16 April 2010, Tiara Park Atlantico Hotel, Porto, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Kotlan, Beatrix

    2010-11-01

    Antibodies and antibody conjugates are currently one of the largest classes of new drug entities under development. These versatile molecules are being investigated for the treatment of many pathological conditions, such as cancer and infectious, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Antibodies can exert biological effects as naked antibodies by themselves, or can be used as delivery agents conjugated with various drugs (e.g., immunoconjugates) and as tools of multistep targeting. Site-specific delivery of therapeutic agents has been the ultimate goal of the pharmaceutical industry, as it has the potential to maximize drug efficiency while minimizing side effects. Antibodies have much potential for this objective. Thus, it is useful to summarize some of the main strategies currently being employed for the development of these diverse therapeutic molecules and to highlight the recent novelties in the field. These goals were the focus of the 15th International Conference on Human Antibodies and Hybridomas, held during 14-16 April 2010 in Porto, Portugal. PMID:21091108

  4. Chemical Structure and Concentration of Intratumor Catabolites Determine Efficacy of Antibody Drug Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shang-Fan; Ma, Yong; Xu, Keyang; Dragovich, Peter S.; Pillow, Thomas H.; Liu, Luna; Del Rosario, Geoffrey; He, Jintang; Pei, Zhonghua; Sadowsky, Jack D.; Erickson, Hans K.; Hop, Cornelis E. C. A.; Khojasteh, S. Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent technological advances in quantifying antibody drug conjugate (ADC) species, such as total antibody, conjugated antibody, conjugated drug, and payload drug in circulation, the correlation of their exposures with the efficacy of ADC outcomes in vivo remains challenging. Here, the chemical structures and concentrations of intratumor catabolites were investigated to better understand the drivers of ADC in vivo efficacy. Anti-CD22 disulfide-linked pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD-dimer) conjugates containing methyl- and cyclobutyl-substituted disulfide linkers exhibited strong efficacy in a WSU-DLCL2 xenograft mouse model, whereas an ADC derived from a cyclopropyl linker was inactive. Total ADC antibody concentrations and drug-to-antibody ratios (DAR) in circulation were similar between the cyclobutyl-containing ADC and the cyclopropyl-containing ADC; however, the former afforded the release of the PBD-dimer payload in the tumor, but the latter only generated a nonimmolating thiol-containing catabolite that did not bind to DNA. These results suggest that intratumor catabolite analysis rather than systemic pharmacokinetic analysis may be used to better explain and predict ADC in vivo efficacy. These are good examples to demonstrate that the chemical nature and concentration of intratumor catabolites depend on the linker type used for drug conjugation, and the potency of the released drug moiety ultimately determines the ADC in vivo efficacy. PMID:27417182

  5. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  6. High concentrations of antibodies to xanthine oxidase in human and animal sera. Molecular characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Bruder, G; Jarasch, E D; Heid, H W

    1984-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of antibodies (IgG) specific to xanthine oxidase in both normal (nonimmune) human and animal sera, and in antisera raised against a diversity of unrelated antigens is described. A study of sera from 81 humans revealed that xanthine oxidase-specific IgG represents a high proportion (1-8%) of total IgG. No obvious correlation to pathological events or symptoms of disease could be found. These xanthine oxidase-specific antibodies could be isolated by immunoaffinity chromatography on purified human or bovine xanthine oxidase and showed specific binding to the enzyme polypeptide of Mr 155,000 in immunoblotting experiments. By immunofluorescence microscopy they displayed the same cell type-specific reaction as experimentally induced antibodies, i.e., the staining of lactating mammary gland epithelium and capillary endothelium. The naturally occurring xanthine oxidase-specific antibodies consisted of polyclonal IgG of various subclasses. F(ab')2 preparations gave immune-reactions identical to those of IgG. The human xanthine oxidase-specific IgG cross-reacted with the bovine enzyme and both human and animal antibodies partially inhibited its activity. The xanthine oxidase activity of human milk lipid globules and supernatant fractions from various human tissues was extremely low when compared with that of the bovine antigen. The enzyme protein, however, was effectively precipitated from these sources by both the human and bovine antibodies. We suggest that the exceptionally high concentrations of antibodies against one protein, xanthine oxidase, are due to self-immunization to the xanthine oxidase antigen present in endothelial cells of capillaries. We do not exclude, however, nutritional contributions of bovine milk antigen to the appearance of xanthine oxidase antibodies in human sera. The possible biological functions of this immunological reaction are discussed. Images PMID:6381540

  7. Capture and Concentration of Waterborne Pathogens Using Lectin and Antibody Coupled Magnetic Beads

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Alena M.; Ozanich, Rich M.

    2005-01-01

    Capture and Concentration of Waterborne Pathogens Using Lectin and Antibody Coupled Magnetic Beads. ALENA BENNETT (University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA, 98416) RICHARD M. OZANICH, JR. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352). The primary challenge of the surveillance of natural and introduced biological threats in large water samples is the purification and concentration process. A method for simultaneously capturing many types of biological pathogens is desired. Lectins coupled with magnetic beads were studied due to their ability to bind to the carbohydrates on the surfaces of cells. With lectin coupled beads we attempted to trap Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Brevundimonas diminuta. Also E. coli antibody coupled beads were tested for their effectiveness at concentrating E. coli cells. Bench top indirect and direct cell capture methods were studied for both lectins and antibodies. The indirect method was found to be more effective for cell concentration. Experiments are underway to understand the differences in the two approaches and improve the direct capture method for implementation on an online automated system.

  8. Antibody treatment against pulmonary exposure to abrin confers significantly higher levels of protection than treatment against ricin intoxication.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Tamar; Gal, Yoav; Elhanany, Eitan; Sapoznikov, Anita; Falach, Reut; Mazor, Ohad; Kronman, Chanoch

    2015-09-01

    Abrin, a potent plant-derived toxin bearing strong resemblance to ricin, irreversibly inactivates ribosomes by site-specific depurination, thereby precipitating cessation of protein synthesis in cells. Due to its high availability and ease of preparation, abrin is considered a biological threat, especially in context of bioterror warfare. To date, there is no established therapeutic countermeasure against abrin intoxication. In the present study, we examined the progress of pulmonary abrin intoxication in mice, evaluated the protective effect of antibody-based post-exposure therapy, and compared these findings to those observed for ricin intoxication and therapy. Salient features of abrin intoxication were found to be similar to those of ricin and include massive recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs, high levels of pro-inflammatory markers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and damage of the alveolar-capillary barrier. In contrast, the protective effect of anti-abrin antibody treatment was found to differ significantly from that of anti-ricin treatment. While anti-ricin treatment efficiency was quite limited even at 24h post-exposure (34% protection), administration of polyclonal anti-abrin antibodies even as late as 72h post-exposure, conferred exceedingly high-level protection (>70%). While both anti-toxin antibody treatments caused neutrophil and macrophage levels in the lungs to revert to normal, only anti-abrin treatment brought about a significant decline in the pulmonary levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. The differential ability of the anti-toxin treatments to dampen inflammation caused by the two similar toxins, abrin and ricin, could explain the radically different levels of protection achieved following antibody treatment. PMID:26051443

  9. Isolation and Chimerization of a Highly Neutralizing Antibody Conferring Passive Protection against Lethal Bacillus anthracis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Ronit; Marcus, Hadar; Ben-Arie, Einat; Lachmi, Bat-El; Mechaly, Adva; Reuveny, Shaul; Gat, Orit; Mazor, Ohad; Ordentlich, Arie

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the passive transfer of protective antigen (PA)-neutralizing antibodies can protect animals against Bacillus anthracis infection. The standard protocol for the isolation of PA-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies is based upon a primary selection of the highest PA-binders by ELISA, and usually yields only few candidates antibodies. We demonstrated that by applying a PA-neutralization functionality-based screen as the primary criterion for positive clones, it was possible to isolate more than 100 PA-neutralizing antibodies, some of which exhibited no measurable anti-PA titers in ELISA. Among the large panel of neutralizing antibodies identified, mAb 29 demonstrated the most potent activity, and was therefore chimerized. The variable region genes of the mAb 29 were fused to human constant region genes, to form the chimeric 29 antibody (cAb 29). Guinea pigs were fully protected against infection by 40LD50 B. anthracis spores following two separate administrations with 10 mg/kg of cAb 29: the first administration was given before the challenge, and a second dose was administered on day 4 following exposure. Moreover, animals that survived the challenge and developed endogenous PA-neutralizing antibodies with neutralizing titers above 100 were fully protected against repeat challenges with 40LD50 of B. anthracis spores. The data presented here emphasize the importance of toxin neutralization-based screens for the efficient isolation of protective antibodies that were probably overlooked in the standard screening protocol. The protective activity of the chimeric cAb 29 demonstrated in this study suggest that it may serve as an effective immunotherapeutic agent against anthrax. PMID:19629185

  10. A threshold concentration of anti-merozoite antibodies is required for protection from clinical episodes of malaria☆

    PubMed Central

    Murungi, Linda M.; Kamuyu, Gathoni; Lowe, Brett; Bejon, Philip; Theisen, Michael; Kinyanjui, Samson M.; Marsh, Kevin; Osier, Faith H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies to selected Plasmodium falciparum merozoite antigens are often reported to be associated with protection from malaria in one epidemiological cohort, but not in another. Here, we sought to understand this paradox by exploring the hypothesis that a threshold concentration of antibodies is necessary for protection. We analyzed data from two independent cohorts along the Kenyan coast, one in which antibodies to AMA1, MSP-2 and MSP-3 were associated with protection from malaria (Chonyi) and another in which this association was not observed (Junju). We used a malaria reference reagent to standardize antibody measurements across both cohorts, and applied statistical methods to derive the threshold concentration of antibodies against each antigen that best correlated with a reduced risk of malaria (the protective threshold), in the Chonyi cohort. We then tested whether antibodies in Junju reached the protective threshold concentrations observed in the Chonyi cohort. Except for children under 3 years, the age-matched proportions of children achieving protective threshold concentrations of antibodies against AMA1 and MSP-2 were significantly lower in Junju compared to Chonyi (Fishers exact test, P < 0.01). For MSP-3, this difference was significant only among 4–5 year olds. We conclude that although antibodies are commonly detected in malaria endemic populations, they may be present in concentrations that are insufficient for protection. Our results have implications for the analysis and interpretation of similar data from immuno-epidemiological studies. PMID:23800539

  11. Higher Plasma Concentration of Food-Specific Antibodies in Persons with Autistic Disorder in Comparison to Their Siblings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trajkovski, Vladimir; Petlichkovski, Aleksandar; Efinska-Mladenovska, Olivija; Trajkov, Dejan; Arsov, Todor; Strezova, Ana; Ajdinski, Ljubomir; Spiroski, Mirko

    2008-01-01

    Specific IgA, IgG, and IgE antibodies to food antigens in 35 participants with autistic disorder and 21 of their siblings in the Republic of Macedonia were examined. Statistically significant higher plasma concentration of IgA antibodies against alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, casein, and gliadin were found in the children with autistic…

  12. Stress Tolerance of Antibody-Poly(Amino Acid) Complexes for Improving the Stability of High Concentration Antibody Formulations.

    PubMed

    Izaki, Shunsuke; Kurinomaru, Takaaki; Handa, Kenji; Kimoto, Tomoaki; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2015-08-01

    The stabilization of antibodies in aqueous solution against physical stress remains a problematic issue for pharmaceutical applications. Recently, protein-polyelectrolyte complex (PPC) formation using poly(amino acids) was proposed to prepare antibody formulation in a salt-dissociable precipitated state without protein denaturation. Here, we investigated the stabilization effect of PPC of therapeutic antibodies with poly-l-glutamic acid on agitation and thermal stress as forms of mechanical and non-mechanical stress, respectively. The precipitated state of PPC prevented the inactivation and aggregation induced by agitation. Similar results were obtained using the suspension state of PPC, but the stabilizing effects were slightly inferior to those of the PPC precipitate. PPC precipitate and PPC suspension prevented heat-induced inactivation of the antibodies, but showed little effect on heat-induced aggregation. Thus, PPC is a new candidate as a simple storage method for antibodies in aqueous solution, as an alternative state for freeze-drying. PMID:26036204

  13. The relationship between infliximab concentrations, antibodies to infliximab and disease activity in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Vande Casteele, Niels; Khanna, Reena; Levesque, Barrett G; Stitt, Larry; Zou, G Y; Singh, Sharat; Lockton, Steve; Hauenstein, Scott; Ohrmund, Linda; Greenberg, Gordon R; Rutgeerts, Paul J; Gils, Ann; Sandborn, William J; Vermeire, Séverine; Feagan, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although low infliximab trough concentrations and antibodies to infliximab (ATI) are associated with poor outcomes in patients with Crohn's disease (CD), the clinical relevance of ATI in patients with adequate infliximab concentrations is uncertain. We evaluated this question using an assay sensitive for identification of ATI in the presence of infliximab. Design In an observational study, 1487 trough serum samples from 483 patients with CD who participated in four clinical studies of maintenance infliximab therapy were analysed using a fluid phase mobility shift assay. Infliximab and ATI concentrations most discriminant for remission, defined as a C-reactive protein concentration of ≤5 mg/L, were determined by receiver operating characteristic curves. A multivariable regression model evaluated these factors as independent predictors of remission. Results Based upon analysis of 1487 samples, 77.1% of patients had detectable and 22.9% had undetectable infliximab concentrations, of which 9.5% and 71.8%, respectively, were positive for ATI. An infliximab concentration of >2.79 μg/mL (area under the curve (AUC)=0.681; 95% CI 0.632 to 0.731) and ATI concentration of <3.15 U/mL (AUC=0.632; 95% CI 0.589 to 0.676) were associated with remission. Multivariable analysis showed that concentrations of both infliximab trough (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.3 to 2.5; p<0.001) and ATI (OR 0.57; 95% CI 0.39 to 0.81; p=0.002) were independent predictors of remission. Conclusions The development of ATI increases the probability of active disease even at low concentrations and in the presence of a therapeutic concentration of drug during infliximab maintenance therapy. Evaluation of strategies to prevent ATI formation, including therapeutic drug monitoring with selective infliximab dose intensification, is needed. PMID:25336114

  14. Investigating high-concentration monoclonal antibody powder suspension in nonaqueous suspension vehicles for subcutaneous injection.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Mayumi; Armstrong, Nick; Maa, Yuh-Fun

    2012-12-01

    Developing high-concentration monoclonal antibody (mAb) liquid formulations for subcutaneous (s.c.) administration is challenging because increased viscosity makes injection difficult. To overcome this obstacle, we investigated a nonaqueous powder suspension approach. Three IgG1 mAbs were spray dried and suspended at different concentrations in Miglyol® 840, benzyl benzoate, or ethyl lactate. Suspensions were characterized for viscosity, particle size, and syringeability; physical stability was visually inspected. Suspensions generally outperformed liquid solutions for injectability despite higher viscosity at the same mAb concentrations. Powder formulations and properties had little effect on viscosity or injectability. Ethyl lactate suspensions had lowest viscosity (<20 cP) and lowest syringe injection glide force (<15 N) at mAb concentrations as high as 333 mg/mL (500 mg powder/mL). Inverse gas chromatography analysis indicated that the vehicle was the most important factor impacting suspension performance. Ethyl lactate rendered greater heat of sorption (suggesting strong particle-suspension vehicle interaction may reduce particle-particle self-association, leading to low suspension viscosity and glide force) but lacked the physical suspension stability exhibited by the other vehicles. Specific mixtures of ethyl lactate and Miglyol® 840 improved overall performance in high mAb concentration suspensions. This study demonstrated the viability of high mAb concentration (>300 mg/mL) in suspension formulations for s.c. administration. PMID:23001898

  15. Treatment with a Monoclonal Antibody against Methamphetamine and Amphetamine Reduces Maternal and Fetal Rat Brain Concentrations in Late Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    White, Sarah J.; Hendrickson, Howard P.; Atchley, William T.; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M.; Gentry, W. Brooks; Williams, D. Keith; Owens, S. Michael

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that treatment of pregnant rat dams with a dual reactive monoclonal antibody (mAb4G9) against (+)-methamphetamine [METH; equilibrium dissociation rate constant (KD) = 16 nM] and (+)-amphetamine (AMP; KD = 102 nM) could confer maternal and fetal protection from brain accumulation of both drugs of abuse. To test this hypothesis, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (on gestational day 21) received a 1 mg/kg i.v. METH dose, followed 30 minutes later by vehicle or mAb4G9 treatment. The mAb4G9 dose was 0.56 mole-equivalent in binding sites to the METH body burden. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed baseline METH and AMP elimination half-lives were congruent in dams and fetuses, but the METH volume of distribution in dams was nearly double the fetal values. The METH and AMP area under the serum concentration-versus-time curves from 40 minutes to 5 hours after mAb4G9 treatment increased >7000% and 2000%, respectively, in dams. Fetal METH serum did not change, but AMP decreased 23%. The increased METH and AMP concentrations in maternal serum resulted from significant increases in mAb4G9 binding. Protein binding changed from ∼15% to > 90% for METH and AMP. Fetal serum protein binding appeared to gradually increase, but the absolute fraction bound was trivial compared with the dams. mAb4G9 treatment significantly reduced METH and AMP brain values by 66% and 45% in dams and 44% and 46% in fetuses (P < 0.05), respectively. These results show anti-METH/AMP mAb4G9 therapy in dams can offer maternal and fetal brain protection from the potentially harmful effects of METH and AMP. PMID:24839971

  16. Viscoelastic characterization of high concentration antibody formulations using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ankit R; Kerwin, Bruce A; Kanapuram, Sekhar R

    2009-09-01

    With increasing protein concentrations, therapeutic protein formulations are increasingly demonstrating significant deviations from ideal dilute solution behavior due to protein-protein interactions. These interactions lead to unique biophysical challenges in the administration of biopharmaceuticals including high apparent viscosity and viscoelasticity as well as challenges in maintaining the physical stability of proteins in solution. Here, we describe a straightforward analytical method to calculate the complex modulus and viscosity of high concentration protein solutions from measurements made using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Further, this methodology was used to investigate the dependence of the storage and loss moduli (G' and G'', respectively) of a humanized monoclonal antibody solution on solution pH. Unlike recent reports, the effect of protein deposition onto the surface of the quartz sensor crystal was measured and explicitly accounted for during analysis when determining the solution's complex modulus. It was found that the ratio G''/G' was significantly greater than unity for all solutions investigated, but demonstrated a distinct maximum at pH 5.5 indicating that the solution exhibited the greatest liquid-like behavior at this pH. In addition, measurements were made at higher frequencies, which were found to be more sensitive to the changes in pH than those made at lower frequencies. It was also found that the viscoelastic ratio was relatively insensitive to the frequency of measurement at lower pH, but showed greater dependence on frequency as pH increased. The characterization of the rheological properties of high concentration antibody solutions provides insight into protein-protein interactions, and the methodology presented here demonstrates a straightforward way to determine the viscoelastic properties using ultrasonic rheology without the drawbacks of numerical fitting. PMID:19025898

  17. Smartphone dongle for simultaneous measurement of hemoglobin concentration and detection of HIV antibodies.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tiffany; Patnaik, Ritish; Kuhlmann, Kevin; Rai, Alex J; Sia, Samuel K

    2015-09-01

    It is traditionally difficult to incorporate two classes of diagnostic tests into a single platform. In this work, we demonstrate a microfluidic-based smartphone dongle that simultaneously measures concentration of hemoglobin and detects HIV antibodies. Specifically, we demonstrate how a previously published immunoassay device, which measured optical density of silver precipitation on gold colloids, can be expanded to quantitatively measure hemoglobin concentration via a colorimetric assay. By lysing whole blood components with CHAPS detergent, we achieved highly reproducible measurement of hemoglobin concentration with the device. We tested this dual test on 38 patient samples from Columbia University Medical Center. Compared with the Hemocue Hb 201+ analyzer, hemoglobin concentrations from our device were accurate within 1.2 g dL(-1), while the HIV immunoassay (in the presence of CHAPS detergent) showed 95% sensitivity and 95% specificity, comparable to our previous studies. This work demonstrates the feasibility of integrating two classes of diagnostic tests (a colorimetric-based quantitative measurement and an immunoassay based on silver precipitation on gold colloids) into a low-cost, fast, and low-power dongle that works with smartphones, and creates a novel dual panel with clinical utility for antenatal-care settings. PMID:26190320

  18. Report of the Cent Gardes HIV Vaccines Conference. Part 1: The antibody response; Fondation Mérieux Conference Center, Veyrier-du-Lac, France, 25-27 October 2015.

    PubMed

    Girard, Marc P; Le-Grand, Roger; Picot, Valentina; Longuet, Christophe; Nabel, Gary J

    2016-06-30

    The 2015 Cent Gardes Conference on HIV vaccines took place on October 25-27 at the Merieux Foundation Conference Center in Veyrier du Lac, near Annecy, France. The meeting reviewed progress in the development of HIV vaccines and identified new directions of future research. The field has advanced incrementally over the past year but major progress will require additional information from new clinical trials. In this article, we review the presentations on humoral immune responses to HIV, and highlight the difficulty of eliciting broadly neutralizing antibodies by vaccination. Advances in cellular immunity for HIV prevention will be reviewed separately, in a following article. PMID:27216761

  19. Vaccination schedules to raise antibody concentrations against epsilon-toxin of Clostridium perfringens in ewes and their triplet lambs.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, C; Hogue, D E; Thonney, M L

    1997-09-01

    The objective of this experiment was to compare vaccination schedules for ewes and their lambs to raise antibody concentrations to epsilon-toxin of Clostridium perfringens, the causative agent of enterotoxemia. Half of 200 Finnsheep x Dorset ewes were vaccinated with C. perfringens type D toxoid vaccine 3 wk before lambing. Serum samples were obtained from 20 ewes that were to be vaccinated and 20 ewes that would remain unvaccinated before treatment and at wk 2, 1, and 0 before the start of lambing. Antibody concentrations in sera of unvaccinated ewes remained at 2 IU/mL, but they peaked in vaccinated ewes at 15 IU/mL by wk 1 before lambing. Lambs from each of the first 13 and the first 14 sets of triplets from vaccinated and unvaccinated ewes, respectively, received one of three vaccination treatments: no vaccine (control), vaccination on d 1 and 21 of age, or vaccination on d 21 and 42 of age. Antibody concentrations declined in sera of vaccinated ewes from 8.5 IU/mL immediately after lambing to 3 IU/mL 12 wk later. Vaccination of lambs did not increase sera antibody concentration. However, prepartum vaccination of ewes significantly increased lamb antibody concentrations (19 IU/mL) compared with lambs reared by unvaccinated ewes (2 IU/mL). Vaccination of ewes resulted in lambs with higher antibody concentrations until wk 10 postpartum. Concentrations declined to .6 IU/mL in all lambs at 12 wk. Because concentrations of .2 IU/mL may be protective, these results indicate that vaccination of ewes before lambing imparts passive protection in lambs to 12 wk of age, whereas vaccination of young lambs provides no added protection. PMID:9303449

  20. Analysis of antibody aggregate content at extremely high concentrations using sedimentation velocity with a novel interference optics.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Kristian; Krause, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies represent the most important group of protein-based biopharmaceuticals. During formulation, manufacturing, or storage, antibodies may suffer post-translational modifications altering their physical and chemical properties. Such induced conformational changes may lead to the formation of aggregates, which can not only reduce their efficiency but also be immunogenic. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the amount of size variants to ensure consistency and quality of pharmaceutical antibodies. In many cases, antibodies are formulated at very high concentrations > 50 g/L, mostly along with high amounts of sugar-based excipients. As a consequence, all routine aggregation analysis methods, such as size-exclusion chromatography, cannot monitor the size distribution at those original conditions, but only after dilution and usually under completely different solvent conditions. In contrast, sedimentation velocity (SV) allows to analyze samples directly in the product formulation, both with limited sample-matrix interactions and minimal dilution. One prerequisite for the analysis of highly concentrated samples is the detection of steep concentration gradients with sufficient resolution: Commercially available ultracentrifuges are not able to resolve such steep interference profiles. With the development of our Advanced Interference Detection Array (AIDA), it has become possible to register interferograms of solutions as highly concentrated as 150 g/L. The other major difficulty encountered at high protein concentrations is the pronounced non-ideal sedimentation behavior resulting from repulsive intermolecular interactions, for which a comprehensive theoretical modelling has not yet been achieved. Here, we report the first SV analysis of highly concentrated antibodies up to 147 g/L employing the unique AIDA ultracentrifuge. By developing a consistent experimental design and data fit approach, we were able to provide a reliable estimation of the minimum

  1. Coarse-Grained Antibody Models for "Weak" Protein-Protein Interactions from Low to High Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Calero-Rubio, Cesar; Saluja, Atul; Roberts, Christopher J

    2016-07-14

    So-called "weak" protein-protein interactions are important for the control of solution properties and stability at elevated protein concentrations (c2) but are not practical to capture in atomistic simulations. This report focuses on a series of coarse-grained models for predicting second osmotic virial coefficients (B22) and high-concentration Rayleigh scattering (osmotic compressibility) as a function of c2 for monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that are of interest in biotechnology. B22 and molecular volume along with c2-dependent osmotic compressibility were calculated for a series of models with increasing structural detail. Models were refined to include contributions from sterics, short-ranged van der Waals and hydrophobic attractions, screened electrostatics, and the flexibility of the mAb hinge region. The results highlight shortcomings for spherical models of MAbs and a useful balance between numerical accuracy and computational burden offered by models based on 6 or 12 spherical, partly overlapping domains. The results provide bounds for realistic values of effective charges on variable domains in order for MAbs to be stable in solution and more generally illustrate semiquantitative bounds for the space of model parameters that can reproduce experimental behavior and provide a basis for future development of computationally efficient and accurate CG mAb models to predict both low- and high-c2 behavior. PMID:27314827

  2. Monoclonal antibody self-association, cluster formation, and rheology at high concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lilyestrom, Wayne G; Yadav, Sandeep; Shire, Steven J; Scherer, Thomas M

    2013-05-30

    The rheological properties of macromolecular and colloidal suspensions are dependent on the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters that define viscous flow, and remain an active field of study with broad implications in cellular biophysics, soft-matter theory, and biopharmaceutical technology. Here we use static light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering, and viscosity measurements as a function of protein concentration to semiquantitatively correlate the oligomeric state of an IgG1 antibody (mAb1) with its rheological behavior at solution pH 6.0 and varying ionic strength (modified by 0.01-0.1 M Na2SO4). Solution SAXS characterization of 100 mM Na2SO4 solutions confirmed that mAb1 forms reversible dimers with extended structures in dilute solutions. Light-scattering measurements over a wide range of concentrations (1-175 mg/mL) provide detailed information on the equilibrium thermodynamic mAb1 interactions and their modulation by modest increases of Na2SO4. Through the use of interacting hard sphere models to fit light-scattering data, we establish that protein cluster formations consisting of 2-9 mAb1 molecules also increase the viscosity of 175 mg/mL IgG solutions from 52 up to 450 cP. The analysis of dilute and semidilute mAb1 solution rheology correlates linearly with the thermodynamic equilibrium cluster size, consistent with the viscosity behavior of elongated oligomeric structures that are not significantly dendrimeric or in a state of globular collapse. Furthermore, SAXS- and rheology-based structural modeling illustrate that only a small set of anisotropic interactions between complementary surfaces are required to nucleate and propagate protein clusters. PMID:23560896

  3. Serum pepsinogen I and II concentrations and IgG antibody to Helicobacter pylori in dyspeptic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Biasco, G; Paganelli, G M; Vaira, D; Holton, J; Di Febo, G; Brillanti, S; Miglioli, M; Barbara, L; Samloff, I M

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the association between histologically confirmed gastritis, carriage of Helicobacter pylori and pepsinogen (PG) I and PG II concentrations. METHODS--Prospective study of 81 dyspeptic patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was made. The extent of gastric mucosal inflammation and the presence of H pylori was determined, and serology to evaluate PG I and II concentrations and IgG titres to H pylori was carried out. RESULTS--The presence of H pylori was strongly correlated with high IgG antibody titres to H pylori and gastritis. Patients who were H pylori positive had significantly higher PG I and PG II concentrations and a significantly lower PG I:PG II ratio than patients who were negative for H pylori. In 13 patients with duodenal ulcer and H pylori positive gastritis serum PG I concentrations were significantly higher than in H pylori positive patients without duodenal ulcer. Significant correlations were found between the age of patients and serum PG II, the PG I:PG II ratio, IgG antibodies to H pylori, the severity of body gastritis and H pylori infection, and between the degree of gastritis in the body of the stomach and the PG II concentration. CONCLUSIONS--Serum PG I and II concentrations, together with a fall in the PG I:PG II ratio, could be used as predictors of H pylori infection as well as serum IgG antibody response to H pylori. PMID:8227432

  4. Weak Interactions Govern the Viscosity of Concentrated Antibody Solutions: High-Throughput Analysis Using the Diffusion Interaction Parameter

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Brian D.; Petry, Chris; Yadav, Sandeep; Demeule, Barthélemy; Ciaccio, Natalie; Moore, Jamie M.R.; Shire, Steven J.; Gokarn, Yatin R.

    2012-01-01

    Weak protein-protein interactions are thought to modulate the viscoelastic properties of concentrated antibody solutions. Predicting the viscoelastic behavior of concentrated antibodies from their dilute solution behavior is of significant interest and remains a challenge. Here, we show that the diffusion interaction parameter (kD), a component of the osmotic second virial coefficient (B2) that is amenable to high-throughput measurement in dilute solutions, correlates well with the viscosity of concentrated monoclonal antibody (mAb) solutions. We measured the kD of 29 different mAbs (IgG1 and IgG4) in four different solvent conditions (low and high ion normality) and found a linear dependence between kD and the exponential coefficient that describes the viscosity concentration profiles (|R| ≥ 0.9). Through experimentally measured effective charge measurements, under low ion normality where the electroviscous effect can dominate, we show that the mAb solution viscosity is poorly correlated with the mAb net charge (|R| ≤ 0.6). With this large data set, our results provide compelling evidence in support of weak intermolecular interactions, in contrast to the notion that the electroviscous effect is important in governing the viscoelastic behavior of concentrated mAb solutions. Our approach is particularly applicable as a screening tool for selecting mAbs with desirable viscosity properties early during lead candidate selection. PMID:22828333

  5. Deconvolution of antibody affinities and concentrations by non-linear regression analysis of competitive ELISA data.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F. J.; Bobrovnik, S. A.; Biosciences Division; Palladin Inst. Biochemistry

    2007-12-01

    Physiological responses of the adaptive immune system are polyclonal in nature whether induced by a naturally occurring infection, by vaccination to prevent infection or, in the case of animals, by challenge with antigen to generate reagents of research or commercial significance. The composition of the polyclonal responses is distinct to each individual or animal and changes over time. Differences exist in the affinities of the constituents and their relative proportion of the responsive population. In addition, some of the antibodies bind to different sites on the antigen, whereas other pairs of antibodies are sterically restricted from concurrent interaction with the antigen. Even if generation of a monoclonal antibody is the ultimate goal of a project, the quality of the resulting reagent is ultimately related to the characteristics of the initial immune response. It is probably impossible to quantitatively parse the composition of a polyclonal response to antigen. However, molecular regression allows further parameterization of a polyclonal antiserum in the context of certain simplifying assumptions. The antiserum is described as consisting of two competing populations of high- and low-affinity and unknown relative proportions. This simple model allows the quantitative determination of representative affinities and proportions. These parameters may be of use in evaluating responses to vaccines, to evaluating continuity of antibody production whether in vaccine recipients or animals used for the production of antisera, or in optimizing selection of donors for the production of monoclonal antibodies.

  6. Both Neutralizing and Non-Neutralizing Human H7N9 Influenza Vaccine-Induced Monoclonal Antibodies Confer Protection.

    PubMed

    Henry Dunand, Carole J; Leon, Paul E; Huang, Min; Choi, Angela; Chromikova, Veronika; Ho, Irvin Y; Tan, Gene S; Cruz, John; Hirsh, Ariana; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Mullarkey, Caitlin E; Ennis, Francis A; Terajima, Masanori; Treanor, John J; Topham, David J; Subbarao, Kanta; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian; Wilson, Patrick C

    2016-06-01

    Pathogenic H7N9 avian influenza viruses continue to represent a public health concern, and several candidate vaccines are currently being developed. It is vital to assess if protective antibodies are induced following vaccination and to characterize the diversity of epitopes targeted. Here we characterized the binding and functional properties of twelve H7-reactive human antibodies induced by a candidate A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) vaccine. Both neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies protected mice in vivo during passive transfer challenge experiments. Mapping the H7 hemagglutinin antigenic sites by generating escape mutant variants against the neutralizing antibodies identified unique epitopes on the head and stalk domains. Further, the broadly cross-reactive non-neutralizing antibodies generated in this study were protective through Fc-mediated effector cell recruitment. These findings reveal important properties of vaccine-induced antibodies and provide a better understanding of the human monoclonal antibody response to influenza in the context of vaccines. PMID:27281570

  7. High Concentrations of Measles Neutralizing Antibodies and High-Avidity Measles IgG Accurately Identify Measles Reinfection Cases.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Sun B; Rota, Jennifer S; Hickman, Carole J; Mercader, Sara; Redd, Susan; McNall, Rebecca J; Williams, Nobia; McGrew, Marcia; Walls, M Laura; Rota, Paul A; Bellini, William J

    2016-08-01

    In the United States, approximately 9% of the measles cases reported from 2012 to 2014 occurred in vaccinated individuals. Laboratory confirmation of measles in vaccinated individuals is challenging since IgM assays can give inconclusive results. Although a positive reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay result from an appropriately timed specimen can provide confirmation, negative results may not rule out a highly suspicious case. Detection of high-avidity measles IgG in serum samples provides laboratory evidence of a past immunologic response to measles from natural infection or immunization. High concentrations of measles neutralizing antibody have been observed by plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) assays among confirmed measles cases with high-avidity IgG, referred to here as reinfection cases (RICs). In this study, we evaluated the utility of measuring levels of measles neutralizing antibody to distinguish RICs from noncases by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Single and paired serum samples with high-avidity measles IgG from suspected measles cases submitted to the CDC for routine surveillance were used for the analysis. The RICs were confirmed by a 4-fold rise in PRN titer or by RT-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay, while the noncases were negative by both assays. Discrimination accuracy was high with serum samples collected ≥3 days after rash onset (area under the curve, 0.953; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.854 to 0.993). Measles neutralizing antibody concentrations of ≥40,000 mIU/ml identified RICs with 90% sensitivity (95% CI, 74 to 98%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 82 to 100%). Therefore, when serological or RT-qPCR results are unavailable or inconclusive, suspected measles cases with high-avidity measles IgG can be confirmed as RICs by measles neutralizing antibody concentrations of ≥40,000 mIU/ml. PMID:27335386

  8. High Concentrations of Measles Neutralizing Antibodies and High-Avidity Measles IgG Accurately Identify Measles Reinfection Cases

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Jennifer S.; Hickman, Carole J.; Mercader, Sara; Redd, Susan; McNall, Rebecca J.; Williams, Nobia; McGrew, Marcia; Walls, M. Laura; Rota, Paul A.; Bellini, William J.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, approximately 9% of the measles cases reported from 2012 to 2014 occurred in vaccinated individuals. Laboratory confirmation of measles in vaccinated individuals is challenging since IgM assays can give inconclusive results. Although a positive reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay result from an appropriately timed specimen can provide confirmation, negative results may not rule out a highly suspicious case. Detection of high-avidity measles IgG in serum samples provides laboratory evidence of a past immunologic response to measles from natural infection or immunization. High concentrations of measles neutralizing antibody have been observed by plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) assays among confirmed measles cases with high-avidity IgG, referred to here as reinfection cases (RICs). In this study, we evaluated the utility of measuring levels of measles neutralizing antibody to distinguish RICs from noncases by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Single and paired serum samples with high-avidity measles IgG from suspected measles cases submitted to the CDC for routine surveillance were used for the analysis. The RICs were confirmed by a 4-fold rise in PRN titer or by RT-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay, while the noncases were negative by both assays. Discrimination accuracy was high with serum samples collected ≥3 days after rash onset (area under the curve, 0.953; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.854 to 0.993). Measles neutralizing antibody concentrations of ≥40,000 mIU/ml identified RICs with 90% sensitivity (95% CI, 74 to 98%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 82 to 100%). Therefore, when serological or RT-qPCR results are unavailable or inconclusive, suspected measles cases with high-avidity measles IgG can be confirmed as RICs by measles neutralizing antibody concentrations of ≥40,000 mIU/ml. PMID:27335386

  9. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  10. Impact of baseline anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide-2 antibody concentration on efficacy outcomes following treatment with subcutaneous abatacept or adalimumab: 2-year results from the AMPLE trial

    PubMed Central

    Sokolove, Jeremy; Schiff, Michael; Fleischmann, Roy; Weinblatt, Michael E; Connolly, Sean E; Johnsen, Alyssa; Zhu, Jin; Maldonado, Michael A; Patel, Salil; Robinson, William H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether baseline anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide-2 (CCP2) antibody status and concentration correlated with clinical outcomes in patients treated with abatacept or adalimumab on background methotrexate (MTX) in the 2-year AMPLE (Abatacept versus adaliMumab comParison in bioLogic-naïvE rheumatoid arthritis subjects with background MTX) study. Methods In this exploratory analysis, anti-CCP2 antibody concentration was measured at baseline, and antibody-positive patients were divided into equal quartiles, Q1–Q4, representing increasing antibody concentrations. Clinical outcomes analysed by baseline anti-CCP2 status and quartile included change from baseline in disease activity and disability and remission rates. Results Baseline characteristics were generally comparable across quartiles and treatment groups. In both treatment groups, anti-CCP2 antibody-negative patients responded less well than antibody-positive patients. At year 2, improvements in disease activity and disability and remission rates were similar across Q1–Q3, but were numerically higher in Q4 in the abatacept group; in contrast, treatment effects were similar across all quartiles in the adalimumab group. Conclusions In AMPLE, baseline anti-CCP2 positivity was associated with a better response for abatacept and adalimumab. Patients with the highest baseline anti-CCP2 antibody concentrations had better clinical response with abatacept than patients with lower concentrations, an association that was not observed with adalimumab. Trial registration number NCT00929864. PMID:26359449

  11. Cow-level association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis antibody seropositivity: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sorge, U S; Molitor, T; Linn, J; Gallaher, D; Wells, S W

    2013-02-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with various human diseases. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the cow-level association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration and Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) seropositivity of dairy cows, adjusting for diet, breed, hair coat color, stage of lactation, reproductive status, and cow age. The sera of 80 MAP antibody ELISA-positive and 80 test-negative herd mates from 5 Minnesota dairy herds were analyzed for 25(OH)D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)(2)D]. The cows' age, production records, and hair coat color were recorded. Additionally, feed samples were obtained and analyzed for vitamin D(2) and vitamin D(3) content. A linear mixed model was used to identify potential predictors for serum 25(OH)D concentration, accounting for herd of origin. The majority of rations analyzed had over 22,000 IU of vitamin D/day (maximum: 52,000 I U/d) and the study cows' average serum 25(OH)D concentration was 62.5 ± 13.8 ng/mL. Serum ELISA-positive cows had, on average, 5.3 ng/mL lower 25(OH)D serum levels than test-negative herd mates. The reproductive status of cows was also associated with the 25(OH)D levels, with fresh cows having the lowest serum concentration. In this cross-sectional study, a temporal or causal association between MAP antibody ELISA status and serum 25(OH)D concentration could not be evaluated. In addition, the high levels of vitamin D in the rations of participating farms and the average 25(OH)D serum concentration suggest that additional supplementation with vitamin D in the ration is likely to be ineffective. PMID:23261386

  12. Local distribution and concentration of intravenously injected sup 131 I-9. 2. 27 monoclonal antibody in human malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Del Vecchio, S.; Reynolds, J.C.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Blasberg, R.G.; Neumann, R.D.; Lotze, M.T.; Bryant, G.J.; Farkas, R.J.; Larson, S.M. )

    1989-05-15

    Regional measurements of {sup 131}I-9.2.27 distribution in human melanoma tumors were obtained using quantitative autoradiography. Tumors were removed from patients 72-96 h after they had received an i.v. injection of 9.15 mCi (100 mg) of {sup 131}I-9.2.27. The autoradiographic images showed that the radioactivity reaching the tumor was heterogeneously distributed. Areas of relative high and low uptake were selected in each tumor. Regions of high activity contained from 51 to 1371 nCi/g, while areas with low uptake had radioactivity ranging from 12 to 487 nCi/g. The reliability of the autoradiographic measurements was demonstrated by the strong positive correlation with direct tissue sample counting (r = 0.994 P less than 0.001). Since comparative immunocytochemistry showed a homogeneous and diffuse staining of target antigen on viable tumor cells, variability of monoclonal antibody uptake within individual tumors was not primarily due to heterogeneity of antigen expression in these cases. However, antigen levels accounted for some of the variation from tumor to tumor. When immunoperoxidase staining was repeated on adjacent sections without the addition of 9.2.27, it confirmed the nonuniform distribution of monoclonal antibody found at autoradiography. Thus, quantitative autoradiography gives information about the distribution and the local concentration of radioactive antibody in tumors allowing calculation of the radiation dose delivered to small regions within tumors.

  13. Estimation of Group B Streptococcus Type III Polysaccharide-Specific Antibody Concentrations in Human Sera Is Antigen Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Reva; Anthony, Bascom F.; Frasch, Carl E.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against group B streptococcus (GBS) type III polysaccharide (PS) has been correlated with protection against GBS disease. The GBS type III PS is structurally similar to the pneumococcal type 14 PS, differing only in the presence of sialic acid residues. Four different preparations of GBS type III PS were evaluated for their specificity in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA): free PS, free PS mixed with methylated human serum albumin (mHSA), PS conjugated to biotin and PS conjugated to human serum albumin. Three groups of human sera were used to evaluate these PS preparations: sera from recipients of a GBS PS vaccine, sera from women receiving a GBS type III PS-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine, and sera from nonimmunized healthy women of childbearing age. Estimated antibody concentrations were different depending on the PS preparation used. Using any of the four preparations, we were able to measure ≤0.05 μg of IgG antibody to the GBS type III PS per ml. The specificity of the assay was determined by competitive inhibition with homologous and heterologous PS. The pneumococcal type 14 PS did not inhibit binding of antibody to the native GBS type III PS in sera from adults receiving the GBS PS vaccine or in sera from nonimmunized adults (except serum G9). The pneumococcal type 14 PS inhibited 50% in sera from recipients of GBS type III conjugate vaccine and in serum G9 when GBS type III PS conjugated to biotin or to HSA was used as antigen in ELISA. These data show that free GBS type III PS or PS mixed with mHSA is a sensitive and specific antigen for ELISA and that conjugation can alter the antigenic specificity of a PS. PMID:9826364

  14. Applying photoacoustics to quantification of melanin concentration in retinal pigment epithelium (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Xiao; Zhang, Hao F.; Liu, Wenzhong

    2016-03-01

    The melanin in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) protects retina and other ocular tissues by photo-screening and acting as antioxidant and free radical scavenger. It helps maintain normal visual functions since human eye is subjected to lifelong high oxygen stress and photon exposure. Loss of the RPE melanin weakens the protection mechanism and jeopardizes ocular health. Local decrease in the RPE melanin concentration is believed to be both a cause and a sign of early-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading blinding disease in developed world. Current technology cannot quantitatively measure the RPE melanin concentration which might be a promising marker in early AMD screening. Photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM), as an emerging optical absorption-based imaging technology, can potentially be applied to measure the RPE melanin concentration if the dependence of the detectable photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitudes on the RPE melanin concentrations is verified. In this study, we tested the feasibility of using PA signal ratio from RPE melanin and the nearby retinal blood vessels as an indicator of the RPE melanin variation. A novel whole eye optical model was designed and Monte Carlo modeling of light (MCML) was employed. We examined the influences on quantification from PAOM axial resolution, the depth and diameter of the retinal blood vessel, and the RPE thickness. The results show that the scheme is robust to individual histological and illumination variations. This study suggests that PAOM is capable of quantitatively measuring the RPE melanin concentration in vivo.

  15. Use of Anti-Aedes aegypti Salivary Extract Antibody Concentration to Correlate Risk of Vector Exposure and Dengue Transmission Risk in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Londono-Renteria, Berlin; Cardenas, Jenny C.; Cardenas, Lucio D.; Christofferson, Rebecca C.; Chisenhall, Daniel M.; Wesson, Dawn M.; McCracken, Michael K.; Carvajal, Daisy; Mores, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    Norte de Santander is a region in Colombia with a high incidence of dengue virus (DENV). In this study, we examined the serum concentration of anti-Aedes salivary gland extract (SGE) antibodies as a biomarker of DENV infection and transmission, and assessed the duration of anti-SGE antibody concentration after exposure to the vector ceased. We also determined whether SGE antibody concentration could differentiate between positive and negative DENV infected individuals and whether there are differences in exposure for each DENV serotype. We observed a significant decrease in the concentration of IgG antibodies at least 40 days after returning to an “Ae. aegypti-free” area. In addition, we found significantly higher anti-SGE IgG concentrations in DENV positive patients with some difference in exposure to mosquito bites among DENV serotypes. We conclude that the concentration of IgG antibodies against SGE is an accurate indicator of risk of dengue virus transmission and disease presence. PMID:24312537

  16. Telecommunications Policy Research Conference. Media Concentration and the First Amendment Section. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telecommunications Policy Research Conference, Inc., Washington, DC.

    These two papers consider the implications of industry concentration in the mass media industry. The first, "Selling the Store: Policy Implications of the 1986 Bonanza in Television Station Transfers" (Joseph Foley, Ohio State University), analyzes the relationship between key market variables and prices paid in 1986 television stations transfers,…

  17. Development of an antibody-based, modular biosensor for 129Xe NMR molecular imaging of cells at nanomolar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Rose, Honor M; Witte, Christopher; Rossella, Federica; Klippel, Stefan; Freund, Christian; Schröder, Leif

    2014-08-12

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is seriously limited when aiming for visualization of targeted contrast agents. Images are reconstructed from the weak diamagnetic properties of the sample and require an abundant molecule like water as the reporter. Micromolar to millimolar concentrations of conventional contrast agents are needed to generate image contrast, thus excluding many molecular markers as potential targets. To address this limitation, we developed and characterized a functional xenon NMR biosensor that can identify a specific cell surface marker by targeted (129)Xe MRI. Cells expressing the cell surface protein CD14 can be spatially distinguished from control cells with incorporation of as little as 20 nM of the xenon MRI readout unit, cryptophane-A. Cryptophane-A serves as a chemical host for hyperpolarized nuclei and facilitates the sensitivity enhancement achieved by xenon MRI. Although this paper describes the application of a CD14-specific biosensor, the construct has been designed in a versatile, modular fashion. This allows for quick and easy adaptation of the biosensor to any cell surface target for which there is a specific antibody. In addition, the modular design facilitates the creation of a multifunctional probe that incorporates readout modules for different detection methods, such as fluorescence, to complement the primary MRI readout. This modular antibody-based approach not only offers a practical technique with which to screen targets, but one which can be readily applied as the xenon MRI field moves closer to molecular imaging applications in vivo. PMID:25071165

  18. Development of an antibody-based, modular biosensor for 129Xe NMR molecular imaging of cells at nanomolar concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Honor M.; Witte, Christopher; Rossella, Federica; Klippel, Stefan; Freund, Christian; Schröder, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is seriously limited when aiming for visualization of targeted contrast agents. Images are reconstructed from the weak diamagnetic properties of the sample and require an abundant molecule like water as the reporter. Micromolar to millimolar concentrations of conventional contrast agents are needed to generate image contrast, thus excluding many molecular markers as potential targets. To address this limitation, we developed and characterized a functional xenon NMR biosensor that can identify a specific cell surface marker by targeted 129Xe MRI. Cells expressing the cell surface protein CD14 can be spatially distinguished from control cells with incorporation of as little as 20 nM of the xenon MRI readout unit, cryptophane-A. Cryptophane-A serves as a chemical host for hyperpolarized nuclei and facilitates the sensitivity enhancement achieved by xenon MRI. Although this paper describes the application of a CD14-specific biosensor, the construct has been designed in a versatile, modular fashion. This allows for quick and easy adaptation of the biosensor to any cell surface target for which there is a specific antibody. In addition, the modular design facilitates the creation of a multifunctional probe that incorporates readout modules for different detection methods, such as fluorescence, to complement the primary MRI readout. This modular antibody-based approach not only offers a practical technique with which to screen targets, but one which can be readily applied as the xenon MRI field moves closer to molecular imaging applications in vivo. PMID:25071165

  19. Impact of Intranasal Insulin on Insulin Antibody Affinity and Isotypes in Young Children With HLA-Conferred Susceptibility to Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ryhänen, Samppa J.; Härkönen, Taina; Siljander, Heli; Näntö-Salonen, Kirsti; Simell, Tuula; Hyöty, Heikki; Ilonen, Jorma; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Olli; Knip, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Despite promising results from studies on mouse models, intranasal insulin failed to prevent or delay the development of type 1 diabetes in autoantibody-positive children with HLA-conferred disease susceptibility. To analyze whether the insulin dose was inadequate to elicit an immunomodulatory response, we compared the changes observed in insulin antibody (IA) affinity and isotypes after treatment with nasal insulin or placebo. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Ninety-five children (47 in the placebo group and 48 in the insulin group of the total of 224 children randomized for the trial) with HLA-conferred susceptibility to type 1 diabetes derived from the intervention arm of the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention study were included in these analyses. Blood samples drawn before or at the beginning of the treatment and after treatment for 3 and 6 months were analyzed for IA affinity and isotype-specific IAs (IgG1–4, IgA, IgM, and IgE). RESULTS IgG3- and IgA-IA levels (P = 0.031 and 0.015, respectively) and the number of IgG3-IA–positive subjects (P = 0.022) were significantly higher at 6 months after the initiation of the treatment in the insulin group. No significant differences were observed between the two groups in IA affinity or other IA isotypes. CONCLUSIONS The insulin dose administered induced a modest change in the IA isotype profile. The lack of impact of nasal insulin on IA affinity implies that the immune response of study subjects was already mature at the beginning of the intervention. PMID:21515841

  20. Replacement therapy with a monoclonal antibody purified protein C concentrate in newborns with severe congenital protein C deficiency.

    PubMed

    Dreyfus, M; Masterson, M; David, M; Rivard, G E; Müller, F M; Kreuz, W; Beeg, T; Minford, A; Allgrove, J; Cohen, J D

    1995-01-01

    Protein C replacement therapy with a monoclonal antibody purified, virus inactivated protein C concentrate was carried out in nine infants (three male, six female) with severe congenital protein C deficiency and life-threatening purpura fulminans and/or thrombosis associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Eight infants were homozygous for protein C deficiency; one was a compound heterozygote. The treatment period varied from 22 days to three years. The half-life of protein C was found to be as short as two to three hours during activation of the coagulation system, increasing to approximately ten hours after stabilization. During the acute phase, protein C levels of 0.10 to 0.25 IU/mL were associated with elevated markers of coagulation activation indicating DIC, while protein C levels greater than 0.25 were associated with normalization of coagulation markers. No product-related side effects were reported. Episodes of bleeding or purpura recurred in all patients who were switched to oral anticoagulant therapy, necessitating reinstatement of protein C replacement therapy, either as needed to control symptoms, or on a long-term prophylactic schedule, alone or in addition to oral anticoagulation. Home treatment with protein C concentrate allowed a near-normal life-style for patients who otherwise would be hospitalized for long periods of time. PMID:8747700

  1. American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists National Biotechnology Conference Short Course: Translational Challenges in Developing Antibody-Drug Conjugates: May 24, 2012, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Thudium, Karen; Bilic, Sanela; Leipold, Douglas; Mallet, William; Kaur, Surinder; Meibohm, Bernd; Erickson, Hans; Tibbitts, Jay; Zhao, Hong; Gupta, Manish

    2013-01-01

    The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) National Biotechnology Conference Short Course "Translational Challenges in Developing Antibody-Drug Conjugates (ADCs)," held May 24, 2012 in San Diego, CA, was organized by members of the Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Drug Metabolism section of AAPS. Representatives from the pharmaceutical industry, regulatory authorities, and academia in the US and Europe attended this short course to discuss the translational challenges in ADC development and the importance of characterizing these molecules early in development to achieve therapeutic utility in patients. Other areas of discussion included selection of target antigens; characterization of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion; assay development and hot topics like regulatory perspectives and the role of pharmacometrics in ADC development. MUC16-targeted ADCs were discussed to illustrate challenges in preclinical development; experiences with trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1; Genentech) and the recently approved brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris; Seattle Genetics) were presented in depth to demonstrate considerations in clinical development. The views expressed in this report are those of the participants and do not necessarily represent those of their affiliations. PMID:23255090

  2. High concentrations of therapeutic IgG1 antibodies are needed to compensate for inhibition of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by excess endogenous immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Preithner, Susanne; Elm, Stefanie; Lippold, Sandra; Locher, Mathias; Wolf, Andreas; da Silva, Antonio J; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Prang, Nadja S

    2006-03-01

    A common feature of human IgG1 antibodies used for cancer treatment is that their anti-tumour efficacy requires high serum trough levels and continued therapy for several months. Treatment cycles, thereby, consume several grams of IgG1 translating into significant drug needs and costs. The basis for the low in vivo efficacy, which is in contrast to high in vitro antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is not well understood. Here, we have explored factors contributing to this discrepancy using adecatumumab (MT201), a fully human monoclonal IgG1 against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) and trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized IgG1 with specificity for the human epithelial growth factor receptor type 2 (HER-2) antigen. We found that physiological levels of human sera strongly inhibited ADCC of both IgG1 antibodies. Effects showed some dependence on the density of Ep-CAM and HER-2 targets, the tumour cell line tested and on effector cell and serum donors. Removal of IgG by affinity chromatography abolished the inhibitory effect of a serum pool. Inhibition of ADCC was fully restored by adding back the IgG fraction or by an equal amount of IgG from a commercial source. We further demonstrate that CD56-positive lymphocytes within human PBMC contributed >90% to ADCC and that normal serum levels of IgG effectively competed for in vitro binding of an IgG1 antibody to low-affinity Fcgamma receptor type III (CD16), as is present on natural killer (NK) cells. Competition of serum IgG for binding of therapeutic IgG1 to NK cell may be one important reason why high antibody doses are required in the clinic for treatment of cancer by an ADCC-based mechanism. PMID:16102830

  3. Dynamic Antibody Specificities and Virion Concentrations in Circulating Immune Complexes in Acute to Chronic HIV-1 Infection ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pinghuang; Overman, R. Glenn; Yates, Nicole L.; Alam, S. Munir; Vandergrift, Nathan; Chen, Yue; Graw, Frederik; Freel, Stephanie A.; Kappes, John C.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Montefiori, David C.; Gao, Feng; Perelson, Alan S.; Cohen, Myron S.; Haynes, Barton F.; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the interactions between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions and antibodies (Ab) produced during acute HIV-1 infection (AHI) is critical for defining antibody antiviral capabilities. Antibodies that bind virions may prevent transmission by neutralization of virus or mechanically prevent HIV-1 migration through mucosal layers. In this study, we quantified circulating HIV-1 virion-immune complexes (ICs), present in approximately 90% of AHI subjects, and compared the levels and antibody specificity to those in chronic infection. Circulating HIV-1 virions coated with IgG (immune complexes) were in significantly lower levels relative to the viral load in acute infection than in chronic HIV-1 infection. The specificities of the antibodies in the immune complexes differed between acute and chronic infection (anti-gp41 Ab in acute infection and anti-gp120 in chronic infection), potentially suggesting different roles in immunopathogenesis for complexes arising at different stages of infection. We also determined the ability of circulating IgG from AHI to bind infectious versus noninfectious virions. Similar to a nonneutralizing anti-gp41 monoclonal antibody (MAb), purified plasma IgG from acute HIV-1 subjects bound both infectious and noninfectious virions. This was in contrast to the neutralizing antibody 2G12 MAb that bound predominantly infectious virions. Moreover, the initial antibody response captured acute HIV-1 virions without selection for different HIV-1 envelope sequences. In total, this study demonstrates that the composition of immune complexes are dynamic over the course of HIV-1 infection and are comprised initially of antibodies that nonselectively opsonize both infectious and noninfectious virions, likely contributing to the lack of efficacy of the antibody response during acute infection. PMID:21865397

  4. Very High Plasma Concentrations of a Monoclonal Antibody against the Human Insulin Receptor Are Produced by Subcutaneous Injection in the Rhesus Monkey.

    PubMed

    Boado, Ruben J; Hui, Eric Ka-Wai; Lu, Jeff Zhiqiang; Pardridge, William M

    2016-09-01

    Brain penetration of recombinant protein drugs is possible following the re-engineering of the drug as an IgG fusion protein. The IgG domain is a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against an endogenous blood-brain barrier (BBB) receptor transporter, such as the insulin receptor. One such mAb targets the human insulin receptor (HIR) and is active in Rhesus monkeys. Prior work has measured the plasma pharmacokinetics of HIRMAb-derived fusion proteins following intravenous (IV) infusion. However, an alternative method of administration for chronic treatment of brain disease is the subcutaneous (SQ) route. The extent to which an antibody against the insulin receptor undergoes systemic distribution and clearance is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, the rate of plasma clearance of the HIRMAb is measured in Rhesus monkeys following IV or SQ administration of 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg doses of the antibody. The HIRMAb is readily absorbed into the systemic circulation following SQ injection with a 42% plasma bioavailability. The rate of plasma clearance of the antibody, 0.04-0.06 mL/min/kg, is the same following either IV or SQ administration. Owing to the slow rate of plasma clearance of the antibody, high concentrations of the HIRMAb are sustained in plasma for days after the SQ injection. The plasma concentration of the HIRMAb exceeds 0.8 mg/mL, which is 9% of the entire plasma IgG pool in the primate, after the SQ injection of the high dose, 30 mg/kg, of the antibody. In summary, the pharmacokinetics of plasma clearance of the HIRMAb are such that HIRMAb-derived fusion proteins can be developed as protein therapeutics for the brain with chronic SQ administration on a weekly or twice-weekly regimen. PMID:27513815

  5. Optimization of Crystals of an Inhibitory Antibody of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR) with Hydrogen Peroxide and Low Protein Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongdong; Shi, Xiaoli; Parry, Graham; Chen, Liqing; Callahan, Jennifer A.; Mazar, Andrew P.; Huang, Mingdong

    2010-07-19

    Optimization of protein crystal formation is often a necessary step leading to diffraction-quality crystals to enable collection of a full X-ray data set. Typical protein crystal optimization involves screening different components, e.g., pH, precipitants, and additives of the precipitant solution. Here we present an example using an inhibitory antibody of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) where such procedures did not yield diffracting crystals. In contrast, it was the treatment of the protein with hydrogen peroxide incubation and the protein concentration reduction that were found to be key factors in obtaining diffracting crystals. Final crystals diffracted to 1.75 {angstrom}, and belong to orthorhombic P212121 space group with unit cell parameters a = 37.162 {angstrom}, b = 84.474 {angstrom}, c = 134.030 {angstrom}, and contain one molecule of Fab fragment of anti-uro kinase receptor antibody in the asymmetric unit.

  6. Randomized Cross-Sectional Study to Compare HIV-1 Specific Antibody and Cytokine Concentrations in Female Genital Secretions Obtained by Menstrual Cup and Cervicovaginal Lavage

    PubMed Central

    Archary, Derseree; Liebenberg, Lenine J.; Werner, Lise; Tulsi, Sahil; Majola, Nelisile; Naicker, Nivashnee; Dlamini, Sarah; Hope, Thomas J.; Samsunder, Natasha; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Morris, Lynn; Passmore, Jo-Ann S.; Garrett, Nigel J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Optimizing methods for genital specimen collection to accurately characterize mucosal immune responses is a priority for the HIV prevention field. The menstrual cup (MC) has been proposed as an alternative to other methods including cervicovaginal lavage (CVL), but no study has yet formally compared these two methods. Methods Forty HIV-infected, antiretroviral therapy-naïve women from the CAPRISA 002 acute HIV infection cohort study were randomized to have genital fluid collected using the MC with subsequent CVL, or by CVL alone. Qualitative data, which assessed levels of comfort and acceptability of MC using a 5-point Likert scale, was collected. Luminex multiplex assays were used to measure HIV-specific IgG against multiple gene products and 48 cytokines. Results The majority (94%) of participants indicated that insertion, wearing and removal of the MC was comfortable. Nineteen MCs with 18 matching, subsequent CVLs and 20 randomized CVLs were available for analysis. Mucosal IgG responses against four HIV-antigens were detected in 99% of MCs compared to only 80% of randomized CVLs (p = 0.029). Higher specific antibody activity and total antibodies were observed in MCs compared to CVL (all p<0.001). In MCs, 42/48 (88%) cytokines were in the detectable range in all participants compared to 27/48 (54%) in CVL (p<0.001). Concentrations of 22/41 cytokines (53.7%) were significantly higher in fluid collected by MC. Both total IgG (r = 0.63; p = 0.005) and cytokine concentrations (r = 0.90; p<0.001) correlated strongly between MC and corresponding post-MC CVL. Conclusions MC sampling improves the detection of mucosal cytokines and antibodies, particularly those present at low concentrations. MC may therefore represent an ideal tool to assess immunological parameters in genital secretions, without interfering with concurrent collection of conventional CVL samples. PMID:26147923

  7. Measurement of cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood: HPLC and radioimmunoassay with a specific monoclonal antibody and /sup 3/H- or /sup 125/I-labeled ligand compared

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, B.A.; Daft, M.C.; Koenig, J.W.; Flye, M.W.; Turk, J.W.; Scott, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    We compared cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood as measured by HPLC and by RIA with a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine with /sup 3/H- or /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporine ligand. The /sup 3/H-RIA kit slightly underestimated cyclosporine concentrations (greater than 600 micrograms/L) in comparison with HPLC. Over a wide range of concentrations, cyclosporine measured with the /sup 125/I-RIA kit correlated well with HPLC (slope = 0.99, n = 301, r = 0.98), observed for samples from recipients of kidney, heart, or liver allografts (respective slopes: 1.01, 0.93, and 1.00). The /sup 125/I-RIA standard curve was linear to 1000 micrograms of cyclosporine per liter. Inter- and intra-assay CVs for /sup 125/I-RIA measurements of cyclosporine were less than or equal to 7%. Evidently, the /sup 125/I-RIA kit involving a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine is equivalent to the HPLC assay and can replace it for therapeutic drug monitoring of cyclosporine therapy.

  8. Evaluating the impact of high Pluronic® F68 concentrations on antibody producing CHO cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tharmalingam, Tharmala; Goudar, Chetan T

    2015-04-01

    Pluronic® F68 (P-F68) is an important component of chemically-defined cell culture medium because it protects cells from hydrodynamic and bubble-induced shear in the bioreactor. While P-F68 is typically used in cell culture medium at a concentration of 1 g/L (0.1%), higher concentrations can offer additional shear protection and have also been shown to be beneficial during cryopreservation. Recent industry experience with variability in P-F68-associated shear-protection has opened up the possibility of elevated P-F68 concentrations in cell culture media, a topic that has not been previously explored in the context of industrial cell culture processes. Recognizing this gap, we first evaluated the effect of 1-5 g/L P-F68 concentrations in shake flask cultures over ten 3-day passages for cell lines A and B. Increase in terminal cell density and cell size was seen over time at higher P-F68 concentrations but protein productivity was not impacted. Results from this preliminary screening study suggested no adverse impact of high P-F68 concentrations. Subsequently fed-batch bioreactor experiments were conducted at 1 and 5 g/L P-F68 concentrations with both cell lines where cell growth, viability, metabolism, and product quality were examined under process conditions reflective of a commercial process. Results from these bioreactor experiments confirmed findings from the preliminary screen and also indicated no impact of elevated P-F68 concentration on product quality. If additional shear protection is desired, either due to raw material variability, cell line sensitivity, or a high-shear cell culture process, our results suggest this can be accomplished by elevating the P-F68 concentration in the cell culture medium without impacting cell culture performance and product quality. PMID:25384465

  9. The Impact of Routine HTLV-III Antibody Testing on Public Health. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference Statement, Vol. 6, No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    A policy statement by a group of experts on screening blood donations for contamination by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), is presented in this document. This document provides policy recommendations formed by a consensus conference sponsored by the National Institutes of Health…

  10. Site-specific antibody-liposome conjugation through copper-free click chemistry: a molecular biology approach for targeted photodynamic therapy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaid, Girgis; Wang, Yucheng; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Broekgaarden, Mans; Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Bulin, Anne-Laure; Hui, James; Tsourkas, Andrew; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    Nanocarriers, such as liposomes, have the ability to potentiate photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment regimens by the encapsulation of high payloads of photosensitizers and enhance their passive delivery to tumors through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. By conjugating targeting moieties to the surface of the liposomal nanoconstructs, cellular selectivity is imparted on them and PDT-based therapies can be performed with significantly higher dose tolerances, as off-target toxicity is simultaneously reduced.1 However, the maximal benefits of conventional targeted nanocarriers, including liposomes, are hindered by practical limitations including chemical instability, non-selective conjugation chemistry, poor control over ligand orientation, and loss of ligand functionality following conjugation, amongst others.2 We have developed a robust, physically and chemically stable liposomal nanoplatform containing benzoporphyrin derivative photosensitizer molecules within the phospholipid bilayer and an optimized surface density of strained cyclooctyne moieties for `click' conjugation to azido-functionalized antibodies.3 The clinical chimeric anti-EGFR antibody Cetuximab is site-specifically photocrosslinked to a recombinant bioengineered that recognizes the antibody's Fc region, containing a terminal azide.4 The copper-free click conjugation of the bioengineered Cetuximab derivative to the optimized photosensitizing liposome provides exceptional control over the antibody's optimal orientation for cellular antigen binding. Importantly, the reaction occurs rapidly under physiological conditions, bioorthogonally (selectively in the presence of other biomolecules) and without the need for toxic copper catalysis.3 Such state-of-the-art conjugation strategies push the boundaries of targeted photodynamic therapy beyond the limitations of traditional chemical coupling techniques to produce more robust and effective targeted therapeutics with applications beyond

  11. Identification of an Epitope on the Entamoeba histolytica 170-kD Lectin Conferring Antibody-mediated Protection against Invasive Amebiasis

    PubMed Central

    Lotter, Hannelore; Zhang, Tonghai; Seydel, Karl B.; Stanley, Samuel L.; Tannich, Egbert

    1997-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms and the failure to eradicate infection by a number of important pathogens has led to increased efforts to develop vaccines to prevent infectious diseases. However, the nature of the immune response to vaccination with a given antigen can be complex and unpredictable. An example is the galactose– and N-acetylgalactosamine–inhibitable lectin, a surface antigen of Entamoeba histolytica that has been identified as a major candidate in a vaccine to prevent amebiasis. Vaccination with the lectin can induce protective immunity to amebic liver abscess in some animals, but others of the same species exhibit exacerbations of disease after vaccination. To better understand this phenomenon, we used recombinant proteins corresponding to four distinct domains of the molecule, and synthetic peptides to localize both protective and exacerbative epitopes of the heavy chain subunit of the lectin. We show that protective immunity after vaccination can be correlated with the development of an antibody response to a region of 25 amino acid residues of the lectin, and have confirmed the importance of the antibody response to this region by passive immunization studies. In addition, we show that exacerbation of disease can be linked to the development of antibodies that bind to an NH2-terminal domain of the lectin. These findings are clinically relevant, as individuals who are colonized with E. histolytica but are resistant to invasive disease have a high prevalence of antibodies to the protective epitope(s), compared to individuals with a history of invasive amebiasis. These studies should enable us to develop an improved vaccine for amebiasis, and provide a model for the identification of protective and exacerbative epitopes of complex antigens. PMID:9151705

  12. Transgenic Restoration of Urea Transporter A1 Confers Maximal Urinary Concentration in the Absence of Urea Transporter A3.

    PubMed

    Klein, Janet D; Wang, Yanhua; Mistry, Abinash; LaRocque, Lauren M; Molina, Patrick A; Rogers, Richard T; Blount, Mitsi A; Sands, Jeff M

    2016-05-01

    Urea has a critical role in urinary concentration. Mice lacking the inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) urea transporter A1 (UT-A1) and urea transporter A3 (UT-A3) have very low levels of urea permeability and are unable to concentrate urine. To investigate the role of UT-A1 in the concentration of urine, we transgenically expressed UT-A1 in knockout mice lacking UT-A1 and UT-A3 using a construct with a UT-A1 gene that cannot be spliced to produce UT-A3. This construct was inserted behind the original UT-A promoter to yield a mouse expressing only UT-A1 (UT-A1(+/+)/UT-A3(-/-)). Western blot analysis demonstrated UT-A1 in the inner medulla of UT-A1(+/+)/UT-A3(-/-) and wild-type mice, but not in UT-A1/UT-A3 knockout mice, and an absence of UT-A3 in UT-A1(+/+)/UT-A3(-/-) and UT-A1/UT-A3 knockout mice. Immunohistochemistry in UT-A1(+/+)/UT-A3(-/-) mice also showed negative UT-A3 staining in kidney and other tissues and positive UT-A1 staining only in the IMCD. Urea permeability in isolated perfused IMCDs showed basal permeability in the UT-A1(+/+)/UT-A3(-/-) mice was similar to levels in wild-type mice, but vasopressin stimulation of urea permeability in wild-type mice was significantly greater (100% increase) than in UT-A1(+/+)/UT-A3(-/-) mice (8% increase). Notably, basal urine osmolalities in both wild-type and UT-A1(+/+)/UT-A3(-/-) mice increased upon overnight water restriction. We conclude that transgenic expression of UT-A1 restores basal urea permeability to the level in wild-type mice but does not restore vasopressin-stimulated levels of urea permeability. This information suggests that transgenic expression of UT-A1 alone in mice lacking UT-A1 and UT-A3 is sufficient to restore urine-concentrating ability. PMID:26407594

  13. A live attenuated H7N7 candidate vaccine virus induces neutralizing antibody that confers protection from challenge in mice, ferrets, and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Min, Ji-Young; Vogel, Leatrice; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Lu, Bin; Swayne, David; Jin, Hong; Kemble, George; Subbarao, Kanta

    2010-11-01

    A live attenuated H7N7 candidate vaccine virus was generated by reverse genetics using the modified hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of highly pathogenic (HP) A/Netherlands/219/03 (NL/03) (H7N7) wild-type (wt) virus and the six internal protein genes of the cold-adapted (ca) A/Ann Arbor/6/60 ca (AA ca) (H2N2) virus. The reassortant H7N7 NL/03 ca vaccine virus was temperature sensitive and attenuated in mice, ferrets, and African green monkeys (AGMs). Intranasal (i.n.) administration of a single dose of the H7N7 NL/03 ca vaccine virus fully protected mice from lethal challenge with homologous and heterologous H7 viruses from Eurasian and North American lineages. Two doses of the H7N7 NL/03 ca vaccine induced neutralizing antibodies in serum and provided complete protection from pulmonary replication of homologous and heterologous wild-type H7 challenge viruses in mice and ferrets. One dose of the H7N7 NL/03 ca vaccine elicited an antibody response in one of three AGMs that was completely protected from pulmonary replication of the homologous wild-type H7 challenge virus. The contribution of CD8(+) and/or CD4(+) T cells to the vaccine-induced protection of mice was evaluated by T-cell depletion; T lymphocytes were not essential for the vaccine-induced protection from lethal challenge with H7 wt viruses. Additionally, passively transferred neutralizing antibody induced by the H7N7 NL/03 ca virus protected mice from lethality following challenge with H7 wt viruses. The safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the H7N7 NL/03 ca vaccine virus in mice, ferrets, and AGMs support the evaluation of this vaccine virus in phase I clinical trials. PMID:20810733

  14. A priori prediction of tumor payload concentrations: preclinical case study with an auristatin-based anti-5T4 antibody-drug conjugate.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dhaval K; King, Lindsay E; Han, Xiaogang; Wentland, Jo-Ann; Zhang, Yanhua; Lucas, Judy; Haddish-Berhane, Nahor; Betts, Alison; Leal, Mauricio

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of this investigation were as follows: (a) to validate a mechanism-based pharmacokinetic (PK) model of ADC for its ability to a priori predict tumor concentrations of ADC and released payload, using anti-5T4 ADC A1mcMMAF, and (b) to analyze the PK model to find out main pathways and parameters model outputs are most sensitive to. Experiential data containing biomeasures, and plasma and tumor concentrations of ADC and payload, following A1mcMMAF administration in two different xenografts, were used to build and validate the model. The model performed reasonably well in terms of a priori predicting tumor exposure of total antibody, ADC, and released payload, and the exposure of released payload in plasma. Model predictions were within two fold of the observed exposures. Pathway analysis and local sensitivity analysis were conducted to investigate main pathways and set of parameters the model outputs are most sensitive to. It was discovered that payload dissociation from ADC and tumor size were important determinants of plasma and tumor payload exposure. It was also found that the sensitivity of the model output to certain parameters is dose-dependent, suggesting caution before generalizing the results from the sensitivity analysis. Model analysis also revealed the importance of understanding and quantifying the processes responsible for ADC and payload disposition within tumor cell, as tumor concentrations were sensitive to these parameters. Proposed ADC PK model provides a useful tool for a priori predicting tumor payload concentrations of novel ADCs preclinically, and possibly translating them to the clinic. PMID:24578215

  15. Coxsackievirus A16-like particles produced in Pichia pastoris elicit high-titer neutralizing antibodies and confer protection against lethal viral challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Liu, Qingwei; Ku, Zhiqiang; Hu, Yang; Ye, Xiaohua; Zhang, Yingyi; Huang, Zhong

    2016-05-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) is a major causative agent of hand, foot and mouse disease (HFMD) which has been affecting millions of young children annually in the Asia-Pacific region over the last seven years. However, no commercial CA16 vaccines are currently available. In the present study, we investigated the expression of virus-like particles (VLPs) of CA16 in Pichia pastoris yeast and their immunogenicity and protective efficacy in mice. We found that CA16-VLPs could be produced at relatively high levels in P. pastoris yeast transformed with a construct co-expressing the P1 and 3CD proteins of CA16. Mice immunized with the yeast-derived CA16-VLPs produced high-titer serum antibodies with potent neutralization effect specifically on CA16. More importantly, passive immunization with the yeast-derived VLPs fully protected neonatal mice against CA16 lethal challenge in both antisera transfer and maternal immunization experiments. Collectively, our results demonstrate that P. pastoris-derived CA16-VLPs represent a promising CA16 vaccine candidate with proven preclinical efficacy and desirable traits for manufacturing at industrial scale. PMID:26902108

  16. Serum pharmacokinetics and cerebrospinal fluid concentration analysis of the new IgG4 monoclonal antibody GNbAC1 to treat multiple sclerosis: A Phase 1 study.

    PubMed

    Curtin, François; Vidal, Virginie; Bernard, Corinne; Kromminga, Arno; Lang, Alois B; Porchet, Hervé

    2016-07-01

    GNbAC1 is a humanized IgG4 monoclonal antibody antagonist of Mulitple Sclerosis Retrovirus Envelope (MSRV-Env), a protein that could play a critical role in multiple sclerosis. This randomized placebo-controlled dose-escalation study evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics of GNbAC1 in 21 healthy volunteers after single intravenous infusion at doses of 6, 18 and 36 mg/kg. Lumbar punctures were performed at days 2, 15 or 29 to measure GNbAC1 concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). GNbAC1 was well tolerated. Serum data show a dose-linear pharmacokinetics. A mean CSF/serum ratio of 0.12% was observed at Day 2, increasing to 0.39% at Day 15 and 0.42% at Day 29. Linear regression analysis shows a relationship between GNbAC1 CSF/serum ratio and albumin CSF/serum ratio and a relationship at the limit of statistical significance with the timing of CSF sampling. PMID:27030142

  17. Technical Decision-Making with Higher Order Structure Data: Detecting Reversible Concentration-Dependent Self-Association in a Monoclonal Antibody and a Preliminary Investigation to Eliminate It.

    PubMed

    Wei, Julie Y; Bou-Assaf, George M; Houde, Damian; Weiskopf, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Protein self-association or aggregation is a property of significant concern for biopharmaceutical products due to the potential ability of aggregates to cause adverse toxicological and immunological effects. Thus, during the development of a protein biopharmaceutical, it is important to detect and quantify the level and nature of aggregate species as early as possible in order to make well-informed decisions and to mitigate and control potential risks. Although a deeper understanding of the mechanism of aggregation (i.e., protein-protein interactions) is desirable, such detailed assessment is not always necessary from a biopharmaceutical process development point of view. In fact, the scope of characterization efforts is often focused on achieving a well-controlled process, which generates a product that reliably meets established acceptance criteria for safety and efficacy. In this brief note, we evaluated the utility of size-exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering, and analytical ultracentrifugation in their simplest forms, to effectively reveal and confirm the presence of concentration-dependent reversible self-association (RSA) in a monoclonal antibody in the early stages of formulation development. Using these techniques, we also initiated preliminary work aimed at reducing the occurrence of this RSA behavior by varying the pH of the formulation buffer. PMID:26308556

  18. Cost-effectiveness of routine measuring of serum drug concentrations and anti-drug antibodies in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis patients with TNF-α blockers

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Juha; Jokiranta, T Sakari; Eklund, Kari K; Väkeväinen, Merja; Puolakka, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of anti-drug antibodies (ADAbs) or serum concentrations of biologicals in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis could provide an explanation for a loss of efficacy and help in the choice of subsequent medication. Current clinical practices do not generally include such monitoring of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α blockers on a routine basis. The main aims of this study were to estimate the probabilities of optimal and nonoptimal treatment decisions if infliximab or adalimumab drug trough level (DL) and ADAbs are tested or not in rheumatoid arthritis, and to model cost-effectiveness of performing such monitoring on a routine basis. Data on DLs and ADAbs concentrations were obtained in Finland from clinically requested monitoring analyses of 486 and 1,137 samples from patients on adalimumab and infliximab, respectively. DL was within the target range in 42% of samples from adalimumab- and 50.4% of infliximab-treated patients. ADAbs were detected in approximately 20% and 13.5% of samples from adalimumab- and infliximab-treated patients, respectively. ADAbs were found in 52.3% and 41.3% of those with low adalimumab or infliximab DLs, respectively. The monitoring data were incorporated into probabilities for making the optimal treatment decision. Economic impact of clinical decision-making was modeled in a short-term (3–6 months) scenario with 100 hypothetical patients. In the model, the combined measurement of DLs and ADAbs was cost-saving compared to the nontesting scenario when the monitoring results affected the treatment decision in at least 2–5 of 100 patients, a proportion which is easily exceeded in real-life clinical practice. This study indicates that routine monitoring of drug level and ADAbs is cost-beneficial in clinical practice, thereby improving the decision-making process in using TNF-α blockers. PMID:27099470

  19. Cost-effectiveness of routine measuring of serum drug concentrations and anti-drug antibodies in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis patients with TNF-α blockers.

    PubMed

    Laine, Juha; Jokiranta, T Sakari; Eklund, Kari K; Väkeväinen, Merja; Puolakka, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of anti-drug antibodies (ADAbs) or serum concentrations of biologicals in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis could provide an explanation for a loss of efficacy and help in the choice of subsequent medication. Current clinical practices do not generally include such monitoring of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α blockers on a routine basis. The main aims of this study were to estimate the probabilities of optimal and nonoptimal treatment decisions if infliximab or adalimumab drug trough level (DL) and ADAbs are tested or not in rheumatoid arthritis, and to model cost-effectiveness of performing such monitoring on a routine basis. Data on DLs and ADAbs concentrations were obtained in Finland from clinically requested monitoring analyses of 486 and 1,137 samples from patients on adalimumab and infliximab, respectively. DL was within the target range in 42% of samples from adalimumab- and 50.4% of infliximab-treated patients. ADAbs were detected in approximately 20% and 13.5% of samples from adalimumab- and infliximab-treated patients, respectively. ADAbs were found in 52.3% and 41.3% of those with low adalimumab or infliximab DLs, respectively. The monitoring data were incorporated into probabilities for making the optimal treatment decision. Economic impact of clinical decision-making was modeled in a short-term (3-6 months) scenario with 100 hypothetical patients. In the model, the combined measurement of DLs and ADAbs was cost-saving compared to the nontesting scenario when the monitoring results affected the treatment decision in at least 2-5 of 100 patients, a proportion which is easily exceeded in real-life clinical practice. This study indicates that routine monitoring of drug level and ADAbs is cost-beneficial in clinical practice, thereby improving the decision-making process in using TNF-α blockers. PMID:27099470

  20. RELATIVE CONCENTRATIONS OF SERUM NEUTRALIZING ANTIBODY TO VP3 AND VP7 PROTEINS IN ADULTS INFECTED WITH A HUMAN ROTAVIRUS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two outer capsid rotavirus proteins, VP3 and VP7, have been found to elicit neutralizing antibody production, but the immunogenicity of these proteins during human rotavirus infection has not been determined. The relative amounts of serum neutralizing antibody against the VP3 and...

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  2. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. The mitochondria are an important part of cells. They are ... often, in people with other kinds of liver disease and some autoimmune diseases. Risks Risks for having ...

  3. Cerebral distribution of immunoconjugate after treatment for neoplastic meningitis using an intrathecal radiolabeled monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, J.C.; Moss, T.; Moseley, R.P.; Maxwell, R.; Coakham, H.B. )

    1989-08-01

    A detailed autopsy and autoradiographic study was performed after the death of a patient undergoing intrathecal, antibody-guided irradiation for carcinomatous meningitis. The results demonstrated tumor cells infiltrating the surface meninges and a severe astrocytic reaction associated with oedema in the periventricular and brain stem subpial white matter. This was not seen in cortical or other gray matter structures. Autoradiographic examination correlated well, demonstrating isotope within the oedematous areas of the white matter in addition to the expected concentration in the leptomeningeal layers. These findings are discussed in the context of antibody binding to tumor tissue and the possible benefits conferred in the treatment of infiltrating tumor cells.

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis pncA Polymorphisms That Do Not Confer Pyrazinamide Resistance at a Breakpoint Concentration of 100 Micrograms per Milliliter in MGIT

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, Michael G.; Streicher, Elizabeth M.; Sampson, Samantha L.; Sirgel, Frik A.; van Helden, Paul D.; Mercante, Alexandra; Willby, Melisa; Hughes, Kelsey; Birkness, Kris; Morlock, Glenn; van Rie, Annelies; Posey, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis pncA gene allows for pyrazinamide susceptibility testing. We summarize data on pncA polymorphisms that do not confer resistance at a susceptibility breakpoint of 100 μg/ml pyrazinamide in MGIT within a cohort of isolates from South Africa and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. PMID:26292310

  5. Increased concentration of two different advanced glycation end-products detected by enzyme immunoassays with new monoclonal antibodies in sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Levels of pentosidine (representative of advanced glycation end-products) in sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis are increased when compared with sera of other diagnoses or healthy controls. These levels have been reported to correlate with clinical indices of rheumatoid arthritis activity and with laboratory markers of inflammation. The purpose of this study was to find out if these findings pertain to other advanced glycation end-products. Methods We have developed two immunoassays based on new monoclonal antibodies to advanced glycation end-products. Antibody 103-E3 reacts with an unidentified antigen, formed in the reaction of proteins with ribose, while antibody 8-C1 responds to Nε-(carboxyethyl)lysine. We have used these monoclonal antibodies to measure levels of advanced glycation end-products in sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, osteoarthritis, and healthy controls. We calculated the correlations between advanced glycation end-product levels in rheumatoid arthritis sera and the Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28), age, disease duration, CRP, anti-CCP, rheumatoid factor and treatment with corticosteroids, respectively. Results Levels of both glycation products were significantly higher in sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis when compared with sera of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, osteoarthritis, or the healthy controls. Neither the level of Nε-(carboxyethyl)lysine nor the level of the 103-E3 antigen in rheumatoid arthritis sera correlated with the DAS28-scored rheumatoid arthritis activity. The levels of both antigens in rheumatoid arthritis sera did not correlate with age, gender, corticosteroid treatment, or levels of CRP, anti-CCP antibodies, and rheumatoid factor in sera. Conclusions We report highly specific increases in the levels of two advanced glycation end-products in sera of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This increase could be explained neither by rheumatoid

  6. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... test is done to confirm the cause of thyroid problems, including Hashimoto thyroiditis . The test is also ...

  7. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society December 7-10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA.

    PubMed

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Carter, Paul J; Melis, Joost P M

    2016-01-01

    The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6-10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on "Antibodies to watch" in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  8. Oscillations of cytosolic free calcium concentration in the presence of intracellular antibodies to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in voltage-clamped guinea-pig hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Noel, J; Fukami, K; Hill, A M; Capiod, T

    1992-01-01

    In liver cells, the stimulation of alpha 1-adrenoceptors by noradrenaline induces the production of Ins(1,4,5)P3 through the degradation of membrane polyphosphoinositides [PtdIns(4,5)P2]. InsP3 evokes in turn the release of Ca2+ from internal stores. Our results show that the internal perfusion of single guinea-pig hepatocytes with monoclonal anti-PtdInsP2 antibody blocks the rise in cytosolic free Ca2+ concn. ([Ca2+]i) evoked by noradrenaline, an InsP3-dependent agonist, but not by the monohydroxylated bile acid taurolithocholate 3-sulphate, which is known to permeabilize the endoplasmic reticulum. In these conditions, the bile acid elicited either fast or slow fluctuations of [Ca2+]i independently of any InsP3 production. The responses to the bile acid were also observed in the absence of external Ca2+. The presence of intracellular anti-PtdInsP2 antibody does not affect the response to a photolytic release of InsP3 (1.5 microM final concn.) from a caged precursor. PMID:1334405

  9. Monoclonal Antibodies against Pectin

    PubMed Central

    Liners, Françoise; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Didembourg, Christian; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been produced that recognize a conformation of homopolygalacturonic acid (pectic acid) induced by an optimum concentration of calcium and sodium of about 1 and 150 millinormal, respectively. The epitope recognized is probably part of the dimers of pectin chains associated according to the `egg box' model. Images Figure 2 PMID:16667195

  10. Biomedical Conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    As a result of Biomedical Conferences, Vivo Metric Systems Co. has produced cardiac electrodes based on NASA technology. Frequently in science, one highly specialized discipline is unaware of relevant advances made in other areas. In an attempt to familiarize researchers in a variety of disciplines with medical problems and needs, NASA has sponsored conferences that bring together university scientists, practicing physicians and manufacturers of medical instruments.

  11. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be due to: Graves disease Hashimoto thyroiditis Hypothyroidism Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) Thyrotoxicosis Type 1 diabetes ... Antibody Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease) Graves disease Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Systemic lupus erythematosus T3 test Update Date 5/ ...

  12. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-zhe; Coljee, Vincent W.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  13. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Zhe; Coljee, Vincent W; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2013-11-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  14. Bispecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kontermann, Roland E; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) combine specificities of two antibodies and simultaneously address different antigens or epitopes. BsAbs with 'two-target' functionality can interfere with multiple surface receptors or ligands associated, for example with cancer, proliferation or inflammatory processes. BsAbs can also place targets into close proximity, either to support protein complex formation on one cell, or to trigger contacts between cells. Examples of 'forced-connection' functionalities are bsAbs that support protein complexation in the clotting cascade, or tumor-targeted immune cell recruiters and/or activators. Following years of research and development (R&D), the first bsAb was approved in 2009. Another bsAb entered the market in December 2014 and several more are in clinical trials. Here, we describe the potentials of bsAbs to become the next wave of antibody-based therapies, focusing on molecules in clinical development. PMID:25728220

  15. The current status and prospects of antibody engineering for therapeutic use: focus on glycoengineering technology.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Rinpei; Satoh, Mitsuo

    2015-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have demonstrated enormous potential as new classes of drugs that confer great benefits to patients, and more than 40 therapeutic antibodies have already been approved for clinical use. In particular, the past 5 years might be recognized as the period guiding the new era for "engineered antibodies," with the successful approval of numerous antibody-drug conjugates, bispecific antibodies, and glyco-engineered antibodies for clinical applications. In this review, we summarize the development of antibody engineering technologies that are proving their concepts in the clinic, mainly focusing on the latest trends in defucosylated antibody technologies. PMID:25583555

  16. Conference Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Cait

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes an original conference, organised by the Child Care Research Forum (http://www.qub.ac.uk/sites/ccrf/), which brought together experts from all over Northern Ireland to showcase some of the wealth of research with children and young people that is going on in the country today. Developed around the six high-level outcomes of…

  17. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb Images Blood test References Guber HA, Faraq AF. Evaluation of endocrine function. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical ...

  18. Monoclonal antibody to spleen focus-forming virus-encoded gp52 provides a probe for the amino-terminal region of retroviral envelope proteins that confers dual tropism and xenotropism.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, L; Koller, R; Ruscetti, S

    1982-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies which recognize a region common to Friend spleen focus-forming virus encoded gp52 and Friend mink cell focus-inducing viral gp70 were isolated. One such antibody from hybridoma 7C10 was tested extensively in immune precipitation and was found to react with a determinant on envelope gp70s of all mink cell focus-inducing, xenotropic, and amphotropic mouse retroviruses tested, but not with envelope gp70s of ecotropic viruses, including Friend, Moloney, and AKR murine leukemia viruses. Monoclonal antibody from hybridoma 7C10 precipitated a 23,000-molecular-weight fragment, derived by V8 protease digestion of Friend mink cell focus-inducing gp70. This 23,000-molecular-weight peptide was determined to derive from the amino terminus of the molecule. These results correlate well with other genetic data which indicate that endogenously acquired sequences of mink cell focus-inducing viruses are found at the 5' end of the envelope gene. Images PMID:6180179

  19. Next conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexemer, Alexander; Toney, Michael F.

    2010-11-01

    After the successful conference on Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science (SRPS) in Rolduc Abbey (the Netherlands), we are now looking forward to the next meeting in this topical series started in 1995 by H G Zachmann, one of the pioneers of the use of synchrotron radiation techniques in polymer science. Earlier meetings were held in Hamburg (1995), Sheffield (2002), Kyoto (2006), and Rolduc (2009). In September of 2012 the Synchrotron Radiation and Polymer Science V conferences will be organized in a joint effort by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory Advanced Light Source at LBL Advanced Light Source at LBL The conference will be organised in the heart of beautiful San Francisco. The program will consist of invited and contributed lectures divided in sessions on the use of synchrotron SAXS/WAXD, imaging and tomography, soft x-rays, x-ray spectroscopy, GISAXS and reflectivity, micro-beams and hyphenated techniques in polymer science. Poster contributions are more than welcome and will be highlighted during the poster sessions. Visits to both SLAC as well as LBL will be organised. San Francisco can easily be reached. It is served by two major international airports San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport. Both are being served by most major airlines with easy connections to Europe and Asia as well as national destinations. Both also boast excellent connections to San Francisco city centre. We are looking forward to seeing you in the vibrant city by the Bay in September 2012. Golden gate bridge Alexander Hexemer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Michael F Toney Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Menlo Pk, CA 94025, USA E-mail: ahexemer@lbl.gov, mftoney@slac.stanford.edu

  20. Conferences revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radcliffe, Jonathan

    2008-08-01

    Way back in the mid-1990s, as a young PhD student, I wrote a Lateral Thoughts article about my first experience of an academic conference (Physics World 1994 October p80). It was a peach of a trip - most of the lab decamped to Grenoble for a week of great weather, beautiful scenery and, of course, the physics. A whole new community was there for me to see in action, and the internationality of it all helped us to forget about England's non-appearance in the 1994 World Cup finals.

  1. Conference Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, James, Jr.; Thomas, Valerie

    2000-01-01

    The MU-SPIN conference focused on showcasing successful experiences with information technology to enhance faculty and student development in areas of scientific and technical research and education. And it provided a forum for discussing increased participation of MU-SPIN schools in NASA Flight Missions and NASA Educational and Public Outreach activities. Opportunities for Involvement sessions focused on Space Science, Earth Science, Education, and Aeronautics. These sessions provided insight into the missions of NASA's enterprises and NASA's Education program. Presentations by NASA scientists, university Principal Investigators, and other affiliates addressed key issues for increased minority involvement.

  2. Antibody response in sheep following immunization with Streptococcus bovis in different adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Shu, Q; Bir, S H; Gill, H S; Duan, E; Xu, Y; Hiliard; Rowe, J B

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that immunization with Streptococcus bovis using Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) may confer protection against lactic acidosis in sheep. The major objective of this study was to compare the antibody responses to S. bovis in a practically acceptable adjuvant (Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA); QuilA; dextran sulphate (Dex); Imject Alum; or Gerbu) and in FCA. Thirty-five sheep were randomly allocated to 7 treatment groups. Six groups were immunized with S. bovis in an adjuvant; the other group served as the non-immunization control. The primary immunization was administered intramuscularly on day 0. followed by a booster injection on day 28. Immunization with FCA induced the highest saliva and serum antibody responses. The saliva antibody concentrations in the FIA and QuilA groups were significantly higher than those in the Alum, Dex and Gerbu groups (p < 0.01). The serum antibody concentration in the FIA group was significantly higher than those in the QuilA, Alum. Dex and Gerbu groups (p < 0.01). Immunization enhanced the antibody level in faeces (p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between the different adjuvant groups (p > 0.05). Seven and 14 days following booster immunization, the saliva antibody levels induced by QuilA and/or FIA were comparable with the level stimulated by FCA (p > 0.05). There was a strongly positive correlation (R2 = 0.770, p < 0.01) between the antibody concentrations in salival and serum. Compared with the controls, a higher faecal dry matter content was observed in the animals immunized with either FCA or QuilA. The change in faecal dry matter content was positively associated with the faecal antibody concentration (R2 = 0.441, p < 0.05). These results indicate that FIA and QuilA were effective at inducing high levels of antibody responses to S. bovis, and suggest that either Freund's incomplete adjuvant or QuilA may be useful for preparing a practically acceptable vaccine against lactic

  3. Trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab

    PubMed Central

    Diermeier-Daucher, Simone; Ortmann, Olaf; Buchholz, Stefan; Brockhoff, Gero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab bivalently targets the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) on epithelial (tumor) cells and the T cell specific CD3 antigen, and its Fc region is selectively recognized by Fcγ type I/III receptor-positive immune cells. As a trifunctional immunoglobulin, ertumaxomab therefore not only targets Her2 on cancer cells, but also triggers immunological effector mechanisms mediated by T and accessory cells (e.g., macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells). Whether molecular effects, however, might contribute to the cellular antitumor efficiency of ertumaxomab are largely unknown. Methods: Potential molecular effects of ertumaxomab on Her2-overexpressing BT474 and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells were evaluated. The dissociation constant Kd of ertumaxomab was calculated from titration curves that were recorded by flow cytometry. Treatment-induced changes in Her2 homodimerization were determined by flow cytometric fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements on a cell-by-cell basis. Potential activation / deactivation of Her2, ERK1/2, AKT and STAT3 were analyzed by western blotting, Immunochemistry and immunofluorescent cell staining. Results: The Kd of ertumaxomab for Her2-binding was determined at 265 nM and the ertumaxomab binding epitope was found to not overlap with that of the therapeutic anti-Her2 monoclonal antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Ertumaxomab caused an increase in Her2 phosphorylation at higher antibody concentrations, but changed neither the rate of Her2-homodimerization /-phosphorylation nor the activation state of key downstream signaling proteins analyzed. Conclusions: The unique mode of action of ertumaxomab, which relies more on activation of immune-mediated mechanisms against tumor cells compared with currently available therapeutic antibodies for breast cancer treatment, suggests that modular or sequential treatment with the trifunctional bivalent antibody might complement

  4. Reagents for astatination of biomolecules. 6. An intact antibody conjugated with a maleimido-closo-decaborate(2-) reagent via sulfhydryl groups had considerably higher kidney concentrations than the same antibody conjugated with an isothiocyanato-closo-decaborate(2-) reagent via lysine amines

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, D. Scott; Chyan, Ming-Kuan; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Chen, Yun; Hamlin, Donald K.; Santos, Erlinda B.; Kornblit, Brian T.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2012-01-01

    We are investigating the use of an 211At-labeled anti-CD45 monoclonal antibody (mAb) as a replacement of total body irradiation in conditioning regimens designed to decrease the toxicity of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). As part of that investigation, dose-escalation studies were conducted in dogs using 211At-labeled anti-canine CD45 mAb, CA12.10C12, conjugated with a maleimido-closo-decaborate(2-) derivative, 4. Unacceptable renal toxicity was noted in the dogs receiving doses in the 0.27 – 0.62 mCi/kg range. This result was not anticipated, as no toxicity had been noted in prior biodistribution and toxicity studies conducted in mice. Studies were conducted to understand the cause of the renal toxicity and to find a way to circumvent it. A dog biodistribution study was conducted with 123Ilabeled CA12.10C12 that had been conjugated with 4. The biodistribution data showed that 10-fold higher kidney concentrations were obtained with the maleimido-conjugate than had been obtained in a previous biodistribution study with 123I-labeled CA12.10C12 conjugated with an amine-reactive phenylisothiocyanato-CHX-A” derivative. The difference in kidney concentrations observed in dogs for the two conjugation approaches led to an investigation of the reagents. SE-HPLC analyses showed that the purity of the CA12.10C12 conjugated via reduced disulfides was lower than that obtained with amine-reactive conjugation reagents, and non-reducing SDS-PAGE analyses indicated protein fragments were present in the disulfide reduced conjugate. Although we had previously prepared closo-decaborate(2-) derivatives with amine-reactive functional groups (e.g. 6 & 8), a new easily synthesized, amine-reactive (phenylisothiocyanate) derivative, 10, was prepared for use in the current studies. A biodistribution was conducted with co-administered 125I- and 211At-labeled CA12.10C10 conjugated with 10. In that study, lower kidney concentrations were obtained for both radionuclides than had

  5. Reagents for astatination of biomolecules. 6. An intact antibody conjugated with a maleimido-closo-decaborate(2-) reagent via sulfhydryl groups had considerably higher kidney concentrations than the same antibody conjugated with an isothiocyanato-closo-decaborate(2-) reagent via lysine amines.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, D Scott; Chyan, Ming-Kuan; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Chen, Yun; Hamlin, Donald K; Santos, Erlinda B; Kornblit, Brian T; Sandmaier, Brenda M

    2012-03-21

    We are investigating the use of an (211)At-labeled anti-CD45 monoclonal antibody (mAb) as a replacement of total body irradiation in conditioning regimens designed to decrease the toxicity of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). As part of that investigation, dose-escalation studies were conducted in dogs using (211)At-labeled anticanine CD45 mAb, CA12.10C12, conjugated with a maleimido-closo-decaborate(2-) derivative, 4. Unacceptable renal toxicity was noted in the dogs receiving doses in the 0.27-0.62 mCi/kg range. This result was not anticipated, as no toxicity had been noted in prior biodistribution and toxicity studies conducted in mice. Studies were conducted to understand the cause of the renal toxicity and to find a way to circumvent it. A dog biodistribution study was conducted with (123)I-labeled CA12.10C12 that had been conjugated with 4. The biodistribution data showed that 10-fold higher kidney concentrations were obtained with the maleimido-conjugate than had been obtained in a previous biodistribution study with (123)I-labeled CA12.10C12 conjugated with an amine-reactive phenylisothiocyanato-CHX-A″ derivative. The difference in kidney concentrations observed in dogs for the two conjugation approaches led to an investigation of the reagents. SE-HPLC analyses showed that the purity of the CA12.10C12 conjugated via reduced disulfides was lower than that obtained with amine-reactive conjugation reagents, and nonreducing SDS-PAGE analyses indicated protein fragments were present in the disulfide reduced conjugate. Although we had previously prepared closo-decaborate(2-) derivatives with amine-reactive functional groups (e.g., 6 and 8), a new, easily synthesized, amine-reactive (phenylisothiocyanate) derivative, 10, was prepared for use in the current studies. A biodistribution was conducted with coadministered (125)I- and (211)At-labeled CA12.10C10 conjugated with 10. In that study, lower kidney concentrations were obtained for both radionuclides

  6. Antibody engineering & therapeutics, the annual meeting of the antibody society December 7–10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA

    PubMed Central

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M.; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.; Carter, Paul J.; Melis, Joost P.M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6–10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on “Antibodies to watch” in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  7. The Conference Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolls, Blanche; Hartman, Linda; Corey, Linda; Marcoux, Betty; Jay, M. Ellen; England, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    Includes five articles on conference experiences: preplanning for a library conference; top ten reasons to attend an AASL (American Association of School Librarians) national conference; why should you bother to fill out a conference evaluation form; a case for conferences; and AASL tours. (LRW)

  8. Resistance of a human serum-selected human immunodeficiency virus type 1 escape mutant to neutralization by CD4 binding site monoclonal antibodies is conferred by a single amino acid change in gp120.

    PubMed Central

    McKeating, J A; Bennett, J; Zolla-Pazner, S; Schutten, M; Ashelford, S; Brown, A L; Balfe, P

    1993-01-01

    We have selected an HXB2 variant which can replicate in the presence of a neutralizing human serum. Sequencing of the gp120 region of the env gene from the variant and parental viruses identified a single amino acid substitution in the third conserved region of gp120 at residue 375 (AGT-->AAT, Ser-->Asn; designated 375 S/N). The escape mutant was found to be resistant to neutralization by soluble CD4 (sCD4) and four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), 39.13g, 1.5e, G13, and 448, binding to epitopes overlapping that of the CD4 binding site (CD4 b.s.). Introduction of the 375 S/N mutation into HXB2 by site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that this mutation is responsible for the neutralization-resistant phenotype. Both sCD4 and three of the CD4 b.s. MAbs (39.13g, 1.5e, and G13) demonstrated reduced binding to the native 375 S/N mutant gp120. The ability to select for an escape variant resistant to multiple independent CD4 b.s. MAbs by a human serum confirms the reports that antibodies to the discontinuous CD4 b.s. are a major component of the group-specific neutralizing activity in human sera. PMID:7688820

  9. Enhanced Potency of a Broadly Neutralizing HIV-1 Antibody In Vitro Improves Protection against Lentiviral Infection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Kwon, Young Do; Ko, Sung-Youl; Pegu, Amarendra; Louder, Mark K.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Wu, Xueling; Zhu, Jiang; Boyington, Jeffrey C.; Chen, Xuejun; Shi, Wei; Yang, Zhi-yong; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Soto, Cinque; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhou, Tongqing; Todd, John-Paul; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Eudailey, Joshua; Roberts, Kyle E.; Donald, Bruce R.; Bailer, Robert T.; Ledgerwood, Julie; Mullikin, James C.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Koup, Richard A.; Graham, Barney S.; Nason, Martha C.; Connors, Mark; Haynes, Barton F.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Roederer, Mario; Kwong, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    protein was used to engineer a next-generation antibody with 5- to 8-fold increased potency in vitro. When administered to nonhuman primates, this antibody conferred protection at a 5-fold lower concentration than the original antibody. Our studies demonstrate an important correlation between in vitro assays used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of antibodies and their in vivo effectiveness. PMID:25142607

  10. Monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  11. Primary antibody deficiency syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wood, P

    2009-03-01

    The primary antibody deficiency syndromes are a group of rare disorders characterized by an inability to produce clinically effective immunoglobulin responses. Some of these disorders result from genetic mutations in genes involved in B cell development, whereas others appear to be complex polygenic disorders. They most commonly present with recurrent infections due to encapsulated bacteria, although in the most common antibody deficiency, Common Variable Immunodeficiency, systemic and organ-specific autoimmunity can be a presenting feature. Diagnostic delay in this group of disorders remains a problem, and the laboratory has a vital role in the detection of abnormalities in immunoglobulin concentration and function. It is critical to distinguish this group of disorders from secondary causes of hypogammaglobulinaemia, in particular lymphoid malignancy, and appropriate laboratory investigations are of critical importance. Treatment of primary antibody deficiencies involves immunoglobulin replacement therapy, either via the intravenous or subcutaneous route. Patients remain at risk of a wide variety of complications, not all linked to diagnostic delay and inadequate therapy. In common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) in particular, patients remain at significantly increased risk of lymphoid malignancy, and regular clinical and laboratory monitoring is required. This review aims to give an overview of these conditions for the general reader, covering pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory investigation, therapy and clinical management. PMID:19151170

  12. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003352.htm Serum herpes simplex antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Serum herpes simplex antibodies is a blood test that looks for antibodies ...

  13. Conference Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, David B.

    2014-07-01

    This conference on ``Multi-wavelength AGN Surveys and Studies'' has provided a detailed look at the explosive growth over the past decade, of available astronomical data from a growing list of large scale sky surveys, from radio-to-gamma rays. We are entering an era were multi-epoch (months to weeks) surveys of the entire sky, and near-instantaneous follow-up observations of variable sources, are elevating time-domain astronomy to where it is becoming a major contributor to our understanding of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). While we can marvel at the range of extragalactic phenomena dispayed by sources discovered in the original ``Markarian Survey'' - the first large-scale objective prism survey of the Northern Sky carried out at the Byurakan Astronomical Observtory almost a half-century ago - it is clear from the talks and posters presented at this meeting that the data to be be obtained over the next decade will be needed if we are to finally understand which phase of galaxy evolution each Markarian Galaxy represents.

  14. Antibodies against the majority subunit of Type IV pili disperse nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms in a LuxS-dependent manner and confer therapeutic resolution of experimental otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Laura A.; Jurcisek, Joseph A.; Ward, Michael O.; Jordan, Zachary B.; Goodman, Steven D.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite resulting in a similar overall outcome, unlike antibodies directed against the DNABII protein, integration host factor (IHF), which induce catastrophic structural collapse of biofilms formed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), those directed against a recombinant soluble form of PilA [the majority subunit of Type IV pili (Tfp) produced by NTHI], mediated gradual ‘top-down’ dispersal of NTHI from biofilms. This dispersal occurred via a mechanism that was dependent upon expression of both PilA (and by inference, Tfp) and production of AI-2 quorum signaling molecules by LuxS. The addition of rsPilA to a biofilm-targeted therapeutic vaccine formulation comprised of IHF plus the powerful adjuvant dmLT, and delivered via a non-invasive transcutaneous immunization route, induced an immune response that targeted two important determinants essential for biofilm formation by NTHI. This resulted in significantly earlier eradication of NTHI from both planktonic and adherent populations in the middle ear, disruption of mucosal biofilms already resident within middle ears prior to immunization, and rapid resolution of signs of disease in an animal model of experimental otitis media. These data support continued development of this novel combinatorial immunization approach for resolution and/or prevention of multiple diseases of the respiratory tract caused by NTHI. PMID:25597921

  15. Antibodies against the majority subunit of type IV Pili disperse nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms in a LuxS-dependent manner and confer therapeutic resolution of experimental otitis media.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Laura A; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Ward, Michael O; Jordan, Zachary B; Goodman, Steven D; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2015-04-01

    Despite resulting in a similar overall outcome, unlike antibodies directed against the DNABII protein, integration host factor (IHF), which induce catastrophic structural collapse of biofilms formed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI), those directed against a recombinant soluble form of PilA [the majority subunit of Type IV pili (Tfp) produced by NTHI], mediated gradual 'top-down' dispersal of NTHI from biofilms. This dispersal occurred via a mechanism that was dependent upon expression of both PilA (and by inference, Tfp) and production of AI-2 quorum signaling molecules by LuxS. The addition of rsPilA to a biofilm-targeted therapeutic vaccine formulation comprised of IHF plus the powerful adjuvant dmLT and delivered via a noninvasive transcutaneous immunization route induced an immune response that targeted two important determinants essential for biofilm formation by NTHI. This resulted in significantly earlier eradication of NTHI from both planktonic and adherent populations in the middle ear, disruption of mucosal biofilms already resident within middle ears prior to immunization and rapid resolution of signs of disease in an animal model of experimental otitis media. These data support continued development of this novel combinatorial immunization approach for resolution and/or prevention of multiple diseases of the respiratory tract caused by NTHI. PMID:25597921

  16. Conference Scene

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, J Steven; Lantos, John; Spielberg, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge for clinicians, pharmaceutical companies and regulatory agencies is to better understand the relative contributions of ontogeny and genetic variation to observed variability in drug disposition and response across the pediatric age spectrum from preterm and term newborns, to infants, children and adolescents. Extrapolation of adult experience with pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine to pediatric patients of different ages and developmental stages, is fraught with many challenges. Compared with adults, pediatric pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics involves an added measure of complexity as variability owing to developmental processes, or ontogeny, is superimposed upon genetic variation. Furthermore, some pediatric diseases have no adult correlate or are more prevalent in children compared with adults, and several adverse drug reactions are unique to children, or occur at a higher frequency in children. The primary objective of this conference was to initiate an ongoing series of annual meetings on ‘Pediatric Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine’ organized by the Center for Personalized Medicine and Therapeutic Innovation and Division of Clinical Pharmacology and Medical Therapeutics at Children’s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics in Kansas City, MO, USA. The primary goals of the inaugural meeting were: to bring together clinicians, basic and translational scientists and allied healthcare practitioners, and engage in a multi- and cross-disciplinary dialog aimed at implementing personalized medicine in pediatric settings; to provide a forum for the presentation and the dissemination of research related to the application of pharmacogenomic strategies to investigations of variability of drug disposition and response in children; to explore the ethical, legal and societal implications of pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine that are unique to children; and finally, to create networking opportunities for stimulating discussion

  17. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science. PMID:22244834

  18. Monoclonal antibodies and method for detecting dioxins and dibenzofurans

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Stanker, Larry H.; Watkins, Bruce E.; Bailey, Nina R.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions of matter are described which include five monoclonal antibodies that react with dioxins and dibenzofurans, and the five hybridomas that produce these monoclonal antibodies. In addition, a method for the use of these antibodies in a sensitive immunoassay for dioxins and dibenzofurans is given, which permits detection of these pollutants in samples at concentrations in the range of a few parts per billion.

  19. [Inhibition of adenovirus reproduction in cell culture by specific antibodies].

    PubMed

    Povnytsia, O Iu; Nosach, L M; Zhovnovata, V L; Zahorodnia, S D; Vantsak, N P; Tokarchuk, L V; Polishchuk, O M; Diachenko, N S

    2009-01-01

    The capacity of specific antibodies to inhibit the reproduction of homo- and heterologous adenoviruses in Hela cell added to culture medium after virus adsorption was studied. The inhibiting effect of polyclonal antivirus and monospecific antihexone antibodies to homo- and heterologous adenoviruses was shown. The effect was more expressed when using antibodies to homologous antibodies. The intensity of inhibition depended on antibodies concentration in the medium and infecting dose of the virus. Essential reduction of the quantity of infected cells and a decrease of the titer of adenovirus synthesized in the presence of homo- and heterologous antibodies was shown but adenovirus reproduction was not inhibited completely. PMID:19663330

  20. Serum Concentrations of Antibodies against Outer Membrane Protein P6, Protein D, and T- and B-Cell Combined Antigenic Epitopes of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in Children and Adults of Different Ages.

    PubMed

    Hua, Chun-Zhen; Hu, Wei-Lin; Shang, Shi-Qiang; Li, Jian-Ping; Hong, Li-Quan; Yan, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is one of the most common etiologies of acute otitis media, rhinosinusitis, and pneumonia. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are the main focus in new vaccine development against NTHi, as the H. influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine does not cover noncapsulated NTHi. The OMPs P6 and protein D are the most promising candidate antigens for an NTHi vaccine, and low antibody levels against them in serum may be correlated with infection caused by NTHi. In the current study, we measured the antibody titers against P6, protein D, and their T- and B-cell combined peptide epitopes in healthy individuals of different ages. We found that children <1 month old had the lowest antibody levels against NTHi P6, protein D, and their T- and B-cell combined antigenic epitopes. Antibody titers increased at ages 1 to 6 months, peaked at 7 months to 3 years, and remained high at 4 to 6 years. The antibody titers started to decrease after 6 years and were the lowest in the 21- to 30-year group. The geometric mean titers (GMTs) of T- and B-cell combined antigenic epitopes in P6 and protein D were positively correlated with those of the protein antigens. Among 12 peptides tested, P6-61, P6-123, and protein D-167 epitopes were better recognized than others in human serum. These findings might contribute to the development of an effective serotype-independent vaccine for H. influenzae. PMID:26677200

  1. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology. PMID:27236550

  2. Antibody-Mediated Pathogen Resistance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Peschen, Dieter; Schillberg, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The methods described in this chapter were developed in order to produce transgenic plants expressing pathogen-specific single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies fused to antifungal peptides (AFPs), conferring resistance against fungal pathogens. We describe the selection from a phage display library of avian scFv antibodies that recognize cell surface proteins on fungi from the genus Fusarium, and the construction of scFv-AFP fusion protein constructs followed by their transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana spp.) plants and stable expression in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Using these techniques, the antibody fusion with the most promising in vitro activity can be used to generate transgenic plants that are resistant to pathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. matthiolae. PMID:26614296

  3. A novel assay for monitoring internalization of nanocarrier coupled antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ulrik B; Kirpotin, Dmitri B; Pickering, Edward M; Drummond, Daryl C; Marks, James D

    2006-01-01

    Background Discovery of tumor-selective antibodies or antibody fragments is a promising approach for delivering therapeutic agents to antigen over-expressing cancers. Therefore it is important to develop methods for the identification of target- and function specific antibodies for effective drug delivery. Here we describe a highly selective and sensitive method for characterizing the internalizing potential of multivalently displayed antibodies or ligands conjugated to liposomes into tumor cells. The assay requires minute amounts of histidine-tagged ligand and relies on the non-covalent coupling of these antibodies to fluorescent liposomes containing a metal ion-chelating lipid. Following incubation of cells with antibody-conjugated liposomes, surface bound liposomes are gently removed and the remaining internalized liposomes are quantitated based on fluorescence in a high throughput manner. We have termed this methodology "Chelated Ligand Internalization Assay", or CLIA. Results The specificity of the assay was demonstrated with different antibodies to the ErbB-2 and EGF receptors. Antibody-uptake correlated with receptor expression levels in tumor cell lines with a range of receptor expression. Furthermore, Ni-NTA liposomes containing doxorubicin were used to screen for the ability of antibodies to confer target-specific cytotoxicity. Using an anti-ErbB2 single chain Fv (scFv) (F5) antibody, cytotoxicity could be conferred to ErbB2-overexpressing cells; however, a poly(ethylene glycol)-linked lipid (DSPE-PEG-NTA-Ni) was necessary to allow for efficient loading of the drug and to reduce nonspecific drug leakage during the course of the assay. Conclusion The CLIA method we describe here represents a rapid, sensitive and robust assay for the identification and characterization of tumor-specific antibodies capable of high drug-delivery efficiency when conjugated to liposomal nanocarriers. PMID:17014727

  4. The General Conference Mennonites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    General Conference Mennonites and Old Order Amish are compared and contrasted in the areas of physical appearance, religious beliefs, formal education, methods of farming, and home settings. General Conference Mennonites and Amish differ in physical appearance and especially in dress. The General Conference Mennonite men and women dress the same…

  5. Parent Conferences. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Roslyn; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents six workshop sessions on parent conferences: (1) "Parents' Perspectives on Conferencing" (R. Duffy); (2) "Three Way Conferences" (G. Zeller); (3) "Conferencing with Parents of Infants" (K. Albrecht); (4) "Conferencing with Parents of School-Agers" (L. G. Miller); (5) "Cross Cultural Conferences" (J. Gonzalez-Mena); and (6) "Working with…

  6. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah; O'Kennedy, Richard J

    2016-06-30

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  7. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  8. Generalized platform for antibody detection using the antibody catalyzed water oxidation pathway.

    PubMed

    Welch, M Elizabeth; Ritzert, Nicole L; Chen, Hongjun; Smith, Norah L; Tague, Michele E; Xu, Youyong; Baird, Barbara A; Abruña, Héctor D; Ober, Christopher K

    2014-02-01

    Infectious diseases, such as influenza, present a prominent global problem including the constant threat of pandemics that initiate in avian or other species and then pass to humans. We report a new sensor that can be specifically functionalized to detect antibodies associated with a wide range of infectious diseases in multiple species. This biosensor is based on electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide generated through the intrinsic catalytic activity of all antibodies: the antibody catalyzed water oxidation pathway (ACWOP). Our platform includes a polymer brush-modified surface where specific antibodies bind to conjugated haptens with high affinity and specificity. Hydrogen peroxide provides an electrochemical signal that is mediated by Resorufin/Amplex Red. We characterize the biosensor platform, using model anti-DNP antibodies, with the ultimate goal of designing a versatile device that is inexpensive, portable, reliable, and fast. We demonstrate detection of antibodies at concentrations that fall well within clinically relevant levels. PMID:24410628

  9. Antibody Blood Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of certain antibodies ... rye and barley that are generically known as “gluten.” Antibody Testing: Only A First Step To help ...

  10. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Screen Share this page: Was this page ... Screen Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; Blood Typing ; RBC Antibody Identification ; Type and Screen; Crossmatch All content ...

  11. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ... may use this test to help diagnose pernicious anemia. Pernicious anemia is a decrease in red blood ...

  12. Lyme disease antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  13. Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference.

    PubMed

    Lee, Violet; Liu, Ang; Groeber, Elizabeth; Moghaddam, Mehran; Schiller, James; Tweed, Joseph A; Walker, Gregory S

    2016-02-01

    Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference, Hyatt Regency Hotel, Cambridge, MA, USA, 14-16 September 2015 The Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis (APA) conference took place at the Hyatt Regency hotel in Cambridge, MA, on 14-16 September 2015. The 3-day conference affords pharmaceutical professionals, academic researchers and industry regulators the opportunity to collectively participate in meaningful and relevant discussions impacting the areas of pharmaceutical drug development. The APA conference was organized in three workshops encompassing the disciplines of regulated bioanalysis, discovery bioanalysis (encompassing new and emerging technologies) and biotransformation. The conference included a short course titled 'Bioanalytical considerations for the clinical development of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs)', an engaging poster session, several panel and round table discussions and over 50 diverse talks from leading industry and academic scientists. PMID:26853375

  14. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  15. Monoclonal Antibodies Attached to Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Paclitaxel Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonbae; Lau, Calvin; Richardson, Mark; Rajapakse, Arith; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip; UCI, Molecular Biology; Biochemistry Collaboration; UCI, Departments of Physics; Astronomy Collaboration

    Paclitaxel is a naturally-occurring pharmaceutical used in numerous cancer treatments, despite its toxic side effects. Partial inhibition of this toxicity has been demonstrated using weakly interacting monoclonal antibodies (3C6 and 8A10), but accurate monitoring of antibody and paclitaxel concentrations remains challenging. Here, single-molecule studies of the kinetics of antibody-paclitaxel interactions have been performed using single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The devices were sensitized with single antibody attachments to record the single-molecule binding dynamics of paclitaxel. This label-free technique recorded a range of dynamic interactions between the antibody and paclitaxel, and it provided sensitive paclitaxel detection for pM to nM concentrations. Measurements with two different antibodies suggest ways of extending this working range and uncovering the mechanistic differences among different antibodies.

  16. Antibody Persistence and Immunologic Memory after Sequential Pneumococcal Conjugate and Polysaccharide Vaccination in HIV-Infected Children on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abzug, Mark J.; Song, Lin Ye; Levin, Myron J.; Nachman, Sharon A.; Borkowsky, William; Pelton, Stephen I.

    2013-01-01

    Background The capacity of pneumococcal vaccination to confer memory in HIV-infected children is critical for durable protection. Methods HIV-infected children 2–<19 years administered two doses of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and one dose of polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) on HAART were randomized four-five years later to receive a PCV7 or PPV booster. Total and high avidity antibodies to serotypes 1 (PPV) and 6B and 14 (PCV7 and PPV) were determined by ELISA. Memory was defined as persistence of ≥0.5 mcg/mL of serotype-specific antibody on day 0 or change from <0.5 mcg/mL to ≥0.5 mcg/mL between day 0 and week 1, or, ≥4-fold antibody rise between day 0 and week 1. Results Prior to boosting, four to five years after the previous PCV7-PCV7-PPV series, geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) were 0.46 mcg/mL (serotype 1), 1.31 mcg/mL (serotype 6B), and 1.47 mcg/mL (serotype 14), with concentrations ≥0.5 mcg/mL in 41% (serotype 1) to 82% (serotypes 6B and 14). Memory based on antibody concentration ≥0.5 mcg/mL before or 1 week after boosting with PCV7 or PPV was demonstrated in 42–61% for serotype 1 and 87–94% for serotypes 6B and 14, with lower rates based on day 0 to week 1 ≥4-fold antibody rise (serotype 1, 3–13%; serotype 6B, 13–31%; serotype 14, 29–53%). Antibody concentrations post-boosting were greater following PCV7 than PPV for serotypes 6B and 14. Ratios of highly avid to total antibody pre- and post-boosting were 0.5–0.8. Predictors of memory included higher CD4% (nadir before HAART and at P1024 and P1061s entry), CD19% (at P1024 and P1061s entry), and antibody response after the PCV7-PCV7-PPV primary series and lower viral load (at P1024 and P1061s entry) and age. Conclusions Protective antibody concentrations, high avidity, and booster responses to PCV7 or PPV indicative of memory were present four-five years after PCV7-PCV7-PPV in HIV-infected children on HAART. PMID:23954381

  17. 4th European Antibody Congress 2008

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth European Antibody meeting, organized by Terrapin Ltd., was held in Geneva, a center of the European biopharmaceutical industry. Merck-Serono, NovImmune, Pierre Fabre and Therapeomic are located nearby, as are R&D centers of Boehringer-Ingelheim, Novartis, Roche and Sanofi-Aventis. Over 40 speakers and more than 200 delegates attended the event. Companies represented included Abbott, Ablynx, Adnexus/ BMS, Astra-Zeneca/ CAT/ Medimmune, BiogenIdec, BioRad, Centocor (Johnson & Johnson), Crucell/DSM, Domantis, Dyax, Genmab, Genzyme, Glycart/ Roche, Haptogen, Immunogen, Kyowa-Kirin, LFB, Medarex, Merck-Serono, Micromet, Novartis, Pierre Fabre Laboratories, Roche, Sanofi-Aventis, Seattle-Genetics, Transgene, UCB Celltech and Wyeth. Other attendees included those based in academe or government (University of Amsterdam, University of Zurich, Univeristy Hospital-Lyon, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, INSERM, Tufts University, US National Institutes of Health), consultants, and patent attorneys (Edwards, Angell, Palmer & Dodge). The meeting was very interactive and included exchanges during the many scheduled networking times (exhibitions, speed-networking, lunches and evening receptions). The first day of the three day conference was dedicated to advances in understanding antibody structure-function relationships. Challenges and opportunities in antibody development were the focus of the second day and the third day featured discussion of innovative antibodies and antibody alternatives. PMID:20061813

  18. Coarse grained modeling of transport properties in monoclonal antibody solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, James; Wang, Gang

    Monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives represent the fastest growing segment of the bio pharmaceutical industry. For many applications such as novel cancer therapies, high concentration, sub-cutaneous injections of these protein solutions are desired. However, depending on the peptide sequence within the antibody, such high concentration formulations can be too viscous to inject via human derived force alone. Understanding how heterogenous charge distribution and hydrophobicity within the antibodies leads to high viscosities is crucial to their future application. In this talk, we explore a coarse grained computational model of therapeutically relevant monoclonal antibodies that accounts for electrostatic, dispersion and hydrodynamic interactions between suspended antibodies to predict assembly and transport properties in concentrated antibody solutions. We explain the high viscosities observed in many experimental studies of the same biologics.

  19. Informing Selection of Nanomaterial Concentrations for ToxCast In Vitro Testing using the Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry Model - 3rd Annual International Conference on the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology (ICEIN) & EPA Nano Grantees Meeting (2011)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, little justification is provided for nanomaterial testing concentrations in in vitro assays. The in vitro concentrations typically used may be higher than those experienced by exposed humans. Selection of concentration levels for hazard evaluation based on real-world e...

  20. Antibody Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Erik D; Smider, Vaughn V; Felding, Brunhilde H

    2016-01-01

    One of the newer classes of targeted cancer therapeutics is monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics are a successful and rapidly expanding drug class due to their high specificity, activity, favourable pharmacokinetics, and standardized manufacturing processes. Antibodies are capable of recruiting the immune system to attack cancer cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity or antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In an ideal scenario the initial tumor cell destruction induced by administration of a therapeutic antibody can result in uptake of tumor associated antigens by antigen-presenting cells, establishing a prolonged memory effect. Mechanisms of direct tumor cell killing by antibodies include antibody recognition of cell surface bound enzymes to neutralize enzyme activity and signaling, or induction of receptor agonist or antagonist activity. Both approaches result in cellular apoptosis. In another and very direct approach, antibodies are used to deliver drugs to target cells and cause cell death. Such antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) direct cytotoxic compounds to tumor cells, after selective binding to cell surface antigens, internalization, and intracellular drug release. Efficacy and safety of ADCs for cancer therapy has recently been greatly advanced based on innovative approaches for site-specific drug conjugation to the antibody structure. This technology enabled rational optimization of function and pharmacokinetics of the resulting conjugates, and is now beginning to yield therapeutics with defined, uniform molecular characteristics, and unprecedented promise to advance cancer treatment. PMID:27081677

  1. Engineering antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Mark L; Gilliland, Gary L

    2016-06-01

    The successful introduction of antibody-based protein therapeutics into the arsenal of treatments for patients has within a few decades fostered intense innovation in the production and engineering of antibodies. Reviewed here are the methods currently used to produce antibodies along with how our knowledge of the structural and functional characterization of immunoglobulins has resulted in the engineering of antibodies to produce protein therapeutics with unique properties, both biological and biophysical, that are leading to novel therapeutic approaches. Antibody engineering includes the introduction of the antibody combining site (variable regions) into a host of architectures including bi and multi-specific formats that further impact the therapeutic properties leading to further advantages and successes in patient treatment. PMID:27525816

  2. From Conference to Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Robert; Tenenberg, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Revising and extending conference articles for journal publication benefits both authors and readers. The new articles are more complete, and benefit from peer review, feedback from conference presentation, and greater editorial consistency. For those articles that are appropriate, we encourage authors to do this, and present two examples of such…

  3. The Effective Clinical Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wink, Diane M.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the common problems with clinical conferences and suggests approaches to maximize student learning. Suggests that an effective clinical conference has three characteristics: (1) it is a group event; (2) it contributes to the achievement of course and clinical objectives; and (3) it provides a setting for students to explore personal…

  4. The Learning Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravn, Ib

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to call attention to the fact that conferences for professionals rely on massive one-way communication and hence produce little learning for delegates--and to introduce an alternative, the "learning conference", that involves delegates in fun and productive learning processes. Design/methodology/approach: A…

  5. Conference Planning Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermont Library Association, Burlington.

    Intended as a useful aid for organizing its annual spring meeting, this general conference planning manual developed by the Vermont Library Association provides a blueprint for planners on the responsibilities of the planning committee, the conference chair, and others; site selection and local arrangements; program and sessions planning;…

  6. Adolescent Prejudice Reduction Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketroser, Heidi

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the fifth annual Dr. Curtis C. Melnick Adolescent Prejudice Reduction Conference sponsored by the Greater Chicago (Illinois) Regional Office of the Anti-Defamation League of the B'nai B'rith. The day-long conference addressed issues of prejudice and allowed students and staff from various high schools to explore their concerns with…

  7. Lyndon Johnson's Press Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stephen

    Because President Lyndon Johnson understood well the publicity value of the American news media, he sought to exploit them. He saw reporters as "torch bearers" for his programs and policies and used the presidential press conference chiefly for promotional purposes. Although he met with reporters often, his press conferences were usually…

  8. ASE Annual Conference 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Roger

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the ASE Annual Conference 2010 which was held at Nottingham after a gap of 22 years. As always, the main conference was preceded by International Day, an important event for science educators from across the world. There were two strands to the programme: (1) "What works for me?"--sharing new ideas and tried…

  9. District Leadership Conference Planner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Coordinating Council for Occupational Education, Olympia.

    This manual provides usable guidelines and planning forms and materials for planning district leadership conferences, which were designed and initiated in Washington State to meet the problems in student enrollment and, consequently, Distributive Education Clubs of America membership. The conferences have become a useful means to increase…

  10. ICCK Conference Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, William H.

    2013-05-28

    The 7th International Conference on Chemical Kinetics (ICCK) was held July 10-14, 2011, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in Cambridge, MA, hosted by Prof. William H. Green of MIT's Chemical Engineering department. This cross-disciplinary meeting highlighted the importance of fundamental understanding of elementary reactions to the full range of chemical investigations. The specific conference focus was on elementary-step kinetics in both the gas phase and in condensed phase. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to discuss how the same reactive species and reaction motifs manifest under very different reaction conditions (e.g. atmospheric, aqueous, combustion, plasma, in nonaqueous solvents, on surfaces.). The conference featured special sessions on new/improved experimental techniques, improved models and data analysis for interpreting complicated kinetics, computational kinetics (especially rate estimates for large kinetic models), and a panel discussion on how the community should document/archive kinetic data. In the past, this conference had been limited to homogeneous gas-phase and liquid-phase systems. This conference included studies of heterogeneous kinetics which provide rate constants for, or insight into, elementary reaction steps. This Grant from DOE BES covered about half of the subsidies we provided to students and postdocs who attended the conference, by charging them reduced-rate registration fees. The complete list of subsidies provided are listed in Table 1 below. This DOE funding was essential to making the conference affordable to graduate students, and indeed the attendance at this conference was higher than at previous conferences in this series. Donations made by companies provided additional subsidies, leveraging the DOE funding. The conference was very effective in educating graduate students and important in fostering scientific interactions, particularly between scientists studying gas phase and liquid phase kinetics

  11. Construction of a reshaped HMFG1 antibody and comparison of its fine specificity with that of the parent mouse antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeyen, M E; Saunders, J A; Price, M R; Marugg, J D; Briggs, S; Broderick, E L; Eida, S J; Mooren, A T; Badley, R A

    1993-01-01

    A human antibody with milk mucin specificity was obtained by transferring the complementarity determining regions (CDR) of the mouse antibody HMFG1 onto carefully selected human framework regions. The resulting reshaped human antibody, HuHMFG1, showed no difference in relative affinity for its antigen compared with the parent mouse HMFG1. The minimum epitope recognized by both the mouse and reshaped antibodies was demonstrated by epitope mapping to be identical, and consists of the tetramer PDTR. In a replacement net analysis, in which each of the amino acids was replaced in turn with the 19 other residues, it was determined that mouse HMFG1 and HuHMFG1 reacted with this series of synthetic peptides in an equivalent manner, indicating retention of identical fine specificity in the HuHMFG1 antibody. In contrast to other published reports, this was achieved without involvement of any framework residues in the binding site transfer. These data demonstrate that if well-matching human framework regions are employed grafting the CDR only can be sufficient to confer desired specificities to human antibodies and can, indeed, provide human analogues of mouse antibodies with virtually indistinguishable affinities and fine specificities relative to the mouse parent antibodies. PMID:7682986

  12. Developing recombinant antibodies for biomarker detection

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Miller, Keith D.; Kagen, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.

    2010-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have an essential role in biomarker validation and diagnostic assays. A barrier to pursuing these applications is the reliance on immunization and hybridomas to produce mAbs, which is time-consuming and may not yield the desired mAb. We recommend a process flow for affinity reagent production that utilizes combinatorial protein display systems (eg, yeast surface display or phage display) rather than hybridomas. These systems link a selectable phenotype-binding conferred by an antibody fragment-with a means for recovering the encoding gene. Recombinant libraries obtained from immunizations can produce high-affinity antibodies (<10 nM) more quickly than other methods. Non-immune libraries provide an alternate route when immunizations are not possible, or when suitable mAbs are not recovered from an immune library. Directed molecular evolution (DME) is an integral part of optimizing mAbs obtained from combinatorial protein display, but can also be used on hybridoma-derived mAbs. Variants can easily be obtained and screened to increase the affinity of the parent mAb (affinity maturation). We discuss examples where DME has been used to tailor affinity reagents to specific applications. Combinatorial protein display also provides an accessible method for identifying antibody pairs, which are necessary for sandwich-type diagnostic assays.

  13. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D’Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew RM

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products. PMID:25530082

  14. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  15. Antibodies as effectors.

    PubMed

    Corbeil, L B

    2002-09-10

    Antibodies are critical in protection against extracellular microbial pathogens. Although antibodies also play a role in transplant/tumor rejection and in autoimmune disease, this paper focuses on defense against bovine infections. Effector mechanisms of different bovine isotypes, subisotypes and allotypes are discussed. The importance of antigen specificity is also stressed. PMID:12072231

  16. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  17. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  18. Affinity purification of antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  19. Antibodies in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The expression of antibodies in plants has several promising applications that are currently being developed. Plants are being considered for the large scale production of antibodies needed for medical purposes. The benefit of using plants is that they are able to perform post-translational modifi...

  20. CONFERENCE NOTE: Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-01-01

    The next Conference on Precision Electromagnetic Measurements (CPEM), will be held from 9 to 12 June 1992 at the Centre des Nouvelles Industries et Technologies (CNIT), La Défense, Paris, France. This conference, which is held every two years and whose importance and high level, confirmed by thirty years' experience, are recognized throughout the world, can be considered as a forum in which scientists, metrologists and professionals will have the opportunity to present and compare their research results on fundamental constants, standards and new techniques of precision measurement in the electromagnetic domain. Topics The following topics are regarded as the most appropriate for this conference: realization of units and fundamental constants d.c. a.c. and high voltage time and frequency radio-frequency and microwaves dielectrics, antennas, fields lasers, fibre optics advanced instrumentation, cryoelectronics. There will also be a session on international cooperation. Conference Language The conference language will be English. No translation will be provided. Organizers Société des Electriciens et des Electroniciens (SEE). Bureau National de Métrologie (BNM) Sponsors Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Instrumentation & Measurement Society Union Radio Scientifique Internationale United States National Institute of Standards and Technology Centre National d'Etudes des Télécommunications Mouvement Français pour la Qualité, Section Métrologie Comité National Français de Radioélectricité Scientifique Contact Jean Zara, CPEM 92 publicity, Bureau National de Métrologie, 22, rue Monge, 75005 Paris Tel.: (33) 1 46 34 48 16, Fax: (33) 1 46 34 48 63

  1. [Recombinant antibodies against bioweapons].

    PubMed

    Thullier, Philippe; Pelat, Thibaut; Vidal, Dominique

    2009-12-01

    The threat posed by bioweapons (BW) could lead to the re-emergence of such deadly diseases as plague or smallpox, now eradicated from industrialized countries. The development of recombinant antibodies allows tackling this risk because these recombinant molecules are generally well tolerated in human medicine, may be utilized for prophylaxis and treatment, and because antibodies neutralize many BW. Recombinant antibodies neutralizing the lethal toxin of anthrax, botulinum toxins and the smallpox virus have in particular been isolated recently, with different technologies. Our approach, which uses phage-displayed immune libraries built from non-human primates (M. fascicularis) to obtain recombinant antibodies, which may later be super-humanized (germlinized), has allowed us to obtain such BWs-neutralizing antibodies. PMID:20035695

  2. [Antiphospholipid antibodies in practice].

    PubMed

    Miyara, M; Diemert, M-C; Amoura, Z; Musset, L

    2012-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the occurrence of thrombotic or obstetrical events associated with the presence in the serum of patients of antibodies that are associated with thrombosis. For the diagnosis of APS, the presence of either lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein1 antibodies of IgG or IgM isotype is required through laboratory testing. Other autoantibodies such as antiphosphatidylethanolamin or antiphosphatidylserin/prothrombin complex antibodies may be interesting in the diagnosis of APS when common antiphospholipid antibodies are missing. These autoantibodies are still under evaluation for their diagnostic contribution. Despite numerous attempts, the assays that are available for the identification of antiphospholipid antibodies have not been standardized yet, which leads to high variability between reagents and laboratories. Thus, to optimize the biological monitoring of APS syndromes, it is mandatory to have consecutive samples analyzed in the same laboratory. PMID:22100197

  3. Affinity Purification of Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Robert M; McGarvey, Jeffery A

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that include antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant, or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facilitate assay reproducibility, economy, and reduced interference of nonspecific components as well as improved storage, stability, and bio-conjugation. Although not always necessary, the relative simplicity of antibody purification using commercially available protein-A, protein-G, or protein-L resins with basic chromatographic principles warrants purification when antibody source material is available in sufficient quantity. Here, we define three simple methods using immobilized (1) protein-A, (2) protein-G, and (3) protein-L agarose beads to yield highly purified antibody. PMID:26160561

  4. Selection of Recombinant Human Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tomszak, Florian; Weber, Susanne; Zantow, Jonas; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of therapeutic antibodies the demand of recombinant human antibodies is steadily increasing. Traditionally, therapeutic antibodies were generated by immunization of rat or mice, the generation of hybridoma clones, cloning of the antibody genes and subsequent humanization and engineering of the lead candidates. In the last few years, techniques were developed that use transgenic animals with a human antibody gene repertoire. Here, modern recombinant DNA technologies can be combined with well established immunization and hybridoma technologies to generate already affinity maturated human antibodies. An alternative are in vitro technologies which enabled the generation of fully human antibodies from antibody gene libraries that even exceed the human antibody repertoire. Specific antibodies can be isolated from these libraries in a very short time and therefore reduce the development time of an antibody drug at a very early stage.In this review, we describe different technologies that are currently used for the in vitro and in vivo generation of human antibodies. PMID:27236551

  5. PK/PD analysis of a novel pH-dependent antigen-binding antibody using a dynamic antibody-antigen binding model.

    PubMed

    Haraya, Kenta; Tachibana, Tatsuhiko; Iwayanagi, Yuki; Maeda, Atsuhiko; Ozeki, Kazuhisa; Nezu, Junichi; Ishigai, Masaki; Igawa, Tomoyuki

    2016-04-01

    Previously, we have reported novel engineered antibody with pH-dependent antigen-binding (recycling antibody), and with both pH-dependent antigen-binding and increased FcRn-binding at neutral pH (sweeping antibody). The purpose of this study is to perform PK/PD predictions to better understand the potential applications of the antibodies as therapeutics. To demonstrate the applicability of recycling and sweeping antibodies over conventional antibodies, PK/PD analyses were performed. PK/PD parameters for antibody and antigen dynamics were estimated from the results of a pharmacokinetic study in human FcRn transgenic mice. A simulation study was performed using the estimated PK/PD parameters with various target antigen profiles. In comparison to conventional antibody, recycling antibody enhanced antibody-antigen complex clearance by 3 folds, while sweeping antibody accelerated antigen clearance by 10 folds in a pharmacokinetic study. Simulation results showed that recycling and sweeping antibodies can improve dosage frequency and reduce the required dose for target antigens with various clearances, plasma concentrations or binding kinetics. Moreover, importance of the association rate constant to enhance the beneficial effect of antibodies was shown. These results support the conclusion that recycling and sweeping antibodies can be applied to various target antigens with different profiles, and expand the number of antigens that antibodies can target. PMID:26944099

  6. 47 CFR 1.248 - Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. 1.248 Section 1.248 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Hearing Proceedings Prehearing Procedures § 1.248 Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR...

  7. 47 CFR 1.248 - Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. 1.248 Section 1.248 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Hearing Proceedings Prehearing Procedures § 1.248 Prehearing conferences; hearing conferences. (a)...

  8. 76 FR 64083 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice... reliability of the Bulk-Power System. The conference will explore the progress made on the priorities for addressing risks to reliability that were identified in earlier Commission technical conferences....

  9. 10 CFR 501.32 - Conferences (other than prepetition conferences).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SANCTIONS Written Comments, Public Hearings and Conferences During Administrative Proceedings § 501.32 Conferences (other than prepetition conferences). (a) At any time following commencement of a proceeding... proceeding. Conferences held after the commencement of an administrative proceeding before OFE shall...

  10. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  11. Allosteric antibody inhibition of human hepsin protease.

    PubMed

    Koschubs, Tobias; Dengl, Stefan; Dürr, Harald; Kaluza, Klaus; Georges, Guy; Hartl, Christiane; Jennewein, Stefan; Lanzendörfer, Martin; Auer, Johannes; Stern, Alvin; Huang, Kuo-Sen; Packman, Kathryn; Gubler, Ueli; Kostrewa, Dirk; Ries, Stefan; Hansen, Silke; Kohnert, Ulrich; Cramer, Patrick; Mundigl, Olaf

    2012-03-15

    Hepsin is a type II transmembrane serine protease that is expressed in several human tissues. Overexpression of hepsin has been found to correlate with tumour progression and metastasis, which is so far best studied for prostate cancer, where more than 90% of such tumours show this characteristic. To enable improved future patient treatment, we have developed a monoclonal humanized antibody that selectively inhibits human hepsin and does not inhibit other related proteases. We found that our antibody, hH35, potently inhibits hepsin enzymatic activity at nanomolar concentrations. Kinetic characterization revealed non-linear, slow, tight-binding inhibition. This correlates with the crystal structure we obtained for the human hepsin-hH35 antibody Fab fragment complex, which showed that the antibody binds hepsin around α3-helix, located far from the active centre. The unique allosteric mode of inhibition of hH35 is distinct from the recently described HGFA (hepatocyte growth factor activator) allosteric antibody inhibition. We further explain how a small change in the antibody design induces dramatic structural rearrangements in the hepsin antigen upon binding, leading to complete enzyme inactivation. PMID:22132769

  12. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    PubMed

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush. PMID:17691940

  13. Aircraft Engine Emissions. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A conference on a aircraft engine emissions was held to present the results of recent and current work. Such diverse areas as components, controls, energy efficient engine designs, and noise and pollution reduction are discussed.

  14. Insider conference tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennant, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Attending an educator conference and its associated exhibit hall can be a rewarding experience for your brain. But if you keep in mind these insider's tips, your feet, arms, stomach, and wallet will also thank you.

  15. Lunar & Planetary Science Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Jeffrey L.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summaries of different topics discussed at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference are presented to provide updated information to nonplanetologists. Some topics include Venus, isotopes, chondrites, creation science, cosmic dust, cratering, moons and rings, igneous rocks, and lunar soil. (DC)

  16. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  17. Heart antibodies in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Trueman, T; Thompson, R A; Cummins, P; Littler, W A

    1981-01-01

    The reported frequency of circulating heart reactive antibodies in cardiomyopathies has varied and their significance is unknown. In this study such antibodies were sought in patients with primary congestive and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies and other heart diseases. Standard "single sandwich" and the more sensitive "double sandwich" indirect immunofluorescence techniques failed to disclose a significant difference between any cardiomyopathic group and controls in repeated experiments. With both techniques results were subject to considerable method-specific artefacts and observer variation. No published work associating heart antibodies detected by immunofluorescence methods with cariomyopathies adequately takes these into account. PMID:7028058

  18. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  19. The 1991 International Aerospace and Ground Conference on Lightning and Static Electricity, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The proceedings of the conference are reported. The conference focussed on lightning protection, detection, and forecasting. The conference was divided into 26 sessions based on research in lightning, static electricity, modeling, and mapping. These sessions spanned the spectrum from basic science to engineering, concentrating on lightning prediction and detection and on safety for ground facilities, aircraft, and aerospace vehicles.

  20. Concentrator Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque-Heredia, Ignacio; Luque, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * The early development of CPV * Concentrator solar cells * Optics for photovoltaic concentrators * Photovoltaic concentration modules * Tracking systems for photovoltaic concentration * High-concentration systems * Rating and performance * Cost considerations * Conclusions * References

  1. Transfer of Maternal Antibodies against Avian Influenza Virus in Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Jacintha G. B.; Mateman, A. Christa; Klaassen, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Maternal antibodies protect chicks from infection with pathogens early in life and may impact pathogen dynamics due to the alteration of the proportion of susceptible individuals in a population. We investigated the transfer of maternal antibodies against avian influenza virus (AIV) in a key AIV host species, the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos). Combining observations in both the field and in mallards kept in captivity, we connected maternal AIV antibody concentrations in eggs to (i) female body condition, (ii) female AIV antibody concentration, (iii) egg laying order, (iv) egg size and (v) embryo sex. We applied maternity analysis to the eggs collected in the field to account for intraspecific nest parasitism, which is reportedly high in Anseriformes, detecting parasitic eggs in one out of eight clutches. AIV antibody prevalence in free-living and captive females was respectively 48% and 56%, with 43% and 24% of the eggs receiving these antibodies maternally. In both field and captive study, maternal AIV antibody concentrations in egg yolk correlated positively with circulating AIV antibody concentrations in females. In the captive study, yolk AIV antibody concentrations correlated positively with egg laying order. Female body mass and egg size from the field and captive study, and embryos sex from the field study were not associated with maternal AIV antibody concentrations in eggs. Our study indicates that maternal AIV antibody transfer may potentially play an important role in shaping AIV infection dynamics in mallards. PMID:25386907

  2. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  3. HIV Antibody Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... despite the fact that the person is infected ( false negative ). If an HIV antibody test is negative ... infection (around 28 days) and may give a false-negative result. ^ Back to top Is there anything ...

  4. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following: For unknown reasons (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, or ITP ) Side effect of certain drugs such ... 2012:chap 134. Read More Antibody Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Platelet count Serum globulin electrophoresis Thrombocytopenia Update ...

  5. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  6. Biodistribution and dosimetry of 3F8 neuroblastoma monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A.D.; Miraldi, F.; Cheung, N.K. )

    1989-01-01

    A method has been developed for quantitating radiolabeled antibody concentrations from images obtained with standard gamma cameras. The method is based on orthogonal projections and accounts both for the effective attenuation of gamma rays and the finite depth dependent resolution of a gamma camera. The method was verified in experimental phantoms and subsequently used in patient studies to quantitate radiolabeled antibody concentrations in neuroblastoma tumors. The in vivo measurements of tumor radioactivity levels were confirmed at biopsy in one patient.

  7. [IgG antibodies against toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 in human immunoglobulins].

    PubMed

    Dickgiesser, N; Kustermann, B

    1986-07-15

    IgG antibodies against toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 in human immunoglobulins were determined using the ELISA technique. Of the drugs for intramuscular application, hemogamma and beriglobin contained the highest amount of antibodies. The highest concentration of antibodies in drugs for intravenous application was found in Pseudomonas polyglobin and in Venimmun. PMID:3762013

  8. A double-sandwich ELISA for identification of monoclonal antibodies suitable for sandwich immunoassays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sandwich immunoassay (sIA) is an invaluable technique for concentrating, detecting, and quantifying target antigens. The two critical components required are a capture antibody and a detection antibody, each binding a different epitope on the target antigen. The specific antibodies incorporated...

  9. Protection against dengue disease by synthetic nucleic acid antibody prophylaxis/immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Flingai, Seleeke; Plummer, Emily M; Patel, Ami; Shresta, Sujan; Mendoza, Janess M; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Muthumani, Kar; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most important mosquito-borne viral infection in humans. In recent years, the number of cases and outbreaks has dramatically increased worldwide. While vaccines are being developed, none are currently available that provide balanced protection against all DENV serotypes. Advances in human antibody isolation have uncovered DENV neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) that are capable of preventing infection from multiple serotypes. Yet delivering monoclonal antibodies using conventional methods is impractical due to high costs. Engineering novel methods of delivering monoclonal antibodies could tip the scale in the fight against DENV. Here we demonstrate that simple intramuscular delivery by electroporation of synthetic DNA plasmids engineered to express modified human nAbs against multiple DENV serotypes confers protection against DENV disease and prevents antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of disease in mice. This synthetic nucleic acid antibody prophylaxis/immunotherapy approach may have important applications in the fight against infectious disease. PMID:26220099

  10. Protection against dengue disease by synthetic nucleic acid antibody prophylaxis/immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Flingai, Seleeke; Plummer, Emily M.; Patel, Ami; Shresta, Sujan; Mendoza, Janess M.; Broderick, Kate E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Muthumani, Kar; Weiner, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most important mosquito-borne viral infection in humans. In recent years, the number of cases and outbreaks has dramatically increased worldwide. While vaccines are being developed, none are currently available that provide balanced protection against all DENV serotypes. Advances in human antibody isolation have uncovered DENV neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) that are capable of preventing infection from multiple serotypes. Yet delivering monoclonal antibodies using conventional methods is impractical due to high costs. Engineering novel methods of delivering monoclonal antibodies could tip the scale in the fight against DENV. Here we demonstrate that simple intramuscular delivery by electroporation of synthetic DNA plasmids engineered to express modified human nAbs against multiple DENV serotypes confers protection against DENV disease and prevents antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of disease in mice. This synthetic nucleic acid antibody prophylaxis/immunotherapy approach may have important applications in the fight against infectious disease. PMID:26220099

  11. Affinity measurement of single chain antibodies: a mathematical method facilitated by statistical software SigmaPlot.

    PubMed

    Safdari, Yaghoub; Farajnia, Safar; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Khalili, Masoumeh; Jaliani, Hossein Zarei

    2014-02-01

    Because they are monovalent for antigen, single chain antibodies display a different antibody-antigen interaction pattern from that of full-length antibodies. Using the law of mass action and considering the antibody-antigen binding pattern at OD-100% and OD-50% points, we introduced a formula for estimating single chain antibody affinity. Sigmoid curves of optical density values versus antibody concentrations were drawn and used to determine antibody concentrations at OD-50% points using statistical software SigmaPlot. The OD-50% points were then used to calculate the affinity via the mathematical formula. A software-adapted format of the equation is also presented for further facilitation of the calculation process. The accuracy of this method for affinity calculation was proved by surface plasma resonance. This method offers a precise evaluation of antibody affinity without requiring special material or apparatus, making it possible to be performed in any biological laboratory with minimum facilities. PMID:24555931

  12. Antinuclear antibodies in mice

    PubMed Central

    Teague, P. O.; Friou, G. J.

    1969-01-01

    Seven-week-old and 16-week-old A/Jax mice were injected with viable spleen cells or homogenates of spleen cells obtained from older syngeneic mice which either had autoimmune anti-deoxyribonucleoprotein (DNP) antibody in their sera or lacked this activity. None of the 7-week-old recipients developed detectable anti-DNP antibody. However, most of the animals in the 16-week-old group developed this autoantibody. The viability of the cells and the presence of or absence of anti-DNP antibody in the donor's sera did not appear to influence the autoimmune response of these recipients. When viable thymus cells which were obtained from young A/Jax mice were transferred to groups of older syngeneic animals that had developed anti-DNP antibody spontaneously, the anti-DNP decreased or disappeared from the sera of most recipients. Untreated controls did not show this variation. When 36-week-old A/Jax mice which lacked anti-DNP antibody were injected with thymus or spleen cells obtained from young donors, none of the recipients or untreated controls developed anti-DNP antibody. After specific immunization with DNP, however, the control animals began to produce autoimmune anti-DNP antibody while the animals treated with thymus or spleen cells remained unresponsive. These observations support the hypothesis that in A/Jax mice: (1) autoimmunity to DNP may result from failure of normal homeostasis mechanisms which allow proliferation of autoimmune cells; (2) the number of cells with autoimmune potential may increase during ageing; (3) the efficiency of the homeostasis system may decrease during ageing as the result of microbial or genetic factors; and (4) cells which participate in homeostasis are found in the thymus and spleen of young mice and may be the thymus dependent lymphocytes. PMID:5307745

  13. DICARBOXYLIC ACID CONCENTRATION TRENDS AND SAMPLING ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a slide presentation on results of dicarboxylic acid concentration trends and sampling artifacts to be presented at the 2006 International Aerosol Conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research in St. Paul, Minnesota on September 10-...

  14. Conference -- summary and comment.

    PubMed

    Fairweather, D

    1974-01-01

    500 delegates met at the IPPF twenty-first Anniversary Conference which was held in Brighton on October 22-27, 1973. The theme of the conference was Planning for the Future. In his welcoming speech Dr. Fernando Tamayo, IPPF President, noted that the quality of life is everybody's business. Mr. Rafael Salas, UNFPA Executive Director, gave the keynote speech pointing out the need for a comprehensive approach to the problem of rapid population growth. The motto of the World Population Year 1974, "1 world for all," should be the goal. "A Survey of Unmet Needs in Family Planning," which was the result of family planning studies in 209 countries, was the background document of the conference. Other important papers of the conference were Dr. Thorsten Sjovall's paper "Human Rights and Welfare Aspects," Dr. Bernard Berelson's paper "Contribution of Family Planning to Demographic, Economic and Social Goals"; Rodney Shearman's "New Possibilities for Fertility Control"; Dr. Alexander Kessler's report "Barriers between Contraceptive Services and the Consumer"; papers on social and economic change and planned parenthood; a discussion by Professor Francis Okediji on "Social and Cultural Values affecting Fertility and the Adoption of Family Planning in Africa," following a speech by Mrs. Nani Soewondo on the influence of legislation and policy in improving the status of women; and the final paper by Mrs. Wendy Marson entitled "A View for the Future." At the final session of the conference Professor Brian Abel-Smith presented a summary of the proceedings. The writer believes that energy was generated by the exchange of views at the conference and that energy must be harnessed and driven forward by the IPPF Governing Body and Management Planning Committee. A major degree of flexibility in outlook and action must be maintained. PMID:12178347

  15. EPRI electric vehicle conference

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleeger, D.

    1999-10-01

    Lower operating and maintenance costs, quiet and clean operation appear the main factors in choosing electric over the typical internal combustion powered equipment. The Conference was sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). EPRI is a cooperative effort by major electric companies across the USA, founded in 1973 and headquartered in Palo Alto, CA. Featured at the Conference were presentations on regulatory issues, lift truck technologies, automotive advances and other industrial applications to include automated guided vehicles, personnel carriers and electric bicycles. Approximately 25 exhibitors displayed components, subassemblies and complete vehicles.

  16. [Continuous perfusion culture hybridoma cells for production of monoclonal antibody].

    PubMed

    Mi, Li; Li, Ling; Feng, Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Nan

    2002-05-01

    Hybridoma cells were cultured by continuous perfusion in Fibra-Cel of 5L packed-bed bioreactor for 22 days in low serum or serum-free media. The corresponded amino acids were fed and serum concentration was decreased by analyzing glucose concentration, oxygen uptake rate, secretary antibody amount and amino acids concentration in culture supernatant. Comparing with continuous perfusion culture that amino acids were not fed, antibody amount of production was increased about 2-3 times. The inoculated cell density was 2.5 x 10(5) cells/mL, while the final cell density was 8.79 x 10(8) cells/mL. Antibody production was reached 295 mg/L/d at average level, and the highest level was reached 532 mg/L/d. These results provided a primary mode of enlarge culture for monoclonal antibody industralization. PMID:12192875

  17. Polyreactive Antibodies: Function and Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Gunti, Sreenivasulu; Notkins, Abner Louis

    2015-01-01

    Polyreactive antibodies, a major component of the natural antibody repertoire, bind with low affinity to a variety of structurally unrelated antigens. Many of these antibodies are germline or near germline in sequence. Little is known, however, about the function of these antibodies. In the present mini-review we show: (1) that the broad antibacterial activity of the natural antibody repertoire is largely due to polyreactive antibodies, which in the presence of complement lyse bacteria and enhance phagocytosis; (2) that polyreactive antibodies bind to UV- or human immunodeficiency virus-induced apoptotic cells and with complement enhance the phagocytosis of these cells by macrophages; and (3) that dinitrophenol can be used as a surrogate for quantitating the level of polyreactive antibodies in serum. We conclude that polyreactive antibodies protect the host against both foreign invaders and its own damaged/apoptotic cells. PMID:26116731

  18. Accommodation and antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dehoux, Jean-Paul; Gianello, Pierre

    2009-06-01

    Accommodation refers to the condition in which an organ transplant functions normally by acquiring resistance to immune-mediated injury (especially), despite the presence of anti-transplant antibodies in the recipient. This status is associated with several modifications in the recipient as well as in the graft, such as previous depletion of anti-graft antibodies and their slow return once the graft is placed; expression of several protective genes in the graft; a Th2 immune response in the recipient; and inhibition of the membrane attack complex of complement. PMID:18973811

  19. 78 FR 27963 - Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference; Notice of Technical Conference Take notice that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will hold a Technical Conference on Tuesday, July 9, 2013 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m....

  20. Declining Enrollment Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    This report summarizes the results of a conference on declining enrollment sponsored by the Arizona State Department of Education. Topics covered include school closing, budget implications of declining enrollment, staffing problems and reduction in force, board of education and community support, problems of small school districts, and…

  1. A Conference of Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Printing House for the Blind, Louisville, KY. Dept. of Educational Research.

    Presented are the proceedings of the First Historic Helen Keller World Conference on Services to Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults, held in New York City in September, 1977 on the theme "The Deaf-Blind Person in the Community." Reports have the following titles and authors: "Definition, Demography, Causes and Prevention of Deaf-Blindness; Finding and…

  2. Open Mind Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Alexander H.

    1995-01-01

    Open Mind, The Association for the achievement of diversity in higher education, met in conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico, between October 16 and 18, 1992. A number of workgroups met to discuss the goals, structure, and generally evaluate the Association and its achievements. A summary of the workgroup sessions and their minutes are included.

  3. APPA 2011 Conference Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facilities Manager, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article presents highlights of APPA conference that was held on July 16-18, 2011. The highlights feature photos of 2011-2012 board of directors, outgoing senior regional representatives to the board, meritorious service award, APPA fellow, president's recognition and gavel exchange, and diamond business partner award.

  4. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineering Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presents the abstracts of 158 papers presented at the American Society for Engineering Education's annual conference at Knoxville, Tennessee, June 14-17, 1976. Included are engineering topics covering education, aerospace, agriculture, biomedicine, chemistry, computers, electricity, acoustics, environment, mechanics, and women. (SL)

  5. Grammar! A Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Lid, Ed.; Boaks, Peter, Ed.

    Papers from a conference on the teaching of grammar, particularly in second language instruction, include: "Grammar: Acquisition and Use" (Richard Johnstone); "Grammar and Communication" (Brian Page); "Linguistic Progression and Increasing Independence" (Bernardette Holmes); "La grammaire? C'est du bricolage!" ("Grammar? That's Hardware!") (Barry…

  6. Microbicides 2006 conference

    PubMed Central

    Ramjee, Gita; Shattock, Robin; Delany, Sinead; McGowan, Ian; Morar, Neetha; Gottemoeller, Megan

    2006-01-01

    Current HIV/AIDS statistics show that women account for almost 60% of HIV infections in Sub-Saharan Africa. HIV prevention tools such as male and female condoms, abstinence and monogamy are not always feasible options for women due to various socio-economic and cultural factors. Microbicides are products designed to be inserted in the vagina or rectum prior to sex to prevent HIV acquisition. The biannual Microbicides conference took place in Cape Town, South Africa from 23–26 April 2006. The conference was held for the first time on the African continent, the region worst affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The conference brought together a record number of 1,300 scientists, researchers, policy makers, healthcare workers, communities and advocates. The conference provided an opportunity for an update on microbicide research and development as well as discussions around key issues such as ethics, acceptability, access and community involvement. This report discusses the current status of microbicide research and development, encompassing basic and clinical science, social and behavioural science, and community mobilisation and advocacy activities. PMID:17038196

  7. Knowledge Sharing at Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Vries, Bregje; Pieters, Jules

    2007-01-01

    To improve the quality in teaching and learning, opportunities need to be provided where practitioners and researchers meet and share visions, disseminate findings, co-construct ideas, and set research agendas together. Visiting a conference is one well-known and established way to do this. But are they effective? A survey was conducted among the…

  8. Government Quality Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Government Quality Conference was an attempt to bring together executive organizations and senior individuals in the Federal Government that have a desire to improve productivity. It was designed to provide an exchange of ideas based on experience, and to encourage individual management initiatives to tap the capabilities of Federal employees.

  9. International waste management conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the international waste management conference. Topics covered include: Quality assurance in the OCR WM program; Leading the spirit of quality; Dept. of Energy hazardous waste remedial actions program; management of hazardous waste projects; and System management and quality assurance.

  10. REGIONAL CONFERENCE SUMMARIES, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    AN AVERAGE OF 200 TEACHER EDUCATORS, STATE DIRECTORS, LAYMEN, AND REPRESENTATIVES OF VARIOUS AGENCIES ATTENDED EACH OF NINE REGIONAL CONFERENCES CONDUCTED THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES TO DISCUSS THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHANGES AND PROBLEMS IN PLANNING AND CONDUCTING VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. MAJOR SPEECHES PRESENTED…

  11. 2002 NASPSA Conference Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Contains abstracts from the 2002 conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity. The publication is divided into three sections: the preconference workshop, "Effective Teaching Methods in the Classroom;" symposia (motor development, motor learning and control, and sport psychology); and free…

  12. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  13. IATUL Conference 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Services and Use, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Summarizes presentations at conference on theme "The future of information resources for science and technology and role of libraries": industrial and commercial use of national, regional, and university resources; balance between public- and private-sector resources; local access in national and regional context; access to information in…

  14. Metabolic Engineering X Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, Evan

    2015-05-07

    The International Metabolic Engineering Society (IMES) and the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE), both technological communities of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), hosted the Metabolic Engineering X Conference (ME-X) on June 15-19, 2014 at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, British Columbia. It attracted 395 metabolic engineers from academia, industry and government from around the globe.

  15. The interparliamentary conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of information on environmental problems with global origins and consequences. The areas of major concern included the following: global climate change; deforestation and desertification; preservation of biological diversity; safeguarding oceans and water resources; population growth; destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer; and sustainable development.

  16. Conference summary - Personal views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lub, J.

    2016-05-01

    This is a collection of remarks on the three and a half days of the RR Lyrae 2015 Conference, limited only by my own lack of attention and understanding. I end with some personal recollections on my complete failure, even though doing the necessary calculations, to spot the importance and the possible application of Fourier amplitudes and phases of the RR Lyrae light curves.

  17. Photovoltaic concentrator research status

    SciTech Connect

    Arvizu, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the most important developments in concentrator research and development since the fifth E.C. Photovoltaic Energy Conference in October 1983. Within the Sandia managed Photovoltaic Concentrator Research Project several record cell efficiencies have been reported. Applied Solar Energy Corporation has fabricated a concentrator silicon cell with 20.9% peak efficiency, at 90X concentration. Varian Associates has demonstrated a 26.0% efficient GaAs cell at 700X concentration. Hughes Research Labs together with Applied Solar Energy Corporation and Sandia has demonstrated a 24.7% efficient, at 70X concentration, mechanically-stacked multijunction device using GaAs on silicon. In addition, a record efficiency for silicon technology has been demonstrated with the Sandia developed 200X silicon module. The module has been measured to have 17% peak efficiency. This paper will review these accomplishments, other research progress, and current research directions in concentrator cells, modules, and arrays. A brief economic assessment is also presented which indicates the potential of concentrator technology.

  18. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Peter J.; O’Shaughnessy, Colette M.; Siggins, Matthew K.; Bobat, Saeeda; Kingsley, Robert A.; Goulding, David A.; Crump, John A.; Reyburn, Hugh; Micoli, Francesca; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F.; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies. PMID:26741681

  19. Overcoming the susceptibility gap between maternal antibody disappearance and auto-antibody production.

    PubMed

    Yosipovich, Roni; Aizenshtein, Elina; Shadmon, Roy; Krispel, Simcha; Shuster, Efrat; Pitcovski, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    In the first 10-14 days of a chick's life, protection is conferred by maternal antibodies. Further broiler protection is achieved by active vaccination. However, the high level of maternal antibodies interferes with the induction of an effective immune response by vaccination at a young age. As a result, there is a gap between the reduction in protective maternal antibodies and elevation of self-produced antibodies following active vaccination. The major aim of this study was to test an approach consisting of passive and active vaccination to overcome this gap and to provide continuous resistance to infectious viral diseases during the broiler's growth period. Newcastle disease virus (NDV), which is one of the world's most prevalent infectious diseases of poultry, was tested as a model. Following subcutaneous injection of 18 hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) units of anti-NDV immunoglobulin Y per 1-day-old chick, protective log2 antibody titers above 4 could be detected to at least 17 days of age. The combination of passive immunization on day 1 of age with attenuated live vaccination on day 10 led to high protective titers throughout the entire growth period, up to 41 days of age. Moreover, the HI titers in the group of birds immunized with the combined vaccination were significantly more homogeneous than those in the group vaccinated only with live virus. Thus, full protection against NDV of all broilers in flock during their entire growth period was achieved by a vaccination regime that combines passive immunization and live vaccination. PMID:25444785

  20. Fourth National Conference on Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    The proceedings contain the papers given and digests of group topics discussed at the 1949 National Conference on Citizenship held in New York. An introduction by the chairman of the conference committee identified the conference theme as "Responsible American Citizens" and noted that discussion would center on citizens in politics, in the world,…

  1. PRACTICAL GUIDE TO CONFERENCE LEADERSHIP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MORGAN, JOHN S.

    THIS GUIDE TO CONFERENCE LEADERSHIP BEGINS WITH A CHAPTER ON LEADERSHIP PSYCHOLOGY AND GOES ON TO PRESENT OUTLINES FOR RUNNING CONFERENCES. THE LEADER PREPARES FOR THE MEETING BY COLLECTING FACTS ON THE SUBJECT, PREPARING AN OUTLINE, KNOWING THE PARTICIPANTS, MAKING PHYSICAL ARRANGEMENTS, AND WRITING THE TENTATIVE SUMMARY. IN THE CONFERENCE HE…

  2. ALA Conference 2009: Chicago Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    There is joy among those who have the funds to go to Chicago for the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference, July 9-15. Every librarian knows there is nothing better than a Chicago gathering, with the city's wonderful haunts, museums, restaurants, and fine memories of past conferences. The conference program covers nearly every…

  3. Reshaping Antibody Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Ekiert, Damian C.; Ahmad, Insha; Yu, Wenli; Zhang, Yong; Bazirgan, Omar; Torkamani, Ali; Raudsepp, Terje; Mwangi, Waithaka; Criscitiello, Michael F.; Wilson, Ian A.; Schultz, Peter G.; Smider, Vaughn V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Unlike humans or mice, some species have limited genome encoded combinatorial diversity potential, yet mount a robust antibody response. Cows are unusual in having exceptionally long CDR H3 loops and few V-regions, but the mechanism for creating diversity is not understood. Deep sequencing revealed that ultralong CDR H3s contain a remarkable complexity of cysteines, suggesting that disulfide-bonded mini-domains may arise during repertoire development. Indeed, crystal structures of two cow antibodies reveal that these CDR H3s form a very unusual architecture composed of a β-strand “stalk” that supports a structurally diverse, disulfide-bonded, “knob” domain. Sequence analysis suggests that diversity arises from somatic hypermutation of an ultralong DH with a severe codon bias towards mutation to cysteine. These unusual antibodies can be elicited to recognize defined antigens through the knob domain. Thus, the bovine immune system produces an antibody repertoire composed of CDR H3s of unprecedented length that fold into a diversity of mini-domains generated through combinations of somatically generated disulfides. PMID:23746848

  4. Choriocarcinoma: blocking factor and monoclonal antibody iodine 131 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pattillo, R.A.; Khazaeli, M.B.; Ruckert, A.C.; Hussa, R.O.; Collier, B.D.; Beierwaltes, W.; Mattingly, R.F.

    1984-04-01

    Postoperative iodine 131 monoclonal antibody localization in metastatic choriocarcinoma was accomplished in this study. The monoclonal antibody was prepared to male choriocarcinoma which cross reacted with gestational choriocarcinoma. The antibody was raised against whole choriocarcinoma cells and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) cross reactivity was excluded. The purified antibody was iodinated with /sup 131/I and successfully imaged BeWo choriocarcinoma transplanted in nude mice; however, imaging of choriocarcinoma in a patient was verified only after resection. It is our belief that failure to sufficiently concentrate the antibody in the tumor before operation was due to blocking factor in the serum of the patient. Blocking factor and hCG dropped postoperatively. Blocking factor activity in 15 patients with metastatic trophoblastic disease was monitored and, like hCG, was found to be a sensitive indicator of the presence of disease. Its efficacy may be in the small number of patients without hCG but with persistent disease.

  5. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000547.htm Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining ...

  6. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Identification Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alloantibody Identification; Antibody ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red Blood Cell ...

  7. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the ...

  8. Humanized Antibodies for Antiviral Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Co, Man Sung; Deschamps, Marguerite; Whitley, Richard J.; Queen, Cary

    1991-04-01

    Antibody therapy holds great promise for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections. Murine monoclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce but are severely restricted for therapeutic use by their immunogenicity in humans. Production of human monoclonal antibodies has been problematic. Humanized antibodies can be generated by introducing the six hypervariable regions from the heavy and light chains of a murine antibody into a human framework sequence and combining it with human constant regions. We humanized, with the aid of computer modeling, two murine monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus gB and gD glycoproteins. The binding, virus neutralization, and cell protection results all indicate that both humanized antibodies have retained the binding activities and the biological properties of the murine monoclonal antibodies.

  9. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... may make the diagnosis of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) if: You have had a blood clot or ... your risk of blood clots. ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODY SYNDROME (APS) In general you will need long-term treatment ...

  10. The Art of Making Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headon, Denis R.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the nature and production of antibodies. Points out that the production of monoclonal antibodies blends the malignant with the beneficial to create a medical tool of exciting potential. (JN)

  11. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  12. Production, isolation, and characterization of rabbit anti-idiotypic antibodies directed against human antithyrotrophin receptor antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J R; Lukes, Y G; Burman, K D

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that anti-idiotypic antibodies can be developed in vivo through animal immunization with idiotype, and that these antibodies can be isolated from other anti-immunoglobulin antibodies by affinity purification. These techniques have relied on large amounts of idiotype, which were produced either by hyperimmunization or by monoclonal antibodies, to serve as the affinity adsorbent. In the present study, we produced anti-idiotypic antibodies to human anti-thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibodies by first injecting rabbits with (TSH receptor purified) IgG from Graves' patients. The resulting antiserum was then adsorbed with Sepharose-coupled TSH in an attempt to specifically bind and isolate the anti-idiotype. The antibody obtained from this process was shown to bind specifically to TSH receptor-binding antibodies from Graves' patients, and this binding could be inhibited by 56% with the addition of 10(-4) M TSH but not by HCG (10(-2) M). The anti-idiotype also bound to TSH, and this binding could be specifically inhibited by receptor-purified Graves' IgG (60% inhibition at 10 micrograms/ml IgG), but not by IgG from normal subjects (no inhibition at 50 micrograms/ml IgG). In a TSH receptor binding assay, the anti-idiotype could inhibit TSH receptor binding in Graves' sera at a 1,000-fold lower concentration than could anti-kappa/lambda antiserum; the anti-idiotypic antiserum also inhibited in vitro TSH-mediated adenylate cyclase stimulation at an IgG concentration of 5 micrograms/ml, while heterologous anti-TSH antisera and normal IgG at similar concentrations had no effect. Finally, despite being generated against a single patient's TSH receptor binding antibody, the anti-idiotype was able to block TSH receptor binding in the serum of six other Graves' patients, thus suggesting that there may be conformational conservation in the antigen that is recognized by different individuals' TSH receptor-binding immunoglobulins. PMID

  13. Therapeutic antibodies in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Magdelaine-Beuzelin, Charlotte; Pinault, Coralie; Paintaud, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    More than a century after the first successful use of serotherapy, antibody-based therapy has been renewed by the availability of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. As in the past, current clinical experience has prompted new pharmacological questions and induced much debate among practitioners, notably in the field of ophthalmology. An examination of the history of antibodies as treatments for ocular disorders reveals interesting parallels to the modern era. The fact that a treatment administered by a systemic route could be efficacious in a local disease was not widely accepted and the “chemical” nature of antibodies was not clearly understood in the late 19th century. Clinical studies by Henry Coppez, a Belgian ophthalmologist, established in 1894 that antidiphtheric antitoxins could be used to treat conjunctival diphtheria. Nearly 20 years later, Coppez and Danis described age-related macular degeneration, a disorder which today benefits from ranibizumab therapy. The product, a locally-administered recombinant monoclonal Fab fragment, is directed against vascular endothelial growth factor A. Interestingly, its full-size counterpart, bevacizumab, which is approved for the treatment of solid tumors, has also demonstrated efficacy in age-related macular degeneration when administered either intravenously or locally, which raises new questions about antibody pharmacology and biodistribution. In order to shed some light on this debate, we recount the early history of serotherapy applied to ophthalmology, review the exact molecular differences between ranibizumab and bevacizumab, and discuss what is known about IgG and the blood-retina barrier and the possible role of FcRn, an IgG transporter. PMID:21358858

  14. Antibodies to cardiac receptors.

    PubMed

    Boivin-Jahns, V; Schlipp, A; Hartmann, S; Panjwani, P; Klingel, K; Lohse, M J; Ertl, G; Jahns, R

    2012-12-01

    Inflammation of cardiac tissue is generally associated with an activation of the host's immune system. On the one hand, this activation is mandatory to protect the heart by fighting the invading microbial agents or toxins and by engaging myocardial reparation and healing processes. On the other hand, uncontrolled activation of the immune defense has the risk of an arousal of auto- or cross-reactive immune cells, which in some cases bring more harm than good. Dependent on the individual genetic predisposition, such heart-directed autoimmune reactions most likely occur as a result of myocyte apoptosis or necrosis and subsequent liberation of self-antigens previously hidden to the immune system. During the past two decades, evidence for a pathogenic relevance of autoimmunity in human heart disease has substantially increased. Conformational cardiac (auto)antibodies affecting cardiac function and, in particular, (auto)antibodies that target G protein-coupled cardiac membrane receptors are thought to play a key role in the development of heart failure. Clinical pilot studies even suggest that such antibodies negatively affect survival in heart failure patients. However, the true prevalence and clinical impact of many cardiac (auto)antibodies in human heart diseases are still unclear, as are the events triggering their formation, their titer course, and their patterns of clearance and/or persistence. The present article summarizes current knowledge in the field of cardiac receptor (auto)antibodies including recent efforts to address some of the aforementioned gaps of knowledge, thereby attempting to pave the way for novel, more specific therapeutic approaches. PMID:23183584

  15. European Conference on Health Economics.

    PubMed

    Malmivaara, Antti

    2010-12-01

    The biennial European Conference on Health Economics was held in Finland this year, at the Finlandia Hall in the centre of Helsinki. The European conferences rotate among European countries and fall between the biennial world congresses organized by the International Health Economics Association (iHEA). A record attendance of approximately 800 delegates from 50 countries around the world were present at the Helsinki conference. The theme of the conference was 'Connecting Health and Economics'. All major topics of health economics were covered in the sessions. For the first time, social care economics was included in the agenda of the European Conference as a session of its own. PMID:21155696

  16. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  17. Mississippi Climate & Hydrology Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Lawford, R.; Huang, J.

    2002-05-01

    The GEWEX Continental International Project (GCIP), which started in 1995 and completed in 2001, held its grand finale conference in New Orleans, LA in May 2002. Participants at this conference along with the scientists funded through the GCIP program are invited to contribute a paper to a special issue of Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR). This special JGR issue (called GCIP3) will serve as the final report on scientific research conducted by GCIP investigators. Papers are solicited on the following topical areas, but are not limited to, (1) water energy budget studies; (2) warm season precipitation; (3) predictability and prediction system; (4) coupled land-atmosphere models; (5) climate and water resources applications. The research areas cover observations, modeling, process studies and water resources applications.

  18. NSI conference support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, Susan

    1991-01-01

    One of the many services NSI provides as an extension of customer/user support is to attend major scientific conferences. The conference effort provides NASA/OSSA scientists with many benefits: (1) scientist get to see NSI in action; they utilize the network to read email, and have recently begun to demonstrate their scientific research to their colleagues; (2) scientist get an opportunity to meet and interact with NSI Staff, which gives scientists a chance to get status on their requirements, ask about network status, get acquainted with our procedures, and learn about services; and (3) scientists are exposed to networking in a larger sense; particularly by knowing about other NASA groups who provide valuable scientific resources over the Internet.

  19. Metabolic Engineering VII Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Korpics

    2012-12-04

    The aims of this Metabolic Engineering conference are to provide a forum for academic and industrial researchers in the field; to bring together the different scientific disciplines that contribute to the design, analysis and optimization of metabolic pathways; and to explore the role of Metabolic Engineering in the areas of health and sustainability. Presentations, both written and oral, panel discussions, and workshops will focus on both applications and techniques used for pathway engineering. Various applications including bioenergy, industrial chemicals and materials, drug targets, health, agriculture, and nutrition will be discussed. Workshops focused on technology development for mathematical and experimental techniques important for metabolic engineering applications will be held for more in depth discussion. This 2008 meeting will celebrate our conference tradition of high quality and relevance to both industrial and academic participants, with topics ranging from the frontiers of fundamental science to the practical aspects of metabolic engineering.

  20. IEEE conference record -- Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This conference covers the following areas: computational plasma physics; vacuum electronic; basic phenomena in fully ionized plasmas; plasma, electron, and ion sources; environmental/energy issues in plasma science; space plasmas; plasma processing; ball lightning/spherical plasma configurations; plasma processing; fast wave devices; magnetic fusion; basic phenomena in partially ionized plasma; dense plasma focus; plasma diagnostics; basic phenomena in weakly ionized gases; fast opening switches; MHD; fast z-pinches and x-ray lasers; intense ion and electron beams; laser-produced plasmas; microwave plasma interactions; EM and ETH launchers; solid state plasmas and switches; intense beam microwaves; and plasmas for lighting. Separate abstracts were prepared for 416 papers in this conference.

  1. Energy Conferences and Symposia; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, J.H.; Simpson, W.F. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Energy Conferences and Symposia, a monthly publication, was instituted to keep scientists, engineers, managers, and related energy professionals abreast of meetings sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and by other technical associations. Announcements cover conference, symposia, workshops, congresses, and other formal meetings pertaining to DOE programmatic interests. Complete meeting information, including title, sponsor, and contact, is presented in the main section, which is arranged alphabetically by subject area. Within a subject, citations are sorted by beginning data of the meeting. New listings are indicated by a bullet after the conference number and DOE-sponsored conferences are indicated by a star. Two indexes are provided for cross referencing conference information. The Chronological Index lists conference titles by dates and gives the subject area where complete information they may be found. The Location Index is alphabetically sorted by the city where the conference will be held.

  2. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed. PMID:25264572

  3. SAARC Conference on Children.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    In September 1992, in Colombo, Sri Lanka, ministry representatives attended the 2nd South Asian Ministerial Conference on Children to discuss child survival and safe motherhood, maternal and child nutrition, basic education, safe water, sanitation, the environment, child rights, and sociopolitical strategy to reach goals and to reduce poverty. To achieve the 7 major goals and essential supportive goals for the region, each country must define tasks in manageable terms based on country-specific and community-specific needs and importance while at the same time countries should cooperate to strengthen prospects of achieving goals emerging as priorities. The Conference called for countries to reinforce their National Plans of Action with a regional perspective and to consider representative goals in primary education, diarrhea control, iodine deficiency disorders, reducing gender disparity, family size, child labor, drinking water, guinea worm disease, immunization, maternal mortality, and nutrition. The Conference emphasized that the strategy for reaching child-centered goals should be integrated with the total development strategy and be a holistic approach. For example, governments need to expand social safety programs for children and women because of structural adjustments in the economy. The resolution also called on governments to allow community-led local planning. A working group at the conference made recommendations for supporting/sectoral goals on water supply, sanitation, and environment. For example, it called for universal access to potable water and sanitary means of excreta disposal by 2000 and for adequate shelter and services to improve the living environment of children in South Asia. Some recommended strategies to achieve these goals were community participation; decentralization; promotion of self-reliance, cost-sharing, and sustainability; and special training for women. Other areas they addressed were home gardens for vegetables and fruits

  4. Moldova. Historic regional conference.

    PubMed

    Moshin, V

    1995-05-01

    The Directorate of Maternal and Child Health and the Family Planning Association of Moldova organized a regional conference, which was held October 18-19, 1994, in Kishinev, Moldova, with the support of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). The conference,"Problems of Family Planning in Eastern Europe," was attended by approximately 400 Moldovan delegates of governmental and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and by 25 delegates from Romania, Russia, Belarus, the Ukraine, and Georgia. The President of Moldova and the Ministry of Public Health of Moldova gave their approval. The main objectives of the conference were to inform the public about the recommendations of the ICPD, to analyze the status of women's reproductive health and family planning in Eastern Europe, and to find ways of implementing the ICPD Plan of Action. Major problems identified during the conference were: 1) the social and economic problems facing most families; 2) the high rate of morbidity and mortality; 3) the decrease in birth rate; 4) the increase in abortions; 5) the rising incidence of venereal disease; and 6) the absence of an effective family planning system. It was agreed that cooperation between governments and NGOs is essential in designing population programs for each country. The following goals were set: 1) to provide populations with sufficient contraceptives; 2) to actively promote family planning concepts through the mass media; 3) to train specialists and to open family planning offices and centers; 4) to introduce sex education in the curricula of Pedagogical Institutes; and 5) to create national and regional statistical and sociological databases on population issues. PMID:12222268

  5. 1999 IEEE radar conference

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    This conference addresses the stringent radar technology demands facing the next century: target detection, tracking and identification; changing target environment; increased clutter mitigation techniques; air traffic control; transportation; drug smuggling; remote sensing, and other consumer oriented applications. A timely discussion covers how to minimize costs for these emerging areas. Advanced radar technology theory and applications are also presented. Topics covered include: signal processing; space time adaptive processing/antennas; surveillance technology; radar systems; dual use; and phenomenology.

  6. An improved procedure of specific polysome precipitation with antibody.

    PubMed

    Ono, M; Kawakami, M

    1976-06-01

    The specific immunoprecipitation of polysomes prepared from a mouse myeloma, 31C, synthesizing an IgG1 immunoglobulin has been investigated. A reported method in which polysomes were coprecipitated by sequential addition of antibody to 31C myeloma protein, antigen (i.e., the 31C protein) and again the antibody, was used. Salt concentration greatly affected the immunoprecipitation of polysomes. In the presence of 100 mM KCl or NaCl, 10-20% of myeloma polysomes and only 1% of mouse liver polysomes were precipitated with the antibody to myeloma protein. On the other hand, 90% of the both polysomes were precipitated by the same antibody at a salt concentration of 10 mM. Triton X-100 and sucrose had little effect on preventing nonspecific binding of immunoglobulin to ribosomes. Experiments were carried out to obtain an optimal ratio of the amount of polysome to that of antibody and antigen to be added for the coprecipitation of polysomes. To date we have tried 25 mug of the first antibody, 14 mug of antigen added second to the polysomes and 38 mug of the antibody added finally and these were found to precipitate most efficiently one A260 unit of 31C polysomes. PMID:787604

  7. A mechanistic compartmental model for total antibody uptake in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Dane Wittrup, K.

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies are under development to treat a variety of cancers, such as lymphomas, colon, and breast cancer. A major limitation to greater efficacy for this class of drugs is poor distribution in vivo. Localization of antibodies occurs slowly, often in insufficient therapeutic amounts, and distributes heterogeneously throughout the tumor. While the microdistribution around individual vessels is important for many therapies, the total amount of antibody localized in the tumor is paramount for many applications such as imaging, determining the therapeutic index with antibody drug conjugates, and dosing in radioimmunotherapy. With imaging and pretargeted therapeutic strategies, the time course of uptake is critical in determining when to take an image or deliver a secondary reagent. We present here a simple mechanistic model of antibody uptake and retention that captures the major rates that determine the time course of antibody concentration within a tumor including dose, affinity, plasma clearance, target expression, internalization, permeability, and vascularization. Since many of the parameters are known or can be estimated in vitro, this model can approximate the time course of antibody concentration in tumors to aid in experimental design, data interpretation, and strategies to improve localization. PMID:22974563

  8. SALT Science Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David; Schroeder, Anja

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) has seen great changes in the last years following the beginning of full time science operations in 2011. The three first generation instruments, namely the SALTICAM imager, the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) and its multiple modes and finally in 2014, the new High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS), have commissioned it. The SALT community now eagerly anticipate the installation and commissioning of the near-infrared arm of RSS, likely to commence in 2016. The the third "Science with SALT" conference was held at the Stellenbosch Institute of Advanced Study from 1-5 June 2015. The goals of this conference were to: -Present and discuss recent results from SALT observations; -Anticipate scientific programs that will be carried out with new SALT instrumentation such as RSS-NIR; -Provide a scientific environment in which to foster inter-institutional and inter-facility collaborations between scientists at the different SALT partners; -Provide an opportunity for students and postdocs to become more engaged in SALT science and operations; -Encourage the scientific strategic planning that will be necessary to insure an important role for SALT in an era of large astronomical facilities in the southern hemisphere such as MeerKAT, the SKA, LSST, and ALMA; -Consider options for future instrumentation and technical development of SALT; and, -Present, discuss, and engage in the SALT Collateral Benefits program led by SAAO. Conference proceedings editors: David Buckley and Anja Schroeder

  9. 2004 Mutagenesis Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Sue Jinks-Robertson

    2005-09-16

    Mutations are genetic alterations that drive biological evolution and cause many, if not all, human diseases. Mutation originates via two distinct mechanisms: ''vertical'' variation is de novo change of one or few bases, whereas ''horizontal'' variation occurs by genetic recombination, which creates new mosaics of pre-existing sequences. The Mutagenesis Conference has traditionally focused on the generation of mutagenic intermediates during normal DNA synthesis or in response to environmental insults, as well as the diverse repair mechanisms that prevent the fixation of such intermediates as permanent mutations. While the 2004 Conference will continue to focus on the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis, there will be increased emphasis on the biological consequences of mutations, both in terms of evolutionary processes and in terms of human disease. The meeting will open with two historical accounts of mutation research that recapitulate the intellectual framework of this field and thereby place the current research paradigms into perspective. The two introductory keynote lectures will be followed by sessions on: (1) mutagenic systems, (2) hypermutable sequences, (3) mechanisms of mutation, (4) mutation avoidance systems, (5) mutation in human hereditary and infectious diseases, (6) mutation rates in evolution and genotype-phenotype relationships, (7) ecology, mutagenesis and the modeling of evolution and (8) genetic diversity of the human population and models for human mutagenesis. The Conference will end with a synthesis of the meeting as the keynote closing lecture.

  10. PREFACE: 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsson, Hans

    1982-01-01

    Invited Papers: The Physics of Hot Plasmas During the last decade a dramatic evolution of plasma physics has occurred. Not only have gigantic fusion plasma machines been planned, and are now being built, and elaborate spaceships and antenna systems been constructed to explore remote parts of the cosmos; new observations have revealed fascinating structures in space, ranging from pulsar plasmas under extreme conditions in very strong magnetic fields to large-scale magnetic field and electric current systems in cosmic plasmas. X-rays from very distant sources as well as radio-waves from the plasma in the magnetosphere and in the Aurora have recently been studied with new observational techniques. Ingenious laboratory experiments are continuously being carried out to exploit new fundamental processes in plasmas. These are of great interest for the basic understanding of plasmas and also have immediate consequences for applications, like plasma heating and diagnostics. The theoretical description of new plasma phenomena, and of the plasma state in general poses challenging problems, particularly in situations where high concentration of energy is located in the plasmas. Nonlinear wave analysis and turbulence theory have accordingly been extensively developed to describe in particular the collective plasma phenomena. New concepts have been envisaged like plasma solitons, which may be thought of as excitations of local concentrations of longitudinal plasma waves which turn out to be particularly stable. More and more sophisticated structures of nonlinear nature are being revealed by means of high capacity computer facilities. Simulation experiments allow for studies of chaotic behaviour of plasma particles. Related fields of activity form new trends in the development of plasma theory. The programme of the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics, which was held in Göteborg, Sweden, stressed the role of the Physics of Hot Plasmas. Studies of such plasmas are

  11. Viral receptor-binding site antibodies with diverse germline origins

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Aaron G.; Therkelsen, Matthew D.; Stewart, Shaun; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M. Anthony; Haynes, Barton F.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines for rapidly evolving pathogens will confer lasting immunity if they elicit antibodies recognizing conserved epitopes, such as a receptor-binding site (RBS). From characteristics of an influenza-virus RBS-directed antibody, we devised a signature motif to search for similar antibodies. We identified, from three vaccinees, over 100 candidates encoded by eleven different VH genes. Crystal structures show that antibodies in this class engage the hemagglutinin RBS and mimic binding of the receptor, sialic acid, by supplying a critical dipeptide on their projecting, heavy-chain third complementarity determining region. They share contacts with conserved, receptor-binding residues but contact different residues on the RBS periphery, limiting the likelihood of viral escape when several such antibodies are present. These data show that related modes of RBS recognition can arise from different germline origins and mature through diverse affinity maturation pathways. Immunogens focused on an RBS-directed response will thus have a broad range of B-cell targets. PMID:25959776

  12. Focusing antibody responses against distraction and loss in diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenshen; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup

    Pathogens are complex and evolving fast. They have developed full ranges of disguises to divert immune responses and often manage to escape recognition and thereby outpace natural immunity. A prominent example is the scarce and staggered development of broadly neutralizing antibodies against highly mutable viruses. It remains unclear under what evolutionary conditions these exceptional antibodies could emerge and dominate the response. To address this challenge, we construct an individual-based stochastic model of the Darwinian evolution of antibody-producing immune cells. We consider complexity of viral epitopes, vary seeding diversity of the immune cell population, and allow a time varying population size and extinction - new aspects essential for designing a realistic vaccine. We show that various temporal statistics of antigenic environments would select distinct evolutionary paths that lead to predominantly non-neutralizing, strain-specific or broadly neutralizing antibody responses. We suggest strategies to focus antibody responses on the targeted vulnerability of the virus and confer selective advantage to cross-reactive lineages. This implies a new step toward an effective vaccine against rapidly mutating complex pathogens. This work is supported by NIH.

  13. Viral receptor-binding site antibodies with diverse germline origins.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Aaron G; Therkelsen, Matthew D; Stewart, Shaun; Kepler, Thomas B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M Anthony; Haynes, Barton F; Harrison, Stephen C

    2015-05-21

    Vaccines for rapidly evolving pathogens will confer lasting immunity if they elicit antibodies recognizing conserved epitopes, such as a receptor-binding site (RBS). From characteristics of an influenza-virus RBS-directed antibody, we devised a signature motif to search for similar antibodies. We identified, from three vaccinees, over 100 candidates encoded by 11 different VH genes. Crystal structures show that antibodies in this class engage the hemagglutinin RBS and mimic binding of the receptor, sialic acid, by supplying a critical dipeptide on their projecting, heavy-chain third complementarity determining region. They share contacts with conserved, receptor-binding residues but contact different residues on the RBS periphery, limiting the likelihood of viral escape when several such antibodies are present. These data show that related modes of RBS recognition can arise from different germline origins and mature through diverse affinity maturation pathways. Immunogens focused on an RBS-directed response will thus have a broad range of B cell targets. PMID:25959776

  14. Targeting antibodies to the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Andrea L J; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Schüngel, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of research consortia are now focused on generating antibodies and recombinant antibody fragments that target the human proteome. A particularly valuable application for these binding molecules would be their use inside a living cell, e.g., for imaging or functional intervention. Animal-derived antibodies must be brought into the cell through the membrane, whereas the availability of the antibody genes from phage display systems allows intracellular expression. Here, the various technologies to target intracellular proteins with antibodies are reviewed. PMID:21099369

  15. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially. PMID:22277519

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to gonadotropin subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, P.H.; Moyle, W.R.; Canfield, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies to peptide hormones, with their unifocal binding sites, can provide tools for understanding hormone structure and function. The paper focuses on techniques that are important for the study of monoclonal antibodies to chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), including hybridoma production, methods of screening for desired clones, properties of the monoclonal antibodies, effect of antibodies on hormone-receptor interaction, inhibition of binding of radiolabeled hCG, inhibition of hCG induced steroidogenesis, determination of relative orientation of epitopes, and synergistic actions of monoclonal antibodies to hCG.

  17. Treatment of leukemia with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sgouros, G; Scheinberg, D A

    1993-01-01

    In contrast to radioimmunotherapy of solid disease, wherein the primary obstacle to success is access of radiolabeled antibody to antigen-positive cells, in the treatment of leukemia delivering a lethal absorbed dose to the isolated cell appears to be the primary obstacle. The isolated cell is defined as one that is exposed only to self-irradiation (from internalized or surface-bound radiolabeled antibody) and to irradiation from free antibody in the blood. It is isolated in the sense that the particulate (beta, electron, alpha) emissions from its nearest neighboring antigen-positive cell do not contribute to its absorbed dose. Disease in the bone marrow and other tissues, since it is confined to a smaller volume, is more easily eradicated because the absorbed dose to a given cell nucleus is enhanced by emissions from adjacent cells (a smaller fraction of the emission energy is 'wasted'). The optimization simulations presented above for the M195 antibody suggest that the optimum dose of antibody that should be administered is that required to yield a concentration within the distribution volume of the antibody that is approximately equal to the concentration of antigen sites as determined by the tumor burden. Although not specifically considered in the modeling example presented above, antibody internalization and catabolism may be expected to play an important role in radioimmunotherapy treatment planning of leukemia. Depending upon the kinetics of internalization and catabolism, the absorbed dose to the red marrow and to antigen-positive cells may be reduced considerably, since catabolism, assuming that it is followed by rapid extrusion of the radioactive label, would decrease the cells' exposure time considerably. The recently demonstrated effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy in certain cases of B-cell lymphoma and in reducing tumor burden in acute myelogenous leukemia suggests that radioimmunotherapy is beginning to fulfill the promise held when it was initially

  18. Direct binding of radioiodinated monoclonal antibody to tumor cells: significance of antibody purity and affinity for drug targeting or tumor imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, S.J.; Foote, L.J.; Lankford, P.K.; Johnson, M.; Mitchell, T.; Braslawsky, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    For MoAb to be used efficiently for drug targeting and tumor imaging, the fraction of antibody binding to tumor cells must be maximized. We have studied the binding of 125I MoAb in three different tumor systems. The fraction of antibody that could be bound to the cell surface was directly proportional to the antibody purity. The affinity constant also limits the fraction of antibody that can bind to cells at a given antigen concentration. Rearrangement of the standard expression for univalent equilibrium binding between two reactants shows that in antigen excess, the maximum fraction of antibody that can bind (formula; see text). Binding data using four different MoAb with three cell systems confirm this relationship. Estimates for reasonable concentrations of tumor antigens in vivo indicate that antibodies with binding constants less than 10(8) M-1 are not likely to be useful for drug targeting or tumor imaging.

  19. A Recap of the Fourth Nationwide Vocational Education Dissemination Conference. The Proceedings (Columbus, Ohio, November 17-19, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Norman M., Comp.; Grieve, Shelley, Comp.

    These proceedings summarize the Fourth Nationwide Vocational Education Dissemination Conference that concentrated on the knowledge, tools, techniques, and topical areas needed by disseminators, linkers, and other change agents. Introductory materials are a conference overview, reflections on the conference, and the agenda. Brief summaries follow…

  20. Therapeutic antibodies against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Mark J.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics against cancer are highly successful in clinic and currently enjoy unprecedented recognition of their potential; 13 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for clinical use in the European Union and in the United States (one, mylotarg, was withdrawn from market in 2010). Three of the mAbs (bevacizumab, rituximab, trastuzumab) are in the top six selling protein therapeutics with sales in 2010 of more than $5 bln each. Hundreds of mAbs including bispecific mAbs and multispecific fusion proteins, mAbs conjugated with small molecule drugs and mAbs with optimized pharmacokinetics are in clinical trials. However, challenges remain and it appears that deeper understanding of mechanisms is needed to overcome major problems including resistance to therapy, access to targets, complexity of biological systems and individual variations. PMID:22520975

  1. Antibody Therapy for Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M.; Hamilton, Andrew J.; Guimarães, Allan J.

    2012-01-01

    The endemic human pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum is a major fungal pathogen with a broad variety of clinical presentations, ranging from mild, focal pulmonary disease to life-threatening systemic infections. Although azoles, such as itraconazole and voriconazole, and amphotericin B have significant activity against H. capsulatum, about 1 in 10 patients hospitalized due to histoplasmosis die. Hence, new approaches for managing disease are being sought. Over the past 10 years, studies have demonstrated that monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can modify the pathogenesis of histoplasmosis. Disease has been shown to be impacted by mAbs targeting either fungal cell surface proteins or host co-stimulatory molecules. This review will detail our current knowledge regarding the impact of antibody therapy on histoplasmosis. PMID:22347215

  2. Antibody-mediated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, W.D.; Lipsztein, R.; Dalton, J.F.

    1985-05-01

    Antibodies that react with antigens on the surface of tumor cells but not normal cells have great potential for cancer detection and therapy. If radiolabeled without loss of immunologic specificity, such antibodies may be able to deliver cytoxic amounts of radiation. Target- cell specificity and a high extraction coefficient are necessary with any radionuclide in order to minimize normal tissue irradiation. Tumor- cell-retention time and the rate of catabolized radionuclide will also influence ultimate applicability. Among the unanswered questions for choosing a radionuclide is the choice of particle emitter. Although classic beta emitters have been used in a number of clinical situations, they have not had a major impact on disease outcome except in diseases of the thyroid. Unfortunately, Auger emitters such as iodine 125 are cytotoxic only when localized within close proximity to the genome. On the other hand, alpha emitters such as astatine 211 eliminate the need for subcellular sequestration but not cell-specific localization. 34 references.

  3. Prediction of Antibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies recognize their cognate antigens in a precise and effective way. In order to do so, they target regions of the antigenic molecules that have specific features such as large exposed areas, presence of charged or polar atoms, specific secondary structure elements, and lack of similarity to self-proteins. Given the sequence or the structure of a protein of interest, several methods exploit such features to predict the residues that are more likely to be recognized by an immunoglobulin. Here, we present two methods (BepiPred and DiscoTope) to predict linear and discontinuous antibody epitopes from the sequence and/or the three-dimensional structure of a target protein. PMID:26424260

  4. Anti-idiotypic antibodies induce neutralizing antibodies to bovine herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed Central

    Srikumaran, S; Onisk, D V; Borca, M V; Nataraj, C; Zamb, T J

    1990-01-01

    A neutralizing murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) of the IgG2a isotype (MM-113), specific for bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) glycoprotein gIV, was used to develop anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Id) in a calf. The bovine anti-Id were isolated from the serum of the immunized calf by affinity chromatography on an MM-113-Sepharose column, followed by repeated adsorption on a murine IgG2a column. The anti-Id thus obtained specifically reacted with MM-113, but not with isotype-matched controls. They also inhibited the binding of MM-113 to BHV-1 in a concentration-dependent manner. Mice immunized with the anti-Id produced neutralizing antibodies to BHV-1. The anti-Id bound to cells permissive to BHV-1 in a cell-binding radioimmunoassay (RIA). PMID:2165998

  5. Commercial antibodies and their validation

    PubMed Central

    Voskuil, JLA

    2014-01-01

    Despite an impressive growth in the business of research antibodies a general lack of trust in commercial antibodies remains in place. A variety of issues, each one potentially causing an antibody to fail, underpin the frustrations that scientists endure. Lots of money goes to waste in buying and trying one failing antibody after the other without realizing all the pitfalls that come with the product: Antibodies can get inactivated, both the biological material and the assay itself can potentially be flawed, a single antibody featuring in many different catalogues can be deemed as a set of different products, and a bad choice of antibody type, wrong dilutions, and lack of proper validation can all jeopardize the intended experiments. Antibodies endorsed by scientific research papers do not always meet the scientist’s requirements either due to flawed specifications, or due to batch-to-batch variations. Antibodies can be found with Quality Control data obtained from previous batches that no longer represent the batch on sale. In addition, one cannot assume that every antibody is fit for every application. The best chance of success is to try an antibody that already was confirmed to perform correctly in the required platform. PMID:25324967

  6. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column. PMID:27515072

  7. A monoclonal antibody against leptin.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Vojgani, Yasaman; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Hadavi, Reza; Zarei, Saeed

    2012-10-01

    Leptin is an important protein that regulates energy storage and homeostasis in humans and animals. Leptin deficiency results in various abnormalities such as diabetes, obesity, and infertility. Producing a high affinity monoclonal antibody against human leptin provides an important tool to monitor and trace leptin function in different biological fluids. In this study, recombinant human leptin was conjugated to KLH and injected into mice. After immunization, mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells were fused with murine splenocytes followed by selection of antibody-producing hybridoma cells. After screening of different hybridoma colonies by ELISA, a high affinity antibody was selected and purified by affinity chromatography. The affinity constant of the antibody was measured by ELISA. Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry experiments were used to characterize the antibody. The anti-leptin antibody had a high affinity (around 1.13 × 10(-9) M) for its antigen. The saturation of the antibody with leptin (20 moles leptin per 1 mole antibody) in Western blot analysis proved that the antibody had specific binding to its antigen. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry on JEG-3 (human placental choriocarcinoma cell) cells revealed that the anti-leptin antibody recognized intracellular leptin. In conclusion, we report here the production and characterization of a murine anti-leptin antibody with high affinity for human leptin. PMID:23098305

  8. Utilisation of antibody microarrays for the selection of specific and informative antibodies from recombinant library binders of unknown quality.

    PubMed

    Kibat, Janek; Schirrmann, Thomas; Knape, Matthias J; Helmsing, Saskia; Meier, Doris; Hust, Michael; Schröder, Christoph; Bertinetti, Daniela; Winter, Gerhard; Pardes, Khalid; Funk, Mia; Vala, Andrea; Giese, Nathalia; Herberg, Friedrich W; Dübel, Stefan; Hoheisel, Jörg D

    2016-09-25

    Many diagnostic and therapeutic concepts require antibodies of high specificity. Recombinant binder libraries and related selection approaches allow the efficient isolation of antibodies against almost every target of interest. Nevertheless, it cannot be guaranteed that selected antibodies perform well and interact specifically enough with analytes unless an elaborate characterisation is performed. Here, we present an approach to shorten this process by combining the selection of suitable antibodies with the identification of informative target molecules by means of antibody microarrays, thereby reducing the effort of antibody characterisation by concentrating on relevant molecules. In a pilot scheme, a library of 456 single-chain variable fragment (scFv) binders to 134 antigens was used. They were arranged in a microarray format and incubated with the protein content of clinical tissue samples isolated from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and healthy pancreas, as well as recurrent and non-recurrent bladder tumours. We observed significant variation in the expression of the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase (CHFR) as well as the glutamate receptor interacting protein 2 (GRIP2), for example, always with more than one of the scFvs binding to these targets. Only the relevant antibodies were then characterised further on antigen microarrays and by surface plasmon resonance experiments so as to select the most specific and highest affinity antibodies. These binders were in turn used to confirm a microarray result by immunohistochemistry analysis. PMID:26709003

  9. Quantitative Assessment of the Effects of Oxidants on Antigen-Antibody Binding In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuang; Wang, Guanyu; Xu, Naijin; Liu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We quantitatively assessed the influence of oxidants on antigen-antibody-binding activity. Methods. We used several immunological detection methods, including precipitation reactions, agglutination reactions, and enzyme immunoassays, to determine antibody activity. The oxidation-reduction potential was measured in order to determine total serum antioxidant capacity. Results. Certain concentrations of oxidants resulted in significant inhibition of antibody activity but had little influence on total serum antioxidant capacity. Conclusions. Oxidants had a significant influence on interactions between antigen and antibody, but minimal effect on the peptide of the antibody molecule. PMID:27313823

  10. PREFACE: Wake Conference 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, Andrew; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Ivanell, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The 44 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the 2015 Wake Conference, held in Visby on the island of Gotland in Sweden. It is the fourth time this conference has been held. The Wake Conference series started in Visby, where it was held in 2009 and 2011. In 2013 it took place in Copenhagen where it was combined with the International Conference on Offshore Wind Energy and Ocean Energy. In 2015 it is back where it started in Visby, where it takes place at Uppsala University Campus Gotland, June 9th-11th. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown tremendously in the past decade and it now comprises more than 3% of the global electrical power consumption. Today the wind power industry has a global annual turnover of more than 50 billion USD and an annual average growth rate of more than 20%. State-of-the-art wind turbines have rotor diameters of up to 150 m and 8 MW installed capacity. These turbines are often placed in large wind farms that have a total production capacity corresponding to that of a nuclear power plant. In order to make a substantial impact on one of the most significant challenges of our time, global warming, the industry's growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research into the physics of wind turbine wakes and wind farms. Modern wind turbines are today clustered in wind farms in which the turbines are fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream turbines. As a consequence, the wake behind the wind turbines has a lower mean wind speed and an increased turbulence level, as compared to the undisturbed flow outside the farm. Hence, wake interaction results in decreased total production of power, caused by lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. Therefore, understanding the physical nature of the vortices and their dynamics in the wake of a turbine is important for the optimal design of a wind farm. This conference is aimed

  11. Monoclonal Antibodies for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Louis M.; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Ferrone, Soldano

    2008-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have emerged as effective therapeutic agents for many human malignancies. However, the ability of antibodies to initiate tumor antigen-specific immune responses has not received as much attention as other mechanisms of antibody action. Here we describe the rationale and evidence for developing anti-cancer antibodies that can stimulate host tumor antigen-specific immune responses. This may be accomplished by inducing antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, by promoting antibody-targeted cross-presentation of tumor antigens or by triggering the idiotypic network. Future treatment modifications or combinations should be able to prolong, amplify and shape these immune responses to increase the clinical benefits of antibody therapy of human cancer. PMID:19304016

  12. Antibody therapy for Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary P

    2014-01-01

    Ebola viruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates with fatality rates up to 90%, and are identified as biosafety level 4 pathogens and CDC Category A Agents of Bioterrorism. To date, there are no approved therapies and vaccines available to treat these infections. Antibody therapy was estimated to be an effective and powerful treatment strategy against infectious pathogens in the late 19th, early 20th centuries but has fallen short to meet expectations to widely combat infectious diseases. Passive immunization for Ebola virus was successful in 2012, after over 15 years of failed attempts leading to skepticism that the approach would ever be of potential benefit. Currently, monoclonal antibody (mAbs)-based therapies are the most efficient at reversing the progression of a lethal Ebola virus infection in nonhuman primates, which recapitulate the human disease with the highest similarity. Novel combinations of mAbs can even fully cure lethally infected animals after clinical symptoms and circulating virus have been detected, days into the infection. These new developments have reopened the door for using antibody-based therapies for filovirus infections. Furthermore, they are reigniting hope that these strategies will contribute to better control the spread of other infectious agents and provide new tools against infectious diseases. PMID:24503566

  13. Long-term anti-HBs antibody persistence and immune memory in children and adolescents who received routine childhood hepatitis B vaccination.

    PubMed

    Behre, Ulrich; Bleckmann, Gerhard; Crasta, Priya Diana; Leyssen, Maarten; Messier, Marc; Jacquet, Jeanne-Marie; Hardt, Karin

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents data from two studies that evaluated 5-y and 10-y persistence of antibodies against hepatitis B (HBV) surface antigen (anti-HBs) and immune response to an HBV vaccine challenge in children and adolescents who had received three doses of a HBV vaccine in infancy as part of routine clinical practice [NCT00519649/NCT00984139]. Anti-HBs antibody concentrations ≥ 10 mIU/ml persisted in 83.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 78.5–87.5) and 78.3% (95% CI: 73.1–83.0) of subjects aged 7–8 y and 12–13 y, respectively 5–10 y after infant vaccination. One month postchallenge dose, 98.2% (95% CI: 95.9–99.4) and 93.7% (95% CI: 90.2–96.2) of subjects in the two age groups, respectively had anti-HBs antibody concentrations ≥ 100 mIU/ml. Overall, 99.6% (95% CI: 98–100) and 97.2% (95% CI: 94.5–98.8) of subjects aged 7–8 y and 12–13 y mounted an anamnestic response to the HBV challenge dose, which was well-tolerated. Healthy children aged 7–8 y and adolescents aged 12–13 y received three doses of a monovalent pediatric HBV vaccine (10 μg of HBsAg) before 18 mo of age. Serum samples collected before and one month post-HBV vaccine challenge dose were tested for anti-HBs antibody concentrations. Safety assessments were made for the HBV vaccine challenge dose. A three-dose childhood HBV immunization regimen induced persistence of antibodies against HBV infection for 10 y, up to adolescence. This vaccination regimen also conferred long-term immune memory against HBV as evidenced by the strong anamnestic response to the HBV vaccine challenge, despite waning anti-HBs antibody levels. PMID:22508412

  14. Passive antibody therapy of Lassa fever in cynomolgus monkeys: importance of neutralizing antibody and Lassa virus strain.

    PubMed Central

    Jahrling, P B; Peters, C J

    1984-01-01

    Lassa virus-infected cynomolgus monkeys were passively immunized with immune plasma of primate or human origin to gain insight into criteria for plasma selection and administration to human Lassa fever patients. Protective efficacy was correlated with neutralizing antibody concentrations, expressed as a log10 neutralization index (LNI). Convalescent Lassa-immune monkey plasma was titrated for protective efficacy in monkeys by intravenous inoculation with dilutions of plasma on the day of subcutaneous Lassa virus inoculation (day 0) and again on days 3 and 6. Monkeys that received undiluted plasma (LNI = 4.1) (1 ml/kg per treatment) survived a lethal viral dose, whereas those given a 1:3 dilution (LNI = 2.6) of this same plasma (1 ml/kg per treatment) died. Protection was restored when the volume of the 1:3 plasma dilution was increased to 3 ml/kg per treatment. Plasma diluted 1:9 or more (LNI = 1.5 or less) delayed onset and suppressed the magnitude of viremia but failed to confer protection at 3 ml/kg per treatment. Immunological enhancement, defined as increased viremia or accelerated death, did not occur following inadequate treatment. Human convalescent plasma also protected recipient monkeys; reductions in mortality and viremia were accurately predicted by the LNI of the plasma. Plasma of Liberian origin neutralized a Liberian Lassa strain more effectively than a Sierra Leone strain in vitro (LNI = 2.8 and 1.6, respectively) and protected monkeys more effectively against the Liberian strain. Geographic origin is thus a factor in the selection of optimal plasma for treatment of human Lassa fever, since geographically matched plasma is more likely to contain adequate LNI titers against homologous Lassa virus strains.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6715049

  15. Rural Energy Conference Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Witmer; Shannon Watson

    2008-12-31

    Alaska remains, even at the beginning of the 21st century, a place with many widely scattered, small, remote communities, well beyond the end of both the road system and the power grid. These communities have the highest energy costs of any place in the United States, despite the best efforts of the utilities that service them. This is due to the widespread dependence on diesel electric generators, which require small capital investments, but recent increases in crude oil prices have resulted in dramatic increases in the cost of power. In the enabling legislation for the Arctic Energy Office in 2001, specific inclusion was made for the study of ways of reducing the cost of electrical power in these remote communities. As part of this mandate, the University of Alaska has, in conjunction with the US Department of Energy, the Denali Commission and the Alaska Energy Authority, organized a series of rural energy conferences, held approximately every 18 months. The goal of these meeting was to bring together rural utility operators, rural community leaders, government agency representatives, equipment suppliers, and researchers from universities and national laboratories to discuss the current state of the art in rural power generation, to discuss current projects, including successes as well as near successes. Many of the conference presenters were from industry and not accustomed to writing technical papers, so the typical method of organizing a conference by requesting abstracts and publishing proceedings was not considered viable. Instead, the organizing committee solicited presentations from appropriate individuals, and requested that (if they were comfortable with computers) prepare Power point presentations that were collected and posted on the web. This has become a repository of many presentations, and may be the best single source of information about current projects in the state of Alaska.

  16. Configuration of antibodies for assay of urinary cortisol in dogs influences analytic specificity.

    PubMed

    Zeugswetter, F K; Neffe, F; Schwendenwein, I; Tichy, A; Möstl, E

    2013-08-01

    Whether the variation in the reported urinary corticoid-to-creatinine ratio in dogs is affected by the application of 2 commonly applied anticortisol antibodies was investigated. Free-catch morning urine samples of 50 healthy dogs were analyzed in duplicate with the use of 2 different polyclonal antibodies (antibody A and B) raised in different rabbits. Antibody A was raised against cortisol-3-carboxymethyl-oxime and antibody B against cortisol-21-hemisuccinate linked to BSA. Enzyme immunoassays were applied by using corresponding biotinylated labels. To examine possible cross-reactions with conjugated and nonconjugated cortisol metabolites, EIA measurements were performed with urine samples both before (directly assayed) and after diethyl-ether extraction, as well as after reversed-phase HPLC. Although the results correlated (P < 0.001), urinary corticoid concentrations and accordingly the urinary corticoid-to-creatinine ratios were 8 times higher when using antibody A than when using antibody B (mean ± SD corticoid concentrations, 223 ± 131 vs 29 ± 12 nmol/L; P < 0.001). Irrespective of the antibody used, extraction significantly decreased measured corticoid concentrations (antibody A, 158 ± 120 nmol/L; antibody B, 15 ± 8 nmol/L; P < 0.001), but the decrease was conspicuous when antibody A was used. Antibody A cross-reacted significantly with polar (eg, conjugated) metabolites, clearly depicted in the chromatogram by 3 additional peaks in earlier fractions well separated from cortisol. In contrast the assay that used antibody B was specific, showing only 1 major peak in the fractions eluting authentic cortisol. In summary, the study indicates that the configuration of the antibody considerably influences the analytic specificity of cortisol assays and underlines the pivotal importance of assay validation for each species and sample material. PMID:23849086

  17. Antibody Therapy for Pediatric Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vedi, Aditi; Ziegler, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing cure rates for pediatric leukemia, relapsed disease still carries a poor prognosis with significant morbidity and mortality. Novel targeted therapies are currently being investigated in an attempt to reduce adverse events and improve survival outcomes. Antibody therapies represent a form of targeted therapy that offers a new treatment paradigm. Monoclonal antibodies are active in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are currently in Phase III trials. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are the next generation of antibodies where a highly potent cytotoxic agent is bound to an antibody by a linker, resulting in selective targeting of leukemia cells. ADCs are currently being tested in clinical trials for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and ALL. Bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) antibodies are a construct whereby each antibody contains two binding sites, with one designed to engage the patient’s own immune system and the other to target malignant cells. BiTE antibodies show great promise as a novel and effective therapy for childhood leukemia. This review will outline recent developments in targeted agents for pediatric leukemia including monoclonal antibodies, ADCs, and BiTE antibodies. PMID:24795859

  18. Networks Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tasaki, Keiji K. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The papers included in these proceedings represent the most interesting and current topics being pursued by personnel at GSFC's Networks Division and supporting contractors involved in Space, Ground, and Deep Space Network (DSN) technical work. Although 29 papers are represented in the proceedings, only 12 were presented at the conference because of space and time limitations. The proceedings are organized according to five principal technical areas of interest to the Networks Division: Project Management; Network Operations; Network Control, Scheduling, and Monitoring; Modeling and Simulation; and Telecommunications Engineering.

  19. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ({bar p}) physics presented at the LEAP `92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, {bar N}N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, {bar N} annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy {bar p}`s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with {bar p} (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new {bar p} facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ({ge} 2 GeV/c).

  20. LEAP 1992: Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    We present a summary of the many new results in antiproton ([bar p]) physics presented at the LEAP '92 conference, in the areas of meson spectroscopy, [bar N]N scattering, annihilation and spin observables, strangeness and charm production, [bar N] annihilation in nuclei, atomic physics with very low energy [bar p]'s, the exploration of fundamental symmetries and interactions with [bar p] (CP, T, CPT, gravitation), and the prospects for new [bar p] facilities at ultralow energies or energies above the LEAR regime ([ge] 2 GeV/c).

  1. MESON2000 Conference Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T.

    2001-04-26

    This short contribution is a lite MESON2000 conference summary. As appropriate for the 600th anniversary of the Jagellonian University, it begins with a brief summary of the last 600 years of European history and its place in hadron physics. Next a ''physicist chirality'' order parameter PC is introduced. When applied to MESON2000 plenary speakers this order parameter illustrates the separation of hadron physicists into disjoint communities. The individual plenary talks in MESON2000 are next sorted according to the subconference associated with each of the 36 plenary speakers. Finally, I conclude with a previously unreported Feynman story regarding the use of models in hadron physics.

  2. Aerospace Environmental Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The mandated elimination of CFC's, Halons, TCA, and other ozone depleting chemicals and specific hazardous materials has required changes and new developments in aerospace materials and processes. The aerospace industry has been involved for several years in providing product substitutions, redesigning entire production processes, and developing new materials that minimize or eliminate damage to the environment. These activities emphasize replacement cleaning solvents and their application verifications, compliant coatings including corrosion protection systems, and removal techniques, chemical propulsion effects on the environment, and the initiation of modifications to relevant processing and manufacturing specifications and standards. The Executive Summary of this Conference is published as NASA CP-3297.

  3. A Neutralizing Antibody Assay Based on a Reporter of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuling; Li, Jia J; Kim, Hyun Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Weiyi; Akhgar, Ahmad; Bowen, Michael A; Spitz, Susan; Jiang, Xu-Rong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-11-01

    Benralizumab is a humanized anti-IL5 receptor α (IL5Rα) monoclonal antibody (mAb) with enhanced (afucosylation) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. An ADCC reporter cell-based neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay was developed and characterized to detect NAb against benralizumab in human serum to support the clinical development of benralizumab. The optimal ratio of target cells to effector cells was 3:1. Neither parental benralizumab (fucosylated) nor benralizumab Fab resulted in ADCC activity, confirming the requirement for ADCC activity in the NAb assay. The serum tolerance of the cells was determined to be 2.5%. The cut point derived from normal and asthma serum samples was comparable. The effective range of benralizumab was determined, and 35 ng/mL [80% maximal effective concentration (EC80)] was chosen as the standard concentration to run in the assessment of NAb. An affinity purified goat anti-benralizumab polyclonal idiotype antibody preparation was shown to have NAb since it inhibited ADCC activity in a dose-dependent fashion. The low endogenous concentrations of IL5 and soluble IL5 receptor (sIL5R) did not demonstrate to interfere with the assay. The estimated assay sensitivities at the cut point were 1.02 and 1.10 μg/mL as determined by the surrogate neutralizing goat polyclonal and mouse monoclonal anti-drug antibody (ADA) controls, respectively. The assay can detect NAb (at 2.5 μg/mL) in the presence of 0.78 μg/mL benralizumab. The assay was not susceptible to non-specific matrix effects. This study provides an approach and feasibility of developing an ADCC cell-based NAb assay to support biopharmaceuticals with an ADCC function. PMID:26205082

  4. Local retention of antibodies in vivo with an injectable film embedded with a fluorogen-activating protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Saunders, Matthew J; Bagia, Christina; Freeman, Eric C; Fan, Yong; Gawalt, Ellen S; Waggoner, Alan S; Meng, Wilson S

    2016-05-28

    Herein we report an injectable film by which antibodies can be localized in vivo. The system builds upon a bifunctional polypeptide consisting of a fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) and a β-fibrillizing peptide (βFP). The FAP domain generates fluorescence that reflects IgG binding sites conferred by Protein A/G (pAG) conjugated with the fluorogen malachite green (MG). A film is generated by mixing these proteins with molar excess of EAK16-II, a βFP that forms β-sheet fibrils at high salt concentrations. The IgG-binding, fluorogenic film can be injected in vivo through conventional needled syringes. Confocal microscopic images and dose-response titration experiments showed that loading of IgG into the film was mediated by pAG(MG) bound to the FAP. Release of IgG in vitro was significantly delayed by the bioaffinity mechanism; 26% of the IgG were released from films embedded with pAG(MG) after five days, compared to close to 90% in films without pAG(MG). Computational simulations indicated that the release rate of IgG is governed by positive cooperativity due to pAG(MG). When injected into the subcutaneous space of mouse footpads, film-embedded IgG were retained locally, with distribution through the lymphatics impeded. The ability to track IgG binding sites and distribution simultaneously will aid the optimization of local antibody delivery systems. PMID:27038493

  5. Induction of antihemagglutinin antibodies by polyclonal antiidiotype antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dinca, L; Neuwirth, S; Schulman, J; Bona, C

    1993-01-01

    Antiidiotypic antibodies can be envisioned as an alternative approach in the development of vaccines against influenza virus, which exhibits natural antigenic variations. In our work, we obtained two polyclonal cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies against PY102, VM113, and VM202 mAbs, which in turn are specific respectively for PR8 virus and laboratory-induced virus variants (PY102-V1 and VM113-V1). With these cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies, we were able to elicit anti-HA antibodies in mice. In comparing the anti-HA antibody response in animals injected with anti-Id antibodies to those immunized with PR8 influenza virus, we demonstrated that the HI titer was higher after virus immunization and that the PR8 virus boost was more efficient in this group. Our results showed that the polyclonal cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies were more efficient than the individual anti-Ids at eliciting responses. At the same time, we demonstrated that PR8-primed T cells, cultured with B cells from animals immunized with anti-Id antibodies, were able to produce anti-PR8 antibodies subsequent to stimulation with influenza virus. PMID:8476510

  6. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed. PMID:25001046

  7. SVC 2003 Technical Conference Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-07-01

    The 46th Annual Technical Conference of the Society of Vacuum Coaters was held in San Francisco May 2-8. All the world events apparently did not affect the attendance or the spirit of the attendees. The Conference was a huge success and very well attended. Many feel that it was the best Techcon yet. This year's Conference really raised the bar for the 47th Annual Technical Conference in Dallas next year. Congratulations go out to the program committee, board of directors, education committee, scholarship committee and Management Plus for a job well done. Excellent accommodations were provided by the San Francisco Marriott.

  8. Control Center Technology Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Conference papers and presentations are compiled and cover evolving architectures and technologies applicable to flight control centers. Advances by NASA Centers and the aerospace industry are presented.

  9. Antibody Glossary —

    Cancer.gov

    The components of the immune system have diverse roles in the initial development of cancers, progression of early-stage malignancies to invasive tumors, establishment of metastatic lesions, tumor dormancy, and response or resistance to therapy. Characterizing the components of the immune system and their functional status in tissues and in tumors requires the use of highly specific reagents. Researchers employ antibodies in a variety of in vitro and in vivo applications to delineate, enrich, or deplete specific immune subsets in order to understand their role(s) in tumorigenesis. This is a glossary of validated reagents and protocols that are useful for functional phenotyping of the immune system in murine cancer models.

  10. Asia. Vancouver Conference Review.

    PubMed

    Brown, T

    1997-02-01

    The 1997 International AIDS Conference in Vancouver gave relatively little attention to the rapid spread of HIV/AIDS in most of the developing world. The popular press reported mainly prevention success stories from Thailand and Uganda, and the successes realized in reducing viral loads with combination drug therapies using protease inhibitors. Societal efforts in Thailand have dramatically reduced the rate of new infections, slowing the growth of the epidemic substantially. Few heard from the conference about how the HIV/AIDS epidemic is spreading rapidly and largely unchecked in much of the world, especially in Asia. Thailand, India, Myanmar, and Cambodia are the most heavily affected countries. Thailand and India, as well as Japan, were therefore heavily represented in the scientific program, while most other countries presented far fewer reports. With the exception of one report on a training course in Fiji, the Pacific Island nations were absent from the program. Vietnam, Malaysia, China, and Hong Kong have rapidly-evolving situations, while Japan, the Philippines, Bangladesh, Nepal, Singapore, Indonesia, Taiwan, Laos, South Korea, Mongolia, and Pakistan should be watched closely. The Asian epidemics are constantly evolving over time. PMID:9155914

  11. History of NAMES Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Lev

    2013-03-01

    -Russian International Centre was demonstrated. By the high standards of the reports presented, as well as by its overall organization, the second Seminar met the standards of an international conference. Reviews of state-of-the-art developments in materials science were given by leading scientists from Moscow and from the Lorraine region. The three days of the seminar were structured into four main themes: Functional Materials Coatings, Films and Surface Engineering Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies The Environment and three Round Table discussions: Defining practical means of carrying out Franco-Russian collaborations in technology transfer and innovation Materials science ARCUS: Lorraine-Russian collaboration in materials science and the environment 32 oral and 25 poster presentations within four sections were given by a total of 110 participants. NAMES 2007, the 3rd Franco-Russian Seminar on New Achievements in Materials and Environmental Sciences, took place in Metz, France on 7-9 November 2007. The conference highlights fundamentals and development of the five main themes connected to the Lorraine-Russia ARCUS project with possible extension to other topics. The five main subjects included in the ARCUS project are: Bulk-surface-interface material sciences Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies Environment and natural resources Plasma physics—ITER project Vibrational dynamics The first, second and third NAMES conferences were financially supported by the following organizations: Ambassade de France à Moscou Communauté Urbaine du Grand Nancy Région Lorraine Conseil Général de Meurthe et Moselle Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine Université de Metz Université Henry Poincaré CNRS ANVAR Federal Agency on Science and Innovations of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation Moscow Committee on Science and Technologies Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys (Technological University) The 4th conference is supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of

  12. [Targeted therapy by monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Kei; Morimoto, Chikao

    2010-10-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies are virtually indispensable for immunotherapy of cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, or organ transplantation. The hybridoma technique, developed by Georges Köhler and César Milstein in 1975, has been shown to be most and highly producible method for generating murine monoclonal antibodies. However, poor results were obtained when it was administered in human bodies. With development of biotechnology, human monoclonal antibodies have been manufactured with higher efficiency. A major hindrance of producing therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies is the lack of an appropriate strategy for determining and selecting the antibodies that would be effective in vivo. In this review, we give an overview of the present techniques on therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. PMID:20954327

  13. Calendar of Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-08-01

    8 - 18 August 1996 International Summer School on Plasma Physics and Technology La Jolla, CA, USA Contact: Mr V Stefan, Institute for Advanced Physics Studies, PO Box 2964, La Jolla, CA 92038, USA. Tel +1-619-456-5737. 26 - 30 August 1996 Joint Varenna - Lausanne International Workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 2 - 5 September 1996 EU - US Workshop on Transport in Fusion Plasmas Villa Monastero, Varenna, Italy Further information: G Gorini, ISPP, 16 Via Celoria, I-20133 Milano, Italy. Tel +39-2-2392637, Fax +39-2-2392205, E-mail ggorini@mi.infn.it. Administrative contact: Centro di Cultura Villa Monastero, 1 Piazza Venini, 22050 Varenna (Lecco), Italy. Tel +39-341-831261, Fax +39-341-831281. Application and abstract deadline: 15 June 1996. 9 - 13 September 1996 International Conference on Plasma Physics Nagoya, Japan Contact: Conference Secretariat, c/o Prof. Hiromu Momota, National Institute for Fusion Science, Nagoya 464-01, Japan. Tel +81-52-789-4260, Fax +81-52-789-1037, E-mail icpp96@nifs.ac.jp. Abstract deadline: 31 March 1996. 16 - 20 September 1996 19th Symposium on Fusion Technology Lisbon, Portugal Contact: Professor Carlos Varandas, Centro de Fusão Nuclear, 1096 Lisboa Codex, Portugal. Fax +351-1-8417819, E-mail cvarandas@cfn.ist.utl.pt. General information will be available via WWW with URL http://www.cfn.ist.utl.pt. 25 - 29 September 1996 Summer University of Plasma Physics Garching, Germany Contact: Ms Ch Stahlberg, Max-Planck-Institut für PlasmaPhysik, Boltzmannstr 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany. Tel +49-89-3299-2232, Fax +49-89-3299-1001. 11 - 15 November 1996 38th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics, APS Denver, CO, USA Contact: Dr Richard Hazeltine, University of Texas

  14. History of NAMES Conferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Lev

    2013-03-01

    -Russian International Centre was demonstrated. By the high standards of the reports presented, as well as by its overall organization, the second Seminar met the standards of an international conference. Reviews of state-of-the-art developments in materials science were given by leading scientists from Moscow and from the Lorraine region. The three days of the seminar were structured into four main themes: Functional Materials Coatings, Films and Surface Engineering Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies The Environment and three Round Table discussions: Defining practical means of carrying out Franco-Russian collaborations in technology transfer and innovation Materials science ARCUS: Lorraine-Russian collaboration in materials science and the environment 32 oral and 25 poster presentations within four sections were given by a total of 110 participants. NAMES 2007, the 3rd Franco-Russian Seminar on New Achievements in Materials and Environmental Sciences, took place in Metz, France on 7-9 November 2007. The conference highlights fundamentals and development of the five main themes connected to the Lorraine-Russia ARCUS project with possible extension to other topics. The five main subjects included in the ARCUS project are: Bulk-surface-interface material sciences Nanomaterials and nanotechnologies Environment and natural resources Plasma physics—ITER project Vibrational dynamics The first, second and third NAMES conferences were financially supported by the following organizations: Ambassade de France à Moscou Communauté Urbaine du Grand Nancy Région Lorraine Conseil Général de Meurthe et Moselle Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine Université de Metz Université Henry Poincaré CNRS ANVAR Federal Agency on Science and Innovations of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation Moscow Committee on Science and Technologies Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys (Technological University) The 4th conference is supported by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of

  15. Conference Report: Power and Energy Society Annual Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, Hayao; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    The 17th Power & Energy Society Annual Conference was held on September 13-15, 2006 at University of the Ryukyus. There were 52 technical sessions and 453 papers. A panel discussion, technical exhibitions and technical tours were also organized. In this article, the outline of the conference is reported.

  16. Crisis or Conference! Master List for Conference Planners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Tony

    This conference organizer's guide contains 42 lists of ideas, reminders, things to check, and questions to ask when a person is planning an event such as a conference, workshop, or training session. Written from a British point of view, the guide is organized into four parts in chronological order: preplanning, planning, onsite, and…

  17. Conference report: the third BIRAX Regenerative Medicine Conference.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Alasdair G; Easterbrook, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    The third Britain/Israel Research and Academic Exchange Partnership Regenerative Medicine conference was recently held in Oxford (UK). This conference report summarizes highlights from the scientific program. There is a particular emphasis on internationally collaborative projects funded by this initiative, the young researchers' symposium, and a lively panel session focused on the relationships between industry and academia. PMID:27404395

  18. National Conference[s] on Career Education: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Joseph F.; And Others

    The report describes a series of conferences whose objective was to orient selected educational leaders to the implications of preparing educational personnel with a career education perspective. The first 32 pages of the report discuss project objectives and procedures, and detail participant profiles, pre- and post-conference career education…

  19. 48 CFR 6101.11 - Conferences; conference memorandum [Rule 11].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... agreements disposing of matters in dispute; or (6) Ways to expedite disposition of the case or to facilitate settlement of the dispute, including, if the parties and the Board agree, the use of alternative dispute... APPEALS, GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT DISPUTE CASES 6101.11 Conferences; conference...

  20. 48 CFR 6101.11 - Conferences; conference memorandum [Rule 11].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... agreements disposing of matters in dispute; or (6) Ways to expedite disposition of the case or to facilitate settlement of the dispute, including, if the parties and the Board agree, the use of alternative dispute... APPEALS, GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT DISPUTE CASES 6101.11 Conferences; conference...

  1. Apollo 11 Facts [Post Flight Press Conference]. Part 1 of 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong, Lunar Module Pilot Edwin Aldrin, Jr., and Command Module Pilot Michael Collins are seen during this post-mission conference, where they give details about the mission, concentrating on their activities on the Moon. They then answer questions from the audience. The second part of this conference is seen on 'Apollo 11 Facts: Post Flight Press Conference, Part 2 of 2' (internal ID 2001181396).

  2. SPRi-based adenovirus detection using a surrogate antibody method.

    PubMed

    Abadian, Pegah N; Yildirim, Nimet; Gu, April Z; Goluch, Edgar D

    2015-12-15

    Adenovirus infection, which is a waterborne viral disease, is one of the most prevelant causes of human morbidity in the world. Thus, methods for rapid detection of this infectious virus in the environment are urgently needed for public health protection. In this study, we developed a rapid, real-time, sensitive, and label-free SPRi-based biosensor for rapid, sensitive and highly selective detection of adenoviruses. The sensing protocol consists of mixing the sample containing adenovirus with a predetermined concentration of adenovirus antibody. The mixture was filtered to remove the free antibodies from the sample. A secondary antibody, which was specific to the adenovirus antibody, was immobilized onto the SPRi chip surface covalently and the filtrate was flowed over the sensor surface. When the free adenovirus antibodies bound to the surface-immobilized secondary antibodies, we observed this binding via changes in reflectivity. In this approach, a higher amount of adenoviruses resulted in fewer free adenovirus antibodies and thus smaller reflectivity changes. A dose-response curve was generated, and the linear detection range was determined to be from 10 PFU/mL to 5000 PFU/mL with an R(2) value greater than 0.9. The results also showed that the developed biosensing system had a high specificity towards adenovirus (less than 20% signal change when tested in a sample matrix containing rotavirus and lentivirus). PMID:26232675

  3. Polymorphism of normal factor IX detected by mouse monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Wallmark, A; Ljung, R; Nilsson, I M; Holmberg, L; Hedner, U; Lindvall, M; Sjögren, H O

    1985-01-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-chromosomal recessive disease due to deficiency of coagulation factor IX. Three monoclonal antibodies against factor IX were prepared and used to develop immunoradiometric assays (IRMAs) of factor IX antigen (IX-Ag). IX-Ag was measured in 65 normal individuals with one IRMA based on polyclonal anti-IX antibodies and two IRMAs based on three monoclonal anti-IX antibodies. One of the monoclonal antibodies differed in specificity since it neutralized less than 50% of the clotting activity of factor IX (IX-C), whereas the other two monoclonal antibodies neutralized 80-95%. When the former antibody was used as the solid phase in IRMA, two groups of normal individuals were distinguished: group A with measurable IX-Ag, and group B without demonstrable IX-Ag. There were no differences between the groups either in IX-C or in IX-Ag measured with polyclonal antibodies. A subgroup comprising only women could be distinguished in group A, in whom intermediate IX-Ag concentrations were found. Family studies showed the group B variant of normal factor IX to be transmitted according to the pattern of X-linked recessive inheritance. The allelic frequency of group A was 0.66, and that of group B was 0.34. PMID:3873655

  4. 10 CFR 2.329 - Prehearing conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... place for a conference or conferences before trial. A prehearing conference in a proceeding involving a... appropriate for the particular proceeding, a prehearing conference may be held to consider such matters as: (1... proceeding. (d) Reports. Prehearing conferences may be reported stenographically or by other means....

  5. 10 CFR 820.22 - Informal conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Informal conference. 820.22 Section 820.22 Energy... conference. The Director may convene an informal conference to discuss any situation that might be a... information. The Director may compel a person to attend the conference. This conference will not normally...

  6. Kinetic study of antibody adhesion on a silicon wafer by laser reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Bibiana D.; Valverde, Juana R.; Rasia, Rodolfo J.

    2003-05-01

    Antibody adhesion kinetic in real time has been studied by laser reflectometry technique. An ellipsometer is used to measure the light intensity reflected by a silicon wafer. Light intensity reflected by the wafer presents a minimum at the pseudo-Brewster angle. Then, the reflectance increases as the antibodies (monoclonal anti- AB) adhere on interface. Mathematical analysis of reflectance curves versus time verifies that the antibody adhesion at the interface follows Langmuir kinetics (Prog. Biomed. Opt. Imaging 1(5) (2000) 19) for low antibody concentrations. Parameters obtained allow to carry out a detailed study of the antibody adsorption and the antigen-antibody interaction. This conduces to development of an optical immunosensor for detection and quantification of soluble antigens, and a novel method for commercial antiserum quality control. This technique does not require labeled antibodies, being also independent of cellular factors. Also, this technique is quicker and sensible than the conventional immunohematology methods.

  7. Antibodies as stratagems against cancer.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Louis; Cuong, Nguyen Tien; Vlachakis, Dimitrios

    2016-06-21

    Antibodies have been in the frontline of anticancer research during the last few decades, since a number of different ways have been discovered to utilize them as parts or main components of anticancer drugs. Antibodies are used as the only component of some anticancer drugs, but they can also be conjugated with a variety of substances. Antibody engineering methods such as humanization, chimerization and Fc engineering are applied in order to modify their properties according to the requirements of anticancer drug application. Given the continuous advances in biology and informatics, the role of antibodies in anticancer treatment is expected to be prominent. PMID:26738941

  8. Durability of passive measles antibody in Jamaican children.

    PubMed

    Christie, C D; Lee-Hirsh, J; Rogall, B; Merrill, S; Ramlal, A A; Karian, V; Black, F L

    1990-09-01

    Measles antibody titres were determined by haemagglutination inhibition and by neutralization in 221 sets of serum collected from delivering mothers, umbilical cords, and infants when about six months of age. Radio-immunoassay was also used to measure antibody in 120 sera. Total IgG concentration was determined in the infant sera. All mothers had measles antibody and the mean titre was high. At the time of birth, measles antibody had been further concentrated in the infant. Nevertheless, many children lost protective titres before six months of age. The rate of loss was correlated with the infant's total serum IgG so that high IgG levels at six months correlated with rapid loss of measles-specific antibody. It is suggested that in homes where sanitation is poor, antibody is made to many agents at an early age. To maintain physiological balance, homeostatic mechanisms then increase the rate of catabolism of all IgG, including that passively acquired. In keeping with its stage of sanitary development, vaccination in Jamaica can profitably be given earlier than in the United States, but it must be later than in many African countries. PMID:2262267

  9. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miraldi, F. )

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.48 references.

  10. High-throughput assay for measuring monoclonal antibody self-association and aggregation in serum.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoning; Geng, Steven B; Chiu, Mark L; Saro, Dorina; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-03-18

    Subcutaneous delivery is one of the preferred administration routes for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). High antibody dosing requirements and small injection volumes necessitate formulation and delivery of highly concentrated mAb solutions. Such elevated antibody concentrations can lead to undesirable solution behaviors such as mAb self-association and aggregation, which are relatively straightforward to detect using various biophysical methods because of the high purity and concentration of antibody formulations. However, the biophysical properties of mAbs in serum can also impact antibody activity, but these properties are less well understood because of the difficulty characterizing mAbs in such a complex environment. Here we report a high-throughput assay for directly evaluating mAb self-association and aggregation in serum. Our approach involves immobilizing polyclonal antibodies specific for human mAbs on gold nanoparticles, and then using these conjugates to capture human antibodies at a range of subsaturating to saturating mAb concentrations in serum. Antibody aggregation is detected at subsaturating mAb concentrations via blue-shifted plasmon wavelengths due to the reduced efficiency of capturing mAb aggregates relative to monomers, which reduces affinity cross-capture of mAbs by multiple conjugates. In contrast, antibody self-association is detected at saturating mAb concentrations via red-shifted plasmon wavelengths due to attractive interparticle interactions between immobilized mAbs. The high-throughput nature of this assay along with its compatibility with unusually dilute mAb solutions (0.1-10 μg per mL) should make it useful for identifying antibody candidates with high serum stability during early antibody discovery. PMID:25714504

  11. Broadly neutralizing antibodies abrogate established hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Ype P.; Dorner, Marcus; Mommersteeg, Michiel C.; Xiao, Jing W.; Balazs, Alejandro B.; Robbins, Justin B.; Winer, Benjamin Y.; Gerges, Sherif; Vega, Kevin; Labitt, Rachael N.; Donovan, Bridget M.; Giang, Erick; Krishnan, Anuradha; Chiriboga, Luis; Charlton, Michael R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Baltimore, David; Law, Mansun; Rice, Charles M.; Ploss, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) establishes a chronic infection in the majority of exposed individuals and can cause cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The role of antibodies directed against HCV in disease progression is poorly understood. Neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) can prevent HCV infection in vitro and in animal models. However, the effects of nAbs on an established HCV infection are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that three broadly nAbs, AR3A, AR3B and AR4A, delivered with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors can confer protection against viral challenge in humanized mice. Furthermore, we provide evidence that nAbs can abrogate an ongoing HCV infection in primary hepatocyte cultures and in a human liver chimeric mouse model. These results showcase a novel therapeutic approach to interfere with HCV infection exploiting a previously unappreciated need for HCV to continuously infect new hepatocytes in order to sustain chronicity. PMID:25232181

  12. Creating Ordered Antibody Arrays with Antibody-Polymer Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xuehui; Obermeyer, Allie; Olsen, Bradley

    Antibodies are a category of functional proteins that play crucial roles in the immune system and have been widely applied in the area of cancer therapeutics, targeting delivery, signal detection, and sensors. Due to the extremely large size and lack of specific functional groups on the surface, it is challenging to functionalize antibodies and manipulate the ordered packing of antibodies in an array with high density and proper orientation, which is critical to achieve outstanding performance in materials. In this work, we demonstrate an efficient and facile approach for preparing antibody-polymer conjugates with two-step sequential ``click'' reaction to form antibody-polymer block copolymers. Highly ordered nanostructures are fabricated based on the principles of block copolymer self-assembly. The nanostructures are studied with both small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Lamellae with alternating antibody domain and polymer domain are observed with an overall domain size of ~50 nm. The nanostructure not only increases the packing density and promotes proper orientation of the antibody, but also provides possible channel to facilitate substrate transportation and improves the stability of the antibody.

  13. Vague Language in Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This study examined abstracts for a British Association for Applied Linguistics conference and a Sociolinguistics Symposium, to define the genre of conference abstracts in terms of vague language, specifically universal general nouns (e.g. people) and research general nouns (e.g. results), and to discover if the language used reflected the level…

  14. The People of Color Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Celebration, education, and community characterized the November 1998 People of Color Conference held in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The National Association of Independent Schools is considering whether such a conference is antithetical to diversity initiatives. Renewal of participants' responsibility for creating inclusive school communities may be a…

  15. The Employable Woman Conference Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeAngelo, Lois; Garcia, Bernice

    The conference proceedings relating to employment status and employment-related problems of women in general, and Montgomery County, Maryland, specifically, are highlighted in this report. The purpose of the conference was to establish a solid base for an on-going dialogue with educators, personnel experts, and affirmative action officers in the…

  16. Sixth National Conference on Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    The document presents proceedings from the sixth in a series of annual national citizenship conferences. Held in Washington, D.C. in 1951, the conference served as a forum where educational, political, business, religious, labor, civic, and communications leaders could explore functions and duties of American citizenship. The theme of the…

  17. Conference Connections: Rewiring the Circuit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siemens, George; Tittenberger, Peter; Anderson, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Increased openness, two-way dialogue, and blurred distinctions between experts and amateurs have combined with numerous technology tools for dialogue, personal expression, networking, and community formation to "remake" conferences, influencing not only how attendees participate in but also how organizers host conferences today. (Contains 31…

  18. Adventures on the Conference Circuit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Mac

    2010-01-01

    Conferences offer the chance to join forces with others in pursuit of a common goal. In most teachers' daily routines, this kind of collaboration is not a priority; in many cases, it is impossible. For this reason alone, the conference experience can be extremely beneficial--and that is before one takes into account the access to fresh research,…

  19. SLA at 100: Conference Preview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstein, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    When School Library Association (SLA) convenes its annual conference in Washington, DC, June 14-17, 2009, the association will be celebrating its 100th birthday. This occasion allows for grand gestures--the SLA Salutes! Awards and Leadership Reception will be held in the Library of Congress's Great Hall. The conference also draws upon Washington…

  20. ARC Conference Showcases Telecommunications Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1996-01-01

    The Appalachian Regional Commission's 1996 Conference, "Building Blocks for Using Telecommunications and Information Technology," held in Binghamton, New York, focused on the role of telecommunications in Appalachia in education and training, telemedicine, business, and government. Highlights conference presentations on special applications of…

  1. Writing Conferences Using the Microcomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pufahl, John

    1986-01-01

    Describes a teaching strategy using Apple IIe computers in a sequence of individual conferences. Includes asking questions while scrolling through the paper, showing students how to elaborate ideas by entering suggested changes and prompts in capital letters during the conference, and using a spelling checker to prompt revision (e.g., by compiling…

  2. Legitimate Talk in Feedback Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copland, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    Feedback on performance is a feature of professional training. Much feedback is delivered in post-observation conferences where a "trainer" will discuss the "trainee's" performance with him/her. What transpires in these conferences, however, is "hidden from view" (Heritage and Sefi 1992: 362) and the norms of interaction are largely unexamined in…

  3. Fifth National Conference on Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    Presented are general session and discussion group reports from a citizenship conference held in Washington, D.C. in May, 1950. Sponsored by the National Citizenship Committee of the National Education Association and the United States Department of Justice, the conference provided a forum for examination of the functions and duties of American…

  4. Seventh National Conference on Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    The document presents proceedings from the seventh in a series of annual national citizenship conferences. Held in Washington, D.C. in September, 1952, the conference served as a forum for more than 1,000 educational, political, business, religious, labor, civic, and communications leaders to explore functions and duties of American citizenship.…

  5. Proceedings of the Pittsburgh conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    These abstracts represent the state-of-the-art in Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy and should be a valuable addition to your technical files. This volume is distributed only to the registrants of the 1991 Pittsburgh Conference and Exposition and therefore does not constitute a publication. This volume is not for sale nor does the Pittsburgh Conference permit abstraction of its contents.

  6. First National Conference on Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC.

    Presented are general session and discussion group reports from a citizenship conference held in Philadelphia in May, 1946. Directed by the National Citizenship Committee of the National Education Association, the conference provided an opportunity for political, business, educational, and religious leaders to discuss benefits and responsibilities…

  7. Third National Conference on Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC.

    Presented are background information, discussion group reports, and addresses from a citizenship conference held in Washington, D.C. in May 1948. Sponsored by the Citizenship Committee of the National Education Association and the United States Department of Justice, the conference centered on the theme, "Citizenship: Rights and Responsibilities."…

  8. Second National Conference on Citizenship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC.

    Presented are speeches, group reports, and panel discussions from a citizenship conference held in Boston in May, 1947. Sponsored by the Citizenship Committee of the National Education Association, the conference provided an opportunity for political, business, educational and religious leaders to discuss the benefits and responsibilities of…

  9. Conference Report: Improving College Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, C. Douglas; Claxton, Charles S.

    The conference report includes an explanation of the conference plan, a description of the highlights, and descriptions of each session. Among the session topics are: faculty development; instructional improvement in the community college, with emphasis on developmental education; conditions that enhance learning; improving the lecture; evaluating…

  10. Antibodies: Protective, destructive and regulatory role

    SciTech Connect

    Milgrom, F.; Abeyounis, C.J.; Albini, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers under 10 subject headings. The headings are: Production and Function of Antibodies, Protective Role of Antibodies, Antibodies to Foreign and Neoplastic Cells, Autoantibodies, Regulatory Mechanisms, Allergy, Immune Complexes, Antibodies in Pregnancy and Aging, Administration of Antibodies for Prevention and Therapy, and Abstracts of Poster Presentations.

  11. SETI conference at Tallinn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, W. T.

    1982-04-01

    The search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) was the subject of the Dec. 1981 conference in Tallinn, U.S.S.R., with the Soviet papers, which constituted about 80 percent of the total, of rather low quality. A large number dealt with paleocontact, or establishing the long-past presence of extraterrestrials through archeological or astronomical means. There was insufficient discussion of which bands of electromagnetic radiation are optimum for SETI. The need to search for extrasolar planets was emphasized, noting recent SETI observations at Ohio State University and a NASA plan which would survey both nearby stars and the entire sky in the next few years. The key is a proposed spectrum analyzer that can detect and analyze signals from eight million frequency channels at once, each of which covers a very narrow bandwidth of typically 1-32 Hz.

  12. Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The promotion of interaction among investigators of all oceanographic disciplines studying the eastern Pacific Ocean was the goal of the 1990 Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference (EPOC), held October 17-19 on the snow-covered slopes of Mt. Hood, Oreg. Thirty oceanographers representing all disciplines attended.Dick Barber, Duke University Marine Lab, Beaufort, N.C., chaired a session on the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, emphasizing issues related to biological activity. Steve Ramp of the Naval Postgraduate School in Montery, Calif., chaired a session on recent results from northern and central California experiments. On October 19, following an early morning earthquake, a business meeting and discussions regarding a collaboration in future experiments were held.

  13. LEAP 96 Conference summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanet, Lucien

    1997-06-01

    The following pages represent a short summary of the many new results in low energy antiproton (p¯) physics presented and discussed at the LEAP 96 Conference. They cover a broad field of physics, from atomic physics to nuclear physics, from hadronic physics to parton physics. The impact of these results on "soft QCD", the part of strong interactions which we do not yet understand, and on the limits that we can establish to the "fundamental symmetries" which govern Nature are original and important. Within these twelve pages, I cannot do justice to all contributions. I present my apologizes for the omissions, hoping however that the serious reader will find the missing information in these proceedings.

  14. Personalized cancer care conference.

    PubMed

    Zänker, Kurt S; Mihich, Enrico; Huber, Hans-Peter; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The Oslo University Hospital (Norway), the K.G. Jebsen Centre for Breast Cancer Research (Norway), The Radiumhospital Foundation (Norway) and the Fritz-Bender-Foundation (Germany) designed under the conference chairmen (E. Mihich, K.S. Zänker, A.L. Borresen-Dale) and advisory committee (A. Borg, Z. Szallasi, O. Kallioniemi, H.P. Huber) a program at the cutting edge of "PERSONALIZED CANCER CARE: Risk prediction, early diagnosis, progression and therapy resistance." The conference was held in Oslo from September 7 to 9, 2012 and the science-based presentations concerned six scientific areas: (1) Genetic profiling of patients, prediction of risk, late side effects; (2) Molecular profiling of tumors and metastases; (3) Tumor-host microenvironment interaction and metabolism; (4) Targeted therapy; (5) Translation and (6) Informed consent, ethical challenges and communication. Two satellite workshops on (i) Ion Ampliseq-a novel tool for large scale mutation detection; and (ii) Multiplex RNA ISH and tissue homogenate assays for cancer biomarker validation were additionally organized. The report concludes that individual risk prediction in carcinogenesis and/or metastatogenesis based on polygenic profiling may be useful for intervention strategies for health care and therapy planning in the future. To detect distinct and overlapping DNA sequence alterations in tumor samples and adjacent normal tissues, including point mutations, small insertions or deletions, copy number changes and chromosomal rearrangements will eventually make it possible to design personalized management plans for individualized patients. However, large individualized datasets need a new approach in bio-information technology to reduce this enormous data dimensionally to simply working hypotheses about health and disease for each individual. PMID:25562519

  15. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO{sub 2} corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  16. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment, Expansion, and...

  17. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment, Expansion, and...

  18. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... THE ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment, Expansion, and...

  19. 38 CFR 39.33 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... STATES FOR ESTABLISHMENT, EXPANSION, AND IMPROVEMENT, OR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, OF VETERANS CEMETERIES Establishment, Expansion, and Improvement Projects Grant Requirements and Procedures § 39.33 Conferences. (a) Predesign conference. A predesign conference is required for all Establishment,...

  20. PREFACE: Adapting to the Atmosphere Conference 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-04-01

    These proceedings, for the ''Adapting to the Atmosphere'' conference, Durham University, 2014, address the field of optical turbulence profiling of the Earth's atmosphere for astronomical observatory site selection, and the applications of Adaptive Optics and Optical Astronomical Instrumentation for small observatories as well as the future Extremely Large Telescope scales. This conference concentrated on the future of the community in an era of change. Optical turbulence profiling and remote sensing is required for the next generation of sophisticated adaptive optics systems and enables many of the proposed instruments and technologies which are necessary for the operation of large to extremely large telescopes. The successful design and operation of these complex systems demands an increasingly detailed understanding of the nature of atmospheric optical turbulence, as well as improvements in our ability to monitor and forecast its properties. This conference has the endorsement of the International Astronomical Union (working group on site testing instrumentation) and has received funding from the European Southern Observatory, the Thirty Meter Telescope and the Optical Infrared Co-ordination Network (OPTICON).

  1. ANTIBODIES TO INTESTINAL MICROVILLOUS MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Iain L.; Donaldson, Robert M.; Kopp, William L.; Trier, Jerry S.

    1968-01-01

    Microvillous membranes isolated from the distal, but not proximal, half of hamster small bowel induced in rabbits the formation of antisera which inhibited intrinsic factor-mediated uptake of vitamin B12 by hamster brush borders. The extent of inhibition was directly proportional to the concentration of antiserum, and an excess of IF-bound vitamin B12 could overcome the inhibitory effect. The inhibitory factor was absorbed from antisera by brush borders isolated from the distal, but not proximal, half of the hamster intestine. Fractionation of antisera by gel filtration and DEAE-cellulose chromatography established that immunoglobulin G contained the inhibitory factor. Antisera capable of completely blocking uptake of IF-bound vitamin B12 did not react with hamster IF or with the IF-vitamin B12 complex, did not inhibit brush border disaccharidase activity and did not impair glucose transport by everted sacs of hamster intestine. These results demonstrate that an antibody to distal microvillous membranes competes with the IF-vitamin B12 complex for a specific binding site or receptor located on the surface of distal hamster intestine. PMID:19867301

  2. ISMB Conference Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Teresa, Gaasterand; Martin, Vingron

    2011-07-01

    This special issue comprises the papers accepted for presentation at the 19th Annual International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology, joint with the 10th European Conference on Computational Biology, an official conference of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB; http://www.iscb.org). ISMB/ECCB 2011 (http://www.iscb.org/ismb2011/) will take place in Vienna, Austria, from July 17 through July 19, 2011; preceded during July 14–16 by eight 1- or 2- day Special Interest Group (SIG) meetings, three satellite meetings and nine half-day tutorials; and followed by two additional satellite meetings. The 48 papers in this volume were selected from 258 submitted papers. Submitted papers were assigned to 13 areas. Area Chairs led each topic area by selecting their area's program committee and overseeing the reviewing process. Many Area Chairs were new compared to 2010, and two completely new areas were added in 2011, ‘Data Visualization’ and ‘Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics’. Six papers for which Area Chairs were in conflict were reviewed under a ‘Conflicts Management’ section headed by the Proceedings Chairs; one such paper was accepted in ‘Bioimaging’. Areas, co-chairs and acceptance information are listed in Table 1. Compared to prior years, five mature topic areas had steady submissions, ‘Evolution and Comparative Genomics’, ‘Gene Regulation and Transcriptomics’, ‘Protein Structure and Function’, ‘Sequence Analysis’, ‘Text Mining’. Two areas newer to ISMB were underrepresented this year, ‘Bioimaging’ and ‘Disease Models and Epidemiology’. One area doubled, ‘Applied Bioinformatics’, renamed from last year's ‘Other Bioinformatics Applications’; and one tripled, ‘Protein Interactions and Molecular Networks’. Across the areas, 326 members of the bioinformatics community provided reviews. Most papers received three reviews and several received four or more. There was

  3. Anti-GAPDHS antibodies: a biomarker of immune infertility.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jun; Yao, Rongyan; Luo, Yanyun; Yang, Dantong; Cao, Yang; Qiu, Yi; Song, Wei; Miao, Shiying; Gu, Yiqun; Wang, Linfang

    2016-04-01

    Numerous investigations have focused on the detection of antisperm antibodies, which have a naturally occurring impact on male and female fertility. In this study, spermatogenic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDHS) was considered to be a candidate biomarker of immune infertility. The concentrations of anti-GAPDHS antibodies in the sera of sterile individuals and fertile couples were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Sera were collected from immune infertile (n = 175) and fertile (n = 237) individuals and were screened by tray agglutination tests (TAT). Infertile sera were further divided into two groups according to the serum titers obtained by TAT (titers ≤ 1:8, n = 58; titers > 1:8, n = 117). The concentrations of anti-GAPDHS antibodies were significantly higher in the immune infertile group than in the fertile group and were much higher with regard to the increased degrees of sperm agglutination (titers > 1:8). Surprisingly, we found statistically significantly higher concentrations of antibodies in the sera of infertile men than in those of infertile women, and a similar statistical result was obtained in the sera when primary infertility was compared with secondary infertility. Thus, anti-GAPDHS antibodies seem to be a sensitive parameter in immune infertile detection and might be one of the main factors causing immune infertility. This factor might be valuable as an indicator in the clinical diagnosis and monitoring treatment of infertility. PMID:26846113

  4. New engineered antibodies against prions

    PubMed Central

    Škrlj, Nives; Dolinar, Marko

    2014-01-01

    A number of recently developed and approved therapeutic agents based on highly specific and potent antibodies have shown the potential of antibody therapy. As the next step, antibody-based therapeutics will be bioengineered in a way that they not only bind pathogenic targets but also address other issues, including drug targeting and delivery. For antibodies that are expected to act within brain tissue, like those that are directed against the pathogenic prion protein isoform, one of the major obstacles is the blood-brain barrier which prevents efficient transfer of the antibody, even of the engineered single-chain variants. We recently demonstrated that a specific prion-specific antibody construct which was injected into the murine tail vein can be efficiently transported into brain tissue. The novelty of the work was in that the cell penetrating peptide was used as a linker connecting both specificity-determining domains of the antibody peptide, thus eliminating the need for the standard flexible linker, composed of an arrangement of three consecutive (Gly4Ser) repeats. This paves the road toward improved bioengineered antibody variants that target brain antigens. PMID:23941991

  5. [The significance of antiphospholipid antibodies].

    PubMed

    Fojtík, Z

    2004-04-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (APLA) present very heterogeneous groups of antibodies which can significantly influence processes on different levels of coagulation cascade depending on effects of phospholipid surfaces on blood coagulation. This usually leads to a particular level of thrombophylia. Clinical syndrome accompanying positive APLA, such as antiphospholipid syndrome, was defined by clinical and laboratory symptoms. This clinical syndrome can be a primary syndrome, if other disorders with ability to induce generation of antibodies can be excluded, or a secondary syndrome. The most often in cases of systemic tissue disease. APLA can be divided according to the presence of lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies. According to a definition lupus anticoagulants are antibodies able to inhibit and prolong in vitro one or more blood clotting processes dependent on phospholipid surfaces. Anticardiolipin antibodies are antibodies measured by ELISA method with cardiolipin used as an antibody. Findings show that some APLA are directed against proteins bound to phospholipid surfaces. Main cofactor proteins include beta 2-GPI and prothrombin. Because of their heterogeneous specificity, APLA are directed against negative phospholipids or proteins bound to phospholipid surfaces and have important pathophysiology role in development of antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:15214303

  6. Production of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Freysd'ottir, J

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) produced by "hybridoma technology" by George Köhler and Cesar Milstein in 1975 has had a great impact both on basic biological research and on clinical medicine. However, this impact was not immediately recognized. It took around 10 years to appreciate the importance of using these mAbs in various fields of science other than immunology, such as cell biology, biochemistry, microbiology, virology, para-sitology, physiology, genetics, and molecular biology; and also in areas of clinical medicine, such as pathology, hematology, oncology, and infectious disease. The contribution of mAbs to science and clinical medicine was recognized in 1984 by the award of the Nobel Prize for Medicine to Köhler and Milstein. PMID:21337095

  7. Micromechanical antibody sensor

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Jacobson, K. Bruce; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    A sensor apparatus is provided using a microcantilevered spring element having a coating of a detector molecule such as an antibody or antigen. A sample containing a target molecule or substrate is provided to the coating. The spring element bends in response to the stress induced by the binding which occurs between the detector and target molecules. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Sondergeld, Pia; van de Donk, Niels W C J; Richardson, Paul G; Plesner, Torben

    2015-09-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting addition to the therapeutic armamentarium. The incorporation of mAbs into current treatment strategies is hoped to enable more effective and targeted treatment, resulting in improved outcomes for patients. A number of targets have been identified, including molecules on the surface of the myeloma cell and components of the bone marrow microenvironment. Our review focuses on a small number of promising mAbs directed against molecules on the surface of myeloma cells, including CS1 (elotuzumab), CD38 (daratumumab, SAR650984, MOR03087), CD56 (lorvotuzumab mertansine), and CD138/syndecan-1 (BT062/indatuximab ravtansine). PMID:26452191

  9. Conference Report: 21st Power and Energy Society Annual Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goda, Tadahiro; Iba, Kenji

    The 21st Power and Energy Society Annual Conference was held on September 1-3, 2010 at Kyushu University. The total number of technical papers was 376, and technical sessions were 53 (52 oral sessions and 1 poster session). An invited lecture, a panel discussion, technical exhibitions and two technical tours were organized. All events were very well attended and the final enrollment attained to 969 registrations. The conference was successfully closed by the great contribution of all participants. The outline of the conference is reported in this article.

  10. Conference Report: 20th Power and Energy Society Annual Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Satoshi; Takao, Tomoaki

    The 20th Power and Energy Society Annual Conference was held on August 18-20, 2009 at Shibaura Institute of Technology. The total number of technical papers was 352, and technical sessions were 47 (46 oral sessions and 1 poster session). An invited lecture, a panel discussion, technical exhibitions and two technical tours were organized. All events were very well attended and the final enrollment attained to 881 registrations. The conference was successfully closed by the great contribution of all participants. The outline of the conference is reported in this article.

  11. Conference Report: Power and Energy Society Annual Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorino, Naoto; Mori, Hiroyuki

    The 19th Power & Energy Society Annual Conference was held on September 24-26, 2008 at Hiroshima University. The total number of technical papers was 415 and 53 sessions (52 oral sessions and 1 poster session) were organized. A panel discussion, a special lecture, technical exhibitions and technical tours were also organized. All events were very well attended and the final enrollment attained to 954 registrations. The conference has been successfully closed by the great contribution of all participants. In this article, the outline of the conference is reported.

  12. Computational Biology Support: RECOMB Conference Series (Conference Support)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Waterman

    2006-06-15

    This funding was support for student and postdoctoral attendance at the Annual Recomb Conference from 2001 to 2005. The RECOMB Conference series was founded in 1997 to provide a scientific forum for theoretical advances in computational biology and their applications in molecular biology and medicine. The conference series aims at attracting research contributions in all areas of computational molecular biology. Typical, but not exclusive, the topics of interest are: Genomics, Molecular sequence analysis, Recognition of genes and regulatory elements, Molecular evolution, Protein structure, Structural genomics, Gene Expression, Gene Networks, Drug Design, Combinatorial libraries, Computational proteomics, and Structural and functional genomics. The origins of the conference came from the mathematical and computational side of the field, and there remains to be a certain focus on computational advances. However, the effective use of computational techniques to biological innovation is also an important aspect of the conference. The conference had a growing number of attendees, topping 300 in recent years and often exceeding 500. The conference program includes between 30 and 40 contributed papers, that are selected by a international program committee with around 30 experts during a rigorous review process rivaling the editorial procedure for top-rate scientific journals. In previous years papers selection has been made from up to 130--200 submissions from well over a dozen countries. 10-page extended abstracts of the contributed papers are collected in a volume published by ACM Press and Springer, and are available at the conference. Full versions of a selection of the papers are published annually in a special issue of the Journal of Computational Biology devoted to the RECOMB Conference. A further point in the program is a lively poster session. From 120-300 posters have been presented each year at RECOMB 2000. One of the highlights of each RECOMB conference is a

  13. [Antithrombotic recombinant antibodies].

    PubMed

    Muzard, Julien; Loyau, Stéphane; Ajzenberg, Nadine; Billiald, Philippe; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine

    2006-01-01

    Coronary syndromes, stroke and other ischaemic arterial diseases are the leading cause of death in the world and will probably remain it at least until 2020. Cardiovascular diseases kill 17 million people each year with an expected increase to 20 million in 2020 and 24 million in 2030. The global impact of recurrence and death during the 6 months following an acute coronary syndrome remains at 8-15% in the present state of medical practice. Acute ischaemic syndromes have a common aetiology that is the formation of a platelet-rich clot at the site of severe coronary stenosis and of eroded atherosclerotic plaques. Therapy consists of medical treatments associating thrombolysis, antiplatelet drugs, and the re-opening of the coronary artery by angioplasty. But these treatments do not prevent morbidity and mortality reaching 15% at 6 months. Finally the treatment of stroke is very limited. There is thus a real clinical need to improve existing treatments and to discover new molecules. Platelet activation is a critical step in ischaemic cardiovascular diseases. This is the reason why antiplatelet drugs are most often prescribed in these cases. Currently, only one recombinant antithrombotic antibody is used in therapy. This is a chimeric Fab, c7E3 or abciximab, which inhibits the final phase of platelet aggregation. Abciximab is prescribed in acute coronary syndromes treated by angioplasty. However, treatment by abciximab can induce severe complications, principally, hemorrages and thrombopenia. Other platelet receptors involved in the earlier steps of platelet activation, such as the phases of contact with and of activation by the subendothelium matrix, have been identified as potential targets for the development of antithrombotic antibodies and are described in this revue. PMID:17652972

  14. Off-rate screening for selection of high-affinity anti-drug antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ylera, Francisco; Harth, Stefan; Waldherr, Dirk; Frisch, Christian; Knappik, Achim

    2013-10-15

    The rapidly increasing number of therapeutic antibodies in clinical development and on the market requires corresponding detection reagents for monitoring the concentration of these drugs in patient samples and as positive controls for measurement of anti-drug antibodies. Phage display of large recombinant antibody libraries has been shown to enable the rapid development of fully human anti-idiotypic antibodies binding specifically to antibody drugs, since the in vitro panning approach allows for incorporation of suitable blockers to drive selection toward the paratope of the drug. A typical bottleneck in antibody generation projects is ranking of the many candidates obtained after panning on the basis of antibody binding strength. Ideally, such method will work without prior labeling of antigens and with crude bacterial lysates. We developed an off-rate screening method of crude Escherichia coli lysates containing monovalent Fab fragments obtained after phage display of the HuCAL PLATINUM® antibody library. We used the antibody drugs trastuzumab and cetuximab as antigen examples. Using the Octet® RED384 label-free sensor instrument we show that antibody off rates can be reliably determined in crude bacterial lysates with high throughput. We also demonstrate that the method can be applied to screening for high-affinity antibodies typically obtained after affinity maturation. PMID:23906643

  15. Calcium-dependent antigen binding as a novel modality for antibody recycling by endosomal antigen dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Hironiwa, N; Ishii, S; Kadono, S; Iwayanagi, Y; Mimoto, F; Habu, K; Igawa, T; Hattori, K

    2016-01-01

    The pH-dependent antigen binding antibody, termed a recycling antibody, has recently been reported as an attractive type of second-generation engineered therapeutic antibody. A recycling antibody can dissociate antigen in the acidic endosome, and thus bind to its antigen multiple times. As a consequence, a recycling antibody can neutralize large amounts of antigen in plasma. Because this approach relies on histidine residues to achieve pH-dependent antigen binding, which could limit the epitopes that can be targeted and affect the rate of antigen dissociation in the endosome, we explored an alternative approach for generating recycling antibodies. Since calcium ion concentration is known to be lower in endosome than in plasma, we hypothesized that an antibody with antigen-binding properties that are calcium-dependent could be used as recycling antibody. Here, we report a novel anti-interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibody, identified from a phage library that binds to IL-6R only in the presence of a calcium ion. Thermal dynamics and a crystal structure study revealed that the calcium ion binds to the heavy chain CDR3 region (HCDR3), which changes and possibly stabilizes the structure of HCDR3 to make it bind to antigen calcium dependently (PDB 5AZE). In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that this calcium-dependent antigen-binding antibody can dissociate its antigen in the endosome and accelerate antigen clearance from plasma, making it a novel approach for generating recycling antibody. PMID:26496237

  16. Natural antibody - Biochemistry and functions.

    PubMed

    Rahyab, Ali Seyar; Alam, Amit; Kapoor, Aricka; Zhang, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Natural antibodies have been common knowledge in the scientific community for more than half a century. Initially disregarded, their functions have garnered a newfound interest recently. Natural antibodies are usually polyreactive IgM antibodies and are implicated in numerous physiologic and pathologic processes. Current research demonstrates they play a role in adaptive and innate immune responses, autoimmunity, and apoptosis. Evidence exists that they are involved in the modulation of neurodegenerative disorders and malignancy. Furthermore, natural antibodies have been implicated in ischemia reperfusion injury and atherosclerosis. As such the study of natural antibodies may provide new insight into normal physiologic processes whilst concurrently paving the road for a wide-range of possible therapeutic options. PMID:25309852

  17. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed. PMID:20930555

  18. Inhomogeneous translational diffusion of monoclonal antibodies on phospholipid Langmuir-Blodgett films.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, L L; Palmer, A G; Thompson, N L

    1988-01-01

    The translational mobility of fluorescent-labeled monoclonal antibodies specifically bound to supported phospholipid bilayers containing hapten-conjugated phospholipids has been measured as a function of the surface concentration of bound antibodies using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Fluorescence recovery curves are fit well by a model that assumes the presence of two populations of antibodies with different lateral diffusion coefficients. The larger diffusion coefficient equals 3.5 x 10(-9) cm2/s, the smaller diffusion coefficient ranges from 1.5 x 10(-9) cm2/s to 2.5 x 10(-10) cm2/s, and the fractional fluorescence recovery associated with the smaller coefficient increases from approximately 0 to approximately 0.7 with increasing concentration of bound antibody. These results suggest that complexes of haptenated phospholipids and antibodies in phospholipid Langmuir-Blodgett films form clusters or domains in a concentration-dependent fashion. PMID:3207834

  19. Antibodies - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    NCI announces the release of monoclonal antipeptide antibodies from rabbit for distribution on the antibody portal. There are 60 recently added monoclonal antibodies, with 56 generated from mouse and 4 generated from rabbit.

  20. Epstein-Barr virus antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Epstein-Barr virus antibody test is a blood test to detect antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus ( EBV ). ... specialist looks for antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus. In the first stages of an illness, little ...

  1. 33rd Actinide Separations Conference

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, L M; Wilk, P A

    2009-05-04

    Welcome to the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference hosted this year by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This annual conference is centered on the idea of networking and communication with scientists from throughout the United States, Britain, France and Japan who have expertise in nuclear material processing. This conference forum provides an excellent opportunity for bringing together experts in the fields of chemistry, nuclear and chemical engineering, and actinide processing to present and discuss experiences, research results, testing and application of actinide separation processes. The exchange of information that will take place between you, and other subject matter experts from around the nation and across the international boundaries, is a critical tool to assist in solving both national and international problems associated with the processing of nuclear materials used for both defense and energy purposes, as well as for the safe disposition of excess nuclear material. Granlibakken is a dedicated conference facility and training campus that is set up to provide the venue that supports communication between scientists and engineers attending the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference. We believe that you will find that Granlibakken and the Lake Tahoe views provide an atmosphere that is stimulating for fruitful discussions between participants from both government and private industry. We thank the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the United States Department of Energy for their support of this conference. We especially thank you, the participants and subject matter experts, for your involvement in the 33rd Actinide Separations Conference.

  2. Lecithin-agar assay for lecithinase antibodies in serum.

    PubMed

    Sibinovic, K H; Brown, F A; Pettigrew, K D; Vought, R L

    1971-01-01

    A technique for assay of lecithinase antibodies in serum was developed in this laboratory by using a lecithin-agar plate diffusion procedure based on a combination of described plate assays. Egg yolk lipoprotein composed primarily of lecithin was used as a substrate for reaction with free or non-neutralized lecithinase C after incubation of known amounts of lecithinase C with various dilutions of control and test sera. It was found that the size of the reaction zone was a function of enzyme concentration and inversely proportional to the antibody concentration. Accuracy and precision of the assay were determined. In addition, lecithinase antibody levels in sera from experimentally inoculated rats and rabbits and sera from randomly selected human patients were studied. PMID:4322282

  3. Lecithin-Agar Assay for Lecithinase Antibodies in Serum

    PubMed Central

    Sibinovic, Kyle H.; Brown, Freddie A.; Pettigrew, Karen D.; Vought, Robert L.

    1971-01-01

    A technique for assay of lecithinase antibodies in serum was developed in this laboratory by using a lecithin-agar plate diffusion procedure based on a combination of described plate assays. Egg yolk lipoprotein composed primarily of lecithin was used as a substrate for reaction with free or non-neutralized lecithinase C after incubation of known amounts of lecithinase C with various dilutions of control and test sera. It was found that the size of the reaction zone was a function of enzyme concentration and inversely proportional to the antibody concentration. Accuracy and precision of the assay were determined. In addition, lecithinase antibody levels in sera from experimentally inoculated rats and rabbits and sera from randomly selected human patients were studied. Images PMID:4322282

  4. Concentrating Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  5. PREFACE: The Irago Conference 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Adarsh; Okada, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    The Irago Conference 2012 - 360 degree outlook on critical scientific and technological challenges for a sustainable society Organized by the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology, the Irago Conference, held recently (15-16 November) in Aichi, Japan, aimed to enhance mutual understanding between scientists, engineers and policymakers. Over 180 participants tackled topics ranging from energy and natural resources to public health and disaster prevention. The 360-degree outlook of the conference impressed speakers and guests. ''This conference has been extremely informative,'' noted Robert Gellar from the University of Tokyo. ''A unique conference with experts from a range of backgrounds,'' agreed Uracha Ruktanonchai from the National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC) in Thailand. Similarly, G P Li, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California Irvine commented that he had been ''able to think the unthinkable'' as a range of topics came together. The conference was streamed live on Ustream to ensure that researchers from across the world could benefit from thought-provoking presentations examining global issues such as energy, disaster mitigation and nanotechnology. ''This was wonderful,'' said Oussama Khatib from Stanford University, ''A good recipe of speakers from such a range of backgrounds.'' Manuscripts submitted to the organizers were peer-reviewed, and the papers in this proceedings were accepted for Journal of Physics: Conference Series. In addition to the formal speaker programme, graduate-student sessions provided a platform for graduate students to describe their latest findings as oral presentations. A series of excursions to relevant locations, such as the Tahara megasolar region under construction and a local car-manufacturing factory, gave participants the opportunity to further consider practical applications of their research in industry

  6. Monoclonal antibodies to cyclodiene insecticides and method for detecting the same

    DOEpatents

    Stanker, L.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Watkins, B.E.

    1994-08-02

    Methods are described for making specific monoclonal antibodies useful for detection of cyclodienes in foods and environmental samples. Monoclonal antibodies specifically reactive with cyclodienes can detect accumulated pesticides in food, tissue or environmental samples. Extraction and preparation of organic samples for immunoassay in a polar-nonpolar reaction medium permits detection of halogenated organic ring structures at concentrations in samples. 13 figs.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies to cyclodiene insecticides and method for detecting the same

    DOEpatents

    Stanker, Larry H.; Vanderlaan, Martin; Watkins, Bruce E.

    1994-01-01

    Methods are described for making specific monoclonal antibodies useful for detection of cyclodienes in foods and environmental samples. Monoclonal antibodies specifically reactive with cyclodienes can detect accumulated pesticides in food, tissue or environmental samples. Extraction and preparation of organic samples for immunoassay in a polar-nonpolar reaction medium permits detection of halogenated organic ring structures at concentrations in samples.

  8. DOE Workshop at Tapia Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Valerie

    2015-02-19

    The DE-SC0013568 DOE Grant, in the amount of $11,822.79, was used to support five doctoral students from underrepresented groups to attend the 2015 Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing Conference, held February 18-21 in Boston, MA. Each scholarship was approximately $1200 to cover conference registration, travel, and lodging for the duration of the conference. The remaining $5,822.79 was used to support a DOE Breakfast Workshop during breakfast on Thursday, February 19. The Breakfast supported approximately 140 graduate students from underrepresented groups to learn about the different career opportunities at the different DOE National Laboratories.

  9. Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Poe, C.C. Jr.; Harris, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference in Hampton, Virginia, December 6-8, 1994. This conference was the culmination of a 3-year program that was initiated by NASA late in 1990 to develop mechanics of textile composites in support of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology Program (ACT). The goal of the program was to develop mathematical models of textile preform materials and test methods to facilitate structural analysis and design. Participants in the program were from NASA, academia, and industry. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for articles from this conference.

  10. Topical conference: Opportunities in biology for physicists. Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    2002-12-16

    The conference was aimed at early career physicists who were interested in exploring the possibilities of working at the interface between physics and biology, in particular, graduate students and postdocs considering applying the methods of physics to biological research. Areas of major importance were genomics and evolution, biological networks, biomolecular dynamics, high-resolution imaging of living cells, and technologies for biological investigation. A total of 205 persons attended the conference.

  11. Protective role of antibodies induced by Brucella melitensis B115 against B. melitensis and Brucella abortus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Adone, Rosanna; Francia, Massimiliano; Pistoia, Claudia; Petrucci, Paola; Pesciaroli, Michele; Pasquali, Paolo

    2012-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that antibodies specific for O-PS antigen of Brucella smooth strains are involved in the protective immunity of brucellosis. Since the rough strain Brucella melitensis B115 was able to protect mice against wild Brucella strains brucellosis despite the lack of anti-OPS antibodies, in this study we evaluated the biological significance of antibodies induced by this strain, directed to antigens other than O-PS, passively tranferred to untreated mice prior to infection with Brucella abortus 2308 and B. melitensis 16M virulent strains. The protective ability of specific antisera collected from mice vaccinated with B. melitensis B115, B. abortus RB51 and B. abortus S19 strains was compared. The results indicated that antibodies induced by B115 were able to confer a satisfactory protection, especially against B. abortus 2308, similar to that conferred by the antiserum S19, while the RB51 antiserum was ineffective. These findings suggest that antibodies induced by B115 could act as opsonins as well as antibodies anti-O-PS, thus triggering more efficient internalization and degradation of bacteria within phagocytes. This is the first study assessing the efficacy of antibodies directed to antigens other than O-PS in the course of brucellosis infection. PMID:22521283

  12. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    The Quark Matter 2006 conference was held on 14 20 November 2006 at the Shanghai Science Hall of the Shanghai Association of Sciences and Technology in Shanghai, China. It was the 19th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus Nucleus Collisions. The conference was organized jointly by SINAP (Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)) and CCNU (Central China Normal University, Wuhan). Over 600 scientists from 32 countries in five continents attended the conference. This is the first time that China has hosted such a premier conference in the field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, an important event for the Chinese high energy nuclear physics community. About one half of the conference participants are junior scientists—a clear indication of the vigor and momentum for this field, in search of the fundamental nature of the nuclear matter at extreme conditions. Professor T D Lee, honorary chair of the conference and one of the founders of the quark matter research, delivered an opening address with his profound and philosophical remarks on the recent discovery of the nature of strongly-interacting quark-gluon-plasma (sQGP). Professor Hongjie Xu, director of SINAP, gave a welcome address to all participants on behalf of the two hosting institutions. Dr Peiwen Ji, deputy director of the Mathematics and Physics Division of the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), also addressed the conference participants and congratulated them on the opening of the conference. Professor Mianheng Jiang, vice president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), gave a concise introduction about the CAS as the premier research institution in China. He highlighted continued efforts at CAS to foster international collaborations between China and other nations. The Quark Matter 2006 conference is an example of such a successful collaboration between high energy nuclear physicists in China and other nations all over the world. The

  13. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    The Quark Matter 2006 conference was held on 14 20 November 2006 at the Shanghai Science Hall of the Shanghai Association of Sciences and Technology in Shanghai, China. It was the 19th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus Nucleus Collisions. The conference was organized jointly by SINAP (Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)) and CCNU (Central China Normal University, Wuhan). Over 600 scientists from 32 countries in five continents attended the conference. This is the first time that China has hosted such a premier conference in the field of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, an important event for the Chinese high energy nuclear physics community. About one half of the conference participants are junior scientists—a clear indication of the vigor and momentum for this field, in search of the fundamental nature of the nuclear matter at extreme conditions. Professor T D Lee, honorary chair of the conference and one of the founders of the quark matter research, delivered an opening address with his profound and philosophical remarks on the recent discovery of the nature of strongly-interacting quark-gluon-plasma (sQGP). Professor Hongjie Xu, director of SINAP, gave a welcome address to all participants on behalf of the two hosting institutions. Dr Peiwen Ji, deputy director of the Mathematics and Physics Division of the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC), also addressed the conference participants and congratulated them on the opening of the conference. Professor Mianheng Jiang, vice president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), gave a concise introduction about the CAS as the premier research institution in China. He highlighted continued efforts at CAS to foster international collaborations between China and other nations. The Quark Matter 2006 conference is an example of such a successful collaboration between high energy nuclear physicists in China and other nations all over the world. The

  14. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge.

  15. Conference OKs science budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    With the budget process all but complete for next fiscal year, the National Science Foundation and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration observers were saying that science had not done that badly in Congress, for an election year. NSF got half the budget increase it requested, NASA two-thirds. The Space Station did well, at the expense of environmental and social programs, which are funded by Congress from the same pot of money as NASA and NSF.A House-Senate conference finished work on a $59 billion appropriations bill for the Department of Housing and Urban Development and independent agencies, including EPA, NASA, and NSF, in early August. The House and Senate then quickly passed the measure before their recess; the President is expected to sign it soon. Included in the Fiscal Year 1989 spending bill are $1,885 billion for NSF, a 9.8% increase over FY 1988, and $10.7 billion for NASA, 18.5% more than the year before.

  16. Oceans '86 conference record

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    These five volumes represent the proceedings of the Oceans '86 Conference Washington, DC, 23-25 September 1986. Volume 1 includes papers on Underwater Photography and Sensing; Marine Recreation; Diving; CTACTS (Charleston Tactical Aircrew Combat Training System); Offshore and Coastal Structures; Underwater Welding, Burning and Cutting; Advances in Ocean Mapping; Ocean Energy; Biofouling and Corrosion; Moorings, Cables and Connections; Marine Minerals; Remote Sensing and Satellites; and Acoustics Analysis. Volume 2 covers Data Base Management; Modeling and Simulation; Ocean Current Simulation; Instrumentation; Artificial Reefs and Fisheries; US Status and Trends; Education and Technology Transfer; Economic Potential and Coastal Zone Management; and Water Quality. Volume 3 includes papers on National and Regional Monitoring Strategies; New Techniques and Strategies for Monitoring; Indicator Parameters/Organisms; Historical Data; Crystal Cube for Coastal and Estuarine Degradation; and the Monitoring Gap. Volume 4 covers the Organotin Symposium - Chemistry; Toxicity Studies; and Environmental Monitoring and Modeling. Volume 5 includes papers on Advances in Oceanography; Applied Oceanography; Unmanned Vehicles and ROV's; Manned Vehicles; and Oceanographic Ships.

  17. [Monoclonal antibody for cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Achiwa, Hiroyuki; Sato, Shigeki; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2002-04-01

    Antibodies have for many decades been viewed as ideal molecules for cancer therapy. Although promising from the start, it has taken much of more than two decades to reach the level of clinical application. Genetic engineering of antibodies; that is novel technologies for chimeric or humanizing monoclonal antibodies, has greatly advanced their utility in molecular targeting therapies, and in the past four years some therapeutic monoclonal antibodies for hematologic malignancies and solid tumors, such as Rituximab for B-cell lymphoma and Trastuzumab for metastatic breast cancer, have provided sufficient efficacy and safety to support regulatory approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. They were subsequently approved by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in 2001. Many molecular biological and immunological studies have revealed the targeting properties of the host immune system and the biological mechanism of cancer cells for a more specific anticancer effect. Many clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies as a single agent, or in combination protocol with current standard chemotherapy or immunoconjugates have shown promise in the treatment of specific diseases. Furthermore, novel antibody designs and improved understanding of the mode of action of current antibodies lend great hope to the future of this therapeutic approach. The accumulating results from many basic, clinical and translational studies may lead to more individualized therapeutic strategies using these agent directed at specific genetic and immunologic targets. PMID:11977531

  18. Fluorescent labeling of antibody fragments using split GFP.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; Listwan, Pawel; Waldo, Geoffrey S; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2011-01-01

    Antibody fragments are easily isolated from in vitro selection systems, such as phage and yeast display. Lacking the Fc portion of the antibody, they are usually labeled using small peptide tags recognized by antibodies. In this paper we present an efficient method to fluorescently label single chain Fvs (scFvs) using the split green fluorescent protein (GFP) system. A 13 amino acid tag, derived from the last beta strand of GFP (termed GFP11), is fused to the C terminus of the scFv. This tag has been engineered to be non-perturbing, and we were able to show that it exerted no effect on scFv expression or functionality when compared to a scFv without the GFP11 tag. Effective functional fluorescent labeling is demonstrated in a number of different assays, including fluorescence linked immunosorbant assays, flow cytometry and yeast display. Furthermore, we were able to show that this split GFP system can be used to determine the concentration of scFv in crude samples, as well an estimate of antibody affinity, without the need for antibody purification. We anticipate this system will be of widespread interest in antibody engineering and in vitro display systems. PMID:21998685

  19. Intra-spike crosslinking overcomes antibody evasion by HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Galimidi, Rachel P; Klein, Joshua S; Politzer, Maria S; Bai, Shiyu; Seaman, Michael S; Nussenzweig, Michel C; West, Anthony P; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2015-01-29

    Antibodies developed during HIV-1 infection lose efficacy as the viral spike mutates. We postulated that anti-HIV-1 antibodies primarily bind monovalently because HIV's low spike density impedes bivalent binding through inter-spike crosslinking, and the spike structure prohibits bivalent binding through intra-spike crosslinking. Monovalent binding reduces avidity and potency, thus expanding the range of mutations permitting antibody evasion. To test this idea, we engineered antibody-based molecules capable of bivalent binding through intra-spike crosslinking. We used DNA as a "molecular ruler" to measure intra-epitope distances on virion-bound spikes and construct intra-spike crosslinking molecules. Optimal bivalent reagents exhibited up to 2.5 orders of magnitude increased potency (>100-fold average increases across virus panels) and identified conformational states of virion-bound spikes. The demonstration that intra-spike crosslinking lowers the concentration of antibodies required for neutralization supports the hypothesis that low spike densities facilitate antibody evasion and the use of molecules capable of intra-spike crosslinking for therapy or passive protection. PMID:25635457

  20. Immunization with Immune Complexes Modulates the Fine Specificity of Antibody Responses to a Flavivirus Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Tsouchnikas, Georgios; Zlatkovic, Juergen; Jarmer, Johanna; Strauß, Judith; Vratskikh, Oksana; Kundi, Michael; Stiasny, Karin

    2015-01-01

    confer protection from disease. Such antibodies can target different epitopes in E protein, and the fine specificities of polyclonal responses can differ between individuals. We conducted a mouse immunization study with TBE E protein alone or complexed to monoclonal antibodies specific for each of the three protein domains. We demonstrated that phenomena such as epitope shielding and antibody-induced structural changes can profoundly influence the fine specificity of antibody responses to the same immunogen. The study thus provided important new information on the potential immunomodulatory role of preexisting antibodies in a flavivirus system that can be relevant for understanding individual-specific factors influencing antibody responses in sequential flavivirus infections and/or immunizations. PMID:26018152

  1. Data Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Orbital Research, Inc., developed, built, and tested three high-temperature components for use in the design of a data concentrator module in distributed turbine engine control. The concentrator receives analog and digital signals related to turbine engine control and communicates with a full authority digital engine control (FADEC) or high-level command processor. This data concentrator follows the Distributed Engine Controls Working Group (DECWG) roadmap for turbine engine distributed controls communication development that operates at temperatures at least up to 225 C. In Phase I, Orbital Research developed detailed specifications for each component needed for the system and defined the total system specifications. This entailed a combination of system design, compiling existing component specifications, laboratory testing, and simulation. The results showed the feasibility of the data concentrator. Phase II of this project focused on three key objectives. The first objective was to update the data concentrator design modifications from DECWG and prime contractors. Secondly, the project defined requirements for the three new high-temperature, application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs): one-time programmable (OTP), transient voltage suppression (TVS), and 3.3V. Finally, the project validated each design by testing over temperature and under load.

  2. PREFACE: 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsson, Hans

    1982-01-01

    Invited Papers: The Physics of Hot Plasmas During the last decade a dramatic evolution of plasma physics has occurred. Not only have gigantic fusion plasma machines been planned, and are now being built, and elaborate spaceships and antenna systems been constructed to explore remote parts of the cosmos; new observations have revealed fascinating structures in space, ranging from pulsar plasmas under extreme conditions in very strong magnetic fields to large-scale magnetic field and electric current systems in cosmic plasmas. X-rays from very distant sources as well as radio-waves from the plasma in the magnetosphere and in the Aurora have recently been studied with new observational techniques. Ingenious laboratory experiments are continuously being carried out to exploit new fundamental processes in plasmas. These are of great interest for the basic understanding of plasmas and also have immediate consequences for applications, like plasma heating and diagnostics. The theoretical description of new plasma phenomena, and of the plasma state in general poses challenging problems, particularly in situations where high concentration of energy is located in the plasmas. Nonlinear wave analysis and turbulence theory have accordingly been extensively developed to describe in particular the collective plasma phenomena. New concepts have been envisaged like plasma solitons, which may be thought of as excitations of local concentrations of longitudinal plasma waves which turn out to be particularly stable. More and more sophisticated structures of nonlinear nature are being revealed by means of high capacity computer facilities. Simulation experiments allow for studies of chaotic behaviour of plasma particles. Related fields of activity form new trends in the development of plasma theory. The programme of the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics, which was held in Göteborg, Sweden, stressed the role of the Physics of Hot Plasmas. Studies of such plasmas are

  3. A fully automated primary screening system for the discovery of therapeutic antibodies directly from B cells.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Simon; Howells, Louise; O'Dowd, Victoria; Starkie, Dale; Whale, Kevin; Saunders, Mark; Lee, David; Lightwood, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    For a therapeutic antibody to succeed, it must meet a range of potency, stability, and specificity criteria. Many of these characteristics are conferred by the amino acid sequence of the heavy and light chain variable regions and, for this reason, can be screened for during antibody selection. However, it is important to consider that antibodies satisfying all these criteria may be of low frequency in an immunized animal; for this reason, it is essential to have a mechanism that allows for efficient sampling of the immune repertoire. UCB's core antibody discovery platform combines high-throughput B cell culture screening and the identification and isolation of single, antigen-specific IgG-secreting B cells through a proprietary technique called the "fluorescent foci" method. Using state-of-the-art automation to facilitate primary screening, extremely efficient interrogation of the natural antibody repertoire is made possible; more than 1 billion immune B cells can now be screened to provide a useful starting point from which to identify the rare therapeutic antibody. This article will describe the design, construction, and commissioning of a bespoke automated screening platform and two examples of how it was used to screen for antibodies against two targets. PMID:25548140

  4. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates.

    PubMed

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Rosenfeld, Ronit; Ariel, Naomi; Epstein, Eyal; Alcalay, Ron; Zvi, Anat; Kronman, Chanoch; Ordentlich, Arie; Mazor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit) was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (koff < 1 × 10(-7) s(-1)) that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication. PMID:26950154

  5. Isolation of Anti-Ricin Protective Antibodies Exhibiting High Affinity from Immunized Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Noy-Porat, Tal; Rosenfeld, Ronit; Ariel, Naomi; Epstein, Eyal; Alcalay, Ron; Zvi, Anat; Kronman, Chanoch; Ordentlich, Arie; Mazor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Ricin, derived from the castor bean plant Ricinus communis, is one of the most potent and lethal toxins known, against which there is no available antidote. To date, the use of neutralizing antibodies is the most promising post-exposure treatment for ricin intoxication. The aim of this study was to isolate high affinity anti-ricin antibodies that possess potent toxin-neutralization capabilities. Two non-human primates were immunized with either a ricin-holotoxin- or subunit-based vaccine, to ensure the elicitation of diverse high affinity antibodies. By using a comprehensive set of primers, immune scFv phage-displayed libraries were constructed and panned. A panel of 10 antibodies (five directed against the A subunit of ricin and five against the B subunit) was isolated and reformatted into a full-length chimeric IgG. All of these antibodies were found to neutralize ricin in vitro, and several conferred full protection to ricin-intoxicated mice when given six hours after exposure. Six antibodies were found to possess exceptionally high affinity toward the toxin, with KD values below pM (koff < 1 × 10−7 s−1) that were well correlated with their ability to neutralize ricin. These antibodies, alone or in combination, could be used for the development of a highly-effective therapeutic preparation for post-exposure treatment of ricin intoxication. PMID:26950154

  6. Dengue Virus (DENV) Neutralizing Antibody Kinetics in Children After Symptomatic Primary and Postprimary DENV Infection.

    PubMed

    Clapham, Hannah E; Rodriguez-Barraquer, Isabel; Azman, Andrew S; Althouse, Benjamin M; Salje, Henrik; Gibbons, Robert V; Rothman, Alan L; Jarman, Richard G; Nisalak, Ananda; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Nimmannitya, Suchitra; Vaughn, David W; Green, Sharone; Yoon, In-Kyu; Cummings, Derek A T

    2016-05-01

    The immune response to dengue virus (DENV) infection is complex and not fully understood. Using longitudinal data from 181 children with dengue in Thailand who were followed for up to 3 years, we describe neutralizing antibody kinetics following symptomatic DENV infection. We observed that antibody titers varied by serotype, homotypic vs heterotypic responses, and primary versus postprimary infections. The rates of change in antibody titers over time varied between primary and postprimary responses. For primary infections, titers increased from convalescence to 6 months. By comparing homotypic and heterotypic antibody titers, we saw an increase in type specificity from convalescence to 6 months for primary DENV3 infections but not primary DENV1 infections. In postprimary cases, there was a decrease in titers from convalescence up until 6 months after infection. Beginning 1 year after both primary and postprimary infections, there was evidence of increasing antibody titers, with greater increases in children with lower titers, suggesting that antibody titers were boosted due to infection and that higher levels of neutralizing antibody may be more likely to confer a sterilizing immune response. These findings may help to model virus transmission dynamics and provide baseline data to support the development of vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26704615

  7. Effect on influenza hemagglutinin protein binding with neutralizing antibody using terahertz spectroscopy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yiwen; Zhong, Junlan; Zuo, Jian; Zhang, Cunlin

    2014-11-01

    Terahertz spectroscopy is sensitive to probe several aspects of biological systems. We have reported the terahertz dielectric spectrum is able to identify the type of the charges in the hydrogen-bonded antibodies' networks in our previous work. Recently we demonstrate a highly sensitive THz-TDS method to monitor binding interaction of influenza hemagglutinin (HA) against its target antibody F10. The terahertz dielectric properties of HA was strongly affected by the presence of a specific antibody. Protein solution concentration or even molecular binding interaction can also affect the terahertz signal. This enables us to detect the specificity and sensitivity of antibody-antigen binding under THz radiation.

  8. Measurement of immunoglobulin A, G, and M class rotavirus antibodies in serum and mucosal secretions.

    PubMed Central

    McLean, B; Sonza, S; Holmes, I H

    1980-01-01

    A solid-phase, enzyme-linked immunospecific assay for measurement of different immunoglobulin classes of human rotavirus antibodies is described. The antigen, which was adsorbed directly to polyvinyl microtiter plates, consisted of a clarified cell culture stock of the simian rotavirus SA 11. The assay was sensitive and reproducible and could readily be calibrated to determine concentrations of each class of antibody. The assay was applied to measurements of rotavirus antibodies in serum, colostrum, milk, and fecal samples. It particularly facilitates investigations of the role of immunoglobulin A antibodies in immunity to rotavirus infections. PMID:6260831

  9. Affinity immunoblotting - High resolution isoelectric focusing analysis of antibody clonotype distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knisley, Keith A.; Rodkey, L. Scott

    1986-01-01

    A sensitive and specific method is proposed for the analysis of specific antibody clonotype changes occurring during an immune response and for comparing multiple sera for antibody clonotype similarities. Polyclonal serum antibodies separated by isoelectric focusing (IEF) were analyzed by an affinity immunoblotting method using antigen-coated nitrocellulose membranes. Antibodies present on the surface of the acrylamide gels following IEF bind the antigen on the nitrocellulose when the coated nitrocellulose is laid over the gels. The technique has been used to analyze Ig clonotypes specific for five protein antigens and two carbohydrate antigens. Optimal antigen concentrations for coating the nitrocellulose membranes were found to range from 10-100 microgram/ml.

  10. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ∼ four new products per year, ∼70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion. PMID:25529996

  11. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  12. The protective role of humoral neutralizing antibody in the NIH potency test for rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wunderli, P S; Shaddock, J H; Schmid, D S; Miller, T J; Baer, G M

    1991-09-01

    Intraperitoneal vaccination of mice with rabies vaccine results in both dosage-dependent rabies virus neutralizing antibody titres and protection from lethal intracerebral (i.c.) challenge with fixed strain CVS rabies virus. Pre-exposure adoptive intravenous transfer of naive or immune cells did not significantly protect naive Balb/c mice from lethal i.c. CVS challenge, but immune serum and anti-rabies glycoprotein monoclonal antibodies (individually and in combination) did confer significant protection when administered before or up to 24 h after lethal i.c. rabies virus challenge. PMID:1950097

  13. Reducing heterophilic antibody interference in immunoassays using single chain antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Tan, Ruimin; Fischer, Christopher J.; Victry, Kristin D.; Zangar, Richard C.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2011-12-15

    Sandwich ELISA microarrays have the potential to simultaneously quantify the levels of multiple diagnostic targets in a biological sample. However, as seen with traditional ELISA diagnostics, heterophilic antibodies (HA) in patient sera have the potential to cause interference in these assays. We demonstrate here that reducing the diagnostic capture antibody to its minimal functional unit, the variable heavy and light domains artificially connected with a short polypeptide linker (scFv), is an effective strategy for reducing the HA assay interference.

  14. 9. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This conference was held November 12--16, 1995 in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on genetic mapping in mice. This report contains abstracts of presentations, focusing on the following areas: mutation identification; comparative mapping; informatics and complex traits; mutagenesis; gene identification and new technology; and genetic and physical mapping.

  15. UN conference reaffirms reproductive rights.

    PubMed

    1996-07-26

    The United Nations Conference on Human Settlements, also known as the Habitat II conference, met in Istanbul from June 3 to 14. It was the last major UN gathering of this millennium and the first major UN meeting since 1995's Fourth World Conference on Women (the "Beijing Conference")--and thus an important opportunity for a wider international community to weigh in on agreements reached in Beijing and at the International Conference on Population and Development, held in Cairo in 1994. The final document that emerged from Habitat II, the "Global Plan of Action," affirmed crucial elements of those earlier accords. The Habitat documents calls for action to "[d]evelop and implement programmes to ensure universal access for women throughout their life-span to a full range of affordable health care services, including those related to reproductive health care, which includes family planning and sexual health, consistent with the Report of the International Conference on Population and Development." Language adopted at the Cairo meeting is also affirmed in Habitat's call for "universal access to the widest range of primary health care services." Perhaps most significantly, the Istanbul document reiterated an important declaration from the Beijing conference: "While the significance of national and regional particularities and various historical, cultural, and religious backgrounds must be borne in mind, it is the duty of all States to promote and protect all human rights and fundamental freedoms." Most of the 189 UN members and observer states that attended the conference upheld all three of these provisions. Only a small group of states--Argentina, Guatemala, Iran, Jordan, Lebanon, Malta, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Syria, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, and the Holy See--filed reservations on the health care sections. PMID:12347289

  16. Immunotoxicity of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are large molecules intended to bind to specific targets often expressed on the immune system, and to treat various immunopathological conditions. Therefore, mAbs can be considered to have a high potential for immunotoxicity, which is reflected in the clinical experience accumulated on mAbs-induced adverse effects related to immunosuppression, immunostimulation and hypersensitivity (immunogenicity). So far, non clinical immunotoxicity studies have been inadequate to address all safety issues in relation to the possible immunotoxicity of mAbs, because they are fraught with limitations and pitfalls primarily related to the lack of relevant animal species. In addition, clinical studies rarely include validated end-points dedicated to the prediction of immunotoxicity. With the ongoing development of mAbs as novel therapeutic strategies for a wide variety of diseases, efforts should be paid to improve our understanding of mAbs-induced immunotoxic effects and design dedicated strategies to assess their immunological safety, both non clinically and clinically. PMID:20061816

  17. 78 FR 38311 - Reliability Technical Conference Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference Agenda Reliability Technical Docket No... Notice of Technical Conference issued on May 7, 2013, the Commission will hold a technical conference on... regarding the matters discussed at the technical conference. Any person or entity wishing to submit...

  18. 76 FR 71011 - Reliability Technical Conference Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Reliability Technical Conference Agenda Reliability Technical Conference... Staff. Not consolidated. As announced in the Notice of Technical Conference issued on October 7, 2011, the Commission will hold a technical conference on Tuesday, November 29, 2011, from 1 p.m. to 5...

  19. 42 CFR 3.512 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prehearing conferences. 3.512 Section 3.512 Public... ORGANIZATIONS AND PATIENT SAFETY WORK PRODUCT Enforcement Program § 3.512 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ must schedule at least one prehearing conference, and may schedule additional prehearing conferences...

  20. 33 CFR 20.501 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PRACTICE, PROCEDURE, AND EVIDENCE FOR FORMAL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEEDINGS OF THE COAST GUARD Conferences and Settlements § 20.501 Conferences. (a) Any party may by motion request a conference. (b) The ALJ may direct the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conferences. 20.501 Section...

  1. 22 CFR 521.19 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Prehearing conferences. 521.19 Section 521.19... § 521.19 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences as appropriate. (b) Upon the motion of any party, the ALJ shall schedule at least one prehearing conference at a...

  2. 24 CFR 26.17 - Prehearing conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the proceeding. (b) Recordation of prehearing conference. The prehearing conference shall, at the... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prehearing conference. 26.17... Development HEARING PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Discovery § 26.17 Prehearing conference....

  3. 50 CFR 228.11 - Prehearing conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prehearing conference. 228.11 Section 228... Prehearing conference. (a) After an examination of all the direct testimony submitted pursuant to § 228.7... prehearing conference. (c) The purpose of the prehearing conference shall be to enable the presiding...

  4. 30 CFR 44.23 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the disposition of the proceeding and assure a just conclusion thereof. (b) Record of conference. The... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prehearing conferences. 44.23 Section 44.23... Hearings § 44.23 Prehearing conferences. (a) Convening a conference. Upon his own motion or the motion of...

  5. 24 CFR 26.39 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prehearing conferences. 26.39... § 26.39 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences as appropriate. (b) Upon the motion of any party or sua sponte, the ALJ may schedule a prehearing conference at...

  6. 28 CFR 68.13 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the proceeding would be expedited by such a conference. Prehearing conferences normally shall be... the disposition of the proceeding. (b) Reporting. A verbatim record of the conference will not be kept... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conferences. 68.13 Section 68.13...

  7. 6 CFR 13.19 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prehearing conferences. 13.19 Section 13.19... § 13.19 Prehearing conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences as appropriate. (b) Upon the motion of any party, the ALJ will schedule at least one prehearing conference at a...

  8. 2 CFR 801.1112 - Conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Subpart for OMB Guidance at 2 CFR Part 180). § 801.1112 Conference. Upon receipt of a request for a conference, the official imposing the sanction shall arrange such a conference with the participant or... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conference. 801.1112 Section 801.1112...

  9. 10 CFR 1013.19 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prehearing conferences. 1013.19 Section 1013.19 Energy... conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule prehearing conferences as appropriate. (b) Upon the motion of any party, the ALJ shall schedule at least one prehearing conference at a reasonable time in advance of...

  10. 49 CFR 209.319 - Prehearing conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prehearing conference. 209.319 Section 209.319... Prehearing conference. (a) The parties shall confer with the presiding officer, either in person or by telephone, for a conference at least 10 days before the hearing to consider: (1) Formulation...

  11. 27 CFR 70.418 - Conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Conferences. 70.418... Beer § 70.418 Conferences. Any person desiring a conference with TTB, relative to any matter arising in connection with such person's operations, will be accorded such a conference upon request. No...

  12. 34 CFR 33.19 - Prehearing conferences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prehearing conferences. 33.19 Section 33.19 Education... conferences. (a) The ALJ may schedule perhearing conferences as appropriate. (b) Upon the motion of any party, the ALJ shall schedule at least one perhearing conference at a reasonable time in advance of...

  13. NASA Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C. (Compiler); McCauley, D. E. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held July 14-16, 1998 at the Von Braun Center in Huntsville, AL. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications. It was the third NASA conference of this type in the microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approximately 125 investigations and 100 principal investigators in FY98, almost all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference. The conference's purpose was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity in preparation for a NASA Research Announcement scheduled for release in late 1998 by the Microgravity Research Division at NASA Headquarters. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A tour of the Marshall Space Flight Center microgravity research facilities was held on July 16, 1998. This volume is comprised of the research reports submitted by the principal investigators after the conference.

  14. NASA Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szofran, Frank R. (Compiler); McCauley, D. (Compiler); Walker, C. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held June 10-11, 1996 at the Von Braun Civic Center in Huntsville, AL. It was organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Microgravity Science and Applications Division at NASA Headquarters, and hosted by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the Alliance for Microgravity Materials Science and Applications (AMMSA). It was the second NASA conference of this type in the microgravity materials science discipline. The microgravity science program sponsored approximately 80 investigations and 69 principal investigators in FY96, all of whom made oral or poster presentations at this conference. The conference's purpose was to inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity in preparation for a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) scheduled for release in late 1996 by the Microgravity Science and Applications Division at NASA Headquarters. The conference was aimed at materials science researchers from academia, industry, and government. A tour of the MSFC microgravity research facilities was held on June 12, 1996. This volume is comprised of the research reports submitted by the principal investigators after the conference and presentations made by various NASA microgravity science managers.

  15. Proceedings of the Fifth International Mobile Satellite Conference 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, T. (Compiler); Rigley, J. (Compiler); Anderson, Louise (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Satellite-based mobile communications systems provide voice and data communications to users over a vast geographic area. The users may communicate via mobile or hand-held terminals, which may also provide access to terrestrial communications services. While previous International Mobile Satellite Conferences have concentrated on technical advances and the increasing worldwide commercial activities, this conference focuses on the next generation of mobile satellite services. The approximately 80 papers included here cover sessions in the following areas: networking and protocols; code division multiple access technologies; demand, economics and technology issues; current and planned systems; propagation; terminal technology; modulation and coding advances; spacecraft technology; advanced systems; and applications and experiments.

  16. Antibodies to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Potentiate the Response of Human T Lymphocyte Clones to the Same Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, Esteban; Chang, Tse Wen

    1984-04-01

    Human T-helper lymphocyte clones specific for hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) proliferate on stimulation with HBsAg in vitro. Antibodies specific for HBsAg, but no other antibodies, augment this proliferative response. In the presence of antibodies to HBsAg, the maximum response could be achieved at HBsAg concentrations that were 1 percent of those required in the absence of the antibodies. These findings suggest that antigen-specific antibodies exert regulatory controls on T cells that recognize the same antigens.

  17. Cold denaturation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Kristi L; Patapoff, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The susceptibility of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to undergo cold denaturation remains unexplored. In this study, the phenomenon of cold denaturation was investigated for a mAb, mAb1, through thermodynamic and spectroscopic analyses. tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were recorded for the guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl)-induced unfolding of mAb1 at pH 6.3 at temperatures ranging from −5 to 50°C. A three-state unfolding model incorporating the linear extrapolation method was fit to the fluorescence data to obtain an apparent free energy of unfolding, ΔGu, at each temperature. CD studies revealed that mAb1 exhibited polyproline II helical structure at low temperatures and at high GuHCl concentrations. the Gibbs-Helmholtz expression fit to the ΔGu versus temperature data from fluorescence gave a ΔCp of 8.0 kcal mol−1 K−1, a maximum apparent stability of 23.7 kcal mol−1 at 18°C, and an apparent cold denaturation temperature (TCD) of −23°C. ΔGu values for another mAb (mAb2) with a similar framework exhibited less stability at low temperatures, suggesting a depressed protein stability curve and a higher relative TCD. Direct experimental evidence of the susceptibility of mAb1 and mAb2 to undergo cold denaturation in the absence of denaturant was confirmed at pH 2.5. thus, mAbs have a potential to undergo cold denaturation at storage temperatures near −20°C (pH 6.3), and this potential needs to be evaluated independently for individual mAbs. PMID:20093856

  18. PREFACE: XXI Fluid Mechanics Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmyd, Janusz S.; Fornalik-Wajs, Elzbieta; Jaszczur, Marek

    2014-08-01

    This Conference Volume contains the papers presented at the 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXI FMC) held at AGH - University of Science and Technology in Krakow, Poland, 15-18 June 2014, and accepted for Proceedings published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The Fluid Mechanics Conferences have been taking place every two years since 1974, a total of forty years. The 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXI FMC) is being organized under the auspices of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Committee of Mechanics. The goal of this conference is to provide a forum for the exposure and exchange of ideas, methods and results in fluid mechanics. Conference topics include, but are not limited to Aerodynamics, Atmospheric Science, Bio-Fluids, Combustion and Reacting Flows, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Experimental Fluid Mechanics, Flow Machinery, General Fluid Dynamics, Hydromechanics, Heat and Fluid Flow, Measurement Techniques, Micro- and Nano- Flow, Multi-Phase Flow, Non-Newtonian Fluids, Rotating and Stratified Flows, Turbulence. Within the general subjects of this conference, the Professor Janusz W. Elsner Competition for the best fluid mechanics paper presented during the Conference is organized. Authors holding a M.Sc. or a Ph.D. degree and who are not older than 35 years of age may enter the Competition. Authors with a Ph.D. degree must present individual papers; authors with a M.Sc. degree may present papers with their supervisor as coauthor, including original results of experimental, numerical or analytic research. Six state-of-the-art keynote papers were delivered by world leading experts. All contributed papers were peer reviewed. Recommendations were received from the International Scientific Committee, reviewers and the advisory board. Accordingly, of the 163 eligible extended abstracts submitted, after a review process by the International Scientific Committee, 137 papers were selected for presentation at the 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference, 68

  19. Assessing antibody microarrays for space missions: effect of long-term storage, gamma radiation, and temperature shifts on printed and fluorescently labeled antibodies.

    PubMed

    de Diego-Castilla, Graciela; Cruz-Gil, Patricia; Mateo-Martí, Eva; Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Rivas, Luis A; Parro, Víctor

    2011-10-01

    Antibody microarrays are becoming frequently used tools for analytical purposes. A key factor for optimal performance is the stability of the immobilized (capturing) antibodies as well as those that have been fluorescently labeled to achieve the immunological test (tracers). This is especially critical for long-distance transport, field testing, or planetary exploration. A number of different environmental stresses may affect the antibody integrity, such as dryness, sudden temperature shift cycles, or, as in the case of space science, exposure to large quantities of the highly penetrating gamma radiation. Here, we report on the effect of certain stabilizing solutions for long-term storage of printed antibody microarrays under different conditions. We tested the effect of gamma radiation on printed and freeze- or vacuum-dried fluorescent antibodies at working concentrations (tracer antibodies), as well as the effect of multiple cycles of sudden and prolonged temperature shifts on the stability of fluorescently labeled tracer antibody cocktails. Our results show that (i) antibody microarrays are stable at room temperature when printed on stabilizing spotting solutions for at least 6 months, (ii) lyophilized and vacuum-dried fluorescently labeled tracer antibodies are stable for more than 9 months of sudden temperature shift cycles (-20°C to 25°C and 50°C), and (iii) both printed and freeze- or vacuum-dried fluorescent tracer antibodies are stable after several-fold excess of the dose of gamma radiation expected during a mission to Mars. Although different antibodies may exhibit different susceptibilities, we conclude that, in general, antibodies are suitable for use in planetary exploration purposes if they are properly treated and stored with the use of stabilizing substances. PMID:22007740

  20. Electron Microscopic Studies of the Antigen-Antibody Complex

    PubMed Central

    Easty, G. C.; Mercer, E. H.

    1958-01-01

    Electron micrographs of the ferritin antibody (rabbit) and ferritin (horse) complex have been obtained. The high iron content of the ferritin molecule (23 per cent Fe) allows its molecules to be recognized within the particles of precipitate. Three methods of visualizing the molecular distribution have been developed: (a) small particles of the precipitated complex have been dried on to electron microscope grids and either examined directly or first shadowed with metal and then examined, (b) the precipitate has been centrifuged to a plug which was embedded and thin sections cut from it for examination, (c) the bands formed by allowing antibody and antigen to diffuse together in agar gels have been fixed, embedded and sectioned. All methods have yielded pictures of the distribution of the ferritin within the complex which are broadly similar to what might have been expected from a somewhat irregular lattice as pictured in the Marrack-Heidelberger Lattice Theory. The antibody molecules are not clearly defined but appear as a halo of low density enveloping the ferritin clusters. The distance, centre to centre, between the ferritin molecules is variable, but is, on the average, in the range 200–400 Å. This is greater than the ferritin-ferritin contact distance (100 Å) and is thought to mean that the ferritin molecules are bridged by antibody molecules as pictured in the Lattice Theory. The bands produced in the gel-diffusion test contain islands of ferritin-antibody complex. When equivalent concentrations of reagents are used a single band of precipitate is formed. When excess of either antigen or antibody is used multiple bands of precipitate are formed which contain islands of ferritin antibody complex indistinguishable from those formed in the single band at equivalent concentrations, providing direct evidence for the formation of multiple bands from a single antigen. Ferritin-ferritin contacts have been observed within the complex. Under all the conditions of

  1. Conference Model: Guidelines...for Science Supervisors on How to Conduct a Successful Leadership Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBlasi, Robert V.

    Guidelines of a four-phase model for conducting leadership conferences are outlined. Phase I focuses on initial conference planning, including (1) identifying need and purpose for the conference; (2) selecting a conference chairperson; (3) forming the conference planning committee, listing suggested committees and their responsibilities (program,…

  2. Eighteen Years of the Great Lakes Regional Counseling Psychology Conference: Revisiting the Need for Regional Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado-Romero, Edward A.; Bowman, Sharon L.; Gerstein, Lawrence H.

    2006-01-01

    The Great Lakes Regional Conference on Counseling Psychology is the only conference to continuously fulfill the 1987 mandate issued by Division 17 for regional counseling conferences. The rationale for regional conferences is reviewed, and the 18-year history of the Great Lakes Regional Conference is examined. The authors conclude by noting the…

  3. In vitro reaction of antibodies to ragweed. II. Quantitative determination of non-IgE antibodies interferring in a radioallergosorbent test.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Y; Wicher, K; Wypych, J I; Reisman, R E; Arbesman, C E

    1975-01-01

    Immunoglobulin E-rich fractions and IgE-depleted fractions were prepared from individual and pooled sera of patients allergic to ragweed. The IgE-depleted fractions contained antibodies to ragweed associated with the immunoglobulins G, A and M. The IgE-rich fraction contained only IgE antibodies to ragweed, although other immunoglobulins were present in this fraction. The amount of antibodies in these fractions was determined by the radioimmunoassay described in a preceding publication. The inhibitory role of the non-IgE antibodies was examined in an allergosorbent test (RAST) by using various concentrations of the IgE-rich fraction. The RAST was performed using ragweed-coupled cellulose powder as well as paper discs. The IgE antibodies in concentration from 0.017 to 0.069 mug/ml were inhibited by 30-60% in the cellulose RAST by non-IgE antibodies in concentrations from 6.25 to 12.5 mug/ml. The inhibition effect was substantially less pronounced in the paper disc RAST. This would indicate that for diagnostic purposes, especially for examination of sera with high levels of IgG antibodies, it is more reliable to use the disc RAST instead of the cellulose powder RAST. PMID:1236837

  4. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibody therapy for experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, J E; Small, G J; Lostrom, M E; Pier, G B

    1986-01-01

    A human immunoglobulin G preparation, enriched in antibodies to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Pseudomonas aeruginosa antigens (PA-IGIV) and murine monoclonal antibodies (MAb) to P. aeruginosa Fisher immunotype-1 (IT-1) LPS antigen and outer membrane protein F (porin), were evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in a guinea pig model of P. aeruginosa pneumonia. The concentration of antibodies to IT-1 LPS was 7.6 micrograms/ml in PA-IGIV and 478 micrograms/ml in the IT-1 MAb preparation. No antibody to IT-1 was detected in MAb to porin. For study, animals were infected by intratracheal instillation of IT-1 P. aeruginosa and then treated 2 h later with intravenous infusions of PA-IGIV, IT-1 MAb, or porin MAb. Control groups received intravenous albumin, and routinely died from pneumonia. Both PA-IGIV (500 mg/kg) and IT-1 MAb (greater than or equal to 2.5 mg/kg) treatment resulted in increased survival (P less than 0.01 to 0.001), and also improved intrapulmonary killing of bacteria. Porin MAb failed to protect from fatal pneumonia. IT-1 MAb treatment produced more survivals than did PA-IGIV treatment but only at dosages of MAb resulting in serum antibody concentrations greater than those achieved with PA-IGIV. PA-IGIV and IT-1 MAb demonstrated in vitro and in vivo (posttreatment guinea pig serum) opsonophagocytic activity for the IT-1 challenge strain. However, the polyclonal preparation required complement, whereas the MAb did not. We conclude that passive immunization with polyclonal hyperimmune P. aeruginosa globulin or with MAb to LPS antigens may be useful in the treatment of acute P. aeruginosa pneumonia. The relative efficacies of such preparations may be limited, however, by their type-specific LPS antibody concentrations. PMID:3093385

  5. Functional effects of anticardiolipin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Harris, E N; Pierangeli, S S

    1996-10-01

    The 'lupus anticoagulant' phenomenon is the best documented functional effect of antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies, occurring either by inhibition of the prothrombinase and/or Factor X activation reactions. Understanding the mechanism by which aPL antibodies inhibit phospholipid dependent coagulation reactions may yield important clues about their 'thrombogenic effects' in vivo. We conducted a series of studies to determine the specificity, diversity, and mechanism by which aPL antibodies inhibit phospholipid dependent reactions. Results showed that purified immunoglobulins with lupus anticoagulant and anti-cardiolipin activities were absorbed by negatively charged phospholipids and both activities were recovered from the phospholipid-antibody precipitate. Purified aPL antibodies inhibited the prothrombinase reaction in a plasma free system in which beta 2-glycoprotein 1 (beta 2-GP1) was absent. Affinity purified aPL antibodies had 25-50 times the inhibitory activity of immunoglobulin preparations. The phospholipid binding proteins, beta 2-GPI and placental anticoagulant protein I (PAP I), independently inhibited the prothrombinase reaction, and when these proteins were combined with aPL, inhibition of the prothrombinase reaction was additive. Antibodies of syphilis had no inhibitory effect, partially accounted for by lack of specificity for phosphotidylserine (PS). Although aPL antibodies inhibited the protein C activation reaction, there was no correlation of these activities with inhibition of the prothrombinase reaction. Together, these results show that aPL exert their effects by interaction with negatively charged phospholipids, in particular phosphotidylserine, but lack of correlation between inhibition of the prothrombinase and protein C activation reactions, suggests that the nature of the coagulation protein is also important. PMID:8902763

  6. Antibodies to watch in 2014.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industry's progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the "Antibodies to watch" series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administration's Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed. PMID:24284914

  7. Natural monoclonal antibodies and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vollmers, Peter H; Brändlein, Stephanie

    2008-06-01

    Immunity is responsible for recognition and elimination of infectious particles and for removal of cellular waste, modified self structures and transformed cells. Innate or natural immunity acts as a first line defense and is also the link to acquired immunity and memory. By using the human hybridoma technology, a series of monoclonal antibodies and several new tumor-specific targets could be identified. A striking phenomenon of immunity against malignant cells is that all so far isolated tumor-specific antibodies were germ-line coded natural IgM antibodies. And neither in animals nor in humans affinity-maturated tumor-specific IgG antibodies have been detected so far. These IgM's preferentially bind to carbohydrate epitopes on post-transcriptionally modified surface receptors, which are recently patented and preferentially remove malignant cells by inducing apoptosis to avoid inflammatory processes. Our "biology-" or "function-driven" method represents a unique yet powerful approach compared to the typical approaches on screening compounds or antibodies against non-validated targets (mostly differentially expressed). Moreover, the approach creates a competitive patenting strategy of creating proprietary antibodies and validated targets at the same time, which has the potential of further streamlining the discovery of new cancer therapies. PMID:18537750

  8. Antibodies to watch in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    The commercial pipeline of recombinant antibody therapeutics is robust and dynamic. As of early December 2014, a total of 6 such products (vedolizumab, siltuximab, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, blinatumomab) were granted first marketing approvals in 2014. As discussed in this perspective on antibodies in late-stage development, the outlook for additional approvals, potentially still in 2014 and certainly in 2015, is excellent as marketing applications for 6 antibody therapeutics (secukinumab, evolocumab, mepolizumab, dinutuximab, nivolumab, necitumumab) are undergoing a first regulatory review in the EU or US. Of the 39 novel mAbs currently in Phase 3 studies, a marketing application for one (alirocumab) may be submitted in late 2014, and marketing application submissions for at least 4 (reslizumab, ixekizumab, ocrelizumab, obiltoxaximab) are expected in 2015. Other ‘antibodies to watch’ are those in Phase 3 studies with estimated primary completion dates in late 2014 or 2015, which includes 13 for non-cancer indications (brodalumab, bimagrumab, bococizumab, MABp1, gevokizumab, dupilumab, sirukumab, sarilumab, tildrakizumab, guselkumab, epratuzumab, combination of actoxumab + bezlotoxumab, romosozumab) and 2 (racotumomab and clivatuzumab tetraxetan) undergoing evaluation as treatments for cancer. In addition to the novel antibody therapeutics mentioned, biosimilar infliximab and biosimilar trastuzumab are ‘antibodies to watch’ in 2015 because of their potential for entry into the US market and regulatory review, respectively. PMID:25484055

  9. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, David Sherman

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  10. Antibodies to watch in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industry’s progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the “Antibodies to watch” series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administration’s Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed. PMID:24284914

  11. Novel antibodies as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zafir-Lavie, I; Michaeli, Y; Reiter, Y

    2007-05-28

    In recent years antibodies, whether generated by traditional hybridoma technology or by recombinant DNA strategies, have evolved from Paul Ehrlich's 'magic bullets' to a modern age 'guided missile'. In the recent years of immunologic research, we are witnessing development in the fields of antigen screening and protein engineering in order to create specific anticancer remedies. The developments in the field of recombinant DNA, protein engineering and cancer biology have let us gain insight into many cancer-related mechanisms. Moreover, novel techniques have facilitated tools allowing unique distinction between malignantly transformed cells, and regular ones. This understanding has paved the way for the rational design of a new age of pharmaceuticals: monoclonal antibodies and their fragments. Antibodies can select antigens on both a specific and a high-affinity account, and further implementation of these qualities is used to target cancer cells by specifically identifying exogenous antigens of cancer cell populations. The structure of the antibody provides plasticity resonating from its functional sites. This review will screen some of the many novel antibodies and antibody-based approaches that are being currently developed for clinical applications as the new generation of anticancer agents. PMID:17530025

  12. Agar-Gel Precipitin Technique in Anthrax Antibody Determinations1

    PubMed Central

    Ray, John G.; Kadull, Paul J.

    1964-01-01

    A modification of the agar-gel precipitation inhibition technique of Thorne and Belton for detecting anthrax antibodies reduces inconsistency of visually determined end points on the same sera observed by different technicians. Determination of the minimal reacting concentrations of the anthrax antigen and antibody reagents, modifications of the visualization apparatus, methods for combining reagents, and length of incubation periods contribute to the ease of the end-point determinations and the uniformity of results. When compared with the previous technique, the modified procedure is less time-consuming while retaining satisfactory reproducibility, simplicity, specificity, and sensitivity. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:14201088

  13. EDITORIAL: International MEMS Conference 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, Francis E. H.; Jianmin, Miao; Iliescu, Ciprian

    2006-04-01

    The International MEMS conference (iMEMS2006) organized by the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology and Nanyang Technological University aims to provide a platform for academicians, professionals and industrialists in various related fields from all over the world to share and learn from each other. Of great interest is the incorporation of the theme of life sciences application using MEMS. It is the desire of this conference to initiate collaboration and form network of cooperation. This has continued to be the objective of iMEMS since its inception in 1997. The technological advance of MEMS over the past few decades has been truly exciting in terms of development and applications. In order to participate in this rapid development, a conference involving delegates from within the MEMS community and outside the community is very meaningful and timely. With the receipt of over 200 articles, delegates related to MEMS field from all over the world will share their perspectives on topics such as MEMS/MST Design, MEMS Teaching and Education, MEMS/MST Packaging, MEMS/MST Fabrication, Microsystems Applications, System Integration, Wearable Devices, MEMSWear and BioMEMS. Invited speakers and delegates from outside the field have also been involved to provide challenges, especially in the life sciences field, for the MEMS community to potentially address. The proceedings of the conference will be published as an issue in the online Journal of Physics: Conference Series and this can reach a wider audience and will facilitate the reference and citation of the work presented in the conference. We wish to express our deep gratitude to the International Scientific Committee members and the organizing committee members for contributing to the success of this conference. We would like to thank all the delegates, speakers and sponsors from all over the world for presenting and sharing their perspectives on topics related to MEMS and the challenges that MEMS can

  14. European Space Power Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Flood, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent, rapid advances in a variety of solar cell technologies offer the potential for significantly enhancing, or enabling entirely new, mission capabilities. Thin film solar cells are of particular interest in that regard. A review is provided of the status of those thin film cell technologies of interest for space applications, and the issues to be resolved before mission planners can consider them. A short summary is also given of recent developments in concentrator and multijunction space solar cell and array technology.

  15. [Evaluation of an experimental rabies vaccine by the oral and intestinal route with inactivated vaccines, concentrated or non-concentrated].

    PubMed

    Atanasiu, P; Metianu, T; Bolanos, A

    1982-01-01

    Application of beta-propiolactone inactivated rabies vaccine prepared in bovine embryo kidney cells, concentrated or non concentrated, by intestinal or oral route resulted in antibody production in rats and cats. 80-100% of vaccinated rats were protected against challenge with street rabies virus. The same vaccines (lyophilized in gelatin capsules) stimulated antibody production in more than 50% (5/8) cats which received the vaccine by the oral route. PMID:7128069

  16. Insights from Fc receptor biology: a route to improved antibody reagents.

    PubMed

    Woof, Jenny M

    2012-01-01

    Fc receptors and their interaction with antibodies will be a major theme at the forthcoming FASEB Science Research Conference on Immunoreceptors to be held in Snowmass this July (details available at www.faseb.org/src/home.aspx, follow the tabs for Immunoreceptors). Since its inception in the mid 1980s, this meeting series has maintained a focus on Fc receptors, and this year's meeting will be no exception. PMID:22531437

  17. Insights from Fc receptor biology: A route to improved antibody reagents

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Fc receptors and their interaction with antibodies will be a major theme at the forthcoming FASEB Science Research Conference on Immunoreceptors to be held in Snowmass this July (details available at www.faseb.org/src/home.aspx, follow the tabs for Immunoreceptors). Since its inception in the mid 1980s, this meeting series has maintained a focus on Fc receptors, and this year’s meeting will be no exception. PMID:22531437

  18. Alternative downstream processes for production of antibodies and antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Ejima, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    Protein-A or Protein-L affinity chromatography and virus inactivation are key processes for the manufacturing of therapeutic antibodies and antibody fragments. These two processes often involve exposure of therapeutic proteins to denaturing low pH conditions. Antibodies have been shown to undergo conformational changes at low pH, which can lead to irreversible damages on the final product. Here, we review alternative downstream approaches that can reduce the degree of low pH exposure and consequently damaged product. We and others have been developing technologies that minimize or eliminate such low pH processes. We here cover facilitated elution of antibodies using arginine in Protein-A and Protein-G affinity chromatography, a more positively charged amidated Protein-A, two Protein-A mimetics (MEP and Mabsorbent), mixed-mode and steric exclusion chromatography, and finally enhanced virus inactivation by solvents containing arginine. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in molecular engineering of antibody. PMID:24859179

  19. ASM Conference on Prokaryotic Development

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, H. B.

    2005-07-13

    Support was provided by DOE for the 2nd ASM Conference on Prokaryotic Development. The final conference program and abstracts book is attached. The conference presentations are organized around topics that are central to the current research areas in prokaryotic development. The program starts with topics that involve relatively simple models systems and ends with systems that are more complex. The topics are: i) the cell cycle, ii) the cytoskeleton, iii) morphogenesis, iv) developmental transcription, v) signaling, vi) multicellularity, and vii) developmental diversity and symbiosis. The best-studied prokaryotic development model systems will be highlighted at the conference through research presentations by leaders in the field. Many of these systems are also model systems of relevance to the DOE mission including carbon sequestration (Bradyrizobium, Synechococcus), energy production (Anabaena, Rhodobacter) and bioremediation (Caulobacter, Mesorhizobium). In addition, many of the highlighted organisms have important practical applications; the actinomycetes and myxobacteria produce antimicrobials that are of commercial interest. It is certain that the cutting-edge science presented at the conference will be applicable to the large group of bacteria relevant to the DOE mission.

  20. IEEE International conference on plasma science: Conference record--Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The conference covered the following topics: basic plasma physics; vacuum electronics; gaseous and electrical gas discharges; laser-produced plasma; space plasmas; computational plasma science; plasma diagnostics; electron, ion and plasma sources; intense electron and ion beams; intense beam microwaves; fast wave M/W devices; microwave-plasma interactions; magnetic fusion; MHD; plasma focus; ultrafast z-pinches and x-ray lasers; plasma processing; fast-opening switches; EM and ETH launchers; solid-state plasmas and switches; plasmas for lighting; ball lightning and spherical plasma configurations; and environmental/energy issues. Separate abstracts were prepared for 379 items in this conference.

  1. Bispecific Antibodies Targeting Different Epitopes on the HIV-1 Envelope Exhibit Broad and Potent Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Asokan, M.; Rudicell, R. S.; Louder, M.; McKee, K.; O'Dell, S.; Stewart-Jones, G.; Wang, K.; Xu, L.; Chen, X.; Choe, M.; Chuang, G.; Georgiev, I. S.; Joyce, M. G.; Kirys, T.; Ko, S.; Pegu, A.; Shi, W.; Todd, J. P.; Yang, Z.; Bailer, R. T.; Rao, S.; Kwong, P. D.; Nabel, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The potency and breadth of the recently isolated neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies to HIV-1 have stimulated interest in their use to prevent or to treat HIV-1 infection. Due to the antigenically diverse nature of the HIV-1 envelope (Env), no single antibody is highly active against all viral strains. While the physical combination of two broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) can improve coverage against the majority of viruses, the clinical-grade manufacturing and testing of two independent antibody products are time and resource intensive. In this study, we constructed bispecific immunoglobulins (IgGs) composed of independent antigen-binding fragments with a common Fc region. We developed four different bispecific IgG variants that included antibodies targeting four major sites of HIV-1 neutralization. We show that these bispecific IgGs display features of both antibody specificities and, in some cases, display improved coverage over the individual parental antibodies. All four bispecific IgGs neutralized 94% to 97% of antigenically diverse viruses in a panel of 206 HIV-1 strains. Among the bispecific IgGs tested, VRC07 × PG9-16 displayed the most favorable neutralization profile. It was superior in breadth to either of the individual antibodies, neutralizing 97% of viruses with a median 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.055 μg/ml. This bispecific IgG also demonstrated in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters comparable to those of the parental bNAbs when administered to rhesus macaques. These results suggest that IgG-based bispecific antibodies are promising candidates for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection in humans. IMPORTANCE To prevent or treat HIV-1 infection, antibodies must potently neutralize nearly all strains of HIV-1. Thus, the physical combination of two or more antibodies may be needed to broaden neutralization coverage and diminish the possibility of viral resistance. A bispecific antibody that has two different

  2. Transient cefuroxime/metronidazole treatment induced factor V antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Van den Berg, Sjoerd Adrianus Antonius; Verwer, Patricia E; Idema, René N; Van Guldener, Coen

    2014-01-01

    A 29-year-old patient presented with an appendicular infiltrate, initially treated with intravenous antibiotics, but later requiring percutaneous drainage. Both prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) were prolonged on 3 days of antibiotic treatment and unresponsive to vitamin K or prothrombin complex concentrate. Laboratory investigation ultimately showed reduced factor V activity and factor V antibodies. In contrast to previously described cases of factor V antibodies, PT and aPTT were only mildly prolonged and residual factor V activity was still >20%. Draining of the abscess did not induce significant bleeding. Afterwards, no haemostatic medication was required. The patient was discharged from the hospital without complications. One week after cessation of the antibiotic treatment, PT and aPTT were within normal range again, with a factor V activity level of 36%. In conclusion, we present a patient with transient factor V antibodies, induced by antibiotics, without clinical bleeding tendency. PMID:25139922

  3. 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald (Editor); Ramachandran, Narayanan (Editor); Murphy, Karen (Editor); McCauley, Dannah (Editor); Bennett, Nancy (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 Microgravity Materials Science Conference was held June 25-26, 2002, at the Von Braun Center, Huntsville, Alabama. Organized by the Microgravity Materials Science Discipline Working Group, sponsored by the Physical Sciences Research Division, NASA Headquarters, and hosted by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and member institutions under the Cooperative Research in Biology and Materials Science (CORBAMS) agreement, the conference provided a forum to review the current research and activities in materials science, discuss the envisioned long-term goals, highlight new crosscutting research areas of particular interest to the Physical Sciences Research Division, and inform the materials science community of research opportunities in reduced gravity. An abstracts book was published and distributed at the conference to the approximately 240 people attending, who represented industry, academia, and other NASA Centers. This CD-ROM proceedings is comprised of the research reports submitted by the Principal Investigators in the Microgravity Materials Science program.

  4. Message from the Conference Chairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Sanjay; Perera, Unil

    2015-05-01

    We were very excited to host the 8th International Workshop on Quantum Structure Infrared Photodetectors (QSIP 2014), in picturesque Santa Fe, New Mexico from June 29th-July 3rd, 2014. This followed successful QSIP conferences at Dana Point (2000), Torino (2002), Kananaskis (2004), Kandy (2006), Yosimite (2009), Istanbul (2010) and Corsica (2012). The QSIP workshop is a high level scientific conference that aims to bring together scientists, engineers, industrial organizations, students and users in order to discuss recent advances, and to share the "State of the Art" in this field. QSIP conferences provide an international forum for attendees to present and discuss progress in infrared device physics and modeling, materials growth and processing issues, focal plane array development and characterization.

  5. Inaugural AGU Science Policy Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2012-01-01

    AGU will present its inaugural Science Policy Conference, 30 April to 3 May 2012, at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, located in downtown Washington, D. C. This conference will bring together leading scientists, policy makers, industry professionals, press, and other stakeholders to discuss natural hazards, natural resources, oceans, and Arctic science and the role these sciences play in serving communities. To bridge the science and policy fields, AGU plans to host this conference every 2 years and focus on the applications of Earth and space sciences to serve local and national communities. "Our nation faces a myriad of challenges such as the sustainability of our natural resources, current and future energy needs, and the ability to mitigate and adapt to natural and manmade hazards," said Michael McPhaden, president of AGU. "It is essential that policies to address these challenges be built on a solid foundation of credible scientific knowledge."

  6. Reference ranges and cutoff levels of pneumococcal antibody global serum assays (IgG and IgG2) and specific antibodies in healthy children and adults.

    PubMed

    Rose, M A; Buess, J; Ventur, Y; Zielen, S; Herrmann, E; Schulze, J; Schubert, R

    2013-08-01

    Pneumococcal antibodies represent the acquisition of natural immunity. Determination of pneumococcal antibodies is an important screening tool for immunodeficiencies. Our study generated reference ranges and cutoff levels for pneumococcal antibody global serum assays correlated to a specific pneumococcal antibody ELISA. Specific pneumococcal antibody levels were measured from 457 children undergoing elective surgery and 46 healthy adult volunteers (88 with previous pneumococcal immunization from both groups), 22 severe immunodeficient subjects with ataxia telangiectasia (A-T, negative controls), and age-matched 36 healthy allergic asthmatics. We determined a representative panel of serotype-specific pneumococcal antibodies (serotype 4, 5, 6B, 7F, 14, 18C, 19F, 23F) by ELISA and global pneumococcal IgG and IgG2 antibodies by EIA. In vaccine-naïve healthy subjects, initial pneumococcal IgG geometric mean concentrations of 13.1 μg/ml were low in the first year of life and increased over the time, reaching adult levels (70.5 μg/ml) at age 8-12 years. In parallel, IgG2 antibodies increased from 20.7 % (0.5-1 year old) to adult proportions (>30 %) in preschoolers. Correlation between the pneumococcal IgG screening assay and specific pneumococcal antibody levels was acceptable (Pearson's coefficient r = 0.4455; p = 0.001). Cutoff levels showed high sensitivity, whereas specificity was high to moderate calculated from correlations with the specific ELISA. We provide reference ranges and cutoff levels for the interpretation of specific antibody determinations in the clinical setting. The global pneumococcal IgG/IgG2 assay is a suitable screening tool and correlates with the ELISA serotype-specific pneumococcal antibodies. However, results below our cutoff values should be re-evaluated by serotype-specific ELISA testing. PMID:23529214

  7. Antibodies: an alternative for antibiotics?

    PubMed

    Berghman, L R; Abi-Ghanem, D; Waghela, S D; Ricke, S C

    2005-04-01

    In 1967, the success of vaccination programs, combined with the seemingly unstoppable triumph of antibiotics, prompted the US Surgeon General to declare that "it was time to close the books on infectious diseases." We now know that the prediction was overly optimistic and that the fight against infectious diseases is here to stay. During the last 20 yr, infectious diseases have indeed made a staggering comeback for a variety of reasons, including resistance against existing antibiotics. As a consequence, several alternatives to antibiotics are currently being considered or reconsidered. Passive immunization (i.e., the administration of more or less pathogen-specific antibodies to the patient) prior to or after exposure to the disease-causing agent is one of those alternative strategies that was almost entirely abandoned with the introduction of chemical antibiotics but that is now gaining interest again. This review will discuss the early successes and limitations of passive immunization, formerly referred to as "serum therapy," the current use of antibody administration for prophylaxis or treatment of infectious diseases in agriculture, and, finally, recent developments in the field of antibody engineering and "molecular farming" of antibodies in various expression systems. Especially the potential of producing therapeutic antibodies in crops that are routine dietary components of farm animals, such as corn and soy beans, seems to hold promise for future application in the fight against infectious diseases. PMID:15844826

  8. Antibodies to watch in 2016.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2016-01-01

    The number of novel antibody therapeutics that received first marketing approvals in 2015 met expectations, with 6 (alirocumab (Praluent®), evolocumab (Repatha®), daratumumab (Darzalex®), dinutuximab (Unituxin®), idarucizumab (Praxbind®), mepolizumab (Nucala®)) granted first approvals as of mid-November*. Seven novel antibody therapeutics (begelomab, brodalumab, elotuzumab, ixekizumab, necitumumab, obiltoxaximab, reslizumab) are in regulatory review, and thus a similar number, if not more, are projected to gain first approvals in 2016. Commercial late-stage antibody therapeutics development exceeded expectations by increasing from 39 candidates in Phase 3 studies as of late 2014 to 53 as of late 2015. Of the 53 candidates, transitions to regulatory review by the end of 2016 are projected for 8 (atezolizumab, benralizumab, bimagrumab, durvalumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, lebrikizumab, ocrelizumab, tremelimumab). Other "antibodies to watch" include 15 candidates (bavituximab, bococizumab, dupilumab, fasinumab, fulranumab, gevokizumab, guselkumab, ibalizumab, LY2951742, onartuzumab, REGN2222, roledumab, romosozumab, sirukumab, Xilonix) undergoing evaluation in Phase 3 studies that have estimated primary completion dates in 2016. As evidenced by the antibody therapeutics discussed in this perspective, the biopharmaceutical industry has a highly active late-stage clinical pipeline that may deliver numerous new products to the global market in the near future. *See Note added in proof for updates through December 31, 2015. PMID:26651519

  9. Antibody-Mediated Immobilization of Cryptococcus neoformans Promotes Biofilm Formation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Emma J.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    Most microbes, including the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, can grow as biofilms. Biofilms confer upon microbes a range of characteristics, including an ability to colonize materials such as shunts and catheters and increased resistance to antibiotics. Here, we provide evidence that coating surfaces with a monoclonal antibody to glucuronoxylomannan, the major component of the fungal capsular polysaccharide, immobilizes cryptococcal cells to a surface support and, subsequently, promotes biofilm formation. We used time-lapse microscopy to visualize the growth of cryptococcal biofilms, generating the first movies of fungal biofilm growth. We show that when fungal cells are immobilized using surface-attached specific antibody to the capsule, the initial stages of biofilm formation are significantly faster than those on surfaces with no antibody coating or surfaces coated with unspecific monoclonal antibody. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that biofilm growth was a dynamic process in which cells shuffled position during budding and was accompanied by emergence of planktonic variant cells that left the attached biofilm community. The planktonic variant cells exhibited mobility, presumably by Brownian motion. Our results indicate that microbial immobilization by antibody capture hastens biofilm formation and suggest that antibody coating of medical devices with immunoglobulins must exclude binding to common pathogenic microbes and the possibility that this effect could be exploited in industrial microbiology. PMID:19251903

  10. Preserved antiviral adaptive immunity following polyclonal antibody immunotherapy for severe murine influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Natalie E.; Hatjopolous, Antoinette; Fraser, Cara K.; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Hayball, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy may have particular benefits for the treatment of severe influenza infection in at-risk populations, however little is known of the impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation of memory responses to the virus. Ideally, passive immunotherapy should attenuate the severity of infection while still allowing the formation of adaptive responses to confer protection from future exposure. In this study, we sought to determine if administration of influenza-specific ovine polyclonal antibodies could inhibit adaptive immune responses in a murine model of lethal influenza infection. Ovine polyclonal antibodies generated against recombinant PR8 (H1N1) hemagglutinin exhibited potent prophylactic capacity and reduced lethality in an established influenza infection, particularly when administered intranasally. Surviving mice were also protected against reinfection and generated normal antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to the virus. The longevity of ovine polyclonal antibodies was explored with a half-life of over two weeks following a single antibody administration. These findings support the development of an ovine passive polyclonal antibody therapy for treatment of severe influenza infection which does not affect the formation of subsequent acquired immunity to the virus. PMID:27380890

  11. Preserved antiviral adaptive immunity following polyclonal antibody immunotherapy for severe murine influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Natalie E; Hatjopolous, Antoinette; Fraser, Cara K; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Diener, Kerrilyn R; Hayball, John D

    2016-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy may have particular benefits for the treatment of severe influenza infection in at-risk populations, however little is known of the impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation of memory responses to the virus. Ideally, passive immunotherapy should attenuate the severity of infection while still allowing the formation of adaptive responses to confer protection from future exposure. In this study, we sought to determine if administration of influenza-specific ovine polyclonal antibodies could inhibit adaptive immune responses in a murine model of lethal influenza infection. Ovine polyclonal antibodies generated against recombinant PR8 (H1N1) hemagglutinin exhibited potent prophylactic capacity and reduced lethality in an established influenza infection, particularly when administered intranasally. Surviving mice were also protected against reinfection and generated normal antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to the virus. The longevity of ovine polyclonal antibodies was explored with a half-life of over two weeks following a single antibody administration. These findings support the development of an ovine passive polyclonal antibody therapy for treatment of severe influenza infection which does not affect the formation of subsequent acquired immunity to the virus. PMID:27380890

  12. Targeting to cells of fluorescent liposomes covalently coupled with monoclonal antibody or protein A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leserman, Lee D.; Barbet, Jacques; Kourilsky, François; Weinstein, John N.

    1980-12-01

    Many applications envisioned for liposomes in cell biology and chemotherapy require their direction to specific cellular targets1-3. The ability to use antibody as a means of conferring specificity to liposomes would markedly increase their usefulness. We report here a method for covalently coupling soluble proteins, including monoclonal antibody and Staphylococcus aureus protein A (ref. 4), to small sonicated liposomes, by using the heterobifunctional cross-linking reagent N-hydroxysuccinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate (SPDP, Pharmacia). Liposomes bearing covalently coupled mouse monoclonal antibody against human β2-microglobulin [antibody B1.1G6 (IgG2a, κ) (B. Malissen et al., in preparation)] bound specifically to human, but not to mouse cells. Liposomes bearing protein A became bound to human cells previously incubated with the B1.1G6 antibody, but not to cells incubated without antibody. The coupling method results in efficient binding of protein to the liposomes without aggregation and without denaturation of the coupled ligand; at least 60% of liposomes bound functional protein. Further, liposomes did not leak encapsulated carboxyfluorescein (CF) as a consequence of the reaction.

  13. Synthetic antibodies with a human framework that protect mice from lethal Sudan ebolavirus challenge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Koellhoffer, Jayne F; Zak, Samantha E; Frei, Julia C; Liu, Nina; Long, Hua; Ye, Wei; Nagar, Kaajal; Pan, Guohua; Chandran, Kartik; Dye, John M; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Lai, Jonathan R

    2014-10-17

    The ebolaviruses cause severe and rapidly progressing hemorrhagic fever. There are five ebolavirus species; although much is known about Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV) and its neutralization by antibodies, little is known about Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV), which is emerging with increasing frequency. Here we describe monoclonal antibodies containing a human framework that potently inhibit infection by SUDV and protect mice from lethal challenge. The murine antibody 16F6, which binds the SUDV envelope glycoprotein (GP), served as the starting point for design. Sequence and structural alignment revealed similarities between 16F6 and YADS1, a synthetic antibody with a humanized scaffold. A focused phage library was constructed and screened to impart 16F6-like recognition properties onto the YADS1 scaffold. A panel of 17 antibodies were characterized and found to have a range of neutralization potentials against a pseudotype virus infection model. Neutralization correlated with GP binding as determined by ELISA. Two of these clones, E10 and F4, potently inhibited authentic SUDV and conferred protection and memory immunity in mice from lethal SUDV challenge. E10 and F4 were further shown to bind to the same epitope on GP as 16F6 with comparable affinities. These antibodies represent strong immunotherapeutic candidates for treatment of SUDV infection. PMID:25140871

  14. Chapman Conference on Rainfall Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V. K.

    The Chapman Conference on Rainfall Fields, sponsored by AGU, was the first of its kind; it was devoted to strengthening scientific interaction between the North American and Latin American geophysics communities. It was hosted by Universidad Simon Bolivar and Instituto Internacional de Estudios Avanzados, in Caracas, Venezuela, during March 24-27, 1986. A total of 36 scientists from Latin America, the United States, Canada, and Europe participated. The conference, which was convened by I. Rodriguez-Iturbe (Universidad Simon Bolivar) and V. K. Gupta (University of Mississippi, University), brought together hydrologists, meteorologists, and mathematicians/statisticians in the name of enhancing an interdisciplinary focus on rainfall research.

  15. World conference on lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Felip, Enriqueta; Rosell, Rafael

    2003-12-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent cause of cancer death. Improving this dismal outcome requires cooperation among several specialists. The 10th World Conference on Lung Cancer was held in Vancouver, Canada last month. The meeting was organised on behalf of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) and the British Columbia Cancer Agency. This Conference was chaired by Nevin Murray and the scientific sessions took place 10 - 14 August, with > 3000 participating lung cancer experts. The Vancouver programme included > 140 invited speakers throughout the 'meet the professor', plenary and interactive sessions, as well as 300 oral and 500 poster presentations. PMID:14640956

  16. Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, Clarence C. (Editor); Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference in Hampton, Virginia, December 6-8, 1994. This conference was the culmination of a 3-year program that was initiated by NASA late in 1990 to develop mechanics of textile composites in support of the NASA Advance Composites Technology Program (ACT). The goal of the program was to develop mathematical models of textile preform materials and test methods to facilitate structural analysis and design. Participants in the program were from NASA, academia, and industry.

  17. Ethnic minority energy conference: report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The report of a 1977 energy conference sponsored by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People summarizes the basic concern that US energy policy was not addressing the importance of full employment or the impact of rising energy costs on the poor. Conference speakers spoke of the social and economic changes that are needed if minorities are to participate in the economics of the technological age. These include better educational opportunities and cooperation between civil rights groups and energy planners. Other topics were venture opportunities for minorities in energy-related fields and opportunities for minority advocacy and energy efficiency actions.

  18. Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Poe, C.C.; Harris, C.E.

    1995-10-01

    This document is a compilation of papers presented at the Mechanics of Textile Composites Conference in Hampton, Virginia, December 6-8, 1994. This conference was the culmination of a 3-year program that was initiated by NASA late in 1990 to develop mechanics of textile composites in support of the NASA Advance Composites Technology Program (ACT). The goal of the program was to develop mathematical models of textile preform materials and test methods to facilitate structural analysis and design. Participants in the program were from NASA, academia, and industry. Separate abstracts were prepared for articles from this document.

  19. Radionuclide antibody-conjugates, a targeted therapy towards cancer.

    PubMed

    Kitson, Sean L; Cuccurullo, Vincenzo; Moody, Thomas S; Mansi, Luigi

    2013-06-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) is an investigational procedure which utilises monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), peptide conjugates and/or other chemical compounds. These bio-vectors are able to transport a dose of alpha particles to destroy cancer cells. Radionuclide antibody-conjugates (RACs), labelled with beta emitters, have already been used in humans. More recently, TAT has been introduced to treat oncological diseases mainly leukaemia and lymphoma. Encouraging results have also been obtained in solid neoplasms with the administration of anti-tenascin. This chimeric antibody labelled with astatine-211 was delivered in patients with recurrent brain tumours into a surgically created cavity. Conversely, a clinical trial using a standard TAT approach to treat patients with metastatic melanoma, observed the shrinkage of the solid tumour mass. This response in melanoma may lead to an alternative mechanism for TAT, called tumour-antivascular- alpha-therapy (TAVAT), and forms the basis of a novel approach to the treatment of cancer disease states. In this paper, we will concentrate mainly on the application of TAT using antibodies. In particular, an investigation into the major general features connected with the use of alpha emitters in cancer therapy will be discussed. The prospective role of TAT with RACs will also be outlined briefly, especially focussing on the most important therapeutic strategies to date based on antibodies radiolabelled with beta emitters. PMID:23808764

  20. Engineered Bispecific Antibodies with Exquisite HIV-1-Neutralizing Activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yaoxing; Yu, Jian; Lanzi, Anastasia; Yao, Xin; Andrews, Chasity D; Tsai, Lily; Gajjar, Mili R; Sun, Ming; Seaman, Michael S; Padte, Neal N; Ho, David D

    2016-06-16

    While the search for an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine remains elusive, emergence of a new generation of virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has re-ignited the field of passive immunization for HIV-1 prevention. However, the plasticity of HIV-1 demands additional improvements to these mAbs to better ensure their clinical utility. Here, we report engineered bispecific antibodies that are the most potent and broad HIV-neutralizing antibodies to date. One bispecific antibody, 10E8V2.0/iMab, neutralized 118 HIV-1 pseudotyped viruses tested with a mean 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.002 μg/mL. 10E8V2.0/iMab also potently neutralized 99% of viruses in a second panel of 200 HIV-1 isolates belonging to clade C, the dominant subtype accounting for ∼50% of new infections worldwide. Importantly, 10E8V2.0/iMab reduced virus load substantially in HIV-1-infected humanized mice and also provided complete protection when administered prior to virus challenge. These bispecific antibodies hold promise as novel prophylactic and/or therapeutic agents in the fight against HIV-1. PMID:27315479

  1. Molecular Communication Modeling of Antibody-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Chahibi, Youssef; Akyildiz, Ian F; Balasubramaniam, Sasitharan; Koucheryavy, Yevgeni

    2015-07-01

    Antibody-mediated Drug Delivery Systems (ADDS) are emerging as one of the most encouraging therapeutic solutions for treating several diseases such as human cancers. ADDS use small molecules (antibodies) that propagate in the body and bind selectively to their corresponding receptors (antigens) expressed at the surface of the diseased cells. In this paper, the Molecular Communication (MC) paradigm, where information is conveyed through the concentration of molecules, is advocated for the engineering of ADDS and modeling their complex behavior, to provide a realistic model without the over-complication of system biology models, and the limitations of experimental approaches. The peculiarities of antibodies, including their anisotropic transport and complex electrochemical structure, are taken into account to develop an analytical model of the ADDS transport and antigen-binding kinetics. The end-to-end response of ADDS, from the drug injection to the drug absorption, is mathematically derived based on the geometry of the antibody molecule, the electrochemical structure of the antibody-antigen complex, and the physiology of the patient. The accuracy of the MC model is validated by finite-element (COMSOL) simulations. The implications of the complex interplay between the transport and kinetics parameters on the performance of ADDS are effectively captured by the proposed MC model. The MC model of ADDS will enable the discovery and optimization of drugs in a versatile, cost-efficient, and reliable manner. PMID:25675450

  2. Conference Proceedings: Health Manpower Planning Conference. May, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hospital Educational and Research Foundation of Pennsylvania, Camp Hill.

    A two-day Health Manpower Planning Conference was held at State College, Pennsylvania, in 1971. The speakers represented a variety of organizations with responsibility for aspects of manpower planning and others not normally involved in planning. Program content was structured in such a way as to broaden the context within which manpower issues…

  3. Nineteenth annual actinide separations conference: Conference program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Bronson, M.

    1995-12-31

    This report contains the abstracts from the conference presentations. Sessions were divided into the following topics: Waste treatment; Spent fuel treatment; Issues and responses to Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board 94-1; Pyrochemical technologies; Disposition technologies; and Aqueous separation technologies.

  4. Inter Association Child Care Conference. Conference Proceedings 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, David, Ed.

    This publication of the proceedings of the Inter Association Child Care Conference includes a debate for and against professionalization in the field of child care. A section on meeting the treatment needs of children through educational preparation of child care practitioners discusses background factors, levels of education for practitioners,…

  5. On the Meaning of Affinity Limits in B-Cell Epitope Prediction for Antipeptide Antibody-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Caoili, Salvador Eugenio C.

    2012-01-01

    B-cell epitope prediction aims to aid the design of peptide-based immunogens (e.g., vaccines) for eliciting antipeptide antibodies that protect against disease, but such antibodies fail to confer protection and even promote disease if they bind with low affinity. Hence, the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) was searched to obtain published thermodynamic and kinetic data on binding interactions of antipeptide antibodies. The data suggest that the affinity of the antibodies for their immunizing peptides appears to be limited in a manner consistent with previously proposed kinetic constraints on affinity maturation in vivo and that cross-reaction of the antibodies with proteins tends to occur with lower affinity than the corresponding reaction of the antibodies with their immunizing peptides. These observations better inform B-cell epitope prediction to avoid overestimating the affinity for both active and passive immunization; whereas active immunization is subject to limitations of affinity maturation in vivo and of the capacity to accumulate endogenous antibodies, passive immunization may transcend such limitations, possibly with the aid of artificial affinity-selection processes and of protein engineering. Additionally, protein disorder warrants further investigation as a possible supplementary criterion for B-cell epitope prediction, where such disorder obviates thermodynamically unfavorable protein structural adjustments in cross-reactions between antipeptide antibodies and proteins. PMID:23209458

  6. Solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, J.S.

    1982-06-08

    A solar concentrator having an open framework formed as a geodesic dome. A rotatable support axle extends substantially diametrically across the dome and has the opposite ends thereof supported on the framework. The support axle defines a first rotational axis which is oriented to extend substantially parallel with the earth's north-south axis. A support post is hingedly mounted on the support shaft substantially at the midpoint thereof for permitting angular displacement of the support post relative to the support shaft about a second rotational axis which is perpendicular to the first axis. A dishshaped reflector assembly is positioned within the interior of the framework and fixedly secured to the support post. First and second drives effect angular displacement of the reflector assembly about the first and second axes, respectively, to permit tracking of the solar position.

  7. Antibody levels for cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, and rubella in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Halbert, S P; Kiefer, D J; Friedman-Kien, A E; Poiesz, B

    1986-01-01

    Significantly higher proportions of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or lymphadenopathy syndrome (LAS) were positive for antibodies to cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) compared with control groups of commercial blood donors. In contrast, no differences were found in the incidence of individuals positive for antibodies to rubella in these groups of subjects. Of those positive for antibodies to CMV and HSV in each group, the mean antibody levels were significantly higher in AIDS-LAS patients compared with the controls. The entire distribution of antibody concentrations to CMV and HSV in AIDS patients was shifted upward, so that significantly more patients showed high values and significantly fewer showed low values, indicating hyperactive humoral immune responses to these viruses. In sharp contrast, the AIDS patients with antibody levels for rubella showed the same distribution of antibody levels as did two groups of controls. No correlation was found between concentrations of CMV and HSV antibodies in individual AIDS-LAS patients. PMID:3009534

  8. Ecological and life-history factors influencing the evolution of maternal antibody allocation: a phylogenetic comparison

    PubMed Central

    Addison, BriAnne; Klasing, Kirk C.; Robinson, W. Douglas; Austin, Suzanne H.; Ricklefs, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Maternally derived yolk antibodies provide neonates with immune protection in early life at negligible cost to mothers. However, developmental effects on the neonate's future immunity are potentially costly and thus could limit yolk antibody deposition. The benefits to neonatal immunity must be balanced against costs, which may depend on neonate vulnerability to pathogens, developmental trajectories and the immunological strategies best suited to a species' pace of life. We measured yolk antibodies and life-history features of 23 species of small Neotropical birds and assessed the evidence for each of several hypotheses for life history and ecological effects on the evolution of yolk antibody levels. Developmental period and yolk antibodies are negatively related, which possibly reflect the importance of humoral immune priming through antigen exposure, and selection to avoid autoimmunity, in species with a slower pace of life. There is also a strong relationship between body size and yolk antibody concentration, suggesting that larger species are architecturally equipped to produce and transfer higher concentrations of antibodies. These results suggest that developmental effects of maternally derived antibodies, such as imprinting effects on B-cell diversity or autoimmune effects, are important and deserve more consideration in future research. PMID:19710063

  9. Communication: Antibody stability and behavior on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bush, Derek B; Knotts, Thomas A

    2015-08-14

    Antibody microarrays have the potential to revolutionize molecular detection in scientific, medical, and other biosensor applications, but their current use is limited because of poor reliability. It is hypothesized that one reason for their poor performance results from strong antibody-surface interactions that destabilize the antibody structure and create steric interference for antigen recognition. Using a recently developed coarse-grain protein-surface model that has been parameterized against experimental data, antibody-surface interactions for two antibody orientations on two types of surfaces have been investigated. The results show that regardless of attachment geometry, antibodies tend to collapse onto hydrophobic surfaces and exhibit lower overall stability compared to antibodies on hydrophilic surfaces or in bulk solution. The results provide an unprecedented view into the dynamics of antibodies on surfaces and offer new insights into the poor performance exhibited by current antibody microarrays. PMID:26277119

  10. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  11. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-22

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  12. Communication: Antibody stability and behavior on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Derek B.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2015-08-01

    Antibody microarrays have the potential to revolutionize molecular detection in scientific, medical, and other biosensor applications, but their current use is limited because of poor reliability. It is hypothesized that one reason for their poor performance results from strong antibody-surface interactions that destabilize the antibody structure and create steric interference for antigen recognition. Using a recently developed coarse-grain protein-surface model that has been parameterized against experimental data, antibody-surface interactions for two antibody orientations on two types of surfaces have been investigated. The results show that regardless of attachment geometry, antibodies tend to collapse onto hydrophobic surfaces and exhibit lower overall stability compared to antibodies on hydrophilic surfaces or in bulk solution. The results provide an unprecedented view into the dynamics of antibodies on surfaces and offer new insights into the poor performance exhibited by current antibody microarrays.

  13. Antisperm antibodies and in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Janssen, H J; Bastiaans, B A; Goverde, H J; Hollanders, H M; Wetzels, A A; Schellekens, L A

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of antisperm antibodies in the male, the female, or both partners on the outcome of in vitro fertilization treatment. The results in terms of ongoing pregnancies in the male and female antibody-positive group were the same as in the antibody-negative group. In the double antibody-positive group two of the three patients became pregnant. When high levels of antisperm antibodies were present on the spermatozoa, the fertilization rate was significantly reduced. In the female positive group no clear relationship between the antibody titer and the fertilization percentage could be detected. Abnormal semen quality was responsible for a much lower fertilization rate than the presence of antibodies. The conclusion of this study is that in vitro fertilization provides an equal change of conception in couples with antisperm antibodies in comparison with couples with no antibodies if the other semen parameters are normal. PMID:1472812

  14. Two-monoclonal-antibody sandwich-type assay for thyrotropin, with use of an avidin-biotin separation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Odell, W.D.; Griffin, J.; Zahradnik, R.

    1986-10-01

    We have developed a sensitive, specific, noncompetitive, sandwich-type radioimmunoassay for human thyrotropin (hTSH), which can be performed in 30 min. The assay involves two monoclonal antibodies, selected for high affinity and specificity and also for reaction against antigenic sites on hTSH that are distal from each other. One of these antibodies is labeled with /sup 125/I; the other is conjugated covalently to biotin. Polystyrene beads were also conjugated covalently to biotin. After conjugation, the beads were incubated with avidin. These beads represent a rapid, simple method for separating hTSH-bound antibody from free antibody. The biotin-antibody-hTSH-/sup 125/I-labeled antibody complexes bind to the beads and hTSH concentration is directly related to counts per minute. This assay can detect hTSH at a concentration of 0.06 milli-unit/L in serum.

  15. Binding of a monoclonal antibody and its Fab fragment to supported phospholipid monolayers measured by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Pisarchick, M L; Thompson, N L

    1990-01-01

    The association of an anti-dinitrophenyl monoclonal antibody and its Fab fragment with supported phospholipid monolayers composed of a mixture of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dinitrophenyl-conjugated dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine has been characterized with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The surface densities of bound antibodies were measured as a function of the antibody and Fab solution concentrations, and as a function of the solution concentration of dinitrophenylglycine. The apparent association constant of Fab fragments with surface-associated haptens was approximately 10-fold lower than the association constant for haptens in solution, and the apparent surface association constant for intact antibodies was only approximately 10-fold higher than the constant for Fab fragments. Data analysis with simple theoretical models indicated that, at most antibody surface densities, 50-90% of membrane-associated intact antibodies were attached to the surface by two antigen binding sites. PMID:2291943

  16. Magnetic CVs - Conference Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario

    The works we have seen presented in the meeting provide important contributions, in my opinion, in four main areas: 1. The origin of magnetic fields in CVs; the reasons for differences between DQ Hers and AM Hers, and the differences between CVs and field white dwarfs. 2. The interaction between the accretion flow and the magnetic field at relatively large distances from the white dwarf. 3. Accretion onto magnetic poles. 4. Evolutionary considerations and system parameters. To conclude, I am most impressed with the improvements in observational and data processing and analysis techniques. I find purely theoretical developments lagging by comparison. It is very important that some of the future work will concentrate on topics that will advance our understanding of the main issues, rather than delve into details.

  17. Ligation of Fc gamma receptor IIB inhibits antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kuan Rong; Zhang, Summer Li-Xin; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Chan, Ying Kai; Chow, Angelia; Lim, Angeline Pei Chiew; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hanson, Brendon J; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2011-07-26

    The interaction of antibodies, dengue virus (DENV), and monocytes can result in either immunity or enhanced virus infection. These opposing outcomes of dengue antibodies have hampered dengue vaccine development. Recent studies have shown that antibodies neutralize DENV by either preventing virus attachment to cellular receptors or inhibiting viral fusion intracellularly. However, whether the antibody blocks attachment or fusion, the resulting immune complexes are expected to be phagocytosed by Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells and cleared from circulation. This suggests that only antibodies that are able to block fusion intracellularly would be able to neutralize DENV upon FcγR-mediated uptake by monocytes whereas other antibodies would have resulted in enhancement of DENV replication. Using convalescent sera from dengue patients, we observed that neutralization of the homologous serotypes occurred despite FcγR-mediated uptake. However, FcγR-mediated uptake appeared to be inhibited when neutralized heterologous DENV serotypes were used instead. We demonstrate that this inhibition occurred through the formation of viral aggregates by antibodies in a concentration-dependent manner. Aggregation of viruses enabled antibodies to cross-link the inhibitory FcγRIIB, which is expressed at low levels but which inhibits FcγR-mediated phagocytosis and hence prevents antibody-dependent enhancement of DENV infection in monocytes. PMID:21746897

  18. On-bead antibody-small molecule conjugation using high-capacity magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nidhi; Godat, Becky; Benink, Hélène; Urh, Marjeta

    2015-11-01

    Antibodies labeled with small molecules such as fluorophore, biotin or drugs play an important role in various areas of biological research, drug discovery and diagnostics. However, the majority of current methods for labeling antibodies is solution-based and has several limitations including the need for purified antibodies at high concentrations and multiple buffer exchange steps. In this study, a method (on-bead conjugation) is described that addresses these limitations by combining antibody purification and conjugation in a single workflow. This method uses high capacity-magnetic Protein A or Protein G beads to capture antibodies directly from cell media followed by conjugation with small molecules and elution of conjugated antibodies from the beads. High-capacity magnetic antibody capture beads are key to this method and were developed by combining porous and hydrophilic cellulose beads with oriented immobilization of Protein A and Protein G using HaloTag technology. With a variety of fluorophores it is shown that the on-bead conjugation method is compatible with both thiol- and amine-based chemistry. This method enables simple and rapid processing of multiple samples in parallel with high-efficiency antibody recovery. It is further shown that recovered antibodies are functional and compatible with downstream applications. PMID:26316179

  19. Seroprevalence of Sarcoptes scabiei var canis antibodies among aborigines in peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Normaznah, Y; Saniah, K; Nazma, M; Mak, J W; Krishnasamy, M; Hakim, S L

    1996-03-01

    The Aborigines or Orang Asli in Peninsular Malaysia who are still seminomadic are known to have a close association with dogs. In this study, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect anti-Sarcoptes scabiei var canis antibodies in this community as a measure of exposure to the mite. Out of 312 Orang Asli tested, 24.7% were positive for polyvalent anti-Sarcoptes antibodies. No significant difference was found between the positive rates in males (26.1%) and females (23.6%). Only 1.9% were positive for IgA and none was positive for IgE anti-Sarcoptes antibodies. Since there were very few patients with clinical manifestation of scabies, there is a possibility that continuous exposure to the dogs mite confers cross-protective immunity in the community against human scabies. PMID:9031401

  20. Remembering antibodies coming of age.

    PubMed

    Melchers, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Norbert Hilschmann discovered that antibodies have variable immunoglobulin domains to bind antigens, and constant domains to carry out effector functions in the immune system. Just as this happened, the author of this perspective entered the field of immunology. Ten years later, the genetic basis of antibody variability was discovered by Susumu Tonegawa and his colleagues at the Basel Institute for Immunology, where the author had become a scientific member. At the same time, Georges Köhler, a former graduate student of the author's at the Basel Institute, invented with Cesar Milstein at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, the method to produce monoclonal antibodies. The author describes here his memories connected to these three monumental, paradigm-changing discoveries, which he observed in close proximity. PMID:27144253

  1. Antibodies to watch in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The transitions of antibody therapeutics to late-stage clinical development, regulatory review and the market are proceeding at a rapid pace in 2013. Since late 2012, two monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics (itolizumab, trastuzumab emtansine) received their first approvals, first marketing applications for three mAbs (vedolizumab, ramucirumab, obinutuzumab) were submitted to regulatory agencies, and five mAbs (brodalumab, MABp1, moxetumomab pasudotox, tildrakizumab, rilotumumab) entered their first Phase 3 studies. The current total of commercially-sponsored antibody therapeutics undergoing evaluation in late-stage studies is 30. Recently announced study results for farletuzumab, naptumomab estafenatox, and tabalumab indicate that clinical endpoints were not met in some Phase 3 studies of these product candidates. PMID:23727858

  2. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  3. Novel Antibody Vectors for Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Olafsen, Tove; Wu, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    Non-invasive molecular imaging approaches include nuclear, optical, MRI, CT, ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging, which require accumulation of a signal delivered by a probe at the target site. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are high affinity molecules that can be used for specific, high signal delivery to cell surface molecules. However, their long circulation time in blood makes them unsuitable as imaging probes. Efforts to improve antibodies pharmacokinetics without compromising affinity and specificity have been made through protein engineering. Antibody variants that differ in antigen binding sites and size have been generated and evaluated as imaging probes to target tissues of interest. Fast clearing fragments such as single-chain Fv (scFv; 25 kDa) with one antigen binding site (monovalent) demonstrated low accumulation in tumors due the low exposure time to the target. Using scFv as building block to produce larger, bivalent fragments such as scFv dimers (diabodies, 50 kDa) and scFv-fusion proteins (80 kDa minibodies and 105 kDa scFv-Fc) resulted in higher tumor accumulation due to their longer residence time in blood. Imaging studies with these fragments following radiolabeling have demonstrated excellent, high contrast images in gamma cameras and PET scanners. Several studies have also investigated antibody fragments conjugated to fluorescence (near infrared dyes), bioluminescence (luciferases) and quantum dots for optical imaging and iron oxides nanoparticles for MRI. However, these studies indicate that there are several factors that influence successful targeting and imaging. These include stability of the antibody fragment, the labeling chemistry (direct or indirect), whether critical residues are modified, the number of antigen expressed on the cell, and whether the target has a rapid recycling rate or internalizes upon binding. The preclinical data presented are compelling and it is evident that antibody-based molecular imaging tracers will play an

  4. Theoretical analysis of antibody targeting of tumor spheroids: importance of dosage for penetration, and affinity for retention.

    PubMed

    Graff, Christilyn P; Wittrup, K Dane

    2003-03-15

    The interplay among antibody/antigen binding kinetics, antibody diffusion, and antigen metabolic turnover together determines the depth of penetration of antitumor antibodies into prevascular tumor spheroid cell clumps. A sharp boundary between an outer shell of bound high-affinity antibody and an inner antibody-free core has been previously observed and mathematically modeled and was termed the "binding site barrier." We show here that this process is well described by a simplified shrinking core model wherein binding equilibration is much more rapid than diffusion. This analysis provides the following experimentally testable predictions: (a) the binding site barrier is a moving boundary whose velocity is proportional to the time integral of antibody concentration at the spheroid surface (i.e. plasma antibody AUC); (b) the velocity of this moving boundary is independent of binding affinity, if the affinity is sufficiently high to strongly favor antibody/antigen complex formation at prevailing antibody concentrations; and (c) maximum tumor retention is achieved when the antibody/antigen dissociation rate approaches the rate of antigen metabolic turnover. The consistency of these predictions with published experimental results is demonstrated. The shrinking core model provides a simple analytic relationship predicting the effects of altered antibody pharmacokinetics, antibody molecular weight, antigen turnover rate, antigen expression level, and micrometastasis size on antibody penetration and retention. For example, a formula is provided for predicting the bolus dose necessary to accomplish tumor saturation as a function of antibody and tumor properties. Furthermore, this analysis indicates certain attributes necessary for an optimal tumor targeting agent. PMID:12649189

  5. Antinuclear antibodies in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Gershwin, Laurel J

    2005-06-01

    Antinuclear antibodies in domestic animal species have been commonly detected for many years, with the greatest frequency occurring in dogs as well as horses and cats. Most commonly, the assay used in diagnostic laboratories is indirect immunofluorescence on HEP-2 cells, similar to that used in human medicine, but with the exception that species-specific antiglobulin reagents are used instead of antihuman immunoglobulin. To a lesser extent, the Crithidia luciliae test for antibodies to double-stranded DNA has been used. Several research groups have used other assays. PMID:16014553

  6. Antibodies against Hsp60 and Hsp65 in the sera of women with ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentrations of IgG antibodies against Hsp60 and Hsp65 in sera of patients with ovarian cancer at various stages of clinical progress and for different histopathological types of disease. Methods Serum samples from 149 patients with ovarian carcinoma and 80 healthy women were investigated. The concentrations of anti-Hsp60 and anti-Hsp65 antibodies were determined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. Results The mean concentrations of anti-Hsp60 and anti-Hsp65 antibodies in the patients with ovarian cancer did not differ significantly from the mean levels in healthy women. Analysis in relation to the clinical progression stage showed that the concentrations of these antibodies were higher when the neoplastic process was less advanced and at early stages significantly higher than in control group. Mean concentrations of both antibodies were not significantly different in relation to the histological type of the ovarian cancer. The use of chemotherapy as a primary anticancer treatment did not cause a significant change in the concentration of anti-Hsp60 antibodies, but the mean level of anti-Hsp65 after this treatment was significantly higher than in control group. Conclusions The immunological response to Hsp60/65 is increased in early clinical stages of ovarian cancer and the level of anti-hsp60/65 antibodies may be then a helpful diagnostic marker. Even antibodies against highly homologous Hsps may be cross-reactive only partially and differ by some functional properties. PMID:24618330

  7. Does Circulating Antibody Play a Role in the Protection of Piglets against Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus?

    PubMed Central

    Poonsuk, Korakrit; Giménez-Lirola, Luis Gabriel; Zhang, Jianqiang; Arruda, Paolo; Chen, Qi; Correa da Silva Carrion, Lucas; Magtoto, Ronaldo; Pineyro, Pablo; Sarmento, Luciana; Wang, Chong; Sun, Yaxuan; Madson, Darin; Johnson, John; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Zimmerman, Jeffrey; Main, Rodger

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of circulating antibody to the protection of naïve piglets against porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was evaluated using a passive antibody transfer model. Piglets (n = 62) derived from 6 sows were assigned to one of 6 different treatments using a randomized block design which provided for allocation of all treatments to all sows' litters. Each treatment was designed to achieve a different level of circulating anti-PEDV antibody via intraperitoneally administration of concentrated serum antibody. Piglets were orally inoculated with PEDV (USA/IN/2013/19338E, 1 x 103 TCID50 per piglet) 24 hours later and then monitored for 14 days. Piglets remained with their dam throughout the experiment. Sow milk samples, piglet fecal samples, and data on piglet clinical signs, body weight, and body temperature were collected daily. Fecal samples were tested by PEDV real-time reverse transcriptase PCR. Serum, colostrum, and milk were tested for PEDV IgG, IgA, and virus-neutralizing antibody. The data were evaluated for the effects of systemic PEDV antibody levels on growth, body temperature, fecal shedding, survival, and antibody response. The analysis showed that circulating antibody partially ameliorated the effect of PEDV infection. Specifically, antibody-positive groups returned to normal body temperature faster and demonstrated a higher rate of survivability than piglets without PEDV antibody. When combined with previous literature on PEDV, it can be concluded that both systemic antibodies and maternal secretory IgA in milk contribute to the protection of the neonatal pig against PEDV infections. Overall, the results of this experiment suggested that passively administered circulating antibodies contributed to the protection of neonatal piglets against PEDV infection. PMID:27050556

  8. Antinuclear antibodies and anticytoplasmic antibodies in bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Menon, P; Menon, V; Hilman, B C; Wolf, R; Bairnsfather, L

    1989-12-01

    The presence of antinuclear antibodies and anticytoplasmic antibodies was evaluated in the sera of 50 patients with bronchial asthma and 35 matched control subjects with miscellaneous medical diseases with the use of an indirect immunofluorescent assay with HEp-2 cells as substrate. The results were compared to age, sex, atopic status, dose, and duration of the antiasthmatic medication, immunotherapy, severity of the disease, and presence or absence of myalgia. The patients had mild to moderate asthma. The incidence of fluorescent anticytoplasmic antibodies (FACA) in the sera of patients with asthma was statistically significant (p = 0.02) in comparison to FACA in the sera of the control subjects. The combined incidence of fluorescent antinuclear antibodies (FANA) and FACA was found to be significantly higher among atopic subjects with asthma (p = 0.03) and the subjects with asthma and with myalgia (p less than 0.05). The 20% incidence of FACA in this group of subjects with asthma was significantly greater (p less than 0.0001) than the reported 2.7% incidence of FACA in a group of patients with various rheumatologic diseases. Variables, such as dose and duration of antiasthma medications and immunotherapy did not appear to influence the presence of FANA and FACA in their sera. The significance of positive FANA and FACA in this group of subjects with asthma is not known and needs to be evaluated by long-term studies. PMID:2689497

  9. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    DOEpatents

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  10. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    DOEpatents

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  11. Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shuptrine, Casey; Surana, Rishi; Weiner, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, the clinical utility of monoclonal antibodies has been realized and antibodies are now a mainstay for the treatment of cancer. Antibodies have the unique capacity to target and kill tumor cells while simultaneously activating immune effectors to kill tumor cells through the complement cascade or antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). This multifaceted mechanism of action combined with target specificity underlies the capacity of antibodies to elicit anti-tumor responses while minimizing the frequency and magnitude of adverse events. This review will focus on mechanisms of action, clinical applications and putative mechanisms of resistance to monoclonal antibody therapy in the context of cancer. PMID:22245472

  12. Affinity and Avidity in Antibody-Based Tumor Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Rudnick, Stephen I.

    2009-01-01

    Summation Many factors contribute to successful tumor targeting by antibodies. Besides properties of the tumor tissue and general antibody pharmacology, a relationship exists between an antibody and its antigen that can shape penetration, catabolism, specificity, and efficacy. The affinity and avidity of the binding interactions play critical roles in these dynamics. In this work, we review the principles that guide models predicting tumor penetration and cellular internalization while providing a critical overview of studies aimed at experimentally determining the specific role of affinity and avidity in these processes. One should gain the perspective that binding affinity can, in part, dictate the localization of antibodies in tumors, leading to high concentrations in the perivascular space or low concentrations diffused throughout the tumor. These patterns can be simply due to the diminution of available dose by binding antigen and are complicated by internalization and degradation stemming from slow rates of dissociation. As opposed to the trend of simply increasing affinity to increase efficacy, novel strategies that increase avidity and broaden specificity have made significant progress in tumor targeting. PMID:19409036

  13. The United Nations Water Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations and Water, 1977

    1977-01-01

    This Water Conference adapted a set of detailed action recommendations on various aspects of water resources development and management and decided that this set of recommendations would be known as the "Mar del Plata Action Plan." This article presents an abridged version of selected recommendations in the Action Plan. (Author/MA)

  14. Synthesis of Bilingual Clearinghouse Conferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    The National Institute of Education and the Office of Education are working together to develop a national clearinghouse for bilingual education information as called for in section 742(c)(3) of Public Law 93-380, Title VII. Six Bilingual Clearinghouse Conferences have been held where federal planners met with bilingual education practitioners and…

  15. International Women's Leadership Conference Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Presents proceedings of the American Association of Dental Schools' International Women's Leadership Conference. Addresses, panel presentations, and general-sessions topics included leadership training and promotion for women in dental education, women's health issues and research, the glass ceiling, infrastructures for research and training,…

  16. CIEE 1993 annual conference: Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The California Institute for Energy efficiency`s third annual conference highlights the results of CIEE-sponsored multiyear research in three programs: Building Energy Efficiency, Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency, and End-Use Resource Planning. Results from scoping studies, Director`s discretionary research, and exploratory research are also featured.

  17. ASTD's 1974 Conference--Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training and Development Journal, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Highlights of speeches presented at the 30th ASTD National Conference in San Francisco are given: S.I. Hayakawa outlined developments in higher education during the 1970's; Joe Batten called for life enrichment, not just job enrichment; and Dorothy Jongeward discussed transactional analysis as a tool for more effective interpersonal relationships.…

  18. Thirteenth International Laser Radar Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    One hundred fifteen papers were presented in both oral and poster sessions. The topics of the conference sessions were: spaceborne lidar applications; extinction/visibility; differential absorption lidar; winds and tropospheric studies; middle atmosphere; clouds and multiple scattering; pollution studies; and new systems.

  19. Space Station Freedom Utilization Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The topics addressed in Space Station Freedom Utilization Conference are: (1) space station freedom overview and research capabilities; (2) space station freedom research plans and opportunities; (3) life sciences research on space station freedom; (4) technology research on space station freedom; (5) microgravity research and biotechnology on space station freedom; and (6) closing plenary.

  20. Ozone Conference II: Abstract Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    Ozone Conference II: Pre- and Post-Harvest Applications Two Years After Gras, was held September 27-28, 1999 in Tulare, California. This conference, sponsored by EPRI's Agricultural Technology Alliance and Southern California Edison's AgTAC facility, was coordinated and organized by the on-site ATA-AgTAC Regional Center. Approximately 175 people attended the day-and-a-half conference at AgTAC. During the Conference twenty-two presentations were given on ozone food processing and agricultural applications. Included in the presentations were topics on: (1) Ozone fumigation; (2) Ozone generation techniques; (3) System and design applications; (4) Prewater treatment requirements; (5) Poultry water reuse; (6) Soil treatments with ozone gas; and (7) Post-harvest aqueous and gaseous ozone research results. A live videoconference between Tulare and Washington, D.C. was held to discuss the regulators' view from inside the beltway. Attendees participated in two Roundtable Question and Answer sessions and visited fifteen exhibits and demonstrations. The attendees included university and governmental researchers, regulators, consultants and industry experts, technology developers and providers, and corporate and individual end-users. This report is comprised of the Abstracts of each presentation, biographical sketches for each speaker and a registration/attendees list.