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Sample records for antibody mediated cell

  1. A Neutralizing Antibody Assay Based on a Reporter of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuling; Li, Jia J; Kim, Hyun Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Weiyi; Akhgar, Ahmad; Bowen, Michael A; Spitz, Susan; Jiang, Xu-Rong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-11-01

    Benralizumab is a humanized anti-IL5 receptor α (IL5Rα) monoclonal antibody (mAb) with enhanced (afucosylation) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. An ADCC reporter cell-based neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay was developed and characterized to detect NAb against benralizumab in human serum to support the clinical development of benralizumab. The optimal ratio of target cells to effector cells was 3:1. Neither parental benralizumab (fucosylated) nor benralizumab Fab resulted in ADCC activity, confirming the requirement for ADCC activity in the NAb assay. The serum tolerance of the cells was determined to be 2.5%. The cut point derived from normal and asthma serum samples was comparable. The effective range of benralizumab was determined, and 35 ng/mL [80% maximal effective concentration (EC80)] was chosen as the standard concentration to run in the assessment of NAb. An affinity purified goat anti-benralizumab polyclonal idiotype antibody preparation was shown to have NAb since it inhibited ADCC activity in a dose-dependent fashion. The low endogenous concentrations of IL5 and soluble IL5 receptor (sIL5R) did not demonstrate to interfere with the assay. The estimated assay sensitivities at the cut point were 1.02 and 1.10 μg/mL as determined by the surrogate neutralizing goat polyclonal and mouse monoclonal anti-drug antibody (ADA) controls, respectively. The assay can detect NAb (at 2.5 μg/mL) in the presence of 0.78 μg/mL benralizumab. The assay was not susceptible to non-specific matrix effects. This study provides an approach and feasibility of developing an ADCC cell-based NAb assay to support biopharmaceuticals with an ADCC function. PMID:26205082

  2. VEGFR2-targeted fusion antibody improved NK cell-mediated immunosurveillance against K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xueyan; Xie, Wei; Wang, Youfu; Xu, Menghuai; Liu, Fang; Tang, Mingying; Li, Chenchen; Wang, Min; Zhang, Juan

    2016-08-01

    MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A (MICA), which is normally expressed on cancer cells, activates NK cells via NK group 2-member D pathway. However, some cancer cells escape NK-mediated immune surveillance by shedding membrane MICA causing immune suppression. To address this issue, we designed an antibody-MICA fusion targeting tumor-specific antigen (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, VEGFR2) based on our patented antibody (mAb04) against VEGFR2. In vitro results demonstrate that the fusion antibody retains both the antineoplastic and the immunomodulatory activity of mAb04. Further, we revealed that it enhanced NK-mediated immunosurveillance against K562 cells through increasing degranulation and cytokine production of NK cells. The overall data suggest our new fusion protein provides a promising approach for cancer-targeted immunotherapy and has prospects for potential application of chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:27154226

  3. Integrin receptors on tumor cells facilitate NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Anikeeva, Nadia; Steblyanko, Maria; Fayngerts, Svetlana; Kopylova, Natalya; Marshall, Deborah J; Powers, Gordon D; Sato, Takami; Campbell, Kerry S; Sykulev, Yuri

    2014-08-01

    NK cells that mediate ADCC play an important role in tumor-specific immunity. We have examined factors limiting specific lysis of tumor cells by CD16.NK-92 cells induced by CNTO 95LF antibodies recognizing αV integrins that are overexpressed on many tumor cells. Although all tested tumor cells were killed by CD16.NK-92 effectors in the presence of the antibodies, the killing of target cells with a low level of ICAM-1 expression revealed a dramatic decrease in their specific lysis at high antibody concentration, revealing a dose limiting effect. A similar effect was also observed with primary human NK cells. The effect was erased after IFN-γ treatment of tumor cells resulting in upregulation of ICAM-1. Furthermore, killing of the same tumor cells induced by Herceptin antibody was significantly impaired in the presence of CNTO 95Ala-Ala antibody variant that blocks αV integrins but is incapable of binding to CD16. These data suggest that αV integrins on tumor cells could compensate for the loss of ICAM-1 molecules, thereby facilitating ADCC by NK cells. Thus, NK cells could exercise cytolytic activity against ICAM-1 deficient tumor cells in the absence of proinflammatory cytokines, emphasizing the importance of NK cells in tumor-specific immunity at early stages of cancer. PMID:24810893

  4. Macrophage-Mediated Trogocytosis Leads to Death of Antibody-Opsonized Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Ramraj; Challa, Dilip K; Ram, Sripad; Ober, Raimund J; Ward, E Sally

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the complex behavior of effector cells such as monocytes or macrophages in regulating cancerous growth is of central importance for cancer immunotherapy. Earlier studies using CD20-specific antibodies have demonstrated that the Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated transfer of the targeted receptors from tumor cells to these effector cells through trogocytosis can enable escape from antibody therapy, leading to the viewpoint that this process is protumorigenic. In the current study, we demonstrate that persistent trogocytic attack results in the killing of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. Further, antibody engineering to increase FcγR interactions enhances this tumoricidal activity. These studies extend the complex repertoire of activities of macrophages to trogocytic-mediated cell death of HER2-overexpressing target cells and have implications for the development of effective antibody-based therapies. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1879-89. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27226489

  5. [Progress of study on antitumor effects of antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity--review].

    PubMed

    Qu, Yu-Hua; Li, Yang

    2010-10-01

    In recent years, as increasing of monoclonal antibody application in clinic, the antitumor effect of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) get increasing attention. The natural killer (NK) cells are the most important effector cells mediating specific antitumor of ADCC; the phagocytes, T-cells and granulocytes have the definite effect on antitumor of ADCC. ADCC is confirmed as the important mechanism and means for clinically treating the cancers with monoclonal antibodies. The IgG antibody firstly combines with target cells (tumor cells) through antigen-binding sites, and then FcγR on effector cells identifies its Fc fragment and mediates ADCC. Today many kinds of monoclonal antibodies have been put into clinical application such as rituximab and other new anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies including trastuzumab, erbitux, cetuximab, edrecolomab, nimotuzumab, gemtuzumab ozogamicin and so on, which all can mediate ADCC. The antitumor effects of ADCC mediated by monoclonal antibody can be influenced by IgG Fc receptor gene polymorphism, tumor cell antigen, serum antibody levels, cytokines and drugs etc. As to peripheral blood mononuclear cells, ADCC efficacies of FcγRIIIa-158V/V and FcγRIIa-131H/H are higher than that of other genotypes, while increasing the level of tumor antigen and decreasing the level of serum antibody or adding some cytokines (IL-2, IL-21, IL-15, etc) may elevate the ADCC effect mediated by monoclonal antibodies. Avoiding use of certain drugs (dexamethasone, TNF antagonist) or appropriately using of ondansetron and clemastine also can enhance the anti-tumor effect of ADCC mediated by monoclonal antibodies. In short, ADCC is very important in clinical application for anti-tumor treatment, but its efficacy may be impacted by multiple factors.In this article, the killing mechanisms of ADCC, the clinical use of monoclonal antibodies with antitumor effect of ADCC, the factors influencing anti-tumor efficacy of ADCC, and the antitumor

  6. Antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytolysis (ADCC) with antibody-coated effectors: rat and human effectors versus tumor targets.

    PubMed

    Jones, J F; Titus, J A; Segal, D M

    1981-06-01

    We have previously described techniques that cause antibody molecules to remain bound to P388D1 cells for at least 18 hr, and enable these cells to lyse hapten-coated erythrocytes not sensitized with antibody. These methods collectively are called "franking." In this study, we have determined that these methods are applicable to other systems. We franked rat splenocytes and human peripheral blood leukocytes with rabbit anti-TNP antibody, and showed that they were capable of lysing TNP-tumor and erythrocyte targets (not coated with antibody) in a hapten-specific, antibody-dependent fashion. Both the mononuclear and the polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte fractions of the human cells were capable of mediating lysis. Additionally, human leukocytes franked with rabbit antibody were stained with fluorescent goat anti-rabbit IgG Fab, and were analyzed for fluorescence by flow microfluorometry. Nearly all of the PMN cells and about one-half of the mononuclear cells had IgG on their surfaces after franking. Clearly, not all cells can be franked, but those that can retain significant numbers of antibody molecules (approximately 5 X 10(4), in the case of PMN cells) on their surfaces. PMID:7014718

  7. Specialized proresolving mediators enhance human B cell differentiation to antibody secreting cells1

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, Sesquile; Gao, Fei; Serhan, Charles N.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    The resolution of inflammation is an active and dynamic process critical in maintaining homeostasis. Newly identified lipid mediators have been recognized as key players during the resolution phase. These specialized proresolving mediators (SPM) constitute separate families that include lipoxins, resolvins, protectins and maresins each derived from essential polyunsaturated fatty acids. New results demonstrate that SPM regulate aspects of the immune response, including reduction of neutrophil infiltration, decreased T cell cytokine production and stimulation of macrophage phagocytic activity. The actions of SPM on B lymphocytes remain unknown. Our study shows for the first time that the novel SPM 17-hydroxydosahexaenoic acid (17-HDHA), resolvin D1 (RvD1) and protectin D1 (PD1) are present in the spleen. Interestingly, 17-HDHA, RvD1 but not PD1, strongly increase activated human B cell IgM and IgG production. Furthermore, increased antibody production by 17-HDHA is due to augmented B cell differentiation towards a CD27+CD38+ antibody-secreting cell phenotype. 17-HDHA did not affect proliferation and was non-toxic to cells. Increase of plasma cell differentiation and antibody production supports the involvement of SPM during the late stages of inflammation and pathogen clearance. The present study provides new evidence for SPM activity in the humoral response. These new findings highlight the potential applications of SPM as endogenous and non-toxic adjuvants, and as anti-inflammatory therapeutic molecules. PMID:22711890

  8. Antibody-mediated targeting of the Orai1 calcium channel inhibits T cell function.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jennifer H; Hussell, Scott; Søndergaard, Henrik; Roepstorff, Kirstine; Bui, John-Vu; Deer, Jen Running; Zhang, Jun; Li, Zhan-Guo; Lamberth, Kasper; Kvist, Peter Helding; Padkjær, Søren; Haase, Claus; Zahn, Stefan; Odegard, Valerie H

    2013-01-01

    Despite the attractiveness of ion channels as therapeutic targets, there are no examples of monoclonal antibodies directed against ion channels in clinical development. Antibody-mediated inhibition of ion channels could offer a directed, specific therapeutic approach. To investigate the potential of inhibiting ion channel function with an antibody, we focused on Orai1, the pore subunit of the calcium channel responsible for store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in T cells. Effector T cells are key drivers of autoimmune disease pathogenesis and calcium signaling is essential for T cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine production. We show here the generation of a specific anti-human Orai1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) against an extracellular loop of the plasma membrane-spanning protein. The anti-Orai1 mAb binds native Orai1 on lymphocytes and leads to cellular internalization of the channel. As a result, T cell proliferation, and cytokine production is inhibited in vitro. In vivo, anti-Orai1 mAb is efficacious in a human T cell-mediated graft-versus host disease (GvHD) mouse model. This study demonstrates the feasibility of antibody-mediated inhibition of Orai1 function and, more broadly, reveals the possibility of targeting ion channels with biologics for the treatment of autoimmunity and other diseases. PMID:24376610

  9. NK Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Erbe, Amy K.; Hank, Jacquelyn A.; Morris, Zachary S.; Sondel, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in cancer immunotherapies that involve tumor-antigen targeting by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). NK cells express a variety of activating and inhibitory receptors that serve to regulate the function and activity of the cells. In the context of targeting cells, NK cells can be “specifically activated” through certain Fc receptors that are expressed on their cell surface. NK cells can express FcγRIIIA and/or FcγRIIC, which can bind to the Fc portion of immunoglobulins, transmitting activating signals within NK cells. Once activated through Fc receptors by antibodies bound to target cells, NK cells are able to lyse target cells without priming, and secrete cytokines like interferon gamma to recruit adaptive immune cells. This antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of tumor cells is utilized in the treatment of various cancers overexpressing unique antigens, such as neuroblastoma, breast cancer, B cell lymphoma, and others. NK cells also express a family of receptors called killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which regulate the function and response of NK cells toward target cells through their interaction with their cognate ligands that are expressed on tumor cells. Genetic polymorphisms in KIR and KIR-ligands, as well as FcγRs may influence NK cell responsiveness in conjunction with mAb immunotherapies. This review focuses on current therapeutic mAbs, different strategies to augment the anti-tumor efficacy of ADCC, and genotypic factors that may influence patient responses to antibody-dependent immunotherapies. PMID:26284063

  10. Expanding the antibody-mediated component of plasma cell-rich acute rejection: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Uppin, M. S.; Gudithi, S.; Taduri, G.; Prayaga, A. K.; Raju, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Renal allograft rejection is mediated by T-cells (T-cell mediated rejection) or by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) (antibody mediated rejection, ABMR). Plasma cell-rich acute rejection (PCAR) is a unique entity due to its peculiar morphology and poor prognostic behavior. All allograft biopsies done at our center from January 2013 to October 2014 were reviewed, and seven were identified with a diagnosis of PCAR with antibody mediated rejection (ABMR). The allograft biopsies were classified as per the Banff 2007 schema. Immunohistochemistry with C4d, SV 40, CD3, CD20, CD138, kappa and lambda light chain was performed. Total 210 allograft biopsies were performed in the study period of which seven biopsies (3.3%) were diagnosed as PCAR with ABMR. All these were late ABMRs (more than 6 months) with median posttransplant duration of 17 months. The allograft biopsy showed features of PCAR along with glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and positive C4d. DSA was positive in six patients. All the patients were treated with standard therapeutic measures of acute cellular rejection (ACR) and ABMR including steroids, plasma exchange, rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins. All the patients had persistent graft dysfunction or graft loss on follow-up. PMID:27194831

  11. Clinical Cancer Therapy by NK Cells via Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Alderson, Kory L.; Sondel, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are powerful effector cells that can be directed to eliminate tumor cells through tumor-targeted monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Some tumor-targeted mAbs have been successfully applied in the clinic and are included in the standard of care for certain malignancies. Strategies to augment the antitumor response by NK cells have led to an increased understanding of how to improve their effector responses. Next-generation reagents, such as molecularly modified mAbs and mAb-cytokine fusion proteins (immunocytokines, ICs) designed to augment NK-mediated killing, are showing promise in preclinical and some clinical settings. Continued research into the antitumor effects induced by NK cells and tumor-targeted mAbs suggests that additional intrinsic and extrinsic factors may influence the antitumor response. Therefore more research is needed that focuses on evaluating which NK cell and tumor criteria are best predictive of a clinical response and which combination immunotherapy regimens to pursue for distinct clinical settings. PMID:21660134

  12. Hormone Conjugated with Antibody to CD3 Mediates Cytotoxic T Cell Lysis of Human Melanoma Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Margaret Ann; Nussbaum, Samuel R.; Eisen, Herman N.

    1988-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes can be activated by antibodies to their antigen-specific receptor complex (TCR-CD3) to destroy target cells, regardless of the specificity of the cytotoxic T cells. A novel hormone-antibody conjugate, consisting of an analog of melanocyte-stimulating hormone chemically coupled to a monoclonal antibody to CD3, the invariant component of the T cell receptor complex, was used to target human melanoma cells for destruction by human cytotoxic T lymphocytes that bear no specificity for the tumor cells. As targeting components of such anti-CD3 conjugates, hormones or growth factors are expected to prove more effective than antibodies to tumor-associated antigens in focusing the destructive activity of cytotoxic T cells on tumor target cells.

  13. Compromised NK Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Chronic SIV/SHIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Xuan; Li, Dan; Luo, Zhenwu; Liang, Hua; Peng, Hong; Zhao, Yangyang; Wang, Nidan; Liu, Donghua; Qin, Chuan; Wei, Qiang; Yan, Huimin; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributes to the control of HIV/SIV infection. However, little is known about the ADCC function of natural killer (NK) cells in non-human primate model. Here we demonstrated that ADCC function of NK cells was significantly compromised in chronic SIV/SHIV infection, correlating closely with the expression of FcγRIIIa receptor (CD16) on NK cells. CD32, another class of IgG Fc receptors, was identified on NK cells with higher expression in the infected macaques and the blockade of CD32 impacted the ability of NK cells to respond to antibody-coated target cells. The inhibition of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), a group of enzymes normally involved in tissue/receptor remodeling, could restore NK cell-mediated ADCC with increased CD16 expression on macaque NK cells. These data offer a clearer understanding of NK cell-mediated ADCC in rhesus macaques, which will allow us to evaluate the ADCC repertoire arising from preclinical vaccination studies in non-human primates and inform us in the future design of effective HIV vaccination strategies. PMID:23424655

  14. Envelope Glycoprotein Internalization Protects Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Cells from Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    von Bredow, Benjamin; Arias, Juan F.; Heyer, Lisa N.; Gardner, Matthew R.; Farzan, Michael; Rakasz, Eva G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cytoplasmic tails of human and simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV and SIV, respectively) envelope glycoproteins contain a highly conserved, membrane-proximal endocytosis motif that prevents the accumulation of Env on the surface of infected cells prior to virus assembly. Using an assay designed to measure the killing of virus-infected cells by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), we show that substitutions in this motif increase the susceptibility of HIV-1- and SIV-infected cells to ADCC in a manner that directly correlates with elevated Env levels on the surface of virus-infected cells. In the case of HIV-1, this effect is additive with a deletion in vpu recently shown to enhance the susceptibility of HIV-1-infected cells to ADCC as a result of tetherin-mediated retention of budding virions on the cell surface. These results reveal a previously unappreciated role for the membrane-proximal endocytosis motif of gp41 in protecting HIV-1- and SIV-infected cells from antibody responses by regulating the amount of Env present on the cell surface. IMPORTANCE This study reveals an unappreciated role for the membrane-proximal endocytosis motif of gp41 in protecting HIV-1- and SIV-infected cells from elimination by Env-specific antibodies. Thus, strategies designed to interfere with this mechanism of Env internalization may improve the efficacy of antibody-based vaccines and antiretroviral therapies designed to enhance the immunological control of HIV-1 replication in chronically infected individuals. PMID:26269175

  15. Systemic induction of cells mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity following administration of interleukin 2.

    PubMed

    Eisenthal, A; Rosenberg, S A

    1989-12-15

    We have previously demonstrated that incubation of murine cells in vitro in interleukin 2 (IL-2) induced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and that these cells were derived from the NK/LAK, FcR+ cell population. In the present study we show that in vivo administration of IL-2 to mice induces cells which exhibit ADCC activity in the peritoneal cavity, liver, lungs, and to a lesser degree in the bone marrow, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, and thymus. A gradual increase in ADCC activity and the number of Fc-receptor-positive cells was seen 1 to 3 days after starting IL-2 treatment. The cells mediating ADCC are closely related to LAK cells since they expressed Thy1.2 antigens and are derived from asialo GM1-positive, Lyt2/L3T4-negative, radiosensitive cells. These results demonstrate that IL-2 can systemically induce cells with ADCC activity and that this ability may be useful in the establishment of therapeutic models against disseminated cancer when combined with specific antitumor monoclonal antibodies. PMID:2573425

  16. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity: a new era in cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Narendiran; Chester, Cariad; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Zhao, Xing; Kohrt, Holbrook E

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of some anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) depends on the capacity of the mAb to recognize the tumor-associated antigen and induce cytotoxicity via a network of immune effector cells. This process of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against tumor cells is triggered by the interaction of the fragment crystallizable (Fc) portion of the mAb with the Fc receptors on effector cells like natural killer cells, macrophages, γδ T cells, and dendritic cells. By augmenting ADCC, the antitumor activity of mAbs can be significantly increased. Currently, identifying and developing therapeutic agents that enhance ADCC is a growing area of research. Combining existing tumor-targeting mAbs and ADCC-promoting agents that stimulate effector cells will translate to greater clinical responses. In this review, we discuss strategies for enhancing ADCC and emphasize the potential of combination treatments that include US Food and Drug Administration-approved mAbs and immunostimulatory therapeutics.

  17. Role of antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) in Sm-p80-mediated protection against Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Torben, Workineh; Ahmad, Gul; Zhang, Weidong; Nash, Stewart; Le, Loc; Karmakar, Souvik; Siddiqui, Afzal A.

    2012-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major health problem in the developing world and for international travelers to the endemic countries. Existing strategies to control schistosomiasis have had limited successes so far. The addition of an effective vaccine in existing control measures would be greatly beneficial in reducing the impact of the disease. In this regard, Sm-p80 mediated protection against intestinal schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma mansoni has been observed to be promising in two animal models of infection and disease. In this study, the role of antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxcity (ADCC) was deciphered in Sm-p80-mediated protection especially in the elimination of lung stage schistosomula. This was achieved using lung lavage cells and lung cells that were isolated from mice immunized with and without Sm-p80 formulated in a recombinant vaccine formulation. Significant differences were observed in cytotoxicity assays using immune sera with the lung lavage cells which showed 51% more killing of schistosomula and elevated levels of nitric oxide in the supernatants were detected compared to controls. PMID:23000221

  18. Antibody-mediated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, W.D.; Lipsztein, R.; Dalton, J.F.

    1985-05-01

    Antibodies that react with antigens on the surface of tumor cells but not normal cells have great potential for cancer detection and therapy. If radiolabeled without loss of immunologic specificity, such antibodies may be able to deliver cytoxic amounts of radiation. Target- cell specificity and a high extraction coefficient are necessary with any radionuclide in order to minimize normal tissue irradiation. Tumor- cell-retention time and the rate of catabolized radionuclide will also influence ultimate applicability. Among the unanswered questions for choosing a radionuclide is the choice of particle emitter. Although classic beta emitters have been used in a number of clinical situations, they have not had a major impact on disease outcome except in diseases of the thyroid. Unfortunately, Auger emitters such as iodine 125 are cytotoxic only when localized within close proximity to the genome. On the other hand, alpha emitters such as astatine 211 eliminate the need for subcellular sequestration but not cell-specific localization. 34 references.

  19. HER2-specific immunoligands engaging NKp30 or NKp80 trigger NK-cell-mediated lysis of tumor cells and enhance antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Peipp, Matthias; Derer, Stefanie; Lohse, Stefan; Staudinger, Matthias; Klausz, Katja; Valerius, Thomas; Gramatzki, Martin; Kellner, Christian

    2015-10-13

    NK cells detect tumors through activating surface receptors, which bind self-antigens that are frequently expressed upon malignant transformation. To increase the recognition of tumor cells, the extracellular domains of ligands of the activating NK cell receptors NKp30, NKp80 and DNAM-1 (i.e. B7-H6, AICL and PVR, respectively) were fused to a single-chain fragment variable (scFv) targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), which is displayed by various solid tumors. The resulting immunoligands, designated B7-H6:HER2-scFv, AICL:HER2-scFv, and PVR:HER2-scFv, respectively, bound HER2 and the addressed NK cell receptor. However, whereas B7-H6:HER2-scFv and AICL:HER2-scFv triggered NK cells to kill HER2-positive breast cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, PVR:HER2-scFv was not efficacious. Moreover, NK cell cytotoxicity was enhanced synergistically when B7-H6:HER2-scFv or AICL:HER2-scFv were applied in combination with another HER2-specific immunoligand engaging the stimulatory receptor NKG2D. In contrast, no improvements were achieved by combining B7-H6:HER2-scFv with AICL:HER2-scFv. Additionally, B7-H6:HER2-scFv and AICL:HER2-scFv enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) by the therapeutic antibodies trastuzumab and cetuximab synergistically, with B7-H6:HER2-scFv exhibiting a higher efficacy. In summary, antibody-derived proteins engaging NKp30 or NKp80 may represent attractive biologics to further enhance anti-tumor NK cell responses and may provide an innovative approach to sensitize tumor cells for antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:26392331

  20. HER2-specific immunoligands engaging NKp30 or NKp80 trigger NK-cell-mediated lysis of tumor cells and enhance antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Peipp, Matthias; Derer, Stefanie; Lohse, Stefan; Staudinger, Matthias; Klausz, Katja; Valerius, Thomas; Gramatzki, Martin; Kellner, Christian

    2015-01-01

    NK cells detect tumors through activating surface receptors, which bind self-antigens that are frequently expressed upon malignant transformation. To increase the recognition of tumor cells, the extracellular domains of ligands of the activating NK cell receptors NKp30, NKp80 and DNAM-1 (i.e. B7-H6, AICL and PVR, respectively) were fused to a single-chain fragment variable (scFv) targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), which is displayed by various solid tumors. The resulting immunoligands, designated B7-H6:HER2-scFv, AICL:HER2-scFv, and PVR:HER2-scFv, respectively, bound HER2 and the addressed NK cell receptor. However, whereas B7-H6:HER2-scFv and AICL:HER2-scFv triggered NK cells to kill HER2-positive breast cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, PVR:HER2-scFv was not efficacious. Moreover, NK cell cytotoxicity was enhanced synergistically when B7-H6:HER2-scFv or AICL:HER2-scFv were applied in combination with another HER2-specific immunoligand engaging the stimulatory receptor NKG2D. In contrast, no improvements were achieved by combining B7-H6:HER2-scFv with AICL:HER2-scFv. Additionally, B7-H6:HER2-scFv and AICL:HER2-scFv enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) by the therapeutic antibodies trastuzumab and cetuximab synergistically, with B7-H6:HER2-scFv exhibiting a higher efficacy. In summary, antibody-derived proteins engaging NKp30 or NKp80 may represent attractive biologics to further enhance anti-tumor NK cell responses and may provide an innovative approach to sensitize tumor cells for antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:26392331

  1. Separation of effector cells mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) to erythrocyte targets from those mediating ADC to tumor targets.

    PubMed

    Pollack, S B; Nelson, K; Grausz, J D

    1976-04-01

    Murine spleen cells mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) both to erythrocyte targets in a 51Cr release assay and to syngeneic tumor targets in a microcytotoxicity assay. The effector cells active in the two ADC assays can be separated by passage of the spleen cells through columns of Sephadex G-10 at 37 degrees C. Cells mediating ADC to sarcoma cells did not adhere to the G-10 and were recovered in the column effluent. These nonadherent cells were not cytotoxic to antibody-coated chicken red blood cells. Spleen cells which mediated ADC in a 51Cr release assay to the red cell targets adhered to G-10. Adherent effector cells could subsequently be recovered from the columns by elution with 5 X 10(-4) M EDTA. PMID:815438

  2. HIV-Specific Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) -Mediating Antibodies Decline while NK Cell Function Increases during Antiretroviral Therapy (ART)

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Sanne Skov; Fomsgaard, Anders; Borggren, Marie; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Rasmussen, Line Dahlerup; Pedersen, Court; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Understanding alterations in HIV-specific immune responses during antiretroviral therapy (ART), such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is important in the development of novel strategies to control HIV-1 infection. This study included 53 HIV-1 positive individuals. We evaluated the ability of effector cells and antibodies to mediate ADCC separately and in combination using the ADCC-PanToxiLux assay. The ability of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to mediate ADCC was significantly higher in individuals who had been treated with ART before seroconversion, compared to the individuals initiating ART at a low CD4+ T cell count (<350 cells/μl blood) and the ART-naïve individuals. The frequency of CD16 expressing natural killer (NK) cells correlated with both the duration of ART and Granzyme B (GzB) activity. In contrast, the plasma titer of antibodies mediating ADCC declined during ART. These findings suggest improved cytotoxic function of the NK cells if initiating ART early during infection, while the levels of ADCC mediating antibodies declined during ART. PMID:26696395

  3. Small CD4 Mimetics Prevent HIV-1 Uninfected Bystander CD4 + T Cell Killing Mediated by Antibody-dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Jonathan; Veillette, Maxime; Ding, Shilei; Zoubchenok, Daria; Alsahafi, Nirmin; Coutu, Mathieu; Brassard, Nathalie; Park, Jongwoo; Courter, Joel R.; Melillo, Bruno; Smith, Amos B.; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Sodroski, Joseph; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Finzi, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection causes a progressive depletion of CD4 + T cells. Despite its importance for HIV-1 pathogenesis, the precise mechanisms underlying CD4 + T-cell depletion remain incompletely understood. Here we make the surprising observation that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediates the death of uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells in cultures of HIV-1-infected cells. While HIV-1-infected cells are protected from ADCC by the action of the viral Vpu and Nef proteins, uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells bind gp120 shed from productively infected cells and are efficiently recognized by ADCC-mediating antibodies. Thus, gp120 shedding represents a viral mechanism to divert ADCC responses towards uninfected bystander CD4 + T cells. Importantly, CD4-mimetic molecules redirect ADCC responses from uninfected bystander cells to HIV-1-infected cells; therefore, CD4-mimetic compounds might have therapeutic utility in new strategies aimed at specifically eliminating HIV-1-infected cells. PMID:26870823

  4. Colostral antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immunity contributes to innate and antigen-specific immunity in piglets.

    PubMed

    Bandrick, Meggan; Ariza-Nieto, Claudia; Baidoo, Samuel K; Molitor, Thomas W

    2014-03-01

    Immunoglobulins and immune cells are critical components of colostral immunity; however, their transfer to and function in the neonate, especially maternal lymphocytes, is unclear. Cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immunity in sow blood and colostrum and piglet blood before (PS) and after (AS) suckling were assessed to investigate transfer and function of maternal immunity in the piglet. CD4, CD8, and γδ lymphocytes were found in sow blood and colostrum and piglet blood PS and AS; each had a unique T lymphocyte profile. Immunoglobulins were detected in sow blood, colostrum, and in piglet blood AS; the immunoglobulin profile of piglet serum AS mimicked that of sow serum. These results suggest selectivity in lymphocyte concentration into colostrum and subsequent lymphocyte transfer into the neonate, but that immunoglobulin transfer is unimpeded. Assessment of colostral natural killer activity and antigen-specific proliferation revealed that colostral cells are capable of influencing the innate and specific immune response of neonatal pigs. PMID:24252519

  5. Bispecific Antibodies that Mediate Killing of Cells Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus of Any Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Jorg; Lotscher, Erika; Steimer, Kathelyn S.; Capon, Daniel J.; Baenziger, Jurg; Jack, Hans-Martin; Wabl, Matthias

    1991-06-01

    Although AIDS patients lose human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific cytotoxic T cells, their remaining CD8-positive T lymphocytes maintain cytotoxic function. To exploit this fact we have constructed bispecific antibodies that direct cytotoxic T lymphocytes of any specificity to cells that express gp120 of HIV. These bispecific antibodies comprise one heavy/light chain pair from an antibody to CD3, linked to a heavy chain whose variable region has been replaced with sequences from CD4 plus a second light chain. CD3 is part of the antigen receptor on T cells and is responsible for signal transduction. In the presence of these bispecific antibodies, T cells of irrelevant specificity effectively lyse HIV-infected cells in vitro.

  6. LGR5 expressing cells of hair follicle as potential targets for antibody mediated anti-cancer laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris V.

    2013-02-01

    Near infrared laser immunotherapy becomes now a new promising research field to cure the patients with cancers. One of the critical limitation in medical application of this treatment is availability of the specific markers for delivery of laser-sensitive nanoparticles. When coupled to antibodies to the cancer stem cells markers these nanoparticles may be delivered to the cancer tissue and mediate the laser induced thermolysis of the cancer stem cells that initiate and drive growth of cancer. This paper addresses the Lgr5 cell surface marker mediating the Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction as a potential target for anti-cancer laser immunotherapy of skin cancers.

  7. Antisperm antibody-mediated alterations in the cellular activity of human trophoblast cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Sinha, D; Chattopadhyay, S

    1994-04-01

    Immune recognition of the fetus is well documented, yet the immunological basis of pregnancy loss awaits elucidation. Identification of trophoblast membrane epitopes as non-self either by preformed immunoglobulins or by circulating immunocompetent cells would lead to immunological rejection of the tissue. Such an event may occur in cases of cross-reacting antibodies developed as a consequence of exposure of sperm surface antigens. This hypothesis was tested by developing specific antibodies in rabbits against intact sperm surface antigens. These were subjected to different schedules of IgG purification and characterization. By means of nuclide precursor incorporation, the effect of antisperm antibody on DNA, RNA and protein synthesis of trophoblast cells in culture were studied. The results showed that the antibody inhibits incorporation into cells but after a delay of 72 hours some cells gradually recover. The interaction also led to a reduced rate of hCG production. Lysosomal enzyme activity was inhibited in the spent medium of antibody-treated cells but lysosome rich fractions showed no effect. This indicated that the major effect of the antibody was growth inhibitory rather than cytolytic. PMID:7520885

  8. Disappearance of T Cell-Mediated Rejection Despite Continued Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Late Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Philip F; Chang, Jessica; Famulski, Konrad; Hidalgo, Luis G; Salazar, Israel D R; Merino Lopez, Maribel; Matas, Arthur; Picton, Michael; de Freitas, Declan; Bromberg, Jonathan; Serón, Daniel; Sellarés, Joana; Einecke, Gunilla; Reeve, Jeff

    2015-07-01

    The prevalent renal transplant population presents an opportunity to observe the adaptive changes in the alloimmune response over time, but such studies have been limited by uncertainties in the conventional biopsy diagnosis of T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) and antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). To circumvent these limitations, we used microarrays and conventional methods to investigate rejection in 703 unselected biopsies taken 3 days to 35 years post-transplant from North American and European centers. Using conventional methods, we diagnosed rejection in 205 biopsy specimens (28%): 67 pure TCMR, 110 pure ABMR, and 28 mixed (89 designated borderline). Using microarrays, we diagnosed rejection in 228 biopsy specimens (32%): 76 pure TCMR, 124 pure ABMR, and 28 mixed (no borderline). Molecular assessment confirmed most conventional diagnoses (agreement was 90% for TCMR and 83% for ABMR) but revealed some errors, particularly in mixed rejection, and improved prediction of failure. ABMR was strongly associated with increased graft loss, but TCMR was not. ABMR became common in biopsy specimens obtained >1 year post-transplant and continued to appear in all subsequent intervals. TCMR was common early but progressively disappeared over time. In 108 biopsy specimens obtained 10.2-35 years post-transplant, TCMR defined by molecular and conventional features was never observed. We conclude that the main cause of kidney transplant failure is ABMR, which can present even decades after transplantation. In contrast, TCMR disappears by 10 years post-transplant, implying that a state of partial adaptive tolerance emerges over time in the kidney transplant population. PMID:25377077

  9. Activation of cytomegalovirus-specific CD8+ T-cell response by antibody-mediated peptide-major histocompatibility class I complexes

    PubMed Central

    Schmittnaegel, Martina; Klein, Christian; Levitsky, Victor; Knoetgen, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Imposing antigenicity on tumor cells is a key step toward successful cancer-immunotherapy. A cytomegalovirus-derived peptide recombinantly fused to a major histocompatibility class I complex and a monoclonal antibody can be targeted to tumor cells by antibody-mediated delivery and activate a strong and specific CD8+ T cell response. PMID:26942061

  10. Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity to Hemagglutinin of Influenza A Viruses After Influenza Vaccination in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Weimin; Liu, Feng; Wilson, Jason R.; Holiday, Crystal; Li, Zhu-Nan; Bai, Yaohui; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Stevens, James; York, Ian A.; Levine, Min Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Detection of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) to influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA) antigens by conventional serological assays is currently the main immune correlate of protection for influenza vaccines However, current prepandemic avian influenza vaccines are poorly immunogenic in inducing nAbs despite considerable protection conferred. Recent studies show that Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) to HA antigens are readily detectable in the sera of healthy individuals and patients with influenza infection. Methods. Virus neutralization and ADCC activities of serum samples from individuals who received either seasonal or a stock-piled H5N1 avian influenza vaccine were evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition assay, microneutralization assay, and an improved ADCC natural killer (NK) cell activation assay. Results. Immunization with inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine led to strong expansion of both nAbs and ADCC-mediating antibodies (adccAbs) to H3 antigen of the vaccine virus in 24 postvaccination human sera. In sharp contrast, 18 individuals vaccinated with the adjuvanted H5N1 avian influenza vaccine mounted H5-specific antibodies with strong ADCC activities despite moderate virus neutralization capacity. Strength of HA-specific ADCC activities is largely associated with the titers of HA-binding antibodies and not with the fine antigenic specificity of anti-HA nAbs. Conclusions. Detection of both nAbs and adccAbs may better reflect protective capacity of HA-specific antibodies induced by avian influenza vaccines.

  11. Antibody-mediated inhibition of Nogo-A signaling promotes neurite growth in PC-12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Iman K; Taghipour, Nima; Hmaidan, Sarah; Palomba, Roberto; Scaria, Shilpa; Munoz, Alvaro; Boone, Timothy B; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    The use of a monoclonal antibody to block the neurite outgrowth inhibitor Nogo-A has been of great interest for promoting axonal recovery as a treatment for spinal cord injury. While several cellular and non-cellular assays have been developed to quantify the bioactive effects of Nogo-A signaling, demand still exists for the development of a reliable approach to characterize the effectiveness of the anti-Nogo-A antibody. In this study, we developed and validated a novel cell-based approach to facilitate the biological quantification of a Nogo-A antibody using PC-12 cells as an in vitro neuronal cell model. Changes in the mRNA levels of the neuronal differentiation markers, growth-associated protein 43 and neurofilament light-polypeptide, suggest that activation of the Nogo-A pathway suppresses axonal growth and dendrite formation in the tested cell line. We found that application of anti-Nogo-A monoclonal antibody can significantly enhance the neuronal maturity of PC-12 cells by blocking the Nogo-A inhibitory effects, providing enhanced effects on neural maturity at the molecular level. No adverse effects were observed on cell viability. PMID:27027860

  12. Toll-like receptor activation enhances cell-mediated immunity induced by an antibody vaccine targeting human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Venky; Vasilakos, John P; Tario, Joseph D; Berger, Marc A; Wallace, Paul K; Keler, Tibor

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we have successfully targeted the mannose receptor (MR) expressed on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) using a fully human MR-specific antibody, B11, as a vehicle to deliver whole protein tumor antigens such as the human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCGβ). Since MRs play a role in bridging innate immunity with adaptive immunity we have explored several toll-like receptor (TLR)-specific ligands that may synergize with MR targeting and be applicable as adjuvants in the clinic. We demonstrate that antigen-specific helper and cytolytic T cells from both healthy donors and cancer patients were effectively primed with B11-hCGβ-treated autologous DCs when a combination of one or several TLR ligands is used. Specifically, concomitant signaling of DCs via TLR3 with dsRNA (poly I:C) and DC TLR 7/8 with Resiquimod (R-848), respectively, elicited efficient antigen presentation-mediated by MR-targeting. We demonstrate that MR and TLRs contribute towards maturation and activation of DCs by a mechanism that may be driven by a combination of adjuvant and antibody vaccines that specifically deliver antigenic targets to DCs. PMID:17254349

  13. A Human Anti-M2 Antibody Mediates Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity (ADCC) and Cytokine Secretion by Resting and Cytokine-Preactivated Natural Killer (NK) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Simhadri, Venkateswara R.; Dimitrova, Milena; Mariano, John L.; Zenarruzabeitia, Olatz; Zhong, Weimin; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Eichelberger, Maryna C.; Borrego, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved matrix protein 2 (M2) is a good candidate for the development of a broadly protective influenza vaccine that induces long-lasting immunity. In animal models, natural killer (NK) cells have been proposed to play an important role in the protection provided by M2-based vaccines through a mechanism of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). We investigated the ability of the human anti-M2 Ab1-10 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to activate human NK cells. They mediated ADCC against M2-expressing cells in the presence of Ab1-10 mAb. Furthermore, NK cell pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine secretion is also enhanced when Ab1-10 mAb is present. We also generated cytokine-preactivated NK cells and showed that they still displayed increased effector functions in the presence of Ab1-10 mAb. Thus, our study has demonstrated that human resting and cytokine-preactivated NK cells may have a very important role in the protection provided by anti-M2 Abs. PMID:25915748

  14. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein mediates tumor cell resistance to antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M K; Sauer, S J; Nath, S; Robinson, T J; Morse, M A; Devi, G R

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the deadliest, distinct subtype of breast cancer. High expression of epidermal growth factor receptors [EGFR or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)] in IBC tumors has prompted trials of anti-EGFR/HER2 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit oncogenic signaling; however, de novo and acquired therapeutic resistance is common. Another critical function of these antibodies is to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), which enables immune effector cells to engage tumors and deliver granzymes, activating executioner caspases. We hypothesized that high expression of anti-apoptotic molecules in tumors would render them resistant to ADCC. Herein, we demonstrate that the most potent caspase inhibitor, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), overexpressed in IBC, drives resistance to ADCC mediated by cetuximab (anti-EGFR) and trastuzumab (anti-HER2). Overexpression of XIAP in parental IBC cell lines enhances resistance to ADCC; conversely, targeted downregulation of XIAP in ADCC-resistant IBC cells renders them sensitive. As hypothesized, this ADCC resistance is in part a result of the ability of XIAP to inhibit caspase activity; however, we also unexpectedly found that resistance was dependent on XIAP-mediated, caspase-independent suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, which otherwise occurs during ADCC. Transcriptome analysis supported these observations by revealing modulation of genes involved in immunosuppression and oxidative stress response in XIAP-overexpressing, ADCC-resistant cells. We conclude that XIAP is a critical modulator of ADCC responsiveness, operating through both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. These results suggest that strategies targeting the effects of XIAP on caspase activation and ROS suppression have the potential to enhance the activity of monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:26821068

  15. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein mediates tumor cell resistance to antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Evans, M K; Sauer, S J; Nath, S; Robinson, T J; Morse, M A; Devi, G R

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the deadliest, distinct subtype of breast cancer. High expression of epidermal growth factor receptors [EGFR or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)] in IBC tumors has prompted trials of anti-EGFR/HER2 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit oncogenic signaling; however, de novo and acquired therapeutic resistance is common. Another critical function of these antibodies is to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), which enables immune effector cells to engage tumors and deliver granzymes, activating executioner caspases. We hypothesized that high expression of anti-apoptotic molecules in tumors would render them resistant to ADCC. Herein, we demonstrate that the most potent caspase inhibitor, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), overexpressed in IBC, drives resistance to ADCC mediated by cetuximab (anti-EGFR) and trastuzumab (anti-HER2). Overexpression of XIAP in parental IBC cell lines enhances resistance to ADCC; conversely, targeted downregulation of XIAP in ADCC-resistant IBC cells renders them sensitive. As hypothesized, this ADCC resistance is in part a result of the ability of XIAP to inhibit caspase activity; however, we also unexpectedly found that resistance was dependent on XIAP-mediated, caspase-independent suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, which otherwise occurs during ADCC. Transcriptome analysis supported these observations by revealing modulation of genes involved in immunosuppression and oxidative stress response in XIAP-overexpressing, ADCC-resistant cells. We conclude that XIAP is a critical modulator of ADCC responsiveness, operating through both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. These results suggest that strategies targeting the effects of XIAP on caspase activation and ROS suppression have the potential to enhance the activity of monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:26821068

  16. Control of Toll-like Receptor-mediated T Cell-independent Type 1 Antibody Responses by the Inducible Nuclear Protein IκB-ζ*

    PubMed Central

    Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Miura, Hanae; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Isagawa, Takayuki; Okuma, Atsushi; Manabe, Ichiro; MaruYama, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Antibody responses have been classified as being either T cell-dependent or T cell-independent (TI). TI antibody responses are further classified as being either type 1 (TI-1) or type 2 (TI-2), depending on their requirement for B cell-mediated antigen receptor signaling. Although the mechanistic basis of antibody responses has been studied extensively, it remains unclear whether different antibody responses share similarities in their transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that mice deficient in IκB-ζ, specifically in their B cells, have impaired TI-1 antibody responses but normal T cell-dependent and TI-2 antibody responses. The absence of IκB-ζ in B cells also impaired proliferation triggered by Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation, plasma cell differentiation, and class switch recombination (CSR). Mechanistically, IκB-ζ-deficient B cells could not induce TLR-mediated induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a class-switch DNA recombinase. Retroviral transduction of AID in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells restored CSR activity. Furthermore, acetylation of histone H3 in the vicinity of the transcription start site of the gene that encodes AID was reduced in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells relative to IκB-ζ-expressing B cells. These results indicate that IκB-ζ regulates TLR-mediated CSR by inducing AID. Moreover, IκB-ζ defines differences in the transcriptional regulation of different antibody responses. PMID:25124037

  17. Control of Toll-like receptor-mediated T cell-independent type 1 antibody responses by the inducible nuclear protein IκB-ζ.

    PubMed

    Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Miura, Hanae; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Isagawa, Takayuki; Okuma, Atsushi; Manabe, Ichiro; MaruYama, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Antibody responses have been classified as being either T cell-dependent or T cell-independent (TI). TI antibody responses are further classified as being either type 1 (TI-1) or type 2 (TI-2), depending on their requirement for B cell-mediated antigen receptor signaling. Although the mechanistic basis of antibody responses has been studied extensively, it remains unclear whether different antibody responses share similarities in their transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that mice deficient in IκB-ζ, specifically in their B cells, have impaired TI-1 antibody responses but normal T cell-dependent and TI-2 antibody responses. The absence of IκB-ζ in B cells also impaired proliferation triggered by Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation, plasma cell differentiation, and class switch recombination (CSR). Mechanistically, IκB-ζ-deficient B cells could not induce TLR-mediated induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a class-switch DNA recombinase. Retroviral transduction of AID in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells restored CSR activity. Furthermore, acetylation of histone H3 in the vicinity of the transcription start site of the gene that encodes AID was reduced in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells relative to IκB-ζ-expressing B cells. These results indicate that IκB-ζ regulates TLR-mediated CSR by inducing AID. Moreover, IκB-ζ defines differences in the transcriptional regulation of different antibody responses. PMID:25124037

  18. Natural killer cells play a critical role in mediating inflammation and graft failure during antibody-mediated rejection of kidney allografts.

    PubMed

    Kohei, Naoki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Masumori, Naoya; Dvorina, Nina; Valujskikh, Anna; Baldwin, William M; Fairchild, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    While the incidence of antibody-mediated kidney graft rejection has increased, the key cellular and molecular participants underlying this graft injury remain unclear. Rejection of kidney allografts in mice lacking the chemokine receptor CCR5 is dependent on production of donor-specific antibody. Here we determine if cells expressing cytotoxic function contributed to antibody-mediated kidney allograft rejection in these recipients. Wild-type C57BL/6, B6.CCR5(-/-), and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) mice were transplanted with complete MHC-mismatched A/J kidney grafts, and intragraft inflammatory components were followed to rejection. B6.CCR5(-/-) and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients rejected kidney allografts by day 35, whereas 65% of allografts in wild-type recipients survived past day 80 post-transplant. Rejected allografts in wild-type C57BL/6, B6.CCR5(-/-), and B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients expressed high levels of VCAM-1 and MMP7 mRNA that was associated with high serum titers of donor-specific antibody. High levels of perforin and granzyme B mRNA expression peaked on day 6 post-transplant in allografts in all recipients, but were absent in isografts. Depletion of natural killer cells in B6.CD8(-/-)/CCR5(-/-) recipients reduced this expression to background levels and promoted the long-term survival of 40% of the kidney allografts. Thus, natural killer cells have a role in increased inflammation during antibody-mediated kidney allograft injury and in rejection of the grafts. PMID:27165816

  19. Antibody-mediated red blood cell agglutination resulting in spontaneous echocardiographic contrast.

    PubMed

    Miller, M R; Thompson, W R; Casella, J F; Spevak, P J

    1999-01-01

    Spontaneous echocardiographic contrast is well reported in states of low flow and low shear stress, and the primary blood component involved has been reported as red blood cells via rouleaux formation. This report describes the occurrence of spontaneous echocardiographic contrast from a unique mechanism of IgM-mediated red blood cell agglutination and describes the clinical sequelae. PMID:10368455

  20. Inhibition of HIV-1 Env-Mediated Cell-Cell Fusion by Lectins, Peptide T-20, and Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Michael; Konopka, Krystyna; Balzarini, Jan; Düzgüneş, Nejat

    2011-01-01

    Background: Broadly cross-reactive, neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies, including 2F5, 2G12, 4E10 and IgG1 b12, can inhibit HIV-1 infection in vitro at very low concentrations. We examined the ability of these antibodies to inhibit cell-cell fusion between Clone69TRevEnv cells induced to express the viral envelope proteins, gp120/gp41 (Env), and highly CD4-positive SupT1 cells. The cells were loaded with green and red-orange cytoplasmic fluorophores, and fusion was monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Results: Cell-cell fusion was inhibited completely by the carbohydrate binding proteins (CBPs), Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) agglutinin (HHA), and Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop) agglutinin (GNA), and by the peptide, T-20, at relatively low concentrations. Anti-gp120 and anti-gp41 antibodies, at concentrations much higher than those required for neutralization, were not particularly effective in inhibiting fusion. Monoclonal antibodies b12, m14 IgG and 2G12 had moderate inhibitory activity; the IC50 of 2G12 was about 80 µg/ml. Antibodies 4E10 and 2F5 had no inhibitory activity at the concentrations tested. Conclusions: These observations raise concerns about the ability of neutralizing antibodies to inhibit the spread of viral genetic material from infected cells to uninfected cells via cell-cell fusion. The interaction of gp120/gp41 with cell membrane CD4 may be different in cell-cell and virus-cell membrane fusion reactions, and may explain the differential effects of antibodies in these two systems. The fluorescence assay described here may be useful in high throughput screening of potential HIV fusion inhibitors. PMID:21660189

  1. Comparing high-throughput methods to measure NK cell-mediated antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity during HIV-infection.

    PubMed

    Konstantinus, Iyaloo N; Gamieldien, Hoyam; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N; Kriek, Jean-Mari; Passmore, Jo-Ann S

    2016-07-01

    HIV-specific binding antibody responses, including those mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), provided the best functional correlate of lower risk of infection in the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine clinical trial. The aim of this study was to compare two high-throughput flow cytometry based methods to measure HIV-specific ADCC responses, the GranToxilux and PanToxilux assays. Plasma from nine HIV-1 seropositive individuals was screened for binding antibody titres against HIV-1 subtype C gp120 by ELISA and western blot. Plasma from six HIV-negative individuals was included as controls. Both ADCC assays used subtype C gp120-coated CEM.NKRCCR5 cells as targets. The PanToxilux assay (which measured both granzyme B and caspase activity) measured higher levels of direct natural killer (NK) cell killing of K562 tumour cells than the GranToxilux assay (granzyme B alone; p<0.05). In ADCC assays in which NK cell killing was directed against gp120-coated CEM.NKRCCR5 cells in an antibody-dependent manner, plasma from HIV-positive individuals yielded significantly higher levels of ADCC activity than the HIV-negative controls. In contrast to direct killing, the GranToxilux assay measured similar levels of ADCC killing as the PanToxilux assay but had significantly lower background cytotoxicity against target cells coated with HIV negative serum. In conclusion, the PanToxilux assay was more sensitive for detecting direct NK cell killing of K562 cells than the GranToxilux assay, although the GranToxilux assay performed better at detecting HIV-specific ADCC activity, because of lower background cytotoxicity from HIV-negative serum. This is the first study to compare GranToxilux and PanToxilux ability to detect ADCC during HIV infection. PMID:27094485

  2. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against IBR-infected bovine kidney cells by ruminant neutrophils: the role of lysosomal cationic protein.

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, K J; Norman, J M; Haydock, S F; Lammas, D A; Duffus, P H

    1984-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR)-infected bovine kidney cells (MDBK) by neutrophils was demonstrated. Neutrophils from bovine and sheep mammary exudate and peripheral blood, and also from human peripheral blood, were all active in the presence of anti-IBR antibody. The component of the ruminant neutrophil granules which was responsible for cytotoxicity appeared to be cationic protein since purified cationic protein lysed the virus-infected cells and heparin inhibited cytotoxicity. Human neutrophil cytotoxicity to herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected human Chang liver cells was also inhibited by heparin. Human neutrophil cytotoxicity to IBR-infected bovine kidney cells did not appear to be mediated by cationic protein since it was inhibited by the chelators of oxidative intermediates DMSO, thiourea, tryptophane, benzoate and mannitol, and not by heparin. PMID:6092270

  3. Antibody-mediated response of NKG2Cbright NK cells against human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Costa-Garcia, Marcel; Vera, Andrea; Moraru, Manuela; Vilches, Carlos; López-Botet, Miguel; Muntasell, Aura

    2015-03-15

    Human CMV (HCMV) infection promotes a variable and persistent expansion of functionally mature NKG2C(bright) NK cells. We analyzed NKG2C(bright) NK cell responses triggered by Abs from HCMV(+) sera against HCMV-infected MRC5 fibroblasts. Specific Abs promoted the degranulation (i.e., CD107a expression) and the production of cytokines (TNF-α and IFN-γ) by a significant fraction of NK cells, exceeding the low natural cytotoxicity against HCMV-infected targets. NK cell-mediated Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity was limited by viral Ag availability and HLA class I expression on infected cells early postinfection and increased at late stages, overcoming viral immunoevasion strategies. Moreover, the presence of specific IgG triggered the activation of NK cells against Ab-opsonized cell-free HCMV virions. As compared with NKG2A(+) NK cells, a significant proportion of NKG2C(bright) NK cells was FcεR γ-chain defective and highly responsive to Ab-driven activation, being particularly efficient in the production of antiviral cytokines, mainly TNF-α. Remarkably, the expansion of NKG2C(bright) NK cells in HCMV(+) subjects was related to the overall magnitude of TNF-α and IFN-γ cytokine secretion upon Ab-dependent and -independent activation. We show the power and sensitivity of the anti-HCMV response resulting from the cooperation between specific Abs and the NKG2C(bright) NK-cell subset. Furthermore, we disclose the proinflammatory potential of NKG2C(bright) NK cells, a variable that could influence the individual responses to other pathogens and tumors. PMID:25667418

  4. Everolimus inhibits anti-HLA I antibody-mediated endothelial cell signaling, migration and proliferation more potently than sirolimus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Y-P; Valenzuela, N M; Ziegler, M E; Rozengurt, E; Reed, E F

    2014-04-01

    Antibody (Ab) crosslinking of HLA I molecules on the surface of endothelial cells triggers proliferative and pro-survival intracellular signaling, which is implicated in the process of chronic allograft rejection, also known as transplant vasculopathy (TV). The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in HLA I Ab-induced signaling cascades. Everolimus provides a tool to establish how the mTOR signal network regulates HLA I-mediated migration, proliferation and survival. We found that everolimus inhibits mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) by disassociating Raptor from mTOR, thereby preventing class I-induced phosphorylation of mTOR, p70S6K, S6RP and 4E-BP1, and resultant class I-stimulated cell migration and proliferation. Furthermore, we found that everolimus inhibits class I-mediated mTORC2 activation (1) by disassociating Rictor and Sin1 from mTOR; (2) by preventing class I-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and (3) by preventing class I-mediated ERK phosphorylation. These results suggest that everolimus is more effective than sirolimus at antagonizing both mTORC1 and mTORC2, the latter of which is critical in endothelial cell functional changes leading to TV in solid organ transplantation after HLA I crosslinking. Our findings point to a potential therapeutic effect of everolimus in prevention of chronic Ab-mediated rejection. PMID:24580843

  5. Prospective Evaluation of Cetuximab-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Predicts Treatment Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Anna Maria; Ottaiano, Alessandro; Romano, Carmela; Nasti, Guglielmo; Nappi, Anna; De Divitiis, Chiara; Napolitano, Maria; Zanotta, Serena; Casaretti, Rossana; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Avallone, Antonio; Califano, Daniela; Iaffaioli, Rosario Vincenzo; Scala, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody to the EGFR that induces antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) through Fcγ receptors on immune cells. Although SNPs in genes encoding Fcγ receptors are functionally relevant to cetuximab-mediated ADCC in colorectal cancer, a direct correlation betweenin vitroADCC and clinical response to cetuximab is not defined. We therefore enrolled 96 consecutive metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients at diagnosis in a study that assessed FcγR status and cetuximab-mediated ADCC. Patients carrying the FcγRIIaHalleles 131H/Hand 131H/Rhad significantly higher ADCC compared with patients with the 131R/Ralleles (P= 0.013). Patients carrying FcγRIIIa genotypes with theValleles 158V/Vand 158V/Fdisplayed higher ADCC compared with patients carrying the 158F/Fgenotype (P= 0.001). Progression-free survival of patients with an FcγRIIIa 158Vallele was significantly longer compared with patients carrying 158F/F(P= 0.05), whereas no significant difference was observed for overall survival. Twenty-eight of 50 mCRC patients with wild-type KRAS received cetuximab. The average ADCC-mediated killing was 30% of assay targets for patients who experienced cetuximab complete or partial response, 21% in patients with stable disease and 9% in patients with progressive disease. To characterize basal natural killer (NK) activity, cytotoxicity was evaluated in 39 of 96 mCRC patients. Patients who responded to first-line treatment had higher NK-cell cytotoxicity. Thus, although limited to this cohort of patients,in vitrocetuximab-mediated ADCC correlated with FcγR polymorphisms and predicted cetuximab responsiveness.Cancer Immunol Res; 4(4); 366-74. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26817995

  6. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ... may use this test to help diagnose pernicious anemia. Pernicious anemia is a decrease in red blood ...

  7. Enhancing natural killer cell-mediated lysis of lymphoma cells by combining therapeutic antibodies with CD20-specific immunoligands engaging NKG2D or NKp30

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Christian; Günther, Andreas; Humpe, Andreas; Repp, Roland; Klausz, Katja; Derer, Stefanie; Valerius, Thomas; Ritgen, Matthias; Brüggemann, Monika; van de Winkel, Jan GJ; Parren, Paul WHI; Kneba, Michael; Gramatzki, Martin; Peipp, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated through the IgG Fc receptor FcγRIIIa represents a major effector function of many therapeutic antibodies. In an attempt to further enhance natural killer (NK) cell-mediated ADCC, we combined therapeutic antibodies against CD20 and CD38 with recombinant immunoligands against the stimulatory NK cell receptors NKG2D or NKp30. These immunoligands, respectively designated as ULBP2:7D8 and B7-H6:7D8, contained the CD20 scFv 7D8 as a targeting moiety and a cognate ligand for either NKG2D or NKp30 (i.e. ULBP2 and B7-H6, respectively). Both the immunoligands synergistically augmented ADCC in combination with the CD20 antibody rituximab and the CD38 antibody daratumumab. Combinations with ULBP2:7D8 resulted in higher cytotoxicity compared to combinations with B7-H6:7D8, suggesting that coligation of FcγRIIIa with NKG2D triggered NK cells more efficiently than with NKp30. Addition of B7-H6:7D8 to ULBP2:7D8 and rituximab in a triple combination did not further increase the extent of tumor cell lysis. Importantly, immunoligand-mediated enhancement of ADCC was also observed for tumor cells and autologous NK cells from patients with hematologic malignancies, in which, again, ULBP2:7D8 was particularly active. In summary, co-targeting of NKG2D was more effective in promoting rituximab or daratumumab-mediated ADCC by NK cells than co-ligation of NKp30. The observed increase in the ADCC activity of these therapeutic antibodies suggests promise for a ‘dual-dual-targeting’ approach in which tumor cell surface antigens are targeted in concert with two distinct activating NK cell receptors (i.e. FcγRIIIa and NKG2D or B7-H6). PMID:26942070

  8. Myelin-reactive antibodies initiate T cell-mediated CNS autoimmune disease by opsonization of endogenous antigen.

    PubMed

    Kinzel, Silke; Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Torke, Sebastian; Häusler, Darius; Winkler, Anne; Stadelmann, Christine; Payne, Natalie; Feldmann, Linda; Saiz, Albert; Reindl, Markus; Lalive, Patrice H; Bernard, Claude C; Brück, Wolfgang; Weber, Martin S

    2016-07-01

    In the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disorders, antigen-specific B cells are implicated to act as potent antigen-presenting cells (APC), eliciting waves of inflammatory CNS infiltration. Here, we provide the first evidence that CNS-reactive antibodies (Ab) are similarly capable of initiating an encephalitogenic immune response by targeting endogenous CNS antigen to otherwise inert myeloid APC. In a transgenic mouse model, constitutive production of Ab against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was sufficient to promote spontaneous experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the absence of B cells, when mice endogenously contained MOG-recognizing T cells. Adoptive transfer studies corroborated that anti-MOG Ab triggered activation and expansion of peripheral MOG-specific T cells in an Fc-dependent manner, subsequently causing EAE. To evaluate the underlying mechanism, anti-MOG Ab were added to a co-culture of myeloid APC and MOG-specific T cells. At otherwise undetected concentrations, anti-MOG Ab enabled Fc-mediated APC recognition of intact MOG; internalized, processed and presented MOG activated naïve T cells to differentiate in an encephalitogenic manner. In a series of translational experiments, anti-MOG Ab from two patients with an acute flare of CNS inflammation likewise facilitated detection of human MOG. Jointly, these observations highlight Ab-mediated opsonization of endogenous CNS auto-antigen as a novel disease- and/or relapse-triggering mechanism in CNS demyelinating disorders. PMID:27022743

  9. Photothermolysis mediated by gold nanorods modified with EGFR monoclonal antibody induces Hep-2 cells apoptosis in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiwen; Li, Yunlong; He, Xiaoguang; Dong, Shouan; Huang, Yunchao; Li, Xiaojiang; Li, Yuxiao; Jin, Congguo; Zhang, Yingying; Wang, Yuanling

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanorods (AuNRs) have been used in plasmonic photothermal therapy (PPTT), which is thought to be more efficient and selective than conventional photothermal therapy. The efficiency and safety of PPTT can be improved by functionally modifying the gold nanorods with proteins or biomolecules. In this study, AuNRs were modified with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (mAb), and the apoptotic potential of EGFRmAb-AuNR was assessed in Hep-2 cells in vitro and in vivo. The EGFRmAb modification had no obvious influence on the original optical property of the AuNRs, but it significantly increased the entry of AuNRs into Hep-2 cells. EGFRmAb-AuNRs, with appropriate laser irradiation, resulted in higher Hep-2 cells apoptosis than AuNRs did alone, in vitro, and was accompanied by alteration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, Ca2+ release, change in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), cytochrome c (Cyt-c) release, active caspase-3 expression, and level of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and B-cell lymphoma 2 protein-associated X protein (Bax). EGFRmAb-AuNR-mediated apoptosis in Hep-2 cells was also observed in vivo and had an inhibitive effect on growth of Hep-2 tumor xenografts. Our data suggest that the EGFRmAb modification improves AuNR-mediated apoptosis and may have the potential to be used clinically. PMID:24790435

  10. Early membrane rupture events during neutrophil-mediated antibody-dependent tumor cell cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Kindzelskii, A L; Petty, H R

    1999-03-15

    Although cell-mediated cytolysis is a fundamental immune effector response, its mechanism remains poorly understood at the cellular level. In this report, we image for the first time transient ruptures, as inferred by cytoplasmic marker release, in tumor cell membranes during Ab-dependent cellular cytolysis. The cytosol of IgG-opsonized YAC tumor cells was labeled with tetra-methylrhodamine diacetate followed by the formation of tumor cell-neutrophil conjugates. We hypothesized that tumor cell cytolysis proceeds via a series of discrete membrane rupture/resealing events that contribute to marker release. To test this hypothesis, we occluded the fluorescence image of the labeled tumor cells by passing an opaque disk into a field-conjugated plane between the light source and the sample. Multiple small bursts of fluorescent label release from tumor cells could be detected using a photomultiplier tube. Similarly, multiple fluorescent plumes were observed at various sites around the perimeter of a target. These findings support a multihit model of target cytolysis and suggest that cytolytic release is not focused at specific sites. Cytolytic bursts were generally observed at 20-s intervals, which match the previously described reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate and superoxide release oscillation periods for neutrophils; we speculate that metabolic oscillations of the effector cell drive the membrane damage of the target. PMID:10092769

  11. The strong in vivo anti-tumor effect of the UIC2 monoclonal antibody is the combined result of Pgp inhibition and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Szalóki, Gábor; Krasznai, Zoárd T; Tóth, Ágnes; Vízkeleti, Laura; Szöllősi, Attila G; Trencsényi, György; Lajtos, Imre; Juhász, István; Krasznai, Zoltán; Márián, Teréz; Balázs, Margit; Szabó, Gábor; Goda, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) extrudes a large variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cells, causing multidrug resistance (MDR). The UIC2 monoclonal antibody recognizes human Pgp and inhibits its drug transport activity. However, this inhibition is partial, since UIC2 binds only to 10-40% of cell surface Pgps, while the rest becomes accessible to this antibody only in the presence of certain substrates or modulators (e.g. cyclosporine A (CsA)). The combined addition of UIC2 and 10 times lower concentrations of CsA than what is necessary for Pgp inhibition when the modulator is applied alone, decreased the EC50 of doxorubicin (DOX) in KB-V1 (Pgp+) cells in vitro almost to the level of KB-3-1 (Pgp-) cells. At the same time, UIC2 alone did not affect the EC50 value of DOX significantly. In xenotransplanted severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice co-treated with DOX, UIC2 and CsA, the average weight of Pgp+ tumors was only ∼10% of the untreated control and in 52% of these animals we could not detect tumors at all, while DOX treatment alone did not decrease the weight of Pgp+ tumors. These data were confirmed by visualizing the tumors in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) based on their increased 18FDG accumulation. Unexpectedly, UIC2+DOX treatment also decreased the size of tumors compared to the DOX only treated animals, as opposed to the results of our in vitro cytotoxicity assays, suggesting that immunological factors are also involved in the antitumor effect of in vivo UIC2 treatment. Since UIC2 binding itself did not affect the viability of Pgp expressing cells, but it triggered in vitro cell killing by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), it is concluded that the impressive in vivo anti-tumor effect of the DOX-UIC2-CsA treatment is the combined result of Pgp inhibition and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). PMID:25238617

  12. Trastuzumab mediates antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and phagocytosis to the same extent in both adjuvant and metastatic HER2/neu breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Monoclonal antibodies (mAb), such as trastuzumab are a valuable addition to breast cancer therapy. Data obtained from neoadjuvant settings revealed that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a major mechanism of action for the mAb trastuzumab. Conflicting results still call into question whether disease progression, prolonged treatment or concomitant chemotherapy influences ADCC and related immunological phenomena. Methods We analyzed the activity of ADCC and antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) positive breast cancer patients receiving trastuzumab therapy either in an adjuvant (n = 13) or metastatic (n = 15) setting as well as from trastuzumab treatment-naive (t-naive) HER2/neu negative patients (n = 15). PBMCs from healthy volunteers (n = 24) were used as controls. ADCC and ADCP activity was correlated with the expression of antibody binding Fc-gamma receptor (FcγR)I (CD64), FcγRII (CD32) and FcγRIII (CD16) on CD14+ (monocytes) and CD56+ (NK) cells, as well as the expression of CD107a+ (LAMP-1) on CD56+ cells and the total amount of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ (Treg) cells. In metastatic patients, markers were correlated with progression-free survival (PFS). Results ADCC activity was significantly down regulated in metastatic, adjuvant and t-naive patient cohorts as compared to healthy controls. Reduced ADCC activity was inversely correlated with the expression of CD107a on CD56+ cells in adjuvant patients. ADCC and ADCP activity of the patient cohorts were similar, regardless of treatment duration or additional chemotherapy. PFS in metastatic patients inversely correlated with the number of peripheral Treg cells. Conclusion The reduction of ADCC in patients as compared to healthy controls calls for adjuvant strategies, such as immune-enhancing agents, to improve the activity of trastuzumab. However, efficacy of trastuzumab

  13. C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1)-targeted TRAIL augments the tumoricidal activity of granulocytes and potentiates therapeutic antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wiersma, Valerie R; de Bruyn, Marco; Shi, Ce; Gooden, Marloes JM; Wouters, Maartje CA; Samplonius, Douwe F; Hendriks, Djoke; Nijman, Hans W; Wei, Yunwei; Zhou, Jin; Helfrich, Wijnand; Bremer, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies stems from their capacity to opsonize targeted cancer cells with subsequent phagocytic removal, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or induction of complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC). The major immune effector cells involved in these processes are natural killer (NK) cells and granulocytes. The latter and most prevalent blood cell population contributes to phagocytosis, but is not effective in inducing ADCC. Here, we report that targeted delivery of the tumoricidal protein tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to granulocyte marker C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1), using fusion protein CLL1:TRAIL, equips granulocytes with high levels of TRAIL. Upon CLL1-selective binding of this fusion protein, granulocytes acquire additional TRAIL-mediated cytotoxic activity that, importantly, potentiates antibody-mediated cytotoxicity of clinically used therapeutic antibodies (e.g., rituximab, cetuximab). Thus, CLL1:TRAIL could be used as an adjuvant to optimize the clinical potential of anticancer antibody therapy by augmenting tumoricidal activity of granulocytes. PMID:25760768

  14. Pathogenesis and mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Willy A

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical consequences of antibodies to red blood cells (RBC) have been studied for a century. Most clinically relevant antibodies can be detected by sensitive in vitro assays. Several mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis are well understood. Such hemolysis following transfusion is reliably avoided in a donor/recipient pair, if one individual is negative for the cognate antigen to which the other has the antibody. Study design and results Mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis were reviewed based on a presentation at the Strategies to Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions Workshop addressing intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and ABO antibodies. The presented topics included the rates of intravascular and extravascular hemolysis; IgM and IgG isoagglutinins; auto- and alloantibodies; antibody specificity; A, B, A,B and A1 antigens; A1 versus A2 phenotypes; monocytes/macrophages, other immune cells and complement; monocyte monolayer assay (MMA); antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC); and transfusion reactions due to ABO and other antibodies. Conclusion Several clinically relevant questions remained unresolved, and diagnostic tools were lacking to routinely and reliably predict the clinical consequences of RBC antibodies. Most hemolytic transfusion reactions associated with IVIG were due to ABO antibodies. Reducing the titers of such antibodies in IVIG may lower the frequency of this kind of adverse event. The only way to stop these events is to have no anti-A or anti-B antibodies in the IVIG products. PMID:26174897

  15. High-Multiplicity HIV-1 Infection and Neutralizing Antibody Evasion Mediated by the Macrophage-T Cell Virological Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Christopher J. A.; Williams, James P.; Schiffner, Torben; Gärtner, Kathleen; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John; Russell, Rebecca A.; Frater, John

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Macrophage infection is considered to play an important role in HIV-1 pathogenesis and persistence. Using a primary cell-based coculture model, we show that monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) efficiently transmit a high-multiplicity HIV-1 infection to autologous CD4+ T cells through a viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) receptor- and actin-dependent virological synapse (VS), facilitated by interactions between ICAM-1 and LFA-1. Virological synapse (VS)-mediated transmission by MDM results in high levels of T cell HIV-1 integration and is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude more efficient than cell-free infection. This mode of cell-to-cell transmission is broadly susceptible to the activity of CD4 binding site (CD4bs) and glycan or glycopeptide epitope-specific broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bNMAbs) but shows resistance to bNMAbs targeting the Env gp41 subunit membrane-proximal external region (MPER). These data define for the first time the structure and function of the macrophage-to-T cell VS and have important implications for bNMAb activity in HIV-1 prophylaxis and therapy. IMPORTANCE in vivo PMID:24307588

  16. Daratumumab-mediated lysis of primary multiple myeloma cells is enhanced in combination with the human anti-KIR antibody IPH2102 and lenalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Nijhof, Inger S.; van Bueren, Jeroen J. Lammerts; van Kessel, Berris; Andre, Pascale; Morel, Yannis; Lokhorst, Henk M.; van de Donk, Niels W.C.J.; Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Mutis, Tuna

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent treatment improvements, multiple myeloma remains an incurable disease. Since antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity is an important effector mechanism of daratumumab, we explored the possibility of improving daratumumab-mediated cell-mediated cytotoxicity by blocking natural killer cell inhibitory receptors with the human monoclonal anti-KIR antibody IPH2102, next to activation of natural killer cells with the immune modulatory drug lenalidomide. In 4-hour antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays, IPH2102 did not induce lysis of multiple myeloma cell lines, but it did significantly augment daratumumab-induced myeloma cell lysis. Also in an ex vivo setting, IPH2102 synergistically improved daratumumab-dependent lysis of primary myeloma cells in bone marrow mononuclear cells (n=21), especially in patients carrying the FcγRIIIa-158F allele or the FcγRIIa-131R allele, who bind IgG1 with lower affinity than patients carrying the FcγRIIIa-158V allele or the FcγRIIa-131H allele. Finally, a further synergistically improved myeloma cell lysis with the daratumumab-IPH2102 combination was observed by adding lenalidomide, which suggests that more effective treatment strategies can be designed for multiple myeloma by combining daratumumab with agents that independently modulate natural killer cell function. PMID:25510242

  17. Removal of terminal alpha-galactosyl residues from xenogeneic porcine endothelial cells. Decrease in complement-mediated cytotoxicity but persistence of IgG1-mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Watier, H; Guillaumin, J M; Piller, F; Lacord, M; Thibault, G; Lebranchu, Y; Monsigny, M; Bardos, P

    1996-07-15

    To determine the role of the terminal alpha-galactosyl residue in the endothelial damage mediated by human xenoreactive natural antibodies (IgM and IgG), we treated porcine endothelial cells in culture with green coffee bean alpha-galactosidase. A practically complete removal of terminal alpha-Gal residues (as evaluated by flow cytometry with Bandeiraea simplicifolia isolectin B4) and concomitant exposure of N-acetyllactosamine were obtained without altering cell viability. A dramatic decrease in IgM and IgG binding (from a pool of human sera) was observed, confirming the key role of the alpha-galactosyl residues. The enzyme treatment did not induce any nonspecific immunoglobulin binding sites, but led to the exposure of new epitopes for a minor fraction of IgM. The main residual IgM and IgG binding could be due to xenoantigens other than the alpha-galactosyl residues. When alpha-galactosidase-treated endothelial cells were used as targets in cytotoxicity experiments, they were less susceptible than untreated cells to complement-mediated cytotoxicity induced by fresh human serum. In contrast, they did not acquire resistance to human IgG-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, despite the decrease in IgG binding. Because it is known that antibody-dependent cytotoxicity mediated by CD16+ NK cells is dependent on IgG1 and IgG3, and not on IgG2 or IgG4, which was confirmed by blocking experiments, we studied the binding of all four subclasses to intact and alpha-galactosidase-treated endothelial cells. Two major subclasses, IgG1 and IgG2, bound to untreated endothelial cells, whereas IgG3 binding was low and IgG4 binding was negligible. A decrease in IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 binding was observed upon alpha-galactosidase treatment, indicating that antibodies belonging to these three subclasses recognize alpha-galactosyl residues. The decrease in IgG2 binding was more pronounced than the decrease in IgG1 binding. Collectively, these data indicate that IgG1 xenoreactive natural

  18. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity by endowing IgG with FcαRI (CD89) binding.

    PubMed

    Borrok, M Jack; Luheshi, Nadia M; Beyaz, Nurten; Davies, Gareth C; Legg, James W; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Tsui, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Fc effector functions such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP) are crucial to the efficacy of many antibody therapeutics. In addition to IgG, antibodies of the IgA isotype can also promote cell killing through engagement of myeloid lineage cells via interactions between the IgA-Fc and FcαRI (CD89). Herein, we describe a unique, tandem IgG1/IgA2 antibody format in the context of a trastuzumab variable domain that exhibits enhanced ADCC and ADCP capabilities. The IgG1/IgA2 tandem Fc format retains IgG1 FcγR binding as well as FcRn-mediated serum persistence, yet is augmented with myeloid cell-mediated effector functions via FcαRI/IgA Fc interactions. In this work, we demonstrate anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 antibodies with the unique tandem IgG1/IgA2 Fc can better recruit and engage cytotoxic polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells than either the parental IgG1 or IgA2. Pharmacokinetics of IgG1/IgA2 in BALB/c mice are similar to the parental IgG, and far surpass the poor serum persistence of IgA2. The IgG1/IgA2 format is expressed at similar levels and with similar thermal stability to IgG1, and can be purified via standard protein A chromatography. The tandem IgG1/IgA2 format could potentially augment IgG-based immunotherapeutics with enhanced PMN-mediated cytotoxicity while avoiding many of the problems associated with developing IgAs. PMID:25970007

  19. IRES-mediated Tricistronic vectors for enhancing generation of high monoclonal antibody expressing CHO cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ho, Steven C L; Bardor, Muriel; Feng, Huatao; Mariati; Tong, Yen Wah; Song, Zhiwei; Yap, Miranda G S; Yang, Yuansheng

    2012-01-01

    A Tricistronic vector utilizing internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements to express the light chain (LC), heavy chain (HC), and a neomycin phosphotransferase (NPT) selection marker from one transcript is designed for generation of mAb expressing CHO cell lines. As compared to the commonly used vectors, benefits of this design include: (1) minimized non-expressing clones, (2) enhanced stable mAb productivity without gene amplification, (3) control of LC and HC expression at defined ratios, and (4) consistent product quality. After optimization of the LC and HC arrangement and increasing selection stringency by weakening the NPT selection marker, this Tricistronic vector is able to generate stably transfected pools with specific productivity (qmAb) greater than 5pg/cell/day (pcd) and titers over 150mg/L. 5% of clones from these pools have qmAb greater than 20pcd and titers ranging from 300 to more than 500mg/L under non-optimized shake flask batch cultures using commercially available protein-free medium. The mAb produced by these clones have low aggregation and consistent glycosylation profiles. The entire process of transfection to high-expressing clones requires only 6 months. The IRES-mediated Tricistronic vector provides an attractive alternative to commonly used vectors for fast generation of mAb CHO cell lines with high productivity. PMID:22024589

  20. Distribution of apoptosis-mediating Fas antigen in human skin and effects of anti-Fas monoclonal antibody on human epidermal keratinocyte and squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Oishi, M; Maeda, K; Sugiyama, S

    1994-01-01

    Fast antigen is a cell surface protein that mediates apoptosis. Using immunohistological, flow cytometry and electron microscopic analyses, we investigated the expression of Fas antigen on various skin tissues, and on cultured SV40-transformed human epidermal keratinocyte cell line KJD and human skin squamous cell carcinoma cell line HSC. The Fas antigen was widely distributed in skin components such as the keratinocytes in the lower portion of the epidermis, epidermal dendritic cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, apocrine glands, eccrine sweat glands, sebaceous glands, some normal melanocytes and infiltrating lymphoid cells. It was also strongly expressed on the keratinocytes of lichenoid eruptions seen in lupus erythematosus and lichen planus, and on the spongiotic or acanthotic epidermis seen in chronic eczema, adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and atopic dermatitis. Its expression was closely correlated with lymphoid infiltrating cells and it was strongly expressed in lymphoid neoplastic cells, particularly ATLL cells, and fibroblasts seen in dermatofibroma. However, the antigen was not detected on basal cell epithelioma cells, some malignant melanomas or any junctional naevi. The cell lines KJD and HSC strongly expressed the Fas antigen, and crosslinking of the Fas antigen by an anti-Fas monoclonal antibody induced apoptosis of these cell lines. These results indicate that the apoptosis-mediating Fas antigen may play an important role in normal skin turnover and cell differentiation, in immune regulation of skin tumours, and in the pathogenesis of various skin diseases. PMID:7529480

  1. Cutting edge: An antibody recognizing ancestral endogenous virus glycoproteins mediates antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity on HIV-1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Henri-Alexandre; SenGupta, Devi; de Mulder, Miguel; Deeks, Steven G; Martin, Jeffrey N; Kobie, James J; Sacha, Jonah B; Nixon, Douglas F

    2014-08-15

    The failure of antiviral vaccines is often associated with rapid viral escape from specific immune responses. In the past, conserved epitope or algorithmic epitope selections, such as mosaic vaccines, have been designed to diversify immunity and to circumvent potential viral escape. An alternative approach is to identify conserved stable non-HIV-1 self-epitopes present exclusively in HIV-1-infected cells. We showed previously that human endogenous retroviral (HERV) mRNA transcripts and protein are found in cells of HIV-1-infected patients and that HERV-K (HML-2)-specific T cells can eliminate HIV-1-infected cells in vitro. In this article, we demonstrate that a human anti-HERV-K (HML-2) transmembrane protein Ab binds specifically to HIV-1-infected cells and eliminates them through an Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mechanism in vitro. Thus, Abs directed against epitopes other than HIV-1 proteins may have a role in eliminating HIV-1-infected cells and could be targeted in novel vaccine approaches or immunotherapeutic modalities. PMID:25024383

  2. FcRn-mediated antibody transport across epithelial cells revealed by electron tomography.

    PubMed

    He, Wanzhong; Ladinsky, Mark S; Huey-Tubman, Kathryn E; Jensen, Grant J; McIntosh, J Richard; Björkman, Pamela J

    2008-09-25

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) transports maternal IgG across epithelial barriers, thereby providing the fetus or newborn with humoral immunity before its immune system is fully functional. In newborn rats, FcRn transfers IgG from milk to blood by apical-to-basolateral transcytosis across intestinal epithelial cells. The pH difference between the apical (pH 6.0-6.5) and basolateral (pH 7.4) sides of intestinal epithelial cells facilitates the efficient unidirectional transport of IgG, because FcRn binds IgG at pH 6.0-6.5 but not at pH 7 or more. As milk passes through the neonatal intestine, maternal IgG is removed by FcRn-expressing cells in the proximal small intestine (duodenum and jejunum); remaining proteins are absorbed and degraded by FcRn-negative cells in the distal small intestine (ileum). Here we use electron tomography to make jejunal transcytosis visible directly in space and time, developing new labelling and detection methods to map individual nanogold-labelled Fc within transport vesicles and simultaneously to characterize these vesicles by immunolabelling. Combining electron tomography with a non-perturbing endocytic label allowed us to conclusively identify receptor-bound ligands, resolve interconnecting vesicles, determine whether a vesicle was microtubule-associated, and accurately trace FcRn-mediated transport of IgG. Our results present a complex picture in which Fc moves through networks of entangled tubular and irregular vesicles, only some of which are microtubule-associated, as it migrates to the basolateral surface. New features of transcytosis are elucidated, including transport involving multivesicular body inner vesicles/tubules and exocytosis through clathrin-coated pits. Markers for early, late and recycling endosomes each labelled vesicles in different and overlapping morphological classes, revealing spatial complexity in endo-lysosomal trafficking. PMID:18818657

  3. FcRn-mediated antibody transport across epithelial cells revealed by electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    He, Wanzhong; Ladinsky, Mark S.; Huey-Tubman, Kathryn E.; Jensen, Grant J.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Björkman, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) transports maternal IgG across epithelial barriers1,2, thereby providing the fetus or newborn with humoral immunity before its immune system is fully functional. In newborn rodents, FcRn transfers IgG from milk to blood by apical-to-basolateral transcytosis across intestinal epithelial cells. The pH difference between the apical (pH 6.0-6.5) and basolateral (pH 7.4) sides of intestinal epithelial cells facilitates efficient unidirectional transport of IgG, since FcRn binds IgG at pH 6.0-6.5 but not pH ≥7 1,2. As milk passes through the neonatal intestine, maternal IgG is removed by FcRn-expressing cells in the proximal small intestine (duodenum, jejunum); remaining proteins are absorbed and degraded by FcRn-negative cells in the distal small intestine (ileum)3-6. We used electron tomography to directly visualize jejunal transcytosis in space and time, developing new labeling and detection methods to map individual nanogold-labeled Fc within transport vesicles7 and to simultaneously characterize these vesicles by immunolabeling. Combining electron tomography with a non-perturbing endocytic label allowed us to conclusively identify receptor-bound ligands, resolve interconnecting vesicles, determine if a vesicle was microtubule-associated, and accurately trace FcRn-mediated transport of IgG. Our results present a complex picture in which Fc moved through networks of entangled tubular and irregular vesicles, only some of which were microtubule-associated, as it migrated to the basolateral surface. New features of transcytosis were elucidated, including transport involving multivesicular body inner vesicles/tubules and exocytosis via clathrin-coated pits. Markers for early, late, and recycling endosomes each labeled vesicles in different and overlapping morphological classes, revealing unexpected spatial complexity in endo-lysosomal trafficking. PMID:18818657

  4. Comparison of the effectiveness of antibody and cell-mediated immunity against inhaled and instilled influenza virus challenge

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate immunity against influenza, mouse challenge studies are typically performed by intranasal instillation of a virus suspension to anesthetized animals. This results in an unnatural environment in the lower respiratory tract during infection, and therefore there is some concern that immune mechanisms identified in this model may not reflect those that protect against infectious virus particles delivered directly to the lower respiratory tract as an aerosol. Method To evaluate differences in protection against instilled and inhaled virus, mice were immunized with influenza antigens known to induce antibody or cell-mediated responses and then challenged with 100 LD50 A/PR/8/34 (PR8) in the form of aerosol (inhaled) or liquid suspension (instilled). Results Mice immunized with recombinant adenovirus (Ad) expressing hemagglutinin were protected against weight loss and death in both challenge models, however immunization with Ad expressing nucleoprotein of influenza A (NPA) or M2 resulted in greater protection against inhaled aerosolized virus than virus instilled in liquid suspension. Ad-M2, but not Ad-NPA-immunized mice were protected against a lower instillation challenge dose. Conclusions These results demonstrate differences in protection that are dependent on challenge method, and suggest that cell-mediated immunity may be more accurately demonstrated in mouse inhalation studies. Furthermore, the data suggest immune mechanisms generally characterized as incomplete or weak in mouse models using liquid intranasal challenge may offer greater immunity against influenza infection than previously thought. PMID:23777453

  5. In vivo gene targeting of IL-3 into immature hematopoietic cells through CD117 receptor mediated antibody gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chapel, Alain; Deas, Olivier; Bensidhoum, Morad; François, Sabine; Mouiseddine, Moubarak; Poncet, Pascal; Dürrbach, Antoine; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Gourmelon, Patrick; Gorin, Norbert C; Hirsch, François; Thierry, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Background Targeted gene transfection remains a crucial issue to permit the real development of genetic therapy. As such, in vivo targeted transfection of specific subsets of hematopoietic stem cells might help to sustain hematopoietic recovery from bone marrow aplasia by providing local production of growth factors. Methods Balb/C mice were injected intravenously, with an anti-mouse c-kit (CD117) monoclonal antibody chemically coupled to a human IL-3 gene-containing plasmid DNA. Mice were sacrificed for tissue analyses at various days after injection of the conjugates. Results By ELISA, the production of human IL-3 was evidenced in the sera of animals 5 days after treatment. Cytofluorometric analysis after in vivo transfection of a reporter gene eGFP demonstrated transfection of CD117+/Sca1+ hematopoietic immature cells. By PCR analysis of genomic DNA and RNA using primer specific pIL3 sequences, presence and expression of the human IL-3-transgene were detected in the bone marrow up to 10 days in transfected mice but not in control animals. Conclusions These data clearly indicate that antibody-mediated endocytosis gene transfer allows the expression of the IL-3 transgene into hematopoietic immature cells, in vivo. While availability of marketed recombinant growth factors is restricted, this targeting strategy should permit delivery of therapeutic genes to tissues of interest through systemic delivery. In particular, the ability to specifically target growth factor expression into repopulating hematopoietic stem cells may create new opportunities for the treatment of primary or radiation-induced marrow failures. PMID:15509303

  6. B Cells and Antibodies in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Alice; Mariat, Christophe; Mousson, Christiane; Wood, Kathryn J; Rifle, Gérard; Thaunat, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Overlooked for decades, the humoral alloimmune response is increasingly recognized as a leading cause of graft loss after transplantation. However, improvement in the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection has not yet translated into better outcomes for transplanted patients. After an update on B cell physiology and antibody generation, the 2015 Beaune Seminar in Transplant Research challenged the conventional view of antibody-mediated rejection pathophysiology and discussed the latest promising therapeutic approaches. PMID:26845305

  7. On the Meaning of Affinity Limits in B-Cell Epitope Prediction for Antipeptide Antibody-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Caoili, Salvador Eugenio C.

    2012-01-01

    B-cell epitope prediction aims to aid the design of peptide-based immunogens (e.g., vaccines) for eliciting antipeptide antibodies that protect against disease, but such antibodies fail to confer protection and even promote disease if they bind with low affinity. Hence, the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) was searched to obtain published thermodynamic and kinetic data on binding interactions of antipeptide antibodies. The data suggest that the affinity of the antibodies for their immunizing peptides appears to be limited in a manner consistent with previously proposed kinetic constraints on affinity maturation in vivo and that cross-reaction of the antibodies with proteins tends to occur with lower affinity than the corresponding reaction of the antibodies with their immunizing peptides. These observations better inform B-cell epitope prediction to avoid overestimating the affinity for both active and passive immunization; whereas active immunization is subject to limitations of affinity maturation in vivo and of the capacity to accumulate endogenous antibodies, passive immunization may transcend such limitations, possibly with the aid of artificial affinity-selection processes and of protein engineering. Additionally, protein disorder warrants further investigation as a possible supplementary criterion for B-cell epitope prediction, where such disorder obviates thermodynamically unfavorable protein structural adjustments in cross-reactions between antipeptide antibodies and proteins. PMID:23209458

  8. Antibody induced CD4 down-modulation of T cells is site-specifically mediated by CD64+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Buschjäger, Daniela; Klawonn, Frank; Döring, Marius; Wang, Junxi; Fletcher, Erika; Bechmann, Ingo; Witte, Torsten; Durisin, Martin; Schraven, Burkhart; Mangsbo, Sara M.; Schönfeld, Kurt; Czeloth, Niklas; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of PBMC with the CD4-specific mAb BT-061 induces CD4 down-modulation of T cells. Here we report that addition of BT-061 to purified T cells did not confer this effect, whereas incubation of T cells in BT-061 coated wells restored CD4 down-modulation. These results implied that Fcγ receptor mediated cell-cell interactions played a role. In consistence with this hypothesis PBMC depleted of CD64+ monocytes did not confer CD4 down-modulation of BT-061 decorated T cells. Strikingly, CD4 down-modulation was observed in BT-061 treated synovial fluid punctuated from patients’ inflamed joints that comprised enhanced numbers of CD64+ cells. In contrast, in a circulating whole blood system injection of BT-061 did not induce CD4 down-modulation, due to CD64 saturation by serum IgG. Similarly, tonsil derived mononuclear cells devoid of CD64+ cells did not show CD4 down-modulation, whereas addition of blood derived monocytes restored the effect. Thus, the interaction of BT-061 decorated T cells with CD64+ cells is needed for CD4 down-modulation, implying that in patients BT-061 would primarily induce CD4 down-modulation at inflammatory sites. These results highlight the need not only to examine the interaction of a given mAb with single FcγR, but also the immunological environment that is appropriate to support such interactions. PMID:26670584

  9. Antibody induced CD4 down-modulation of T cells is site-specifically mediated by CD64(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stephanie; Grabski, Elena; Buschjäger, Daniela; Klawonn, Frank; Döring, Marius; Wang, Junxi; Fletcher, Erika; Bechmann, Ingo; Witte, Torsten; Durisin, Martin; Schraven, Burkhart; Mangsbo, Sara M; Schönfeld, Kurt; Czeloth, Niklas; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of PBMC with the CD4-specific mAb BT-061 induces CD4 down-modulation of T cells. Here we report that addition of BT-061 to purified T cells did not confer this effect, whereas incubation of T cells in BT-061 coated wells restored CD4 down-modulation. These results implied that Fcγ receptor mediated cell-cell interactions played a role. In consistence with this hypothesis PBMC depleted of CD64(+) monocytes did not confer CD4 down-modulation of BT-061 decorated T cells. Strikingly, CD4 down-modulation was observed in BT-061 treated synovial fluid punctuated from patients' inflamed joints that comprised enhanced numbers of CD64(+) cells. In contrast, in a circulating whole blood system injection of BT-061 did not induce CD4 down-modulation, due to CD64 saturation by serum IgG. Similarly, tonsil derived mononuclear cells devoid of CD64(+) cells did not show CD4 down-modulation, whereas addition of blood derived monocytes restored the effect. Thus, the interaction of BT-061 decorated T cells with CD64(+) cells is needed for CD4 down-modulation, implying that in patients BT-061 would primarily induce CD4 down-modulation at inflammatory sites. These results highlight the need not only to examine the interaction of a given mAb with single FcγR, but also the immunological environment that is appropriate to support such interactions. PMID:26670584

  10. Control of culture environment for improved polyethylenimine-mediated transient production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies by CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, Douglas J; Tait, Andrew S; Racher, Andrew J; Birch, John R; James, David C

    2006-01-01

    In this study we describe optimization of polyethylenimine (PEI)-mediated transient production of recombinant protein by CHO cells by facile manipulation of a chemically defined culture environment to limit accumulation of nonproductive cell biomass, increase the duration of recombinant protein production from transfected plasmid DNA, and increase cell-specific production. The optimal conditions for transient transfection of suspension-adapted CHO cells using branched, 25 kDa PEI as a gene delivery vehicle were experimentally determined by production of secreted alkaline phosphatase reporter in static cultures and recombinant IgG4 monoclonal antibody (Mab) production in agitated shake flask cultures to be a DNA concentration of 1.25 microg 10(6) cells(-1) mL(-1) at a PEI nitrogen:DNA phosphate ratio of 20:1. These conditions represented the optimal compromise between PEI cytotoxicity and product yield with most efficient recombinant DNA utilization. Separately, both addition of recombinant insulin-like growth factor (LR3-IGF) and a reduction in culture temperature to 32 degrees C were found to increase product titer 2- and 3-fold, respectively. However, mild hypothermia and LR3-IGF acted synergistically to increase product titer 11-fold. Although increased product titer in the presence of LR3-IGF alone was solely a consequence of increased culture duration, a reduction in culture temperature post-transfection increased both the integral of viable cell concentration (IVC) and cell-specific Mab production rate. For cultures maintained at 32 degrees C in the presence of LR3-IGF, IVC and qMab were increased 4- and 2.5-fold, respectively. To further increase product yield from transfected DNA, the duration of transgene expression in cell populations maintained at 32 degrees C in the presence of LR3-IGF was doubled by periodic resuspension of transfected cells in fresh media, leading to a 3-fold increase in accumulated Mab titer from approximately 13 to approximately 39

  11. Removal of a C-terminal serine residue proximal to the inter-chain disulfide bond of a human IgG1 lambda light chain mediates enhanced antibody stability and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Zeng, Lin; Zhu, Aiping; Blanc, Tim; Patel, Dipa; Pennello, Anthony; Bari, Amtul; Ng, Stanley; Persaud, Kris; Kang, Yun (Kenneth); Balderes, Paul; Surguladze, David; Hindi, Sagit; Zhou, Qinwei; Ludwig, Dale L.; Snavely, Marshall

    2013-01-01

    Optimization of biophysical properties is a critical success factor for the developability of monoclonal antibodies with potential therapeutic applications. The inter-domain disulfide bond between light chain (Lc) and heavy chain (Hc) in human IgG1 lends structural support for antibody scaffold stability, optimal antigen binding, and normal Fc function. Recently, human IgG1λ has been suggested to exhibit significantly greater susceptibility to reduction of the inter Lc-Hc disulfide bond relative to the same disulfide bond in human IgG1κ. To understand the molecular basis for this observed difference in stability, the sequence and structure of human IgG1λ and human IgG1κ were compared. Based on this Lc comparison, three single mutations were made in the λ Lc proximal to the cysteine residue, which forms a disulfide bond with the Hc. We determined that deletion of S214 (dS) improved resistance of the association between Lc and Hc to thermal stress. In addition, deletion of this terminal serine from the Lc of IgG1λ provided further benefit, including an increase in stability at elevated pH, increased yield from transient transfection, and improved in vitro antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). These observations support the conclusion that the presence of the terminal serine of the λ Lc creates a weaker inter-chain disulfide bond between the Lc and Hc, leading to slightly reduced stability and a potential compromise in IgG1λ function. Our data from a human IgG1λ provide a basis for further investigation of the effects of deleting terminal serine from λLc on the stability and function of other human IgG1λ antibodies. PMID:23567210

  12. Control of Immune Response to Allogeneic Embryonic Stem Cells by CD3 Antibody-Mediated Operational Tolerance Induction.

    PubMed

    Calderon, D; Prot, M; You, S; Marquet, C; Bellamy, V; Bruneval, P; Valette, F; de Almeida, P; Wu, J C; Pucéat, M; Menasché, P; Chatenoud, L

    2016-02-01

    Implantation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and their differentiated derivatives into allogeneic hosts triggers an immune response that represents a hurdle to clinical application. We established in autoimmunity and in transplantation that CD3 antibody therapy induces a state of immune tolerance. Promising results have been obtained with CD3 antibodies in the clinic. In this study, we tested whether this strategy can prolong the survival of undifferentiated ESCs and their differentiated derivatives in histoincompatible hosts. Recipients of either mouse ESC-derived embryoid bodies (EBs) or cardiac progenitors received a single short tolerogenic regimen of CD3 antibody. In immunocompetent mice, allogeneic EBs and cardiac progenitors were rejected within 20-25 days. Recipients treated with CD3 antibody showed long-term survival of implanted cardiac progenitors or EBs. In due course, EBs became teratomas, the growth of which was self-limited. Regulatory CD4(+)FoxP3(+) T cells and signaling through the PD1/PDL1 pathway played key roles in the CD3 antibody therapeutic effect. Gene profiling emphasized the importance of TGF-β and the inhibitory T cell coreceptor Tim3 to the observed effect. These results demonstrate that CD3 antibody administered alone promotes prolonged survival of allogeneic ESC derivatives and thus could prove useful for enhancing cell engraftment in the absence of chronic immunosuppression. PMID:26492394

  13. Overcoming chemoresistance of small-cell lung cancer through stepwise HER2-targeted antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and VEGF-targeted antiangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Toshiyuki; Kijima, Takashi; Kohmo, Satoshi; Arase, Hisashi; Otani, Yasushi; Nagatomo, Izumi; Takahashi, Ryo; Miyake, Kotaro; Higashiguchi, Masayoshi; Morimura, Osamu; Ihara, Shoichi; Tsujino, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Haruhiko; Inoue, Koji; Takeda, Yoshito; Kida, Hiroshi; Tachibana, Isao; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) easily recurs with a multidrug resistant phenotype. However, standard therapeutic strategies for relapsed SCLC remain unestablished. We found that human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is not only expressed in pretreated human SCLC specimens, but is also upregulated when HER2-positive SCLC cells acquire chemoresistance. Trastuzumab induced differential levels of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) to HER2-positive SCLC cells. Furthermore, as a mechanism of the differential levels of ADCC, we have revealed that coexpression of intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 on SCLC cells is essential to facilitate and accelerate the trastuzumab-mediated ADCC. Although SN-38–resistant SCLC cells lacking ICAM-1 expression were still refractory to trastuzumab, their in vivo growth was significantly suppressed by bevacizumab treatment due to dependence on their distinctive and abundant production of vascular endothelial growth factor. Collectively, stepwise treatment with trastuzumab and bevacizumab is promising for the treatment of chemoresistant SCLC. PMID:24036898

  14. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunction have been reported, and these demonstrate that antibodies can directly injure the allograft. However, the incidence and toll of antibody-mediated rejection are unknown because there is no widely accepted definition and some cases may be unrecognized. Clearly, humoral immunity has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:23002428

  15. Preclinical characterization of 1-7F9, a novel human anti–KIR receptor therapeutic antibody that augments natural killer–mediated killing of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    André, Pascale; Spee, Pieter; Zahn, Stefan; Anfossi, Nicolas; Gauthier, Laurent; Capanni, Marusca; Ruggeri, Loredana; Benson, Don M.; Blaser, Bradley W.; Della Chiesa, Mariella; Moretta, Alessandro; Vivier, Eric; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Velardi, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitory-cell killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) negatively regulate natural killer (NK) cell–mediated killing of HLA class I–expressing tumors. Lack of KIR-HLA class I interactions has been associated with potent NK-mediated antitumor efficacy and increased survival in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients upon haploidentical stem cell transplantation from KIR-mismatched donors. To exploit this pathway pharmacologically, we generated a fully human monoclonal antibody, 1-7F9, which cross-reacts with KIR2DL1, -2, and -3 receptors, and prevents their inhibitory signaling. The 1-7F9 monoclonal antibody augmented NK cell–mediated lysis of HLA-C–expressing tumor cells, including autologous AML blasts, but did not induce killing of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, suggesting a therapeutic window for preferential enhancement of NK-cell cytotoxicity against malignant target cells. Administration of 1-7F9 to KIR2DL3-transgenic mice resulted in dose-dependent rejection of HLA-Cw3–positive target cells. In an immunodeficient mouse model in which inoculation of human NK cells alone was unable to protect against lethal, autologous AML, preadministration of 1-7F9 resulted in long-term survival. These data show that 1-7F9 confers specific, stable blockade of KIR, boosting NK-mediated killing of HLA-matched AML blasts in vitro and in vivo, providing a preclinical basis for initiating phase 1 clinical trials with this candidate therapeutic antibody. PMID:19553639

  16. γδ T Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity with CD19 Antibodies Assessed by an Impedance-Based Label-Free Real-Time Cytotoxicity Assay.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Ursula Jördis Eva; Vogt, Fabian; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram; Handgretinger, Rupert; Lang, Peter

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells are not MHC restricted, elicit cytotoxicity against various malignancies, are present in early post-transplant phases in novel stem cell transplantation strategies and have been shown to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). These features make γδ T cells promising effector cells for antibody-based immunotherapy in pediatric patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). To evaluate combination of human γδ T cells with CD19 antibodies for immunotherapy of B-lineage ALL, γδ T cells were expanded after a GMP-compliant protocol and ADCC of both primary and expanded γδ T cells with an Fc-optimized CD19 antibody (4G7SDIE) and a bi-specific antibody with the specificities CD19 and CD16 (N19-C16) was evaluated in CD107a-degranulation assays and intracellular cytokine staining. CD107a, TNFα, and IFNγ expression of primary γδ T cells were significantly increased and correlated with CD16-expression of γδ T cells. γδ T cells highly expressed CD107a after expansion and no further increased expression by 4G7SDIE and N19-C16 was measured. Cytotoxicity of purified expanded γδ T cells targeting CD19-expressing cells was assessed in both europium-TDA release and in an impedance-based label-free method (using the xCELLigence system) measuring γδ T cell lysis in real-time. Albeit in the 2 h end-point europium-TDA release assay no increased lysis was observed, in real-time xCELLigence assays both significant antibody-independent cytotoxicity and ADCC of γδ T cells were observed. The xCELLigence system outperformed the end-point europium-TDA release assay in sensitivity and allows drawing of conclusions to lysis kinetics of γδ T cells over prolonged periods of time periods. Combination of CD19 antibodies with primary as well as expanded γδ T cells exhibits a promising approach, which may enhance clinical outcome of patients with pediatric B-lineage ALL and requires clinical

  17. Interaction of human IgG chimeric antibodies with the human FcRI and FcRII receptors: requirements for antibody-mediated host cell-target cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Walker, M R; Woof, J M; Brüggemann, M; Jefferis, R; Burton, D R

    1989-04-01

    Chimeric monoclonal antibodies (McAb), specific for the hapten 5-iodo-4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenacetyl (NIP), expressing human IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 subclass constant domains, have been examined for their ability to interact with the human FcRII receptor. Human red blood cells (RBC) sensitized by each of these McAbs have been assayed for their ability to form rosettes with the human histiocytic lymphoma U937 cell line, human B cell line Daudi and erythroblastoid K562 cell line. IgG1 and IgG3 sensitized RBC formed significant rosettes with the FcR- and FcRII+ Daudi and K562 cell lines, the percentage of cells forming rosettes being directly proportional to the degree of sensitization of the RBC. Bromelin treating Daudi cells did not alter this pattern of reactivity, whereas bromelin treated FcRI+ and FcRII+ U937 cells formed significant resettes with IgG1, IgG3 and IgG4 sensitized RBC, demonstrating a difference in the IgG subclass specificity between human FcRI and FcRII. Murine IgG2b anti-NIP sensitized RBC did not form rosettes with any cell line tested; however, RBC sensitized by some members of a panel of murine IgG1 McAb, specific for the glycophorin A molecule, were able to form rosettes with Daudi, U937 and K562 cells. This interaction was enhanced by bromelin treating the Daudi or U937 cells and can be correlated to the disposition of the epitopes recognized, relative to the target cell membrane, those McAbs recognizing epitopes furthest from the RBC surface being most effective in interacting with FcRII. The data are interpreted in terms of a simple model for antibody-mediated cell--cell interaction. PMID:2716734

  18. Bi20 (fBTA05), a novel trifunctional bispecific antibody (anti-CD20 x anti-CD3), mediates efficient killing of B-cell lymphoma cells even with very low CD20 expression levels.

    PubMed

    Stanglmaier, Michael; Faltin, Margot; Ruf, Peter; Bodenhausen, Annette; Schröder, Petra; Lindhofer, Horst

    2008-09-01

    Trifunctional bispecific antibodies can efficiently mediate tumor cell killing by redirecting T cells and immune accessory cells to the tumor cell. Here, we describe the new trifunctional antibody, Bi20 (FBTA05, anti-CD20 x anti-CD3), that connects B cells and T cells via its variable regions and recruits FcgammaRI(+) accessory immune cells via its Fc region. Bi20 mediated efficient and specific lysis of B-cell lines and of B cells with low CD20 expression levels that were derived from CLL patients. Remarkably, T-cell activation and tumor cell killing occurred in an entirely autologous setting without additional effector cells in 5 of 8 samples. In comparison, rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal CD20 antibody, demonstrated a significantly lower B-cell eradication rate. Additionally, Bi20, but not rituximab, upregulated the activation markers CD25 and CD69 on both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the presence of accessory immune cells. CD14(+) accessory cells and the monocyte cell line THP-1 were activated via binding of the Fc region of Bi20, given that T cells were simultaneously engaged by the antibody. Bi20 induced a strong Th1 cytokine pattern characterized by high IFN-gamma and very low IL-4 secretion. In conclusion, Bi20 may offer new immunotherapeutic options for the treatment of B-cell lymphomas. PMID:18546289

  19. Development of IgG Mediated Antibody Dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxicity (ADCC) in the Serum and Genital Mucosa of HIV Seroconverters

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Mariam; Mahmood, Fareeha; Mata, Mariana; Durkin, Helen G; Liu, Chenglong; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Nowicki, Marek; Golub, Elizabeth T; Anastos, Kathryn; French, Audrey L; Baum, Linda L

    2015-01-01

    Background We measured antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity in serum and genital fluids of heterosexually exposed women during HIV seroconversion. Methods Plasma and cervico-vaginal lavage (CVL) fluid from 11 seroconverters (SC) were analyzed biannually from one year pre- to 6 year post-seroconversion using a 51Cr-release assay to measure HIV-1 gp120 specific ADCC. Results No SC had significant HIV specific CVL ADCC activity before seroconversion or until 1.5 yr after seroconversion. One individual had a %Specific Release (SR) of 25.4 at 2 years, 26.7 at 3 years and 21.0 at 4 years after seroconversion in CVL. Another sample had 4.7% SR at 2 years, 5.3 at 3 years, 10.9 at 4 years, and 8.4 at 5 years after seroconversion in CVL. A third had no activity until 17% SR 5 years after seroconversion in CVL. A fourth showed activity of 36.5% SR at 6.5 years after seroconversion. Seven women had no ADCC activity in their CVL. Paired serum samples showed HIV specific ADCC activity prior to the appearance of CVL ADCC activity. Conclusions HIV specific ADCC activity in CVL rose 2 years after seroconversion; ADCC was present in the serum prior to this time. These data suggest that genital tract ADCC activity is not present until well after acute infection. PMID:26798561

  20. Survival of residual neutrophils and accelerated myelopoiesis limit the efficacy of antibody-mediated depletion of Ly-6G+ cells in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Moses, Katrin; Klein, Johanna C; Männ, Linda; Klingberg, Anika; Gunzer, Matthias; Brandau, Sven

    2016-06-01

    Expansion of Ly-6G(+) myeloid cells has been reported in most murine cancer models. However, divergent findings exist regarding the role and effect of these cells on host immunity and tumor progression. Antibody-mediated depletion of Ly-6G(+) cells is a common technique to assess the in vivo relevance of these cells. Interpretation of results crucially depends on the efficacy and course of depletion. We established murine head and neck cancer models and analyzed the efficacy of antibody-mediated depletion by flow cytometry, conventional histology, and intravital imaging with a novel Ly-6G-transgenic mouse model. The first phase of depletion was characterized by effective elimination of Ly-6G(+) cells from the peripheral blood. Nevertheless, viable, resistant cells were found to reside in the tumor tissue and spleen. This peripheral depletion phase was associated with high systemic levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and KC and enhanced splenic production of Ly-6G(+) cells. Even under sustained treatment with either αGr-1 or αLy-6G antibodies, peripheral blood depletion ended after approximately 1 wk and was followed by reappearance of immature Ly-6G(+) cells with an immunoregulatory phenotype. Reappearance of these depletion-resistant immature cells was enhanced in tumor-bearing, compared with naïve, control mice. Collectively, our data suggest that depletion of Ly-6G(+) myeloid cells in tumor-bearing mice is counteracted by the persistence of intratumoral cells, enhanced extramedullary granulopoiesis, and accelerated reappearance of immature cells. Hence, extensive monitoring of in vivo kinetics and tissue distribution of Ly-6G(+) cells is required in depletion studies. PMID:26819319

  1. Protection in antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases by antiinflammatory IgG Fcs requires type II FcRs.

    PubMed

    Fiebiger, Benjamin M; Maamary, Jad; Pincetic, Andrew; Ravetch, Jeffrey V

    2015-05-01

    The antiinflammatory activity of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is dependent on the presence of sialic acid in the core IgG fragment crystallizable domain (Fc) glycan, resulting in increased conformational flexibility of the CH2 domain with corresponding modulation of Fc receptor (FcR) binding specificity from type I to type II receptors. Sialylated IgG Fc (sFc) increases the activation threshold of innate effector cells to immune complexes by stimulating the up-regulation of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB. We have found that the structural alterations induced by sialylation can be mimicked by specific amino acid modifications to the CH2 domain. An IgG Fc variant with a point mutation at position 241 (F→A) exhibits antiinflammatory activity even in the absence of sialylation. F241A and sFc protect mice from arthritis in the K/BxN-induced model and, in the T cell-mediated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model, suppress disease by specifically activating regulatory T cells (Treg cells). Protection by these antiinflammatory Fcs in both antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases required type II FcRs and the induction of IL-33. These results further clarify the mechanism of action of IVIG in both antibody- and T cell-mediated inflammatory diseases and demonstrate that Fc variants that mimic the structural alterations induced by sialylation, such as F241A, can be promising therapeutic candidates for the treatment of various autoimmune disorders. PMID:25870292

  2. Protection in antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases by antiinflammatory IgG Fcs requires type II FcRs

    PubMed Central

    Fiebiger, Benjamin M.; Maamary, Jad; Pincetic, Andrew; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.

    2015-01-01

    The antiinflammatory activity of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is dependent on the presence of sialic acid in the core IgG fragment crystallizable domain (Fc) glycan, resulting in increased conformational flexibility of the CH2 domain with corresponding modulation of Fc receptor (FcR) binding specificity from type I to type II receptors. Sialylated IgG Fc (sFc) increases the activation threshold of innate effector cells to immune complexes by stimulating the up-regulation of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB. We have found that the structural alterations induced by sialylation can be mimicked by specific amino acid modifications to the CH2 domain. An IgG Fc variant with a point mutation at position 241 (F→A) exhibits antiinflammatory activity even in the absence of sialylation. F241A and sFc protect mice from arthritis in the K/BxN-induced model and, in the T cell-mediated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model, suppress disease by specifically activating regulatory T cells (Treg cells). Protection by these antiinflammatory Fcs in both antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases required type II FcRs and the induction of IL-33. These results further clarify the mechanism of action of IVIG in both antibody- and T cell-mediated inflammatory diseases and demonstrate that Fc variants that mimic the structural alterations induced by sialylation, such as F241A, can be promising therapeutic candidates for the treatment of various autoimmune disorders. PMID:25870292

  3. A Humanized Anti-CD22-Onconase Antibody-Drug Conjugate Mediates Highly Potent Destruction of Targeted Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Tobias; Mavratzas, Athanasios; Kiesgen, Stefan; Haase, Stephanie; Bötticher, Benedikt; Exner, Evelyn; Mier, Walter; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jäger, Dirk; Arndt, Michaela A. E.; Krauss, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have evolved as a new class of potent cancer therapeutics. We here report on the development of ADCs with specificity for the B-cell lineage specific (surface) antigen CD22 being expressed in the majority of hematological malignancies. As targeting moiety a previously generated humanized anti-CD22 single-chain variable fragment (scFv) derivative from the monoclonal antibody RFB4 was reengineered into a humanized IgG1 antibody format (huRFB4). Onconase (ranpirnase), a clinically active pancreatic-type ribonuclease, was employed as cytotoxic payload moiety. Chemical conjugation via thiol-cleavable disulfide linkage retained full enzymatic activity and full binding affinity of the ADC. Development of sophisticated purification procedures using size exclusion and ion exchange chromatography allowed the separation of immunoconjugate species with stoichiometrically defined number of Onconase cargos. A minimum of two Onconase molecules per IgG was required for achieving significant in vitro cytotoxicity towards lymphoma and leukemia cell lines. Antibody-drug conjugates with an Onconase to antibody ratio of 3 : 1 exhibited an IC50 of 0.08 nM, corresponding to more than 18,400-fold increased cytotoxicity of the ADC when compared with unconjugated Onconase. These results justify further development of this ADC as a promising first-in-class compound for the treatment of CD22-positive malignancies. PMID:26605343

  4. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    PubMed

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  5. miR-143 or miR-145 overexpression increases cetuximab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Sofia E.; Simões, André E. S.; Pereira, Diane M.; Castro, Rui E.; Rodrigues, Cecília M. P.; Borralho, Pedro M.

    2016-01-01

    miR-143 and miR-145 are downregulated in colon cancer. Here, we tested the effect of restoring these miRNAs on sensitization to cetuximab in mutant KRAS (HCT116 and SW480) and wild-type KRAS (SW48) colon cancer cells. We evaluated cetuximab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and the modulation of signaling pathways involved in immune effector cell-mediated elimination of cancer cells. Stable miR-143 or miR-145 overexpression increased cell sensitivity to cetuximab, resulting in a significant increase of cetuximab-mediated ADCC independently of KRAS status. Importantly, HCT116 cells overexpressing these miRNAs triggered apoptosis in result of cetuximab-mediated ADCC, effected by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (p < 0.01). This was associated with increased apoptosis and caspase-3/7 activity, and reduced Bcl-2 protein expression (p < 0.01). In addition, caspase inhibition abrogated cetuximab-mediated ADCC in HCT116 cells overexpressing either miR-143 or miR-145 (p < 0.01). Furthermore, Bcl-2 silencing led to high level of cetuximab-mediated ADCC, compared to control siRNA (p < 0.05). Importantly, granzyme B inhibition, abrogated cetuximab-mediated ADCC, reducing caspase-3/7 activity (p < 0.01). Collectively, our data suggests that re-introduction of miR-143 or miR-145 may provide a new approach for development of therapeutic strategies to re-sensitize colon cancer cells to cetuximab by stimulating cetuximab-dependent ADCC to induce cell death. PMID:26824186

  6. Defective T cell Receptor-mediated Signal Transduction in Memory CD4 T Lymphocytes Exposed to Superantigen or anti-T cell Receptor Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Andrew R.O.; Lee, William T.

    2007-01-01

    Lymphocytes must promote protective immune responses while still maintaining self-tolerance. Stimulation through the T cell receptor (TCR1) can lead to distinct responses in naive and memory CD4 T cells. Whereas peptide antigen stimulates both naive and memory T cells, soluble anti-CD3 antibodies and bacterial superantigens stimulate only naive T cells to proliferate and secrete cytokines. Further, superantigens, like staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), cause memory T cells to become anergic while soluble anti-CD3 does not. In the present report we show that signal transduction through the TCR is impaired in memory cells exposed to either anti-CD3 or SEB. A block in signaling leads to impaired activation of the kinase ZAP-70 so that downstream signals and cell proliferation do not occur. We further show that the signaling defect is unique to each agent. In anti-CD3-treated memory T cells, the src kinase Lck is only transiently activated and does not phosphorylate and activate ZAP-70. In SEB-treated memory T cells, ZAP-70 does not interact with the TCR/CD3 complex to become accessible to Lck. Finally, we provide evidence that alternative signaling pathways are initiated in SEB-treated memory cells. Altered signaling, indicated by an elevation in activity of the src kinase Fyn, may be responsible for memory cell anergy caused by SEB. Thus, differentiation of naive T cells into memory cells is accompanied by alterations in TCR-mediated signaling that can promote heightened recall immunity or specific tolerance. PMID:17083922

  7. Increased infectivity in human cells and resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization by truncation of the SIV gp41 cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Takeo; Kaori, Takaki; Enomoto, Ikumi; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2013-01-01

    The role of antibodies in protecting the host from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is of considerable interest, particularly because the RV144 trial results suggest that antibodies contribute to protection. Although infection of non-human primates with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is commonly used as an animal model of HIV-1 infection, the viral epitopes that elicit potent and broad neutralizing antibodies to SIV have not been identified. We isolated a monoclonal antibody (MAb) B404 that potently and broadly neutralizes various SIV strains. B404 targets a conformational epitope comprising the V3 and V4 loops of Env that intensely exposed when Env binds CD4. B404-resistant variants were obtained by passaging viruses in the presence of increasing concentration of B404 in PM1/CCR5 cells. Genetic analysis revealed that the Q733stop mutation, which truncates the cytoplasmic tail of gp41, was the first major substitution in Env during passage. The maximal inhibition by B404 and other MAbs were significantly decreased against a recombinant virus with a gp41 truncation compared with the parental SIVmac316. This indicates that the gp41 truncation was associated with resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. The infectivities of the recombinant virus with the gp41 truncation were 7,900-, 1,000-, and 140-fold higher than those of SIVmac316 in PM1, PM1/CCR5, and TZM-bl cells, respectively. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the gp41 truncation enhanced the incorporation of Env into virions. The effect of the gp41 truncation on infectivity was not obvious in the HSC-F macaque cell line, although the resistance of viruses harboring the gp41 truncation to neutralization was maintained. These results suggest that viruses with a truncated gp41 cytoplasmic tail were selected by increased infectivity in human cells and by acquiring resistance to neutralizing antibody. PMID:23717307

  8. Lysis of horse red blood cells mediated by antibody-independent activation of the alternative pathway of chicken complement.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, H; Yoshikawa, Y; Kai, C; Yamanouchi, K; Okada, H

    1984-01-01

    Horse red blood cells (HRBC) were found to be lysed when incubated with fresh normal chicken serum (NCS). By comparison of the properties of the lysis of HRBC with those of the complement-dependent lysis of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) sensitized with haemolytic antibody via the classical pathway, the following differences were observed between the two haemolytic phenomena. (i) The lysis of HRBC was independent on antibody in contrast to the antibody dependence of the lysis of sensitized SRBC. (ii) The lysis of HRBC was dependent on Mg but not on Ca ion, whereas the lysis of sensitized SRBC required both Mg and Ca ions. (iii) Treatment of NCS with carrageenan that acts as an inactivator of the first component of complement (C1) inhibited the lysis of sensitized SRBC but not the lysis of HRBC. (iv) C1 was consumed in the lysis of sensitized SRBC but not in the lysis of HRBC. (v) Cobra venom factor (CVF), C3 inactivator via the alternative complement pathway, inhibited the lysis of HRBC but not the lysis of sensitized SRBC. (vi) Minimal reaction times for the lysis of HRBC and for the lysis of sensitized SRBC were 90 and 60 min, respectively. These findings indicate that the lysis of HRBC was caused by the antibody-independent activation of complement via the alternative pathway. PMID:6430791

  9. Vector-Mediated In Vivo Antibody Expression.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    This article focuses on a novel vaccine strategy known as vector-mediated antibody gene transfer, with a particular focus on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This strategy provides a solution to the problem of current vaccines that fail to generate neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 infection and AIDS. Antibody gene transfer allows for predetermination of antibody affinity and specificity prior to "immunization" and avoids the need for an active humoral immune response against the HIV envelope protein. This approach uses recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors, which have been shown to transduce muscle with high efficiency and direct the long-term expression of a variety of transgenes, to deliver the gene encoding a broadly neutralizing antibody into the muscle. Following rAAV vector gene delivery, the broadly neutralizing antibodies are endogenously synthesized in myofibers and passively distributed to the circulatory system. This is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. Vector-mediated gene transfer studies in mice and monkeys with anti-HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-neutralizing antibodies demonstrated long-lasting neutralizing activity in serum with complete protection against intravenous challenge with virulent HIV and SIV. These results indicate that existing potent anti-HIV antibodies can be rapidly moved into the clinic. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV. The general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets such as hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. PMID:26104192

  10. Transplantation tolerance mediated by suppressor T cells and suppressive antibody in a recipient of a renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Mizuochi, I; Sada, M; Amemiya, H

    1985-10-01

    This is a report of a patient who underwent cadaveric renal transplantation in spite of the presence of three HLA-A, B and two DR antigen mismatches between the recipient and donor. The recipient received more than 20 units of blood before transplantation. The crossmatch between the recipient's serum and the T and B cells of the donor was negative. The patient exhibited hepatic dysfunction from the early posttransplant period, which eventually led to discontinuation of azathioprine or Bredinin at one year posttransplantation. Thereafter, only betamethasone was administered once every 3 days. The patients has maintained good renal function for more than one year following withdrawal of the immunosuppressants. It appeared that transplantation tolerance was established in this patient. Therefore, we examined the mechanisms sustaining the tolerance. Both nylon-wool-adherent, alloantigen-specific suppressor T cells and nonadherent, nonspecific suppressor T cells were observed in the lymphocytes of the patient after transplantation. It was also shown that suppressive antibody was present in the serum directed toward the clone of autologous lymphocytes that reacted with the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) antigen of the donor. In the inhibition test against various types of MLR antigens using this suppressive antibody, it was found that the reaction against the donor cells was suppressed when the responding cells shared the same class I antigen with the recipient. When the stimulating cells had the class II antigen of the donor, the reaction of the specific responding cells was also inhibited. These inhibiting effects were only seen when the responding cells were pretreated with the antibody, but not when stimulating cells were pretreated. PMID:2413592

  11. Rational clinical trial design for antibody mediated renal allograft injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandal, Shaifali; Zand, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody mediated renal allograft rejection is a significant cause of acute and chronic graft loss. Recent work has revealed that AMR is a complex processes, involving B and plasma cells, donor-specific antibodies, complement, vascular endothelial cells, NK cells, Fc receptors, cytokines and chemokines. These insights have led to the development of numerous new therapies, and adaptation of others originally developed for treatment of hemetologic malignancies, autoimmune and complement mediated conditions. Here we review emerging insights into the pathophysiology of AMR as well as current and emerging therapies for both acute and chronic AMR. Finally, we discuss rational clinical trial design in light of antibody and B cell immunobiology, as well as appropriate efficacy metrics to identify robust protocols and therapeutic agents. PMID:25553476

  12. Rational clinical trial design for antibody mediated renal allograft injury.

    PubMed

    Sandal, Shaifali; Zand, Martin S

    2015-01-01

    Antibody mediated renal allograft rejection is a significant cause of acute and chronic graft loss. Recent work has revealed that AMR is a complex processes, involving B and plasma cells, donor-specific antibodies, complement, vascular endothelial cells, NK cells, Fc receptors, cytokines and chemokines. These insights have led to the development of numerous new therapies, and adaptation of others originally developed for treatment of hemetologic malignancies, autoimmune and complement mediated conditions. Here we review emerging insights into the pathophysiology of AMR as well as current and emerging therapies for both acute and chronic AMR. Finally, we discuss rational clinical trial design in light of antibody and B cell immunobiology, as well as appropriate efficacy metrics to identify robust protocols and therapeutic agents. PMID:25553476

  13. The ability of Hepatitis B surface antigen DNA vaccine to elicit cell-mediated immune responses, but not antibody responses, was affected by the deglysosylation of S antigen.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yiping; Huang, Zuhu; Lin, Yan; Li, Jun; Chou, Te-Hui; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2008-09-19

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection remains a major worldwide infectious disease with serious long-term morbidity and mortality. The limited selections of drug treatment are not able to control the progress of disease in people with active and persistent HBV infection. Immunotherapy to control the degree of viral infection is one possible alternative solution to this challenge. HBV DNA vaccines, with their strong ability to induce cell-mediated immune responses, offer an attractive option. HBV surface protein is important in viral immunity. Re-establishing anti-S immunity in chronic HBV infected patients will bring significant benefit to the patients. Previous studies have shown that HBV S DNA vaccines are immunogenic in a number of animal studies. In the current study, we further investigated the effect of glycosylation to the expression and immunogenicity of S DNA vaccines. Our results demonstrate that deglycosylation at the two potential N-linked glycosylation sites in S protein resulted in a significant decrease of S-specific cell-mediated immune responses, but did not affect anti-S antibody responses. This finding provides important direction to the development of S DNA vaccines to elicit the optimal and balanced antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to treat people with HBV chronic infections. PMID:18462847

  14. Antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia due to epoetin alfa during antiviral therapy of chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Stravitz, R Todd; Chung, Harold; Sterling, Richard K; Luketic, Velimir A; Sanyal, Arun J; Price, Angie S; Purrington, Amy; Shiffman, Mitchell L

    2005-06-01

    Anemia frequently complicates the treatment of chronic hepatitis C with interferon and ribavirin (RVN), requiring dose reduction and jeopardizing sustained virologic response. Increasingly, epoetin alfa is used to prevent anemia in this setting. Below, we report the first case of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) in a patient with chronic hepatitis C who received epoetin alfa (Procrit) to manage anti-viral treatment-induced anemia. Red blood cell transfusion-dependence developed 16 wk after the patient was started on peginterferon alfa-2b and RVN for chronic hepatitis C despite the simultaneous administration of epoetin alfa and subsequent discontinuation of the antiviral medications. Bone marrow biopsy was consistent with PRCA. High-titer erythropoietin antibodies, assayed by two methods, appeared shortly after epoetin alfa was administered, and were associated with a decline in serum erythropoietin to undetectable levels. Erythropoietin antibodies directed toward epoetin alfa were shown to cross react with darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp), and a neutralization assay confirmed that they inhibited cell growth in the presence of erythropoietin. Transfusion-dependence resolved approximately 16 wk after discontinuing epoetin alfa, and 6 wk after starting danazol. PRCA caused by the development of erythropoietin antibodies is a potentially life-threatening complication of administering epoetin alfa to prevent the anemia associated with antiviral therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C. PMID:15929778

  15. Recent advances in renal transplantation: antibody-mediated rejection takes center stage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien Chia; Sicard, Antoine; Rabeyrin, Maud; Morelon, Emmanuel; Dubois, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Overlooked for decades, antibodies have taken center stage in renal transplantation and are now widely recognized as the first cause of allograft failure. Diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection has considerably improved with identification of antibody-mediated lesions in graft biopsies and advances made in the detection of circulating donor-specific antibodies. Unfortunately, this progress has not yet translated into better outcomes for patients. Indeed, in the absence of a drug able to suppress antibody generation by plasma cells, available therapies can only slow down graft destruction. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of antibody-mediated rejection and discusses future interesting research directions. PMID:26097724

  16. Adoptive cell transfer of contact sensitivity-initiation mediated by nonimmune cells sensitized with monoclonal IgE antibodies. Dependence on host skin mast cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, H; Ushio, H; Paliwal, V; Ptak, W; Askenase, P W

    1995-05-15

    A role for mast cell release of serotonin (5-HT), via Ag-specific factors derived from Thy-1+ B220+ lymphoid cells in the initiation of murine contact sensitivity (CS) has been suggested. However, because CS in mast cell-deficient mice was intact, a role for mast cells in CS initiation was unclear. Therefore, we examined whether CS could be initiated by i.v. injection of nonimmune mixed lymphoid cells that were sensitized in vitro with IgE. When naive mice received IgE-sensitized nonimmune spleen or lymph node cells, or IgE-sensitized purified mast cells, together with immune CS-effector B220- T cells, which therefore were depleted of CS-initiating, Thy-1+, B220+ cells, which could not transfer CS, then reconstitution of CS occurred. Mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice could not elicit this IgE-dependent CS ear swelling, but when mast cell deficiency was reversed by ear injection of normal bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells, then CS was restored. In vitro pretreatment with irrelevant monoclonal anti-OVA IgE prevented CS initiation mediated by Ag-specific, IgE mAb-sensitized cells, presumably by blocking sensitization with IgE. Thus Fc epsilon R on the normal lymphoid cells were involved. When ketanserin, a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, was injected i.v. before cell transfer, CS initiation via IgE-sensitized cells and CS were no longer elicited. Thus, in this system, IgE Abs bound to circulating IgE Fc epsilon R bearing lymphoid cells sensitized in vitro (most likely basophils), probably mediated early activation of these circulating basophils to release mediators, causing 5-HT release from cutaneous mast cells, to mediate CS initiation. PMID:7730614

  17. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Identification Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alloantibody Identification; Antibody ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red Blood Cell ...

  18. Nanoparticle mediated drug delivery of rolipram to tyrosine kinase B positive cells in the inner ear with targeting peptides and agonistic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Glueckert, Rudolf; Pritz, Christian O.; Roy, Soumen; Dudas, Jozsef; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Systemic pharmacotherapies have limitation due to blood-labyrinth barrier, so local delivery via the round window membrane opens a path for effective treatment. Multifunctional nanoparticle (NP)-mediated cell specific drug delivery may enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. Different NPs with ligands to target TrkB receptor were tested. Distribution, uptake mechanisms, trafficking, and bioefficacy of drug release of rolipram loaded NPs were evaluated. Methods: We tested lipid based nanocapsules (LNCs), Quantum Dot, silica NPs with surface modification by peptides mimicking TrkB or TrkB activating antibodies. Bioefficacy of drug release was tested with rolipram loaded LNCs to prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis. We established different cell culture models with SH-SY-5Y and inner ear derived cell lines and used neonatal and adult mouse explants. Uptake and trafficking was evaluated with FACS and confocal as well as transmission electron microscopy. Results: Plain NPs show some selectivity in uptake related to the in vitro system properties, carrier material, and NP size. Some peptide ligands provide enhanced targeted uptake to neuronal cells but failed to show this in cell cultures. Agonistic antibodies linked to silica NPs showed TrkB activation and enhanced binding to inner ear derived cells. Rolipram loaded LNCs proved as effective carriers to prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Discussion: Most NPs with targeting ligands showed limited effects to enhance uptake. NP aggregation and unspecific binding may change uptake mechanisms and impair endocytosis by an overload of NPs. This may affect survival signaling. NPs with antibodies activate survival signaling and show effective binding to TrkB positive cells but needs further optimization for specific internalization. Bioefficiacy of rolipram release confirms LNCs as encouraging vectors for drug delivery of lipophilic agents to the inner ear with ideal release characteristics independent of endocytosis

  19. E-cadherin expression on human carcinoma cell affects trastuzumab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity through killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 on natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Chisako; Fujii, Satoshi; Kimura, Taichi; Kuwata, Takeshi; Wada, Noriaki; Mukai, Hirofumi; Matsumoto, Naoki; Fukayama, Masashi; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2011-05-01

    Trastuzumab is a recombinant antibody drug that is widely used for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast carcinoma. Despite encouraging clinical results, many HER2-overexpressing carcinomas are primarily resistant to trastuzumab. We attempted to explain trastuzumab resistance and search for solutions. Since the killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1), an inhibitory receptor expressed on subsets of natural killer (NK) cells recognizes E-cadherin as ligands and may inhibit immune responses by regulating the effector function of NK cells, we used HER2-overexpressing carcinoma cells which were expressing E-cadherin to investigate the role of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) through KLRG1 on NK cells in vitro and vivo. The results indicated that HER2-overexpressing carcinoma cells were killed by trastuzumab-mediated ADCC and the ADCC activity was reflected the degree of E-cadherin expression on carcinoma cells. We found that expression of E-cadherin was shown to be a predictor of response to trastuzumab-based treatment for HER2-overexpressing carcinomas, furthermore, trastuzumab-mediated ADCC was markedly enhanced by KLRG1-negative peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs(KLRG1(-))). PMID:21387286

  20. Increasing the efficacy of CD20 antibody therapy through the engineering of a new type II anti-CD20 antibody with enhanced direct and immune effector cell–mediated B-cell cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mössner, Ekkehard; Brünker, Peter; Moser, Samuel; Püntener, Ursula; Schmidt, Carla; Herter, Sylvia; Grau, Roger; Gerdes, Christian; Nopora, Adam; van Puijenbroek, Erwin; Ferrara, Claudia; Sondermann, Peter; Jäger, Christiane; Strein, Pamela; Fertig, Georg; Friess, Thomas; Schüll, Christine; Bauer, Sabine; Dal Porto, Joseph; Del Nagro, Christopher; Dabbagh, Karim; Dyer, Martin J. S.; Poppema, Sibrand; Klein, Christian

    2010-01-01

    CD20 is an important target for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma as well as autoimmune disorders. B-cell depletion therapy using monoclonal antibodies against CD20, such as rituximab, has revolutionized the treatment of these disorders, greatly improving overall survival in patients. Here, we report the development of GA101 as the first Fc-engineered, type II humanized IgG1 antibody against CD20. Relative to rituximab, GA101 has increased direct and immune effector cell-mediated cytotoxicity and exhibits superior activity in cellular assays and whole blood B-cell depletion assays. In human lymphoma xenograft models, GA101 exhibits superior antitumor activity, resulting in the induction of complete tumor remission and increased overall survival. In nonhuman primates, GA101 demonstrates superior B cell–depleting activity in lymphoid tissue, including in lymph nodes and spleen. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence for the development of GA101 as a promising new therapy for the treatment of B-cell disorders. PMID:20194898

  1. Synthetic Antibodies for Reversible Cell Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing Zhou

    2011-12-01

    Antibody-mediated cell recognition plays a critical role in various biological and biomedical applications. However, strong antibody-cell interactions can lead to the difficulty of separating antibodies from the bound cells in a simple and non-destructive manner, which is often necessary to numerous applications such as cell sorting or separation. Thus, this thesis research is aimed to create an antibody-like nanomaterial with the function of reversible cell recognition It was hypothesized that nucleic acid aptamer and dendrimer could be used as fundamental structural components to develop an antibody-like nanomaterial. The aptamer functions as the binding site of an antibody; the dendrimer is used as a robust, defined nano-scaffold to support the aptamer and to carry small molecules (e.g., fluorophores). To test this hypothesis, a novel method was first developed to discover the essential nucleotides of full-length aptamers to mimic the binding sites of antibodies. The essential nucleotides were further conjugated with a dendrimer to synthesize a monovalent aptamer-dendrimer nanomaterial. The results clearly showed that the essential nucleotides could maintain high affinity and specificity after tethered on dendrimer surface. To further test the hypothesis that antibody-like nanomaterials can be rationally designed to acquire the capability of reversible cell recognition, an aptamer that was selected at 0 °C was used as a model to synthesize a "Y-shaped" nanomaterial by conjugating two aptamers to the same dendrimer. The results showed that the nanomaterial-cell interaction could be affected by the distance between two binding aptamers. In addition, the "Y-shaped" antibody-like nanomaterial could bind target cells more strongly than its monovalent control. Importantly, the strong cell-nanomaterial interaction could be rapidly reversed when the temperature was shifted from 0 °C to 37 °C. In summary, we developed a synthetic antibody that can not only mimic the

  2. Neuronal Surface Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Linnoila, Jenny J.; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, many autoimmune encephalitides have been identified, with specific clinical syndromes and associated antibodies against neuronal surface antigens. There is compelling evidence that many of these antibodies are pathogenic and most of these encephalitides are highly responsive to immunotherapies. The clinical spectra of some of these antibody-mediated syndromes, especially those reported in only a few patients, are evolving. Others, such as anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, are well characterized. Diagnosis involves recognizing the specific syndromes and identifying the antibody in a patient’s cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and/or serum. These syndromes are associated with variable abnormalities in CSF, magnetic resonance imaging, and electroencephalography. Treatment is often multidisciplinary and should be focused upon neutralizing the effects of antibodies and eliminating their source. Overlapping disorders have been noted, with some patients having more than one neurologic autoimmune disease. In other patients, viral infections such as herpes simplex virus encephalitis trigger robust antineuronal autoimmune responses. PMID:25369441

  3. A novel method for evaluating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity by flowcytometry using cryopreserved human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Makiko; Kitano, Shigehisa; Aikawa, Hiroaki; Kuchiba, Aya; Hayashi, Mitsuhiro; Yamamoto, Noboru; Tamura, Kenji; Hamada, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the cytotoxic functions of effector cells, such as NK cells against target cancer cells, is thought to be necessary for predicting the clinical efficacy of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) -dependent antibody therapy. The 51Cr release assay has long been the most widely used method for quantification of ADCC activity. However, the reproducibilities of these release assays are not adequate, and they do not allow evaluation of the lysis susceptibilities of distinct cell types within the target cell population. In this study, we established a novel method for evaluating cytotoxicity, which involves the detection and quantification of dead target cells using flowcytometry. CFSE (carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester) was used as a dye to specifically stain and thereby label the target cell population, allowing living and dead cells, as well as both target and effector cells, to be quantitatively distinguished. Furthermore, with our new approach, ADCC activity was more reproducibly, sensitively, and specifically detectable, not only in freshly isolated but also in frozen human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), than with the calcein-AM release assay. This assay, validated herein, is expected to become a standard assay for evaluating ADCC activity which will ultimately contribute the clinical development of ADCC dependent-antibody therapies. PMID:26813960

  4. Analysis of leukocyte populations in Canadian Holsteins classified as high or low immune responders for antibody- or cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Hine, Brad C; Cartwright, Shannon L; Mallard, Bonnie A

    2012-04-01

    Selection of dairy cattle for increased milk production with little or no emphasis on health traits leads to an increased prevalence of disease. A possible genetic solution to this problem is to combine production and immune response traits in a weighted selection index. In the current study, leukocyte populations in heifers identified as having a high antibody-mediated immune response (HiAMIR) or high cell-mediated immune response (HiCMIR) phenotype were compared before and after immunization in order to identify leukocyte population profiles associated with these phenotypes. The results demonstrated that the HiCMIR-phenotype animals had a higher baseline proportion of gamma-delta T-cells in peripheral blood. Also, the observed increase in the proportion of B-cells in peripheral blood in response to immunization was greater in the HiAMIR-phenotype animals. It is expected that identifying leukocyte population profiles associated with immune response phenotypes will improve our ability to identify animals with enhanced overall immune responsiveness. PMID:23024458

  5. Treating IgE-mediated diseases via targeting IgE-expressing B cells using an anti-CεmX antibody.

    PubMed

    Liour, Sean S; Tom, Andrew; Chan, Yueh-Hsuan; Chang, Tse Wen

    2016-08-01

    Targeting the IgE pathway is a clinically validated strategy for treating IgE-mediated diseases. Omalizumab, an anti-IgE antibody, which binds to free IgE and prevents the binding of IgE to FcεRI on mast cells and basophils has been approved for severe persistent allergic asthma and chronic spontaneous (idiopathic) urticaria. The therapeutic efficacy of anti-IgE has also been reported in allergic rhinitis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, latex allergy, atopic dermatitis, allergic urticaria, anaphylaxis, and others. Anti-CεmX, which binds to membrane-bound IgE (mIgE) on IgE-switched B cells, lyses mIgE-expressing B lymphoblasts and prevents the allergen-induced generation of IgE-producing plasma cells, offers an alternative mechanism of intervening with the IgE inflammatory pathway. Because anti-CεmX does not bind to free IgE, it can modulate the IgE pathway regardless of the serum IgE levels in treated patients. These unique pharmacologic mechanisms potentially enable anti-CεmX to provide different clinical utilities from anti-IgE and serve as a therapeutic and a prophylactic in some IgE-mediated diseases, which are not adequately treated with current medicine. PMID:27090058

  6. CD147 monoclonal antibody mediated by chitosan nanoparticles loaded with α-hederin enhances antineoplastic activity and cellular uptake in liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Rong; Zhang, Chun-ge; Liu, Yang; Yuan, Zhi-qiang; Chen, Wei-liang; Yang, Shu-di; Li, Ji-zhao; Zhu, Wen-jing; Zhou, Xiao-feng; You, Ben-gang; Zhang, Xue-nong

    2015-01-01

    An antibody that specifically interacts with an antigen could be applied to an active targeting delivery system. In this study, CD147 antibody was coupled with α-hed chitosan nanoparticles (α-Hed-CS-NPs). α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs were round and spherical in shape, with an average particle size of 148.23 ± 1.75 nm. The half-maximum inhibiting concentration (IC50) of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs in human liver cancer cell lines HepG2 and SMMC-7721 was lower than that of free α-Hed and α-Hed-CS-NPs. α-Hed-induced cell death was mainly triggered by apoptosis. The increase in intracellular accumulation of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs was also related to CD147-mediated internalization through the Caveolae-dependent pathway and lysosomal escape. The higher targeting antitumor efficacy of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs than that α-Hed-CS-NPs was attributed to its stronger fluorescence intensity in the tumor site in nude mice. PMID:26639052

  7. CD147 monoclonal antibody mediated by chitosan nanoparticles loaded with α-hederin enhances antineoplastic activity and cellular uptake in liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rong; Zhang, Chun-ge; Liu, Yang; Yuan, Zhi-qiang; Chen, Wei-liang; Yang, Shu-di; Li, Ji-zhao; Zhu, Wen-jing; Zhou, Xiao-feng; You, Ben-gang; Zhang, Xue-nong

    2015-01-01

    An antibody that specifically interacts with an antigen could be applied to an active targeting delivery system. In this study, CD147 antibody was coupled with α-hed chitosan nanoparticles (α-Hed-CS-NPs). α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs were round and spherical in shape, with an average particle size of 148.23 ± 1.75 nm. The half-maximum inhibiting concentration (IC50) of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs in human liver cancer cell lines HepG2 and SMMC-7721 was lower than that of free α-Hed and α-Hed-CS-NPs. α-Hed-induced cell death was mainly triggered by apoptosis. The increase in intracellular accumulation of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs was also related to CD147-mediated internalization through the Caveolae-dependent pathway and lysosomal escape. The higher targeting antitumor efficacy of α-Hed-CS-CD147-NPs than that α-Hed-CS-NPs was attributed to its stronger fluorescence intensity in the tumor site in nude mice. PMID:26639052

  8. Silica vesicles as nanocarriers and adjuvants for generating both antibody and T-cell mediated immune resposes to Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Mody, Karishma T; Mahony, Donna; Zhang, Jun; Cavallaro, Antonino S; Zhang, Bing; Popat, Amirali; Mahony, Timothy J; Yu, Chengzhong; Mitter, Neena

    2014-12-01

    Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) is widely distributed in cattle industries and causes significant economic losses worldwide annually. A limiting factor in the development of subunit vaccines for BVDV is the need to elicit both antibody and T-cell-mediated immunity as well as addressing the toxicity of adjuvants. In this study, we have prepared novel silica vesicles (SV) as the new generation antigen carriers and adjuvants. With small particle size of 50 nm, thin wall (~6 nm), large cavity (~40 nm) and large entrance size (5.9 nm for SV-100 and 16 nm for SV-140), the SV showed high loading capacity (∼ 250 μg/mg) and controlled release of codon-optimised E2 (oE2) protein, a major immunogenic determinant of BVDV. The in vivo functionality of the system was validated in mice immunisation trials comparing oE2 plus Quil A (50 μg of oE2 plus 10 μg of Quil A, a conventional adjuvant) to the oE2/SV-140 (50 μg of oE2 adsorbed to 250 μg of SV-140) or oE2/SV-140 together with 10 μg of Quil A. Compared to the oE2 plus Quil A, which generated BVDV specific antibody responses at a titre of 10(4), the oE2/SV-140 group induced a 10 times higher antibody response. In addition, the cell-mediated response, which is essential to recognise and eliminate the invading pathogens, was also found to be higher [1954-2628 spot forming units (SFU)/million cells] in mice immunised with oE2/SV-140 in comparison to oE2 plus Quil A (512-1369 SFU/million cells). Our study has demonstrated that SV can be used as the next-generation nanocarriers and adjuvants for enhanced veterinary vaccine delivery. PMID:25239045

  9. Transpo-mAb display: Transposition-mediated B cell display and functional screening of full-length IgG antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Waldmeier, Lorenz; Hellmann, Ina; Gutknecht, Chantal K; Wolter, Fabian I; Cook, Skylar C; Reddy, Sai T; Grawunder, Ulf; Beerli, Roger R

    2016-01-01

    In vitro antibody display and screening technologies geared toward the discovery and engineering of clinically applicable antibodies have evolved from screening artificial antibody formats, powered by microbial display technologies, to screening of natural, full-IgG molecules expressed in mammalian cells to readily yield lead antibodies with favorable properties in production and clinical applications. Here, we report the development and characterization of a novel, next-generation mammalian cell-based antibody display and screening platform called Transpo-mAb Display, offering straightforward and efficient generation of cellular libraries by using non-viral transposition technology to obtain stable antibody expression. Because Transpo-mAb Display uses DNA-transposable vectors with substantial cargo capacity, genomic antibody heavy chain expression constructs can be utilized that undergo the natural switch from membrane bound to secreted antibody expression in B cells by way of alternative splicing of Ig-heavy chain transcripts from the same genomic expression cassette. We demonstrate that stably transposed cells co-express transmembrane and secreted antibodies at levels comparable to those provided by dedicated constructs for secreted and membrane-associated IgGs. This unique feature expedites the screening and antibody characterization process by obviating the need for intermediate sequencing and re-cloning of individual antibody clones into separate expression vectors for functional screening purposes. In a series of proof-of-concept experiments, we demonstrate the seamless integration of antibody discovery with functional screening for various antibody properties, including binding affinity and suitability for preparation of antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:26986818

  10. Protection from diabetes development by single-chain antibody-mediated delivery of a NF-κB inhibitor specifically to β-cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ueberberg, Sandra; Deutschbein, Timo; Klein, Harald H; Dietrich, Johannes W; Akinturk, Sara; Prochnow, Nora; Schirrmacher, Ralph; Schneider, Stephan

    2011-07-01

    Recently, we reported the generation of single-chain antibodies (SCAs) highly specific for rodent and human β-cells. Our current report describes the generation of a fusion protein of one of these SCAs (SCA B1) with a NF-κB essential modifier (NEMO)-binding domain (NBD) peptide, thereby creating a selective inhibitor of NF-κB activation in β-cells. The SCA B1-NBD fusion protein was cloned in the pIRES-EGFP, expressed in bacteria, and purified by metal affinity chromatography; the newly generated complex was then administered intravenously to rodents and evaluated for its ability to protect β-cells against cytokines in vitro and diabetogenic agents in vivo. First, it was shown clearly that our SCA B1-NBD fusion protein binds highly selective to CD rat β-cells in vivo. Second, we observed that SCA B1-mediated in vivo delivery of the NBD peptide completely blocked IL-1β + IFNγ- and TNFα + IFNγ-mediated induction of NF-κB as well as islet dysfunction in culture. Finally, repeated intravenous injection of SCA B1-NBD prior to multiple low-dose administration of streptozotocin in CD mice not only induced a striking resistance to diabetes development but also preserved β-cell mass. In conclusion, our data show for the first time that a SCA B1-NBD fusion peptide reliably protects β-cells against cytokines in vitro and allows protection from diabetes development in CD mice in vivo. PMID:21521716

  11. Antibody-Mediated Pathogen Resistance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Peschen, Dieter; Schillberg, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The methods described in this chapter were developed in order to produce transgenic plants expressing pathogen-specific single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies fused to antifungal peptides (AFPs), conferring resistance against fungal pathogens. We describe the selection from a phage display library of avian scFv antibodies that recognize cell surface proteins on fungi from the genus Fusarium, and the construction of scFv-AFP fusion protein constructs followed by their transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana spp.) plants and stable expression in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Using these techniques, the antibody fusion with the most promising in vitro activity can be used to generate transgenic plants that are resistant to pathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. matthiolae. PMID:26614296

  12. Donor antibodies to HNA-3a implicated in TRALI reactions prime neutrophils and cause PMN-mediated damage to human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells in a two-event in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Silliman, Christopher C; Curtis, Brian R; Kopko, Patricia M; Khan, Samina Y; Kelher, Marguerite R; Schuller, Randy M; Sannoh, Baindu; Ambruso, Daniel R

    2007-02-15

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Antibodies to HNA-3a are commonly implicated in TRALI. We hypothesized that HNA-3a antibodies prime neutrophils (PMNs) and cause PMN-mediated cytotoxicity through a two-event pathogenesis. Isolated HNA-3a+ or HNA-3a- PMNs were incubated with plasma containing HNA-3a antibodies implicated in TRALI, and their ability to prime the oxidase was measured. Human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) were activated with endotoxin or buffer, HNA-3a+ or HNA-3a- PMNs were added, and the coculture was incubated with plasma+/-antibodies to HNA-3a. PMN-mediated damage was measured by counting viable HMVECs/mm2. Plasma containing HNA-3a antibodies primed the fMLP-activated respiratory burst of HNA-3a+, but not HNA-3a-, PMNs and elicited PMN-mediated damage of LPS-activated HMVECs when HNA-3a+, but not HNA-3a-, PMNs were used. Thus, antibodies to HNA-3a primed PMNs and caused PMN-mediated HMVEC cytotoxicity in a two-event model identical to biologic response modifiers implicated in TRALI. PMID:17038531

  13. IgA EGFR antibodies mediate tumour killing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Boross, Peter; Lohse, Stefan; Nederend, Maaike; Jansen, Johannes Hendrik Marco; van Tetering, Geert; Dechant, Michael; Peipp, Matthias; Royle, Louise; Liew, Li Phing; Boon, Louis; van Rooijen, Nico; Bleeker, Wim K; Parren, Paul W H I; van de Winkel, Jan G J; Valerius, Thomas; Leusen, Jeanette H W

    2013-01-01

    Currently all approved anti-cancer therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are of the IgG isotype, which rely on Fcgamma receptors (FcγRs) to recruit cellular effector functions. In vitro studies showed that targeting of FcαRI (CD89) by bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) or recombinant IgA resulted in more effective elimination of tumour cells by myeloid effector cells than targeting of FcγR. Here we studied the in vivo anti-tumour activity of IgA EGFR antibodies generated using the variable sequences of the chimeric EGFR antibody cetuximab. Using FcαRI transgenic mice, we demonstrated significant in vivo anti-tumour activity of IgA2 EGFR against A431 cells in peritoneal and lung xenograft models, as well as against B16F10-EGFR cells in a lung metastasis model in immunocompetent mice. IgA2 EGFR was more effective than cetuximab in a short-term syngeneic peritoneal model using EGFR-transfected Ba/F3 target cells. The in vivo cytotoxic activity of IgA2 EGFR was mediated by macrophages and was significantly decreased in the absence of FcαRI. These results support the potential of targeting FcαRI for effective antibody therapy of cancer. The study reveals that IgA antibodies directed against EGFR and engaging Fcalpha receptor (FcαRI) on effector cells, have in vivo anti-cancer activity. These data support the development of novel immunotherapeutic strategies based on targeting FcαRI. PMID:23918228

  14. CHO-S Antibody Titers >1 Gram/Liter Using Flow Electroporation-Mediated Transient Gene Expression followed by Rapid Migration to High-Yield Stable Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Brady, James; Wang, Weili; Duskin, Meg; Donato, Karen; Peshwa, Madhusudan

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have turned to transient gene expression (TGE) as an alternative to CHO stable cell line generation for early-stage antibody development. Despite advances in transfection methods and culture optimization, the majority of CHO-based TGE systems produce insufficient antibody titers for extensive use within biotherapeutic development pipelines. Flow electroporation using the MaxCyte STX Scalable Transfection System is a highly efficient, scalable means of CHO-based TGE for gram-level production of antibodies without the need for specialized expression vectors or genetically engineered CHO cell lines. CHO cell flow electroporation is easily scaled from milligram to multigram quantities without protocol reoptimization while maintaining transfection performance and antibody productivity. In this article, data are presented that demonstrate the reproducibility, scalability, and antibody production capabilities of CHO-based TGE using the MaxCyte STX. Data show optimization of posttransfection parameters such as cell density, media composition, and feed strategy that result in secreted antibody titers >1 g/L and production of multiple grams of antibody within 2 weeks of a single CHO-S cell transfection. In addition, data are presented to demonstrate the application of scalable electroporation for the rapid generation of high-yield stable CHO cell lines to bridge the gap between early- and late-stage antibody development activities. PMID:25520372

  15. The mammalian tRNA ligase complex mediates splicing of XBP1 mRNA and controls antibody secretion in plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jurkin, Jennifer; Henkel, Theresa; Nielsen, Anne Færch; Minnich, Martina; Popow, Johannes; Kaufmann, Therese; Heindl, Katrin; Hoffmann, Thomas; Busslinger, Meinrad; Martinez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a conserved stress-signaling pathway activated after accumulation of unfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Active UPR signaling leads to unconventional, enzymatic splicing of XBP1 mRNA enabling expression of the transcription factor XBP1s to control ER homeostasis. While IRE1 has been identified as the endoribonuclease required for cleavage of this mRNA, the corresponding ligase in mammalian cells has remained elusive. Here, we report that RTCB, the catalytic subunit of the tRNA ligase complex, and its co-factor archease mediate XBP1 mRNA splicing both in vitro and in vivo. Depletion of RTCB in plasma cells of Rtcbfl/fl Cd23-Cre mice prevents XBP1s expression, which normally is strongly induced during plasma cell development. RTCB-depleted plasma cells show reduced and disorganized ER structures as well as severe defects in antibody secretion. Targeting RTCB and/or archease thus represents a promising strategy for the treatment of a growing number of diseases associated with elevated expression of XBP1s. PMID:25378478

  16. CD169-Mediated Trafficking of HIV to Plasma Membrane Invaginations in Dendritic Cells Attenuates Efficacy of Anti-gp120 Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Hisashi; Ramirez, Nora-Guadalupe Pina; Gudheti, Manasa V.; Gummuluru, Suryaram

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) can capture HIV-1 via the receptor CD169/Siglec-1 that binds to the ganglioside, GM3, in the virus particle membrane. In turn, HIV-1 particles captured by CD169, an I-type lectin, whose expression on DCs is enhanced upon maturation with LPS, are protected from degradation in CD169+ virus-containing compartments (VCCs) and disseminated to CD4+ T cells, a mechanism of DC-mediated HIV-1 trans-infection. In this study, we describe the mechanism of VCC formation and its role in immune evasion mechanisms of HIV-1. We find HIV-1-induced formation of VCCs is restricted to myeloid cells, and that the cytoplasmic tail of CD169 is dispensable for HIV-1 trafficking and retention within VCCs and subsequent trans-infection to CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, introduction of a di-aromatic endocytic motif in the cytoplasmic tail of CD169 that results in endocytosis of HIV-1 particles, suppressed CD169-mediated HIV-1 trans-infection. Furthermore, super-resolution microscopy revealed close association of CD169 and HIV-1 particles in surface-accessible but deep plasma membrane invaginations. Intriguingly, HIV-1 particles in deep VCCs were inefficiently accessed by anti-gp120 broadly neutralizing antibodies, VRC01 and NIH45-46 G54W, and thus were less susceptible to neutralization. Our study suggests that HIV-1 capture by CD169 can provide virus evasion from both innate (phagocytosis) and adaptive immune responses. PMID:25760631

  17. Cytotoxic activity against human neuroblastoma and melanoma cells mediated by IgM antibodies derived from peripheral blood of healthy donors.

    PubMed

    Devarapu, Satish Kumar; Mamidi, Srinivas; Plöger, Frank; Dill, Othmar; Blixt, Ola; Kirschfink, Michael; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard

    2016-06-15

    A small percentage of healthy donors identified in the Western population carry antibodies in their peripheral blood which convey cytotoxic activity against certain human melanoma and neuroblastoma cell lines. We measured the cytotoxic activity of sera and plasmas from healthy donors on the human neuroblastoma cell line Kelly and various melanoma cell lines. Antibodies of IgM isotype, presumably belonging to the class of naturally occurring antibodies, exerted cytotoxic activity in a complement-dependent fashion. Apart from complement-dependent tumor cell lysis, we observed C3 opsonization in all tumor cell lines upon treatment with cytotoxic plasmas. Cell lines tested primarily expressed membrane complement regulatory proteins (mCRP) CD46, CD55 and CD59 to various extents. Blocking of mCRPs by monoclonal antibodies enhanced cell lysis and opsonization, though some melanoma cells remained resistant to complement attack. Epitopes recognized by cytotoxic antibodies were represented by gangliosides such as GD2 and GD3, as evidenced by cellular sialidase pretreatment and enhanced expression of distinct gangliosides. It remains to be clarified why only a small fraction of healthy persons carry these antitumor cytotoxic antibodies. PMID:26830059

  18. Molecular Communication Modeling of Antibody-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Chahibi, Youssef; Akyildiz, Ian F; Balasubramaniam, Sasitharan; Koucheryavy, Yevgeni

    2015-07-01

    Antibody-mediated Drug Delivery Systems (ADDS) are emerging as one of the most encouraging therapeutic solutions for treating several diseases such as human cancers. ADDS use small molecules (antibodies) that propagate in the body and bind selectively to their corresponding receptors (antigens) expressed at the surface of the diseased cells. In this paper, the Molecular Communication (MC) paradigm, where information is conveyed through the concentration of molecules, is advocated for the engineering of ADDS and modeling their complex behavior, to provide a realistic model without the over-complication of system biology models, and the limitations of experimental approaches. The peculiarities of antibodies, including their anisotropic transport and complex electrochemical structure, are taken into account to develop an analytical model of the ADDS transport and antigen-binding kinetics. The end-to-end response of ADDS, from the drug injection to the drug absorption, is mathematically derived based on the geometry of the antibody molecule, the electrochemical structure of the antibody-antigen complex, and the physiology of the patient. The accuracy of the MC model is validated by finite-element (COMSOL) simulations. The implications of the complex interplay between the transport and kinetics parameters on the performance of ADDS are effectively captured by the proposed MC model. The MC model of ADDS will enable the discovery and optimization of drugs in a versatile, cost-efficient, and reliable manner. PMID:25675450

  19. Antibody-mediated targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles to the folate receptor alpha increases tumor cell association in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ndong, Christian; Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Baker, Ian; Gerngross, Tillman U; Fiering, Steven N; Griswold, Karl E

    2015-01-01

    Active molecular targeting has become an important aspect of nanoparticle development for oncology indications. Here, we describe molecular targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) to the folate receptor alpha (FOLRα) using an engineered antibody fragment (Ffab). Compared to control nanoparticles targeting the non-relevant botulinum toxin, the Ffab-IONP constructs selectively accumulated on FOLRα-overexpressing cancer cells in vitro, where they exhibited the capacity to internalize into intracellular vesicles. Similarly, Ffab-IONPs homed to FOLRα-positive tumors upon intraperitoneal administration in an orthotopic murine xenograft model of ovarian cancer, whereas negative control particles showed no detectable tumor accumulation. Interestingly, Ffab-IONPs built with custom 120 nm nanoparticles exhibited lower in vitro targeting efficiency when compared to those built with commercially sourced 180 nm nanoparticles. In vivo, however, the two Ffab-IONP platforms achieved equivalent tumor homing, although the smaller 120 nm IONPs were more prone to liver sequestration. Overall, the results show that Ffab-mediated targeting of IONPs yields specific, high-level accumulation within cancer cells, and this fact suggests that Ffab-IONPs could have future utility in ovarian cancer diagnostics and therapy. PMID:25878495

  20. Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalopathies and Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Gastaldi, Matteo; Thouin, Anaïs; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 15 years it has become clear that rare but highly recognizable diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including newly identified forms of limbic encephalitis and other encephalopathies, are likely to be mediated by antibodies (Abs) to CNS proteins. The Abs are directed against membrane receptors and ion channel-associated proteins that are expressed on the surface of neurons in the CNS, such as N-methyl D-aspartate receptors and leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein and contactin-associated protein like 2, that are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels. The diseases are not invariably cancer-related and are therefore different from the classical paraneoplastic neurological diseases that are associated with, but not caused by, Abs to intracellular proteins. Most importantly, the new antibody-associated diseases almost invariably respond to immunotherapies with considerable and sometimes complete recovery, and there is convincing evidence of their pathogenicity in the relatively limited studies performed so far. Treatments include first-line steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, and plasma exchange, and second-line rituximab and cyclophosphamide, followed in many cases by steroid-sparing agents in the long-term. This review focuses mainly on N-methyl D-aspartate receptor- and voltage-gated potassium channel complex-related Abs in adults, the clinical phenotypes, and treatment responses. Pediatric cases are referred to but not reviewed in detail. As there have been very few prospective studies, the conclusions regarding immunotherapies are based on retrospective studies. PMID:26692392

  1. Mechanisms maintaining antibody-induced enhancement of allografts. II. Mediation of specific suppression by short lived CD4+ T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, N.W.; Spinelli, A.; Gurley, K.E.; Dorsch, S.E.; Hall, B.M.

    1989-07-15

    In DA rats grafted with PVG hearts, the injection of 1 ml of Wistar-Furth (x DA)F1 anti-PVG serum on the day of grafting prevents rejection and induces a state of specific unresponsiveness. An adoptive transfer assay was used to test the capacity of T cell subsets, taken from rats given enhancing serum, to either restore rejection or to transfer unresponsiveness to syngeneic hosts irradiated with 9 Gy and grafted with donor (PVG) or third party (Wistar-Furth) hearts. W3/25+ (CD4+) cells from these animals retained some capacity to restore rejection until 50 days posttransplant, after which they invariably failed to restore PVG graft rejection but retained the capacity to effect Wistar-Furth rejection. At this time CD4+ cells were also capable of inhibiting naive but not specifically sensitized CD4+ cells capacity to restore PVG graft rejection in irradiated hosts. The development of CD4+ suppressor cells was concurrent with the appearance of clinically evident unresponsiveness in the host. MRC Ox8+ (CD8+) cells from enhanced rats when mixed with naive CD4+ cells delayed rejection in adoptive recipients but did not reestablish unresponsiveness. Paradoxically, the CD4+ cells that transfer unresponsiveness to the adoptive host proliferate such as normal cells in MLC to both donor and third party alloantigen. Unfractionated cells, CD4+ or CD8+ cells did not proliferate to relevant idiotype in vitro. The CD4+ cells after 3 days in culture, with either alloantigen or idiotype-bearing stimulator cells, lost their capacity to suppress in the adoptive transfer assay. The maintenance of specific unresponsiveness was thus shown to be due to a CD4+ suppressor T cell whose function was lost in culture, and therefore could not be detected in MLC or idiotype assays.

  2. Generation of new peptide-Fc fusion proteins that mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against different types of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sioud, Mouldy; Westby, Phuong; Olsen, Julie Kristine E.; Mobergslien, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), a key effector function for the clinical effectiveness of monoclonal antibodies, is triggered by the engagement of the antibody Fc domain with the Fcγ receptors expressed by innate immune cells such as natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages. Here, we fused cancer cell-binding peptides to the Fc domain of human IgG1 to engineer novel peptide-Fc fusion proteins with ADCC activity. The designed fusion proteins were expressed in human embryonic kidney 293T cells, followed by purification and characterization by western blots. One of the engineered variants (WN-Fc), bound with high affinity to a wide range of solid tumor cell lines (e.g., colon, lung, prostate, skin, ovarian, and mammary tumors). Treatment of cancer cells with the engineered peptide-Fc fusions in the presence of effector NK cells potentially enhanced cytotoxicity, degranulation, and interferon-γ production by NK cells when compared to cells treated with the Fc control. The presence of competing peptides inhibited NK cell activation. Furthermore, a bispecific peptide-Fc fusion protein activated NK cells against HER-1- and/or HER-2-expressing cancer cells. Collectively, the engineered peptide-Fc fusions constitute a new promising strategy to recruit and activate NK cells against tumor cells, a primary goal of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26605373

  3. Expression of miR-142-5p in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Renal Transplant Patients with Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Danger, Richard; Paul, Chloé; Giral, Magali; Lavault, Amélie; Foucher, Yohann; Degauque, Nicolas; Pallier, Annaïck; Durand, Maxim; Castagnet, Stéphanie; Duong Van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Delahousse, Michel; Renaudin, Karine; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Brouard, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    In renal transplantation, the unresponsiveness of patients undergoing chronic antibody mediated rejection (CAMR) to classical treatment stress on the need for accurate biomarkers to improve its diagnosis. We aim to determine whether microRNA expression patterns may be associated with a diagnosis of CAMR. We performed expression profiling of miRNAs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of kidney transplant recipients with CAMR or stable graft function. Among 257 expressed miRNAs, 10 miRNAs associated with CAMR were selected. Among them, miR-142-5p was increased in PBMC and biopsies of patients with CAMR as well as in a rodent model of CAMR. The lack of modulation of miR-142-5p in PBMC of patients with renal failure, suggests that its over-expression in CAMR was associated with immunological disorders rather than renal dysfunction. A ROC curve analysis performed on independent samples showed that miR-142-5p is a potential biomarker of CAMR allowing a very good discrimination of the patients with CAMR (AUC = 0.74; p = 0.0056). Moreover, its expression was decreased in PHA-activated blood cells and was not modulated in PBMC from patients with acute rejection, excluding a non-specific T cell activation expression. The absence of modulation of this miRNA in immunosuppressed patients suggests that its expression was not influenced by treatment. Finally, the analysis of miR-142-5p predicted targets under-expressed in CAMR PBMC in a published microarray dataset revealed an enrichment of immune-related genes. Altogether, these data suggest that miR-142-5p could be used as a biomarker in CAMR and these finding may improve our understanding of chronic rejection mechanisms. PMID:23577151

  4. Targeting Tumor Cells with Anti-CD44 Antibody Triggers Macrophage-Mediated Immune Modulatory Effects in a Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Maisel, Daniela; Birzele, Fabian; Voss, Edgar; Nopora, Adam; Bader, Sabine; Friess, Thomas; Goller, Bernhard; Laifenfeld, Daphna; Weigand, Stefan; Runza, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    CD44, a transmembrane receptor reported to be involved in various cellular functions, is overexpressed in several cancer types and supposed to be involved in the initiation, progression and prognosis of these cancers. Since the sequence of events following the blockage of the CD44-HA interaction has not yet been studied in detail, we profiled xenograft tumors by RNA Sequencing to elucidate the mode of action of the anti-CD44 antibody RG7356. Analysis of tumor and host gene-expression profiles led us to the hypothesis that treatment with RG7356 antibody leads to an activation of the immune system. Using cytokine measurements we further show that this activation involves the secretion of chemo-attractants necessary for the recruitment of immune cells (i.e. macrophages) to the tumor site. We finally provide evidence for antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) of the malignant cells by macrophages. PMID:27463372

  5. Cell-targeting antibodies in immunity to Ebola.

    PubMed

    Schmaljohn, Alan; Lewis, George K

    2016-06-01

    As the 2014-15 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa evolved from emergency to lesson, developers of both vaccines and therapeutic antibodies were left with the puzzlement of what kinds of anti-Ebola antibodies are predictably desirable in treating the afflicted, and what antibodies might account for the specific and lasting protection elicited by the more effective vaccines. The facile answer in virology is that neutralizing antibody (NAb) is desired and required. However, with Ebola and other filoviruses (as with many prior viral examples), there are multiple discordances in which neutralizing antibodies fail to protect animals, and others in which antibody-mediated protection is observed in the absence of measured virus neutralization. Explanation presumably resides in the protective role of antibodies that bind and functionally 'target' virus-infected cells, here called 'cell-targeting antibody', or CTAb. To be clear, many NAbs are also CTAbs, and in the case of Ebola the great majority of NAbs are likely CTAbs. Isotype, glycosylation, and other features of CTAbs are likely crucial in their capacity to mediate protection. Overall, results and analysis invite an increasingly complex view of antibody-mediated immunity to enveloped viruses. PMID:27005312

  6. B Cells, Antibodies, and More.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G; Chalasani, Geetha

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell-targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell-targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  7. The Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin enhances the anti-CD3 antibody-mediated activation of human peripheral blood CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Urrea, Francisco; Ortiz-Quintero, Blanca; Sanchez-Garcia, Francisco Javier; Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Garfias, Yonathan; Lascurain, Ricardo; Zenteno, Edgar

    2010-08-01

    Activation of CD4(+) T cells plays a main role in adaptive immune response by regulating cellular and humoral immunity via processes associated with changes in cell surface oligosaccharide receptors. Lectins are glycoproteins that specifically recognize oligosaccharides and have been used to characterize changes in oligosaccharides present on T cell surface and their effects on activation. A lectin from Amaranthus leucocarpus seeds (ALL) is specific for glycoprotein structures containing galactose-N-acetylgalactosamine and is able to bind to human and murine CD4(+) T cells, however, its effect on activation remains unclear. We examined the effect of ALL on the activation of peripheral blood human CD4(+) T cells and analyzed cell proliferation, expression of the activation-associated molecule CD25, secretion of the activation-dependent cytokine interleukin (IL)-2 and intracellular calcium influx changes using flow cytometry. CD4(+) T cells were stimulated with anti-CD3 antibodies that provided the first activation signal in the presence or absence of ALL. ALL alone did not induce CD4(+) T cell activation but when also stimulated with anti-CD3 antibodies, ALL up-regulated CD25 expression, cell proliferation, IL-2 secretion and an intracellular calcium influx in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ALL recognized CD4(+) T cells expressing the CD69 and Ki67 molecules expressed only by activated T cells and induced production of the TH1-type cytokine interferon-gamma. Our findings indicate that ALL binds to human activated CD4(+) T cells and enhances the degree of activation of CD4(+) T cells that are stimulated with anti-CD3 antibodies. ALL provides a new tool for analyzing T cell activation mechanisms. PMID:20644342

  8. Antibody-mediated Xenograft Injury: Mechanisms and Protective Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Richard N.

    2009-01-01

    The use of porcine organs for clinical transplantation is a promising potential solution to the shortage of human organs. Preformed anti-pig antibody is the primary cause of hyperacute rejection, while elicited antibody can contribute to subsequent “delayed” xenograft rejection. This article will review recent progress to overcome antibody mediated xenograft rejection, through modification of the host immunity and use of genetically engineered pig organs. PMID:19376229

  9. TCDD-Mediated Suppression of the In Vitro Anti-Sheep Erythrocyte IgM Antibody Forming Cell Response is Reversed by Interferon-Gamma

    PubMed Central

    North, Colin M.; Kim, Byung-Sam; Snyder, Neil; Crawford, Robert B.; Holsapple, Michael P.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2009-01-01

    Suppression of humoral immune responses by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been well established to require the aryl hydrocarbon receptor; however, the downstream mechanisms for this immunotoxic response remain poorly understood. Based on evidence demonstrating that primary hepatocytes pretreated with interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) exhibited decreased induction of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) by TCDD, and that serum factors alter the sensitivity of the in vitro T-cell–dependent IgM antibody forming cell (AFC) response, it was hypothesized that IFN-γ attenuates suppression of humoral immune responses by TCDD. In fact, concomitant addition of IFN-γ (100 U/ml) produced a concentration-related attenuation of TCDD-mediated suppression of the anti-sheep erythrocyte (anti-sRBC) IgM AFC response. Time-of-addition studies performed by adding 100 U/ml IFN-γ at 0, 1, 2, 4, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h post-TCDD showed that suppression of the AFC response was prevented only when IFN-γ was added within 2 h of TCDD treatment. mRNA levels of the IgM components, immunoglobulin κ light chain, immunoglobulin μ heavy chain, and immunoglobulin J-chain were significantly decreased by TCDD treatment, an effect that was completely reversed by IFN-γ (100 U/ml) cotreatment. Further studies showed that IFN-α, IFN-β, and IFN-γ significantly attenuate TCDD-induced increases in CYP1A1 mRNA levels to varying degrees, but concentrations as high as 1000 U/ml of type I IFNs did not reverse the effect of TCDD on the anti-sRBC IgM AFC response. In summary, IFN-γ prevents TCDD-mediated suppression of the IgM AFC response in a concentration- and time-related manner by altering transcriptional effects associated with TCDD treatment. PMID:18948302

  10. Characterization of rabbit cells by monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Ponsard, D C; Cinader, B; Chou, C T; Dubiski, S

    1986-01-01

    Reagents for the identification of rabbit cell markers have been developed at a relatively slow rate. In this paper, rabbit cells are being characterized by polyclonal antibodies against a T-cell antigen (RTLA), a B-cell antigen (RABELA) and an analogue of murine Ia antigen. A number of monoclonal antibodies, specific for lymphocytes and/or bone marrow and/or polymorphonuclear leucocytes, have been used for the analysis of cells with identifiable membrane antigens. Populations that have cells with two of the above antigens in the membranes were identified. To these ends, complement-mediated cell kill by antisera alone and in mixtures was employed. PMID:3489667

  11. B Cells, Antibodies, and More

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell–targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell–targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  12. Infection of CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1 is mediated by the glucose transporter GLUT-1: Evidence using antibodies specific to the receptor's large extracellular domain

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Qingwen; Agrawal, Lokesh; VanHorn-Ali, Zainab; Alkhatib, Ghalib . E-mail: galkhati@iupui.edu

    2006-05-25

    To analyze HTLV-1 cytotropism, we developed a highly sensitive vaccinia virus-based assay measuring activation of a reporter gene upon fusion of two distinct cell populations. We used this system in a functional cDNA screening to isolate and confirm that the glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT-1) is a receptor for HTLV-1. GLUT-1 is a ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane glycoprotein with 12 transmembrane domains and 6 extracellular loops (ECL). We demonstrate for the first time that peptide antibodies (GLUT-IgY) raised in chicken to the large extracellular loop (ECL1) detect GLUT-1 at the cell surface and inhibit envelope (Env)-mediated fusion and infection. Efficient GLUT-IgY staining was detected with peripheral blood CD4{sup +} lymphocytes purified by positive selection. Further, GLUT-IgY caused efficient inhibition of Env-mediated fusion and infection of CD4{sup +} T and significantly lower inhibition of CD8{sup +} T lymphocytes. The specificity of GLUT-IgY antibodies to GLUT-1 was demonstrated by ECL1 peptide competition studies. Grafting ECL1 of GLUT-1 onto the receptor-negative GLUT-3 conferred significant receptor activity. In contrast, grafting ECL1 of GLUT-3 onto GLUT-1 resulted in a significant loss of the receptor activity. The ECL1-mediated receptor activity was efficiently blocked with four different human monoclonal antibody (HMab) to HTLV-1 Env. The ECL1-derived peptide blocked HTLV-1 Env-mediated fusion with several nonhuman mammalian cell lines. The results demonstrate the utilization of cell surface GLUT-1 in HTLV-1 infection of CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes and implicate a critical role for the ECL1 region in viral tropism.

  13. Cell-targeting antibodies in immunity to Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Schmaljohn, Alan; Lewis, George K.

    2016-01-01

    As the 2014–15 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa evolved from emergency to lesson, developers of both vaccines and therapeutic antibodies were left with the puzzlement of what kinds of anti-Ebola antibodies are predictably desirable in treating the afflicted, and what antibodies might account for the specific and lasting protection elicited by the more effective vaccines. The facile answer in virology is that neutralizing antibody (NAb) is desired and required. However, with Ebola and other filoviruses (as with many prior viral examples), there are multiple discordances in which neutralizing antibodies fail to protect animals, and others in which antibody-mediated protection is observed in the absence of measured virus neutralization. Explanation presumably resides in the protective role of antibodies that bind and functionally ‘target’ virus-infected cells, here called ‘cell-targeting antibody’, or CTAb. To be clear, many NAbs are also CTAbs, and in the case of Ebola the great majority of NAbs are likely CTAbs. Isotype, glycosylation, and other features of CTAbs are likely crucial in their capacity to mediate protection. Overall, results and analysis invite an increasingly complex view of antibody-mediated immunity to enveloped viruses. PMID:27005312

  14. Identifying Subphenotypes of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Transplants.

    PubMed

    Halloran, P F; Merino Lopez, M; Barreto Pereira, A

    2016-03-01

    The key lesions in antibody-mediated kidney transplant rejection (ABMR) are microcirculation inflammation (peritubular capillaritis and/or glomerulitis lesions, abbreviated "pg") and glomerular double contours (cg lesions). We used these features to explore subphenotypes in 164 indication biopsies with ABMR-related diagnoses: 137 ABMR (109 pure and 28 mixed with T cell-mediated rejection [TCMR]) and 27 transplant glomerulopathy (TG), identified from prospective multicenter studies. The lesions indicated three ABMR subphenotypes: pgABMR, cgABMR, and pgcgABMR. Principal component analysis confirmed these subphenotypes and showed that TG can be reclassified as pgcgABMR (n = 17) or cgABMR (n = 10). ABMR-related biopsies included 45 pgABMR, 90 pgcgABMR, and 25 cgABMR, with four unclassifiable. Dominating all time intervals was the subphenotype pgcgABMR. The pgABMR subphenotype presented earliest (median <2 years), frequently mixed with TCMR, and was most associated with nonadherence. The cgABMR subphenotype presented late (median 9 years). Subphenotypes differed in their molecular changes, with pgABMR having the most histologic-molecular discrepancies (i.e. potential errors). Donor-specific antibody (DSA) was not identified in 29% of pgcgABMR and 46% of cgABMR, but failure rates and molecular findings were similar to cases where DSA was known to be positive. Thus, ABMR presents distinct subphenotypes, early pg-dominant, late cg-dominant, and combined pgcg phenotype, differing in time, molecular features, accompanying TCMR, HLA antibody, and probability of nonadherence. PMID:26743766

  15. HIV-1 Tat Promotes Integrin-Mediated HIV Transmission to Dendritic Cells by Binding Env Spikes and Competes Neutralization by Anti-HIV Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Monini, Paolo; Cafaro, Aurelio; Srivastava, Indresh K.; Moretti, Sonia; Sharma, Victoria A.; Andreini, Claudia; Chiozzini, Chiara; Ferrantelli, Flavia; Cossut, Maria R. Pavone.; Tripiciano, Antonella; Nappi, Filomena; Longo, Olimpia; Bellino, Stefania; Picconi, Orietta; Fanales-Belasio, Emanuele; Borsetti, Alessandra; Toschi, Elena; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Bacigalupo, Ilaria; Kan, Elaine; Sernicola, Leonardo; Maggiorella, Maria T.; Montin, Katy; Porcu, Marco; Leone, Patrizia; Leone, Pasqualina; Collacchi, Barbara; Palladino, Clelia; Ridolfi, Barbara; Falchi, Mario; Macchia, Iole; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; Buttò, Stefano; Sgadari, Cecilia; Magnani, Mauro; Federico, Maurizio P. M.; Titti, Fausto; Banci, Lucia; Dallocchio, Franco; Rappuoli, Rino; Ensoli, Fabrizio; Barnett, Susan W.; Garaci, Enrico; Ensoli, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Use of Env in HIV vaccine development has been disappointing. Here we show that, in the presence of a biologically active Tat subunit vaccine, a trimeric Env protein prevents in monkeys virus spread from the portal of entry to regional lymph nodes. This appears to be due to specific interactions between Tat and Env spikes that form a novel virus entry complex favoring R5 or X4 virus entry and productive infection of dendritic cells (DCs) via an integrin-mediated pathway. These Tat effects do not require Tat-transactivation activity and are blocked by anti-integrin antibodies (Abs). Productive DC infection promoted by Tat is associated with a highly efficient virus transmission to T cells. In the Tat/Env complex the cysteine-rich region of Tat engages the Env V3 loop, whereas the Tat RGD sequence remains free and directs the virus to integrins present on DCs. V2 loop deletion, which unshields the CCR5 binding region of Env, increases Tat/Env complex stability. Of note, binding of Tat to Env abolishes neutralization of Env entry or infection of DCs by anti-HIV sera lacking anti-Tat Abs, which are seldom present in natural infection. This is reversed, and neutralization further enhanced, by HIV sera containing anti-Tat Abs such as those from asymptomatic or Tat-vaccinated patients, or by sera from the Tat/Env vaccinated monkeys. Thus, both anti-Tat and anti-Env Abs are required for efficient HIV neutralization. These data suggest that the Tat/Env interaction increases HIV acquisition and spreading, as a mechanism evolved by the virus to escape anti-Env neutralizing Abs. This may explain the low effectiveness of Env-based vaccines, which are also unlikely to elicit Abs against new Env epitopes exposed by the Tat/Env interaction. As Tat also binds Envs from different clades, new vaccine strategies should exploit the Tat/Env interaction for both preventative and therapeutic interventions. PMID:23152803

  16. Decreased complement mediated binding of antibody//sup 3/-dsDNA immune complexes to the red blood cells of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.P.; Horgan, C.; Buschbacher, R.; Brunner, C.M.; Hess, C.E.; O'Brien, W.M.; Wanebo, H.J.

    1983-06-01

    The complement mediated binding of prepared antibody//sup 3/H-dsDNA immune complexes to the red blood cells obtained from a number of patient populations has been investigated. Patients with solid tumors have binding activity similar to that seen in a normal group of individuals. However, a significant fraction of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and hematologic malignancies have lowered binding activity compared with normal subjects. Quantitative studies indicate the lowered activity probably arises due to a decrease in complement receptors on the respective red blood cells. The potential importance and implications of these findings are briefly discussed.

  17. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology.

    PubMed

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2015-11-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease. PMID:26494046

  18. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T.; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease. PMID:26494046

  19. Oxidative stress sensitizes retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells to complement-mediated injury in a natural antibody-, lectin pathway-, and phospholipid epitope-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Kusumam; Kulik, Liudmila; Coughlin, Beth; Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; Thiel, Steffen; Thielens, Nicole M; Holers, V Michael; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2013-05-01

    Uncontrolled activation of the alternative complement pathway (AP) is thought to be associated with age-related macular degeneration. Previously, we have shown that in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) monolayers, oxidative stress reduced complement inhibition on the cell surface, resulting in sublytic complement activation and loss of transepithelial resistance (TER), but the potential ligand and pathway involved are unknown. ARPE-19 cells were grown as monolayers on transwell plates, and sublytic complement activation was induced with H2O2 and normal human serum. TER deteriorated rapidly in H2O2-exposed monolayers upon adding normal human serum. Although the effect required AP activation, AP was not sufficient, because elimination of MASP, but not C1q, prevented TER reduction. Reconstitution experiments to unravel essential components of the lectin pathway (LP) showed that both ficolin and mannan-binding lectin can activate the LP through natural IgM antibodies (IgM-C2) that recognize phospholipid cell surface modifications on oxidatively stressed RPE cells. The same epitopes were found on human primary embryonic RPE monolayers. Likewise, mouse laser-induced choroidal neovascularization, an injury that involves LP activation, could be increased in antibody-deficient rag1(-/-) mice using the phospholipid-specific IgM-C2. In summary, using a combination of depletion and reconstitution strategies, we have shown that the LP is required to initiate the complement cascade following natural antibody recognition of neoepitopes, which is then further amplified by the AP. LP activation is triggered by IgM bound to phospholipids. Taken together, we have defined novel mechanisms of complement activation in oxidatively stressed RPE, linking molecular events involved in age-related macular degeneration, including the presence of natural antibodies and neoepitopes. PMID:23493397

  20. Procedures for Sxs antigen detection by antibody-mediated cytotoxicity tests. A comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, A; Jiménez, R; Burgos, M; Díaz de la Guardia, R

    1994-11-01

    Biological reagents used in the serological detection of Sxs antigen by antibody-mediated cytotoxicity tests were compared in order to optimize the method. Our analyses showed that: (a) red cell-free spleen cells are the best target cells, (b) rabbit serum used as the complement source should be obtained from females, and absorbed with female spleen cells before use, (c) antiserum obtained by immunizing females with repeated injections of syngenic male spleen cells provides the highest anti-Sxs antibody titer, and (d) of the different biological fluids investigated, testis supernatant has highest concentration of Sxs antigen. PMID:7836542

  1. A Nanoparticle Platform To Evaluate Bioconjugation and Receptor-Mediated Cell Uptake Using Cross-Linked Polyion Complex Micelles Bearing Antibody Fragments.

    PubMed

    Florinas, Stelios; Liu, Marc; Fleming, Ryan; Van Vlerken-Ysla, Lilian; Ayriss, Joanne; Gilbreth, Ryan; Dimasi, Nazzareno; Gao, Changshou; Wu, Herren; Xu, Ze-Qi; Chen, Shaoyi; Dirisala, Anjaneyulu; Kataoka, Kazunori; Cabral, Horacio; Christie, R James

    2016-05-01

    Targeted nanomedicines are a promising technology for treatment of disease; however, preparation and characterization of well-defined protein-nanoparticle systems remain challenging. Here, we describe a platform technology to prepare antibody binding fragment (Fab)-bearing nanoparticles and an accompanying real-time cell-based assay to determine their cellular uptake compared to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and Fabs. The nanoparticle platform was composed of core-cross-linked polyion complex (PIC) micelles prepared from azide-functionalized PEG-b-poly(amino acids), that is, azido-PEG-b-poly(l-lysine) [N3-PEG-b-PLL] and azido-PEG-b-poly(aspartic acid) [N3-PEG-b-PAsp]. These PIC micelles were 30 nm in size and contained approximately 10 polymers per construct. Fabs were derived from an antibody binding the EphA2 receptor expressed on cancer cells and further engineered to contain a reactive cysteine for site-specific attachment and a cleavable His tag for purification from cell culture expression systems. Azide-functionalized micelles and thiol-containing Fab were linked using a heterobifunctional cross-linker (FPM-PEG4-DBCO) that contained a fluorophenyl-maleimide for stable conjugation to Fabs thiols and a strained alkyne (DBCO) group for coupling to micelle azide groups. Analysis of Fab-PIC micelle conjugates by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography, and UV-vis absorbance determined that each nanoparticle contained 2-3 Fabs. Evaluation of cellular uptake in receptor positive cancer cells by real-time fluorescence microscopy revealed that targeted Fab-PIC micelles achieved higher cell uptake than mAbs and Fabs, demonstrating the utility of this approach to identify targeted nanoparticle constructs with unique cellular internalization properties. PMID:27007881

  2. Lung injury mediated by antibodies to endothelium. II. Study of the effect of repeated antigen-antibody interactions in rabbits tolerant to heterologous antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Camussi, G.; Caldwell, P. R.; Andres, G.; Brentjens, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of repeated interactions of antibodies with cell surface antigens have been examined in in vitro, but not in in vivo systems. In this study are described the results of multiple antibody-cell surface antigen interactions in vivo. Rabbits were given repeated intravenous injections of goat antibodies to angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), an antigen expressed on the surface of lung endothelial cells. For prevention of anaphylactic reactions, which would have been induced by multiple injections of heterologous immune or nonimmune IgG, the rabbits were made neonatally tolerant to goat IgG. Divalent immune IgG given daily for 21 days induced chronic antigenic modulation (antigen disappearance) with resistance to antibody-mediated inflammatory lesions. The rabbits, however, developed degenerative changes of alveolar endothelial and epithelial cells. Administration of immune IgG every other day for 43 days allowed partial reexpression of ACE and was associated with intravascular, but not interstitial, inflammatory changes. In contrast, repeated administration of monovalent immune Fab did not induce antigenic modulation but caused severe, lethal, interstitial pneumonitis. Thus, in this experimental model the development of acute interstitial inflammatory changes correlates with persistence of antigen and is abrogated by disappearance of antigen induced by divalent antibodies. Further, repeated endothelial antigen antibody interactions fail to induce chronic inflammatory or sclerosing lung lesions. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:3034065

  3. Cellular cytotoxicity mediated by isotype-switch variants of a monoclonal antibody to human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed Central

    d'Uscio, C. H.; Jungi, T. W.; Blaser, K.

    1991-01-01

    The biological property of an antibody is determined by its antigen binding characteristics and its isotype-related effector functions. We have established monoclonal antibodies of different isotypes by stepwise selection and cloning of the hybridoma CE7. The original CE7 secretes an IgG1/kappa (CE7 gamma 1) antibody that recognises a 185 kD cell surface glycoprotein expressed on all human sympatho-adrenomedullary cells. Isotype-switch variants were isolated in the following sequence: from the original CE7 gamma 1, CE7 gamma 2b variants were isolated, and from a CE7 gamma 2b variant CE7 gamma 2a variants were isolated. The antibodies of three different isotype variant cell lines possess identical antigen binding characteristics, but display distinct effector functions as demonstrated by antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). ADCC was performed with the neuroblastoma line IMR-32 as the target cells, and different FcR gamma positive cells were either freshly isolated from human peripheral blood leukocytes or cultured for 6-10 days and tested as potential effector cells. Tumour lysis mediated by monocyte-derived macrophages depended on the presence of CE7 gamma 2a antibodies; antibodies from the CE7 hybridomas of gamma 2b and gamma 1 isotypes were virtually inactive in ADCC assay. Pre-exposure of macrophages to rIFN-gamma enhanced their ADCC activity, a result that is compatible with the notion that the high affinity Fc IgG receptor (FcR gamma I/CD64) is involved in the triggering of ADCC in macrophages. In contrast to macrophages, mononuclear cells, nonadherent cells and monocytes displayed considerable non-specific lytic activity, which was little influenced by the presence of antibody regardless of the isotype added. PMID:1911183

  4. Antibody-Mediated Clearance of Alphavirus Infection from Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Beth; Hardwick, J. Marie; Trapp, Bruce D.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Bollinger, Robert C.; Griffin, Diane E.

    1991-11-01

    Humoral immunity is important for protection against viral infection and neutralization of extracellular virus, but clearance of virus from infected tissues is thought to be mediated solely by cellular immunity. However, in a SCID mouse model of persistent alphavirus encephalomyelitis, adoptive transfer of hyperimmune serum resulted in clearance of infectious virus and viral RNA from the nervous system, whereas adoptive transfer of sensitized T lymphocytes had no effect on viral replication. Three monoclonal antibodies to two different epitopes on the E2 envelope glycoprotein mediated viral clearance. Treatment of alphavirus-infected primary cultured rat neurons with these monoclonal antibodies to E2 resulted in decreased viral protein synthesis, followed by gradual termination of mature infectious virion production. Thus, antibody can mediate clearance of alphavirus infection from neurons by restricting viral gene expression.

  5. Antibody-mediated cofactor-driven reactions

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reactions capable of being rate-enhanced by auxiliary species which interact with the reactants but do not become chemically bound to them in the formation of the final product are performed in the presence of antibodies which promote the reactions. The antibodies contain regions within their antigen binding sites which recognize the auxiliary species in a conformation which promotes the reaction. The antigen binding site frequently recognizes a particular transition state complex or other high energy complex along the reaction coordinate, thereby promoting the progress of the reaction along the desired route as opposed to other less favorable routes. Various classes of reaction together with appropriate antigen binding site specificities tailored for each are disclosed.

  6. Suppression of Fcγ-receptor-mediated antibody effector function during persistent viral infection.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Douglas H; Elsaesser, Heidi; Lux, Anja; Timmerman, John M; Morrison, Sherie L; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Brooks, David G

    2015-02-17

    Understanding how viruses subvert host immunity and persist is essential for developing strategies to eliminate infection. T cell exhaustion during chronic viral infection is well described, but effects on antibody-mediated effector activity are unclear. Herein, we show that increased amounts of immune complexes generated in mice persistently infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) suppressed multiple Fcγ-receptor (FcγR) functions. The high amounts of immune complexes suppressed antibody-mediated cell depletion, therapeutic antibody-killing of LCMV infected cells and human CD20-expressing tumors, as well as reduced immune complex-mediated cross-presentation to T cells. Suppression of FcγR activity was not due to inhibitory FcγRs or high concentrations of free antibody, and proper FcγR functions were restored when persistently infected mice specifically lacked immune complexes. Thus, we identify a mechanism of immunosuppression during viral persistence with implications for understanding effective antibody activity aimed at pathogen control. PMID:25680277

  7. Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity-Mediating Antibodies from an HIV-1 Vaccine Efficacy Trial Target Multiple Epitopes and Preferentially Use the VH1 Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Pollara, Justin; Moody, M. Anthony; Alpert, Michael D.; Chen, Xi; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Gilbert, Peter B.; Huang, Ying; Gurley, Thaddeus C.; Kozink, Daniel M.; Marshall, Dawn J.; Whitesides, John F.; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Montefiori, David C.; Lewis, George K.; DeVico, Anthony; Evans, David T.; Ferrari, Guido; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2012-01-01

    The ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX-B/E RV144 vaccine trial showed an estimated efficacy of 31%. RV144 secondary immune correlate analysis demonstrated that the combination of low plasma anti-HIV-1 Env IgA antibodies and high levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) inversely correlate with infection risk. One hypothesis is that the observed protection in RV144 is partially due to ADCC-mediating antibodies. We found that the majority (73 to 90%) of a representative group of vaccinees displayed plasma ADCC activity, usually (96.2%) blocked by competition with the C1 region-specific A32 Fab fragment. Using memory B-cell cultures and antigen-specific B-cell sorting, we isolated 23 ADCC-mediating nonclonally related antibodies from 6 vaccine recipients. These antibodies targeted A32-blockable conformational epitopes (n = 19), a non-A32-blockable conformational epitope (n = 1), and the gp120 Env variable loops (n = 3). Fourteen antibodies mediated cross-clade target cell killing. ADCC-mediating antibodies displayed modest levels of V-heavy (VH) chain somatic mutation (0.5 to 1.5%) and also displayed a disproportionate usage of VH1 family genes (74%), a phenomenon recently described for CD4-binding site broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Maximal ADCC activity of VH1 antibodies correlated with mutation frequency. The polyclonality and low mutation frequency of these VH1 antibodies reveal fundamental differences in the regulation and maturation of these ADCC-mediating responses compared to VH1 bNAbs. PMID:22896626

  8. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity-mediating antibodies from an HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial target multiple epitopes and preferentially use the VH1 gene family.

    PubMed

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Pollara, Justin; Moody, M Anthony; Alpert, Michael D; Chen, Xi; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Gilbert, Peter B; Huang, Ying; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Kozink, Daniel M; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Lewis, George K; DeVico, Anthony; Evans, David T; Ferrari, Guido; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F

    2012-11-01

    The ALVAC-HIV/AIDSVAX-B/E RV144 vaccine trial showed an estimated efficacy of 31%. RV144 secondary immune correlate analysis demonstrated that the combination of low plasma anti-HIV-1 Env IgA antibodies and high levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) inversely correlate with infection risk. One hypothesis is that the observed protection in RV144 is partially due to ADCC-mediating antibodies. We found that the majority (73 to 90%) of a representative group of vaccinees displayed plasma ADCC activity, usually (96.2%) blocked by competition with the C1 region-specific A32 Fab fragment. Using memory B-cell cultures and antigen-specific B-cell sorting, we isolated 23 ADCC-mediating nonclonally related antibodies from 6 vaccine recipients. These antibodies targeted A32-blockable conformational epitopes (n = 19), a non-A32-blockable conformational epitope (n = 1), and the gp120 Env variable loops (n = 3). Fourteen antibodies mediated cross-clade target cell killing. ADCC-mediating antibodies displayed modest levels of V-heavy (VH) chain somatic mutation (0.5 to 1.5%) and also displayed a disproportionate usage of VH1 family genes (74%), a phenomenon recently described for CD4-binding site broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Maximal ADCC activity of VH1 antibodies correlated with mutation frequency. The polyclonality and low mutation frequency of these VH1 antibodies reveal fundamental differences in the regulation and maturation of these ADCC-mediating responses compared to VH1 bNAbs. PMID:22896626

  9. HIV-1 Replication in Langerhans and Interstitial Dendritic Cells Is Inhibited by Neutralizing and Fc-Mediated Inhibitory Antibodies ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Peressin, M.; Holl, V.; Schmidt, S.; Decoville, T.; Mirisky, D.; Lederle, A.; Delaporte, M.; Xu, K.; Aubertin, A. M.; Moog, C.

    2011-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) and interstitial dendritic cells (IDCs) may be among the first human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) targets after sexual transmission. We generated cells of these types by differentiation of purified CD34+ cord blood cells. After in vitro infection with R5-tropic strains, we obtained similar percentages of infected cells for both dendritic cell (DC) subsets. Moreover, LC infection was not increased by blockage of langerin by antilangerin. These results indicate that, under our experimental conditions, there was no evidence of any preference of HIV replication in LCs versus IDCs. The inhibitory activity of HIV-1-specific IgAs and IgGs against HIV-1 replication in LCs and IDCs was analyzed. We found that neutralizing antibodies inhibit HIV-1 infection of both DC subsets. Interestingly, HIV-1 was inhibited more efficiently by the IgGs than the corresponding IgA, due to an Fcγ receptor-dependent mechanism. Moreover, nonneutralizing inhibitory IgGs were able to inhibit infection of both LCs and IDCs. These results underline the importance of HIV-1 inhibition by the binding of the Fc part of IgGs to Fcγ receptors and suggest that the induction of neutralizing and nonneutralizing inhibitory IgGs in addition to neutralizing IgAs at mucosal sites may contribute to protection against sexual transmission of HIV-1. PMID:21084491

  10. Mediation of macrophage cytolytic and phagocytic activities by antibodies of different classes and class-specific Fc-receptors.

    PubMed

    Walker, W S

    1977-08-01

    The classes of antibodies that mediate the phagocytosis and cytolysis of 51Cr-labeled chicken erythrocytes by IC-21 macrophages, an established line of mouse peritoneal macrophages, were identified. The phagocytic activity of IC-21 macrophages, as determined by a functional inhibition assay with mouse myeloma proteins, depended mainly on IgM and IgG2a antibodies and to a lesser extent on IgG2b antibodies. Extracellular cytolysis of target cells was mediated solely by IgG2b antibodies. These results correlate with the previously documented specificities of discrete Fc-receptors for IgG2a and IgG2b immunoglobulins on IC-21 cells. Thus, phagocytosis and cytolysis appear to be mediated by antibodies of different classes operating through separate and distinct sites on the surface of IC-21 macrophages. PMID:886183

  11. Oral administration of Aloe vera gel, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory herbal remedy, stimulates cell-mediated immunity and antibody production in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bałan, Barbara Joanna; Niemcewicz, Marcin; Kocik, Janusz; Jung, Leszek; Skopiński, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f. (Aloe barbadensis Mill) Liliaceae, succulent plant native to northern Africa, is presently cultivated in many regions of the world. Traditionally, its inner part of parenchyma, which contains aloe gel, was used for the treatment of minor wounds, inflammatory skin disorders, thermal and radiation burns and to alleviate chronic osteoarthritis pain. It also possesses some antimicrobial activity. Now, aloe gel is also increasingly consumed as a dietary supplement. Some data suggest its immunomodulatory properties. The aim of the study The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of orally administered aloe gel on some parameters of cellular and humoral immunity viz. mitogen-induced proliferation of splenic lymphocytes and their chemokinetic activity, and anti-sheep red blood cells (SRBC) antibody production in Balb/c mice. Results Daily treatment of mice for 14 and 21 days with 50 µl or 150 µl of aloe gel dose resulted in enhanced chemokinetic activity and stronger response of their splenic lymphocytes to mitogen PHA and enhancement of anti-SRBC antibody production. PMID:26155113

  12. Bullous pemphigoid, an autoantibody-mediated disease, is a novel immune-related adverse event in patients treated with anti-programmed cell death 1 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shelley J E; Carlos, Giuliana; Chou, Shaun; Wakade, Deepal; Carlino, Matteo S; Fernandez-Penas, Pablo

    2016-08-01

    Anti-programmed cell death 1 (anti-PD1) antibodies such as pembrolizumab have shown improved progression-free and overall survival in patients with advanced melanoma. Of 124 patients reviewed in Westmead Hospital from May 2012 to November 2015, treated with pembrolizumab for advanced melanoma, we encountered three cases of bullous pemphigoid (BP). We have previously reported a case of BP. In two recent cases, BP was diagnosed early and treated promptly with potent topical or oral steroid. Patients on anti-PD1 antibodies are at a higher risk of developing cutaneous immune-related adverse events such as lichenoid reactions, eczema and vitiligo. No cases of BP were encountered in the previously published cohort of 260 melanoma patients treated with BRAF inhibitors; as such, it appears that BP is associated with anti-PD1 treatment rather than metastatic melanoma. BP appears to be another immune-related adverse event, and clinicians should have a low threshold for performing cutaneous biopsies and immunofluorescence studies in patients on anti-PD1 therapies. PMID:27031539

  13. Cell-mediated immune deficiency in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R K; Penny, R

    1982-10-01

    Disturbances of the immune system frequently accompany the development of lymphomas in man. In the early stages of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, abnormalities of immunological function are usually minimal, but impairment of both antibody- and cell-mediated immunity is often noted in advanced disease. In contrast, while antibody-mediated immune responses in patients with Hodgkin's disease usually remain intact until late in the course of the illness, cell-mediated immune dysfunction is an early and consistent feature. Here Rakesh Kumar and Ronald Penny discuss the abnormalities of cell-mediated immunity in Hodgkin's disease. PMID:25290229

  14. Impaired antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by herceptin in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kono, Koji; Takahashi, Akihiro; Ichihara, Fumiko; Sugai, Hidemitsu; Fujii, Hideki; Matsumoto, Yoshirou

    2002-10-15

    The humanized monoclonal antibody Herceptin, which specifically targets HER-2/neu, exhibits growth inhibitory activity against HER-2/neu-overexpressing tumors and is approved for therapeutic use with proved survival benefit in patients with HER-2/neu-positive breast cancer. In the present study, we investigated whether Herceptin could affect the HER-2/neu-overexpressing gastric cancer cells based on antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and compared immune effector cells from gastric cancer patients with normal individuals on ADCC. HER-2/neu-expressing gastric cancer cells could be killed by Herceptin-mediated ADCC and the Herceptin-induced ADCC correlated with the degree of HER-2/neu expression on the gastric cancer cells. However, the Herceptin-mediated ADCC was significantly impaired in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from advanced disease patients (n = 10) compared with that in early disease (n = 12; P = 0.04) or healthy individuals (n = 10, P = 0.02). Moreover, natural killer (NK) cells purified from patients with advanced disease indicated less Herceptin-mediated ADCC in comparison with that from healthy donors (P = 0.04), whereas monocytes purified from the patients showed an almost equal amount of Herceptin-mediated ADCC in comparison with that from healthy individuals, indicating that NK cell dysfunction contributed to the impaired Herceptin-mediated ADCC in gastric cancer patients. Furthermore, the NK-cell dysfunction on Herceptin-mediated ADCC correlated with the down-regulation of CD16zeta expression in the patients, and interleukin 2 ex vivo treatment of NK cells could restore the impairment of Herceptin-mediated ADCC, concomitant to the normalization of the expression of CD16zeta molecules. Thus, some modalities such as interleukin 2 treatment aimed at reversing NK dysfunction may be necessary for successful Herceptin treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:12384543

  15. Effective protein inhibition in intact mouse oocytes through peptide nanoparticle-mediated antibody transfection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruichao; Jin, Zhen; Gao, Leilei; Liu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Female meiosis is a fundamental area of study in reproductive medicine, and the mouse oocyte model of in vitro maturation (IVM) is most widely used to study female meiosis. To investigate the probable role(s) of an unknown protein in female meiosis, the method traditionally used involves microinjecting a specific antibody into mouse oocytes. Recently, in studies on somatic cells, peptide nanoparticle-mediated antibody transfection has become a popular tool because of its high efficiency, low toxicity, good stability, and strong serum compatibility. However, untill now no researchers have tried using this technique on mouse oocytes because the zona pellucida surrounding the oocyte membrane (vitelline membrane) is usually thought or proved to be a tough barrier to macromolecules such as antibodies and proteins. Therefore, we attempted to introduce an antibody into mouse oocytes using a peptide nanoparticle. Here we show for the first time that with our optimized method, an antibody can be effectively delivered into mouse oocytes and inhibit its target protein with high specificity. We obtained significant results using small GTPase Arl2 as a test subject protein. We propose peptide nanoparticle-mediated antibody transfection to be a superior alternative to antibody microinjection for preliminary functional studies of unknown proteins in mouse oocytes. PMID:27114861

  16. bIgG time for large eaters: monocytes and macrophages as effector and target cells of antibody-mediated immune activation and repression.

    PubMed

    Gordan, Sina; Biburger, Markus; Nimmerjahn, Falk

    2015-11-01

    The mononuclear phagocytic system consists of a great variety of cell subsets localized throughout the body in immunological and non-immunological tissues. While one of their prime tasks is to detect, phagocytose, and kill intruding microorganisms, they are also involved in maintaining tissue homeostasis and immune tolerance toward self through removal of dying cells. Furthermore, monocytes and macrophages have been recognized to play a critical role for mediating immunoglobulin G (IgG)-dependent effector functions, including target cell depletion, tissue inflammation, and immunomodulation. For this, monocyte and macrophage populations are equipped with a complex set of Fc-receptors, enabling them to directly interact with pro- or anti-inflammatory IgG preparations. In this review, we will summarize the most recent findings, supporting a central role of monocytes and macrophages for pro- and anti-inflammatory IgG activity. PMID:26497512

  17. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  18. An integrative structure-based framework for predicting biological effects mediated by antipeptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Caoili, Salvador Eugenio C

    2015-12-01

    A general framework is presented for predicting quantitative biological effects mediated by antipeptide antibodies, primarily on the basis of antigen structure (possibly featuring intrinsic disorder) analyzed to estimate epitope-paratope binding affinities, which in turn is considered within the context of dose-response relationships as regards antibody concentration. This is illustrated mainly using an approach based on protein structural energetics, whereby expected amounts of solvent-accessible surface area buried upon epitope-paratope binding are related to the corresponding binding affinity, which is estimated from putative B-cell epitope structure with implicit treatment of paratope structure, for antipeptide antibodies either reacting with peptides or cross-reacting with cognate protein antigens. Key methods described are implemented in SAPPHIRE/SUITE (Structural-energetic Analysis Program for Predicting Humoral Immune Response Epitopes/SAPPHIRE User Interface Tool Ensemble; publicly accessible via http://freeshell.de/~badong/suite.htm). Representative results thus obtained are compared with published experimental data on binding affinities and quantitative biological effects, with special attention to loss of paratope sidechain conformational entropy (neglected in previous analyses) and in light of key in-vivo constraints on antigen-antibody binding affinity and antibody-mediated effects. Implications for further refinement of B-cell epitope prediction methods are discussed as regards envisioned biomedical applications including the development of prophylactic and therapeutic antibodies, peptide-based vaccines and immunodiagnostics. PMID:26410103

  19. Anti-CD40 antibody and toll-like receptor 3 ligand restore dendritic cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity suppressed by morphine

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Li; Chiang, Ying-Cheng; Cheng, Ya-Jung; Jen, Yu-Wei; Chen, Chi-An; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Sun, Wei-Zen

    2016-01-01

    The influence of morphine on host immunity and the underlying mechanism are still unclear. In the current study, we investigated the influence of morphine on dendritic cells (DCs), its possible mechanism of action, and the molecules that could reverse these effects. Morphine suppressed DC maturation, antigen presenting abilities, and the ability to activate antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Morphine-treated DCs also secreted higher concentrations of IL-10, but lower IL-6 and TNF-α. Morphine-treated DCs showed decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reduced p38 dephosphorylation. The in vivo administration of immuno-modulators, anti-CD40 Ab and TLR3 ligand-poly(I:C), enhanced antigen-specific immunity, promoted the anti-tumor effects, and prolonged the survival of morphine-treated, tumor-bearing mice by promoting the maturation and function of BMM-derived DCs by enhancing ERK1/2 phosphorylation and p38 dephosphorylation. We concluded that morphine can inhibit DC-mediated anti-tumor immunity by suppressing DC maturation and function. Immuno-modulators, such as anti-CD40 Abs and TLR agonists, can restore the DC-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Use of immuno-modulators could serve as a useful approach to overcome the immunocompromised state generated by morphine. PMID:27186393

  20. Effect of yeast-derived products and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on antibody-mediated immune response and gene expression of pattern recognition receptors and cytokines in broiler chickens immunized with T-cell dependent antigens.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, M; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; Echeverry, H; Crow, G H; Slominski, B A

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of yeast-derived products on innate and antibody mediated immune response in broiler chickens following immunization with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). One-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308) were randomly assigned to 6 dietary treatments of 9 replicate cages of 5 birds each per treatment. Dietary treatments consisted of a Control diet without antibiotic, and diets containing 11 mg/kg of virginiamycin, 0.25% of yeast cell wall (YCW), 0.2% of a commercial product Maxi-Gen Plus containing processed yeast and nucleotides, 0.05% of nucleotides, or a diet containing 10% of DDGS. On days 21 and 28 post-hatching, 5 birds per treatment were immunized intramuscularly with both SRBC and BSA. One week after each immunization, blood samples were collected. Serum samples were analyzed by hemagglutination test for antibody response to SRBC, and by ELISA for serum IgM and IgG response to BSA. On d 35, 5 birds per treatment were euthanized and the tissue samples from the cecal tonsils were collected to assess the gene expression of toll-like receptors TLR2b, TLR4, and TLR21, monocyte mannose receptor (MMR), and cytokines IL-10, IL-13, IL-4, IL-12p35, and IFN-γ. The results for gene expression analysis demonstrated that the diet supplemented with YCW increased the expression of TLR2b and T-helper type 2 cytokines IL-10, IL-4, and IL-13 relative to the Control; and the expression of TLR4 and IL-13 was upregulated in the nucleotide-containing diet. However, the diets containing antibiotics or Maxi-Gen Plus downregulated the expression of IFN-γ compared to the control. The primary antibody response to SRBC was not affected by diets. However, the diet containing YCW increased the secondary antibody response to SRBC compared to the antibiotic treatment. Neither primary nor secondary IgG and IgM response against BSA were affected by diets. In conclusion, supplementation of the diet with YCW stimulated Th2 cell-mediated

  1. How antibodies alter the cell entry pathway of dengue virus particles in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Nunez, Nilda V.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van de Pol, Denise P.I.; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Flipse, Jacky; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus (DENV) infection plays an important role in the exacerbation of DENV-induced disease. To understand how antibodies influence the fate of DENV particles, we explored the cell entry pathway of DENV in the absence and presence of antibodies in macrophage-like P388D1 cells. Recent studies unraveled that both mature and immature DENV particles contribute to ADE, hence, both particles were studied. We observed that antibody-opsonized DENV enters P388D1 cells through a different pathway than non-opsonized DENV. Antibody-mediated DENV entry was dependent on FcγRs, pH, Eps15, dynamin, actin, PI3K, Rab5, and Rab7. In the absence of antibodies, DENV cell entry was FcγR, PI3K, and Rab5-independent. Live-cell imaging of fluorescently-labeled particles revealed that actin-mediated membrane protrusions facilitate virus uptake. In fact, actin protrusions were found to actively search and capture antibody-bound virus particles distantly located from the cell body, a phenomenon that is not observed in the absence of antibodies. Overall, similar results were seen for antibody-opsonized standard and antibody-bound immature DENV preparations, indicating that the maturation status of the virus does not control the entry pathway. Collectively, our findings suggest that antibodies alter the cell entry pathway of DENV and trigger a novel mechanism of initial virus-cell contact. PMID:27385443

  2. B cell Rab7 mediates induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and class-switching in T-dependent and T-independent antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Pone, Egest J; Lam, Tonika; Lou, Zheng; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yuhui; Liu, Dongfang; Edinger, Aimee L; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) is central to the maturation of the Ab response because it diversifies Ab effector functions. Like somatic hypermutation, CSR requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), whose expression is restricted to B cells, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR-BCR engagement (primary CSR-inducing stimuli). By constructing conditional knockout Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice, we identified a B cell-intrinsic role for Rab7, a small GTPase involved in intracellular membrane functions, in mediating AID induction and CSR. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice displayed normal B and T cell development and were deficient in Rab7 only in B cells undergoing Igh(C)γ(1-cre) Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1-cre transcription, as induced--like Igh germline Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1 and Iε-Sε-Cε transcription--by IL-4 in conjunction with a primary CSR-inducing stimulus. These mice could not mount T-independent or T-dependent class-switched IgG1 or IgE responses while maintaining normal IgM levels. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells showed, in vivo and in vitro, normal proliferation and survival, normal Blimp-1 expression and plasma cell differentiation, as well as intact activation of the noncanonical NF-κB, p38 kinase, and ERK1/2 kinase pathways. They, however, were defective in AID expression and CSR in vivo and in vitro, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR1/2-, TLR4-, TLR7-, or TLR9-BCR engagement. In Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells, CSR was rescued by enforced AID expression. These findings, together with our demonstration that Rab7-mediated canonical NF-κB activation, as critical to AID induction, outline a novel role of Rab7 in signaling pathways that lead to AID expression and CSR, likely by promoting assembly of signaling complexes along intracellular membranes. PMID:25740947

  3. The quality of chimpanzee T-cell activation and simian immunodeficiency virus/human immunodeficiency virus susceptibility achieved via antibody-mediated T-cell receptor/CD3 stimulation is a function of the anti-CD3 antibody isotype.

    PubMed

    Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; McKinney, Brett A; Duverger, Alexandra; Wagner, Frederic H; Ansari, Aftab A; Kutsch, Olaf

    2008-10-01

    While human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is associated with hyperimmune activation and systemic depletion of CD4(+) T cells, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in sooty mangabeys or chimpanzees does not exhibit these hallmarks. Control of immune activation is thought to be one of the major components that govern species-dependent differences in the disease pathogenesis. A previous study introduced the idea that the resistance of chimpanzees to SIVcpz infection-induced hyperimmune activation could be the result of the expression of select sialic acid-recognizing immunoglobulin (Ig)-like lectin (Siglec) superfamily members by chimpanzee T cells. Siglecs, which are absent on human T cells, were thought to control levels of T-cell activation in chimpanzees and were thus suggested as a cause for the pathogenic differences in the course of SIVcpz or HIV-1 infection. As in human models of T-cell activation, stimulation had been attempted using an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (MAb) (UCHT1; isotype IgG1), but despite efficient binding, UCHT1 failed to activate chimpanzee T cells, an activation block that could be partially overcome by MAb-induced Siglec-5 internalization. We herein demonstrate that anti-CD3 MAb-mediated chimpanzee T-cell activation is a function of the anti-CD3 MAb isotype and is not governed by Siglec expression. While IgG1 anti-CD3 MAbs fail to stimulate chimpanzee T cells, IgG2a anti-CD3 MAbs activate chimpanzee T cells in the absence of Siglec manipulations. Our results thus imply that prior to studying possible differences between human and chimpanzee T-cell activation, a relevant model of chimpanzee T cell activation needs to be established. PMID:18667496

  4. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  5. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  6. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  7. Novel antimalarial antibodies highlight the importance of the antibody Fc region in mediating protection.

    PubMed

    Pleass, Richard J; Ogun, Solabomi A; McGuinness, David H; van de Winkel, Jan G J; Holder, Anthony A; Woof, Jenny M

    2003-12-15

    Parasite drug resistance and difficulties in developing effective vaccines have precipitated the search for alternative therapies for malaria. The success of passive immunization suggests that immunoglobulin (Ig)-based therapies are effective. To further explore the mechanism(s) by which antibody mediates its protective effect, we generated human chimeric IgG1 and IgA1 and a single-chain diabody specific for the C-terminal 19-kDa region of Plasmodium yoelii merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP119), a major target of protective immune responses. These novel human reagents triggered in vitro phagocytosis of merozoites but, unlike their parental mouse IgG2b, failed to protect against parasite challenge in vivo. Therefore, the Fc region appears critical for mediating protection in vivo, at least for this MSP119 epitope. Such antibodies may serve as prototype therapeutic agents, and as useful tools in the development of in vitro neutralization assays with Plasmodium parasites. PMID:12855589

  8. Ulocuplumab (BMS-936564 / MDX1338): a fully human anti-CXCR4 antibody induces cell death in chronic lymphocytic leukemia mediated through a reactive oxygen species-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Manoj K.; Kumar, Deepak; Jones, Harrison; Amaya-Chanaga, Carlos I.; Choi, Michael Y.; Melo-Cardenas, Johanna; Ale-Ali, Amine; Kuhne, Michelle R.; Sabbatini, Peter; Cohen, Lewis J.; Shelat, Suresh G.; Rassenti, Laura Z.; Kipps, Thomas J.; Cardarelli, Pina M.; Castro, Januario E.

    2016-01-01

    The CXCR4 receptor (Chemokine C-X-C motif receptor 4) is highly expressed in different hematological malignancies including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The CXCR4 ligand (CXCL12) stimulates CXCR4 promoting cell survival and proliferation, and may contribute to the tropism of leukemia cells towards lymphoid tissues. Therefore, strategies targeting CXCR4 may constitute an effective therapeutic approach for CLL. To address that question, we studied the effect of Ulocuplumab (BMS-936564), a fully human IgG4 anti-CXCR4 antibody, using a stroma – CLL cells co-culture model. We found that Ulocuplumab (BMS-936564) inhibited CXCL12 mediated CXCR4 activation-migration of CLL cells at nanomolar concentrations. This effect was comparable to AMD3100 (Plerixafor - Mozobil), a small molecule CXCR4 inhibitor. However, Ulocuplumab (BMS-936564) but not AMD3100 induced apoptosis in CLL at nanomolar concentrations in the presence or absence of stromal cell support. This pro-apoptotic effect was independent of CLL high-risk prognostic markers, was associated with production of reactive oxygen species and did not require caspase activation. Overall, these findings are evidence that Ulocuplumab (BMS-936564) has biological activity in CLL, highlight the relevance of the CXCR4-CXCL12 pathway as a therapeutic target in CLL, and provide biological rationale for ongoing clinical trials in CLL and other hematological malignancies. PMID:26646452

  9. Ulocuplumab (BMS-936564 / MDX1338): a fully human anti-CXCR4 antibody induces cell death in chronic lymphocytic leukemia mediated through a reactive oxygen species-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Manoj K; Kumar, Deepak; Jones, Harrison; Amaya-Chanaga, Carlos I; Choi, Michael Y; Melo-Cardenas, Johanna; Ale-Ali, Amine; Kuhne, Michelle R; Sabbatini, Peter; Cohen, Lewis J; Shelat, Suresh G; Rassenti, Laura Z; Kipps, Thomas J; Cardarelli, Pina M; Castro, Januario E

    2016-01-19

    The CXCR4 receptor (Chemokine C-X-C motif receptor 4) is highly expressed in different hematological malignancies including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The CXCR4 ligand (CXCL12) stimulates CXCR4 promoting cell survival and proliferation, and may contribute to the tropism of leukemia cells towards lymphoid tissues. Therefore, strategies targeting CXCR4 may constitute an effective therapeutic approach for CLL. To address that question, we studied the effect of Ulocuplumab (BMS-936564), a fully human IgG4 anti-CXCR4 antibody, using a stroma - CLL cells co-culture model. We found that Ulocuplumab (BMS-936564) inhibited CXCL12 mediated CXCR4 activation-migration of CLL cells at nanomolar concentrations. This effect was comparable to AMD3100 (Plerixafor - Mozobil), a small molecule CXCR4 inhibitor. However, Ulocuplumab (BMS-936564) but not AMD3100 induced apoptosis in CLL at nanomolar concentrations in the presence or absence of stromal cell support. This pro-apoptotic effect was independent of CLL high-risk prognostic markers, was associated with production of reactive oxygen species and did not require caspase activation. Overall, these findings are evidence that Ulocuplumab (BMS-936564) has biological activity in CLL, highlight the relevance of the CXCR4-CXCL12 pathway as a therapeutic target in CLL, and provide biological rationale for ongoing clinical trials in CLL and other hematological malignancies. PMID:26646452

  10. Identification of HBsAg-specific antibodies from a mammalian cell displayed full-length human antibody library of healthy immunized donor.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang-Zheng; Liang, Zhong-Kun; Chen, Zhen-Rui; Lou, Hai-Bo; Zhou, Ye; Zhang, Zhe-Huan; Yu, Fei; Liu, Shuwen; Zhou, Yuanping; Wu, Shuguang; Zheng, Wenling; Tan, Wanlong; Jiang, Shibo; Zhou, Chen

    2012-03-01

    Hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) is important in the management of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Aiming to develop recombinant monoclonal antibodies as an alternative to HBIG, we report the successful identification of HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-specific antibodies from a full-length human antibody library displayed on mammalian cell surface. Using total RNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a natively immunized donor as template, the antibody repertoire was amplified. Combining four-way ligation and the Flp recombinase-mediated integration (Flp-In) system, we constructed a mammalian cell-based, fully human, full-length antibody display library in which each cell displayed only one kind of antibody molecule. By screening the cell library using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), eight cell clones that displayed HBsAg-specific antibodies on cell surfaces were identified. DNA sequence analysis of the antibody genes revealed three unique antibodies. FACS data indicated that fluorescent strength of expression (FSE), fluorescent strength of binding (FSB) and relative binding ability (RBA) were all different among them. These results demonstrated that by using our antibody mammalian display and screening platform, we can successfully identify antigen-specific antibodies from an immunized full-length antibody library. Therefore, this platform is very useful for the development of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:22179672

  11. TLR5-mediated sensing of gut microbiota is necessary for antibody responses to seasonal influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jason Z; Ravindran, Rajesh; Chassaing, Benoit; Carvalho, Frederic A; Maddur, Mohan S; Bower, Maureen; Hakimpour, Paul; Gill, Kiran P; Nakaya, Helder I; Yarovinsky, Felix; Sartor, R Balfour; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Pulendran, Bali

    2014-09-18

    Systems biological analysis of immunity to the trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) in humans revealed a correlation between early expression of TLR5 and the magnitude of the antibody response. Vaccination of Trl5(-/-) mice resulted in reduced antibody titers and lower frequencies of plasma cells, demonstrating a role for TLR5 in immunity to TIV. This was due to a failure to sense host microbiota. Thus, antibody responses in germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice were impaired, but restored by oral reconstitution with a flagellated, but not aflagellated, strain of E. coli. TLR5-mediated sensing of flagellin promoted plasma cell differentiation directly and by stimulating lymph node macrophages to produce plasma cell growth factors. Finally, TLR5-mediated sensing of the microbiota also impacted antibody responses to the inactivated polio vaccine, but not to adjuvanted vaccines or the live-attenuated yellow fever vaccine. These results reveal an unappreciated role for gut microbiota in promoting immunity to vaccination. PMID:25220212

  12. TLR5-Mediated Sensing of Gut Microbiota Is Necessary for Antibody Responses to Seasonal Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jason Z.; Ravindran, Rajesh; Chassaing, Benoit; Carvalho, Frederic A.; Maddur, Mohan S.; Bower, Maureen; Hakimpour, Paul; Gill, Kiran P.; Nakaya, Helder I.; Yarovinsky, Felix; Sartor, R. Balfour; Gewirtz, Andrew T.; Pulendran, Bali

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Systems biological analysis of immunity to the trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) in humans revealed a correlation between early expression of TLR5 and the magnitude of the antibody response. Vaccination of Trl5−/− mice resulted in reduced antibody titers and lower frequencies of plasma cells, demonstrating a role for TLR5 in immunity to TIV. This was due to a failure to sense host microbiota. Thus, antibody responses in germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice were impaired, but restored by oral reconstitution with a flagellated, but not aflagellated, strain of E. coli. TLR5-mediated sensing of flagellin promoted plasma cell differentiation, directly, and by stimulating lymph node macrophages to produce plasma cell growth factors. Finally, TLR5-mediated sensing of the microbiota also impacted antibody responses to the inactivated polio vaccine, but not to adjuvanted vaccines or the live-attenuated yellow fever vaccine. These results reveal an unappreciated role for gut microbiota in promoting immunity to vaccination. PMID:25220212

  13. Anti-epidermal-cell-surface pemphigus antibody detaches viable epidermal cells from culture plates by activation of proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Farb, R M; Dykes, R; Lazarus, G S

    1978-01-01

    Immunoglobulin from pemphigus patients binds to the surface of mouse epidermal cells in culture. Cells incubated with the pemphigus antibody are easily detached from culture plates whereas cells incubated with serum from normal patients remain on the plate. Pemphigus antibody-mediated cell detachment is blocked by the addition of the proteinase inhibitors soybean trypsin inhibitor and alpha2-macroglobulin to the culture media. Detachable cells are viable, and activation of the complement cascade is not necessary for cell detachment. The anti-cell-surface antibody of pemphigus appears to disrupt adhesion between viable epidermal cells by activation of proteinase. Images PMID:272663

  14. Broadly neutralizing antibodies that inhibit HIV-1 cell to cell transmission

    PubMed Central

    Malbec, Marine; Porrot, Françoise; Rua, Rejane; Horwitz, Joshua; Klein, Florian; Halper-Stromberg, Ari; Scheid, Johannes F.; Eden, Caroline; Mouquet, Hugo; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2013-01-01

    The neutralizing activity of anti–HIV-1 antibodies is typically measured in assays where cell-free virions enter reporter cell lines. However, HIV-1 cell to cell transmission is a major mechanism of viral spread, and the effect of the recently described broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) on this mode of transmission remains unknown. Here we identify a subset of bNAbs that inhibit both cell-free and cell-mediated infection in primary CD4+ lymphocytes. These antibodies target either the CD4-binding site (NIH45-46 and 3BNC60) or the glycan/V3 loop (10-1074 and PGT121) on HIV-1 gp120 and act at low concentrations by inhibiting multiple steps of viral cell to cell transmission. These antibodies accumulate at virological synapses and impair the clustering and fusion of infected and target cells and the transfer of viral material to uninfected T cells. In addition, they block viral cell to cell transmission to plasmacytoid DCs and thereby interfere with type-I IFN production. Thus, only a subset of bNAbs can efficiently prevent HIV-1 cell to cell transmission, and this property should be considered an important characteristic defining antibody potency for therapeutic or prophylactic antiviral strategies. PMID:24277152

  15. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  16. Antibody-mediated immune suppression of erythrocyte alloimmunization can occur independently from red cell clearance or epitope masking in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Honghui; Stowell, Sean R; Bernardo, Lidice; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Zimring, James C; Amash, Alaa; Uchikawa, Makoto; Lazarus, Alan H

    2014-09-15

    Anti-D can prevent immunization to the RhD Ag on RBCs, a phenomenon commonly termed Ab-mediated immune suppression (AMIS). The most accepted theory to explain this effect has been the rapid clearance of RBCs. In mouse models using SRBC, these xenogeneic cells are always rapidly cleared even without Ab, and involvement of epitope masking of the SRBC Ags by the AMIS-inducing Ab (anti-SRBC) has been suggested. To address these hypotheses, we immunized mice with murine transgenic RBCs expressing the HOD Ag (hen egg lysozyme [HEL], in sequence with ovalbumin, and the human Duffy transmembrane protein) in the presence of polyclonal Abs or mAbs to the HOD molecule. The isotype, specificity, and ability to induce AMIS of these Abs were compared with accelerated clearance as well as steric hindrance of the HOD Ag. Mice made IgM and IgG reactive with the HEL portion of the molecule only. All six of the mAbs could inhibit the response. The HEL-specific Abs (4B7, IgG1; GD7, IgG2b; 2F4, IgG1) did not accelerate clearance of the HOD-RBCs and displayed partial epitope masking. The Duffy-specific Abs (MIMA 29, IgG2a; CBC-512, IgG1; K6, IgG1) all caused rapid clearance of HOD RBCs without steric hindrance. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of AMIS to erythrocytes in an all-murine model and shows that AMIS can occur in the absence of RBC clearance or epitope masking. The AMIS effect was also independent of IgG isotype and epitope specificity of the AMIS-inducing Ab. PMID:25122924

  17. Antibody persistence and T-cell balance: Two key factors confronting HIV vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, George K.; DeVico, Anthony L.; Gallo, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    The quest for a prophylactic AIDS vaccine is ongoing, but it is now clear that the successful vaccine must elicit protective antibody responses. Accordingly, intense efforts are underway to identify immunogens that elicit these responses. Regardless of the mechanism of antibody-mediated protection, be it neutralization, Fc-mediated effector function, or both, antibody persistence and appropriate T-cell help are significant problems confronting the development of a successful AIDS vaccine. Here, we discuss the evidence illustrating the poor persistence of antibody responses to Env, the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1, and the related problem of CD4+ T-cell responses that compromise vaccine efficacy by creating excess cellular targets of HIV-1 infection. Finally, we propose solutions to both problems that are applicable to all Env-based AIDS vaccines regardless of the mechanism of antibody-mediated protection. PMID:25349379

  18. Chemically programmed bispecific antibodies that recruit and activate T cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Huiting; Thomas, Joshua D; Burke, Terrence R; Rader, Christoph

    2012-08-17

    Bispecific antibodies (biAbs) that mediate cytotoxicity by recruiting and activating endogenous immune cells are an emerging class of next-generation antibody therapeutics. Of particular interest are biAbs of relatively small size (∼50 kDa) that can redirect cytotoxic T cells through simultaneous binding of tumor cells. Here we describe a conceptually unique class of biAbs in which the tumor cell specificity of a humanized antibody fragment that recognizes CD3 on T cells is chemically programmed through a C-terminal selenocysteine (Sec) residue. We demonstrate that through chemically programmed specificity for integrin α(4)β(1) or folate receptor 1 (FOLR1), and common specificity for CD3, these hybrid molecules exert potent and specific in vitro and ex vivo cytotoxicity toward tumor cell lines and primary tumor cells in the presence of primary T cells. Importantly, the generic nature of chemical programming allows one to apply our approach to virtually any specificity, promising a broad utility of chemically programmed biAbs in cancer therapy. PMID:22761439

  19. Immunological effects of the anti-programmed death-1 antibody on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Nonomura, Chizu; Kondou, Ryota; Miyata, Haruo; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Maeda, Chie; Mitsuya, Koichi; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Nakasu, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2016-09-01

    Immune checkpoint antibody-mediated blockade has gained attention as a new cancer immunotherapy strategy. Accumulating evidence suggests that this therapy imparts a survival benefit to metastatic melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer patients. A substantial amount of data on immune checkpoint antibodies has been collected from clinical trials; however, the direct effect of the antibodies on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has not been exclusively investigated. In this study, we developed an anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1) antibody (with biosimilarity to nivolumab) and examined the effects of the antibody on PBMCs derived from cancer patients. Specifically, we investigated the effects of the anti-PD-1 antibody on proliferation, cytokine production, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and regulatory T cells. These investigations yielded several important results. First, the anti-PD-1 antibody had no obvious effect on resting PBMCs; however, high levels of the anti-PD-1 antibody partly stimulated PBMC proliferation when accompanied by an anti-CD3 antibody. Second, the anti-PD-1 antibody restored the growth inhibition of anti-CD3 Ab-stimulated PBMCs mediated by PD-L1. Third, the anti-PD-1 antibody exhibited a moderate inhibitory effect on the induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) by anti-CD3 antibody stimulation. Additionally, the presence of the anti-PD-1 antibody promoted antigen-specific CTL induction, which suggests that combining anti-PD-1 antibody and conventional immunotherapy treatments may have beneficial effects. These results indicate that specific cellular immunological mechanisms are partly responsible for the antitumor effect exhibited by the anti-PD-1 antibody against advanced cancers in clinical trials. PMID:27573705

  20. Antibody-mediated immune suppression is improved when blends of anti-RBC monoclonal antibodies are used in mice.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Lidice; Amash, Alaa; Marjoram, Danielle; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-08-25

    Although the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is highly effective using polyclonal anti-D, a recombinant alternative is long overdue. Unfortunately, anti-D monoclonal antibodies have been, at best, disappointing. To determine the primary attribute defining an optimal antibody, we assessed suppression of murine red blood cell (RBC) immunization by single-monoclonal antibodies vs defined blends of subtype-matched antibodies. Allogeneic RBCs expressing the HOD antigen (hen egg lysozyme [HEL]-ovalbumin-human transmembrane Duffy(b)) were transfused into naïve mice alone or together with selected combinations of HEL-specific antibodies, and the resulting suppressive effect was assessed by evaluating the antibody response. Polyclonal HEL antibodies dramatically inhibited the antibody response to the HOD antigen, whereas single-monoclonal HEL antibodies were less effective despite the use of saturating doses. A blend of monoclonal HEL-specific antibodies reactive with different HEL epitopes significantly increased the suppressive effect, whereas a blend of monoclonal antibodies that block each other's binding to the HEL protein did not increase suppression. In conclusion, these data show that polyclonal antibodies are superior to monoclonal antibodies at suppressing the immune response to the HOD cells, a feature that can be completely recapitulated using monoclonal antibodies to different epitopes. PMID:27330002

  1. A rapid and quantitative assay for measuring antibody-mediated neutralization of West Nile virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, Theodore C. . E-mail: piersontc@mail.nih.gov; Sanchez, Melissa D.; Puffer, Bridget A.; Ahmed, Asim A.; Geiss, Brian J.; Valentine, Laura E.; Altamura, Louis A.; Diamond, Michael S.; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-03-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurotropic flavivirus within the Japanese encephalitis antigenic complex that is responsible for causing West Nile encephalitis in humans. The surface of WNV virions is covered by a highly ordered icosahedral array of envelope proteins that is responsible for mediating attachment and fusion with target cells. These envelope proteins are also primary targets for the generation of neutralizing antibodies in vivo. In this study, we describe a novel approach for measuring antibody-mediated neutralization of WNV infection using virus-like particles that measure infection as a function of reporter gene expression. These reporter virus particles (RVPs) are produced by complementation of a sub-genomic replicon with WNV structural proteins provided in trans using conventional DNA expression vectors. The precision and accuracy of this approach stem from an ability to measure the outcome of the interaction between antibody and viral antigens under conditions that satisfy the assumptions of the law of mass action as applied to virus neutralization. In addition to its quantitative strengths, this approach allows the production of WNV RVPs bearing the prM-E proteins of different WNV strains and mutants, offering considerable flexibility for the study of the humoral immune response to WNV in vitro. WNV RVPs are capable of only a single round of infection, can be used under BSL-2 conditions, and offer a rapid and quantitative approach for detecting virus entry and its inhibition by neutralizing antibody.

  2. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44(high)CD24(low)HER2(low) cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells. PMID:23593542

  3. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44highCD24lowHER2low cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells. PMID:23593542

  4. Antibody-mediated phagocytosis contributes to the anti-tumor activity of the therapeutic antibody daratumumab in lymphoma and multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Overdijk, Marije B; Verploegen, Sandra; Bögels, Marijn; van Egmond, Marjolein; van Bueren, Jeroen J Lammerts; Mutis, Tuna; Groen, Richard WJ; Breij, Esther; Martens, Anton CM; Bleeker, Wim K; Parren, Paul WHI

    2015-01-01

    Daratumumab (DARA) is a human CD38-specific IgG1 antibody that is in clinical development for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). The potential for IgG1 antibodies to induce macrophage-mediated phagocytosis, in combination with the known presence of macrophages in the tumor microenvironment in MM and other hematological tumors, led us to investigate the contribution of antibody-dependent, macrophage-mediated phagocytosis to DARA's mechanism of action. Live cell imaging revealed that DARA efficiently induced macrophage-mediated phagocytosis, in which individual macrophages rapidly and sequentially engulfed multiple tumor cells. DARA-dependent phagocytosis by mouse and human macrophages was also observed in an in vitro flow cytometry assay, using a range of MM and Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines. Phagocytosis contributed to DARA's anti-tumor activity in vivo, in both a subcutaneous and an intravenous leukemic xenograft mouse model. Finally, DARA was shown to induce macrophage-mediated phagocytosis of MM cells isolated from 11 of 12 MM patients that showed variable levels of CD38 expression. In summary, we demonstrate that phagocytosis is a fast, potent and clinically relevant mechanism of action that may contribute to the therapeutic activity of DARA in multiple myeloma and potentially other hematological tumors. PMID:25760767

  5. Neutralizing antibodies are unable to inhibit direct viral cell-to-cell spread of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Christian L; Lamorte, Louie; Sepulveda, Eliud; Lorenz, Ivo C; Gauthier, Annick; Franti, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Infection with human cytomegalovirus (CMV) during pregnancy is the most common cause of congenital disorders, and can lead to severe life-long disabilities with associated high cost of care. Since there is no vaccine or effective treatment, current efforts are focused on identifying potent neutralizing antibodies. A panel of CMV monoclonal antibodies identified from patent applications, was synthesized and expressed in order to reproduce data from the literature showing that anti-glycoprotein B antibodies neutralized virus entry into all cell types and that anti-pentameric complex antibodies are highly potent in preventing virus entry into epithelial cells. It had not been established whether antibodies could prevent subsequent rounds of infection that are mediated primarily by direct cell-to-cell transmission. A thorough validation of a plaque reduction assay to monitor cell-to-cell spread led to the conclusion that neutralizing antibodies do not significantly inhibit plaque formation or reduce plaque size when they are added post-infection. PMID:23849792

  6. Magnetic antibody-linked nanomatchmakers for therapeutic cell targeting

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ke; Shen, Deliang; Hensley, M. Taylor; Middleton, Ryan; Sun, Baiming; Liu, Weixin; De Couto, Geoffrey; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a promising strategy for therapeutic cardiac regeneration, but current therapies are limited by inefficient interaction between potentially beneficial cells (either exogenously transplanted or endogenously recruited) and the injured tissue. Here we apply targeted nanomedicine to achieve in vivo cell-mediated tissue repair, imaging and localized enrichment without cellular transplantation. Iron nanoparticles are conjugated with two types of antibodies (one against antigens on therapeutic cells and the other directed at injured cells) to produce magnetic bifunctional cell engager (MagBICE). The antibodies link the therapeutic cells to the injured cells, whereas the iron core of MagBICE enables physical enrichment and imaging. We treat acute myocardial infarction by targeting exogenous bone marrow-derived stem cells (expressing CD45) or endogenous CD34-positive cells to injured cardiomyocytes (expressing myosin light chain. Targeting can be further enhanced by magnetic attraction, leading to augmented functional benefits. MagBICE represents a generalizable platform technology for regenerative medicine. PMID:25205020

  7. HLA-C antibodies in women with recurrent miscarriage suggests that antibody mediated rejection is one of the mechanisms leading to recurrent miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Meuleman, T; van Beelen, E; Kaaja, R J; van Lith, J M M; Claas, F H J; Bloemenkamp, K W M

    2016-08-01

    HLA-C is the only polymorphic classical HLA I antigen expressed on trophoblast cells. It is known that higher incidence of C4d deposition on trophoblast cells is present in women with recurrent miscarriage. C4d is a footprint of antibody-mediated classical complement activation. Therefore, this study hypothesize that antibodies against HLA-C may play a role in the occurrence of unexplained consecutive recurrent miscarriage. Present case control study compared the incidence of HLA-C specific antibodies in 95 women with at least three consecutive miscarriages and 105 women with uneventful pregnancy. In the first trimester of the next pregnancy, presence and specificity of HLA antibodies were determined and their complement fixing ability. The incidence of HLA antibodies was compared with uni- and multivariate logistic regression models adjusting for possible confounders. Although in general a higher incidence of HLA antibodies was found in women with recurrent miscarriage 31.6% vs. in control subjects 9.5% (adjusted OR 4.3, 95% CI 2.0-9.5), the contribution of antibodies against HLA-C was significantly higher in women with recurrent miscarriage (9.5%) compared to women with uneventful pregnancy (1%) (adjusted OR 11.0, 95% CI 1.3-89.0). In contrast to the control group, HLA-C antibodies in the recurrent miscarriage group were more often able to bind complement. The higher incidence of antibodies specific for HLA-C in women with recurrent miscarriage suggests that HLA-C antibodies may be involved in the aetiology of unexplained consecutive recurrent miscarriage. PMID:27172837

  8. Protein disulfide isomerases are antibody targets during immune-mediated tumor destruction

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Catia; Soiffer, Robert; Ho, Vincent; Vanneman, Matthew; Jinushi, Masahisa; Ritz, Jerome; Neuberg, Donna; Stone, Richard; DeAngelo, Dan

    2009-01-01

    The identification of cancer antigens that contribute to transformation and are linked with immune-mediated tumor destruction is an important goal for immunotherapy. Toward this end, we screened a murine renal cell carcinoma cDNA expression library with sera from mice vaccinated with irradiated tumor cells engineered to secrete granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Multiple nonmutated, overexpressed proteins that function in tumor cell migration, protein/nucleic acid homeostasis, metabolism, and stress responses were detected. Among these, the most frequently recognized clone was protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). High titer antibodies to human PDI were similarly induced in an acute myeloid leukemia patient who achieved a complete response after vac-cination with irradiated, autologous GM-CSF–secreting tumor cells in the setting of nonmyeloablative allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Moreover, ERp5, a closely related disulfide isomerase involved in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related protein A (MICA) shedding, also evoked potent humoral reactions in diverse solid and hematologic malignancy patients who responded to GM-CSF–secreting tumor cell vaccines or antibody blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4). Together, these findings reveal the unexpected immunogenicity of PDIs and raise the possibility that these gene products might serve as targets for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. PMID:19008459

  9. A refractory case of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to anti-HLA-DQ antibody in a kidney transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Toshinari; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Izumi; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Yamada, Hiroki; Miki, Jun; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    We herein report a refractory case of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) due to anti-HLA-DQ antibody in a kidney transplant patient. A 45-year-old man was admitted for a protocol biopsy; he had a serum creatinine (S-Cr) level of 1.8 mg/dL 3 years following primary kidney transplantation. Histological examination revealed moderate to severe inflammatory cell infiltration in the peritubular capillaries. Thorough laboratory examination showed that the patient had donor-specific antibodies (DSAbs) to DR9 and DQ9. Considering both the histological and laboratory findings, we diagnosed acute antibody-mediated rejection. The patient underwent 3 days of consecutive steroid pulse therapy, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and plasma exchange. We also administered rituximab (200 mg/body). Six months after the treatment, a second allograft biopsy revealed the progression of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and persistence of mild peritubular capillaritis. Further analysis showed that the anti-DR9 antibodies had disappeared, but that the mean fluorescence intensity value of the anti-DQ9 antibodies had increased. Therefore, we repeated the plasma exchange and IVIG. Allograft function was stable throughout the course of treatment, and the S-Cr level remained at 1.8 mg/dL. This case report demonstrates the difficulty of treating AMR due to the presence of anti-DQ DSAbs and the necessity for subsequent therapies in refractory cases. PMID:26031594

  10. Diagnosis and Management of Antibody-Mediated Rejection: Current Status and Novel Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Djamali, A; Kaufman, D B; Ellis, T M; Zhong, W; Matas, A; Samaniego, M

    2014-01-01

    Advances in multimodal immunotherapy have significantly reduced acute rejection rates and substantially improved 1-year graft survival following renal transplantation. However, long-term (10-year) survival rates have stagnated over the past decade. Recent studies indicate that antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is among the most important barriers to improving long-term outcomes. Improved understanding of the roles of acute and chronic ABMR has evolved in recent years following major progress in the technical ability to detect and quantify recipient anti-HLA antibody production. Additionally, new knowledge of the immunobiology of B cells and plasma cells that pertains to allograft rejection and tolerance has emerged. Still, questions regarding the classification of ABMR, the precision of diagnostic approaches, and the efficacy of various strategies for managing affected patients abound. This review article provides an overview of current thinking and research surrounding the pathophysiology and diagnosis of ABMR, ABMR-related outcomes, ABMR prevention and treatment, as well as possible future directions in treatment. This review addresses the spectrum of antibody-mediated rejection after kidney transplantation, including its pathogenesis, risk factors, phenotypes, the revised Banff 2013 classification, treatment options, and outcomes. Also see meeting report by Haas et al on page 272. PMID:24401076

  11. Access of protective antiviral antibody to neuronal tissues requires CD4 T-cell help.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Norifumi; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-26

    Circulating antibodies can access most tissues to mediate surveillance and elimination of invading pathogens. Immunoprivileged tissues such as the brain and the peripheral nervous system are shielded from plasma proteins by the blood-brain barrier and blood-nerve barrier, respectively. Yet, circulating antibodies must somehow gain access to these tissues to mediate their antimicrobial functions. Here we examine the mechanism by which antibodies gain access to neuronal tissues to control infection. Using a mouse model of genital herpes infection, we demonstrate that both antibodies and CD4 T cells are required to protect the host after immunization at a distal site. We show that memory CD4 T cells migrate to the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord in response to infection with herpes simplex virus type 2. Once inside these neuronal tissues, CD4 T cells secrete interferon-γ and mediate local increase in vascular permeability, enabling antibody access for viral control. A similar requirement for CD4 T cells for antibody access to the brain is observed after intranasal challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Our results reveal a previously unappreciated role of CD4 T cells in mobilizing antibodies to the peripheral sites of infection where they help to limit viral spread. PMID:27225131

  12. Establishment of Stable, Cell-Mediated Immunity that Makes "Susceptible" Mice Resistant to Leishmania major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretscher, Peter A.; Wei, Guojian; Menon, Juthika N.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    1992-07-01

    Cell-mediated, but not antibody-mediated, immune responses protect humans against certain pathogens that produce chronic diseases such as leishmaniasis. Effective vaccination against such pathogens must therefore produce an immunological "imprint" so that stable, cell-mediated immunity is induced in all individuals after natural infection. BALB/c mice "innately susceptible" to Leishmania major produce antibodies after substantial infection. In the present study, "susceptible" mice injected with a small number of parasites mounted a cell-mediated response and acquired resistance to a larger, normally pathogenic, challenge. This vaccination strategy may be applicable in diseases in which protection is dependent on cell-mediated immunity.

  13. Design considerations for liposomal vaccines: Influence of formulation parameters on antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to liposome associated antigens

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Douglas S.; Endsley, Aaron N.; Huang, Leaf

    2012-01-01

    Liposomes (phospholipid bilayer vesicles) are versatile and robust delivery systems for induction of antibody and T lymphocyte responses to associated subunit antigens. In the last 15 years, liposome vaccine technology has matured and now several vaccines containing liposome-based adjuvants have been approved for human use or have reached late stages of clinical evaluation. Given the intensifying interest in liposome-based vaccines, it is important to understand precisely how liposomes interact with the immune system and stimulate immunity. It has become clear that the physicochemical properties of liposomal vaccines – method of antigen attachment, lipid composition, bilayer fluidity, particle charge, and other properties – exert dramatic effects on the resulting immune response. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the physicochemical properties of liposomal vaccines and how they influence immune responses. A discussion of novel and emerging immunomodulators that are suitable for inclusion in liposomal vaccines is also presented. Through a comprehensive analysis of the body of liposomal vaccine literature, we enumerate a series of principles that can guide the rational design of liposomal vaccines to elicit immune responses of a desired magnitude and quality. We also identify major unanswered questions in the field, pointing the direction for future study. PMID:22306376

  14. Decitabine enhances anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody BI 836858-mediated natural killer ADCC against AML blasts.

    PubMed

    Vasu, Sumithira; He, Shun; Cheney, Carolyn; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Mani, Rajeswaran; Lozanski, Gerard; Mo, Xiaokui; Groh, Veronica; Whitman, Susan P; Konopitzky, Renate; Kössl, Christian; Bucci, Donna; Lucas, David M; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A; Blum, William; Adam, Paul J; Borges, Eric; Rueter, Bjoern; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Marcucci, Guido; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia, affecting older individuals at a median age of 67 years. Resistance to intensive induction chemotherapy is the major cause of death in elderly AML; hence, novel treatment strategies are warranted. CD33-directed antibody-drug conjugates (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) have been shown to improve overall survival, validating CD33 as a target for antibody-based therapy of AML. Here, we report the in vitro efficacy of BI 836858, a fully human, Fc-engineered, anti-CD33 antibody using AML cell lines and primary AML blasts as targets. BI 836858-opsonized AML cells significantly induced both autologous and allogeneic natural killer (NK)-cell degranulation and NK-cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro treatment of AML blasts with decitabine (DAC) or 5-azacytidine, 2 hypomethylating agents that show efficacy in older patients, did not compromise BI 836858-induced NK-cell-mediated ADCC. Evaluation of BI 836858-mediated ADCC in serial marrow AML aspirates in patients who received a 10-day course of DAC (pre-DAC, days 4, 11, and 28 post-DAC) revealed significantly higher ADCC in samples at day 28 post-DAC when compared with pre-DAC treatment. Analysis of ligands to activating receptors (NKG2D) showed significantly increased NKG2D ligand [NKG2DL] expression in day 28 post-DAC samples compared with pre-DAC samples; when NKG2DL receptor was blocked using antibodies, BI 836858-mediated ADCC was significantly decreased, suggesting that DAC enhances AML blast susceptibility to BI 836858 by upregulating NKG2DL. These data provide a rationale for combination therapy of Fc-engineered antibodies such as BI 836858 with azanucleosides in elderly patients with AML. PMID:27013443

  15. Myelin-reactive antibodies mediate the pathology of MBP-PLP fusion protein MP4-induced EAE.

    PubMed

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Pauly, Robert; Rottlaender, Andrea; Rodi, Michael; Gruppe, Traugott L; Addicks, Klaus; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Lehmann, Paul V

    2011-07-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is frequently used for studies of multiple sclerosis (MS). Because in most EAE models T cells mediate the pathology in the absence of B cells/autoantibodies, the notion has evolved that also MS may be a primarily T cell-mediated disease. We have previously introduced MBP-PLP fusion protein (MP4)-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice. Here we show that the disease in this model is antibody-dependent. Immunization of B cell-deficient mice did not induce EAE. When such B cell-deficient mice were, however, injected with MBP/PLP-specific antibodies in addition to the immunization with MP4, they developed disease of a severity and course that was similar to the wild-type mice. The deposition of antibodies in demyelinated lesions provided further evidence for the contribution of MBP/PLP-specific antibodies to CNS lesion formation. Based upon these data we suggest a two-stage model for the involvement of MBP/PLP-specific antibodies in autoimmune CNS pathology. PMID:21489887

  16. Antibody-protein A conjugated quantum dots for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Takashi; Tiwari, Dhermendra K; Tanaka, Shin-Ichi; Inouye, Yasushi; Yoshizawa, Keiko; Watanabe, Tomonobu M

    2010-11-01

    To use quantum dots (QDs) as fluorescent probes for receptor imaging, QD surface should be modified with biomolecules such as antibodies, peptides, carbohydrates, and small-molecule ligands for receptors. Among these QDs, antibody conjugated QDs are the most promising fluorescent probes. There are many kinds of coupling reactions that can be used for preparing antibody conjugated QDs. Most of the antibody coupling reactions, however, are non-selective and time-consuming. In this paper, we report a facile method for preparing antibody conjugated QDs for surface receptor imaging. We used ProteinA as an adaptor protein for binding of antibody to QDs. By using ProteinA conjugated QDs, various types of antibodies are easily attached to the surface of the QDs via non-covalent binding between the F(c) (fragment crystallization) region of antibody and ProteinA. To show the utility of ProteinA conjugated QDs, HER2 (anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) in KPL-4 human breast cancer cells were stained by using anti-HER2 antibody conjugated ProteinA-QDs. In addition, multiplexed imaging of HER2 and CXCR4 (chemokine receptor) in the KPL-4 cells was performed. The result showed that CXCR4 receptors coexist with HER2 receptors in the membrane surface of KPL-4 cells. ProteinA mediated antibody conjugation to QDs is very useful to prepare fluorescent probes for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells. PMID:20835432

  17. Current and future challenges in therapy for antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Nair, Nandini; Ball, Timothy; Uber, Patricia A; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2011-06-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) continues to present a challenge for the survival of the cardiac allograft. AMR appears to be on the rise, likely secondary to changing trends in clinical practice, including selection of patients for transplantation on mechanical circulatory support and development of more effective combinations of immunosuppressive drugs against acute cellular rejection. Most current strategies are aimed at treating acute AMR, but the treatment of chronic AMR is still not well defined. Clinically, AMR can often be more severe than cellular rejection and more difficult to treat, often not responding to typical protocols of increased immunosuppression. Complex steps involved in the antibody response allows for several potential targets for therapeutic intervention, including suppression of T and B cells, elimination of circulating antibodies, and inhibition of residual antibodies. Existing evidence suggests a multiregimen approach is the best option. Sustenance of accommodation and induction of tolerance could be viewed as viable options if adequate immune surveillance can be achieved in this setting. This review discusses the challenges in treating AMR and provides a critical analysis of current and possible future therapies. PMID:21474341

  18. De novo donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies mediated rejection in liver-transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Del Bello, Arnaud; Congy-Jolivet, Nicolas; Danjoux, Marie; Muscari, Fabrice; Lavayssière, Laurence; Esposito, Laure; Cardeau-Desangles, Isabelle; Guitard, Joëlle; Dörr, Gaëlle; Milongo, David; Suc, Bertrand; Duffas, Jean Pierre; Alric, Laurent; Bureau, Christophe; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Rostaing, Lionel; Kamar, Nassim

    2015-12-01

    The incidence and consequences of de novo donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) after liver transplantation (LT) are not well known. We investigated the incidence, risk factors, and complications associated with de novo DSAs in this setting. A total of 152 de novo liver-transplant patients, without preformed anti-HLA DSAs, were tested for anti-HLA antibodies, with single-antigen bead technology, before, at transplantation, at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after transplantation, and thereafter annually and at each time they presented with increased liver-enzyme levels until the last follow-up, that is, 34 (1.5-77) months. Twenty-one patients (14%) developed de novo DSAs. Of these, five patients had C1q-binding DSAs (24%). Younger age, low exposure to calcineurin inhibitors, and noncompliance were predictive factors for de novo DSA formation. Nine of the 21 patients (43%) with de novo DSAs experienced an acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Positive C4d staining was more frequently observed in liver biopsies of patients with AMR (9/9 vs. 1/12, P < 0.0001). Eight patients received a B-cell targeting therapy, and one patient received polyclonal antibodies. Only one patient required retransplantation. Patient- and graft-survival rates did not differ between patients with and without DSAs. In conclusion, liver-transplant patients with liver abnormalities should be screened for DSAs and AMR. PMID:26303035

  19. Antibody-mediated neutralization of African swine fever virus: myths and facts.

    PubMed

    Escribano, José M; Galindo, Inmaculada; Alonso, Covadonga

    2013-04-01

    Almost all viruses can be neutralized by antibodies. However, there is some controversy about antibody-mediated neutralization of African swine fever virus (ASFV) with sera from convalescent pigs and about the protective relevance of antibodies in experimentally vaccinated pigs. At present, there is no vaccine available for this highly lethal and economically relevant virus and all classical attempts to generate a vaccine have been unsuccessful. This failure has been attributed, in part, to what many authors describe as the absence of neutralizing antibodies. The findings of some studies clearly contradict the paradigm of the impossibility to neutralize ASFV by means of monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies. This review discusses scientific evidence of these types of antibodies in convalescent and experimentally immunized animals, the nature of their specificity, the neutralization-mediated mechanisms demonstrated, and the potential relevance of antibodies in protection. PMID:23159730

  20. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxic responses in the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabriella K; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research. PMID:21957452

  1. Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Lung Transplantation: Clinical Outcomes and Donor-Specific Antibody Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Roux, A; Bendib Le Lan, I; Holifanjaniaina, S; Thomas, K A; Hamid, A M; Picard, C; Grenet, D; De Miranda, S; Douvry, B; Beaumont-Azuar, L; Sage, E; Devaquet, J; Cuquemelle, E; Le Guen, M; Spreafico, R; Suberbielle-Boissel, C; Stern, M; Parquin, F

    2016-04-01

    In the context of lung transplant (LT), because of diagnostic difficulties, antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) remains a matter of debate. We retrospectively analyzed an LT cohort at Foch Hospital to demonstrate the impact of AMR on LT prognosis. AMR diagnosis requires association of clinical symptoms, donor-specific antibodies (DSAs), and C4d(+) staining and/or histological patterns consistent with AMR. Prospective categorization split patients into four groups: (i) DSA positive, AMR positive (DSA(pos) AMR(pos) ); (ii) DSA positive, AMR negative (DSA(pos) AMR(neg) ); (iii) DSA limited, AMR negative (DSA(Lim) ; equal to one specificity, with mean fluorescence intensity of 500-1000 once); and (iv) DSA negative, AMR negative (DSA(neg) ). AMR treatment consisted of a combination of plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab. Among 206 transplanted patients, 10.7% were DSA(pos) AMR(pos) (n = 22), 40.3% were DSA(pos) AMR(neg) (n = 84), 6% were DSA(Lim) (n = 13) and 43% were DSA(neg) (n = 88). Analysis of acute cellular rejection at month 12 showed higher cumulative numbers (mean plus or minus standard deviation) in the DSA(pos) AMR(pos) group (2.1 ± 1.7) compared with DSA(pos) AMR(neg) (1 ± 1.2), DSA(Lim) (0.75 ± 1), and DSA(neg) (0.7 ± 1.23) groups. Multivariate analysis demonstrated AMR as a risk factor for chronic lung allograft dysfunction (hazard ratio [HR] 8.7) and graft loss (HR 7.56) for DSA(pos) AMR(pos) patients. Our results show a negative impact of AMR on LT clinical course and advocate for an early active diagnostic approach and evaluation of therapeutic strategies to improve prognosis. PMID:26845386

  2. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  3. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  4. Siglecs as targets for therapy in immune cell mediated disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Mary K.; Paulson, James C.

    2010-01-01

    The sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (siglecs) comprise a family of receptors that are differentially expressed on leukocytes and other immune cells. The restricted expression of several siglecs to one or a few cell types makes them attractive targets for cell-directed therapies. The anti-CD33 (Siglec-3) antibody Gemtuzumab (Mylotarg™) is approved for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and antibodies targeting CD22 (Siglec-2) are currently in clinical trials for treatment of B cell non-Hodgkins lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. Because siglecs are endocytic receptors, they are well suited for a ‘Trojan horse’ strategy, whereby therapeutic agents conjugated to an antibody, or multimeric glycan ligand, bind to the siglec and are efficiently carried into the cell. Although the rapid internalization of unmodified siglec antibodies reduces their utility for induction of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) or complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody binding of Siglec-8, Siglec-9, and CD22 have been demonstrated to induce apoptosis of eosinophils, neutrophils, and depletion of B cells, respectively. Here we review the properties of siglecs that make them attractive for cell-targeted therapies. PMID:19359050

  5. [Inhibition of adenovirus reproduction in cell culture by specific antibodies].

    PubMed

    Povnytsia, O Iu; Nosach, L M; Zhovnovata, V L; Zahorodnia, S D; Vantsak, N P; Tokarchuk, L V; Polishchuk, O M; Diachenko, N S

    2009-01-01

    The capacity of specific antibodies to inhibit the reproduction of homo- and heterologous adenoviruses in Hela cell added to culture medium after virus adsorption was studied. The inhibiting effect of polyclonal antivirus and monospecific antihexone antibodies to homo- and heterologous adenoviruses was shown. The effect was more expressed when using antibodies to homologous antibodies. The intensity of inhibition depended on antibodies concentration in the medium and infecting dose of the virus. Essential reduction of the quantity of infected cells and a decrease of the titer of adenovirus synthesized in the presence of homo- and heterologous antibodies was shown but adenovirus reproduction was not inhibited completely. PMID:19663330

  6. Modeling single cell antibody excretion on a biosensor.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Ivan; Baumgartner, Wolfgang; van der Velden, Thomas J G; Terstappen, Leon W M M; Schasfoort, Richard B M

    2016-07-01

    We simulated, using Comsol Multiphysics, the excretion of antibodies by single hybridoma cells and their subsequent binding on a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) sensor. The purpose was to confirm that SPRi is suitable to accurately quantify antibody (anti-EpCAM) excretion. The model showed that antibody loss by diffusion away from the sensor was less than 1%. Unexpectedly, more than 99% of the excreted antibodies were captured on the sensor. These data prove the remarkable phenomenon that the SPRi output of cellular antibody excretion and its subsequent binding, performed under the conditions described here, is directly usable for quantification of single cell antibody production rates. PMID:27040182

  7. A Highly Conserved Residue of the HIV-1 gp120 Inner Domain Is Important for Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Responses Mediated by Anti-cluster A Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shilei; Veillette, Maxime; Coutu, Mathieu; Prévost, Jérémie; Scharf, Louise; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Ferrari, Guido; Robinson, James E.; Stürzel, Christina; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank; Lewis, George K.; Pazgier, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sera from HIV-1-infected individuals contain antibodies able to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). These antibodies preferentially recognize envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitopes induced upon CD4 binding. Here, we show that a highly conserved tryptophan at position 69 of the gp120 inner domain is important for ADCC mediated by anti-cluster A antibodies and sera from HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:26637462

  8. Antibody-Mediated Targeting of Tau In Vivo Does Not Require Effector Function and Microglial Engagement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hye; Le Pichon, Claire E; Adolfsson, Oskar; Gafner, Valérie; Pihlgren, Maria; Lin, Han; Solanoy, Hilda; Brendza, Robert; Ngu, Hai; Foreman, Oded; Chan, Ruby; Ernst, James A; DiCara, Danielle; Hotzel, Isidro; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Hansen, David V; Atwal, Jasvinder; Lu, Yanmei; Bumbaca, Daniela; Pfeifer, Andrea; Watts, Ryan J; Muhs, Andreas; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Ayalon, Gai

    2016-08-01

    The spread of tau pathology correlates with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. In vitro, tau antibodies can block cell-to-cell tau spreading. Although mechanisms of anti-tau function in vivo are unknown, effector function might promote microglia-mediated clearance. In this study, we investigated whether antibody effector function is required for targeting tau. We compared efficacy in vivo and in vitro of two versions of the same tau antibody, with and without effector function, measuring tau pathology, neuron health, and microglial function. Both antibodies reduced accumulation of tau pathology in Tau-P301L transgenic mice and protected cultured neurons against extracellular tau-induced toxicity. Only the full-effector antibody enhanced tau uptake in cultured microglia, which promoted release of proinflammatory cytokines. In neuron-microglia co-cultures, only effectorless anti-tau protected neurons, suggesting full-effector tau antibodies can induce indirect toxicity via microglia. We conclude that effector function is not required for efficacy, and effectorless tau antibodies may represent a safer approach to targeting tau. PMID:27475227

  9. Fluorometric assay for red blood cell antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, A.B.; Lambermont, M.; Strosberg, A.D.; Wybran, J.

    1981-03-01

    A fluorometric assay is described for the detection of red blood cell antibodies. The assay reveals as little as 600 molecules of bound, fluoroesceinated rabbit anti-human IgG antibodies per erythrocyte. Eleven patients with possible autoimmune erythrocyte disorder and negative direct antiglobulin test were studied by the fluorometric assay. The outcome of the fluorometric assay was compared with that of the human allogeneic rosette test. Results obtained by the two methods were in complete agreement. Five of the patients were shown to possess unexpectedly high levels of erythrocyte-bound IgG in spite of a negative, direct antiglobulin test. These findings and the validity of the fluorometric assay are discussed.

  10. Tregalizumab – A Monoclonal Antibody to Target Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    König, Martin; Rharbaoui, Faiza; Aigner, Silke; Dälken, Benjamin; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a subpopulation of CD4+ T cells, which are essential for the maintenance of immunological tolerance. The absence or dysfunction of Tregs can lead to autoimmunity and allergies. The restoration of functional Tregs and/or Treg cell numbers represents a novel and attractive approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, e.g., rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The CD4 cell surface receptor is a target for modulation of T cell function. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against CD4 have previously been tested for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, including RA. Furthermore, in model systems, anti-CD4 antibodies are able to induce tolerance and mediate immunomodulatory effects through a variety of mechanisms. Despite the availability of innovative and effective therapies for RA, many patients still have persistently active disease or experience adverse events that can limit use. A growing body of evidence suggests that Treg modulation could offer a new therapeutic strategy in RA and other autoimmune disorders. Here, we describe tregalizumab (BT-061), which is a novel, non-depleting IgG1 mAb that binds to a unique epitope of CD4. Tregalizumab represents the first humanized anti-CD4 mAb that selectively induces Treg activation. PMID:26834751

  11. Cell mediated immune regulation in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Gillissen, G; Pusztai-Markos, Z

    1979-01-01

    Autoimmunity is the term for the immune conditions characterized by a specific humoral or cell mediated response to the body's own tissues. The termination of the natural state of self tolerance may lead to immunopathological manifestations with clinical consequences, i.e. autoimmune diseases. In a very general sense, one may classify autoimmune diseases into two groups with respect to the underlying mechanism: 1. There are autoimmune diseases which develop in the presence of a normal intact regulation mechanism. 2. Another group whose development must be understood on the basis of a cellular dysfunction. In the first case, dequestered or semi-sequestered autoantigens are liberated as a consequence of exogenic influences inducing the sensitization of immunocompetent cells. The immune system then reacts with these autoantigens in the same way as with foreign substances. This kind of autoimmune disease will, however, not be dealt with here. In the second case, autoantigens are normally, i.e. in healthy individuals, accessible to the immunocompetent cells. To understand the reason for the development of an autoimmune reaction one must first clarify the mechanism of self tolerance. Then one must examine the way in which a break of this physiological state takes place. One of the major unanswered questions is the relative importance of antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immune mechanisms in the onset and further development of autoimmune diseases. Recently it has been suggested that a dysfunction at the cellular level might represent the basic cause which induces the termination of selftolerance. Most of the conceptions about the mechanism by which autoimmune diseases are triggered were gained through experiments with animals. It is, however, difficult to use these experimental results to explain human diseases; in humans many questions are still open. Undoubtedly, the mechanisms of induction and maintenance of self tolerance and also the ways in which autoimmune

  12. Nanoliposome-mediated targeting of antibodies to tumors: IVIG antibodies as a model.

    PubMed

    Nikpoor, Amin Reza; Tavakkol-Afshari, Jalil; Gholizadeh, Zahra; Sadri, Kayvan; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Chamani, Jamshidkhan; Badiee, Ali; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-11-10

    Monoclonal antibodies are routinely used as tools in immunotherapies against solid tumors. However, administration of monoclonal antibodies may cause undesired side effects due to their accumulation in non-targeted organs. Nanoliposomes of less than 200 nm can target antibodies to tumors by enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) mechanisms. To direct monoclonal antibodies to tumors, nanoliposomes encapsulating intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) as a model antibody were prepared. The liposomes had average diameters of 100 nm and encapsulation efficiencies of 31 to 46%. They showed less than 10% release in plasma at 37°C up to seven days. The secondary and tertiary structures of liposome-encapsulated antibodies were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The near and far-UV spectra analyses revealed no obvious conformational changes in the structures of the encapsulated antibodies. The biodistribution of free and liposome-encapsulated iodinated antibodies was investigated in mice bearing C-26 colon carcinoma tumors. The accumulation of liposome-encapsulated antibodies in tumors was significantly greater than that of free antibodies due to the EPR effect. The PEGylated liposomes were more efficient in the delivery of antibodies to the tumor site than non-PEGylated liposomes. We conclude that administration of monoclonal antibodies in PEGylated liposomes is more efficient than administration of non-encapsulated monoclonal antibodies for solid tumor immunotherapy. PMID:26302860

  13. Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Sensitized Nonhuman Primates: Modeling Human Biology.

    PubMed

    Burghuber, C K; Kwun, J; Page, E J; Manook, M; Gibby, A C; Leopardi, F V; Song, M; Farris, A B; Hong, J J; Villinger, F; Adams, A B; Iwakoshi, N N; Knechtle, S J

    2016-06-01

    We have established a model of sensitization in nonhuman primates and tested two immunosuppressive regimens. Animals underwent fully mismatched skin transplantation, and donor-specific antibody (DSA) response was monitored by flow cross-match. Sensitized animals subsequently underwent kidney transplantation from their skin donor. Immunosuppression included tacrolimus, mycophenolate, and methylprednisolone. Three animals received basiliximab induction; compared with nonsensitized animals, they showed a shorter mean survival time (4.7 ± 3.1 vs. 187 ± 88 days). Six animals were treated with T cell depletion (anti-CD4/CD8 mAbs), which prolonged survival (mean survival time 21.6 ± 19.0 days). All presensitized animals showed antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). In two of three basiliximab-injected animals, cellular rejection (ACR) was prominent. After T cell depletion, three of six monkeys experienced early acute rejection within 8 days with histological evidence of thrombotic microangiopathy and AMR. The remaining three monkeys survived 27-44 days, with mixed AMR and ACR. Most T cell-depleted animals experienced a rebound of DSA that correlated with deteriorating kidney function. We also found an increase in proliferating memory B cells (CD20(+) CD27(+) IgD(-) Ki67(+) ), lymph node follicular helper T cells (ICOS(+) PD-1(hi) CXCR5(+) CD4(+) ), and germinal center (GC) response. Depletion controlled cell-mediated rejection in sensitized nonhuman primates better than basiliximab, yet grafts were rejected with concomitant DSA rise. This model provides an opportunity to test novel desensitization strategies. PMID:26705099

  14. Relationship between natural and heme-mediated antibody polyreactivity.

    PubMed

    Hadzhieva, Maya; Vassilev, Tchavdar; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Dimitrov, Jordan D

    2016-03-25

    Polyreactive antibodies represent a considerable fraction of the immune repertoires. Some antibodies acquire polyreactivity post-translationally after interaction with various redox-active substances, including heme. Recently we have demonstrated that heme binding to a naturally polyreactive antibody (SPE7) results in a considerable broadening of the repertoire of recognized antigens. A question remains whether the presence of certain level of natural polyreactivity of antibodies is a prerequisite for heme-induced further extension of antigen binding potential. Here we used a second monoclonal antibody (Hg32) with unknown specificity and absence of intrinsic polyreactivity as a model to study the potential of heme to induce polyreactivity of antibodies. We demonstrated that exposure to heme greatly extends the antigen binding potential of Hg32, suggesting that the intrinsic binding promiscuity is not a prerequisite for the induction of polyreactivity by heme. In addition we compared the kinetics and thermodynamics of the interaction of heme-exposed antibodies with a panel of unrelated antigens. These analyses revealed that the two heme-sensitive antibodies adopt different mechanisms of binding to the same set of antigens. This study contributes to understanding the phenomenon of induced antibody polyreactivity. The data may also be of importance for understanding of physiological and pathological roles of polyreactive antibodies. PMID:26926563

  15. Effector-mediated eradication of precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a novel Fc engineered monoclonal antibody targeting the BAFF-R

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, Reshmi; Lim, Min; Fei, Fei; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Arutyunyan, Anna; Schiffer, Isabelle; McLaughlin, Margaret E.; Gram, Hermann; Huet, Heather; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2014-01-01

    B-cell activating factor receptor (BAFF-R) is expressed on precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia ALL (pre-B ALL) cells but not on their pre-B normal counterparts. Thus, selective killing of ALL cells is possible by targeting this receptor. Here we have further examined therapeutic targeting of pre-B ALL based on the presence of the BAFF-R. Mouse pre-B ALL cells lacking BAFF-R function had comparable viability and proliferation to wild type cells but were more sensitive to drug treatment. Viability of human pre-B ALL cells was further reduced when antibodies to the BAFF-R were combined with other drugs, even in the presence of stromal protection. This indicates that inhibition of BAFF-R function reduces fitness of stressed pre-B ALL cells. We tested a novel humanized anti-BAFF-R monoclonal antibody optimalized for FcRγIII mediated, antibody-dependent cell killing by effector cells. Antibody binding to human ALL cells was inhibitable, in a dose-dependent manner, by recombinant human BAFF. There was no evidence for internalization of the antibodies. The antibodies significantly stimulated NK cell-mediated killing of different human patient-derived ALL cells. Moreover, incubation of such ALL cells with these antibodies stimulated phagocytosis by macrophages. When this was tested in an immunodeficient transplant model, mice that were treated with the antibody had a significantly decreased leukemia burden in bone marrow and spleen. In view of the restricted expression of the BAFF-R on normal cells and the multiple anti-pre-B ALL activities stimulated by this antibody, a further examination of its use for treatment of pre-B ALL is warranted. PMID:24825858

  16. Antibody secreting cell assay for influenza A virus in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ELISPOT assay to enumerate B-cells producing antibodies specific to a given antigen, also known as an antibody secreting cell (ASC) assay, was adapted to detect B-cells specific for influenza A virus (IAV). The assay is performed ex vivo and enumerates ASC at a single cell level. A simple ASC det...

  17. Detection of anti-liver cell membrane antibody using a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo-Yeo, A.; McSorley, C.; McFarlane, B.M.; Mieli-Vergani, G.; Mowat, A.P.; Vergani, D.

    1989-02-01

    A radioimmunometric technique for the detection of autoantibodies to liver membrane antigens has been developed using Alexander cells, a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. After incubation of Alexander cells with serum, antimembrane antibodies were detected by addition of /sup 125/I-labeled Protein A. Binding ratios in 15 children with uncontrolled autoimmune chronic active hepatitis and in seven children with primary sclerosing cholangitis were significantly higher than in 18 age-matched normal controls. Nine patients with inactive autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, 13 with alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency and five with fulminant hepatic failure had ratios similar to controls. In nine patients with Wilson's disease, there was a modest but significant increase in binding ratio. In four children with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, binding ratios fell during effective immunosuppressive therapy. Sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis gave normal results, excluding that binding derives from Fc-mediated immune complex capture. A positive correlation was found between Alexander cell binding values and anti-liver-specific protein antibody titers, suggesting that the two assays detect antibodies against shared antigenic determinants. The Alexander cell assay is a simple, rapid and sensitive technique to detect antibody to liver cell membrane antigens.

  18. The Biological Effects of IL-21 Signaling on B-Cell-Mediated Responses in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yongkang; van Besouw, Nicole M.; Shi, Yunying; Hoogduijn, Martin J.; Wang, Lanlan; Baan, Carla C.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has emerged as one of the major issues limiting the success of organ transplantation. It exerts a highly negative impact on graft function and outcome, and effective treatment is lacking. The triggers for antibody development, and the mechanisms leading to graft dysfunction and failure, are incompletely understood. The production of antibodies is dependent on instructions from various immunocytes including CD4 T-helper cells that secrete interleukin (IL)-21 and interact with antigen-specific B-cells via costimulatory molecules. In this article, we discuss the role of IL-21 in the activation and differentiation of B-cells and consider the mechanisms of IL-21 and B-cell interaction. An improved understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in antibody-mediated complications after organ transplantation could lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies, which control humoral alloreactivity, potentially preventing and treating graft-threatening antibody-mediated rejection. PMID:27602031

  19. The Biological Effects of IL-21 Signaling on B-Cell-Mediated Responses in Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongkang; van Besouw, Nicole M; Shi, Yunying; Hoogduijn, Martin J; Wang, Lanlan; Baan, Carla C

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has emerged as one of the major issues limiting the success of organ transplantation. It exerts a highly negative impact on graft function and outcome, and effective treatment is lacking. The triggers for antibody development, and the mechanisms leading to graft dysfunction and failure, are incompletely understood. The production of antibodies is dependent on instructions from various immunocytes including CD4 T-helper cells that secrete interleukin (IL)-21 and interact with antigen-specific B-cells via costimulatory molecules. In this article, we discuss the role of IL-21 in the activation and differentiation of B-cells and consider the mechanisms of IL-21 and B-cell interaction. An improved understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in antibody-mediated complications after organ transplantation could lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies, which control humoral alloreactivity, potentially preventing and treating graft-threatening antibody-mediated rejection. PMID:27602031

  20. Naturally occurring anti-band-3 antibodies and complement together mediate phagocytosis of oxidatively stressed human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, H.U.; Bussolino, F.; Flepp, R.; Fasler, S.; Stammler, P.; Kazatchkine, M.D.; Arese, P.

    1987-11-01

    Treatment of erythrocytes with the thiol-specific oxidant azodicarboxylic acid bis(dimethylamide) (diamide) enhances their phagocytosis by adherent monocytes. Phagocytosis of diamide-treated erythrocytes required that the cells were opsonized with whole serum, since complement inactivation abolished phagocytosis. Opsonization with whole serum containing 20-100 times the physiological concentration of naturally occurring anti-band-3- antibodies enhanced phagocytosis of diamide-treated erythrocytes. High inputs of anti-band-3 also restored phagocytosis of erythrocytes that had been incubated with complement-inactivated serum. Elevated concentrations of anti-spectrin antibodies were ineffective in whole and complement-inactivated serum. Specific recognition of diamide-treated erythrocytes by anti-band-3 antibodies may be due to generation of anti-band-3 reactive protein oligomers on intact diamide-treated erythrocytes. Generation of such oligomers was dose-dependent with respect to diamide. Bound anti-band-3 alone was not sufficient to mediate phagocytosis. It resulted in deposition of complement component C3b on the cells through activation of the alternative complement pathway in amounts exceeding that of bound antibodies by two orders of magnitude. Thus, anti-band-3 and complement together mediate phagocytosis of oxidatively stressed erythrocytes, which simulate senescent erythrocytes with respect to bound antibody and complement.

  1. The specialized proresolving mediator 17-HDHA enhances the antibody-mediated immune response against influenza virus: Anew class of adjuvant?a

    PubMed Central

    Ramon, Sesquile; Baker, Steven F.; Sahler, Julie M.; Kim, Nina; Feldsott, Eric A.; Serhan, Charles N.; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Topham, David J.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses remain a critical global health concern. More efficacious vaccines are needed to protect against influenza virus, yet few adjuvants are approved for routine use. Specialized proresolving mediators (SPMs) are powerful endogenous bioactive regulators of inflammation, with great clinical translational properties. Here, we investigated the ability of the SPM 17-HDHA to enhance the adaptive immune response using an OVA immunization model and a pre-clinical influenza vaccination mouse model. Our findings revealed that mice immunized with OVA plus 17-HDHA or with H1N1-derived HA protein plus 17-HDHA increased antigen-specific antibody titers. 17-HDHA increased the number of antibody-secreting cells in vitro as well as the number of HA-specific antibody secreting cells present in the bone marrow. Importantly, the 17-HDHA-mediated increased antibody production was more protective against live pH1N1 influenza infection in mice. This is the first report on the biological effects of omega-3-derived SPMs on the humoral immune response. These findings illustrate a previously unknown biological link between proresolution signals and the adaptive immune system. Furthermore, this work has important implications for the understanding of B cell biology, as well as the development of new potential vaccine adjuvants. PMID:25392529

  2. Antibody-mediated neutralization of myelin-associated EphrinB3 accelerates CNS remyelination.

    PubMed

    Syed, Yasir A; Zhao, Chao; Mahad, Don; Möbius, Wiebke; Altmann, Friedrich; Foss, Franziska; Sentürk, Aycan; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Lubec, Gert; Lilley, Kathryn; Franklin, Robin J M; Nave, Klaus-A; Kotter, Mark R N

    2016-02-01

    Remyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions often remains incomplete despite the presence of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Amongst other factors, successful remyelination depends on the phagocytic clearance of myelin debris. However, the proteins in myelin debris that act as potent and selective inhibitors on OPC differentiation and inhibit CNS remyelination remain unknown. Here, we identify the transmembrane signalling protein EphrinB3 as important mediator of this inhibition, using a protein analytical approach in combination with a primary rodent OPC assay. In the presence of EphrinB3, OPCs fail to differentiate. In a rat model of remyelination, infusion of EphrinB3 inhibits remyelination. In contrast, masking EphrinB3 epitopes using antibodies promotes remyelination. Finally, we identify EphrinB3 in MS lesions and demonstrate that MS lesion extracts inhibit OPC differentiation while antibody-mediated masking of EphrinB3 epitopes promotes it. Our findings suggest that EphrinB3 could be a target for therapies aiming at promoting remyelination in demyelinating disease. PMID:26687980

  3. A game of numbers: the stoichiometry of antibody-mediated neutralization of flavivirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Theodore C.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The humoral response contributes to the protection against viral pathogens. Although antibodies have the potential to inhibit viral infections via several mechanisms, an ability to neutralize viruses directly may be particularly important. Neutralizing antibody titers are commonly used as predictors of protection from infection, especially in the context of vaccine responses and immunity. Despite the simplicity of the concept, how antibody binding results in virus inactivation is incompletely understood despite decades of research. Flaviviruses have been an attractive system in which to seek a structural and quantitative understanding of how antibody interactions with virions modulate infection because of the contribution of antibodies to both protection and pathogenesis. This review will present a stoichiometric model of antibody-mediated neutralization of flaviviruses and discuss how these concepts can inform the development of vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics. PMID:25595803

  4. Reaction of human smooth muscle antibody with thyroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Biberfeld, Gunnel; Fagraeus, Astrid; Lenkei, Rodica

    1974-01-01

    Sera from cases of active chronic hepatitis or acute hepatitis containing smooth muscle antibodies reacted by immunofluorescence with the membrane region of sectioned thyroid cells from thyrotoxic glands. With non-toxic glands the reaction was negative or weak. The prerequisite for a positive reaction was that the complement of the sera had been heat-inactivated. Absorption with smooth muscle antigen abolished the reaction of smooth muscle antibody positive sera with thyroid cells. Some smooth muscle antibody negative sera from cases with disorders other than liver disease were found to give a similar immunofluorescence staining of the membrane region of sectioned thyroid cells, but these antibodies were not absorbed with smooth muscle antigen. Culture of thyroid cells was found to increase the number of cells reacting with smooth muscle antibody. In contrast, the thyroid cell antigen reacting with smooth muscle antibody negative sera was lost during culture. PMID:4619977

  5. A Recombinant Bispecific CD20×CD95 Antibody With Superior Activity Against Normal and Malignant B-cells.

    PubMed

    Nalivaiko, Kristina; Hofmann, Martin; Kober, Karina; Teichweyde, Nadine; Krammer, Peter H; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Jung, Gundram

    2016-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed to the B-cell-specific CD20-antigen are successfully used for the treatment of lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. Here, we compare the anti-B-cell activity of three different antibodies directed to CD20: (i) a chimeric, monospecific antibody, (ii) an Fc-optimized variant thereof, and (iii) a bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody in a newly developed recombinant format, termed Fabsc. The bispecific antibody specifically triggers the CD95 death receptor on malignant, as well as activated, normal B-cells. We found that the capability of this antibody to suppress the growth of malignant B-cells in vitro and in vivo and to specifically deplete normal, activated B-cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures was superior to that of the Fc-optimized monospecific antibody. This antibody in turn was more effective than its nonoptimized variant. Moreover, the bispecific antibody was the only reagent capable of significantly suppressing antibody production in vitro. Our findings imply that the bispecific CD20×CD95-antibody might become a new, prototypical reagent for the treatment of B-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. PMID:26581163

  6. CD4+ T Cells Promote Antibody Production but Not Sustained Affinity Maturation during Borrelia burgdorferi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Rebecca A.; Hastey, Christine J.

    2014-01-01

    CD4 T cells are crucial for enhancing B cell-mediated immunity, supporting the induction of high-affinity, class-switched antibody responses, long-lived plasma cells, and memory B cells. Previous studies showed that the immune response to Borrelia burgdorferi appears to lack robust T-dependent B cell responses, as neither long-lived plasma cells nor memory B cells form for months after infection, and nonswitched IgM antibodies are produced continuously during this chronic disease. These data prompted us to evaluate the induction and functionality of B. burgdorferi infection-induced CD4 TFH cells. We report that CD4 T cells were effectively primed and TFH cells induced after B. burgdorferi infection. These CD4 T cells contributed to the control of B. burgdorferi burden and supported the induction of B. burgdorferi-specific IgG responses. However, while affinity maturation of antibodies against a prototypic T-dependent B. burgdorferi protein, Arthritis-related protein (Arp), were initiated, these increases were reversed later, coinciding with the previously observed involution of germinal centers. The cessation of affinity maturation was not due to the appearance of inhibitory or exhausted CD4 T cells or a strong induction of regulatory T cells. In vitro T-B cocultures demonstrated that T cells isolated from B. burgdorferi-infected but not B. burgdorferi-immunized mice supported the rapid differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells rather than continued proliferation, mirroring the induction of rapid short-lived instead of long-lived T-dependent antibody responses in vivo. The data further suggest that B. burgdorferi infection drives the humoral response away from protective, high-affinity, and long-lived antibody responses and toward the rapid induction of strongly induced, short-lived antibodies of limited efficacy. PMID:25312948

  7. What Lies Beneath: Antibody Dependent Natural Killer Cell Activation by Antibodies to Internal Influenza Virus Proteins.

    PubMed

    Vanderven, Hillary A; Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Rockman, Steven; Laurie, Karen; Barr, Ian; Chen, Weisan; Wines, Bruce; Hogarth, P Mark; Lambe, Teresa; Gilbert, Sarah C; Parsons, Matthew S; Kent, Stephen J

    2016-06-01

    The conserved internal influenza proteins nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix 1 (M1) are well characterised for T cell immunity, but whether they also elicit functional antibodies capable of activating natural killer (NK) cells has not been explored. We studied NP and M1-specific ADCC activity using biochemical, NK cell activation and killing assays with plasma from healthy and influenza-infected subjects. Healthy adults had antibodies to M1 and NP capable of binding dimeric FcγRIIIa and activating NK cells. Natural symptomatic and experimental influenza infections resulted in a rise in antibody dependent NK cell activation post-infection to the hemagglutinin of the infecting strain, but changes in NK cell activation to M1 and NP were variable. Although antibody dependent killing of target cells infected with vaccinia viruses expressing internal influenza proteins was not detected, opsonising antibodies to NP and M1 likely contribute to an antiviral microenvironment by stimulating innate immune cells to secrete cytokines early in infection. We conclude that effector cell activating antibodies to conserved internal influenza proteins are common in healthy and influenza-infected adults. Given the significance of such antibodies in animal models of heterologous influenza infection, the definition of their importance and mechanism of action in human immunity to influenza is essential. PMID:27428437

  8. Flexibility in Surface-Exposed Loops in a Virus Capsid Mediates Escape from Antibody Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Kolawole, Abimbola O.; Li, Ming; Xia, Chunsheng; Fischer, Audrey E.; Giacobbi, Nicholas S.; Rippinger, Christine M.; Proescher, Jody B. G.; Wu, Susan K.; Bessling, Seneca L.; Gamez, Monica; Yu, Chenchen; Zhang, Rebecca; Mehoke, Thomas S.; Pipas, James M.; Wolfe, Joshua T.; Lin, Jeffrey S.; Feldman, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT New human norovirus strains emerge every 2 to 3 years, partly due to mutations in the viral capsid that allow escape from antibody neutralization and herd immunity. To understand how noroviruses evolve antibody resistance, we investigated the structural basis for the escape of murine norovirus (MNV) from antibody neutralization. To identify specific residues in the MNV-1 protruding (P) domain of the capsid that play a role in escape from the neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb) A6.2, 22 recombinant MNVs were generated with amino acid substitutions in the A′B′ and E′F′ loops. Six mutations in the E′F′ loop (V378F, A382K, A382P, A382R, D385G, and L386F) mediated escape from MAb A6.2 neutralization. To elucidate underlying structural mechanisms for these results, the atomic structure of the A6.2 Fab was determined and fitted into the previously generated pseudoatomic model of the A6.2 Fab/MNV-1 virion complex. Previously, two distinct conformations, A and B, of the atomic structures of the MNV-1 P domain were identified due to flexibility in the two P domain loops. A superior stereochemical fit of the A6.2 Fab to the A conformation of the MNV P domain was observed. Structural analysis of our observed escape mutants indicates changes toward the less-preferred B conformation of the P domain. The shift in the structural equilibrium of the P domain toward the conformation with poor structural complementarity to the antibody strongly supports a unique mechanism for antibody escape that occurs via antigen flexibility instead of direct antibody-antigen binding. IMPORTANCE Human noroviruses cause the majority of all nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. New epidemic strains arise in part by mutations in the viral capsid leading to escape from antibody neutralization. Herein, we identify a series of point mutations in a norovirus capsid that mediate escape from antibody neutralization and determine the structure of a neutralizing antibody. Fitting of

  9. Antibodies to myeloid precursor cells in autoimmune neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Hartman, K R; LaRussa, V F; Rothwell, S W; Atolagbe, T O; Ward, F T; Klipple, G

    1994-07-15

    Antibodies to mature blood neutrophils and to bone marrow myeloid cells have been described in the sera of some patients with apparent autoimmune neutropenia. To further explore the prevalence and specificities of antibodies to myeloid precursor cells, we evaluated sera from 148 patients with suspected autoimmune neutropenia for the presence of antibodies to neutrophils, to cultured myeloid cell lines, and to highly purified bone marrow myeloid progenitor cells. Using an immunofluorescence flow cytometric assay, we identified IgG antibodies in 42 (28%) of these sera that bound specifically to K562 cells, a multilineage cell line originally derived from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia. Twenty-two (15%) of the sera also contained IgG antibodies that bound specifically to the primitive myelomonocytic leukemia cell line KG1a. Twenty-five (17%) of the sera had IgG antibodies to myeloid cell lines in the absence of antibodies to mature neutrophils. There was a trend toward more severe neutropenia in patients with antibodies to K562 cells, without antineutrophil antibodies. In further studies, antibodies from 12 sera bound to mononuclear CD34+ cells that had been purified from normal human bone marrow by an immunomagnetic separation procedure. Moreover, two of these sera suppressed the growth of granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GM) in methylcellulose cultures. The presence of antibodies to primitive hematopoietic cells in the sera of some patients with suspected immune neutropenia suggests that these antibodies may have a role in the pathogenesis of the neutropenia observed. PMID:7517722

  10. Cell-free production and streamlined assay of cytosol-penetrating antibodies.

    PubMed

    Min, Seung Eui; Lee, Kyung-Ho; Park, Seong-Wook; Yoo, Tae Hyeon; Oh, Chan Hee; Park, Ji-Ho; Yang, Sung Yun; Kim, Yong-Sung; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2016-10-01

    Antibodies that target intracellular proteins hold great promise in the development of novel therapeutic interventions for various diseases. In particular, antibodies that can cross cellular membranes have potential applications in controlling disease-related intracellular protein-protein interactions. Given the large number of cytosolic proteins and complicated interactions that are potentially involved in disease development, discovery of antibodies targeting intracellular proteins requires iterative cycles of expression and assessment of candidate antibodies. Because current cell-based expression methods do not provide sufficient throughput for production and assay of cytosol-penetrating antibodies, we integrated a cell-free protein synthesis system designed to provide optimal conditions for production of functional antibodies with a cytosol-penetration assay. The proposed approach of consolidating cell-free synthesis and cell-based assay will substantially expand the capability of discovering and engineering antibodies that can cross the cell membrane and effectively control protein-mediated cellular functions. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2107-2112. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27043877

  11. Redirecting adenoviruses to tumour cells using therapeutic antibodies: Generation of a versatile human bispecific adaptor.

    PubMed

    Vasiljevic, Snezana; Beale, Emma V; Bonomelli, Camille; Easthope, Iona S; Pritchard, Laura K; Seabright, Gemma E; Caputo, Alessandro T; Scanlan, Christopher N; Dalziel, Martin; Crispin, Max

    2015-12-01

    Effective use of adenovirus-5 (Ad5) in cancer therapy is heavily dependent on the degree to which the virus's natural tropism can be subverted to one that favours tumour cells. This is normally achieved through either engineering of the viral fiber knob or the use of bispecific adaptors that display both adenovirus and tumour antigen receptors. One of the main limitations of these strategies is the need to tailor each engineering event to any given tumour antigen. Here, we explore bispecific adaptors that can utilise established anti-cancer therapeutic antibodies. Conjugates containing bacterially derived antibody binding motifs are efficient at retargeting virus to antibody targets. Here, we develop a humanized strategy whereby we synthesise a re-targeting adaptor based on a chimeric Ad5 ligand/antibody receptor construct. This adaptor acts as a molecular bridge analogous to therapeutic antibody mediated cross-linking of cytotoxic effector and tumour cells during immunotherapy. As a proof or principle, we demonstrate how this adaptor allows efficient viral recognition and entry into carcinoma cells through the therapeutic monoclonal antibodies Herceptin/trastuzumab and bavituximab. We show that targeting can be augmented by use of contemporary antibody enhancement strategies such as the selective elimination of competing serum IgG using "receptor refocusing" enzymes and we envisage that further improvements are achievable by enhancing the affinities between the adaptor and its ligands. Humanized bispecific adaptors offer the promise of a versatile retargeting technology that can exploit both clinically approved adenovirus and therapeutic antibodies. PMID:26391350

  12. Monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.G.; Bucheli, E.; Darvill, A.; Albersheim, P. )

    1989-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) are useful tools to probe the structure of plant cell wall polysaccharides and to localize these polysaccharides in plant cells and tissues. Murine McAbs were generated against the pectic polysaccharide, rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells. The McAbs that were obtained were grouped into three classes based upon their reactivities with a variety of plant polysaccharides and membrane glycoproteins. Eleven McAbs (Class I) recognize epitope(s) that appear to be immunodominant and are found in RG-I from sycamore and maize, citrus pectin, polygalacturonic acid, and membrane glycoproteins from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore, maize, tobacco, parsley, and soybean. A second group of five McAbs (Class II) recognize epitope(s) present in sycamore RG-I, but do not bind to any of the other polysaccharides or glycoproteins recognized by Class I. Lastly, one McAb (Class III) reacts with sycamore RG-I, sycamore and tamarind xyloglucan, and sycamore and rice glucuronoarabinoxylan, but does not bind to maize RG-I, polygalacturonic acid or the plant membrane glycoproteins recognized by Class I. McAbs in Classes II and III are likely to be useful in studies of the structure, biosynthesis and localization of plant cell wall polysaccharides.

  13. Reaginic antibodies from horses with recurrent airway obstruction produce mast cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Moran, G; Folch, H; Henriquez, C; Ortloff, A; Barria, M

    2012-12-01

    Reaginic antibodies (IgE and some IgG subclasses) and mast cells play important roles in the induction of type I immediate hypersensitivity reactions. These antibodies bind through their Fc fragment to high affinity receptors (FcεRI) present in the membrane of mast cells and basophils. The cross-linking of the receptor initiates a coordinated sequence of biochemical and morphological events that results in exocytosis of secretory granules containing pre-formed inflammatory mediators, secretion of newly formed lipid mediators, and secretion of cytokines. Previously, several studies have investigated the role of reaginic antibodies in the pathogenesis of Recurrent Airway Obstruction (RAO). However, whereas the immunological aspects of RAO have been extensively studied, the precise sequence of events involved in the pathogenesis remains not completely understood, and the role of IgE in this disease remains controversial. Therefore, in this study, several bioassays were conducted to determine whether reaginic antibodies from RAO-affected horses have the ability to activate mast cells. These bioassays involved measuring degranulation of rat peritoneal mast cells, activation of NF-κB and morphological changes in basophilic leukemia cells (RBL-2H3) following incubation with horse serum from RAO-affected horses that were sensitive and insensitive to Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) or from unaffected horses. Our results show that reaginic antibodies from horses sensitive to A. fumigatus were able to degranulate rat peritoneal mast cells. In additon, there was an increase in the activity of the transcription factor NF-κB in RBL-2H3 cells, and morphological changes were observed in these cells once cross-linking was produced. These findings were not found in horses not sensitive to A. fumigatus and healthy horses. These bioassays demonstrate the ability of reaginic antibodies to stimulate mast cells and indicate that these antibodies could be involved in the

  14. Prevention trumps treatment of antibody-mediated transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Knechtle, Stuart J.; Kwun, Jean; Iwakoshi, Neal

    2010-01-01

    Belying the spectacular success of solid organ transplantation and improvements in immunosuppressive therapy is the reality that long-term graft survival rates remain relatively unchanged, in large part due to chronic and insidious alloantibody-mediated graft injury. Half of heart transplant recipients develop chronic rejection within 10 years — a daunting statistic, particularly for young patients expecting to achieve longevity by enduring the rigors of a transplant. The current immunosuppressive pharmacopeia is relatively ineffective in preventing late alloantibody-associated chronic rejection. In this issue of the JCI, Kelishadi et al. report that preemptive deletion of B cells prior to heart transplantation in cynomolgus monkeys, in addition to conventional posttransplant immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine, markedly attenuated not only acute graft rejection but also alloantibody elaboration and chronic graft rejection. The success of this preemptive strike implies a central role for B cells in graft rejection, and this approach may help to delay or prevent chronic rejection after solid organ transplantation. PMID:20335653

  15. Antibody-mediated reduction of .alpha.-ketoamides

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Gallop, Mark A.

    1998-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies raised against a 4-nitrophenyl phosphonate hapten catalyze the stereospecific reduction of an .alpha.-ketoamide to the corresponding .alpha.-hydroxyamide in the presence of an appropriate reducing agent.

  16. Antibody-mediated reduction of {alpha}-ketoamides

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, P.G.; Gallop, M.A.

    1998-06-09

    Monoclonal antibodies raised against a 4-nitrophenyl phosphonate hapten catalyze the stereospecific reduction of an {alpha}-ketoamide to the corresponding {alpha}-hydroxyamide in the presence of an appropriate reducing agent.

  17. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology. PMID:26928739

  18. Mucosal priming of newborn mice with S. Typhi Ty21a expressing anthrax protective antigen (PA) followed by parenteral PA-boost induces B and T cell-mediated immunity that protects against infection bypassing maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Karina; Ditamo, Yanina; Galen, James E; Baillie, Les W J; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2010-08-23

    The currently licensed anthrax vaccine has several limitations and its efficacy has been proven only in adults. Effective immunization of newborns and infants requires adequate stimulation of their immune system, which is competent but not fully activated. We explored the use of the licensed live attenuated S. Typhi vaccine strain Ty21a expressing Bacillus anthracis protective antigen [Ty21a(PA)] followed PA-alum as a strategy for immunizing the pediatric population. Newborn mice primed with a single dose of Ty21a(PA) exhibited high frequencies of mucosal IgA-secreting B cells and IFN-gamma-secreting T cells during the neonatal period, none of which was detected in newborns immunized with a single dose of PA-alum. Priming with Ty21a(PA) followed by PA-boost resulted in high levels of PA-specific IgG, toxin neutralizing and opsonophagocytic antibodies and increased frequency of bone marrow IgG plasma cells and memory B cells compared with repeated immunization with PA-alum alone. Robust B and T cell responses developed even in the presence of maternal antibodies. The prime-boost protected against systemic and respiratory infection. Mucosal priming with a safe and effective S. Typhi-based anthrax vaccine followed by PA-boost could serve as a practical and effective prophylactic approach to prevent anthrax early in life. PMID:20619377

  19. Mechanism of inhibition of immunoglobulin G-mediated phagocytosis by monoclonal antibodies that recognize the Mac-1 antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, E J; Bohnsack, J F; Gresham, H D

    1988-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of the monoclonal antibodies against the cell surface molecule Mac-1 on C3bi-mediated rosetting and IgG-mediated rosetting and phagocytosis by human peripheral blood monocytes. Highly purified M1/70 F(ab')2, used in the fluid phase, inhibited both monocyte functions. Half-maximal C3bi rosette inhibition occurred at a concentration of 2 nM F(ab')2 M1/70. An equivalent decrease in IgG-mediated rosetting required 10 nM M1/70 F(ab')2, and 50% inhibition of IgG-mediated phagocytosis required 7 nM antibody. Mo-1 F(ab')2 inhibited EC3bi binding with an ID50 of 0.3 nM, whereas 50% decrease in IgG-mediated rosetting required 70 nM of this antibody. OKM1 did not inhibit rosettes of sheep erythrocytes opsonized with IgG antibody (EA) at all. F(ab')2 M1/70 did not affect the binding of monomeric human IgG to monocytes, but did substantially decrease the binding of IgG aggregates. Half-maximal inhibition of aggregated IgG binding at 0 degrees C occurred at 8 nM F(ab')2 M1/70, very close to the concentration that caused equivalent inhibition of IgG-mediated phagocytosis. Aggregated IgG inhibited the binding of radiolabeled M1/70 to monocytes by approximately 40%, suggesting that some, but not all Mac-1 molecules were associated with IgG receptors under these conditions. When cells were allowed to adhere to surfaces coated with M1/70 or Mo-1 F(ab')2, C3bi-mediated rosetting was inhibited, but IgG mediated-phagocytosis was unaffected. Moreover, the dose response of inhibition of phagocytosis by fluid-phase F(ab')2, of anti-Mac-1 monoclonals was similar on monocytes adherent to albumin-coated and antibody-coated surfaces. Kinetic experiments showed that even prolonged incubation of monocytes on M1/70 coated surfaces did not lead to inhibition of EA binding nor did these incubations alter the dose response for inhibition of EA binding by fluid-phase M1/70 F(ab')2. This suggested that not all molecules recognized by M1/70 are freely mobile in the

  20. Complement Inhibition for Prevention and Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Renal Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Jordan, S C; Choi, J; Kahwaji, J; Vo, A

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic interventions aimed at the human complement system are recognized as potentially important strategies for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases because there is often evidence of complement-mediated injury according to pathologic assessments. In addition, there are a large number of potential targets, both soluble and cell bound, that might offer potential for new drug development, but progress in this area has met with significant challenges. Currently, 2 drugs are approved aimed at inhibition of complement activation. The first option is eculizumab (anti-C5), which is approved for the treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Eculizumab has also been studied in human transplantation for the treatment and prevention of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Initial data from uncontrolled studies suggested a significant benefit of eculizumab for the prevention of ABMR in highly HLA-sensitized patients, but a subsequent randomized, placebo-controlled trial failed to meet its primary endpoint. Anecdotal data, primarily from case studies, showed benefits in treating complement-mediated ABMR. A second approved complement-inhibiting therapy is C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), which is approved for use in patients with hereditary angioedema, a condition caused by mutations in the gene that codes for C1-INH. A recent placebo-controlled trial of C1-INH for prevention of ABMR in HLA-sensitized patients found that the drug was safe, with evidence for inhibition of systemic complement activation and complement-activating donor-specific antibodies. Other drugs are now under development. PMID:27234741

  1. Osthole prevents anti-Fas antibody-induced hepatitis in mice by affecting the caspase-3-mediated apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Toshihiro; Kawasaki, Toru; Hino, Okio

    2003-02-15

    Fas (Apo-1/CD95) ligand, which is a type II membrane protein, is a major inducer of apoptosis. Osthole is a coumarin derivative present in medicinal plants. The effect of osthole on hepatitis induced by anti-Fas antibody in mice was studied. Pretreatment of mice with osthole (10, 50, and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) prevented the elevation of plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) caused by anti-Fas antibody (175 microg/kg, i.v.). Administration of osthole to mice even at a dose of 10 mg/kg significantly inhibited of anti-Fas antibody-induced elevation of plasma ALT. Capase-3 is a cysteine protease, and treatment of mice with anti-Fas antibody caused an elevation of caspase-3 activity at 3.5 and 6 hr. Pretreatment of mice with osthole (100 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited the elevation of caspase-3 activity caused by anti-Fas antibody. However, the addition of osthole (up to 10(-4)M) to a liver cytosol fraction isolated from mice treated with anti-Fas antibody did not inhibit caspase-3 activity in vitro. Thus, treatment of mice with osthole inhibited caspase-3 activity by an effect upstream of caspase-3 activation. The livers of mice treated with anti-Fas antibody contained apoptotic and dead cells; osthole attenuated the development of this apoptosis and cell death. The present results show that osthole prevented anti-Fas antibody-induced hepatitis by inhibiting the Fas-mediated apoptotic pathway. PMID:12566097

  2. Active treatment of murine tumors with a highly attenuated vaccinia virus expressing the tumor associated antigen 5T4 (TroVax) is CD4+ T cell dependent and antibody mediated.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Richard; Ryan, Matthew G; Myers, Kevin A; Redchenko, Irina; Kingsman, Susan M; Carroll, Miles W

    2006-09-01

    5T4 is a tumor associated antigen that is expressed on the surface of a wide spectrum of human adenocarcinomas. The highly attenuated virus, modified vaccinia Ankara, has been engineered to express human 5T4 (h5T4). In a pre-clinical murine model, the recombinant virus (TroVax) induces protection against challenge with CT26-h5T4 (a syngeneic tumor line expressing h5T4). Anti-tumor activity is long lived, with protection still evident 6 months after the final vaccination. In a therapeutic setting, injection of mice with TroVax results in a reduction in tumor burden of >90%. Depletion of CD8+ T cells has no effect upon therapy in the active treatment model, whereas depletion of CD4+ T cells completely abrogates anti-tumor activity. In a prophylactic setting, depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells after the induction of a h5T4 immune response has no deleterious effect on protection following challenge with CT26-h5T4. In light of these studies, the role of antibodies in protection against tumor challenge was investigated. 5T4 specific polyclonal serum decreased tumor burden by approximately 70%. Thus, we conclude that CD4+ T cells are essential for the induction of a protective immune response and that antibodies are the likely effector moiety in this xenogeneic murine tumor model. PMID:16311730

  3. TIM-1 signaling in B cells regulates antibody production

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Juan; Usui, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Harada, Norihiro; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko; Akiba, Hisaya

    2011-03-11

    Highlights: {yields} TIM-1 is highly expressed on anti-IgM + anti-CD40-stimulated B cells. {yields} Anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and Ig production on activated B cell in vitro. {yields} TIM-1 signaling regulates Ab production by response to TI-2 and TD antigens in vivo. -- Abstract: Members of the T cell Ig and mucin (TIM) family have recently been implicated in the control of T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we found TIM-1 expression on anti-IgM- or anti-CD40-stimulated splenic B cells, which was further up-regulated by the combination of anti-IgM and anti-CD40 Abs. On the other hand, TIM-1 ligand was constitutively expressed on B cells and inducible on anti-CD3{sup +} anti-CD28-stimulated CD4{sup +} T cells. In vitro stimulation of activated B cells by anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and expression of a plasma cell marker syndecan-1 (CD138). We further examined the effect of TIM-1 signaling on antibody production in vitro and in vivo. Higher levels of IgG2b and IgG3 secretion were detected in the culture supernatants of the anti-TIM-1-stimulated B cells as compared with the control IgG-stimulated B cells. When immunized with T-independent antigen TNP-Ficoll, TNP-specific IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 Abs were slightly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice. When immunized with T-dependent antigen OVA, serum levels of OVA-specific IgG2b, IgG3, and IgE Abs were significantly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice as compared with the control IgG-treated mice. These results suggest that TIM-1 signaling in B cells augments antibody production by enhancing B cell proliferation and differentiation.

  4. CEA TCB: A novel head-to-tail 2:1 T cell bispecific antibody for treatment of CEA-positive solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Bacac, Marina; Klein, Christian; Umana, Pablo

    2016-08-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen T cell bispecific antibody (CEA TCB) is a bispecific antibody used to recognize CEA and CD3e via a novel molecular format (2:1) that induces T cell-mediated killing of CEA over-expressing tumors while sparing primary cells with low CEA expression. CEA TCB treatment inhibits tumor growth and generates a highly inflamed tumor microenvironment. PMID:27622073

  5. Monoclonal Antibody and an Antibody-Toxin Conjugate to a Cell Surface Proteoglycan of Melanoma Cells Suppress in vivo Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumol, T. F.; Wang, Q. C.; Reisfeld, R. A.; Kaplan, N. O.

    1983-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody directed against a cell surface chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan of human melanoma cells, 9.2.27, and its diphtheria toxin A chain (DTA) conjugate were investigated for their effects on in vitro protein synthesis and in vivo tumor growth of human melanoma cells. The 9.2.27 IgG and its DTA conjugate display similar serological activities against melanoma target cells but only the conjugate can induce consistent in vitro inhibition of protein synthesis and toxicity in M21 melanoma cells. However, both 9.2.27 IgG and its DTA conjugate effect significant suppression of M21 tumor growth in vivo in an immunotherapy model of a rapidly growing tumor in athymic nu/nu mice, suggesting that other host mechanisms may mediate monoclonal antibody-induced tumor suppression.

  6. An Uncoordinated-5 Homolog B Receptor Monoclonal Antibody Regulates A375 Melanoma Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Yuanling; He, Jun; Zhao, Yiming; He, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Uncoordinated-5 homolog B receptor (UNC5B) was first found to mediate neural chemorepulsive effects by binding to its ligand netrin-1 in the nervous system. Newer evidence indicated that UNC5B also has functions outside the nervous system. In this study, we report on the generation of a monoclonal antibody specific to the outer-membrane immunoglobulin-like domains of UNC5B using the hybridoma technique. Western blot, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometry analyses showed that the antibody specifically bound to UNC5B protein. Interestingly, the antibody blocked the Netrin-1-induced inhibitory effect on the mobility of melanoma A375 cells by wound healing assay and transwell migration assay, whereas it had no effects on cell proliferation measured by CCK-8 assay. Thus, the functional antibody may provide a useful tool for the study of UNC5B expression profiles and functions outside the nervous system. PMID:25171009

  7. Selecting agonists from single cells infected with combinatorial antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Yea, Kyungmoo; Xie, Jia; Ruiz, Diana; Wilson, Ian A; Lerner, Richard A

    2013-05-23

    We describe a system for direct selection of antibodies that are receptor agonists. Combinatorial antibody libraries in lentiviruses are used to infect eukaryotic cells that contain a fluorescent reporter system coupled to the receptor for which receptor agonist antibodies are sought. In this embodiment of the method, very large numbers of candidate antibodies expressing lentivirus and eukaryotic reporter cells are packaged together in a format where each is capable of replication, thereby forging a direct link between genotype and phenotype. Following infection, cells that fluoresce are sorted and the integrated genes encoding the agonist antibodies recovered. We validated the system by illustrating its ability to generate rapidly potent antibody agonists that are complete thrombopoietin phenocopies. The system should be generalizable to any pathway where its activation can be linked to production of a selectable phenotype. PMID:23706638

  8. CD13 mediates phagocytosis in human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Licona-Limón, Ileana; Garay-Canales, Claudia A; Muñoz-Paleta, Ofelia; Ortega, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    CD13 is a membrane-bound ectopeptidase, highly expressed on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is involved in diverse functions, including degradation of peptide mediators, cellular adhesion, migration, viral endocytosis, signaling, and positive modulation of phagocytosis mediated by FcγRs and other phagocytic receptors. In this work, we explored whether besides acting as an accessory receptor, CD13 by itself is a primary phagocytic receptor. We found that hCD13 mediates efficient phagocytosis of large particles (erythrocytes) modified so as to interact with the cell only through CD13 in human macrophages and THP-1 monocytic cells. The extent of this phagocytosis is comparable with the phagocytosis mediated through the canonical phagocytic receptor FcγRI. Furthermore, we demonstrated that hCD13 expression in the nonphagocytic cell line HEK293 is sufficient to enable these cells to internalize particles bound through hCD13. CD13-mediated phagocytosis is independent of other phagocytic receptors, as it occurs in the absence of FcγRs, CR3, and most phagocytic receptors. Phagocytosis through CD13 is independent of its enzymatic activity but is dependent on actin rearrangement and activation of PI3K and is partially dependent on Syk activation. Moreover, the cross-linking of CD13 with antibodies rapidly induced pSyk in human macrophages. Finally, we observed that antibody-mediated cross-linking of hCD13, expressed in the murine macrophage-like J774 cell line, induces production of ROS. These results demonstrate that CD13 is a fully competent phagocytic receptor capable of mediating internalization of large particles. PMID:25934926

  9. Univalent antibodies kill tumour cells in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glennie, M. J.; Stevenson, G. T.

    1982-02-01

    Antibody molecules are bivalent, or less often multivalent, with each antibody site within a single molecule having the same specificity. Bivalency must enhance the tenacity of antibody attachment to cell surfaces, as dissociation will require simultaneous release at both sites. However, the bivalency of the antibody sometimes induces a target cell to undergo antigenic modulation1-3, thereby offering the cell a means of evading complement and the various effector cells recruited by the antibody. We have investigated the attack by univalent antibodies, which, despite removal of one antibody site, retain their Fc zones and hence their ability to recruit the killing agents, on neoplastic B lymphocytes of the guinea pig L2C line. Rabbit antibodies raised against surface immunoglobulin of these cells were partially digested with papain to yield the univalent Fab/c derivatives4,5. We report here that these derivatives showed enhanced cell killing both in vitro and in vivo, and that this enhancement appeared to derive from avoiding antigenic modulation.

  10. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies from single rhesus macaque antibody secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Weixu; Li, Leike; Xiong, Wei; Fan, Xuejun; Deng, Hui; Bett, Andrew J; Chen, Zhifeng; Tang, Aimin; Cox, Kara S; Joyce, Joseph G; Freed, Daniel C; Thoryk, Elizabeth; Fu, Tong-Ming; Casimiro, Danilo R; Zhang, Ningyan; A Vora, Kalpit; An, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are used as a preclinical model for vaccine development, and the antibody profiles to experimental vaccines in NHPs can provide critical information for both vaccine design and translation to clinical efficacy. However, an efficient protocol for generating monoclonal antibodies from single antibody secreting cells of NHPs is currently lacking. In this study we established a robust protocol for cloning immunoglobulin (IG) variable domain genes from single rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) antibody secreting cells. A sorting strategy was developed using a panel of molecular markers (CD3, CD19, CD20, surface IgG, intracellular IgG, CD27, Ki67 and CD38) to identify the kinetics of B cell response after vaccination. Specific primers for the rhesus macaque IG genes were designed and validated using cDNA isolated from macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cloning efficiency was averaged at 90% for variable heavy (VH) and light (VL) domains, and 78.5% of the clones (n = 335) were matched VH and VL pairs. Sequence analysis revealed that diverse IGHV subgroups (for VH) and IGKV and IGLV subgroups (for VL) were represented in the cloned antibodies. The protocol was tested in a study using an experimental dengue vaccine candidate. About 26.6% of the monoclonal antibodies cloned from the vaccinated rhesus macaques react with the dengue vaccine antigens. These results validate the protocol for cloning monoclonal antibodies in response to vaccination from single macaque antibody secreting cells, which have general applicability for determining monoclonal antibody profiles in response to other immunogens or vaccine studies of interest in NHPs. PMID:25996084

  11. Generation of BiKEs and TriKEs to Improve NK Cell-Mediated Targeting of Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Felices, Martin; Lenvik, Todd R; Davis, Zachary B; Miller, Jeffrey S; Vallera, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapies have gained significant momentum over the past decade, particularly with the advent of checkpoint inhibitors and CAR T-cells. While the latter personalized targeted immunotherapy has revolutionized the field, a need for off-the-shelf therapies remains. The ability of NK cells to quickly lyse antibody-coated tumors and potently secrete cytokines without prior priming has made NK cells ideal candidates for antigen-specific immunotherapy. NK cells have been targeted to tumors through two main strategies: mono-specific antibodies and bi/tri-specific antibodies. Mono-specific antibodies drive NK cell antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of tumor cells. Bi/tri-specific antibodies drive re-directed lysis of tumor cells through binding of a tumor antigen and direct binding and crosslinking of the CD16 receptor on NK cells, thus bypassing the need for binding of the Fc portion of mono-specific antibodies. This chapter focuses on the generation of bi- and tri-specific killer engagers (BiKEs and TriKEs) meant to target NK cells to tumors. BiKEs and TriKEs are smaller molecules composed of 2-3 variable portions of antibodies with different specificities, and represent a novel and more versatile strategy compared to traditional bi- and tri-specific antibody platforms. PMID:27177679

  12. Taxanes enhance trastuzumab-mediated ADCC on tumor cells through NKG2D-mediated NK cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Di Modica, Martina; Sfondrini, Lucia; Regondi, Viola; Varchetta, Stefania; Oliviero, Barbara; Mariani, Gabriella; Bianchi, Giulia Valeria; Generali, Daniele; Balsari, Andrea; Triulzi, Tiziana; Tagliabue, Elda

    2016-01-01

    Recent clinical data indicate a synergistic therapeutic effect between trastuzumab and taxanes in neoadjuvantly treated HER2-positive breast cancer (BC) patients. In HER2+ BC experimental models and patients, we investigated whether this synergy depends on the ability of drug-induced stress to improve NK cell effectiveness and thus trastuzumab-mediated ADCC. HER2+ BC cell lines BT474 and MDAMB361 treated with docetaxel showed up-modulation of NK activator ligands both in vitro and in vivo, accompanied by a 15-40% increase in in vitro trastuzumab-mediated ADCC; antibodies blocking the NKG2D receptor significantly reduced this enhancement. NKG2D receptor expression was increased by docetaxel treatment in circulating and splenic NK cells from mice xenografted with tumor cells, an increase related to expansion of the CD11b+Ly6G+ cell population. Accordingly, NK cells derived from HER2+ BC patients after treatment with taxane-containing therapy expressed higher levels of NKG2D receptor than before treatment. Moreover, plasma obtained from these patients recapitulated the modulation of NKG2D on healthy donors' NK cells, improving their trastuzumab-mediated activity in vitro. This enhancement occurred mainly using plasma from patients with low NKG2D basal expression. Our results indicate that taxanes increase tumor susceptibility to ADCC by acting on tumor and NK cells, and suggest that taxanes concomitantly administered with trastuzumab could maximize the antibody effect, especially in patients with low basal immune effector cytotoxic activity. PMID:26595802

  13. Taxanes enhance trastuzumab-mediated ADCC on tumor cells through NKG2D-mediated NK cell recognition

    PubMed Central

    Regondi, Viola; Varchetta, Stefania; Oliviero, Barbara; Mariani, Gabriella; Bianchi, Giulia Valeria; Generali, Daniele; Balsari, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Recent clinical data indicate a synergistic therapeutic effect between trastuzumab and taxanes in neoadjuvantly treated HER2-positive breast cancer (BC) patients. In HER2+ BC experimental models and patients, we investigated whether this synergy depends on the ability of drug-induced stress to improve NK cell effectiveness and thus trastuzumab-mediated ADCC. HER2+ BC cell lines BT474 and MDAMB361 treated with docetaxel showed up-modulation of NK activator ligands both in vitro and in vivo, accompanied by a 15–40% increase in in vitro trastuzumab-mediated ADCC; antibodies blocking the NKG2D receptor significantly reduced this enhancement. NKG2D receptor expression was increased by docetaxel treatment in circulating and splenic NK cells from mice xenografted with tumor cells, an increase related to expansion of the CD11b+Ly6G+ cell population. Accordingly, NK cells derived from HER2+ BC patients after treatment with taxane-containing therapy expressed higher levels of NKG2D receptor than before treatment. Moreover, plasma obtained from these patients recapitulated the modulation of NKG2D on healthy donors' NK cells, improving their trastuzumab-mediated activity in vitro. This enhancement occurred mainly using plasma from patients with low NKG2D basal expression. Our results indicate that taxanes increase tumor susceptibility to ADCC by acting on tumor and NK cells, and suggest that taxanes concomitantly administered with trastuzumab could maximize the antibody effect, especially in patients with low basal immune effector cytotoxic activity. PMID:26595802

  14. Iron as the Key Modulator of Hepcidin Expression in Erythroid Antibody-Mediated Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, J. C.; Garrido, P.; Ribeiro, S.; Rocha-Pereira, P.; Bronze-da-Rocha, E.; Belo, L.; Costa, E.; Reis, F.; Santos-Silva, A.

    2014-01-01

    Erythroid hypoplasia (EH) is a rare complication associated with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapies, due to development of anti-rHuEPO antibodies; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly clarified. Our aim was to manage a rat model of antibody-mediated EH induced by rHuEPO and study the impact on iron metabolism and erythropoiesis. Wistar rats treated during 9 weeks with a high rHuEPO dose (200 IU) developed EH, as shown by anemia, reduced erythroblasts, reticulocytopenia, and plasmatic anti-rHuEPO antibodies. Serum iron was increased and associated with mRNA overexpression of hepatic hepcidin and other iron regulatory mediators and downregulation of matriptase-2; overexpression of divalent metal transporter 1 and ferroportin was observed in duodenum and liver. Decreased EPO expression was observed in kidney and liver, while EPO receptor was overexpressed in liver. Endogenous EPO levels were normal, suggesting that anti-rHuEPO antibodies blunted EPO function. Our results suggest that anti-rHuEPO antibodies inhibit erythropoiesis causing anemia. This leads to a serum iron increase, which seems to stimulate hepcidin expression despite no evidence of inflammation, thus suggesting iron as the key modulator of hepcidin synthesis. These findings might contribute to improving new therapeutic strategies against rHuEPO resistance and/or development of antibody-mediated EH in patients under rHuEPO therapy. PMID:25580431

  15. Enhanced antigen-antibody binding affinity mediated by an anti-idiotypic antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Sawutz, D.G.; Koury, R.; Homcy, C.J.

    1987-08-25

    The authors previously described the production of four monoclonal antibodies to the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor antagonist alprenolol. One of these antibodies, 5B7 (IgG/sub 2a/, kappa), was used to raise anti-idiotypic antisera in rabbits. In contrast to the expected results, one of the anti-idiotypic antisera (R9) promotes (/sup 125/I)iodocyanopinodolol (ICYP) binding to antibody 5B7. In the presence of R9, the dissociation constant decreases 100-fold from 20 to 0.3 nM. This increase in binding affinity of antibody 5B7 for ICYP is not observed in the presence of preimmune, rabbit anti-mouse or anti-idiotypic antisera generated to a monoclonal antibody of a different specificity. Furthermore, R9 in the absence of 5B7 does not bind ICYP. The F(ab) fragments of 5B7 and T9 behaved in a similar manner, and the soluble complex responsible for the high-affinity interaction with ICYP can be identified by gel filtration chromatography. The elution position of the complex is consistent with a 5B7 F(ab)-R9 F(ab) dimer, indicating that polyvalency is not responsible for the enhanced ligand binding. Kinetic analysis of ICYP-5B7 binding revealed that the rate of ICYP dissociation from 5B7 in the presence of R9 is approximately 100 times slower than in the absence of R9, consistent with the 100-fold change in binding affinity of 5B7 for ICYP. The available data best fit a model in which an anti-idiotypic antibody binds at or near the binding site of the idiotype participating in the formation of a hybrid ligand binding site. This would allow increased contact of the ligand with the idiotype-anti-idiotype complex and result in an enhanced affinity of the ligand interaction.

  16. [Immunopathogenesis of cytotoxic antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Morenz, J

    1980-01-15

    This review deals with autoantibodies, autoantigens, immunopathogenetic mechanisms and their consequences in autoimmune diseases caused by cytotoxic antibodies. Findings demonstrating the pathogenicity and pathogenic potency of antibodies, the involvement of complement and polymorphonuclears, and the chain of events leading from the start of immune reactions to clinical signs and symptoms are stressed. It is shown that the immunopathogenesis of this group of diseases can be deduced from only a few related immune mechanisms while the heterogeneity of clinical syndromes can be explained primarily by the function and localization of autoantigens. Questions still open and findings not yet understood are pointed out. From the progress of immunology in recent years further diseases can be expected to be recognized as type II autoimmune diseases in the years ahead notably by the combined application of immunological and physiological or pharmacological methods. PMID:6996350

  17. Non-IgE antibody mediated mechanisms in food allergy.

    PubMed

    Halpern, G M; Scott, J R

    1987-01-01

    Food sensitivity or intolerance is not necessarily based on the Type I allergic reaction. Non-IgE antibody reactions, complement-dependent reactions, enzyme deficiencies such as lactase and non-immunologic histamine release (such as with some sea foods) have been described. Even the detection of specific antibodies on their own does not necessarily indicate that a given symptom is due to that antibody. Food allergy nevertheless exists. It is important that those observers fortunate enough to see many cases document their observations carefully and eventually publish them for the education of their less fortunate colleagues. Is food allergy more common in infants and young children? What happens as they grow older? How often is atopic eczema due to food allergy? Why are some foods more likely to be implicated than others? Does a negative RAST result eliminate the diagnosis or a positive one confirm it? Until the answers to these and other questions are known, the mainstay of diagnosis will be the history, and that of treatment will be the elimination diet. PMID:3099610

  18. A Therapeutic Antibody for Cancer, Derived from Single Human B Cells.

    PubMed

    Bushey, Ryan T; Moody, M Anthony; Nicely, Nathan L; Haynes, Barton F; Alam, S Munir; Keir, Stephen T; Bentley, Rex C; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Gottlin, Elizabeth B; Campa, Michael J; Liao, Hua-Xin; Patz, Edward F

    2016-05-17

    Some patients with cancer never develop metastasis, and their host response might provide cues for innovative treatment strategies. We previously reported an association between autoantibodies against complement factor H (CFH) and early-stage lung cancer. CFH prevents complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC) by inhibiting formation of cell-lytic membrane attack complexes on self-surfaces. In an effort to translate these findings into a biologic therapy for cancer, we isolated and expressed DNA sequences encoding high-affinity human CFH antibodies directly from single, sorted B cells obtained from patients with the antibody. The co-crystal structure of a CFH antibody-target complex shows a conformational change in the target relative to the native structure. This recombinant CFH antibody causes complement activation and release of anaphylatoxins, promotes CDC of tumor cell lines, and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. The isolation of anti-tumor antibodies derived from single human B cells represents an alternative paradigm in antibody drug discovery. PMID:27160908

  19. Viremic HIV controllers exhibit high plasmacytoid dendritic cell\\reactive opsonophagocytic IgG antibody responses against HIV-1 p24 associated with greater antibody isotype diversification

    PubMed Central

    Tjiam, M. Christian; Taylor, James P. A.; Morshidi, Mazmah A.; Sariputra, Lucy; Burrows, Sally; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Tan, Dino B.A.; Lee, Silvia; Fernandez, Sonia; French, Martyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the mechanisms of natural control of HIV-1 infection could lead to novel approaches to prevent or cure HIV infection. Several studies have associated natural control of HIV-1 infection with IgG antibodies against HIV-1 Gag proteins (e.g. p24) and/or production of IgG2 antibodies against HIV-1 proteins. These antibodies likely exert their effect by activating anti-viral effector cell responses rather than virus neutralization. We hypothesized that an opsonophagocytic IgG antibody response against HIV-1 p24 that activates plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) through FcγRIIa would be associated with control of HIV and that this would be enhanced by antibody isotype diversification. Using the Gen2.2 pDC cell line, we demonstrated that pDC-reactive opsonophagocytic IgG antibody responses against HIV-1 p24 were higher in HIV controllers (HIV RNA <2000 copies/mL) than non-controllers (HIV RNA >10,000 copies/mL) particularly in controllers with low but detectable viremia (HIV RNA 75–2000 copies/mL). Opsonophagocytic antibody responses correlated with plasma levels of IgG1 and IgG2 anti-HIV-1 p24 and notably, correlated inversely with plasma HIV RNA levels in viremic HIV patients. Phagocytosis of these antibodies was mediated via FcγRIIa. Isotype diversification (towards IgG2) was greatest in HIV controllers and depletion of IgG2 from immunoglobulin preparations indicated that IgG2 antibodies to HIV-1 p24 do not enhance phagocytosis, suggesting that they enhance other aspects of antibody function, such as antigen opsonization. Our findings emulate those for pDC-reactive opsonophagocytic antibody responses against coxsackie, picorna and influenza viruses and demonstrate a previously undefined immune correlate of HIV-1 control that may be relevant to HIV vaccine development. PMID:25911748

  20. Recombinant antibody mediated delivery of organelle-specific DNA pH sensors along endocytic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Souvik; Halder, Saheli; Nizak, Clément; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2013-12-01

    DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing the sequence of the pH sensitive domain of the DNA sensor, we have been able to tune their pH sensitive regimes and create a family of DNA sensors spanning ranges from pH 4 to 7.6. To enable a generalizable targeting methodology, this new sensor design also incorporates a `handle' domain. We have identified, using a phage display screen, a set of three recombinant antibodies (scFv) that bind sequence specifically to the handle domain. Sequence analysis of these antibodies revealed several conserved residues that mediate specific interactions with the cognate DNA duplex. We also found that all three scFvs clustered into different branches indicating that their specificity arises from mutations in key residues. When one of these scFvs is fused to a membrane protein (furin) that traffics via the cell surface, the scFv-furin chimera binds the `handle' and ferries a family of DNA pH sensors along the furin endocytic pathway. Post endocytosis, all DNA nanodevices retain their functionality in cellulo and provide spatiotemporal pH maps of retrogradely trafficking furin inside living cells. This new molecular technology of DNA-scFv-protein chimeras can be used to site-specifically complex DNA nanostructures for bioanalytical applications.DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing

  1. Lenalidomide enhances antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of solid tumor cells in vitro: influence of host immune and tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Parton, Anastasia; Lu, Ling; Adams, Mary; Schafer, Peter; Bartlett, J Blake

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of combining lenalidomide with therapeutic antibodies on antibody-dependant cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of solid tumor cells, and the requirement for expression of natural killer (NK) cell-activating receptors and their solid tumor surface ligands. Twenty-three human tumor cell lines (colon, breast, lung, head and neck, ovary, and bone sarcoma) were analyzed. NK effector cells were isolated from healthy donors, pre-treated with and without lenalidomide, and incubated with antibody-coated tumor cells to determine ADCC. In blocking experiments, NK cells were pre-incubated with anti-DNAM-1 or anti-NKG2D antibodies, and target colorectal cells were pre-incubated with anti-CD155 (PVR), anti-MIC-A/B, or anti-ULBP 3 antibodies. Differences between groups were assessed using unpaired and paired Student's t test and one-way ANOVA. Lenalidomide enhanced NK cell-mediated ADCC of trastuzumab- and cetuximab-coated tumor cells. Activity against colorectal cancer cells was dependent on target antigen expression, but independent of KRAS status and FcγRIIIa genotype. The extent of ADCC and its enhancement by lenalidomide correlated with NK cell expression of NKG2D and DNAM-1, and tumor cell expression of PVR and MIC-A. Blocking of NKG2D and, to a lesser extent, DNAM-1 inhibited ADCC. Anti-MIC-A/B monoclonal antibody blocked natural cytotoxicity, but not ADCC. Lenalidomide enhances the ability of IgG1-isotype antibodies to mediate ADCC of solid tumor cells, the extent of which is largely dependent on NKG2D-NKG2D ligand interactions, but appears to be independent of MIC-A/B. This provides a rationale for exploratory clinical studies and an assessment of potential biomarkers predictive of clinical benefit. PMID:20848094

  2. Late antibody-mediated rejection after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation during Gram-negative sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The major challenge in ABO-incompatible transplantation is to minimize antibody-mediated rejection. Effective reduction of the anti-ABO blood group antibodies at the time of transplantation has made ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation a growing practice in our hospital and in centers worldwide. ABO antibodies result from contact with A- and B-like antigens in the intestines via nutrients and bacteria. We demonstrate a patient with fulminant antibody-mediated rejection late after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation, whose anti-A antibody titers rose dramatically following Serratia marcescens sepsis. Case presentation A 58-year-old woman underwent an ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation for end-stage renal disease secondary to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. It concerned a blood group A1 to O donation. Pre-desensitization titers were 64 for anti-blood group A IgM and 32 for anti-blood group A IgG titers. Desensitization treatment consisted of rituximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, corticosteroids, immunoadsorption and intravenous immunoglobulines. She was readmitted to our hospital 11 weeks after transplantation for S. marcescens urosepsis. Her anti-A IgM titer rose to >5000 and she developed a fulminant antibody-mediated rejection. We hypothesized that the (overwhelming) presence in the blood of S. marcescens stimulated anti-A antibody formation, as S. marcescens might share epitopes with blood group A antigen. Unfortunately we could not demonstrate interaction between blood group A and S. marcescens in incubation experiments. Conclusion Two features of this post-transplant course are remarkably different from other reports of acute rejection in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation: first, the late occurrence 12 weeks after kidney transplantation and second, the very high anti-A IgM titers (>5000), suggesting recent boosting of anti-A antibody formation by S. marcescens. PMID:24517251

  3. Profiling antibody responses by multiparametric analysis of primary B cells.

    PubMed

    Story, Craig M; Papa, Eliseo; Hu, Chih-Chi Andrew; Ronan, Jehnna L; Herlihy, Kara; Ploegh, Hidde L; Love, J Christopher

    2008-11-18

    Determining the efficacy of a vaccine generally relies on measuring neutralizing antibodies in sera. This measure cannot elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the development of immunological memory at the cellular level, however. Quantitative profiles that detail the cellular origin, extent, and diversity of the humoral (antibody-based) immune response would improve both the assessment and development of vaccines. Here, we describe a novel approach to collect multiparametric datasets that describe the specificity, isotype, and apparent affinity of the antibodies secreted from large numbers of individual primary B cells (approximately 10(3)-10(4)). The antibody/antigen binding curves obtained by this approach can be used to classify closely related populations of cells using algorithms for data clustering, and the relationships among populations can be visualized graphically using affinity heatmaps. The technique described was used to evaluate the diversity of antigen-specific antibody-secreting cells generated during an in vivo humoral response to a series of immunizations designed to mimic a multipart vaccination. Profiles correlating primary antibody-producing cells with the molecular characteristics of their secreted antibodies should facilitate both the evaluation of candidate vaccines and, broadly, studies on the repertoires of antibodies generated in response to infectious or autoimmune diseases. PMID:19004776

  4. The use of antibody to complement protein C5 for salvage treatment of severe antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Locke, J E; Magro, C M; Singer, A L; Segev, D L; Haas, M; Hillel, A T; King, K E; Kraus, E; Lees, L M; Melancon, J K; Stewart, Z A; Warren, D S; Zachary, A A; Montgomery, R A

    2009-01-01

    Desensitized patients are at high risk of developing acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). In most cases, the rejection episodes are mild and respond to a short course of plasmapheresis (PP) / low-dose IVIg treatment. However, a subset of patients experience severe AMR associated with sudden onset oliguria. We previously described the utility of emergent splenectomy in rescuing allografts in patients with this type of severe AMR. However, not all patients are good candidates for splenectomy. Here we present a single case in which eculizumab, a complement protein C5 antibody that inhibits the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), was used combined with PP/IVIg to salvage a kidney undergoing severe AMR. We show a marked decrease in C5b-C9 (MAC) complex deposition in the kidney after the administration of eculizumab. PMID:18976298

  5. HIV-Specific Functional Antibody Responses in Breast Milk Mirror Those in Plasma and Are Primarily Mediated by IgG Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fouda, Genevieve G.; Yates, Nicole L.; Pollara, Justin; Shen, Xiaoying; Overman, Glenn R.; Mahlokozera, Tatenda; Wilks, Andrew B.; Kang, Helen H.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Salazar, Maria G.; Kalilani, Linda; Meshnick, Steve R.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.; Lovingood, Rachel V.; Denny, Thomas N.; Haynes, Barton; Letvin, Norman L.; Ferrari, Guido; Montefiori, David C.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Permar, Sallie R.

    2011-01-01

    Despite months of mucosal virus exposure, the majority of breastfed infants born to HIV-infected mothers do not become infected, raising the possibility that immune factors in milk inhibit mucosal transmission of HIV. HIV Envelope (Env)-specific antibodies are present in the milk of HIV-infected mothers, but little is known about their virus-specific functions. In this study, HIV Env-specific antibody binding, autologous and heterologous virus neutralization, and antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) responses were measured in the milk and plasma of 41 HIV-infected lactating women. Although IgA is the predominant antibody isotype in milk, HIV Env-specific IgG responses were higher in magnitude than HIV Env-specific IgA responses in milk. The concentrations of anti-HIV gp120 IgG in milk and plasma were directly correlated (r = 0.75; P < 0.0001), yet the response in milk was 2 logarithm units lower than in plasma. Similarly, heterologous virus neutralization (r = 0.39; P = 0.010) and ADCC activity (r = 0.64; P < 0.0001) in milk were directly correlated with that in the systemic compartment but were 2 log units lower in magnitude. Autologous neutralization was rarely detected in milk. Milk heterologous virus neutralization titers correlated with HIV gp120 Env-binding IgG responses but not with IgA responses (r = 0.71 and P < 0.0001, and r = 0.17 and P = 0.30). Moreover, IgGs purified from milk and plasma had equal neutralizing potencies against a tier 1 virus (r = 0.65; P < 0.0001), whereas only 1 out of 35 tested non-IgG milk fractions had detectable neutralization. These results suggest that plasma-derived IgG antibodies mediate the majority of the low-level HIV neutralization and ADCC activity in breast milk. PMID:21734046

  6. [Continuous perfusion culture hybridoma cells for production of monoclonal antibody].

    PubMed

    Mi, Li; Li, Ling; Feng, Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Nan

    2002-05-01

    Hybridoma cells were cultured by continuous perfusion in Fibra-Cel of 5L packed-bed bioreactor for 22 days in low serum or serum-free media. The corresponded amino acids were fed and serum concentration was decreased by analyzing glucose concentration, oxygen uptake rate, secretary antibody amount and amino acids concentration in culture supernatant. Comparing with continuous perfusion culture that amino acids were not fed, antibody amount of production was increased about 2-3 times. The inoculated cell density was 2.5 x 10(5) cells/mL, while the final cell density was 8.79 x 10(8) cells/mL. Antibody production was reached 295 mg/L/d at average level, and the highest level was reached 532 mg/L/d. These results provided a primary mode of enlarge culture for monoclonal antibody industralization. PMID:12192875

  7. Anti-dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 antibodies cause NO-mediated endothelial cell apoptosis via ceramide-regulated glycogen synthase kinase-3β and NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Wan, Shu-Wen; Wei, Li-Shiung; Chen, Mei-Chun; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Anderson, Robert; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2013-08-15

    Immunopathogenetic mechanisms of dengue virus (DENV) infection are involved in hemorrhagic syndrome resulting from thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, and vasculopathy. We have proposed a mechanism of molecular mimicry in which Abs against DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) cross-react with human endothelial cells and cause NF-κB-regulated immune activation and NO-mediated apoptosis. However, the signaling pathway leading to NF-κB activation after the binding of anti-DENV NS1 Abs to endothelial cells is unresolved. In this study, we found that anti-DENV NS1 Abs caused the formation of lipid raftlike structures, and that disrupting lipid raft formation by methyl-β-cyclodextrin decreased NO production and apoptosis. Treatment with anti-DENV NS1 Abs elevated ceramide generation in lipid rafts. Pharmacological inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) decreased anti-DENV NS1 Ab-mediated ceramide and NO production, as well as apoptosis. Exogenous ceramide treatment induced biogenesis of inducible NO synthase (iNOS)/NO and apoptosis through an NF-κB-regulated manner. Furthermore, activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) was required for ceramide-induced NF-κB activation and iNOS expression. Notably, anti-DENV NS1 Abs caused GSK-3β-mediated NF-κB activation and iNOS expression, which were regulated by aSMase. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3β reduced hepatic endothelial cell apoptosis in mice passively administered anti-DENV NS1 Abs. These results suggest that anti-DENV NS1 Abs bind to the endothelial cell membrane and cause NO production and apoptosis via a mechanism involving the aSMase/ceramide/GSK-3β/NF-κB/iNOS/NO signaling pathway. PMID:23851680

  8. Markers of Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition: Evidence for Antibody-Endothelium Interaction during Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Recipients.

    PubMed

    Xu-Dubois, Yi-Chun; Peltier, Julie; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Suberbielle-Boissel, Caroline; Djamali, Arjang; Reese, Shannon; Mooney, Nuala; Keuylian, Zela; Lion, Julien; Ouali, Nacéra; Levy, Pierre P; Jouanneau, Chantal; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is a leading cause of allograft loss. Treatment efficacy depends on accurate diagnosis at an early stage. However, sensitive and reliable markers of antibody-endothelium interaction during ABMR are not available for routine use. Using immunohistochemistry, we retrospectively studied the diagnostic value of three markers of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), fascin1, vimentin, and heat shock protein 47, for ABMR in 53 renal transplant biopsy specimens, including 20 ABMR specimens, 24 cell-mediated rejection specimens, and nine normal grafts. We validated our results in an independent set of 74 unselected biopsy specimens. Endothelial cells of the peritubular capillaries in grafts with ABMR expressed fascin1, vimentin, and heat shock protein 47 strongly, whereas those from normal renal grafts did not. The level of EndMT marker expression was significantly associated with current ABMR criteria, including capillaritis, glomerulitis, peritubular capillary C4d deposition, and donor-specific antibodies. These markers allowed us to identify C4d-negative ABMR and to predict late occurrence of disease. EndMT markers were more specific than capillaritis for the diagnosis and prognosis of ABMR and predicted late (up to 4 years after biopsy) renal graft dysfunction and proteinuria. In the independent set of 74 renal graft biopsy specimens, the EndMT markers for the diagnosis of ABMR had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 85%. Fascin1 expression in peritubular capillaries was also induced in a rat model of ABMR. In conclusion, EndMT markers are a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool for detecting endothelial activation during ABMR and predicting late loss of allograft function. PMID:25995444

  9. PRESENCE OF PRE-EXISTING ANTIBODIES MEDIATE SURVIVAL IN SEPSIS

    PubMed Central

    Moitra, Rituparna; Beal, Dominic R.; Belikoff, Bryan G.; Remick, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in hospitals worldwide. Even with optimal therapy, severe sepsis results in 50% mortality, indicating variability in the response of individuals towards treatment. We hypothesize that the presence of pre-existing antibodies present in the blood before the onset of sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in mice, accounts for the differences in their survival. A Plasma Enhanced Killing (PEK) assay was performed to calculate the PEK capacity of plasma i.e. the ability of plasma to augment PMN killing of bacteria. PEK was calculated as PEK= (1/log (N)) × 100; where N= number of surviving bacteria; a higher PEK indicated better bacterial killing. A range of PEK in plasma collected from mice prior to CLP was observed, documenting individual differences in bacterial killing capacity. Mortality was predicted based on plasma IL-6 levels at 24 hr post CLP. Mice predicted to die (Die-P) had a lower PEK (<14) and higher peritoneal bacterial counts 24 hr post sepsis compared to those predicted to live (Live-P) with a PEK>16. Mice with PEK<14 were 3.1 times more likely to die compared to the PEK>16 group. To understand the mechanism of defense conferred by the pre-existing antibodies, binding of IgM or IgG to enteric bacteria was documented by flow cytometry. To determine the relative contribution of IgM or IgG, the immunoglobulins were specifically immuno-depleted from the naïve plasma samples and the PEK of the depleted plasma measured. Compared to naïve plasma, depletion of IgM had no effect on the PEK. However, depletion of IgG increased PEK suggesting that an inhibitory IgG binds to antigenic sites on bacteria preventing optimal opsonization of the bacteria. These data demonstrate that prior to CLP; circulating inhibitory IgG antibodies exist that prevent bacterial killing by PMNs in a CLP model of sepsis. PMID:21921828

  10. Establishment of a cell model for screening antibody drugs against rheumatoid arthritis with ADCC and CDC.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Hu, Rui; Tu, Song; Cheng, Wen-Jun; Zheng, Qiong; Wang, Jun-Wen; Kan, Wu-Sheng; Ren, Yi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    TNFα played a dominant role in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Clinical trials proved the efficacies of anti-TNFα agents for curing RA. However, most researchers were concentrating on their abilities of neutralizing TNFα, the potencies of different anti-TNFα agents varied a lot due to the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). For better understanding and differentiating the potentiality of various candidate anti-TNF reagents at the stage of new drug research and development, present study established a cell model expressing the transmembrane TNFα for usage in in vitro ADCC or CDC assay, meanwhile, the assay protocol described here could provide guidelines for screening macromolecular antibody drugs. A stable cell subline bearing transmembrane TNFα was first established by conventional transfection method, the expression of transmembrane TNFα was approved by flow cytometer, and the performance of the stable subline in ADCC and CDC assay was evaluated, using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as effector cells, and Adalimumab as the anti-TNFα reagent. The stable cell subline demonstrated high level of surface expression of transmembrane TNFα, and Adalimumab exerted both ADCC and CDC effects on this cell model. In conclusion, the stable cell line we established in present research could be used in ADCC or CDC assay for screening antibody drugs, which would provide in-depth understanding of the potencies of candidate antibody drugs in addition to the traditional TNFα neutralizing assay. PMID:26884918

  11. Rapid Reduction in Donor-Specific Anti-Human Leukocyte Antigen Antibodies and Reversal of Antibody-Mediated Rejection With Bortezomib in Pediatric Heart Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, William Robert; Frazier, Elizabeth A.; Mahle, William T.; Harville, Terry O.; Pye, Sherry E.; Knecht, Kenneth R.; Howard, Emily L.; Smith, R. Neal; Saylors, Robert L.; Garcia, Xiomara; Jaquiss, Robert D.B.; Woodle, E. Steve

    2013-01-01

    Background High titer donor-specific antibodies (DSA) and positive crossmatch in cardiac transplant recipients is associated with increased mortality from antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Although treatment to reduce antihuman leukocyte antigen antibodies using plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab has been reported to be beneficial, in practice these are often ineffective. Moreover, these interventions do not affect the mature antibody producing plasma cell. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor active against plasma cells, has been shown to reduce DSA in renal transplant patients with AMR. We report here the first use of bortezomib for cardiac transplant recipients in four pediatric heart recipients with biopsy-proven AMR, hemodynamic compromise, positive crossmatch, and high titer class I DSA. Methods Patients received four intravenous dose of bortezomib (1.3 mg/m2) over 2 weeks with plasmapheresis and rituximab. DSA specificity and strength (mean fluorescence intensity) was determined with Luminex. All had received previous treatment with plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab that was ineffective. Results AMR resolved in all patients treated with bortezomib with improvement in systolic function, conversion of biopsy to C4d negative in three patients and IgG negative in one patient, and a prompt, precipitous reduction in DSAs. In three patients who received plasmapheresis before bortezomib, plasmapheresis failed to reduce DSA. In one case, DSA increased after bortezomib but decreased after retreatment. Conclusions Bortezomib reduces DSA and may be an important adjunct to treatment of AMR in cardiac transplant recipients. Bortezomib may also be useful in desensitization protocols and in prevention of AMR in sensitized patients with positive crossmatch and elevated DSA. PMID:22179403

  12. Antibody h-R3-dendrimer mediated siRNA has excellent endosomal escape and tumor targeted delivery ability, and represents efficient siPLK1 silencing and inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Liu, Jing; Li, Shengnan; Hao, Yanli; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    The major obstacle to developing siRNA delivery is their extracellular and intracellular barriers. Herein, a humanized anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody h-R3 was developed to modify the self-assembled binary complexes (dendriplexes) of PAMAM and siRNA via electrostatic interactions, and two common ligands HSA and EGF were used as a control. Compared to dendriplexes, h-R3/EGF/HSA-dendriplexes showed increased particle size, decreased zeta potentials and lower cytotoxicity. Moreover, h-R3-dendriplexes presented greater cellular uptake and excellent endosomal escape ability in HepG2 cells. Ex vivo fluorescence imaging revealed that h-R3-dendriplexes showed higher targeted delivery and gene expression in the tumors than dendriplexes, HSA-dendriplexes and EGF-dendriplexes, which was in agreement with confocal results of cryosections. Furthermore, h-R3-dendriplexes for siPLK1 delivery indicated efficient gene silencing, potentiated cell growth inhibition and cell apoptosis, and suppressed cellular migration/invasion. These results indicate that h-R3-dendriplexes represent a great potential to be used as efficient targeted siRNA delivery carriers. PMID:26883109

  13. Modalities for treatment of antisperm antibody mediated infertility: novel perspectives.

    PubMed

    Naz, Rajesh K

    2004-05-01

    Immunoinfertility because of antisperm antibodies (ASA) is an important cause of infertility in humans. The incidence of ASA in infertile couples is 9-36% depending on the reporting center. Early claims regarding the incidence and involvement of ASA in involuntary infertility were probably overemphasized, which has resulted in subsequent confusion, doubt, and underestimation of their clinical significance. No immunoglobulin that binds to sperm should be called an antisperm antibody in a strict sense unless it is directed against a sperm antigen that plays a role in fertilization and fertility. ASA directed against the fertilization-related antigens are more relevant to infertility than the immunoglobulins that bind to sperm associated antigens. Several methods have been reported for treatment of immunoinfertility. These include: immunosuppressive therapies using corticosteroids or cyclosporine; assisted reproductive technologies such as intrauterine insemination, gamete intrafallopian transfer, in vitro fertilization, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection; laboratory techniques such as sperm washing, immunomagnetic sperm separation, proteolytic enzyme treatment, and use of immunobeads. Most of the available techniques have side effects, are invasive and expensive, have low efficacy, or provide conflicting results. Recent findings using defined sperm antigens that have a role in fertilization/fertility have provided animal models and innovative novel perspectives for studying the mechanism of immunoinfertility and possible modalities for treatment. The better understanding of local immunity and latest advances in hybridoma and recombinant technologies, proteomics and genomics leading to characterization of sperm antigens relevant to fertility will help to clarify the controversy and to establish the significance of ASA in infertility. PMID:15212677

  14. A Cell-Based Internalization and Degradation Assay with an Activatable Fluorescence-Quencher Probe as a Tool for Functional Antibody Screening.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Liu, Peter Corbett; Shen, Yang; Snavely, Marshall D; Hiraga, Kaori

    2015-08-01

    For the development of therapeutically potent anti-cancer antibody drugs, it is often important to identify antibodies that internalize into cells efficiently, rather than just binding to antigens on the cell surface. Such antibodies can mediate receptor endocytosis, resulting in receptor downregulation on the cell surface and potentially inhibiting receptor function and tumor growth. Also, efficient antibody internalization is a prerequisite for the delivery of cytotoxic drugs into target cells and is critical for the development of antibody-drug conjugates. Here we describe a novel activatable fluorescence-quencher pair to quantify the extent of antibody internalization and degradation in the target cells. In this assay, candidate antibodies were labeled with a fluorescent dye and a quencher. Fluorescence is inhibited outside and on the surface of cells, but activated upon endocytosis and degradation of the antibody. This assay enabled the development of a process for rapid characterization of candidate antibodies potentially in a high-throughput format. By employing an activatable secondary antibody, primary antibodies in purified form or in culture supernatants can be screened for internalization and degradation. Because purification of candidate antibodies is not required, this method represents a direct functional screen to identify antibodies that internalize efficiently early in the discovery process. PMID:26024945

  15. Adhesion between peptides/antibodies and breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, J.; Paetzell, E.; Bogorad, A.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2010-06-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to measure the adhesion forces between the receptors on breast cancer cells specific to human luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) peptides and antibodies specific to the EphA2 receptor. The adhesion forces between LHRH-coated AFM tips and human MDA-MB-231 cells (breast cancer cells) were shown to be about five times greater than those between LHRH-coated AFM tips and normal Hs578Bst breast cells. Similarly, those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and breast cancer cells were over five times greater than those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and normal breast cells. The results suggest that AFM can be used for the detection of breast cancer cells in biopsies. The implications of the results are also discussed for the early detection and localized treatment of cancer.

  16. Antibody-mediated disruption of the mechanics of CS20 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupender; Mortezaei, Narges; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Preventive vaccines against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are being developed, many of which target common fimbrial colonization factors as the major constituent, based on empirical evidence that these function as protective antigens. Particularly, passive oral administration of ETEC anti-fimbrial antibodies prevent ETEC diarrhea. Little is, however, known regarding the specific mechanisms by which intestinal antibodies against ETEC fimbriae function to prevent disease. Using coli surface antigen 20 (CS20) fimbriae as a model ETEC colonization factor, we show using force spectroscopy that anti-fimbrial antibodies diminish fimbrial elasticity by inhibiting their natural capacity to unwind and rewind. In the presence of anti-CS20 antibodies the force required to unwind a single fimbria was increased several-fold and the extension length was shortened several-fold. Similar measurements in the presence of anti-CS20 Fab fragments did not show any effect, indicating that bivalent antibody binding is required to reduce fimbrial elasticity. Based on these findings, we propose a model for an in-vivo mechanism whereby antibody-mediated disruption of the biomechanical properties of CS20 fimbriae impedes sustained adhesion of ETEC to the intestinal mucosal surface. Further elucidation of the role played by intestinal antibodies in mechanical disruption of fimbrial function may provide insights relevant to ETEC vaccine development. PMID:26411657

  17. Antibody-mediated disruption of the mechanics of CS20 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhupender; Mortezaei, Narges; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J.; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Preventive vaccines against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are being developed, many of which target common fimbrial colonization factors as the major constituent, based on empirical evidence that these function as protective antigens. Particularly, passive oral administration of ETEC anti-fimbrial antibodies prevent ETEC diarrhea. Little is, however, known regarding the specific mechanisms by which intestinal antibodies against ETEC fimbriae function to prevent disease. Using coli surface antigen 20 (CS20) fimbriae as a model ETEC colonization factor, we show using force spectroscopy that anti-fimbrial antibodies diminish fimbrial elasticity by inhibiting their natural capacity to unwind and rewind. In the presence of anti-CS20 antibodies the force required to unwind a single fimbria was increased several-fold and the extension length was shortened several-fold. Similar measurements in the presence of anti-CS20 Fab fragments did not show any effect, indicating that bivalent antibody binding is required to reduce fimbrial elasticity. Based on these findings, we propose a model for an in-vivo mechanism whereby antibody-mediated disruption of the biomechanical properties of CS20 fimbriae impedes sustained adhesion of ETEC to the intestinal mucosal surface. Further elucidation of the role played by intestinal antibodies in mechanical disruption of fimbrial function may provide insights relevant to ETEC vaccine development. PMID:26411657

  18. Diminished lymphocyte adhesion and alleviation of allergic responses by small-molecule- or antibody-mediated inhibition of L-selectin functions.

    PubMed

    Oostingh, Gertie J; Ludwig, Ralf J; Enders, Sven; Grüner, Sabine; Harms, Gesche; Boehncke, W Henning; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Tauber, Rudolf; Schön, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    Selectins are attractive targets for specific anti-inflammatory therapies. Using human lymphocytes as well as an L-selectin-transfected pre-B-cell line in dynamic flow chamber experiments, we could demonstrate that the small-molecule compound efomycine M blocks L-selectin-mediated lymphocyte rolling on sialylated Lewis(X), an action that was confirmed by plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Recruitment of naive lymphocytes to peripheral lymph nodes depends on L-selectin-mediated adhesion to high endothelial venules. We performed intravital microscopy studying lymphocyte rolling in peripheral lymph nodes and showed a 53% reduction (P=0.0006) of lymphocyte rolling in mice treated with efomycine M or a function-blocking antibody against L-selectin. In addition, the number of lymph node-homing T cells was reduced by >60% using either efomycine M or L-selectin-blocking antibodies. As recruitment of naive lymphocytes is a prerequisite for sensitization in T-cell-mediated immune reactions and allergic responses, mice were treated with efomycine M or an L-selectin-specific antibody during contact sensitization with DNFB. After adoptive transfer of corresponding T cells into non-sensitized recipient mice, the capacity of these cells to induce contact hypersensitivity was significantly reduced (P=0.0002 and P=0.0001, respectively). Our data demonstrate that it is possible, in principle, to diminish T-cell-mediated allergic reactions through interference with L-selectin functions during the early sensitization phase. PMID:16902419

  19. Antidrug Antibodies: B Cell Immunity Against Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fogdell-Hahn, A

    2015-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are now treated with a range of different biopharmaceuticals, often requiring lifelong parenteral administrations. This exposure to drugs is unnatural and can trigger the immune system and result in the formation of antidrug antibodies. Drug-specific antibodies will, if of sufficiently high titre and affinity, block the intended effect of the drug, increase its clearance and make continued treatment worthless. We expect the immune system to react towards therapies against which tolerance has never been established, which is the case for factor VIII treatment in patients with haemophilia A. However, even biopharmaceutical molecules that we should be tolerant against can elicit antidrug antibodies, for instance in treatment of multiple sclerosis patients with recombinant human interferon-beta. Possible immunological mechanisms behind the breaking of tolerance against drugs, the impact this has on continuous treatment success, clinical practice and drug development, will be discussed in this review. PMID:26098690

  20. GPRC6A mediates Alum-induced Nlrp3 inflammasome activation but limits Th2 type antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Dagmar; Rothe, Kathrin; Baerwald, Christoph; Rossol, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Alum adjuvanticity is still an unknown mechanism despite the frequent use as vaccine adjuvant in humans. Here we show that Alum-induced inflammasome activation in vitro and in vivo is mediated by the G protein-coupled receptor GPRC6A. The Alum-induced humoral response in vivo was independent of the inflammasome because Nlrp3−/− and ASC−/− mice responded normally to Alum and blockade of IL-1 had no effect on antibody production. In contrast, Alum adjuvanticity was increased in GPRC6A−/− mice resulting in increased antibody responses and increased Th2 cytokine concentrations compared to wildtype mice. In vitro activation of GPRC6A−/− splenic B cells also induced increased IgG1 concentrations compared to wildtype B cells. For the first time, we show GPRC6A expression in B cells, contributing to the direct effects of Alum on those cells. B cell produced immunostimulatory IL-10 is elevated in GPRC6A−/− B cells in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate a dual role of GPRC6A in Alum adjuvanticity. GPCR6A activation by Alum leads to the initiation of innate inflammatory responses whereas it is an important signal for the limitation of adaptive immune responses induced by Alum, partially explained by B cell IL-10. PMID:26602597

  1. Antibody-Mediated Immobilization of Cryptococcus neoformans Promotes Biofilm Formation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Emma J.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    Most microbes, including the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, can grow as biofilms. Biofilms confer upon microbes a range of characteristics, including an ability to colonize materials such as shunts and catheters and increased resistance to antibiotics. Here, we provide evidence that coating surfaces with a monoclonal antibody to glucuronoxylomannan, the major component of the fungal capsular polysaccharide, immobilizes cryptococcal cells to a surface support and, subsequently, promotes biofilm formation. We used time-lapse microscopy to visualize the growth of cryptococcal biofilms, generating the first movies of fungal biofilm growth. We show that when fungal cells are immobilized using surface-attached specific antibody to the capsule, the initial stages of biofilm formation are significantly faster than those on surfaces with no antibody coating or surfaces coated with unspecific monoclonal antibody. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that biofilm growth was a dynamic process in which cells shuffled position during budding and was accompanied by emergence of planktonic variant cells that left the attached biofilm community. The planktonic variant cells exhibited mobility, presumably by Brownian motion. Our results indicate that microbial immobilization by antibody capture hastens biofilm formation and suggest that antibody coating of medical devices with immunoglobulins must exclude binding to common pathogenic microbes and the possibility that this effect could be exploited in industrial microbiology. PMID:19251903

  2. Glycoepitopes of Staphylococcal Wall Teichoic Acid Govern Complement-mediated Opsonophagocytosis via Human Serum Antibody and Mannose-binding Lectin*

    PubMed Central

    Kurokawa, Kenji; Jung, Dong-Jun; An, Jang-Hyun; Fuchs, Katharina; Jeon, Yu-Jin; Kim, Na-Hyang; Li, Xuehua; Tateishi, Koichiro; Park, Ji Ae; Xia, Guoqing; Matsushita, Misao; Takahashi, Kazue; Park, Hee-Ju; Peschel, Andreas; Lee, Bok Luel

    2013-01-01

    Serum antibodies and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) are important host defense factors for host adaptive and innate immunity, respectively. Antibodies and MBL also initiate the classical and lectin complement pathways, respectively, leading to opsonophagocytosis. We have shown previously that Staphylococcus aureus wall teichoic acid (WTA), a cell wall glycopolymer consisting of ribitol phosphate substituted with α- or β-O-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc) and d-alanine, is recognized by MBL and serum anti-WTA IgG. However, the exact antigenic determinants to which anti-WTA antibodies or MBL bind have not been determined. To answer this question, several S. aureus mutants, such as α-GlcNAc glycosyltransferase-deficient S. aureus ΔtarM, β-GlcNAc glycosyltransferase-deficient ΔtarS, and ΔtarMS double mutant cells, were prepared from a laboratory and a community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain. Here, we describe the unexpected finding that β-GlcNAc WTA-deficient ΔtarS mutant cells (which have intact α-GlcNAc) escape from anti-WTA antibody-mediated opsonophagocytosis, whereas α-GlcNAc WTA-deficient ΔtarM mutant cells (which have intact β-GlcNAc) are efficiently engulfed by human leukocytes via anti-WTA IgG. Likewise, MBL binding in S. aureus cells was lost in the ΔtarMS double mutant but not in either single mutant. When we determined the serum concentrations of the anti-α- or anti-β-GlcNAc-specific WTA IgGs, anti-β-GlcNAc WTA-IgG was dominant in pooled human IgG fractions and in the intact sera of healthy adults and infants. These data demonstrate the importance of the WTA sugar conformation for human innate and adaptive immunity against S. aureus infection. PMID:24045948

  3. Mitochondrial Pyruvate Import Promotes Long-Term Survival of Antibody-Secreting Plasma Cells.

    PubMed

    Lam, Wing Y; Becker, Amy M; Kennerly, Krista M; Wong, Rachel; Curtis, Jonathan D; Llufrio, Elizabeth M; McCommis, Kyle S; Fahrmann, Johannes; Pizzato, Hannah A; Nunley, Ryan M; Lee, Jieun; Wolfgang, Michael J; Patti, Gary J; Finck, Brian N; Pearce, Erika L; Bhattacharya, Deepta

    2016-07-19

    Durable antibody production after vaccination or infection is mediated by long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs). Pathways that specifically allow LLPCs to persist remain unknown. Through bioenergetic profiling, we found that human and mouse LLPCs could robustly engage pyruvate-dependent respiration, whereas their short-lived counterparts could not. LLPCs took up more glucose than did short-lived plasma cells (SLPCs) in vivo, and this glucose was essential for the generation of pyruvate. Glucose was primarily used to glycosylate antibodies, but glycolysis could be promoted by stimuli such as low ATP levels and the resultant pyruvate used for respiration by LLPCs. Deletion of Mpc2, which encodes an essential component of the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier, led to a progressive loss of LLPCs and of vaccine-specific antibodies in vivo. Thus, glucose uptake and mitochondrial pyruvate import prevent bioenergetic crises and allow LLPCs to persist. Immunizations that maximize these plasma cell metabolic properties might thus provide enduring antibody-mediated immunity. PMID:27396958

  4. Rebmab200, a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting the sodium phosphate transporter NaPi2b displays strong immune mediated cytotoxicity against cancer: a novel reagent for targeted antibody therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Lopes dos Santos, Mariana; Yeda, Fernanda Perez; Tsuruta, Lilian Rumi; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Pimenta, Alécio A; Degaki, Theri Leica; Soares, Ibere C; Tuma, Maria Carolina; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Alves, Venancio A F; Old, Lloyd J; Ritter, Gerd; Moro, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    NaPi2b, a sodium-dependent phosphate transporter, is highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and is recognized by the murine monoclonal antibody MX35. The antibody had shown excellent targeting to ovarian cancer in several early phase clinical trials but being murine the antibody's full therapeutic potential could not be explored. To overcome this impediment we developed a humanized antibody version named Rebmab200, expressed in human PER.C6® cells and cloned by limiting dilution. In order to select a clone with high therapeutic potential clones were characterized using a series of physicochemical assays, flow cytometry, real-time surface plasmon resonance, glycosylation analyses, immunohistochemistry, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, complement-dependent-cytotoxicity assays and quantitative PCR. Comparative analyses of Rebmab200 and MX35 monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that the two antibodies had similar specificity for NaPi2b by flow cytometry with a panel of 30 cell lines and maintained similar kinetic parameters. Robust and high producer cell clones potentially suitable for use in manufacturing were obtained. Rebmab200 antibodies were assessed by immunohistochemistry using a large panel of tissues including human carcinomas of ovarian, lung, kidney and breast origin. An assessment of its binding towards 33 normal human organs was performed as well. Rebmab200 showed selected strong reactivity with the tested tumor types but little or no reactivity with the normal tissues tested confirming its potential for targeted therapeutics strategies. The remarkable cytotoxicity shown by Rebmab200 in OVCAR-3 cells is a significant addition to the traits of stability and productivity displayed by the top clones of Rebmab200. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated toxicity functionality was confirmed in repeated assays using cancer cell lines derived from ovary, kidney and lung as targets. To explore use of this antibody in clinical trials, GMP production of Rebmab

  5. The Complement System and Antibody-Mediated Transplant Rejection.

    PubMed

    Stites, Erik; Le Quintrec, Moglie; Thurman, Joshua M

    2015-12-15

    Complement activation is an important cause of tissue injury in patients with Ab-mediated rejection (AMR) of transplanted organs. Complement activation triggers a strong inflammatory response, and it also generates tissue-bound and soluble fragments that are clinically useful markers of inflammation. The detection of complement proteins deposited within transplanted tissues has become an indispensible biomarker of AMR, and several assays have recently been developed to measure complement activation by Abs reactive to specific donor HLA expressed within the transplant. Complement inhibitors have entered clinical use and have shown efficacy for the treatment of AMR. New methods of detecting complement activation within transplanted organs will improve our ability to diagnose and monitor AMR, and they will also help guide the use of complement inhibitory drugs. PMID:26637661

  6. Sialylated intravenous immunoglobulin suppress anti-ganglioside antibody mediated nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Massaad, Cynthia A; Gao, Tong; Pillai, Laila; Bogdanova, Nataliia; Ghauri, Sameera; Sheikh, Kazim A

    2016-08-01

    The precise mechanisms underlying the efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in autoimmune neurological disorders including Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) are not known. Anti-ganglioside antibodies have been reported to be pathogenic in some variants of GBS, and we have developed passive transfer animal models to study anti-ganglioside antibody mediated-endoneurial inflammation and associated neuropathological effects and to evaluate the efficacy of new therapeutic approaches. Some studies indicate that IVIg's anti-inflammatory activity resides in a minor sialylated IVIg (sIVIg) fractions and is dependent on an innate Th2 response via binding to a specific ICAM3-grabbing nonintegrin related 1 receptor (SIGN-R1). Therefore the efficacy of IVIg, IVIg fractions with various IgG Fc sialylation status, and the involvement of Th2 pathway were examined in one of our animal model of antibody-mediated inhibition of axonal regeneration. We demonstrate that both IVIg and sIVIg ameliorated anti-glycan antibody mediated-pathological effect, whereas, the unsialylated fractions of IVIg were not beneficial in our model. Tenfold lower doses of sIVIg compared to whole IVIg provided equivalent efficacy in our studies. Moreover, we found that whole IVIg and sIVIg significantly upregulates the gene expression of IL-33, which itself can provide protection from antibody-mediated nerve injury in our model. Our results support that the SIGN-R1-Th2 pathway is involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of IVIg on endoneurium in our model and elements of this pathway including IL-33 can provide novel therapeutics in inflammatory neuropathies. PMID:27208700

  7. Delivery of Antibody Mimics into Mammalian Cells via Anthrax Toxin Protective Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiaoli; Rabideau, Amy E; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2014-01-01

    Antibody mimics have significant scientific and therapeutic utility for the disruption of protein–protein interactions inside cells; however, their delivery to the cell cytosol remains a major challenge. Here we show that protective antigen (PA), a component of anthrax toxin, efficiently transports commonly used antibody mimics to the cytosol of mammalian cells when conjugated to the N-terminal domain of LF (LFN). In contrast, a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) was not able to deliver any of these antibody mimics into the cell cytosol. The refolding and binding of a transported tandem monobody to Bcr-Abl (its protein target) in chronic myeloid leukemia cells were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. We also observed inhibition of Bcr-Abl kinase activity and induction of apoptosis caused by the monobody. In a separate case, we show disruption of key interactions in the MAPK signaling pathway after PA-mediated delivery of an affibody binder that targets hRaf-1. We show for the first time that PA can deliver bioactive antibody mimics to disrupt intracellular protein–protein interactions. This technology adds a useful tool to expand the applications of these modern agents to the intracellular milieu. PMID:25250705

  8. Retargeting cytokine-induced killer cell activity by CD16 engagement with clinical-grade antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Cappuzzello, Elisa; Tosi, Anna; Zanovello, Paola; Sommaggio, Roberta; Rosato, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytokine-induced Killer (CIK) cells are a heterogeneous population of ex vivo expanded T lymphocytes capable of MHC-unrestricted antitumor activity, which share phenotypic and functional features with both NK and T cells. Preclinical data and initial clinical studies demonstrated their high tolerability in vivo, supporting CIK cells as a promising cell population for adoptive cell immunotherapy. In this study, we report for the first time that CIK cells display a donor-dependent expression of CD16, which can be engaged by trastuzumab or cetuximab to exert a potent antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against ovarian and breast cancer cell lines, leading to an increased lytic activity in vitro, and an enhanced therapeutic efficacy in vivo. Thus, an efficient tumor antigen-specific retargeting can be achieved by a combination therapy with clinical-grade monoclonal antibodies already widely used in cancer therapy, and CIK cell populations that are easily expandable in very large numbers, inexpensive, safe and do not require genetic manipulations. Overall, these data provide a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of Her2 and EGFR expressing tumors by adoptive cell therapy, which could find wide implementation and application, and could also be expanded to the use of additional therapeutic antibodies.

  9. Retargeting cytokine-induced killer cell activity by CD16 engagement with clinical-grade antibodies.

    PubMed

    Cappuzzello, Elisa; Tosi, Anna; Zanovello, Paola; Sommaggio, Roberta; Rosato, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Cytokine-induced Killer (CIK) cells are a heterogeneous population of ex vivo expanded T lymphocytes capable of MHC-unrestricted antitumor activity, which share phenotypic and functional features with both NK and T cells. Preclinical data and initial clinical studies demonstrated their high tolerability in vivo, supporting CIK cells as a promising cell population for adoptive cell immunotherapy. In this study, we report for the first time that CIK cells display a donor-dependent expression of CD16, which can be engaged by trastuzumab or cetuximab to exert a potent antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against ovarian and breast cancer cell lines, leading to an increased lytic activity in vitro, and an enhanced therapeutic efficacy in vivo. Thus, an efficient tumor antigen-specific retargeting can be achieved by a combination therapy with clinical-grade monoclonal antibodies already widely used in cancer therapy, and CIK cell populations that are easily expandable in very large numbers, inexpensive, safe and do not require genetic manipulations. Overall, these data provide a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of Her2 and EGFR expressing tumors by adoptive cell therapy, which could find wide implementation and application, and could also be expanded to the use of additional therapeutic antibodies. PMID:27622068

  10. Salmonella Modulates B Cell Biology to Evade CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells and antibodies are the central effectors of humoral immunity, B cells can also produce and secrete cytokines and present antigen to helper T cells. The uptake of antigen is mainly mediated by endocytosis; thus, antigens are often presented by MHC-II molecules. However, it is unclear if B cells can present these same antigens via MHC-I molecules. Recently, Salmonella bacteria were found to infect B cells, allowing possible antigen cross-processing that could generate bacterial peptides for antigen presentation via MHC-I molecules. Here, we will discuss available knowledge regarding Salmonella antigen presentation by infected B cell MHC-I molecules and subsequent inhibitory effects on CD8+ T cells for bacterial evasion of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:25484884

  11. Low-Dose Rituximab Therapy for Antibody-Mediated Rejection in a Highly Sensitized Heart-Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Ashim; Pyle, Joseph; Hamilton, John; Bhat, Geetha

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is the B-cell–mediated production of immunoglobulin G antibody against the transplanted heart. The currently available therapies for antibody-mediated rejection have had marginal success, and chronic manifestations of rejection can result in an increased risk of graft vasculopathy and perhaps require repeat transplantation. Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 receptor of B-lymphocytes and approved as therapy for lymphoma, can be used in heart-transplant patients for the management of antibody-mediated rejection. We present the case of a 52-year-old woman with high allosensitization (pre-transplantation panel reactive antibody level, 72%) who underwent successful orthotopic heart transplantation. Postoperatively, her acute antibody-mediated rejection with concomitant cellular rejection was successfully treated with low-dose rituximab. The patient died 5 months later because of multiple other medical problems. The present case suggests a role for low-dose rituximab as therapy for antibody-mediated rejection in heart-transplant patients. PMID:23304051

  12. Development of an edema factor-mediated cAMP-induction bioassay for detecting antibody-mediated neutralization of anthrax protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Zmuda, Jonathan F; Zhang, Linyi; Richards, Terri; Pham, Quyen; Zukauskas, David; Pierre, Jennifer L; Laird, Michael W; Askins, Janine; Choi, Gil H

    2005-03-01

    Intoxication of mammalian cells by Bacillus anthracis requires the coordinate activity of three distinct bacterial proteins: protective antigen (PA), edema factor (EF), and lethal factor (LF). Among these proteins, PA has become the major focus of work on monoclonal antibodies and vaccines designed to treat or prevent anthrax infection since neither EF nor LF is capable of inducing cellular toxicity in its absence. Here, we present the development of a sensitive, precise, and biologically relevant bioassay platform capable of quantifying antibody-mediated PA neutralization. This bioassay is based on the ability of PA to bind and shuttle EF, a bacterial adenylate cyclase, into mammalian cells leading to an increase in cAMP that can be quantified using a sensitive chemiluminescent ELISA. The results of this study indicate that the cAMP-induction assay possesses the necessary performance characteristics for use as both a potency-indicating release assay in a quality control setting and as a surrogate pharmacodynamic marker for ensuring the continued bioactivity of therapeutic antibodies against PA during clinical trials. PMID:15847796

  13. A Cell-Based Internalization and Degradation Assay with an Activatable Fluorescence–Quencher Probe as a Tool for Functional Antibody Screening

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peter Corbett; Shen, Yang; Snavely, Marshall D.; Hiraga, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    For the development of therapeutically potent anti-cancer antibody drugs, it is often important to identify antibodies that internalize into cells efficiently, rather than just binding to antigens on the cell surface. Such antibodies can mediate receptor endocytosis, resulting in receptor downregulation on the cell surface and potentially inhibiting receptor function and tumor growth. Also, efficient antibody internalization is a prerequisite for the delivery of cytotoxic drugs into target cells and is critical for the development of antibody–drug conjugates. Here we describe a novel activatable fluorescence–quencher pair to quantify the extent of antibody internalization and degradation in the target cells. In this assay, candidate antibodies were labeled with a fluorescent dye and a quencher. Fluorescence is inhibited outside and on the surface of cells, but activated upon endocytosis and degradation of the antibody. This assay enabled the development of a process for rapid characterization of candidate antibodies potentially in a high-throughput format. By employing an activatable secondary antibody, primary antibodies in purified form or in culture supernatants can be screened for internalization and degradation. Because purification of candidate antibodies is not required, this method represents a direct functional screen to identify antibodies that internalize efficiently early in the discovery process. PMID:26024945

  14. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  15. Targeting Tumor Cells by Natural Anti-Carbohydrate Antibodies Using Rhamnose-Functionalized Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuexia; Rao, Xiongjian; Cai, Li; Liu, Xuling; Wang, Huixia; Wu, Weinan; Zhu, Chenggang; Chen, Min; Wang, Peng G; Yi, Wen

    2016-05-20

    Recruitment of antibodies in human immune systems for targeted destruction of tumor cells has emerged as an exciting area of research due to its low occurrence of side effects, high efficacy, and high specificity. The presence of large amounts of anticarbohydrate natural antibodies in human sera has prompted research efforts to utilize carbohydrate epitopes for immune recruitment. Here, we have developed a general strategy for specific targeted destruction of tumor cells based on rhamnose-functionalized liposomes. Tumor cells artificially decorated with rhamnose epitopes were subjected to complement-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro and showed delayed tumor growth in vivo. This study highlights the therapeutic potential for activation of endogenous immune response through cell-surface glycan engineering. PMID:26982552

  16. Endothelial cell activation by antiphospholipid antibodies is modulated by Krüppel-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Kristi L.; Hamik, Anne; Jain, Mukesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by thrombosis and/or recurrent pregnancy loss in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (APLAs). The majority of APLAs are directed against phospholipid-binding proteins, particularly β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI). Anti-β2GPI antibodies activate endothelial cells in a β2GPI-dependent manner through a pathway that involves NF-κB. Krüppel-like factors (KLFs) play a critical role in regulating the endothelial response to inflammatory stimuli. We hypothesized that activation of endothelial cells by APLA/anti-β2GPI antibodies might be associated with decreased expression of KLFs, which in turn might facilitate cellular activation mediated through NF-κB. Our experimental results confirmed this hypothesis, demonstrating markedly decreased expression of KLF2 and KLF4 after incubation of cells with APLA/anti-β2GPI antibodies. Restoration of KLF2 or KLF4 levels inhibited NF-κB transcriptional activity and blocked APLA/anti-β2GPI–mediated endothelial activation despite NF-κB p65 phosphorylation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that inhibition of NF-κB transcriptional activity by KLFs reflects sequestration of the cotranscriptional activator CBP/p300, making this cofactor unavailable to NF-κB. These findings suggest that the endothelial response to APLA/anti-β2GPI antibodies reflects competition between KLFs and NF-κB for their common cofactor, CBP/p300. Taken together, these observations are the first to implicate the KLFs as novel participants in the endothelial proinflammatory response to APLA/anti-β2GPI antibodies. PMID:21482710

  17. RED: a red-cell antibody identification expert module.

    PubMed

    Smith, J W; Svirbely, J R; Evans, C A; Strohm, P; Josephson, J R; Tanner, M

    1985-06-01

    We describe a software module in an expert system RED, which interprets data related to red cell antibody identification. There are three portions to this module: the problem-solving component, which incorporates the knowledge required for antibody identification as a hierarchy of programs. The programs in the hierarchy organize within themselves small pieces of knowledge represented in the form of production rules, which are capable of making judgments concerning a specific hypothesis; an intelligent data base for storage of patient data, red cell attributes, and test results; the "overview critic" portion, which combines the atomic hypotheses judged favorably by the antibody programs into a unified judgment concerning the case. Overview makes the decision to terminate processing with a conclusion about which antibodies are actually present and what specific further tests need to be performed to resolve any remaining ambiguities. PMID:3840517

  18. Engineering multivalent antibodies to target heregulin-induced HER3 signaling in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeffrey C; Poovassery, Jayakumar S; Bansal, Pankaj; You, Sungyong; Manjarres, Isabel M; Ober, Raimund J; Ward, E Sally

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibodies in therapy and diagnosis has undergone an unprecedented expansion during the past two decades. This is due in part to innovations in antibody engineering that now offer opportunities for the production of “second generation” antibodies with multiple specificities or altered valencies. The targeting of individual components of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)3-PI3K signaling axis, including the preferred heterodimerization partner HER2, is known to have limited anti-tumor effects. The efficacy of antibodies or small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in targeting this axis is further reduced by the presence of the HER3 ligand, heregulin. To address these shortcomings, we performed a comparative analysis of two distinct approaches toward reducing the proliferation and signaling in HER2 overexpressing tumor cells in the presence of heregulin. These strategies both involve the use of engineered antibodies in combination with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/HER2 specific TKI, lapatinib. In the first approach, we generated a bispecific anti-HER2/HER3 antibody that, in the presence of lapatinib, is designed to sequester HER3 into inactive HER2-HER3 dimers that restrain HER3 interactions with other possible dimerization partners. The second approach involves the use of a tetravalent anti-HER3 antibody with the goal of inducing efficient HER3 internalization and degradation. In combination with lapatinib, we demonstrate that although the multivalent HER3 antibody is more effective than its bivalent counterpart in reducing heregulin-mediated signaling and growth, the bispecific HER2/HER3 antibody has increased inhibitory activity. Collectively, these observations provide support for the therapeutic use of bispecifics in combination with TKIs to recruit HER3 into complexes that are functionally inert. PMID:24492289

  19. Neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies to conformational epitopes of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 gp46.

    PubMed Central

    Hadlock, K G; Rowe, J; Perkins, S; Bradshaw, P; Song, G Y; Cheng, C; Yang, J; Gascon, R; Halmos, J; Rehman, S M; McGrath, M S; Foung, S K

    1997-01-01

    Ten human monoclonal antibodies derived from peripheral B cells of a patient with human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-associated myelopathy are described. One monoclonal antibody recognized a linear epitope within the carboxy-terminal 43 amino acids of HTLV gp21, and two monoclonal antibodies recognized linear epitopes within HTLV type 1 (HTLV-1) gp46. The remaining seven monoclonal antibodies recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 that were expressed on the surfaces of infected cells. Two of these antibodies also bound to viable HTLV-2 infected cells and immunoprecipitated HTLV-2 gp46. Virus neutralization was determined by syncytium inhibition assays. Eight monoclonal antibodies, including all seven that recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46, possessed significant virus neutralization activity. By competitive inhibition analysis it was determined that these antibodies recognized at least four distinct conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46. These findings indicate the importance of conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 in mediating a neutralizing antibody response to HTLV infection. PMID:9223472

  20. Antibody targeting facilitates effective intratumoral siRNA nanoparticle delivery to HER2-overexpressing cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Palanca-Wessels, Maria C.; Booth, Garrett C.; Convertine, Anthony J.; Lundy, Brittany B.; Berguig, Geoffrey Y.; Press, Michael F.; Stayton, Patrick S.; Press, Oliver W.

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of RNA interference (RNAi) has been limited by inefficient delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA). Tumor-specific recognition can be effectively achieved by antibodies directed against highly expressed cancer cell surface receptors. We investigated the utility of linking an internalizing streptavidin-conjugated HER2 antibody to an endosome-disruptive biotinylated polymeric nanocarrier to improve the functional cytoplasmic delivery of siRNA in breast and ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in an intraperitoneal ovarian cancer xenograft model in vivo, yielding an 80% reduction of target mRNA and protein levels with sustained repression for at least 96 hours. RNAi-mediated site specific cleavage of target mRNA was demonstrated using the 5′ RLM-RACE (RNA ligase mediated-rapid amplification of cDNA ends) assay. Mice bearing intraperitoneal human ovarian tumor xenografts demonstrated increased tumor accumulation of Cy5.5 fluorescently labeled siRNA and 70% target gene suppression after treatment with HER2 antibody-directed siRNA nanocarriers. Detection of the expected mRNA cleavage product by 5′ RLM-RACE assay confirmed that suppression occurs via the expected RNAi pathway. Delivery of siRNA via antibody-directed endosomolytic nanoparticles may be a promising strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:26840082

  1. Competency development in antibody production in cancer cell biology

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M.S.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objective of this project was to develop a rapid recombinant antibody production technology. To achieve the objective, the authors employed (1) production of recombinant antigens that are important for cell cycle regulation and DNA repair, (2) immunization and specific selection of antibody-producing lymphocytes using the flow cytometry and magnetic bead capturing procedure, (3) construction of single chain antibody library, (4) development of recombinant vectors that target, express, and regulate the expression of intracellular antibodies, and (5) specific inhibition of tumor cell growth in tissue culture. The authors have accomplished (1) optimization of a selection procedure to isolate antigen-specific lymphocytes, (2) optimization of the construction of a single-chain antibody library, and (3) development of a new antibody expression vector for intracellular immunization. The future direction of this research is to continue to test the potential use of the intracellular immunization procedure as a tool to study functions of biological molecules and as an immuno-cancer therapy procedure to inhibit the growth of cancer cells.

  2. Pituitary expression of CTLA-4 mediates hypophysitis secondary to administration of CTLA-4 blocking antibody.

    PubMed

    Iwama, Shintaro; De Remigis, Alessandra; Callahan, Margaret K; Slovin, Susan F; Wolchok, Jedd D; Caturegli, Patrizio

    2014-04-01

    Hypophysitis is a chronic inflammation of the pituitary gland of unknown (primary forms) or recognizable (secondary forms) etiology, such as the use of ipilimumab in cancer immunotherapy. Ipilimumab, which blocks the T cell inhibitory molecule CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4), induces hypophysitis in about 4% of patients through unknown mechanisms. We first established a model of secondary hypophysitis by repeated injections of a CTLA-4 blocking antibody into SJL/J or C57BL/6J mice, and showed that they developed lymphocytic infiltration of the pituitary gland and circulating pituitary antibodies. We next assessed the prevalence of pituitary antibodies in a cohort of 20 patients with advanced melanoma or prostate cancer, 7 with a clinical diagnosis of hypophysitis, before and after ipilimumab administration. Pituitary antibodies, negative at baseline, developed in the 7 patients with hypophysitis but not in the 13 without it; these antibodies predominantly recognized thyrotropin-, follicle-stimulating hormone-, and corticotropin-secreting cells. We then hypothesized that the injected CTLA-4 antibody could cause pituitary toxicity if bound to CTLA-4 antigen expressed "ectopically" on pituitary endocrine cells. Pituitary glands indeed expressed CTLA-4 at both RNA and protein levels, particularly in a subset of prolactin- and thyrotropin-secreting cells. Notably, these cells became the site of complement activation, featuring deposition of C3d and C4d components and an inflammatory cascade akin to that seen in type II hypersensitivity. In summary, the study offers a mechanism to explain the pituitary toxicity observed in patients receiving ipilimumab, and highlights the utility of measuring pituitary antibodies in this form of secondary hypophysitis. PMID:24695685

  3. Proteomic differences in recombinant CHO cells producing two similar antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Sommeregger, Wolfgang; Mayrhofer, Patrick; Steinfellner, Willibald; Reinhart, David; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin; Meleady, Paula; Kunert, Renate

    2016-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most commonly used mammalian hosts for the production of biopharmaceuticals. To overcome unfavorable features of CHO cells, a lot of effort is put into cell engineering to improve phenotype. "Omics" studies investigating elevated growth rate and specific productivities as well as extracellular stimulus have already revealed many interesting engineering targets. However, it remains largely unknown how physicochemical properties of the recombinant product itself influence the host cell. In this study, we used quantitative label-free LC-MS proteomic analyses to investigate product-specific proteome differences in CHO cells producing two similar antibody fragments. We established recombinant CHO cells producing the two antibodies, 3D6 and 2F5, both as single-chain Fv-Fc homodimeric antibody fragments (scFv-Fc). We applied three different vector strategies for transgene delivery (i.e., plasmid, bacterial artificial chromosome, recombinase-mediated cassette exchange), selected two best performing clones from transgene variants and transgene delivery methods and investigated three consecutively passaged cell samples by label-free proteomic analysis. LC-MS-MS profiles were compared in several sample combinations to gain insights into different aspects of proteomic changes caused by overexpression of two different heterologous proteins. This study suggests that not only the levels of specific product secretion but the product itself has a large impact on the proteome of the cell. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1902-1912. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26913574

  4. Inhibitory Effect of Individual or Combinations of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies and Antiviral Reagents against Cell-Free and Cell-to-Cell HIV-1 Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kolodkin-Gal, Dror; Eslamizar, Leila; Owuor, Joshua O.; Mazzola, Emanuele; Gonzalez, Ana M.; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Gelman, Rebecca S.; Montefiori, David C.; Haynes, Barton F.; Schmitz, Joern E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To date, most therapeutic and vaccine candidates for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are evaluated preclinically for efficacy against cell-free viral challenges. However, cell-associated HIV-1 is suggested to be a major contributor to sexual transmission by mucosal routes. To determine if neutralizing antibodies or inhibitors block cell-free and cell-associated virus transmission of diverse HIV-1 strains with different efficiencies, we tested 12 different antibodies and five inhibitors against four green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled HIV-1 envelope (Env) variants from transmitted/founder (T/F) or chronic infection isolates. We evaluated antibody/inhibitor-mediated virus neutralization using either TZM-bl target cells, in which infectivity was determined by virus-driven luciferase expression, or A3R5 lymphoblastoid target cells, in which infectivity was evaluated by GFP expression. In both the TZM-bl and A3R5 assays, cell-free virus or infected CD4+ lymphocytes were used as targets for neutralization. We further hypothesized that the combined use of specific neutralizing antibodies targeting HIV-1 Env would more effectively prevent cell-associated virus transmission than the use of individual antibodies. The tested antibody combinations included two gp120-directed antibodies, VRC01 and PG9, or VRC01 with the gp41-directed antibody 10E8. Our results demonstrated that cell-associated virus was less sensitive to neutralizing antibodies and inhibitors, particularly using the A3R5 neutralization assay, and the potencies of these neutralizing agents differed among Env variants. A combination of different neutralizing antibodies that target specific sites on gp120 led to a significant reduction in cell-associated virus transmission. These assays will help identify ideal combinations of broadly neutralizing antibodies to use for passive preventive antibody administration and further characterize targets for the most effective neutralizing antibodies

  5. Rare Association of Anti-Hu Antibody Positive Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome and Transitional Cell Bladder Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs, S.; Szabo, N.; Woodhams, S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis (PEM) and subacute sensory neuronopathy (SSN) are remote effects of cancer, usually associated with small-cell lung carcinoma and positive anti-Hu antibody. We describe the rare association of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) with anti-Hu antibody positivity resulting in this paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. Patient. A 76-year-old female presented with bilateral muscle weakness and paraesthesia of the upper and lower limbs in a length-dependent “glove and stocking” distribution. Central nervous system symptoms included cognitive problems, personality change, and truncal ataxia. Case notes and the literature were reviewed. Result. Autoantibody screening was positive for anti-Hu antibody (recently renamed antineuronal nuclear antibody 1, ANNA-1). The diagnosis of PEM and SSN was supported by MRI and lumbar puncture results. A superficial bladder TCC was demonstrated on CT and subsequently confirmed on histology. No other primary neoplasm was found on full-body imaging. The neurological symptoms were considered to be an antibody-mediated paraneoplastic neurological syndrome and improved after resection of the tumour. Discussion. The association of anti-Hu positive paraneoplastic neurological syndrome and TCC has not been described in the literature previously. We emphasize the need for detailed clinical examination and the importance of a multidisciplinary thought process and encourage further awareness of this rare association. PMID:23320243

  6. Methods for quantitative detection of antibody-induced complement activation on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Meulenbroek, Elisabeth M; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies against red blood cells (RBCs) can lead to complement activation resulting in an accelerated clearance via complement receptors in the liver (extravascular hemolysis) or leading to intravascular lysis of RBCs. Alloantibodies (e.g. ABO) or autoantibodies to RBC antigens (as seen in autoimmune hemolytic anemia, AIHA) leading to complement activation are potentially harmful and can be - especially when leading to intravascular lysis - fatal(1). Currently, complement activation due to (auto)-antibodies on RBCs is assessed in vitro by using the Coombs test reflecting complement deposition on RBC or by a nonquantitative hemolytic assay reflecting RBC lysis(1-4). However, to assess the efficacy of complement inhibitors, it is mandatory to have quantitative techniques. Here we describe two such techniques. First, an assay to detect C3 and C4 deposition on red blood cells that is induced by antibodies in patient serum is presented. For this, FACS analysis is used with fluorescently labeled anti-C3 or anti-C4 antibodies. Next, a quantitative hemolytic assay is described. In this assay, complement-mediated hemolysis induced by patient serum is measured making use of spectrophotometric detection of the released hemoglobin. Both of these assays are very reproducible and quantitative, facilitating studies of antibody-induced complement activation. PMID:24514151

  7. HLA Class II Antibody Activation of Endothelial Cells Promotes Th17 and Disrupts Regulatory T Lymphocyte Expansion.

    PubMed

    Lion, J; Taflin, C; Cross, A R; Robledo-Sarmiento, M; Mariotto, E; Savenay, A; Carmagnat, M; Suberbielle, C; Charron, D; Haziot, A; Glotz, D; Mooney, N

    2016-05-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most successful treatment option for patients with end-stage renal disease, and chronic antibody-mediated rejection is the principal cause of allograft loss. Predictive factors for chronic rejection include high levels of HLA alloantibodies (particularly HLA class II) and activation of graft endothelial cells (ECs). The mechanistic basis for this association is unresolved. We used an experimental model of HLA-DR antibody stimulation of microvascular ECs to examine the mechanisms underlying the association between HLA class II antibodies, EC activation and allograft damage. Activation of ECs with the F(Ab')2 fragment of HLA-DR antibody led to phosphorylation of Akt, ERK and MEK and increased IL-6 production by ECs cocultured with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in an Akt-dependent manner. We previously showed that HLA-DR-expressing ECs induce polarization of Th17 and FoxP3(bright) regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets. Preactivation of ECs with anti-HLA-DR antibody redirected EC allogenicity toward a proinflammatory response by decreasing amplification of functional Treg and by further increasing IL-6-dependent Th17 expansion. Alloimmunized patient serum containing relevant HLA-DR alloantibodies selectively bound and increased EC secretion of IL-6 in cocultures with PBMCs. These data contribute to understanding of potential mechanisms of antibody-mediated endothelial damage independent of complement activation and FcR-expressing effector cells. PMID:26614587

  8. Antibody-Mediated Neutralization of the Exotoxin Mycolactone, the Main Virulence Factor Produced by Mycobacterium ulcerans

    PubMed Central

    Gersbach, Philipp; Hug, Melanie N.; Bieri, Raphael; Bomio, Claudio; Li, Jun; Huber, Sylwia; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Pluschke, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycolactone, the macrolide exotoxin produced by Mycobacterium ulcerans, causes extensive tissue destruction by inducing apoptosis of host cells. In this study, we aimed at the production of antibodies that could neutralize the cytotoxic activities of mycolactone. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the B cell hybridoma technology, we generated a series of monoclonal antibodies with specificity for mycolactone from spleen cells of mice immunized with the protein conjugate of a truncated synthetic mycolactone derivative. L929 fibroblasts were used as a model system to investigate whether these antibodies can inhibit the biological effects of mycolactone. By measuring the metabolic activity of the fibroblasts, we found that anti-mycolactone mAbs can completely neutralize the cytotoxic activity of mycolactone. Conclusions/Significance The toxin neutralizing capacity of anti-mycolactone mAbs supports the concept of evaluating the macrolide toxin as vaccine target. PMID:27351976

  9. Antidotes, antibody-mediated immunity and the future of pharmaceutical product development

    PubMed Central

    Caoili, Salvador Eugenio C.

    2013-01-01

    If new scientific knowledge is to be more efficiently generated and applied toward the advancement of health, human safety must be more effectively addressed in the conduct of research. Given the present difficulties of accurately predicting biological outcomes of novel interventions in vivo, the imperative of human safety suggests the development of novel pharmaceutical products in tandem with their prospective antidotes in anticipation of possible adverse events, to render the risks of initial clinical trials more acceptable from a regulatory standpoint. Antibody-mediated immunity provides a generally applicable mechanistic basis for developing antidotes to both biologicals and small-molecule drugs (such that antibodies may serve as antidotes to pharmaceutical agents as a class including other antibodies) and also for the control and prevention of both infectious and noninfectious diseases via passive or active immunization. Accordingly, the development of prophylactic or therapeutic passive-immunization strategies using antipeptide antibodies is a plausible prelude to the development of corresponding active-immunization strategies using peptide-based vaccines. In line with this scheme, global proliferation of antibody- and vaccine-production technologies, especially those that obviate dependence on the cold chain for storage and transport of finished products, could provide geographically distributed breakout capability against emerging and future health challenges. PMID:23291934

  10. Antidotes, antibody-mediated immunity and the future of pharmaceutical product development.

    PubMed

    Caoili, Salvador Eugenio C

    2013-02-01

    If new scientific knowledge is to be more efficiently generated and applied toward the advancement of health, human safety must be more effectively addressed in the conduct of research. Given the present difficulties of accurately predicting biological outcomes of novel interventions in vivo, the imperative of human safety suggests the development of novel pharmaceutical products in tandem with their prospective antidotes in anticipation of possible adverse events, to render the risks of initial clinical trials more acceptable from a regulatory standpoint. Antibody-mediated immunity provides a generally applicable mechanistic basis for developing antidotes to both biologicals and small-molecule drugs (such that antibodies may serve as antidotes to pharmaceutical agents as a class including other antibodies) and also for the control and prevention of both infectious and noninfectious diseases via passive or active immunization. Accordingly, the development of prophylactic or therapeutic passive-immunization strategies using antipeptide antibodies is a plausible prelude to the development of corresponding active-immunization strategies using peptide-based vaccines. In line with this scheme, global proliferation of antibody- and vaccine-production technologies, especially those that obviate dependence on the cold chain for storage and transport of finished products, could provide geographically distributed breakout capability against emerging and future health challenges. PMID:23291934

  11. Polyanhydride Nanovaccines Induce Germinal Center B Cell Formation and Sustained Serum Antibody Responses.

    PubMed

    Vela Ramirez, Julia E; Tygrett, Lorraine T; Hao, Jihua; Habte, Habtom H; Cho, Michael W; Greenspan, Neil S; Waldschmidt, Thomas J; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticle-based subunit vaccines have shown promising characteristics by enhancing antigen presentation and inducing protective immune responses when compared with soluble protein. Specifically, polyanhydride nanoparticle-based vaccines (i.e., nanovaccines) have been shown to successfully encapsulate and release antigens, activate B and T cells, and induce both antibody- and cell-mediated immunity towards a variety of immunogens. One of the characteristics of strong thymus-dependent antibody responses is the formation of germinal centers (GC) and the generation of GC B cells, which is part of the T helper cell driven cellular response. In order to further understand the role of nanovaccines in the induction of antigen-specific immune responses, their ability to induce germinal center B cell formation and isotype switching and the effects thereof on serum antibody responses were investigated in these studies. Polyanhydride nanovaccines based on 1,6-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)hexane and 1,8-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy)-3,6-dioxaoctane were used to subcutaneously administer a viral antigen. GC B cell formation and serum antibody responses induced by the nanovaccines were compared to that induced by alum-based vaccine formulations. It was demonstrated that a single dose of polyanhydride nanovaccines resulted in the formation of robust GCs and serum antibody in comparison to that induced by the alum-based formulation. This was attributed to the sustained release of antigen provided by the nanovaccines. When administered in a multiple dose regimen, the highest post-immunization titer and GC B cell number was enhanced, and the immune response induced by the nanovaccines was further sustained. These studies provide foundational information on the mechanism of action of polyanhydride nanovaccines. PMID:27319223

  12. Islet Cell Surface Antibodies in Graves’ Disease; As Organ Non-Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Il-Min; Izumi, Motomori; Nagataki, Shigenobu

    1988-01-01

    To define ICA positiveness and its clinical correlation in AITD, ICSA were checked in Graves’ patients by indirect IF test using rat insulinoma (RINr) cells. Also Ig adherence to rat thyroid (FRTL5) and EB virus cloned human B lymphocytes that do not produce immunoglobulins were measured as the same method of ICSA with determination of organ specific antibodies in the sera. The incidence of ICSA in Graves’ disease was 23.1 % (9/39) and the degree of the positiveness measured as % binding was roughly correlated to those of Ig adherence to FRTL5 and B cells. This ability to bind multiple organs of different species was not found to have any correlation with the titers of organ specific antibodies, but the incidence of organ specific antibody positiveness was much higher in the ICSA positive sera. Also there was a significant difference on the absorption pattern to FRTL5 and RINr cells between the sera of ICSA positive IDDM and Graves’ patients, where absorption and % binding to FRTL5, cell in ICSA positive diabetic sera were significantly lower than those to RINr cells in ICSA positive Graves’. PMID:3153792

  13. Immunoglobulins, antibody repertoire and B cell development.

    PubMed

    Butler, J E; Zhao, Y; Sinkora, M; Wertz, N; Kacskovics, I

    2009-03-01

    Swine share with most placental mammals the same five antibody isotypes and same two light chain types. Loci encoding lambda, kappa and Ig heavy chains appear to be organized as they are in other mammals. Swine differ from rodents and primates, but are similar to rabbits in using a single VH family (VH3) to encode their variable heavy chain domain, but not the family used by cattle, another artiodactyl. Distinct from other hoofed mammals and rodents, Ckappa:Clambda usage resembles the 1:1 ratio seen in primates. Since IgG subclasses diversified after speciation, same name subclass homologs do not exist among swine and other mammals unless very closely related. Swine possess six putative IgG subclasses that appear to have diversified by gene duplication and exon shuffle while retaining motifs that can bind to FcgammaRs, FcRn, C1q, protein A and protein G. The epithelial chorial placenta of swine and the precosial nature of their offspring have made piglets excellent models for studies on fetal antibody repertoire development and on the postnatal role of gut colonization, maternal colostrum and neonatal infection on the development of adaptive immunity during the "critical window" of immunological development. This chapter traces the study of the humoral immune system of this species through its various eras of discovery and compiles the results in tables and figures that should be a useful reference for educators and investigators. PMID:18804488

  14. Phosphorylated S6 Kinase and S6 Ribosomal Protein are Diagnostic Markers of Antibody Mediated Rejection in Heart Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Lai, Chi; Zhang, Qiuheng; Gjertson, David; Fishbein, Michael C; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Deng, Mario; Reed, Elaine F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Anti-MHC class I alloantibodies have been implicated in the processes of acute and chronic rejection. These antibodies (Ab) bind to endothelial cells (EC) and transduce signals leading to the activation of cell survival and proliferation pathways, including Src, FAK, mTOR, and downstream targets ERK, S6 kinase (S6K) and S6 ribosomal protein (S6RP). We tested the hypothesis that phosphorylation of S6K, S6RP and ERK in capillary endothelium may serve as an adjunct diagnostic tool for antibody mediated rejection (AMR) in heart allografts. Methods Diagnosis of AMR was based on histology or immunoperoxidase staining of paraffin-embedded tissue consistent with 2013 ISHLT criteria. Diagnosis of acute cellular rejection (ACR) was based on ISHLT criteria. Endomyocardial biopsies from 67 heart transplant recipients diagnosed with acute rejection [33 with pAMR, 18 with ACR (15 with grade 1R, 3 with grade >2R), 16 with pAMR+ACR (13 with 1R and 3 with >2R)] and 40 age- and gender-matched recipients without rejection were tested for the presence of phosphorylated forms of ERK, S6RP and S6K by immunohistochemistry. Results Immunostaining of endomyocardial biopsies with evidence of pAMR showed significant increase in expression of p-S6K and p-S6RP in capillary EC compared to controls. A weaker association was observed between pAMR and p-ERK. Conclusions Biopsies diagnosed with pAMR often showed phosphorylation of S6K and S6RP, indicating that staining for p-S6K and p-S6RP is useful for the diagnosis of AMR. Our findings support a role for antibody-mediated HLA signaling in the process of graft injury. PMID:25511749

  15. Isolation of human monoclonal antibodies from peripheral blood B cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinghe; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Longo, Nancy S; Laub, Leo; Lin, Chien-Li; Turk, Ellen; Kang, Byong H; Migueles, Stephen A; Bailer, Robert T; Mascola, John R; Connors, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Isolation of monoclonal antibodies is an important technique for understanding the specificities and characteristics of antibodies that underlie the humoral immune response to a given antigen. Here we describe a technique for isolating monoclonal antibodies from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The protocol includes strategies for the isolation of switch-memory B cells from peripheral blood, the culture of B cells, the removal of the supernatant for screening and the lysis of B cells in preparation for immunoglobulin heavy-chain and light-chain amplification and cloning. We have observed that the addition of cytokines IL-2, IL-21 and irradiated 3T3-msCD40L feeder cells can successfully stimulate switch-memory B cells to produce high concentrations of IgG in the supernatant. The supernatant may then be screened by appropriate assays for binding or for other functions. This protocol can be completed in 2 weeks. It is adaptable to use in other species and enables the efficient isolation of antibodies with a desired functional characteristic without prior knowledge of specificity. PMID:24030440

  16. Matrix metalloproteinases inhibition promotes the polyfunctionality of human natural killer cells in therapeutic antibody-based anti-tumour immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Q; Gil-Krzewska, A; Peruzzi, G; Borrego, F

    2013-07-01

    Activation of human natural killer (NK) cells is associated with the cleavage of CD16 from the cell surface, a process mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this report, we examined whether inhibition of MMPs would lead to improved NK cell antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. Using an in-vitro ADCC assay, we tested the anti-tumour function of NK cells with three different therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in the presence of MMPs inhibitor GM6001 or its control. Loss of CD16 was observed when NK cells were co-cultured with tumour targets in the presence of specific anti-tumour antibodies, and was found particularly on the majority of degranulating NK responding cells. Treatment with MMPs inhibitors not only prevented CD16 down-regulation, but improved the quality of the responding cells significantly, as shown by an increase in the percentage of polyfunctional NK cells that are capable of both producing cytokines and degranulation. Furthermore, MMPs inhibition resulted in augmented and sustained CD16-mediated signalling, as shown by increased tyrosine phosphorylation of CD3ζ and other downstream signalling intermediates, which may account for the improved NK cell function. Collectively, our results provide a foundation for combining MMPs inhibitors and therapeutic mAbs in new clinical trials for cancer treatment. PMID:23607800

  17. DEATH OF INTERMEDIOLATERAL SPINAL CORD NEURONS FOLLOWS SELECTIVE COMPLEMENT-MEDIATED DESTRUCTION OF PERIPHERAL PREGANGLIONIC SYMPATHETIC TERMINALS BY ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE ANTIBODIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systemically administered antibodies to acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) cause a selective complement-mediated destruction of preganglionic sympathetic nerve terminals. o assess neurologic integrity, rats given murine monoclonal AChE-antibodies or normal mouse IgG (1.5 mg,i.v.) were e...

  18. Alteration of the retinotectal map in Xenopus by antibodies to neural cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, S E; Murray, B A; Chuong, C M; Edelman, G M

    1984-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) mediates neuron-neuron adhesion, is ubiquitous in the nervous system of developing and mature vertebrates, and undergoes major alterations in both amount and distribution during development. Perturbation of homophilic (N-CAM to N-CAM) binding by univalent fragments of specific anti-N-CAM antibodies has previously been found to alter neural tissue patterns in vitro. To show that significant alterations can also occur in vivo, antibodies to Xenopus N-CAM were embedded in agarose microcylinders and implanted in the tecta of juvenile Xenopus laevis frogs that were undergoing regeneration of their retinotectal projections; 1 week later, the effects of implantation on the projection pattern from the optic nerve were determined. Both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to N-CAM distorted the retinotectal projection pattern and greatly decreased the precision of the projection; these alterations recovered to near normal after an additional 3 weeks. Similar but smaller effects were obtained when normally developing froglets received tectal implants. In control animals, implants of immunoglobulins from preimmune serum and monoclonal antibodies not directed against N-CAM had little or no effect on the pattern. The results suggest that neuronal adhesion mediated by N-CAM is important in establishing and maintaining the precision and topography of neural patterns. Images PMID:6588385

  19. Heparan sulfate mediates trastuzumab effect in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    these resistant cells. Conclusion Trastuzumab action is dependent on the availability of heparan sulfate on the surface of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that high levels of heparan sulfate shed to the medium are able to capture trastuzumab, blocking the antibody action mediated by HER2. In addition to HER2 levels, heparan sulfate synthesis and shedding determine breast cancer cell susceptibility to trastuzumab. PMID:24083474

  20. CEA TCB: A novel head-to-tail 2:1 T cell bispecific antibody for treatment of CEA-positive solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bacac, Marina; Klein, Christian; Umana, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Carcinoembryonic antigen T cell bispecific antibody (CEA TCB) is a bispecific antibody used to recognize CEA and CD3e via a novel molecular format (2:1) that induces T cell-mediated killing of CEA over-expressing tumors while sparing primary cells with low CEA expression. CEA TCB treatment inhibits tumor growth and generates a highly inflamed tumor microenvironment. PMID:27622073

  1. Antibody mediated therapy targeting CD47 inhibits tumor progression of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhenyu; Chung, Haniee; Banan, Babak; Manning, Pamela T; Ott, Katherine C; Lin, Shin; Capoccia, Benjamin J; Subramanian, Vijay; Hiebsch, Ronald R; Upadhya, Gundumi A; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour; Frazier, William A; Lin, Yiing; Chapman, William C

    2015-05-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a high rate of tumor recurrence and metastasis, resulting in shortened survival times. The efficacy of current systemic therapies for HCC is limited. In this study, we used xenograft tumor models to investigate the use of antibodies that block CD47 and inhibit HCC tumor growth. Immunostaining of tumor tissue and HCC cell lines demonstrated CD47 over-expression in HCC as compared to normal hepatocytes. Macrophage phagocytosis of HCC cells was increased after treatment with CD47 antibodies (CD47mAbs) that block CD47 binding to SIRPα. Further, CD47 blockade inhibited tumor growth in both heterotopic and orthotopic models of HCC, and promoted the migration of macrophages into the tumor mass. Our results demonstrate that targeting CD47 by specific antibodies has potential immunotherapeutic efficacy in human HCC. PMID:25721088

  2. Specific antibody-mediated detection of Brochothrix thermosphacta in situ in British fresh sausage.

    PubMed

    Stringer, S C; Chaffey, B J; Dodd, C E; Morgan, M R; Waites, W M

    1995-04-01

    A rabbit polyclonal antibody-linked probe was developed which detected 76% of 800 food isolates of the spoilage bacterium Brochothrix thermosphacta when cells were bound to nitrocellulose. In slide cross-reaction tests all six environmental isolates tested were stained but the type strain was not. The antibody did not cross-react with Listeria grayi, L. monocytogenes, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus mutans, Bacillus cereus or B. subtilis. The antibody-linked probe detected Br. thermosphacta in thin sections of British fresh sausage when the viable count was greater than 10(6) g-1. Cells were detected mainly within 1 or 2 mm of the surface on the loose starchy material. They were not detected within muscle blocks or in the centre of the sausage. Such results suggest that growth of this organism occurs close to the surface of the sausage. PMID:7538105

  3. Antibody mediated therapy targeting CD47 inhibits tumor progression of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhenyu; Chung, Haniee; Banan, Babak; Manning, Pamela T.; Ott, Katherine C.; Lin, Shin; Capoccia, Benjamin J.; Subramanian, Vijay; Hiebsch, Ronald R.; Upadhya, Gundumi A.; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour; Frazier, William A.; Lin, Yiing; Chapman, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a high rate of tumor recurrence and metastasis, resulting in shortened survival times. The efficacy of current systemic therapies for HCC is limited. In this study, we used xenograft tumor models to investigate the use of antibodies that block CD47 and inhibit HCC tumor growth. Immunostaining of tumor tissue and HCC cell lines demonstrated CD47 over-expression in HCC as compared to normal hepatocytes. Macrophage phagocytosis of HCC cells was increased after treatment with CD47 antibodies (CD47mAbs) that block CD47 binding to SIRPα. Further, CD47 blockade inhibited tumor growth in both heterotopic and orthotopic models of HCC, and promoted the migration of macrophages into the tumor mass. Our results demonstrate that targeting CD47 by specific antibodies has potential immunotherapeutic efficacy in human HCC. PMID:25721088

  4. Antibody-mediated immunotherapy of macaques chronically infected with SHIV suppresses viraemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingai, Masashi; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald; Buckler-White, Alicia; Seaman, Michael; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Martin, Malcolm A.

    2013-11-01

    Neutralizing antibodies can confer immunity to primate lentiviruses by blocking infection in macaque models of AIDS. However, earlier studies of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies administered to infected individuals or humanized mice reported poor control of virus replication and the rapid emergence of resistant variants. A new generation of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies, possessing extraordinary potency and breadth of neutralizing activity, has recently been isolated from infected individuals. These neutralizing antibodies target different regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein including the CD4-binding site, glycans located in the V1/V2, V3 and V4 regions, and the membrane proximal external region of gp41 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14). Here we have examined two of the new antibodies, directed to the CD4-binding site and the V3 region (3BNC117 and 10-1074, respectively), for their ability to block infection and suppress viraemia in macaques infected with the R5 tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-AD8, which emulates many of the pathogenic and immunogenic properties of HIV-1 during infections of rhesus macaques. Either antibody alone can potently block virus acquisition. When administered individually to recently infected macaques, the 10-1074 antibody caused a rapid decline in virus load to undetectable levels for 4-7days, followed by virus rebound during which neutralization-resistant variants became detectable. When administered together, a single treatment rapidly suppressed plasma viraemia for 3-5weeks in some long-term chronically SHIV-infected animals with low CD4+ T-cell levels. A second cycle of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody therapy, administered to two previously treated animals, successfully controlled virus rebound. These results indicate that immunotherapy or a combination of immunotherapy plus conventional antiretroviral drugs might be useful as a treatment for chronically HIV-1-infected

  5. Heterosubtypic Antibodies to Influenza A Virus Have Limited Activity against Cell-Bound Virus but Are Not Impaired by Strain-Specific Serum Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Wyrzucki, Arkadiusz; Bianchi, Matteo; Kohler, Ines; Steck, Marco

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The majority of influenza virus-specific antibodies elicited by vaccination or natural infection are effective only against the eliciting or closely related viruses. Rare stem-specific heterosubtypic monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) can neutralize multiple strains and subtypes by preventing hemagglutinin (HA)-mediated fusion of the viral membrane with the endosomal membrane. The epitopes recognized by these hMAbs are therefore considered promising targets for the development of pan-influenza virus vaccines. Here, we report the isolation of a novel human HA stem-reactive monoclonal antibody, hMAb 1.12, with exceptionally broad neutralizing activity encompassing viruses from 15 distinct HA subtypes. Using MAb 1.12 and two other monoclonal antibodies, we demonstrate that neutralization by hMAbs is virtually irreversible but becomes severely impaired following virus attachment to cells. In contrast, no interference by human anti-influenza virus serum antibodies was found, indicating that apically binding antibodies do not impair access to the membrane-proximal heterosubtypic epitopes. Our findings therefore encourage development of new vaccine concepts aiming at the induction of stem-specific heterosubtypic antibodies, as we provide support for their effectiveness in individuals previously exposed to influenza virus. IMPORTANCE The influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA) can easily accommodate changes in its antigenic structures to escape preexisting immunity. This variability restricts the breadth and long-term efficacy of influenza vaccines. Only a few heterosubtypic antibodies (hMAbs), i.e., antibodies that can neutralize more than one subtype of influenza A virus, have been identified. The molecular interactions between these heterosubtypic antibodies and hemagglutinin are well characterized, yet little is known about the functional properties of these antibodies. Using a new, extraordinarily broad hMAb, we show that virus neutralization by hMAbs is virtually

  6. Lysyl oxidase like-4 monoclonal antibody demonstrates therapeutic effect against head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells and xenografts.

    PubMed

    Görögh, Tibor; Quabius, Elgar S; Heidebrecht, Hans; Nagy, Andreas; Muffels, Till; Haag, Jochen; Ambrosch, Petra; Hoffmann, Markus

    2016-05-15

    A new member of the lysyl oxidase (LOX) family, lysyl oxidase-like 4 (LOXL4), is overexpressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) compared to normal squamous epithelium. A monoclonal antibody (mAb) derived from fusion of Balb/c mouse splenocytes immunized with LOXL4 specific peptide was used to evaluate its therapeutic efficacy in 15 HNSCC cell lines associated with LOXL4 overexpression. For xenograft experiments 41 severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice were used to analyze LOXL4-mAb mediated tumor regression. Cell viability was analyzed using cytotoxicity-, and clonogenic-assays. Significant suppression of tumor cell growth was observed in 12 out of 15 (80%) tumor cell lines after 48 hr exposure to the mAb (LD50 of 15 µg/ml to 45 µg/ml). The effect induced by the antibody could be blocked by pre-incubation of the antibody with the peptide used for immunization of the mice and antibody generation, indicating that the effect of the antibody is specific. In mice inoculated with HNSCC cells, i.v. injections of the LOXL4-mAb resulted within 70 days in extensive tumor destruction in all treated animals whereas no tumor regression occurred in control animals. In mice pre-immunized i.v. with LOXL4-mAb and subsequently injected with HNSCC cells, tumor development was considerably delayed in contrast to non LOXL4-mAb pre-immunized animals. These results demonstrate that the LOXL4-mAb has potent antitumor activity and suggest its suitability as a therapeutic immune agent applicable to HNSCC exhibiting tumor specific upregulation of LOXL4. PMID:26756583

  7. Complement-Mediated Virus Infectivity Neutralisation by HLA Antibodies Is Associated with Sterilising Immunity to SIV Challenge in the Macaque Model for HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Mark; Hassall, Mark; Cranage, Martin; Stott, James; Almond, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Sterilising immunity is a desired outcome for vaccination against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and has been observed in the macaque model using inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). This protection was attributed to antibodies specific for cell proteins including human leucocyte antigens (HLA) class I and II incorporated into virions during vaccine and challenge virus preparation. We show here, using HLA bead arrays, that vaccinated macaques protected from virus challenge had higher serum antibody reactivity compared with non-protected animals. Moreover, reactivity was shown to be directed against HLA framework determinants. Previous studies failed to correlate serum antibody mediated virus neutralisation with protection and were confounded by cytotoxic effects. Using a virus entry assay based on TZM-bl cells we now report that, in the presence of complement, serum antibody titres that neutralise virus infectivity were higher in protected animals. We propose that complement-augmented virus neutralisation is a key factor in inducing sterilising immunity and may be difficult to achieve with HIV/SIV Env-based vaccines. Understanding how to overcome the apparent block of inactivated SIV vaccines to elicit anti-envelope protein antibodies that effectively engage the complement system could enable novel anti-HIV antibody vaccines that induce potent, virolytic serological response to be developed. PMID:24551145

  8. Novel anti–B-cell maturation antigen antibody-drug conjugate (GSK2857916) selectively induces killing of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Patrick A.; Acharya, Chirag; Zhong, Mike Y.; Cea, Michele; Cagnetta, Antonia; Craigen, Jenny; Yates, John; Gliddon, Louise; Fieles, William; Hoang, Bao; Tunstead, James; Christie, Amanda L.; Kung, Andrew L.; Richardson, Paul; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), highly expressed on malignant plasma cells in human multiple myeloma (MM), has not been effectively targeted with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. We here show that BCMA is universally expressed on the MM cell surface and determine specific anti-MM activity of J6M0-mcMMAF (GSK2857916), a novel humanized and afucosylated antagonistic anti-BCMA antibody-drug conjugate via a noncleavable linker. J6M0-mcMMAF specifically blocks cell growth via G2/M arrest and induces caspase 3–dependent apoptosis in MM cells, alone and in coculture with bone marrow stromal cells or various effector cells. It strongly inhibits colony formation by MM cells while sparing surrounding BCMA-negative normal cells. J6M0-mcMMAF significantly induces effector cell-mediated lysis against allogeneic or autologous patient MM cells, with increased potency and efficacy compared with the wild-type J6M0 without Fc enhancement. The antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptotic activity of J6M0-mcMMAF is further enhanced by lenalidomide. Importantly, J6M0-mcMMAF rapidly eliminates myeloma cells in subcutaneous and disseminated mouse models, and mice remain tumor-free up to 3.5 months. Furthermore, J6M0-mcMMAF recruits macrophages and mediates antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis of MM cells. Together, these results demonstrate that GSK2857916 has potent and selective anti-MM activities via multiple cytotoxic mechanisms, providing a promising next-generation immunotherapeutic in this cancer. PMID:24569262

  9. Novel anti-B-cell maturation antigen antibody-drug conjugate (GSK2857916) selectively induces killing of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yu-Tzu; Mayes, Patrick A; Acharya, Chirag; Zhong, Mike Y; Cea, Michele; Cagnetta, Antonia; Craigen, Jenny; Yates, John; Gliddon, Louise; Fieles, William; Hoang, Bao; Tunstead, James; Christie, Amanda L; Kung, Andrew L; Richardson, Paul; Munshi, Nikhil C; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2014-05-15

    B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), highly expressed on malignant plasma cells in human multiple myeloma (MM), has not been effectively targeted with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. We here show that BCMA is universally expressed on the MM cell surface and determine specific anti-MM activity of J6M0-mcMMAF (GSK2857916), a novel humanized and afucosylated antagonistic anti-BCMA antibody-drug conjugate via a noncleavable linker. J6M0-mcMMAF specifically blocks cell growth via G2/M arrest and induces caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in MM cells, alone and in coculture with bone marrow stromal cells or various effector cells. It strongly inhibits colony formation by MM cells while sparing surrounding BCMA-negative normal cells. J6M0-mcMMAF significantly induces effector cell-mediated lysis against allogeneic or autologous patient MM cells, with increased potency and efficacy compared with the wild-type J6M0 without Fc enhancement. The antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptotic activity of J6M0-mcMMAF is further enhanced by lenalidomide. Importantly, J6M0-mcMMAF rapidly eliminates myeloma cells in subcutaneous and disseminated mouse models, and mice remain tumor-free up to 3.5 months. Furthermore, J6M0-mcMMAF recruits macrophages and mediates antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis of MM cells. Together, these results demonstrate that GSK2857916 has potent and selective anti-MM activities via multiple cytotoxic mechanisms, providing a promising next-generation immunotherapeutic in this cancer. PMID:24569262

  10. Acute Liver Allograft Antibody-Mediated Rejection: an inter-institutional study of routine histopathological features

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Jacqueline G.; Shiller, S. Michelle; Bellamy, Christopher; Nalesnik, Michael A.; Kaneku, Hugo; Terasaki, Paul I.; Klintmalm, Göran B.; Demetris, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) occurs in a minority of sensitized liver transplant recipients. Although histopathologic characteristics have been described, a generalizable scoring system used to trigger a more in-depth analysis is needed to screen for this rare but important finding. Toward this goal, we created a training and validation cohort from 3 high volume liver transplant programs of putative acute AMR and control cases that were evaluated blindly by 4 independent transplant pathologists. The evaluations were performed on H&E sections alone without knowledge of serum DSA results nor C4d stains. Characteristics strongly correlated with acute AMR included portal eosinophilia (OR=4.37, p<0.001), portal vein endothelial cell hypertrophy (OR=2.88, p<0.001), and eosinophilic central venulitis (OR=2.48, p=0.003). These and other characteristics were incorporated into models created from the training cohort alone. The final Acute-AMR (aAMR) score exhibited a strong correlation with acute AMR in the training (OR=2.86, p<0.001) and validation cohort (OR=2.49, p<0.001). SPSS tree classification was used to select 2 cutoffs, one that optimized specificity at a score >1.75 (sensitivity = 34%, specificity = 87%) and a second that optimized sensitivity at a score >1.0 (sensitivity = 81%, specificity = 71%). In conclusion, routine histopathological features of the aAMR score can be used to screen for acute AMR on routine H&E in liver transplant biopsies, a diagnosis that requires substantiation by donor-specific HLA alloantibody testing, C4d staining, and exclusion of other insults. PMID:25045154

  11. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes B cells and B cell precursors in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Coffman, R.L.; Weissman, I.L.

    1981-02-01

    The monoclonal antibody, RA3-2C2, appears to be specific for cells within the B cell lineage. This antibody does not recognize thymocytes, peripheral T cells, or nonlymphoid hematopoietic cells in the spleen or bone marrow. Nor does it recognize the pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells, the spleen colony-forming unit, All sIg+ B cells and most plasma cells are RA3-2C2+. In addition, approximately 20% of nucleated bone marrow cells are RA3-2C2+ but sIg-. This population contains B cell precursors that can give rise to sIg+ cells within 2 d in vitro.

  12. Elimination of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bruel, Timothée; Guivel-Benhassine, Florence; Amraoui, Sonia; Malbec, Marine; Richard, Léa; Bourdic, Katia; Donahue, Daniel Aaron; Lorin, Valérie; Casartelli, Nicoletta; Noël, Nicolas; Lambotte, Olivier; Mouquet, Hugo; Schwartz, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The Fc region of HIV-1 Env-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) is required for suppressing viraemia, through mechanisms which remain poorly understood. Here, we identify bNAbs that exert antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in cell culture and kill HIV-1-infected lymphocytes through natural killer (NK) engagement. These antibodies target the CD4-binding site, the glycans/V3 and V1/V2 loops on gp120, or the gp41 moiety. The landscape of Env epitope exposure at the surface and the sensitivity of infected cells to ADCC vary considerably between viral strains. Efficient ADCC requires sustained cell surface binding of bNAbs to Env, and combining bNAbs allows a potent killing activity. Furthermore, reactivated infected cells from HIV-positive individuals expose heterogeneous Env epitope patterns, with levels that are often but not always sufficient to trigger killing by bNAbs. Our study delineates the parameters controlling ADCC activity of bNAbs, and supports the use of the most potent antibodies to clear the viral reservoir. PMID:26936020

  13. Elimination of HIV-1-infected cells by broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bruel, Timothée; Guivel-Benhassine, Florence; Amraoui, Sonia; Malbec, Marine; Richard, Léa; Bourdic, Katia; Donahue, Daniel Aaron; Lorin, Valérie; Casartelli, Nicoletta; Noël, Nicolas; Lambotte, Olivier; Mouquet, Hugo; Schwartz, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The Fc region of HIV-1 Env-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) is required for suppressing viraemia, through mechanisms which remain poorly understood. Here, we identify bNAbs that exert antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in cell culture and kill HIV-1-infected lymphocytes through natural killer (NK) engagement. These antibodies target the CD4-binding site, the glycans/V3 and V1/V2 loops on gp120, or the gp41 moiety. The landscape of Env epitope exposure at the surface and the sensitivity of infected cells to ADCC vary considerably between viral strains. Efficient ADCC requires sustained cell surface binding of bNAbs to Env, and combining bNAbs allows a potent killing activity. Furthermore, reactivated infected cells from HIV-positive individuals expose heterogeneous Env epitope patterns, with levels that are often but not always sufficient to trigger killing by bNAbs. Our study delineates the parameters controlling ADCC activity of bNAbs, and supports the use of the most potent antibodies to clear the viral reservoir. PMID:26936020

  14. Cross-neutralization of influenza A viruses mediated by a single antibody loop.

    PubMed

    Ekiert, Damian C; Kashyap, Arun K; Steel, John; Rubrum, Adam; Bhabha, Gira; Khayat, Reza; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Dillon, Michael A; O'Neil, Ryann E; Faynboym, Aleksandr M; Horowitz, Michael; Horowitz, Lawrence; Ward, Andrew B; Palese, Peter; Webby, Richard; Lerner, Richard A; Bhatt, Ramesh R; Wilson, Ian A

    2012-09-27

    Immune recognition of protein antigens relies on the combined interaction of multiple antibody loops, which provide a fairly large footprint and constrain the size and shape of protein surfaces that can be targeted. Single protein loops can mediate extremely high-affinity binding, but it is unclear whether such a mechanism is available to antibodies. Here we report the isolation and characterization of an antibody called C05, which neutralizes strains from multiple subtypes of influenza A virus, including H1, H2 and H3. X-ray and electron microscopy structures show that C05 recognizes conserved elements of the receptor-binding site on the haemagglutinin surface glycoprotein. Recognition of the haemagglutinin receptor-binding site is dominated by a single heavy-chain complementarity-determining region 3 loop, with minor contacts from heavy-chain complementarity-determining region 1, and is sufficient to achieve nanomolar binding with a minimal footprint. Thus, binding predominantly with a single loop can allow antibodies to target small, conserved functional sites on otherwise hypervariable antigens. PMID:22982990

  15. Functional advantage of educated KIR2DL1(+) natural killer cells for anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Gooneratne, S L; Center, R J; Kent, S J; Parsons, M S

    2016-04-01

    Evidence from the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial implicates anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vaccine-conferred protection from infection. Among effector cells that mediate ADCC are natural killer (NK) cells. The ability of NK cells to be activated in an antibody-dependent manner is reliant upon several factors. In general, NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent activation is most robust in terminally differentiated CD57(+) NK cells, as well as NK cells educated through ontological interactions between inhibitory killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and their major histocompatibility complex class I [MHC-I or human leucocyte antigen (HLA-I)] ligands. With regard to anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent NK cell activation, previous research has demonstrated that the epidemiologically relevant KIR3DL1/HLA-Bw4 receptor/ligand combination confers enhanced activation potential. In the present study we assessed the ability of the KIR2DL1/HLA-C2 receptor/ligand combination to confer enhanced activation upon direct stimulation with HLA-I-devoid target cells or antibody-dependent stimulation with HIV-1 gp140-pulsed CEM.NKr-CCR5 target cells in the presence of an anti-HIV-1 antibody source. Among donors carrying the HLA-C2 ligand for KIR2DL1, higher interferon (IFN)-γ production was observed within KIR2DL1(+) NK cells than in KIR2DL1(-) NK cells upon both direct and antibody-dependent stimulation. No differences in KIR2DL1(+) and KIR2DL1(-) NK cell activation were observed in HLA-C1 homozygous donors. Additionally, higher activation in KIR2DL1(+) than KIR2DL1(-) NK cells from HLA-C2 carrying donors was observed within less differentiated CD57(-) NK cells, demonstrating that the observed differences were due to education and not an overabundance of KIR2DL1(+) NK cells within differentiated CD57(+) NK cells. These observations are relevant for understanding the regulation of anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent NK cell responses. PMID:26647083

  16. M protein mediates streptococcal adhesion to HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, J R; Stinson, M W

    1994-02-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes adheres to human epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. To identify adhesins, cell wall components were extracted from S. pyogenes M6 with alkali or by treatment with mutanolysin and lysozyme. HEp-2 cells were incubated with extracts of S. pyogenes M6 and then analyzed by Western blot (immunoblot) assays, using antibodies to S. pyogenes. Only one streptococcal component (62 kDa) was bound to HEp-2 cells and was identified serologically as M6 protein. Experiments with pepsin-cleaved fragments of M protein indicated that the binding site was located at the N-terminal half of the molecule. M protein was bound selectively to two trypsin-sensitive surface components, 97 and 205 kDa, of HEp-2 cells on nitrocellulose blots of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Tritium-labeled lipoteichoic acid bound to different HEp-2 cell components, 34 and 35 kDa, in a parallel experiment, indicating that lipoteichoic acid was not complexed with M protein and does not mediate M-protein binding. The four HEp-2 components were unrelated to fibronectin since they did not react with specific antibodies. An M-protein-deficient (M-) strain of streptococcus (JRS75), grown in chemically defined medium, showed 73% less adhesion activity to HEp-2 monolayers than an M+ strain (JRS4). Streptococcal adhesion was insensitive to competitive inhibition by selected monosaccharides. These results indicate that M protein binds directly to certain HEp-2 cell membrane components and mediates streptococcal adhesion. PMID:8300205

  17. Identification of Staphylococcus aureus Proteins Recognized by the Antibody-Mediated Immune Response to a Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Rebecca A.; Leid, Jeff G.; Camper, Anne K.; Costerton, J. William; Shirtliff, Mark E.

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes persistent, recurrent infections (e.g., osteomyelitis) by forming biofilms. To survey the antibody-mediated immune response and identify those proteins that are immunogenic in an S. aureus biofilm infection, the tibias of rabbits were infected with methicillin-resistant S. aureus to produce chronic osteomyelitis. Sera were collected prior to infection and at 14, 28, and 42 days postinfection. The sera were used to perform Western blot assays on total protein from biofilm grown in vitro and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Those proteins recognized by host antibodies in the harvested sera were identified via matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight analysis. Using protein from mechanically disrupted total and fractionated biofilm protein samples, we identified 26 and 22 immunogens, respectively. These included a cell surface-associated β-lactamase, lipoprotein, lipase, autolysin, and an ABC transporter lipoprotein. Studies were also performed using microarray analyses and confirmed the biofilm-specific up-regulation of most of these genes. Therefore, although the biofilm antigens are recognized by the immune system, the biofilm infection can persist. However, these proteins, when delivered as vaccines, may be important in directing the immune system toward an early and effective antibody-mediated response to prevent chronic S. aureus infections. Previous works have identified S. aureus proteins that are immunogenic during acute infections, such as sepsis. However, this is the first work to identify these immunogens during chronic S. aureus biofilm infections and to simultaneously show the global relationship between the antigens expressed during an in vivo infection and the corresponding in vitro transcriptomic and proteomic gene expression levels. PMID:16714572

  18. Optically absorbing nanoparticle mediated cell membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Mehta, Smit; Viator, John

    2012-11-01

    Membrane permeabilization is imperative for gene and drug delivery systems, along with other cell manipulation methods, since the average eukaryotic cell membrane is not permeable to polar and large nonpolar molecules. Antibody conjugated optically absorbing gold nanospheres are targeted to the cell membrane of T47D breast cancer cell line and irradiated with 5 ns pulse, 20 Hz, 532 nm light to increase membrane permeability. Up to 90% permeabilization with less than 6% death is reported at radiant exposures up to 10 times lower than those of other comparable studies. PMID:23114334

  19. Evaluation of antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) measurement.

    PubMed

    Broussas, Matthieu; Broyer, Lucile; Goetsch, Liliane

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve therapeutic antibodies efficacy in cancer patients, several strategies were developed. One of these strategies consists in the enhancement of effector functions. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was shown to mediate the activity of several therapeutic antibodies through interaction of the constant fragment (Fc) with immune cells. The interactions of Fc fragment can be modulated by engineering through modifications of the carbohydrate moieties or through modifications of some critical amino acids for its binding. Such modifications have to be studied in an in vitro assay to evaluate their impact on the regulation of effector functions. Here, we described a method to evaluate ADCC using a nonradioactive assay based on the measurement of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. NK cells were purified by negative immunomagnetic selection and used as effector cells to trigger ADCC against specific target tumor cells. The LDH release measurement from lysed cells is performed after 4 h incubation. This method can replace the (51)Cr release assay since it is less restrictive and highly sensitive. PMID:23475728

  20. Natural killer cell cytotoxicity of breast cancer targets is enhanced by two distinct mechanisms of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against LFA-3 and HER2/neu.

    PubMed

    Cooley, S; Burns, L J; Repka, T; Miller, J S

    1999-10-01

    Treatment of advanced breast cancer with autologous stem cell transplantation is limited by a high probability of disease relapse. In clinical trials, interleukin 2 (IL-2) alone can expand natural killer (NK) cells in vivo and increase their cytotoxic activity against breast cancer cell lines, but this increase is modest. Understanding the mechanisms that mediate NK cell lysis of breast cancer targets may lead to improvements of current immunotherapy strategies. NK cells from normal donors or patients receiving subcutaneous IL-2 were tested in cytotoxicity assays against five breast cancer cell lines. The role of adhesion molecules and antibodies that interact through Fc receptors on NK cells was explored. NK cell lysis of breast cancer targets is variable and is partially dependent on recognition through ICAM-1 and CD18. While blocking CD2 slightly decreased cytotoxicity, contrary to expectations, an antibody against CD58 (the ligand for CD2), failed to block killing and instead mediated an increased cytotoxicity that correlated with target density of CD58. The CD58 antibody-enhanced killing was dependent not only on FcRgammaIII but also on CD2 and ICAM-1/CD18. To further elucidate the mechanism of this CD58 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), another antibody was tested. Trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized antibody against HER2/neu, mediated potent ADCC against all the HER2/neu positive breast cancer targets. Unlike CD58 antibody-mediated ADCC, Herceptin ADCC was minimally affected by blocking antibodies to CD2 or ICAM-1/CD18, which suggests a different mechanism of action. This study shows that multiple mechanisms are involved in NK cell lysis of breast cancer targets, that none of the targets are inherently resistant to killing, and that two distinct mechanisms of ADCC can target immunotherapy to breast cancer cells. PMID:10517495

  1. Combined use of anti-ErbB monoclonal antibodies and erlotinib enhances antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of wild-type erlotinib-sensitive NSCLC cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an established target for anti-cancer treatment in different tumour types. Two different strategies have been explored to inhibit this pivotal molecule in epithelial cancer development: small molecules TKIs and monoclonal antibodies. ErbB/HER-targeting by monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab and trastuzumab or tyrosine-kinase inhibitors as gefitinib or erlotinib has been proven effective in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. Results In this study we explored the potential of combining either erlotinib with cetuximab or trastuzumab to improve the efficacy of EGFR targeted therapy in EGFR wild-type NSCLC cell lines. Erlotinib treatment was observed to increase EGFR and/or HER2 expression at the plasma membrane level only in NSCLC cell lines sensitive to the drug inducing protein stabilization. The combined treatment had marginal effect on cell proliferation but markedly increased antibody-dependent, NK mediated, cytotoxicity in vitro. Moreover, in the Calu-3 xenograft model, the combination significantly inhibited tumour growth when compared with erlotinib and cetuximab alone. Conclusion Our results indicate that erlotinib increases surface expression of EGFR and/or HER2 only in EGFR-TKI sensitive NSCLC cell lines and, in turns, leads to increased susceptibility to ADCC both in vitro and in a xenograft models. The combination of erlotinib with monoclonal antibodies represents a potential strategy to improve the treatment of wild-type EGFR NSCLC patients sensitive to erlotinib. PMID:23234355

  2. Cell culture processes for monoclonal antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Vijayasankaran, Natarajan; Shen, Amy (Yijuan); Kiss, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Animal cell culture technology has advanced significantly over the last few decades and is now generally considered a reliable, robust and relatively mature technology. A range of biotherapeutics are currently synthesized using cell culture methods in large scale manufacturing facilities that produce products for both commercial use and clinical studies. The robust implementation of this technology requires optimization of a number of variables, including (1) cell lines capable of synthesizing the required molecules at high productivities that ensure low operating cost; (2) culture media and bioreactor culture conditions that achieve both the requisite productivity and meet product quality specifications; (3) appropriate on-line and off-line sensors capable of providing information that enhances process control; and (4) good understanding of culture performance at different scales to ensure smooth scale-up. Successful implementation also requires appropriate strategies for process development, scale-up and process characterization and validation that enable robust operation and ensure compliance with current regulations. This review provides an overview of the state-of-the art technology in key aspects of cell culture, e.g., generation of highly productive cell lines and optimization of cell culture process conditions. We also summarize the current thinking on appropriate process development strategies and process advances that might affect process development. PMID:20622510

  3. A new class of bispecific antibodies to redirect T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Diane L; Rossi, Edmund A; Cardillo, Thomas M; Goldenberg, David M; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    Various constructs of bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) to redirect effector T cells for the targeted killing of tumor cells have shown considerable promise in both preclinical and clinical studies. The single-chain variable fragment (scFv)-based formats, including bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE) and dual-affinity re-targeting (DART), which provide monovalent binding to both CD3 on T cells and to the target antigen on tumor cells, can exhibit rapid blood clearance and neurological toxicity due to their small size (~55 kDa). Herein, we describe the generation, by the modular DOCK-AND-LOCK™) (DNL™) method, of novel T-cell redirecting bispecific antibodies, each comprising a monovalent anti-CD3 scFv covalently conjugated to a stabilized dimer of different anti-tumor Fabs. The potential advantages of this design include bivalent binding to tumor cells, a larger size (~130 kDa) to preclude renal clearance and penetration of the blood-brain barrier, and potent T-cell mediated cytotoxicity. These prototypes were purified to near homogeneity, and representative constructs were shown to provoke the formation of immunological synapses between T cells and their target tumor cells in vitro, resulting in T-cell activation and proliferation, as well as potent T-cell mediated anti-tumor activity. In addition, in vivo studies in NOD/SCID mice bearing Raji Burkitt lymphoma or Capan-1 pancreatic carcinoma indicated statistically significant inhibition of tumor growth compared with untreated controls. PMID:24492297

  4. A new class of bispecific antibodies to redirect T cells for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Diane L; Rossi, Edmund A; Cardillo, Thomas M; Goldenberg, David M; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    Various constructs of bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) to redirect effector T cells for the targeted killing of tumor cells have shown considerable promise in both preclinical and clinical studies. The single-chain variable fragment (scFv)-based formats, including bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE) and dual-affinity re-targeting (DART), which provide monovalent binding to both CD3 on T cells and to the target antigen on tumor cells, can exhibit rapid blood clearance and neurological toxicity due to their small size (~55 kDa). Herein, we describe the generation, by the modular DOCK-AND-LOCKTM (DNLTM) method, of novel T-cell redirecting bispecific antibodies, each comprising a monovalent anti-CD3 scFv covalently conjugated to a stabilized dimer of different anti-tumor Fabs. The potential advantages of this design include bivalent binding to tumor cells, a larger size (~130 kDa) to preclude renal clearance and penetration of the blood-brain barrier, and potent T-cell mediated cytotoxicity. These prototypes were purified to near homogeneity, and representative constructs were shown to provoke the formation of immunological synapses between T cells and their target tumor cells in vitro, resulting in T-cell activation and proliferation, as well as potent T-cell mediated anti-tumor activity. In addition, in vivo studies in NOD/SCID mice bearing Raji Burkitt lymphoma or Capan-1 pancreatic carcinoma indicated statistically significant inhibition of tumor growth compared with untreated controls. PMID:24492297

  5. Regulatory T cells in immune-mediated renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Joanna R; Wang, Yuan Min; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are CD4+ T cells that can suppress immune responses by effector T cells, B cells and innate immune cells. This review discusses the role that Tregs play in murine models of immune-mediated renal diseases and acute kidney injury and in human autoimmune kidney disease (such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis). Current research suggests that Tregs may be reduced in number and/or have impaired regulatory function in these diseases. Tregs possess several mechanisms by which they can limit renal and systemic inflammatory immune responses. Potential therapeutic applications involving Tregs include in vivo induction of Tregs or inducing Tregs from naïve CD4+ T cells or expanding natural Tregs ex vivo, to use as a cellular therapy. At present, the optimal method of generating a phenotypically stable pool of Tregs with long-lasting suppressive effects is not established, but human studies in renal transplantation are underway exploring the therapeutic potential of Tregs as a cellular therapy, and if successful may have a role as a novel therapy in immune-mediated renal diseases. PMID:26206106

  6. Report from a consensus conference on antibody-mediated rejection in heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kobashigawa, Jon; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G.; Ensminger, Stephan M.; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Angelini, Annalisa; Berry, Gerald; Burke, Margaret; Czer, Lawrence; Hiemann, Nicola; Kfoury, Abdallah G.; Mancini, Donna; Mohacsi, Paul; Patel, Jignesh; Pereira, Naveen; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Reed, Elaine F.; Reinsmoen, Nancy; Rodriguez, E. Rene; Rose, Marlene L.; Russell, Stuart D.; Starling, Randy; Suciu-Foca, Nicole; Tallaj, Jose; Taylor, David O.; Van Bakel, Adrian; West, Lori; Zeevi, Adriana; Zuckermann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The problem of AMR remains unsolved because standardized schemes for diagnosis and treatment remains contentious. Therefore, a consensus conference was organized to discuss the current status of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in heart transplantation. METHODS The conference included 83 participants (transplant cardiologists, surgeons, immunologists and pathologists) representing 67 heart transplant centers from North America, Europe, and Asia who all participated in smaller break-out sessions to discuss the various topics of AMR and attempt to achieve consensus. RESULTS A tentative pathology diagnosis of AMR was established, however, the pathologist felt that further discussion was needed prior to a formal recommendation for AMR diagnosis. One of the most important outcomes of this conference was that a clinical definition for AMR (cardiac dysfunction and/or circulating donor-specific antibody) was no longer believed to be required due to recent publications demonstrating that asymptomatic (no cardiac dysfunction) biopsy-proven AMR is associated with subsequent greater mortality and greater development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy. It was also noted that donor-specific antibody is not always detected during AMR episodes as the antibody may be adhered to the donor heart. Finally, recommendations were made for the timing for specific staining of endomyocardial biopsy specimens and the frequency by which circulating antibodies should be assessed. Recommendations for management and future clinical trials were also provided. CONCLUSIONS The AMR Consensus Conference brought together clinicians, pathologists and immunologists to further the understanding of AMR. Progress was made toward a pathology AMR grading scale and consensus was accomplished regarding several clinical issues. PMID:21300295

  7. Maternal Antibody-Mediated Disease Enhancement in Type I Interferon-Deficient Mice Leads to Lethal Disease Associated with Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Jian Hang; Binte Aman, Siti Amanlina; Libau, Eshele Anak; Lee, Pei Xuan; St. John, Ashley L.; Alonso, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported that most of the severe dengue cases occur upon a secondary heterologous infection. Furthermore, babies born to dengue immune mothers are at greater risk of developing severe disease upon primary infection with a heterologous or homologous dengue virus (DENV) serotype when maternal antibodies reach sub-neutralizing concentrations. These observations have been explained by the antibody mediated disease enhancement (ADE) phenomenon whereby heterologous antibodies or sub-neutralizing homologous antibodies bind to but fail to neutralize DENV particles, allowing Fc-receptor mediated entry of the virus-antibody complexes into host cells. This eventually results in enhanced viral replication and heightened inflammatory responses. In an attempt to replicate this ADE phenomenon in a mouse model, we previously reported that upon DENV2 infection 5-week old type I and II interferon (IFN) receptors-deficient mice (AG129) born to DENV1-immune mothers displayed enhancement of disease severity characterized by increased virus titers and extensive vascular leakage which eventually led to the animals’ death. However, as dengue occurs in immune competent individuals, we sought to reproduce this mouse model in a less immunocompromised background. Here, we report an ADE model that is mediated by maternal antibodies in type I IFN receptor-deficient A129 mice. We show that 5-week old A129 mice born to DENV1-immune mothers succumbed to a DENV2 infection within 4 days that was sub-lethal in mice born to naïve mothers. Clinical manifestations included extensive hepatocyte vacuolation, moderate vascular leakage, lymphopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Anti-TNFα therapy totally protected the mice and correlated with healthy hepatocytes. In contrast, blocking IL-6 did not impact the virus titers or disease outcome. This A129 mouse model of ADE may help dissecting the mechanisms involved in dengue pathogenesis and evaluate the efficacy of vaccine and

  8. B cell priming for extrafollicular antibody responses requires Bcl-6 expression by T cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sau K; Rigby, Robert J; Zotos, Dimitra; Tsai, Louis M; Kawamoto, Shimpei; Marshall, Jennifer L; Ramiscal, Roybel R; Chan, Tyani D; Gatto, Dominique; Brink, Robert; Yu, Di; Fagarasan, Sidonia; Tarlinton, David M; Cunningham, Adam F; Vinuesa, Carola G

    2011-07-01

    T follicular helper cells (Tfh cells) localize to follicles where they provide growth and selection signals to mutated germinal center (GC) B cells, thus promoting their differentiation into high affinity long-lived plasma cells and memory B cells. T-dependent B cell differentiation also occurs extrafollicularly, giving rise to unmutated plasma cells that are important for early protection against microbial infections. Bcl-6 expression in T cells has been shown to be essential for the formation of Tfh cells and GC B cells, but little is known about its requirement in physiological extrafollicular antibody responses. We use several mouse models in which extrafollicular plasma cells can be unequivocally distinguished from those of GC origin, combined with antigen-specific T and B cells, to show that the absence of T cell-expressed Bcl-6 significantly reduces T-dependent extrafollicular antibody responses. Bcl-6(+) T cells appear at the T-B border soon after T cell priming and before GC formation, and these cells express low amounts of PD-1. Their appearance precedes that of Bcl-6(+) PD-1(hi) T cells, which are found within the GC. IL-21 acts early to promote both follicular and extrafollicular antibody responses. In conclusion, Bcl-6(+) T cells are necessary at B cell priming to form extrafollicular antibody responses, and these pre-GC Tfh cells can be distinguished phenotypically from GC Tfh cells. PMID:21708925

  9. Targeting T Cells with Bispecific Antibodies for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Lawrence G.; Thakur, Archana

    2013-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies (BiAbs) offer a unique opportunity to redirect immune effector cells to kill cancer cells. BiAbs combine the benefits of different binding specificities of two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) into a single construct. This unique feature of BiAbs enables approaches that are not possible with single mAbs. Advances in antibody engineering and antigen profiling of malignant cells have led to the development of a number of BiAb formats and their combinations for redirecting effector cells to tumor targets. There have been significant advances in the design and application of BiAbs for intravenous and local injection. The initial barrier of cytokine storm has been partially overcome by more recent constructs that have improved clinical effectiveness without dose-limiting toxicities. Since the recent revival of BiAbs, there has been multiple, ongoing, phase I/II and III trials, and some promising clinical outcomes have been reported in completed clinical studies. This review focuses on arming T cells with BiAbs to create the ‘poor man's cytotoxic lymphocyte’. PMID:22050339

  10. Neutrophil-mediated killing of Dipetalonema viteae microfilariae: simultaneous presence of IgE, IgG antibodies and complement is required.

    PubMed Central

    Aime, N; Haque, A; Bonnel, B; Torpier, G; Capron, A

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophils from the peripheral washings of normal rats in the presence of sera obtained from rats immune to circulating microfilariae adhered to and killed the microfilariae of Dipetalonema viteae in vitro within 16-24 hr. No significant adherence or cytotoxicity was mediated by sera collected from animals with a high microfilaraemia or from normal rats. Ultrastructural studies show that neutrophils, which are bigger than microfilariae, can easily internalize the small larvae resulting in the disintegration of the parasite. Immunoadsorption and inhibition experiments showed that the adherence-promoting activity resides both in IgG and IgE classes of antibody. However, the mere participation of these two antibodies is not sufficient to effect neutrophil adherence towards microfilariae, the presence of complement is also required. Samples of fresh immune rat serum (fIRS) depleted in alternative pathway components of complement by treatment with zymosan A failed to mediate cell adherence to the parasite. fIRS inactivated for the classical pathway of complement by the chelating agent EGTA partially retains its activity in mediating cytotoxicity to microfilariae. The striking antigenic specificity of D. viteae antibodies was shown by their ability to mediate cytotoxicity only to D. viteae but not towards Brugia malayi microfilariae. Images Figure 2 PMID:6538183

  11. Fibronectin mediates mesendodermal cell fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Paul; Andersen, Peter; Hassel, David; Kaynak, Bogac L.; Limphong, Pattraranee; Juergensen, Lonny; Kwon, Chulan; Srivastava, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Non-cell-autonomous signals often play crucial roles in cell fate decisions during animal development. Reciprocal signaling between endoderm and mesoderm is vital for embryonic development, yet the key signals and mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we show that endodermal cells efficiently promote the emergence of mesodermal cells in the neighboring population through signals containing an essential short-range component. The endoderm-mesoderm interaction promoted precardiac mesoderm formation in mouse embryonic stem cells and involved endodermal production of fibronectin. In vivo, fibronectin deficiency resulted in a dramatic reduction of mesoderm accompanied by endodermal expansion in zebrafish embryos. This event was mediated by regulation of Wnt signaling in mesodermal cells through activation of integrin-β1. Our findings highlight the importance of the extracellular matrix in mediating short-range signals and reveal a novel function of endoderm, involving fibronectin and its downstream signaling cascades, in promoting the emergence of mesoderm. PMID:23715551

  12. Anti-ganglioside antibody-induced tumor cell death by loss of membrane integrity.

    PubMed

    Roque-Navarro, Lourdes; Chakrabandhu, Krittalak; de León, Joel; Rodríguez, Sandra; Toledo, Carlos; Carr, Adriana; de Acosta, Cristina Mateo; Hueber, Anne-Odile; Pérez, Rolando

    2008-07-01

    Gangliosides have been involved in multiple cellular processes such as growth, differentiation and adhesion, and more recently as regulators of cell death signaling pathways. Some of these molecules can be considered as tumor-associated antigens, in particular, N-glycolyl sialic acid-containing gangliosides, which are promising candidates for cancer-targeted therapy because of their low expression in normal human tissues. In this study, we provided the molecular and cellular characterization of a novel cell death mechanism induced by the anti-NGcGM3 14F7 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in L1210 murine tumor cell line but not in mouse normal cells (B and CD4(+) T lymphocytes) that expressed the antigen. Impairment of ganglioside synthesis in tumor cells abrogated the 14F7 mAb cytotoxic effect; however, exogenous reincorporation of the ganglioside did not restore tumor cell sensitivity to 14F7 mAb-induced cytotoxicity. 14F7 F(ab')(2) but not Fab fragments retained the cytotoxic capacity of the whole mAb. By contrary, other mAb, which recognizes N-glycolylated gangliosides, did not show any cytotoxic effect. These mAbs showed quite different capacities to bind NGcGM3-positive cell lines measured by binding inhibition experiments. Interestingly, this complement-independent cell death mechanism did not resemble apoptosis, because no DNA fragmentation, caspase activation, or Fas mediation were observed. However, NGcGM3 ganglioside-mediated 14F7 mAb-induced cell death was accompanied by cellular swelling, membrane lesion formation, and cytoskeleton activation, suggesting an oncosis-like phenomenon. This novel mechanism of cell death lets us to support further therapeutic approaches using NGcGM3 as a molecular target for antibody-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:18645013

  13. Human neutrophil Fcγ receptors initiate and play specialized nonredundant roles in antibody-mediated inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Naotake; Asano, Kenichi; Lauterbach, Michael; Mayadas, Tanya N.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Antibody-antigen complex mediated inflammation is integral to the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Mice deficient in the γ-chain of Fc-receptors are protected in IgG-mediated glomerulonephritis and the Arthus reaction and FcR-bearing mast cells and macrophages have been assigned primary roles in these processes. Here we demonstrate that neutrophil selective transgenic expression of the two uniquely human activating FcγRs, FcγRIIA and FcγRIIIB was sufficient to restore susceptibility to progressive anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and the cutaneous Reverse Passive Arthus (RPA) reaction in γ-chain deficient mice. Both FcγRIIA and FcγRIIIB mediated robust neutrophil accumulation in tissues suggesting direct roles for these human receptors in IC-induced neutrophil recruitment, while FcγRIIA alone mediated organ injury. In an acute model of anti-GBM nephritis, both FcγRIIIB and FcγRIIA promoted initial neutrophil recruitment to glomerular immune-complexes (ICs) accessible to circulating cells, while FcγRIIA further sustained accumulation. In a model of soluble ICs deposited strictly within the post-capillary venules of the cremaster muscle, FcγRIIIB was solely responsible for converting initial selectin-dependent tethers to slow rolling and adhesion. However, in the cremaster RPA reaction, dependent on vascular and tissue accumulation of soluble ICs, FcγRIIA predominated in neutrophil recruitment that was dependent on G-protein coupled receptor activation. Thus, human FcγRs on neutrophils serve as the primary molecular links between ICs and immunological disease with FcγRIIA promoting tissue injury, and FcγRIIIB and FcγRIIA displaying specialized context-dependent functions in IC-induced neutrophil recruitment. PMID:18538590

  14. Cytoskeleton mediated spreading dynamics of immune cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, King-Lam; Wayt, Jessica; Grooman, Brian; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the spreading of Jurkat T-cells on anti-CD3 antibody-coated substrates as a model of immune synapse formation. Cell adhesion area versus time was measured via interference reflection contrast microscopy. We found that the spread area exhibited a sigmoidal growth as a function of time in contrast to the previously proposed universal power-law growth for spreading cells. We used high-resolution total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of these cells transfected with GFP-actin to study cytoskeletal dynamics during the spreading process. Actin filaments spontaneously organized into a variety of structures including traveling waves, target patterns, and mobile clusters emanating from an organizing center. We quantify these dynamic structures and relate them to the spreading rates. We propose that the spreading kinetics are determined by active rearrangements of the cytoskeleton initiated by signaling events upon antibody binding by T-cell receptors. Membrane deformations induced by such wavelike organization of the cytoskeleton may be a general phenomenon that underlies cell movement and cell-substrate interactions.

  15. Anti-4-1BB monoclonal antibodies attenuate concanavalin A-induced immune-mediated liver injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Guangtao; Wu, Sensen; Zhang, Yuanchao

    2016-01-01

    Effective therapies for the treatment of immune-mediated liver disease are currently lacking. As a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, 4-1BB has a key role in T-cell activation and has been implicated in the development of autoimmune disorders. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential therapeutic or preventive function of an anti-4-1BB monoclonal antibody (mAb) in a mouse model of concanavalin (Con) A-induced immune-mediated liver injury. A mouse model of immune-mediated liver injury was established by tail vein injection of Con A (20 mg/kg). 4-1BB mAb (100 µg), with or without methylprednisolone (MEP; 3 mg/kg), was intraperitoneally injected into the tail vein 2 h prior to or 2 h following Con A injection. Con A induced marked hepatocyte necrosis, significantly reduced CD 4+/CD25+ T-cell levels, and increased the serum levels of aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT), in addition to the percentage of 4-1BB+ T-cells, compared with the control (all P<0.05). The administration of 4-1BB mAb prior to or following Con A injection was able to attenuate Con A-induced liver tissue damage and significantly reduce serum AST and ALT levels (P<0.05). A combination of MEP and 4-1BB mAb further reduced serum AST and ALT levels, compared with either treatment alone. In addition, administration of 4-1BB mAb and MEP alone or in combination significantly increased CD4+/CD25+ T-cell levels, compared with the control (P<0.05). These results suggested that 4-1BB mAb was able to attenuate liver injury and preserve liver function in a mouse model of Con A-induced immune-mediated liver injury by promoting the expansion of CD4+/CD25+ T-cells. Furthermore, a combination of 4-1BB mAb with MEP was associated with greater beneficial effects than either treatment alone. The clinical significance of 4-1BB mAb in immune-mediated liver disease remains to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27588047

  16. FLIP switches Fas-mediated glucose signaling in human pancreatic cells from apoptosis to cell replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maedler, Kathrin; Fontana, Adriano; Ris, Frédéric; Sergeev, Pavel; Toso, Christian; Oberholzer, José; Lehmann, Roger; Bachmann, Felix; Tasinato, Andrea; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Halban, Philippe A.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2002-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus results from an inadequate adaptation of the functional pancreatic cell mass in the face of insulin resistance. Changes in the concentration of glucose play an essential role in the regulation of cell turnover. In human islets, elevated glucose concentrations impair cell proliferation and induce cell apoptosis via up-regulation of the Fas receptor. Recently, it has been shown that the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP may divert Fas-mediated death signals into those for cell proliferation in lymphatic cells. We observed expression of FLIP in human pancreatic cells of nondiabetic individuals, which was decreased in tissue sections of type 2 diabetic patients. In vitro exposure of islets from nondiabetic organ donors to high glucose levels decreased FLIP expression and increased the percentage of apoptotic terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells; FLIP was no longer detectable in such TUNEL-positive cells. Up-regulation of FLIP, by incubation with transforming growth factor or by transfection with an expression vector coding for FLIP, protected cells from glucose-induced apoptosis, restored cell proliferation, and improved cell function. The beneficial effects of FLIP overexpression were blocked by an antagonistic anti-Fas antibody, indicating their dependence on Fas receptor activation. The present data provide evidence for expression of FLIP in the human cell and suggest a novel approach to prevent and treat diabetes by switching Fas signaling from apoptosis to proliferation.

  17. CD16 polymorphisms and NK activation induced by monoclonal antibody-coated target cells.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Julie A; Weiner, George J

    2005-09-01

    CD16 and natural killer (NK) cells appear to play a central role in mediating the anti-tumor effects of monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy, yet little is known about changes in NK cells that result from interaction of the NK cells with mAb-coated tumor cells under physiologic conditions. We developed a system using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and either transformed B cells or breast cancer cells to assess how mAbs impact on NK cell phenotype. Rituximab, apolizumab and trastuzumab induced modulation of CD16 and upregulation of CD54 on NK cells when the appropriate target cells were present. Higher concentrations of mAb were needed to induce these changes on NK cells from subjects with the lower affinity CD16 polymorphism. Phenotypic changes were greater in NK cells from subjects with the higher affinity polymorphism even when saturating concentrations of mAb were used, demonstrating increased concentration of mAb can overcome some, but not all, of the influence CD16 polymorphisms have on NK activation. These studies provide a straightforward and easily reproducible technique to measure the ability of mAb-coated tumor cells to activate NK cells in vitro which should be particularly useful as mAbs with varying affinity for both target antigen and Fc receptor (FcR) are developed. PMID:16109421

  18. Neutralizing antibodies to African swine fever virus proteins p30, p54, and p72 are not sufficient for antibody-mediated protection.

    PubMed

    Neilan, J G; Zsak, L; Lu, Z; Burrage, T G; Kutish, G F; Rock, D L

    2004-02-20

    Although antibody-mediated immune mechanisms have been shown to be important in immunity to ASF, it remains unclear what role virus neutralizing antibodies play in the protective response. Virus neutralizing epitopes have been identified on three viral proteins, p30, p54, and p72. To evaluate the role(s) of these proteins in protective immunity, pigs were immunized with baculovirus-expressed p30, p54, p72, and p22 from the pathogenic African swine fever virus (ASFV) isolate Pr4. ASFV specific neutralizing antibodies were detected in test group animals. Following immunization, animals were challenged with 10(4) TCID(50) of Pr4 virus. In comparison to the control group, test group animals exhibited a 2-day delay to onset of clinical disease and reduced viremia levels at 2 days postinfection (DPI); however, by 4 DPI, there was no significant difference between the two groups and all animals in both groups died between 7 and 10 DPI. These results indicate that neutralizing antibodies to these ASFV proteins are not sufficient for antibody-mediated protection. PMID:14980493

  19. Antibody-Mediated and Cellular Immune Responses Induced in Naive Volunteers by Vaccination with Long Synthetic Peptides Derived from the Plasmodium vivax Circumsporozoite Protein

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Soto, Liliana; Perlaza, Blanca Liliana; Céspedes, Nora; Vera, Omaira; Lenis, Ana Milena; Bonelo, Anilza; Corradin, Giampietro; Herrera, Sócrates

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite (CS) protein is a leading malaria vaccine candidate. We describe the characterization of specific immune responses induced in 21 malaria-naive volunteers vaccinated with long synthetic peptides derived from the CS protein formulated in Montanide ISA 720. Both antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses were analyzed. Antibodies were predominantly of IgG1 and IgG3 isotypes, recognized parasite proteins on the immunofluorescent antibody test, and partially blocked sporozoite invasion of hepatoma cell lines in vitro. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from most volunteers (94%) showed IFN-γ production in vitro upon stimulation with both long signal peptide and short peptides containing CD8+ T-cell epitopes. The relatively limited sample size did not allow conclusions about HLA associations with the immune responses observed. In summary, the inherent safety and tolerability together with strong antibody responses, invasion blocking activity, and the IFN-γ production induced by these vaccine candidates warrants further testing in a phase II clinical trial. PMID:21292876

  20. Anti-huCD20 Antibody Therapy for Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Renal Allografts in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Toyofumi; Ishii, Daisuke; Gorbacheva, Victoria; Kohei, Naoki; Tsuda, Hidetoshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Dvorina, Nina; Nonomura, Norio; Takahara, Shiro; Valujskikh, Anna; Baldwin, William M.; Fairchild, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    We have reported that B6.CCR5−/− mice reject renal allografts with high serum donor-specific antibody (DSA) titers and marked C4d deposition in grafts, features consistent with AMR. B6.huCD20/CCR5−/− mice, where human CD20 expression is restricted to B cells, rejected A/J renal allografts by day 26 post-transplant with DSA first detected in serum on day 5 post-transplant and increased thereafter. Recipient treatment with anti-huCD20 mAb prior to the transplant and weekly up to 7 weeks post-transplant promoted long-term allograft survival (> 100 days) with low DSA titers. To investigate the effect of B cell depletion at the time serum DSA was first detected, recipients were treated with anti-huCD20 mAb on days 5, 8 and 12 post-transplant. This regimen significantly reduced DSA titers and graft inflammation on day 15 post-transplant and prolonged allograft survival > 60 days. However, DSA returned to the titers observed in control treated recipients by day 30 post-transplant and histological analyses on day 60 post-transplant indicated severe interstitial fibrosis. These results indicate that anti-huCD20 mAb had the greatest effect as a prophylactic treatment and that the distinct kinetics of DSA responses accounts for acute renal allograft failure versus the development of fibrosis. PMID:25731734

  1. Outcome of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplant recipients with preformed donor-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Loupy, A; Suberbielle-Boissel, C; Hill, G S; Lefaucheur, C; Anglicheau, D; Zuber, J; Martinez, F; Thervet, E; Méjean, A; Charron, D; Duong van Huyen, J P; Bruneval, P; Legendre, C; Nochy, D

    2009-11-01

    This study describes clinical relevance of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection (SAMR) in a cohort of 54 DSA-positive kidney transplant recipients receiving a deceased donor. In 3 months screening biopsies, 31.1% of patients met the criteria of SAMR. A total of 48.9% had an incomplete form of SAMR (g+/ptc+/C4d-negative) whereas 20% had no humoral lesions. Patients with SAMR at 3 months had at 1 year: a higher C4d score, ptc score, and arteriosclerosis score, higher rate of IFTA (100% vs. 33.3%, p < 0.01) and a higher rate of transplant glomerulopathy (43% vs. 0%, p = 0.02) compared to patients without 3-month SAMR. Patients with SAMR at 3 months exhibited at 1 year a higher class II MFImax-DSA and a lower mGFR compared to patients without SAMR (39.2 +/- 13.9 vs. 61.9 +/- 19.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2) respectively, p < 0.01). The group of patients with C4d-negative SAMR at 3 months developed more ptc and IFTA lesions, and lower GFR at 1 year in comparison to biopsies without humoral lesions. SAMR is a frequent entity in KTR with preexisting DSAs and promotes subsequent GFR impairment and development of chronic AMR. C4d-negative SAMR patients displayed an intermediate course between the no-SAMR group and the C4d+ SAMR group. Screening biopsies may be useful to recognize patients more likely to develop SAMR. PMID:19775320

  2. Antibody-dependent haemolytic activity of human leukaemic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Holm, G; Björkholm, M; Böttiger, B; Mellstedt, H; Pettersson, D; Simonsson-Lindemalm, C

    1980-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of human leukaemic blood cells against human RBC treated with IgG isoantibody was studied by the 51Cr-release method. ADCC in this particular system is a property of normal phagocytic cells of the monocytic and myeloid series while lymphocytes are inactive. Well differentiated leukaemic monocytes from patients with acute monocytic leukaemia were highly cytotoxic and engulfed opsonized RBC. Promyelocytic leukaemic cells from two patients with acute promyelocytic leukaemia were cytotoxic and phagocytic. Seven patients with low differentiated acute myeloblastic leukaemia had no cytotoxic or phagocytic blood cells. Leukaemic B cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia or prolymphocytic leukaemia lacked cytotoxic and phagocytic properties. It is concluded that ADCC against isoantibody-treated human RBC may be a tool to distinguish between well and poorly differentiated leukaemic cells of the monocytic or myeloid series. PMID:7460388

  3. Antibody-mediated delivery of IL-10 inhibits the progression of established collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Trachsel, Eveline; Bootz, Frank; Silacci, Michela; Kaspar, Manuela; Kosmehl, Hartwig; Neri, Dario

    2007-01-01

    The antibody-mediated targeted delivery of cytokines to sites of disease is a promising avenue for cancer therapy, but it is largely unexplored for the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions. Using both radioactive and fluorescent techniques, the human monoclonal antibodies L19 and G11 (specific to two markers of angiogenesis that are virtually undetectable in normal adult tissues) were found to selectively localize at arthritic sites in the murine collagen-induced model of rheumatoid arthritis following intravenous (i.v.) administration. The same animal model was used to study the therapeutic action of the L19 antibody fused to the cytokines IL-2, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-10. Whereas L19–IL-2 and L19–TNF treatment led to increased arthritic scores and paw swellings, the fusion protein L19–IL-10 displayed a therapeutic activity, which was superior to the activity of IL-10 fused to an antibody of irrelevant specificity in the mouse. The anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 has been investigated for the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but clinical development plans have been discontinued because of a lack of efficacy. Because the antigen recognised by L19 is strongly expressed at sites of arthritis in humans and identical in both mice and humans, it suggests that the fusion protein L19–IL-10 might help overcome some of the clinical limitations of IL-10 and provide a therapeutic benefit to patients with chronic inflammatory disorders, including arthritis. PMID:17261171

  4. Selective cell recruitment and spatially controlled cell attachment on instructive chitosan surfaces functionalized with antibodies.

    PubMed

    Custódio, C A; Frias, A M; del Campo, A; Reis, R L; Mano, J F

    2012-12-01

    Bioactive constructs to guide cellular mobilization and function have been proposed as an approach for a new generation of biomaterials in functional tissue engineering. Adult mesenchymal stem cells have been widely used as a source for cell based therapeutic strategies, namely tissue engineering. This is a heterogeneous cell population containing many subpopulations with distinct regenerative capacity. Thus, one of the issues for the effective clinical use of stem cells in tissue engineering is the isolation of a highly purified, expandable specific subpopulation of stem cells. Antibody functionalized biomaterials could be promising candidates to isolate and recruit specific cell types. Here we propose a new concept of instructive biomaterials that are able to recruit and purify specific cell types from a mixed cell population. This biomimetic concept uses a target-specific chitosan substrate to capture specific adipose derived stem cells. Specific antibodies were covalently immobilized onto chitosan membranes using bis[sulfosuccinimidyl] suberate (BS3). Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) was used to monitor antibody immobilization/adsorption onto the chitosan films. Specific antibodies covalently immobilized, kept their bioactivity and captured specific cell types from a mixed cell population. Microcontact printing allowed to covalently immobilize antibodies in patterns and simultaneously a spatial control in cell attachment. PMID:23109106

  5. A novel antibody discovery platform identifies anti-influenza A broadly neutralizing antibodies from human memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiaodong; Chen, Yan; Varkey, Reena; Kallewaard, Nicole; Koksal, Adem C; Zhu, Qing; Wu, Herren; Chowdhury, Partha S; Dall'Acqua, William F

    2016-07-01

    Monoclonal antibody isolation directly from circulating human B cells is a powerful tool to delineate humoral responses to pathological conditions and discover antibody therapeutics. We have developed a platform aimed at improving the efficiencies of B cell selection and V gene recovery. Here, memory B cells are activated and amplified using Epstein-Barr virus infection, co-cultured with CHO-muCD40L cells, and then assessed by functional screenings. An in vitro transcription and translation (IVTT) approach was used to analyze variable (V) genes recovered from each B cell sample and identify the relevant heavy/light chain pair(s). We achieved efficient amplification and activation of memory B cells, and eliminated the need to: 1) seed B cells at clonal level (≤1 cell/well) or perform limited dilution cloning; 2) immortalize B cells; or 3) assemble V genes into an IgG expression vector to confirm the relevant heavy/light chain pairing. Cross-reactive antibodies targeting a conserved epitope on influenza A hemagglutinin were successfully isolated from a healthy donor. In-depth analysis of the isolated antibodies suggested their potential uses as anti-influenza A antibody therapeutics and uncovered a distinct affinity maturation pathway. Importantly, our results showed that cognate heavy/light chain pairings contributed to both the expression level and binding abilities of our newly isolated VH1-69 family, influenza A neutralizing antibodies, contrasting with previous observations that light chains do not significantly contribute to the function of this group of antibodies. Our results further suggest the potential use of the IVTT as a powerful antibody developability assessment tool. PMID:27049174

  6. A novel pathway of cellular activation mediated by antiphospholipid antibody-induced extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    WU, M.; BARNARD, J.; KUNDU, S.; MCCRAE, K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Elevated levels of endothelial cell (EC)-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) circulate in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies (APLAs), and APLAs, particularly those against β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI), stimulate EV release from ECs. However, the effects of EC-derived EVs have not been characterized. Objective To determine the mechanism by which EVs released from ECs by anti-β2GPI antibodies activate unstimulated ECs. Patients/methods We used interleukin (IL)-1 receptor inhibitors, small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and microRNA (miRNA) profiling to assess the mechanism(s) by which EVs released from ECs exposed to anti-β2GPI antibodies activated unstimulated ECs. Results and conclusions Anti-β2GPI antibodies caused formation of an EC inflammasome and the release of EVs that were enriched in mature IL-1β, had a distinct miRNA profile, and caused endothelial activation. However, activation was not inhibited by an IL-1β antibody, an IL-1 receptor antagonist, or IL-1 receptor siRNA. EC activation by EVs required IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 phosphorylation, and was inhibited by pretreatment of cells with TLR7 siRNA or RNase A, which degrades ssRNA. Profiling of miRNA in EVs released from ECs incubated with β2GPI and either control IgG or anti-β2GPI antibodies revealed numerous differences in the content of specific miRNAs, including a significant decrease in mIR126. These observations demonstrate that, although anti-β2GPI-derived endothelial EVs contain IL-1β, they activate unstimulated ECs through a TLR7-dependent and ssRNA-dependent pathway. Alterations in miRNA content may contribute to the ability of EVs derived from ECs exposed to anti-β2GPI antibodies to activate unstimulated ECs in an autocrine or paracrine manner. PMID:26264622

  7. Investigation of anti-WI-1 adhesin antibody-mediated protection in experimental pulmonary blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, M; Klein, B S

    2000-05-01

    Infection with Blastomyces dermatitidis elicits strong antibody responses to the surface adhesin WI-1. The antibodies are directed chiefly against the adhesive domain, a 25-amino-acid repeat. Tandem-repeat-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were studied for their opsonic activity in vitro and their capacity to adoptively transfer protection in murine experimental blastomycosis. mAbs to WI-1 enhanced binding and entry of B. dermatitidis yeasts into J774. 16 cells but did not enhance killing or growth inhibition of the yeast. Passive transfer of 8 mAbs to WI-1 into 3 different inbred strains of mice also did not improve the course of experimental infection and sometimes worsened it. mu-deficient mice were more resistant to experimental blastomycosis than were intact littermates, and passive transfer of the mAbs into these mice did not protect them against experimental infection. Thus, antibody to WI-1 does not appear to improve the outcome of murine blastomycosis and may enhance the infection. PMID:10823774

  8. Target cell specific antibody-based photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblum, Lauren T.; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Kakareka, John W.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2011-03-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), localized monochromatic light is used to activate targeted photosensitizers (PS) to induce cellular damage through the generation of cytotoxic species such as singlet oxygen. While first-generation PS passively targeted malignancies, a variety of targeting mechanisms have since been studied, including specifically activatable agents. Antibody internalization has previously been employed as a fluorescence activation system and could potentially enable similar activation of PS. TAMRA, Rhodamine-B and Rhodamine-6G were conjugated to trastuzumab (brand name Herceptin), a humanized monoclonal antibody with specificity for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), to create quenched PS (Tra-TAM, Tra-RhoB, and Tra-Rho6G). Specific PDT with Tra-TAM and Tra-Rho6G, which formed covalently bound H-dimers, was demonstrated in HER2+ cells: Minimal cell death (<6%) was observed in all treatments of the HER2- cell line (BALB/3T3) and in treatments the HER2+ cell line (3T3/HER2) with light or trastuzumab only. There was significant light-induced cell death in HER2 expressing cells using Tra-TAM (3% dead without light, 20% at 50 J/cm2, 46% at 100 J/cm2) and Tra-Rho6G (5% dead without light, 22% at 50 J/cm2, 46% at 100 J/cm2). No efficacy was observed in treatment with Tra-RhoB, which was also non-specifically taken up by BALB/3T3 cells and which had weaker PS-antibody interactions (as demonstrated by visualization of protein and fluorescence on SDS-PAGE).

  9. Carboxypeptidase D is the only enzyme responsible for antibody C-terminal lysine cleavage in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhilan; Zhang, Henry; Haley, Benjamin; Macchi, Frank; Yang, Feng; Misaghi, Shahram; Elich, Joseph; Yang, Renee; Tang, Yun; Joly, John C; Snedecor, Bradley R; Shen, Amy

    2016-10-01

    Heterogeneity of C-terminal lysine levels often observed in therapeutic monoclonal antibodies is believed to result from the proteolysis by endogenous carboxypeptidase(s) during cell culture production. Identifying the responsible carboxypeptidase(s) for C-terminal lysine cleavage in CHO cells would provide valuable insights for antibody production cell culture processes development and optimization. In this study, five carboxypeptidases, CpD, CpM, CpN, CpB, and CpE, were studied for message RNA (mRNA) expression by qRT-PCR analysis in two most commonly used blank hosts (DUXB-11 derived DHFR-deficient DP12 host and DHFR-positive CHOK1 host), used for therapeutic antibody production, as well an antibody-expressing cell line derived from each host. Our results showed that CpD had the highest mRNA expression. When CpD mRNA levels were reduced by RNAi (RNA interference) technology, C-terminal lysine levels increased, whereas there was no obvious change in C-terminal lysine levels when a different carboxypeptidase mRNA level was knocked down suggesting that carboxypeptidase D is the main contributor for C-terminal lysine processing. Most importantly, when CpD expression was knocked out by CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) technology, C-terminal lysine cleavage was completely abolished in CpD knockout cells based on mass spectrometry analysis, demonstrating that CpD is the only endogenous carboxypeptidase that cleaves antibody heavy chain C-terminal lysine in CHO cells. Hence, our work showed for the first time that the cleavage of antibody heavy chain C-terminal lysine is solely mediated by the carboxypeptidase D in CHO cells and our finding provides one solution to eliminating C-terminal lysine heterogeneity for therapeutic antibody production by knocking out CpD gene expression. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2100-2106. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26989081

  10. Functional Characterization of an scFv-Fc Antibody that Immunotherapeutically Targets the Common Cancer Cell Surface Proteoglycan CSPG4

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinhui; Katayama, Akihiro; Wang, Yangyang; Yu, Ling; Favoino, Elvira; Sakakura, Koichi; Favole, Alessandra; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Silver, Susan; Watkins, Simon C.; Kageshita, Toshiro; Ferrone, Soldano

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) is an attractive target for antibody-based cancer immunotherapy because of its role in tumor cell biology, its high expression on malignant cells including cancer-initiating cells, and its restricted distribution in normal tissues. The clinical use of CSPG4 has been hampered by the lack of a CSPG4-specific chimeric, humanized, or fully human monoclonal antibody. To overcome this limitation, we generated a CSPG4-specific fully human single-chain antibody termed scFv-FcC21 and characterized its specificity and antitumor activity. Viable CSPG4+ melanoma cells were used in a screen of a human scFv phage display library that included CDR3 engineered to optimize antibody binding sites. The scFv antibody isolated was then recombinantly engineered with a human immunoglobulin G1 Fc region to construct the fully human antibody scFv-FcC21, which recognized tumors of neuroectodermal origin, various types of carcinomas, mesotheliomas, and sarcomas as well as myeloid leukemias. scFv-FcC21 inhibited in vitro growth and migration of tumor cells and in vivo growth of human tumor xenografts. These effects were mediated by inhibition of the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and focal adhesion kinase signaling pathways that are critical for tumor cell growth and migration, respectively. Our findings define the CSPG4-specific fully human scFv-FcC21 antibody as a candidate therapeutic agent to target the many types of tumors that express CSPG4. PMID:22021902

  11. A CD28 superagonistic antibody elicits 2 functionally distinct waves of T cell activation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Nora; van den Brandt, Jens; Odoardi, Francesca; Tischner, Denise; Herath, Judith; Flügel, Alexander; Reichardt, Holger M.

    2008-01-01

    Administration of the CD28 superagonistic antibody JJ316 is an efficient means to treat autoimmune diseases in rats, but the humanized antibody TGN1412 caused devastating side effects in healthy volunteers during a clinical trial. Here we show that JJ316 treatment of rats induced a dramatic redistribution of T lymphocytes from the periphery to the secondary lymphoid organs, resulting in severe T lymphopenia. Live imaging of secondary lymphoid organs revealed that JJ316 administration almost instantaneously (<2 minutes) arrested T cells in situ. This reduction in T cell motility was accompanied by profound cytoskeletal rearrangements and increased cell size. In addition, surface expression of lymphocyte function–associated antigen-1 was enhanced, endothelial differentiation sphingolipid G protein–coupled receptor 1 and L selectin levels were downregulated, and the cells lost their responsiveness to sphingosine 1–phosphate–directed migration. These proadhesive alterations were accompanied by signs of strong activation, including upregulation of CD25, CD69, CD134, and proinflammatory mediators. However, this did not lead to a cytokine storm similar to the clinical trial. While most of the early changes disappeared within 48 hours, we observed that CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells experienced a second phase of activation, which resulted in massive cell enlargement, extensive polarization, and increased motility. These data suggest that CD28 superagonists elicit 2 qualitatively distinct waves of activation. PMID:18357346

  12. Eculizumab for the Treatment of Severe Antibody-Mediated Rejection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Anne; Collette, Suzon; Senécal, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    In renal transplantation, treatment options for antibody-mediated rejection are limited. Here, we report a case of severe AMR treated with eculizumab. A 50-year-old woman known for end stage kidney disease secondary to IgA nephropathy received a kidney transplant from a 50-year-old deceased donor. At 5 months after transplantation, she presented with acute graft dysfunction and biopsy showed a severe antibody-mediated rejection associated with thrombotic microangiopathy. Despite an aggressive conventional immunosuppressive regimen, signs of rejection persisted and the patient was treated with 3 doses of eculizumab. Following the therapy, markers of TMA improved and graft function stabilized. However, ongoing signs of rejection remained in the repeated biopsy. In kidney transplantation, eculizumab is an expensive treatment and its role in the treatment of antibody-mediated rejection remains to be determined. PMID:27478676

  13. An association between antibodies specific for endothelial cells and renal transplant failure.

    PubMed

    Perrey, C; Brenchley, P E; Johnson, R W; Martin, S

    1998-06-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-specific antibodies, present at the time of transplant, cause renal transplant rejection but cases of rejection of HLA-identical renal transplants indicate that antibodies to non-HLA antigens may also be detrimental. There is increasing evidence that antibodies to antigens present on endothelial cells and monocytes, and on endothelial cells alone, are associated with transplant rejection. We investigated 105 patients with failed renal transplants for the presence of endothelial cell reactive antibodies and compared them with 94 successful transplant patients to determine the role of non-HLA antibodies in transplant failure. Patient sera were tested by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) using as a target fixed cells either from the endothelial/epithelial cell line EAHy.926 or primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Antibody binding was detected using an alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody. Fourteen of the 105 failed transplant patients had endothelial cell-reactive antibodies as compared with only three of the 94 patients with successful transplants (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.02). Antibody-positive sera were absorbed with the epithelial cell line A549 to remove antibodies directed against the epithelial component of EAHy.926 and with a pool of lymphoblastoid cell line cells to remove HLA-specific antibodies. Absorption did not reduce antibody activity showing the antibodies to be directed against endothelial cell determinants. Antibody-positive sera were also tested by flow cytometry against the monocyte cell line THP-1 and 13 of the 14 patients were negative. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the presence of IgG antibodies directed against endothelial cell determinants in renal transplant recipients in association with renal transplant failure. PMID:9777698

  14. Susceptibility of rhabdomyosarcoma cells to macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Delia; Seitz, Guido; Fuchs, Jörg; Armeanu-Ebinger, Sorin

    2012-05-01

    The prognosis of advanced stage rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is still sobering. In recent years, outcome has not been further improved by conventional therapy. Therefore, novel treatment options such as macrophage-directed immunotherapy have to be investigated. The aim of this study was to analyze the phagocytosis of RMS cells by macrophages and to modulate the susceptibility using monoclonal antibodies and cytotoxic drugs.   Expression of the macrophage activating ligand calreticulin and CD47, the counterpart of the inhibitory receptor SIRPα, was analyzed with Affymetrix mRNA expression arrays and immunohistochemistry on 11 primary RMS samples. Results were verified in two RMS cell lines using flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Macrophage cytotoxic activity was quantified by a MTT colorimetric assay in co-culture experiments of RMS cells with monocyte-derived, GM-CSF stimulated macrophages. Gene expression analysis and immunohistochemistry revealed a high expression of CD47 and calreticulin in alveolar and embryonal RMS tissue specimens. Extracellular expression of CD47 on RMS cell lines was confirmed by flow cytometry, whereas calreticulin was exclusively detected in the endoplasmatic reticulum. After co-culturing of RMS cells with macrophages, viability dropped to 50-60%. Macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity was not influenced by a blocking antibody against CD47. However, susceptibility was significantly enhanced after pre-treatment of RMS cells with the anthracycline drug doxorubicin. Furthermore, translocation of calreticulin onto the cell surface was detected by flow cytometry. The immunologic effect of doxorubicin may improve the efficacy of adoptive cellular immunotherapy and chemotherapy of childhood RMS. PMID:22737603

  15. B-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Fight Chronic Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dalloul, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after 1 year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of “tolerant” vs. effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic allograft

  16. A Quantitative Method for Comparing the Brightness of Antibody-dye Reagents and Estimating Antibodies Bound per Cell.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Aaron B; Moore, Wayne A; Meehan, Stephen; Parks, David R

    2016-01-01

    We present a quantitative method for comparing the brightness of antibody-dye reagents and estimating antibodies bound per cell. The method is based on complementary binding of test and fill reagents to antibody capture microspheres. Several aliquots of antibody capture beads are stained with varying amounts of the test conjugate. The remaining binding sites on the beads are then filled with a second conjugate containing a different fluorophore. Finally, the fluorescence of the test conjugate compared to the fill conjugate is used to measure the relative brightness of the test conjugate. The fundamental assumption of the test-fill method is that if it takes X molecules of one test antibody to lower the fill signal by Y units, it will take the same X molecules of any other test antibody to give the same effect. We apply a quadratic fit to evaluate the test-fill signal relationship across different amounts of test reagent. If the fit is close to linear, we consider the test reagent to be suitable for quantitative evaluation of antibody binding. To calibrate the antibodies bound per bead, a PE conjugate with 1 PE molecule per antibody is used as a test reagent and the fluorescence scale is calibrated with Quantibrite PE beads. When the fluorescence per antibody molecule has been determined for a particular conjugate, that conjugate can be used for measurement of antibodies bound per cell. This provides comparisons of the brightness of different conjugates when conducted on an instrument whose statistical photoelectron (Spe) scales are known. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367287

  17. Bispecific antibodies and CARs: generalized immunotherapeutics harnessing T cell redirection.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, Eugene A; Morse, Richard J; Maus, Marcela V

    2016-06-01

    To realize the full potential of cancer immunotherapy, the latest generation immunotherapeutics are designed to harness the potent tumor-killing capacity of T cells. Thus, to mobilize T cells, new optimized bispecific antibody (BsAb) designs, enabling efficient polyclonal redirection of cytotoxic activity through binding to CD3 and a Tumor Associated Antigen (TAA) and refined genetically modified T cells have recently expanded the arsenal of available options for cancer treatment. This review presents the current understanding of the parameters crucial to the design of optimal T cell redirecting BsAb and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells. However, there are additional questions that require thorough elucidation. Both modalities will benefit from design changes that may increase the therapeutic window. One such approach could employ the discrimination afforded by multiple TAA to significantly increase selectivity. PMID:26963133

  18. Anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody Fc variants differentially impact regulatory T cells and immune homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Huss, David J; Pellerin, Alex F; Collette, Brian P; Kannan, Arun K; Peng, Liaomin; Datta, Abhishek; Wipke, Brian T; Fontenot, Jason D

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a critical regulator of immune homeostasis through its non-redundant role in regulatory T (Treg) cell biology. There is major interest in therapeutic modulation of the IL-2 pathway to promote immune activation in the context of tumour immunotherapy or to enhance immune suppression in the context of transplantation, autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases. Antibody-mediated targeting of the high-affinity IL-2 receptor α chain (IL-2Rα or CD25) offers a direct mechanism to target IL-2 biology and is being actively explored in the clinic. In mouse models, the rat anti-mouse CD25 clone PC61 has been used extensively to investigate the biology of IL-2 and Treg cells; however, there has been controversy and conflicting data on the exact in vivo mechanistic function of PC61. Engineering antibodies to alter Fc/Fc receptor interactions can significantly alter their in vivo function. In this study, we re-engineered the heavy chain constant region of an anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody to generate variants with highly divergent Fc effector function. Using these anti-CD25 Fc variants in multiple mouse models, we investigated the in vivo impact of CD25 blockade versus depletion of CD25(+) Treg cells on immune homeostasis. We report that immune homeostasis can be maintained during CD25 blockade but aberrant T-cell activation prevails when CD25(+) Treg cells are actively depleted. These results clarify the impact of PC61 on Treg cell biology and reveal an important distinction between CD25 blockade and depletion of CD25(+) Treg cells. These findings should inform therapeutic manipulation of the IL-2 pathway by targeting the high-affinity IL-2R. PMID:27012310

  19. Fluorescent-Antibody Measurement Of Cancer-Cell Urokinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1993-01-01

    Combination of laboratory techniques provides measurements of amounts of urokinase in and between normal and cancer cells. Includes use of fluorescent antibodies specific against different forms of urokinase-type plasminogen activator, (uPA), fluorescence microscopy, quantitative analysis of images of sections of tumor tissue, and flow cytometry of different uPA's and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) found in suspended-tumor-cell preparations. Measurements provide statistical method for indicating or predicting metastatic potentials of some invasive tumors. Assessments of metastatic potentials based on such measurements used in determining appropriate follow-up procedures after surgical removal of tumors.

  20. Chemokine-mediated B cell trafficking during early rabbit GALT development

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Shi-Kang; Volgina, Veronica V.; Sethupathi, Periannan; Knight, Katherine L.; Lanning, Dennis K.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial and host cell interactions stimulate rabbit B cells to diversify the primary antibody repertoire in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT). B cells at the base of appendix follicles begin proliferating and diversifying their V-(D)-J genes around 1 week of age, ∼5 days after B cells first begin entering appendix follicles, To gain insight into the microbial and host cell interactions that stimulate B cells to diversify the primary antibody repertoire, we analyzed B cell trafficking within follicles during the first week of life. We visualized B cells, as well as chemokines that mediate B cell homing in lymphoid tissues, by in situ hybridization, and examined B cell chemokine receptor expression by flow cytometry. We found that B cells were activated, and began downregulating their BCRs, well before a detectable B cell proliferative region appeared at the follicle base. The proliferative region was similar to germinal center dark zones, in that it exhibited elevated CXCL12 mRNA expression, and B cells that upregulated CXCR4 mRNA in response to signals acquired from select intestinal commensals localized in this region. Our results suggest that, after entering appendix follicles, B cells home sequentially to the FAE, the FDC network, the B cell:T cell boundary and, ultimately, the base of the follicle, where they enter a proliferative program and diversify the primary antibody repertoire. PMID:25385821

  1. Secretome identification of immune cell factors mediating metastatic cell homing

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Wu, Jia J.; Azarin, Samira M.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Medicherla, Chaitanya B.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cell homing is a complex process mediated in part by diffusible factors secreted from immune cells found at a pre-metastatic niche. We report on connecting secretomics and TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRray (TRACER) data to identify functional paracrine interactions between immune cells and metastatic cells as novel mediators of homing. Metastatic breast cancer mouse models were used to generate a diseased splenocyte conditioned media (D-SCM) containing immune cell secreted factors. MDA-MB-231 metastatic cell activity including cell invasion, migration, transendothelial migration, and proliferation were increased in D-SCM relative to control media. Our D-SCM secretome analysis yielded 144 secreted factor candidates that contribute to increased metastatic cell activity. The functional mediators of homing were identified using MetaCore software to determine interactions between the immune cell secretome and the TRACER-identified active transcription factors within metastatic cells. Among the 5 candidate homing factors identified, haptoglobin was selected and validated in vitro and in vivo as a key mediator of homing. Our studies demonstrate a novel systems biology approach to identify functional signaling factors associated with a cellular phenotype, which provides an enabling tool that complements large-scale protein identification provided by proteomics. PMID:26634905

  2. High-performance low-cost antibody microarrays using enzyme-mediated silver amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gina; Bergeron, Sebastien; Juncker, David

    2015-04-01

    Antibody microarrays can detect multiple proteins simultaneously, but the need for bulky and expensive fluorescence scanners limits their adaptation in clinical settings. Here we introduce a 15-plex enzyme-mediated silver enhanced sandwich immunoassay (SENSIA) on a microarray as an economic alternative to conventional fluorescence microarray assays. We compared several gold and silver amplification schemes, optimized HRP-mediated silver amplification, and evaluated the use of flatbed scanners for microarray quantification. Using the optimized assay condition, we established binding curves for 15 proteins using both SENSIA and conventional fluorescence microarray assays and compared their limits of detection (LODs) and dynamic ranges (DRs). We found that the LODs for all proteins are in the pg/mL range, with LODs for 12 proteins below 10 pg/mL. All but two proteins (ENDO and IL4) have similar LODs (less than 10-fold difference) and all but two proteins (IL1b and MCP1) are similar in DR (less than 1.5-log difference). Furthermore, we spiked six proteins in diluted serum and measured them by both silver enhancement and fluorescence detection and found a good agreement (R(2) > 0.9) between the two methods, suggesting that a complex matrix such as serum has a minimal effect on the measurement. By combining enzyme-mediated silver enhancement and consumer electronics for optical detection, SENSIA presents a new opportunity for low-cost high-sensitivity multiplex immunoassays for clinical applications. PMID:25668573

  3. Antibody-Mediated Enhancement of HIV-1 and HIV-2 Production from BST-2/Tetherin-Positive Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Miyagi, Eri; Andrew, Amy; Kao, Sandra; Yoshida, Takeshi; Strebel, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    BST-2/CD317/HM1.24/tetherin is a B-cell antigen overexpressed on the surface of myeloma cell lines and on neoplastic plasma cells of patients with multiple myeloma. Antibodies to BST-2 are in clinical trial for the treatment of multiple myeloma and are considered for the treatment of solid tumors with high BST-2 antigen levels. Functionally, BST-2 restricts the secretion of retroviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1, as well as members of the herpesvirus, filovirus, and arenavirus families, presumably by tethering nascent virions to the cell surface. Here we report that BST-2 antibody treatment facilitates virus release from BST-2+ cells by interfering with the tethering activity of BST-2. BST-2 antibodies were unable to release already tethered virions and were most effective when added early during virus production. BST-2 antibody treatment did not affect BST-2 dimerization and did not reduce the cell surface expression of BST-2. Interestingly, BST-2 antibody treatment reduced the nonspecific shedding of BST-2 and limited the encapsidation of BST-2 into virions. Finally, flotation analyses indicate that BST-2 antibodies affect the distribution of BST-2 within membrane rafts. Our data suggest that BST-2 antibody treatment may enhance virus release by inducing a redistribution of BST-2 at the cell surface, thus preventing it from accumulating at the sites of virus budding. PMID:21917971

  4. Characterization of warm-reactive IgG anti-lymphocyte antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. Relative specificity for mitogen-activated T cells and their soluble products.

    PubMed

    Litvin, D A; Cohen, P L; Winfield, J B

    1983-01-01

    In addition to previously described cold-reactive IgM anti-lymphocyte antibodies maximally cytotoxic for resting cells at 15 degrees C, sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were found to contain a new type of antibody preferentially reactive at physiologic temperatures with mitogen-activated lymphocytes. This antibody lacked specificity for unstimulated lymphocytes, and was shown to be of the IgG class both by indirect immunofluorescence and in immunochemical experiments. Certain SLE sera also contained IgG antibodies with the capacity to develop plaques with mitogen-activated T lymphocyte preparations used in a reverse hemolytic plaque assay, indicating reactivity with products released by activated cells. The elimination of the ability of SLE sera to develop plaques after absorption with viable mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes, but not with resting cells, suggested that these antibodies were directed toward activation "neoantigen(s)" shed from the cell surface membrane. Surface membrane phenotype analyses performed by using a variety of monoclonal antibody reagents indicated that the plaque-forming cells (PFC) detected with SLE sera were activated T lymphocytes not restricted to single OKT4+, OKT8+, or Ia antigen+ subpopulations. Essentially all PFC expressed transferrin receptors. The present data raise the possibility that certain of the interesting effects of anti-lymphocyte antibodies on immunologic function in SLE may be mediated by interactions of these new type(s) of antibodies with activated lymphocytes or their products, rather than through blocking or depletion effects on resting precursor cells. PMID:6600174

  5. Affinity maturation of T-cell receptor-like antibodies for Wilms tumor 1 peptide greatly enhances therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Tassev, Dimiter V.; Hasan, Aisha; Kuo, Tzu-Yun; Guo, Hong-fen; O’Reilly, Richard J.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2016-01-01

    WT1126 (RMFPNAPYL) is a human leukocyte antigen-A2 (HLA-A2) restricted peptide derived from Wilms tumor protein (WT1), which is widely expressed in a broad spectrum of leukemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. A novel T-cell-receptor (TCR)-like single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody specific for the T cell epitope consisting of the WT1/HLA-A2 complex was isolated from a human scFv phage library. This scFv was affinity-matured by mutagenesis combined with yeast display, and structurally analyzed using a homology model. This monovalent scFv showed a 100-fold affinity improvement (dissociation constant [KD]= 3nM) and exquisite specificity towards its targeted epitope or HLA-A2+/WT1+ tumor cells. Bivalent scFv-huIgG1-Fc fusion protein demonstrated an even higher avidity (KD = 2pM) binding to the T cell epitope and to tumor targets, and was capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity or tumor lysis by chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing human T or NK-92-MI transfected cells. This antibody demonstrated specific and potent cytotoxicity in vivo towards WT1-positive leukemia xenograft that was HLA-A2 restricted. In summary, T cell epitopes can provide novel targets for antibody-based therapeutics. By combining phage and yeast displays and scFv-Fc fusion platforms, a strategy for developing high affinity TCR-like antibodies could be rapidly explored for potential clinical development. PMID:25987253

  6. Lepidopteran cells, an alternative for the production of recombinant antibodies?

    PubMed Central

    Cérutti, Martine; Golay, Josée

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are used with great success in many different therapeutic domains. In order to satisfy the growing demand and to lower the production cost of these molecules, many alternative systems have been explored. Among them, the baculovirus/insect cells system is a good candidate. This system is very safe, given that the baculoviruses have a highly restricted host range and they are not pathogenic to vertebrates or plants. But the major asset is the speed with which it is possible to obtain very stable recombinant viruses capable of producing fully active proteins whose glycosylation pattern can be modulated to make it similar to the human one. These features could ultimately make the difference by enabling the production of antibodies with very low costs. However, efforts are still needed, in particular to increase production rates and thus make this system commercially viable for the production of these therapeutic agents. PMID:22531440

  7. Optimization of heavy chain and light chain signal peptides for high level expression of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Haryadi, Ryan; Ho, Steven; Kok, Yee Jiun; Pu, Helen X; Zheng, Lu; Pereira, Natasha A; Li, Bin; Bi, Xuezhi; Goh, Lin-Tang; Yang, Yuansheng; Song, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of a nascent protein from the cytosol into the ER mediated by its signal peptide is a critical step in protein secretion. The aim of this work was to develop a platform technology to optimize the signal peptides for high level production of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells. A database of signal peptides from a large number of human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain (HC) and kappa light chain (LC) was generated. Most of the HC signal peptides contain 19 amino acids which can be divided into three domains and the LC signal peptides contain 22 amino acids. The signal peptides were then clustered according to sequence similarity. Based on the clustering, 8 HC and 2 LC signal peptides were analyzed for their impacts on the production of 5-top selling antibody therapeutics, namely, Herceptin, Avastin, Remicade, Rituxan, and Humira. The best HC and LC signal peptides for producing these 5 antibodies were identified. The optimized signal peptides for Rituxan is 2-fold better compared to its native signal peptides which are available in the public database. Substitution of a single amino acid in the optimized HC signal peptide for Avastin reduced its production significantly. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed that all optimized signal peptides are accurately removed in the mature antibodies. The results presented in this report are particularly important for the production of these 5 antibodies as biosimilar drugs. They also have the potential to be the best signal peptides for the production of new antibodies in CHO cells. PMID:25706993

  8. Optimization of Heavy Chain and Light Chain Signal Peptides for High Level Expression of Therapeutic Antibodies in CHO Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haryadi, Ryan; Ho, Steven; Kok, Yee Jiun; Pu, Helen X.; Zheng, Lu; Pereira, Natasha A.; Li, Bin; Bi, Xuezhi; Goh, Lin-Tang; Yang, Yuansheng; Song, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of a nascent protein from the cytosol into the ER mediated by its signal peptide is a critical step in protein secretion. The aim of this work was to develop a platform technology to optimize the signal peptides for high level production of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells. A database of signal peptides from a large number of human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain (HC) and kappa light chain (LC) was generated. Most of the HC signal peptides contain 19 amino acids which can be divided into three domains and the LC signal peptides contain 22 amino acids. The signal peptides were then clustered according to sequence similarity. Based on the clustering, 8 HC and 2 LC signal peptides were analyzed for their impacts on the production of 5-top selling antibody therapeutics, namely, Herceptin, Avastin, Remicade, Rituxan, and Humira. The best HC and LC signal peptides for producing these 5 antibodies were identified. The optimized signal peptides for Rituxan is 2-fold better compared to its native signal peptides which are available in the public database. Substitution of a single amino acid in the optimized HC signal peptide for Avastin reduced its production significantly. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed that all optimized signal peptides are accurately removed in the mature antibodies. The results presented in this report are particularly important for the production of these 5 antibodies as biosimilar drugs. They also have the potential to be the best signal peptides for the production of new antibodies in CHO cells. PMID:25706993

  9. ANTIBODY-MEDIATED PROTECTION AGAINST GENITAL HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS TYPE 2 DISEASE IN MICE BY FC GAMMA RECEPTOR -DEPENDENT AND -INDEPENDENT MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chin-Fun; Meador, Michael G.; Young, Christal G.; Strasser, Jane E.; Bourne, Nigel; Milligan, Gregg N.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of antibody (Ab) to modulate HSV pathogenesis is well recognized but the mechanisms by which HSV-specific IgG antibodies protect against genital HSV-2 disease are not well understood. The requirement for Ab interactions with Fcγ receptors (FcγR) in protection was examined using a murine model of genital HSV-2 infection. IgG antibodies isolated from the serum of HSV-immune mice protected normal mice against HSV-2 disease when administered prior to genital HSV-2 inoculation. However, protection was significantly diminished in recipient mice lacking the gamma chain subunit utilized in FcγRI, FcγRIII, FcγRIV and FcepsilonRI receptors and in normal mice depleted of Gr-1+ immune cell populations known to express FcγR, suggesting protection was largely mediated by an FcγR-dependent mechanism. To test whether neutralizing Ab might provide superior protection, a highly neutralizing HSV glycoprotein D (gD)- specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) was utilized. Similar to results with HSV-specific polyclonal IgG, administration of the gD-specific mAb did not prevent initial infection of the genital tract but resulted in lower virus loads in the vaginal epithelium and provided significant protection against disease and acute infection of the sensory ganglia; however, this protection was independent of host FcγR expression and was manifest in mice depleted of Gr-1+ immune cells. Together, these data demonstrate that substantial Ab-mediated protection against genital HSV-2 disease could be achieved by either FcγR-dependent or -independent mechanisms. These studies suggest that HSV vaccines might need to elicit multiple, diverse antibody effector mechanisms to achieve optimal protection. PMID:17950908

  10. CD176 single-chain variable antibody fragment inhibits the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells and hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangnan; Yi, Bin; Zhang, Zhe; Cao, Yi

    2016-06-01

    CD176 (Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen) is a tumor-associated carbohydrate epitope (glycotope) functionally involved in blood spread and liver metastasis of cancer cells by mediating the adhesion of cancer cells to endothelial cells and hepatocytes, respectively. CD176 could be a promising target for antitumor immunotherapy. We applied B lymphocytes obtained from mice immunized with CD176 antigen and constructed a phage display library. A positive clone of CD176 single-chain variable antibody fragment (scFv) was successfully screened from this library. The CD176 scFv was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The purified scFv can bind to the natural CD176 expressed on the surface of cancer cells. Furthermore, the CD176 scFv inhibits the adhesion of CD176(+) cancer cells to endothelial cells and hepatocytes. This CD176 scFv provides a basis for future development of recombinant CD176-specific antibodies that can be used in therapeutic application. PMID:27090911

  11. Delivery of anticancer drugs and antibodies into cells using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junru; Pepe, Jason; Rincon, Mercedes

    2005-04-01

    It has been shown experimentally in cell suspensions that pulsed ultrasound (2.0 MHz) could be used to deliver an anti-cancer drug (Adriamycin hydrochloride) into Jurkat lymphocytes and antibodies (goat anti rabbit IgG and anti mouse IgD) into human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMC) cells and Jurkat lymphocytes assisted by encapsulated microbubbles (Optison). When Adriamycin hydrochloride (ADR) was delivered, the delivery efficiency reached 4.80% and control baseline (no ultrasound and no ADR) was 0.17%. When anti-rabbit IgD was delivered, the efficiencies were 34.90% (control baseline was 1.33%) and 32.50% (control baseline was 1.66%) respectively for Jurkat cells and PBMC. When goat anti rabbit IgG was delivered, the efficiencies were 78.60% (control baseline was 1.60%) and 57.50% (control baseline was 11.30%) respectively for Jurkat cells and PBMC.

  12. Targeted adenovirus gene transfer to endothelial and smooth muscle cells by using bispecific antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Wickham, T J; Segal, D M; Roelvink, P W; Carrion, M E; Lizonova, A; Lee, G M; Kovesdi, I

    1996-01-01

    A major hurdle to adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene transfer is that the target issue lacks sufficient levels of receptors to mediate vector attachment via its fiber coat protein. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells are primary targets in gene therapy approaches to prevent restenosis following angioplasty or to promote or inhibit angiogenesis. However, Ad poorly binds and transduces these cells because of their low or undetectable levels of functional Ad fiber receptor. The Ad-binding deficiency of these cells was overcome by targeting Ad binding to alpha v integrin receptors that are sufficiently expressed by these cells. In order to target alpha v integrins, a bispecific antibody (bsAb) that comprised a monoclonal Ab to the FLAG peptide epitope, DYKDDDDK, and a monoclonal Ab to alpha v integrins was constructed. In conjunction with the bsAb, a new vector, AdFLAG, which incorporated the FLAG peptide epitope into its penton base protein was constructed. Complexing AdFLAG with the bsAb increased the beta-glucuronidase transduction of human venule endothelial cells and human intestinal smooth muscle cells by seven- to ninefold compared with transduction by AdFLAG alone. The increased transduction efficiency was shown to occur through the specific interaction of the complex with alpha v integrins. These results demonstrate that bsAbs can be successfully used to target Ad to a specific cellular receptor and thereby increase the efficiency of gene transfer. PMID:8794324

  13. Molecular microscope strategy to improve risk stratification in early antibody-mediated kidney allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Lefaucheur, Carmen; Vernerey, Dewi; Chang, Jessica; Hidalgo, Luis G; Beuscart, Thibaut; Verine, Jerome; Aubert, Olivier; Dubleumortier, Sébastien; Duong van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Jouven, Xavier; Glotz, Denis; Legendre, Christophe; Halloran, Philip F

    2014-10-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is the leading cause of kidney allograft loss. We investigated whether the addition of gene expression measurements to conventional methods could serve as a molecular microscope to identify kidneys with ABMR that are at high risk for failure. We studied 939 consecutive kidney recipients at Necker Hospital (2004-2010; principal cohort) and 321 kidney recipients at Saint Louis Hospital (2006-2010; validation cohort) and assessed patients with ABMR in the first 1 year post-transplant. In addition to conventional features, we assessed microarray-based gene expression in transplant biopsy specimens using relevant molecular measurements: the ABMR Molecular Score and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcript set. The main outcomes were kidney transplant loss and progression to chronic transplant injury. We identified 74 patients with ABMR in the principal cohort and 54 patients with ABMR in the validation cohort. Conventional features independently associated with failure were donor age and humoral histologic score (g+ptc+v+cg+C4d). Adjusting for conventional features, ABMR Molecular Score (hazard ratio [HR], 2.22; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.37 to 3.58; P=0.001) and endothelial donor-specific antibody-selective transcripts (HR, 3.02; 95% CI, 1.00 to 9.16; P<0.05) independently associated with an increased risk of graft loss. The results were replicated in the independent validation group. Adding a gene expression assessment to a traditional risk model improved the stratification of patients at risk for graft failure (continuous net reclassification improvement, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.57 to 1.46; P<0.001; integrated discrimination improvement, 0.16; P<0.001). Compared with conventional assessment, the addition of gene expression measurement in kidney transplants with ABMR improves stratification of patients at high risk for graft loss. PMID:24700874

  14. Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation Is Associated with Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and the Complement-Independent Alloreactive Potential of Donor-Specific Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Legris, Tristan; Picard, Christophe; Todorova, Dilyana; Lyonnet, Luc; Laporte, Cathy; Dumoulin, Chloé; Nicolino-Brunet, Corinne; Daniel, Laurent; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Bataille, Stanislas; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Moal, Valérie; Berland, Yvon; Dignat-George, Francoise; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation remains the best treatment for end-stage renal failure, it is limited by chronic humoral aggression of the graft vasculature by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). The complement-independent mechanisms that lead to the antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) of kidney allografts remain poorly understood. Increasing lines of evidence have revealed the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells as innate immune effectors of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), but few studies have investigated their alloreactive potential in the context of solid organ transplantation. Our study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of the antibody-dependent alloreactive function of NK cells to kidney graft dysfunction. We first conducted an observational study to investigate whether the cytotoxic function of NK cells is associated with chronic allograft dysfunction. The NK-Cellular Humoral Activation Test (NK-CHAT) was designed to evaluate the recipient and antibody-dependent reactivity of NK cells against allogeneic target cells. The release of CD107a/Lamp1(+) cytotoxic granules, resulting from the recognition of rituximab-coated B cells by NK cells, was analyzed in 148 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs, mean graft duration: 6.2 years). Enhanced ADCC responsiveness was associated with reduced graft function and identified as an independent risk factor predicting a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate over a 1-year period (hazard ratio: 2.83). In a second approach, we used the NK-CHAT to reveal the cytotoxic potential of circulating alloantibodies in vitro. The level of CD16 engagement resulting from the in vitro recognition of serum-coated allogeneic B cells or splenic cells was further identified as a specific marker of DSA-induced ADCC. The NK-CHAT scoring of sera obtained from 40 patients at the time of transplant biopsy was associated with ABMR diagnosis. Our findings indicate that despite the administration of

  15. Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation Is Associated with Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and the Complement-Independent Alloreactive Potential of Donor-Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Legris, Tristan; Picard, Christophe; Todorova, Dilyana; Lyonnet, Luc; Laporte, Cathy; Dumoulin, Chloé; Nicolino-Brunet, Corinne; Daniel, Laurent; Loundou, Anderson; Morange, Sophie; Bataille, Stanislas; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Moal, Valérie; Berland, Yvon; Dignat-George, Francoise; Burtey, Stéphane; Paul, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation remains the best treatment for end-stage renal failure, it is limited by chronic humoral aggression of the graft vasculature by donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). The complement-independent mechanisms that lead to the antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) of kidney allografts remain poorly understood. Increasing lines of evidence have revealed the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells as innate immune effectors of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), but few studies have investigated their alloreactive potential in the context of solid organ transplantation. Our study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of the antibody-dependent alloreactive function of NK cells to kidney graft dysfunction. We first conducted an observational study to investigate whether the cytotoxic function of NK cells is associated with chronic allograft dysfunction. The NK-Cellular Humoral Activation Test (NK-CHAT) was designed to evaluate the recipient and antibody-dependent reactivity of NK cells against allogeneic target cells. The release of CD107a/Lamp1+ cytotoxic granules, resulting from the recognition of rituximab-coated B cells by NK cells, was analyzed in 148 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs, mean graft duration: 6.2 years). Enhanced ADCC responsiveness was associated with reduced graft function and identified as an independent risk factor predicting a decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate over a 1-year period (hazard ratio: 2.83). In a second approach, we used the NK-CHAT to reveal the cytotoxic potential of circulating alloantibodies in vitro. The level of CD16 engagement resulting from the in vitro recognition of serum-coated allogeneic B cells or splenic cells was further identified as a specific marker of DSA-induced ADCC. The NK-CHAT scoring of sera obtained from 40 patients at the time of transplant biopsy was associated with ABMR diagnosis. Our findings indicate that despite the administration of

  16. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T.; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O.; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G.; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S.; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors. PMID:27196125

  17. Structural insight into antibody-mediated antagonism of the Glucagon-like peptide-1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Hennen, Stephanie; Kodra, János T; Soroka, Vladyslav; Krogh, Berit O; Wu, Xiaoai; Kaastrup, Peter; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rønn, Sif G; Schluckebier, Gerd; Barbateskovic, Silvia; Gandhi, Prafull S; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a member of the class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family and a well-established target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) of GLP-1R is important for GLP-1 binding and the crystal structure of the GLP-1/ECD complex was reported previously. The first structure of a class B GPCR transmembrane (TM) domain was solved recently, but the full length receptor structure is still not well understood. Here we describe the molecular details of antibody-mediated antagonism of the GLP-1R using both in vitro pharmacology and x-ray crystallography. We showed that the antibody Fab fragment (Fab 3F52) blocked the GLP-1 binding site of the ECD directly and thereby acts as a competitive antagonist of native GLP-1. Interestingly, Fab 3F52 also blocked a short peptide agonist believed to engage primarily the transmembrane and extracellular loop region of GLP-1R, whereas functionality of an allosteric small-molecule agonist was not inhibited. This study has implications for the structural understanding of the GLP-1R and related class B GPCRs, which is important for the development of new and improved therapeutics targeting these receptors. PMID:27196125

  18. Activation of NLRC4 downregulates TLR5-mediated antibody immune responses against flagellin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Yang, Jingyi; Zhang, Ejuan; Zhong, Maohua; Xiao, Yang; Yu, Jie; Zhou, Dihan; Cao, Yuan; Yang, Yi; Li, Yaoming; Yan, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial flagellin is a unique pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP), which can be recognized by surface localized Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) and the cytosolic NOD-like receptor (NLR) protein 4 (NLRC4) receptors. Activation of the TLR5 and/or NLRC4 signaling pathways by flagellin and the resulting immune responses play important roles in anti-bacterial immunity. However, it remains unclear how the dual activities of flagellin that activate the TLR5 and/or NLRC4 signaling pathways orchestrate the immune responses. In this study, we assessed the effects of flagellin and its mutants lacking the ability to activate TLR5 and NLRC4 alone or in combination on the adaptive immune responses against flagellin. Flagellin that was unable to activate NLRC4 induced a significantly higher antibody response than did wild-type flagellin. The increased antibody response could be eliminated when macrophages were depleted in vivo. The activation of NLRC4 by flagellin downregulated the flagellin-induced and TLR5-mediated immune responses against flagellin. PMID:25914934

  19. Better understanding of transplant glomerulopathy secondary to chronic antibody-mediated rejection.

    PubMed

    Remport, Adam; Ivanyi, Bela; Mathe, Zoltan; Tinckam, Kathryn; Mucsi, Istvan; Molnar, Miklos Z

    2015-11-01

    Transplant glomerulopathy (TG) is generally accepted to result from repeated episodes of endothelial activation, injury and repair, leading to pathological abnormalities of double contouring or multi-layering of the glomerular basement membrane. TG is a major sequel of chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (cABMR), from pre-existing or de novo anti-HLA antibodies. Hepatitis C infection, thrombotic microangiopathy or other factors may also contribute to TG development. TG prevalence is 5-20% in most series, reaching 55%, in some high-risk cohorts, and is associated with worse allograft outcomes. Despite its prevalence and clinical significance, few well-studied treatment options have been proposed. Similar to desensitization protocols, plasmapheresis with or without immunoabsorption, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, bortezomib and eculizumab have been proposed in the treatment of TG due to cABMR individually or in various combinations. Robust clinical trials are urgently needed to address this major cause of allograft loss. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the epidemiology, etiology, pathology, and the preventive and treatment options for TG secondary to cABMR. PMID:25473123

  20. Targeting endogenous nuclear antigens by electrotransfer of monoclonal antibodies in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Guillaume; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Desplancq, Dominique; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Vigneron, Marc; Gannon, Julian; Van Regenmortel, Marc H.; Weiss, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are valuable tools for functional studies in vitro, but their use in living cells remains challenging because they do not naturally cross the cell membrane. Here, we present a simple and highly efficient method for the intracytoplasmic delivery of any antibody into cultured cells. By following the fate of monoclonal antibodies that bind to nuclear antigens, it was possible to image endogenous targets and to show that inhibitory antibodies are able to induce cell growth suppression or cell death. Our electrotransfer system allowed the cancer cells we studied to be transduced without loss of viability and may have applications for a variety of intracellular immuno-interventions. PMID:23765067

  1. Antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis in mice: the role of endotoxin, complement and genetic background

    PubMed Central

    ROBSON, M G; COOK, H T; PUSEY, C D; WALPORT, M J; DAVIES, K A

    2003-01-01

    Antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis in man may be exacerbated by infection and this effect may be mediated by bacterial endotoxin. There is evidence supporting a role for endotoxin in heterologous nephrotoxic nephritis in rats, but the role of endotoxin in this model in mice has not previously been explored. Previous data in mice on the role of complement in this model are conflicting and this may be due to the mixed genetic background of mice used in these studies. We used the model of heterologous nephrotoxic nephritis in mice and explored the role of endotoxin, complement and genetic background. In this study we show a synergy between antibody and endotoxin in causing a neutrophil influx. We also show that C1q-deficient mice have an increased susceptibility to glomerular inflammation but this is seen only on a mixed 129/Sv × C57BL/6 genetic background. On a C57BL/6 background we did not find any differences in disease susceptibility when wildtype, C1q, factor B or factor B/C2 deficient mice were compared. We also demonstrate that C57BL/6 mice are more susceptible to glomerular inflammation than 129/Sv mice. These results show that endotoxin is required in this model in mice, and that complement does not play a major role in glomerular inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. C1q may play a protective role in mixed-strain 129/Sv × C57BL/6 mice, but the data may also be explained by systematic bias in background genes, as there is a large difference in disease susceptibility between C57BL/6 and 129/Sv mice. PMID:12930357

  2. Antibody Mediated Rejection as a Contributor to Previously Unexplained Early Liver Allograft Loss

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Jacqueline G.; Kaneku, Hugo; Demetris, Anthony J.; Marr, John D.; Shiller, S. Michelle; Susskind, Brian M.; Tillery, Glenn W.; Terasaki, Paul I.; Klintmalm, Göran B.

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed 60 patients with idiopathic early allograft loss (defined as death or retransplantation <90 days) to determine the relative contribution of preformed donor specific HLA alloantibodies (DSA) to this endpoint and defined strict criteria for the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in liver allografts. Inclusion criteria encompassed availability of a pre-transplant serum sample and both post-reperfusion and follow-up tissue specimens for “blinded” retrospective re-review of histology and C4d staining. AMR was diagnosed based on the presence of all 4 strict criteria: 1) DSA in serum; 2) histopathological evidence of diffuse microvascular injury/microvasculitis, consistent with antibody-mediated injury; 3) diffuse C4d staining in the portal microvasculature with or without staining in the sinusoids or central veins in at least one sample; and 4) exclusion of other causes of a similar type of injury. Patients thought to be experiencing definite AMR on the basis of routine histopathology alone showed the highest levels of DSA sensitization. Forty percent of patients with pre-transplant DSA with a pattern of bead saturation after serial dilutions developed AMR. One additional multiparous female developed, what appeared to be, a strong “recall” response resulting in combined AMR and ACR causing graft failure. A contribution of DSA to allograft failure could not be excluded in three additional patients who received marginal grafts. In conclusion, liver allograft recipients with high mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) preformed DSA despite dilution seem to be at risk for clinically significant allograft injury, and possibly loss, from AMR often in combination with ACR. PMID:24382837

  3. Antibodies to the leucine-rich repeat region of internalin block entry of Listeria monocytogenes into cells expressing E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Mengaud, J; Lecuit, M; Lebrun, M; Nato, F; Mazie, J C; Cossart, P

    1996-12-01

    Internalin, a surface protein essential for entry of Listeria monocytogenes EGD into epithelial cells, was used as an antigen to raise nine monoclonal antibodies. These monoclonal antibodies recognized seven distinct epitopes which were located in three different regions of the protein. Three of them inhibited internalin-mediated entry and recognized the amino-terminal leucine-rich repeat region of the protein, suggesting that this region is essential for entry. PMID:8945603

  4. Long antibody HCDR3s from HIV-naïve donors presented on a PG9 neutralizing antibody background mediate HIV neutralization.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Finn, Jessica A; Briney, Bryan; Sapparapu, Gopal; Singh, Vidisha; King, Hannah; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David C; Meiler, Jens; Crowe, James E

    2016-04-19

    Development of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against HIV-1 usually requires prolonged infection and induction of Abs with unusual features, such as long heavy-chain complementarity-determining region 3 (HCDR3) loops. Here we sought to determine whether the repertoires of HIV-1-naïve individuals contain Abs with long HCDR3 loops that could mediate HIV-1 neutralization. We interrogated at massive scale the structural properties of long Ab HCDR3 loops in HIV-1-naïve donors, searching for structured HCDR3s similar to those of the HIV-1 bnAb PG9. We determined the nucleotide sequences encoding 2.3 × 10(7)unique HCDR3 amino acid regions from 70 different HIV-1-naïve donors. Of the 26,917 HCDR3 loops with 30-amino acid length identified, we tested 30 for further study that were predicted to have PG9-like structure when chimerized onto PG9. Three of these 30 PG9 chimeras bound to the HIV-1 gp120 monomer, and two were neutralizing. In addition, we found 14 naturally occurring HCDR3 sequences that acquired the ability to bind to the HIV-1 gp120 monomer when adding 2- to 7-amino acid mutations via computational design. Of those 14 designed Abs, 8 neutralized HIV-1, with IC50values ranging from 0.7 to 98 µg/mL. These data suggest that the repertoire of HIV-1-naïve individuals contains rare B cells that encode HCDR3 loops that bind or neutralize HIV-1 when presented on a PG9 background with relatively few or no additional mutations. Long HCDR3 sequences are present in the HIV-naïve B-cell repertoire, suggesting that this class of bnAbs is a favorable target for rationally designed preventative vaccine efforts. PMID:27044078

  5. Immunosuppressive human anti-CD83 monoclonal antibody depletion of activated dendritic cells in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Seldon, T A; Pryor, R; Palkova, A; Jones, M L; Verma, N D; Findova, M; Braet, K; Sheng, Y; Fan, Y; Zhou, E Y; Marks, J D; Munro, T; Mahler, S M; Barnard, R T; Fromm, P D; Silveira, P A; Elgundi, Z; Ju, X; Clark, G J; Bradstock, K F; Munster, D J; Hart, D N J

    2016-03-01

    Current immunosuppressive/anti-inflammatory agents target the responding effector arm of the immune response and their nonspecific action increases the risk of infection and malignancy. These effects impact on their use in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation and other forms of transplantation. Interventions that target activated dendritic cells (DCs) have the potential to suppress the induction of undesired immune responses (for example, graft versus host disease (GVHD) or transplant rejection) and to leave protective T-cell immune responses intact (for example, cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunity). We developed a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb), 3C12, specific for CD83, which is expressed on activated but not resting DC. The 3C12 mAb and an affinity improved version, 3C12C, depleted CD83(+) cells by CD16(+) NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and inhibited allogeneic T-cell proliferation in vitro. A single dose of 3C12C prevented human peripheral blood mononuclear cell-induced acute GVHD in SCID mouse recipients. The mAb 3C12C depleted CMRF-44(+)CD83(bright) activated DC but spared CD83(dim/-) DC in vivo. It reduced human T-cell activation in vivo and maintained the proportion of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) CD25(+) Treg cells and also viral-specific CD8(+) T cells. The anti-CD83 mAb, 3C12C, merits further evaluation as a new immunosuppressive agent in transplantation. PMID:26286117

  6. Specific capture and temperature-mediated release of cells in an aptamer-based microfluidic device†

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Nguyen, ThaiHuu; Pei, Renjun; Stojanovic, Milan; Lin, Qiao

    2014-01-01

    Isolation of cells from heterogeneous mixtures is critically important in both basic cell biology studies and clinical diagnostics. Cell isolation can be realized based on physical properties such as size, density and electrical properties. Alternatively, affinity binding of target cells by surface-immobilized ligands, such as antibodies, can be used to achieve specific cell isolation. Microfluidics technology has recently been used in conjunction with antibody-based affinity isolation methods to capture, purify and isolate cells with higher yield rates, better efficiencies and lower costs. However, a method that allows easy release and collection of live cells from affinity surfaces for subsequent analysis and detection has yet to be developed. This paper presents a microfluidic device that not only achieves specific affinity capture and enrichment, but also enables non-destructive, temperature-mediated release and retrieval of cells. Specific cell capture is achieved using surface-immobilized aptamers in a microchamber. Release of the captured cells is realized by a moderate temperature change, effected via integrated heaters and a temperature sensor, to reversibly disrupt the cell-aptamer interaction. Experimental results with CCRF-CEM cells have demonstrated that the device is capable of specific capture and temperature-mediated release of cells, that the released cells remain viable and that the aptamer-functionalized surface is regenerable. PMID:22854859

  7. Stimulation of angiogenesis and survival of endothelial cells by human monoclonal Tie2 receptor antibody.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Byungtae; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jang-Seong; Moon, Ji Hyun; Jeung, In Cheul; Lee, Na Geum; Park, Jongjin; Hong, Hyo Jeong; Cho, Young-Lai; Jung, Haiyoung; Park, Young-Jun; Lee, Seon-Jin; Lee, Hee Gu; Kim, Won Kon; Han, Baek Soo; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Chung, Sang J; Kwon, Young-Guen; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Sang Jik; Min, Jeong-Ki

    2015-05-01

    Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) and its endothelium-specific receptor, tyrosine kinase with Ig and epidermal growth factor homology domain 2 (Tie2), play critical roles in vascular development. Although the Ang1/Tie2 system has been considered a promising target for therapeutic neovascularization, several imitations of large-scale production have hampered the development of recombinant Ang1 for therapeutics. In this study, we produced a fully human agonistic antibody against Tie2, designated 1-4h, and tested the applicability of 1-4h as an alternative to native Ang1 in therapeutic angiogenesis. 1-4h significantly enhanced the phosphorylation of Tie2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human Tie2-expressing HEK293 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Moreover, 1-4h induced the activation of Tie2-mediated intracellular signaling such as AKT, eNOS, MAPK, and Focal Adhesion Kinase p125(FAK). In addition, 1-4h increased the chemotactic motility and capillary-like tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro and enhanced the survival of serum-deprived endothelial cells. Taken together, our data clearly suggest that a human Tie2 agonistic antibody is a potentially useful therapeutic approach for the treatment of several ischemic diseases including delayed-wound healing and ischemic heart and limb diseases. PMID:25771003

  8. Antibody-dependent complement-mediated cytotoxicity in sera from patients with HIV-1 infection is controlled by CD55 and CD59.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, J; Zimmer, J P; Kluxen, B; Aries, S; Bögel, M; Gigli, I; Schmitz, H

    1995-01-01

    Various immune mechanisms have been reported to contribute to the progressive destruction of Th cells in HIV-1-infected patients. Among these, complement mediated lysis of infected cells has been suggested. An increased sensitivity of lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected patients to lysis by monoclonal antibodies directed to MHC class I antigen and complement has been directly correlated with a decreased expression of the decay accelerating factor (CD55). It also has been reported that the expression of the membrane inhibitor of reactive lysis (CD59) is decreased during HIV-1 infection. We examined the effect of antibodies in the serum of HIV-1-positive individuals and normal human serum (NHS) as source of complement on several HIV-1-infected cell lines differing in their expression of CD55 and CD59. When HIV-1-infected target cells without membrane expression of CD55 and CD59 were used, a highly significant cytotoxic effect was observed in the presence of heat inactivated anti-HIV-1-positive sera and NHS, while heat-inactivated anti-HIV-1-negative sera and NHS were unable to induce cytolysis. Similar results were obtained using purified IgG isolated from HIV-1-positive sera and either NHS or guinea pig serum as source of complement. Lysis of HIV-1-infected cells correlated with expression of viral antigens on the cell surface. HIV-1-infected CD55 and CD59 positive target cells showed specific lysis, when the function of these molecules was abrogated by blocking antibodies to CD55 and CD59. The finding of anti-HIV-1-specific cytotoxic antibodies in sera from HIV-1-infected patients should be considered in the pathogenesis of the HIV-1-infection. PMID:7544808

  9. Natural killer cell stimulatory factor (NKSF) augments natural killer cell and antibody-dependent tumoricidal response against colon carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, M D; Sigal, R K; Williams, N N; Daly, J M

    1991-04-01

    The therapy of colorectal cancer may be improved by biologic response modifiers that enhance natural killer (NK) cell and antibody-dependent tumoricidal mechanisms. This study examined the effect of a recently discovered cytokine purified from the supernatant of an Ebstein-Barr virus-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell line (RPMI-8866), natural killer cell stimulatory factor (NKSF), on NK and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured for 24 hr in the presence or absence of NKSF (3.6 pM) or interleukin-2 (1 nM). The cultured lymphocytes were analyzed for lytic potential toward chromium-51-labeled colon carcinoma targets SW 1116, 498 LI, and WC 1. ADCC was measured by incubating chromium-51-labeled SW 1116 or WC 1 targets with the monoclonal antibody CO17-1A, an IgG2a antibody reactive with gastrointestinal cancer-associated cell antigen, or control mouse IgG prior to testing NKSF-treated or control PBL effectors in a 6-hr cytotoxicity assay. NKSF significantly enhanced NK cytolysis of colon carcinoma and NK-resistant lymphoma cell lines, and on a molar basis was approximately 300 times more potent than interleukin-2 in generating NK cytotoxicity. Furthermore, NKSF significantly augmented lymphocyte-mediated ADCC against colon carcinoma targets, and the combination of NKSF with the antibody CO17-1A had an additive effect on lymphocyte tumoricidial capacity. Thus, NKSF may have a potential role in the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:1673486

  10. Cooperativity Between CD8+ T Cells, Non-Neutralizing Antibodies, and Alveolar Macrophages Is Important for Heterosubtypic Influenza Virus Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Brian J.; Decman, Vilma; Ali, Mohammed-Alkhatim A.; Abt, Michael C.; Wolf, Amaya I.; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Angelosanto, Jill M.; Artis, David; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E. John

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal epidemics of influenza virus result in ∼36,000 deaths annually in the United States. Current vaccines against influenza virus elicit an antibody response specific for the envelope glycoproteins. However, high mutation rates result in the emergence of new viral serotypes, which elude neutralization by preexisting antibodies. T lymphocytes have been reported to be capable of mediating heterosubtypic protection through recognition of internal, more conserved, influenza virus proteins. Here, we demonstrate using a recombinant influenza virus expressing the LCMV GP33-41 epitope that influenza virus-specific CD8+ T cells and virus-specific non-neutralizing antibodies each are relatively ineffective at conferring heterosubtypic protective immunity alone. However, when combined virus-specific CD8 T cells and non-neutralizing antibodies cooperatively elicit robust protective immunity. This synergistic improvement in protective immunity is dependent, at least in part, on alveolar macrophages and/or other lung phagocytes. Overall, our studies suggest that an influenza vaccine capable of eliciting both CD8+ T cells and antibodies specific for highly conserved influenza proteins may be able to provide heterosubtypic protection in humans, and act as the basis for a potential “universal” vaccine. PMID:23516357

  11. Cooperativity between CD8+ T cells, non-neutralizing antibodies, and alveolar macrophages is important for heterosubtypic influenza virus immunity.

    PubMed

    Laidlaw, Brian J; Decman, Vilma; Ali, Mohammed-Alkhatim A; Abt, Michael C; Wolf, Amaya I; Monticelli, Laurel A; Mozdzanowska, Krystyna; Angelosanto, Jill M; Artis, David; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E John

    2013-03-01

    Seasonal epidemics of influenza virus result in ∼36,000 deaths annually in the United States. Current vaccines against influenza virus elicit an antibody response specific for the envelope glycoproteins. However, high mutation rates result in the emergence of new viral serotypes, which elude neutralization by preexisting antibodies. T lymphocytes have been reported to be capable of mediating heterosubtypic protection through recognition of internal, more conserved, influenza virus proteins. Here, we demonstrate using a recombinant influenza virus expressing the LCMV GP33-41 epitope that influenza virus-specific CD8+ T cells and virus-specific non-neutralizing antibodies each are relatively ineffective at conferring heterosubtypic protective immunity alone. However, when combined virus-specific CD8 T cells and non-neutralizing antibodies cooperatively elicit robust protective immunity. This synergistic improvement in protective immunity is dependent, at least in part, on alveolar macrophages and/or other lung phagocytes. Overall, our studies suggest that an influenza vaccine capable of eliciting both CD8+ T cells and antibodies specific for highly conserved influenza proteins may be able to provide heterosubtypic protection in humans, and act as the basis for a potential "universal" vaccine. PMID:23516357

  12. T-cell modulation of the antibody response to bacterial polysaccharide antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, C E; Bright, R

    1989-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with subimmunogenic doses of meningococcal polysaccharide (MP), Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (PA), or Streptococcus mutans polysaccharide (SM) resulted in suppression of antibody response. The transfer of putative suppressor T cells (Ts cells) from donor mice primed with a subimmunogenic dose of MP to naive recipients at the time of immunization with MP substantially reduced the magnitude of the antibody response. Also, the infusion of B cells taken from animals immunized with either MP or PA suppressed the antibody response of naive recipients to MP or PA, respectively, relative to controls, suggesting that Ts cells respond to determinants on immune B cells. We observed that the injection of concanavalin A or phytohemagglutinin (two lectins known to augment the activity of amplifier T cells [Ta cells]) 2 days postimmunization enhanced the antibody response to MP and SM. In addition, Ta-cell activity was transferred to naive animals by using spleen cells. Although the administration of phytohemagglutinin at the time of immunization with MP also resulted in increased antibody response, the injection of concanavalin A simultaneous with immunization resulted in a suppression of the antibody response to MP. Although Ts cells generated in response to pneumococcal polysaccharide type III were found to respond to monoclonal antibody Ly-m22, Ta cells responded to monoclonal antibodies L3T4 and Ia but not to Ly-m22. These studies suggest that Ta and Ts cells can modulate the antibody response to MP, SM, and PA in a positive and negative manner, respectively. PMID:2462536

  13. Target deletion of complement component 9 attenuates antibody-mediated hemolysis and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute shock in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaoyan; Ju, Jiyu; Lin, Zhijuan; Xiao, Weiling; Li, Xiaofang; Zhuang, Baoxiang; Zhang, Tingting; Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Xiangyu; Ma, Chao; Su, Weiliang; Wang, Yuqi; Qin, Xuebin; Liang, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Terminal complement membrane attack complex (MAC) formation is induced initially by C5b, followed by the sequential condensation of the C6, C7, C8. Polymerization of C9 to the C5b-8 complex forms the C5b-9 (or MAC). The C5b-9 forms lytic or non lytic pores in the cell membrane destroys membrane integrity. The biological functionalities of MAC has been previously investigated by using either the mice deficient in C5 and C6, or MAC’s regulator CD59. However, there is no available C9 deficient mice (mC9−/−) for directly dissecting the role of C5b-9 in the pathogenesis of human diseases. Further, since C5b-7 and C5b-8 complexes form non lytic pore, it may also plays biological functionality. To better understand the role of terminal complement cascades, here we report a successful generation of mC9−/−. We demonstrated that lack of C9 attenuates anti-erythrocyte antibody-mediated hemolysis or LPS-induced acute shock. Further, the rescuing effect on the acute shock correlates with the less release of IL-1β in mC9−/−, which is associated with suppression of MAC-mediated inflammasome activation in mC9−/−. Taken together, these results not only confirm the critical role of C5b-9 in complement-mediated hemolysis and but also highlight the critical role of C5b-9 in inflammasome activation. PMID:27444648

  14. Target deletion of complement component 9 attenuates antibody-mediated hemolysis and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute shock in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoyan; Ju, Jiyu; Lin, Zhijuan; Xiao, Weiling; Li, Xiaofang; Zhuang, Baoxiang; Zhang, Tingting; Ma, Xiaojun; Li, Xiangyu; Ma, Chao; Su, Weiliang; Wang, Yuqi; Qin, Xuebin; Liang, Shujuan

    2016-01-01

    Terminal complement membrane attack complex (MAC) formation is induced initially by C5b, followed by the sequential condensation of the C6, C7, C8. Polymerization of C9 to the C5b-8 complex forms the C5b-9 (or MAC). The C5b-9 forms lytic or non lytic pores in the cell membrane destroys membrane integrity. The biological functionalities of MAC has been previously investigated by using either the mice deficient in C5 and C6, or MAC's regulator CD59. However, there is no available C9 deficient mice (mC9(-/-)) for directly dissecting the role of C5b-9 in the pathogenesis of human diseases. Further, since C5b-7 and C5b-8 complexes form non lytic pore, it may also plays biological functionality. To better understand the role of terminal complement cascades, here we report a successful generation of mC9(-/-). We demonstrated that lack of C9 attenuates anti-erythrocyte antibody-mediated hemolysis or LPS-induced acute shock. Further, the rescuing effect on the acute shock correlates with the less release of IL-1β in mC9(-/-), which is associated with suppression of MAC-mediated inflammasome activation in mC9(-/-). Taken together, these results not only confirm the critical role of C5b-9 in complement-mediated hemolysis and but also highlight the critical role of C5b-9 in inflammasome activation. PMID:27444648

  15. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood.

  16. Natural antibodies sustain differentiation and maturation of human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Donkova-Petrini, Vladimira; Carbonneil, Cédric; Misra, Namita; Lepelletier, Yves; Delignat, Sandrine; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Oksenhendler, Eric; Lévy, Yves; Debré, Marianne; Kazatchkine, Michel D.; Hermine, Olivier; Kaveri, Srini V.

    2004-01-01

    The differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) is governed by various signals in the microenvironment. Monocytes and DCs circulate in peripheral blood, which contains high levels of natural antibodies (NAbs). NAbs are germ-line-encoded and occur in the absence of deliberate immunization or microbial aggression. To assess the importance of NAbs in the milieu on DC development, we examined the status of DCs in patients with X-linked agammaglobulinemia, a disease characterized by paucity of B cells and circulating antibodies. We demonstrate that the in vitro differentiation of DCs is severely impaired in these patients, at least in part because of low levels of circulating NAbs. We identified NAbs reactive with the CD40 molecule as an important component that participates in the development of DCs. CD40-reactive NAbs restored normal phenotypes of DCs in patients. The maturation process induced by CD40-reactive NAbs was accompanied by an increased IL-10 and decreased IL-12 production. The transcription factor analysis revealed distinct signaling pathways operated by CD40-reactive NAbs compared to those by CD40 ligand. These results suggest that B cells promote bystander DC development through NAbs and the interaction between NAbs and DCs may play a role in steady-state migration of DCs. PMID:15381781

  17. A new cell line for high throughput HIV-specific antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and cell-to-cell virus transmission studies.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Chiara; Flinko, Robin; Lewis, George K

    2016-06-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (Wren et al., 2013) is important in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. Namely, ADCC is induced during natural HIV-1 infection or in HIV-1 vaccine studies, the latter demonstrated by the RV144 vaccine trial. To expedite the assessment of ADCC in studies of HIV, we have developed a high throughput assay. We have optimized the rapid fluorometric antibody-mediated cytotoxicity assay (RFADCC) by transfecting the EGFP-CEM-NKr cell line to constitutively express SNAP-tagged CCR5. This cell line can then serve as a source of HIV-specific targets when coated with monomeric gp120, spinoculated with inactivated intact virions, infected by cell-free viral diffusion or infected by cell-to-cell transmission of virus. The optimized strategy has two significant advantages over the original RFADCC method: First, the preparation of detectable target cells is less labor intensive and faster as it does not rely on multiple staining and washing steps for target cells. Second, because the target cell markers GFP and SNAP are constitutively expressed, the assay provides highly reproducible data. These strengths make the optimized RFADCC assay suitable not only for studies of HIV-1 specific cytotoxicity but also for studies of cell-cell transmission of virus. In conclusion, this assay provides a new generation T cell line that can expedite large clinical studies as well as research studies in humans or non-human primates. PMID:26969387

  18. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  19. Cell line profiling to improve monoclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sohye; Ren, Da; Xiao, Gang; Daris, Kristi; Buck, Lynette; Enyenihi, Atim A; Zubarev, Roman; Bondarenko, Pavel V; Deshpande, Rohini

    2014-04-01

    Mammalian cell culture performance is influenced by both intrinsic (genetic) and extrinsic (media and process) factors. In this study, intrinsic capacity of various monoclonal antibody-producing Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines was compared by exposing them to the same culture condition. Microarray-based transcriptomics and LC-MS/MS shotgun proteomics technologies were utilized to obtain expression landscape of different cell lines. Specific transcripts and proteins correlating with productivity, growth rate and cell size have been identified. The proteomics analysis results showed a strong correlation between the intracellular protein expression levels of the recombinant DHFR and productivity. In contrast, neither the light chain nor the heavy chain of the recombinant monoclonal antibody showed correlation to productivity. Other top ranked proteins which demonstrated positive correlation to productivity included the adaptor protein complex subunits AP3D1and AP2B2, DNA repair protein DDB1 and the ER translocation complex component, SRPR. The subunits of molecular chaperone T-complex protein 1 and the regulator of mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism MTHFD2 showed negative correlation to productivity. The transcriptomics analysis has identified the regulators of calcium signaling, Tmem20 and Rcan1, as the top ranked genes displaying positive and negative correlation to productivity, respectively. For the second part of the study, the principal component analysis (PCA) was generated to view the underlying global structure of the expression data. A clear division and expression polarity was observed between the two distinct clusters of cell lines, independent of link to productivity or any other traits examined. The primary component of the PCA generated from either transcriptomics or proteomics data displayed a strong correlation to cell size and doubling time, while none of the main principal components showed correlation to productivity. Our findings suggest

  20. Redox polymer mediation for enzymatic biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaway, Joshua

    Mediated biocatalytic cathodes prepared from the oxygen-reducing enzyme laccase and redox-conducting osmium hydrogels were characterized for use as cathodes in enzymatic biofuel cells. A series of osmium-based redox polymers was synthesized with redox potentials spanning the range from 0.11 V to 0.85 V (SHE), and the resulting biocatalytic electrodes were modeled to determine reaction kinetic constants using the current response, measured osmium concentration, and measured apparent electron diffusion. As in solution-phase systems, the bimolecular rate constant for mediation was found to vary greatly with mediator potential---from 250 s-1M-1 when mediator and enzyme were close in potential to 9.4 x 10 4 s-1M-1 when this overpotential was large. Optimum mediator potential for a cell operating with a non-limiting platinum anode and having no mass transport limitation from bulk solution was found to be 0.66 V (SHE). Redox polymers were synthesized under different concentrations, producing osmium variation. An increase from 6.6% to 7.2% osmium increased current response from 1.2 to 2.1 mA/cm2 for a planar film in 40°C oxygen-saturated pH 4 buffer, rotating at 900 rpm. These results translated to high surface area electrodes, nearly doubling current density to 13 mA/cm2, the highest to date for such an electrode. The typical fungal laccase from Trametes versicolor was replaced by a bacterially-expressed small laccase from Streptomyces coelicolor, resulting in biocatalytic films that reduced oxygen at increased pH, with full functionality at pH 7, producing 1.5 mA/cm 2 in planar configuration. Current response was biphasic with pH, matching the activity profile of the free enzyme in solution. The mediated enzyme electrode system was modeled with respect to apparent electron diffusion, mediator concentration, and transport of oxygen from bulk solution, all of which are to some extent controlled by design. Each factor was found to limit performance in certain circumstances

  1. Kinetics of antibody-induced modulation of respiratory syncytial virus antigens in a human epithelial cell line

    PubMed Central

    Sarmiento, Rosa E; Tirado, Rocio G; Valverde, Laura E; Gómez-Garcia, Beatriz

    2007-01-01

    Background The binding of viral-specific antibodies to cell-surface antigens usually results in down modulation of the antigen through redistribution of antigens into patches that subsequently may be internalized by endocytosis or may form caps that can be expelled to the extracellular space. Here, by use of confocal-laser-scanning microscopy we investigated the kinetics of the modulation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) antigen by RSV-specific IgG. RSV-infected human epithelial cells (HEp-2) were incubated with anti-RSV polyclonal IgG and, at various incubation times, the RSV-cell-surface-antigen-antibody complexes (RSV Ag-Abs) and intracellular viral proteins were detected by indirect immunoflourescence. Results Interaction of anti-RSV polyclonal IgG with RSV HEp-2 infected cells induced relocalization and aggregation of viral glycoproteins in the plasma membrane formed patches that subsequently produced caps or were internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis participation. Moreover, the concentration of cell surface RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins showed a time dependent cyclic variation and that anti-RSV IgG protected HEp-2 cells from viral-induced death. Conclusion The results from this study indicate that interaction between RSV cell surface proteins and specific viral antibodies alter the expression of viral antigens expressed on the cells surface and intracellular viral proteins; furthermore, interfere with viral induced destruction of the cell. PMID:17608950

  2. Mouse Invariant Monoclonal Antibody NKT14: A Novel Tool to Manipulate iNKT Cell Function In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Scheuplein, Felix; Lamont, Deanna J.; Poynter, Matthew E.; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Serreze, David; Lundblad, Lennart K. A.; Mashal, Robert; Schaub, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells are a T cell subset expressing an invariant T Cell Receptor (TCR) that recognizes glycolipid antigens rather than peptides. The cells have both innate-like rapid cytokine release, and adaptive-like thymic positive selection. iNKT cell activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma and inflammatory diseases, while reduced iNKT cell activation promotes infectious disease, cancer and certain autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Therapeutic means to reduce or deplete iNKT cells could treat inflammatory diseases, while approaches to promote their activation may have potential in certain infectious diseases, cancer or autoimmunity. Thus, we developed invariant TCR-specific monoclonal antibodies to better understand the role of iNKT cells in disease. We report here the first monoclonal antibodies specific for the mouse invariant TCR that by modifying the Fc construct can specifically deplete or activate iNKT cells in vivo in otherwise fully immuno-competent animals. We have used both the depleting and activating version of the antibody in the NOD model of T1D. As demonstrated previously using genetically iNKT cell deficient NOD mice, and in studies of glycolipid antigen activated iNKT cells in standard NOD mice, we found that antibody mediated depletion or activation of iNKT cells respectively accelerated and retarded T1D onset. In BALB/c mice, ovalbumin (OVA) mediated airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) was abrogated with iNKT cell depletion prior to OVA sensitization, confirming studies in knockout mice. Depletion of iNKT cells after sensitization had no effect on AHR in the conducting airways but did reduce AHR in the lung periphery. This result raises caution in the interpretation of studies that use animals that are genetically iNKT cell deficient from birth. These activating and depleting antibodies provide a novel tool to assess the therapeutic potential of iNKT cell manipulation. PMID:26474487

  3. Intratumoral delivery of CpG-conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody enhances NK cell anti-tumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Schettini, Jorge; Kidiyoor, Amritha; Besmer, Dahlia M.; Tinder, Teresa L.; Roy, Lopamudra Das; Lustgarten, Joseph; Gendler, Sandra J.

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against tumor-associated antigens are useful anticancer agents. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is one of the major mechanisms responsible for initiating natural killer cell (NK)-mediated killing of tumors. However, the regulation of ADCC via NK cells is poorly understood. We have investigated the cytolytic activity of NK cells against pancreatic cancer cells that were coated with an antibody directed against the human tumor antigen, Mucin-1 designated HMFG-2, either alone or conjugated to CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODN). Conjugated antibodies were tested for their ability to elicit ADCC in vitro and in vivo against pancreatic cancer cells. NK cells cultured in the presence of immobilized CpG ODN, HMFG-2 Ab, or CpG ODN-conjugated HMFG-2 Ab were able to up-regulate perforin similarly. Interestingly, a significant higher ADCC was observed when CpG ODN-conjugated HMFG-2-coated tumor cells were co-cultured with NK cells compared to unconjugated HMFG-2 Ab or CpG ODN alone. Moreover, MyD88-deficient NK cells can perform ADCC in vitro. Furthermore, intratumoral injections of CpG ODN-conjugated HMFG-2 induced a significant reduction in tumor burden in vivo in an established model of pancreatic tumor in nude mice compared to CpG ODN or the HMFG-2 alone. Depletion of macrophages or NK cells before treatment confirmed that both cells were required for the anti-tumor response in vivo. Results also suggest that CpG ODN and HMFG-2 Ab could be sensed by NK cells on the mAb-coated tumor cells triggering enhanced ADCC in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22543528

  4. Intratumoral delivery of CpG-conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody enhances NK cell anti-tumor activity.

    PubMed

    Schettini, Jorge; Kidiyoor, Amritha; Besmer, Dahlia M; Tinder, Teresa L; Roy, Lopamudra Das; Lustgarten, Joseph; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2012-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against tumor-associated antigens are useful anticancer agents. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is one of the major mechanisms responsible for initiating natural killer cell (NK)-mediated killing of tumors. However, the regulation of ADCC via NK cells is poorly understood. We have investigated the cytolytic activity of NK cells against pancreatic cancer cells that were coated with an antibody directed against the human tumor antigen, Mucin-1 designated HMFG-2, either alone or conjugated to CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODN). Conjugated antibodies were tested for their ability to elicit ADCC in vitro and in vivo against pancreatic cancer cells. NK cells cultured in the presence of immobilized CpG ODN, HMFG-2 Ab, or CpG ODN-conjugated HMFG-2 Ab were able to up-regulate perforin similarly. Interestingly, a significant higher ADCC was observed when CpG ODN-conjugated HMFG-2-coated tumor cells were co-cultured with NK cells compared to unconjugated HMFG-2 Ab or CpG ODN alone. Moreover, MyD88-deficient NK cells can perform ADCC in vitro. Furthermore, intratumoral injections of CpG ODN-conjugated HMFG-2 induced a significant reduction in tumor burden in vivo in an established model of pancreatic tumor in nude mice compared to CpG ODN or the HMFG-2 alone. Depletion of macrophages or NK cells before treatment confirmed that both cells were required for the anti-tumor response in vivo. Results also suggest that CpG ODN and HMFG-2 Ab could be sensed by NK cells on the mAb-coated tumor cells triggering enhanced ADCC in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22543528

  5. Circulating NK-cell subsets in renal allograft recipients with anti-HLA donor-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Crespo, M; Yelamos, J; Redondo, D; Muntasell, A; Perez-Saéz, M J; López-Montañés, M; García, C; Torio, A; Mir, M; Hernández, J J; López-Botet, M; Pascual, J

    2015-03-01

    Detection of posttransplant donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA) constitutes a risk factor for kidney allograft loss. Together with complement activation, NK-cell antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) has been proposed to contribute to the microvascular damage associated to humoral rejection. In the present observational exploratory study, we have tried to find a relationship of circulating donor-specific and non donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA and HLA non-DSA) with peripheral blood NK-cell subsets and clinical features in 393 renal allograft recipients. Multivariate analysis indicated that retransplantation and pretransplant sensitization were associated with detection of posttransplant DSA. Recipient female gender, DR mismatch and acute rejection were significantly associated with posttransplant DSA compared to HLA non-DSA. In contrast with patients without detectable anti-HLA antibodies, DSA and HLA non-DSA patients displayed lower proportions of NK-cells, associated with increased CD56(bright) and NKG2A(+) subsets, the latter being more marked in DSA cases. These differences appeared unrelated to retransplantation, previous acute rejection or immunosuppressive therapy. Although preliminary and observational in nature, our results suggest that the assessment of the NK-cell immunophenotype may contribute to define signatures of alloreactive humoral responses in renal allograft recipients. PMID:25656947

  6. The antileukemia activity of a human anti-CD40 antagonist antibody, HCD122, on human chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Klabunde, Sha; Lin, Karen; Georgakis, Georgios V.; Cherukuri, Anu; Holash, Jocelyn; Goldbeck, Cheryl; Xu, Xiaomei; Kadel, Edward E.; Lee, Sang Hoon; Aukerman, Sharon Lea; Jallal, Bahija; Aziz, Natasha; Weng, Wen-Kai; Wierda, William; O'Brien, Susan; Younes, Anas

    2008-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is a lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by the surface expression of CD20, CD5 antigens, as well as the receptor CD40. Activation of CD40 by its ligand (CD40L) induces proliferation and rescues the cells from spontaneous and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. CD40 activation also induces secretion of cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, IL-8, and GM-CSF, which are involved in tumor cell survival, migration, and interaction with cells in the tumor microenvironment. Here we demonstrate that in primary B-CLL tumor cells, the novel antagonist anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody, HCD122, inhibits CD40L-induced activation of signaling pathways, proliferation and survival, and secretion of cytokines. Furthermore, HCD122 is also a potent mediator of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), lysing B-CLL cells more efficiently than rituximab in vitro, despite a significantly higher number of cell surface CD20 binding sites compared with CD40. Unlike rituximab, however, HCD122 (formerly CHIR-12.12) does not internalize upon binding to the cells. Our data suggest that HCD122 may inhibit B-CLL growth by blocking CD40 signaling and by ADCC-mediated cell lysis. PMID:18497318

  7. ApoE Receptor 2 mediates trophoblast dysfunction and pregnancy complications induced by antiphospholipid antibodies in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Victoria; Gelber, Shari E.; Vukelic, Milena; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Herz, Joachim; Urbanus, Rolf T.; de Groot, Philip G.; Natale, David R.; Harihara, Anirudha; Redecha, Patricia; Abrahams, Vikki M.; Shaul, Philip W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pregnancies in women with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are frequently complicated by fetal loss and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). How circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) cause pregnancy complications in APS is poorly understood. We sought to determine if the LDL receptor family member apoE receptor 2 (apoER2) mediates trophoblast dysfunction and pregnancy complications induced by aPL. Methods Placental and trophoblast apoER2 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Normal human IgG (NHIgG) and aPL were purified from healthy individuals and APS patients, respectively. The role of apoER2 in aPL-induced changes in trophoblast proliferation, migration and kinase activation was assessed using RNA interference in HTR-8/SVneo cells. The participation of apoER2 in aPL-induced pregnancy loss and IUGR was evaluated in pregnant apoER2+/+ and apoER2−/− mice injected with aPL or NHIgG. Results We found that apoER2 is abundant in human and mouse placental trophoblasts, and in multiple trophoblast-derived cell lines including HTR-8/SVneo cells. ApoER2 and its interaction with the cell surface protein β2-glycoprotein I were required for aPL-induced inhibition of cultured trophoblast proliferation and migration. In parallel, aPL antagonism of Akt kinase activation by EGF in trophoblasts was mediated by apoER2. Furthermore, in a murine passive transfer model of pregnancy complications of APS, apoER2−/− mice were protected from both aPL-induced fetal loss and aPL-induced IUGR. Conclusion ApoER2 plays a major role in the attenuation of trophoblast function by aPL, and the receptor mediates aPL-induced pregnancy complications in vivo in mice. ApoER2-directed interventions can now potentially be developed to combat the pregnancy complications associated with APS. PMID:26474194

  8. Serial Killing of Tumor Cells by Human Natural Killer Cells – Enhancement by Therapeutic Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Rauf; Watzl, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    Background Natural killer cells are an important component of the innate immune system. Anti-cancer therapies utilizing monoclonal antibodies also rely on the cytotoxicity of NK cells for their effectiveness. Here, we study the dynamics of NK cell cytotoxicity. Methodology/Principal Findings We observe that IL-2 activated human NK cells can serially hit multiple targets. Using functional assays, we demonstrate that on an average, a single IL-2 activated NK cell can kill four target cells. Data using live video microscopy suggest that an individual NK cell can make serial contacts with multiple targets and majority of contacts lead to lysis of target cells. Serial killing is associated with a loss of Perforin and Granzyme B content. A large majority of NK cells survive serial killing, and IL-2 can replenish their granular stock and restore the diminished cytotoxicity of ‘exhausted’ NK cells. IL-2 and IL-15 are equally effective in enhancing the killing frequency of resting NK cells. Significantly, Rituximab, a therapeutic monoclonal antibody increases the killing frequency of both resting and IL-2 activated NK cells. Conclusion/Significance Our data suggest that NK cell-based therapies for overcoming tumors rely on their serial killing ability. Therefore, strategies augmenting the killing ability of NK cells can boost the immune system and enhance the effectiveness of monoclonal antibody-based therapies. PMID:17389917

  9. AST Cutting Edge of Transplantation 2013 Meeting Report: a comprehensive look at B cells and antibodies in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mengel, M; Chong, A; Rothstein, D M; Zorn, E; Maltzman, J S

    2014-03-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) represents a significant clinical challenge for solid organ transplantation. Mechanistic understanding of ABMR is incomplete and diagnostic accuracy for ABMR is limited, and as a result, targeted treatment remains elusive and new treatment modalities are difficult to validate. Three hundred twenty-six participants from 15 countries met for the first Cutting Edge of Transplantation (CEOT) symposium organized by the American Society of Transplantation (AST) in Chandler, Arizona, February 14-16, 2013. During the 3-day interactive symposium, presentations, moderated poster sessions and round table discussions addressed cutting edge knowledge of B and plasma cell biology, mechanisms of antibody-mediated tissue injury, advances and limitations in ABMR diagnostics, as well as current and potential new treatment options for ABMR. The outcome of the meeting identified the following unmet needs for: (a) improved understanding of the regulation of B cell maturation and antibody response to enable targeted therapies; (b) more precise diagnostics of ABMR, including molecular pathology, risk stratification by sensitive antibody testing and monitoring of treatment effects; and (c) innovative multicenter trial designs that enhance observational power, in particular, in assessing synergistic multimodality therapies with reduced toxicities. PMID:24674597

  10. Interstitial cells of Cajal mediate inhibitory neurotransmission in the stomach.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, A J; Lomax, A E; Torihashi, S; Sanders, K M; Ward, S M

    1996-01-01

    The structural relationships between interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), varicose nerve fibers, and smooth muscle cells in the gastrointestinal tract have led to the suggestion that ICC may be involved in or mediate enteric neurotransmission. We characterized the distribution of ICC in the murine stomach and found two distinct classes on the basis of morphology and immunoreactivity to antibodies against c-Kit receptors. ICC with multiple processes formed a network in the myenteric plexus region from corpus to pylorus. Spindle-shaped ICC were found within the circular and longitudinal muscle layers (IC-IM) throughout the stomach. The density of these cells was greatest in the proximal stomach. IC-IM ran along nerve fibers and were closely associated with nerve terminals and adjacent smooth muscle cells. IC-IM failed to develop in mice with mutations in c-kit. Therefore, we used W/W(V) mutants to test whether IC-IM mediate neural inputs in muscles of the gastric fundus. The distribution of inhibitory nerves in the stomachs of c-kit mutants was normal, but NO-dependent inhibitory neuro-regulation was greatly reduced. Smooth muscle tissues of W/W(V) mutants relaxed in response to exogenous sodium nitroprusside, but the membrane potential effects of sodium nitroprusside were attenuated. These data suggest that IC-IM play a critical serial role in NO-dependent neurotransmission: the cellular mechanism(s) responsible for transducing NO into electrical responses may be expressed in IC-IM. Loss of these cells causes loss of electrical responsiveness and greatly reduces responses to nitrergic nerve stimulation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8876253

  11. Combining three antibodies nullifies feedback-mediated resistance to erlotinib in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Maicol; Gaborit, Nadège; Lindzen, Moshit; Salame, Tomer Meir; Dall'Ora, Massimiliano; Sevilla-Sharon, Michal; Abdul-Hai, Ali; Downward, Julian; Yarden, Yosef

    2015-06-01

    Despite initial responses to targeted kinase inhibitors, lung cancer patients presenting with primary epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations acquire resistance, often due to a second-site mutation (T790M). However, clinical trials found no survival benefits in patients treated with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to EGFR that should block activation of the mutated receptor and thus bypass resistance to molecules that target the catalytic or ATP-binding site. Using cell lines with the T790M mutation, we discovered that prolonged exposure to mAbs against only the EGFR triggered network rewiring by (i) stimulating the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway; (ii) inducing the transcription of HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) and HER3, which encode other members of the EGFR family, and the gene encoding HGF, which is the ligand for the receptor tyrosine kinase MET; and (iii) stimulating the interaction between MET and HER3, which promoted MET activity. Supplementing the EGFR-specific mAb with those targeting HER2 and HER3 suppressed these compensatory feedback loops in cultured lung cancer cells. The triple mAb combination targeting all three receptors prevented the activation of ERK, accelerated the degradation of the receptors, inhibited the proliferation of tumor cells but not of normal cells, and markedly reduced the growth of tumors in mice xenografted with cells that were resistant to combined treatment with erlotinib and the single function-blocking EGFR mAb. These findings uncovered feedback loops that enable resistance to treatment paradigms that use a single antibody and indicate a new strategy for the treatment of lung cancer patients. PMID:26038598

  12. NK Cells and γδ T Cells Mediate Resistance to Polyomavirus–Induced Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rabinarayan; Chen, Alex T.; Welsh, Raymond M.; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2010-01-01

    NK and γδ T cells can eliminate tumor cells in many experimental models, but their effect on the development of tumors caused by virus infections in vivo is not known. Polyomavirus (PyV) induces tumors in neonatally infected mice of susceptible strains and in adult mice with certain immune deficiencies, and CD8+ αβ T cells are regarded as the main effectors in anti-tumor immunity. Here we report that adult TCRβ knockout (KO) mice that lack αβ but have γδ T cells remain tumor-free after PyV infection, whereas TCRβ×δ KO mice that lack all T cells develop tumors. In addition, E26 mice, which lack NK and T cells, develop the tumors earlier than TCRβ×δ KO mice. These observations implicate γδ T and NK cells in the resistance to PyV-induced tumors. Cell lines established from PyV-induced tumors activate NK and γδ T cells both in culture and in vivo and express Rae-1, an NKG2D ligand. Moreover, these PyV tumor cells are killed by NK cells in vitro, and this cytotoxicity is prevented by treatment with NKG2D-blocking antibodies. Our findings demonstrate a protective role for NK and γδ T cells against naturally occurring virus-induced tumors and suggest the involvement of NKG2D-mediated mechanisms. PMID:20523894

  13. A new cell line for high throughput HIV-specific antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and cell-to-cell virus transmission studies

    PubMed Central

    Orlandi, Chiara; Flinko, Robin; Lewis, George K.

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (Wren et al., 2013) is important in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. Namely, ADCC is induced during natural HIV-1 infection or in HIV-1 vaccine studies, the latter demonstrated by the RV144 vaccine trial. To expedite the assessment of ADCC in studies of HIV, we have developed a high throughput assay. We have optimized the rapid fluorometric antibody-mediated cytotoxicity assay (RFADCC) by transfecting the EGFP-CEM-NKr cell line to constitutively express SNAP-tagged CCR5. This cell line can then serve as a source of HIV-specific targets when coated with monomeric gp120, spinoculated with inactivated intact virions, infected by cell-free viral diffusion or infected by cell-to-cell transmission of virus. The optimized strategy has two significant advantages over the original RFADCC method: First, the preparation of detectable target cells is less labor intensive and faster as it does not rely on multiple staining and washing steps for target cells. Second, because the target cell markers GFP and SNAP are constitutively expressed, the assay provides highly reproducible data. These strengths make the optimized RFADCC assay suitable not only for studies of HIV-1 specific cytotoxicity but also for studies of cell–cell transmission of virus. In conclusion, this assay provides a new generation T cell line that can expedite large clinical studies as well as research studies in humans or non-human primates. PMID:26969387

  14. The trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab destroys tumor cells that express low levels of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Michael; Schoberth, Alexandra; Ruf, Peter; Hess, Jürgen; Lindhofer, Horst

    2009-05-15

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) is an important target for the treatment of the breast cancers in which it is overexpressed. However, no approved anti-HER2/neu therapy is available for t