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Sample records for antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles

  1. Mass Spectrometric Detection of Neuropeptides Using Affinity-Enhanced Microdialysis with Antibody-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Schmerberg, Claire M.; Li, Lingjun

    2012-01-01

    Microdialysis (MD) is a useful sampling tool for many applications due to its ability to permit sampling from an animal concurrent with normal activity. MD is of particular importance in the field of neuroscience, in which it is used to sample neurotransmitters (NTs) while the animal is behaving in order to correlate dynamic changes in NTs with behavior. One important class of signaling molecules, the neuropeptides (NPs), however, presented significant challenges when studied with MD, due to the low relative recovery (RR) of NPs by this technique. Affinity-enhanced microdialysis (AE-MD) has previously been used to improve recovery of NPs and similar molecules. For AE-MD, an affinity agent (AA), such as an antibody-coated particle or free antibody, is added to the liquid perfusing the MD probe. This AA provides an additional mass transport driving force for analyte to pass through the dialysis membrane, and thus increases the RR. In this work, a variety of AAs have been investigated for AE-MD of NPs in vitro and in vivo, including particles with C18 surface functionality and antibody-coated particles. Antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles (AbMnP) provided the best RR enhancement in vitro, with statistically significant (p<0.05) enhancements for 4 out of 6 NP standards tested, and RR increases up to 41-fold. These particles were then used for in vivo MD in the Jonah crab, Cancer borealis, during a feeding study, with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. 31 NPs were detected in a 30 min collection sample, compared to 17 when no AA was used. The use of AbMnP also increased the temporal resolution from 4–18 hrs in previous studies to just 30 min in this study. The levels of NPs detected were also sufficient for reliable quantitation with the MS system in use, permitting quantitative analysis of the concentration changes for 7 identified NPs on a 30 min time course during feeding. PMID:23249250

  2. Targeting vascular amyloid in arterioles of Alzheimer disease transgenic mice with amyloid β protein antibody-coated nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Poduslo, Joseph F; Hultman, Kristi L; Curran, Geoffry L; Preboske, Gregory M; Chamberlain, Ryan; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Garwood, Michael; Jack, Clifford R; Wengenack, Thomas M

    2011-08-01

    The relevance of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) and dementia in general emphasizes the importance of developing novel targeting approaches for detecting and treating cerebrovascular amyloid (CVA) deposits. We developed a nanoparticle-based technology that uses a monoclonal antibody against fibrillar human amyloid-β42 that is surface coated onto a functionalized phospholipid monolayer. We demonstrate that this conjugated nanoparticle binds to CVA deposits in arterioles of AD transgenic mice (Tg2576) after infusion into the external carotid artery using 3 different approaches. The first 2 approaches use a blood vessel enrichment of homogenized brain and a leptomeningeal vessel preparation from thin tangential brain slices from the surface of the cerebral cortex. Targeting of CVA by the antibody-coated nanoparticle was visualized using fluorescent lissamine rhodamine-labeled phospholipids in the nanoparticles, which were compared with fluorescent staining of the endothelial cells and amyloid deposits using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The third approach used high-field strength magnetic resonance imaging of antibody-coated iron oxide nanoparticles after infusion into the external carotid artery. Dark foci of contrast enhancement in cortical arterioles were observed in T2*-weighted images of ex vivo AD mouse brains that correlated histologically with CVA deposits. The targeting ability of these nanoparticles to CVA provides opportunities for the prevention and treatment of CAA. PMID:21760540

  3. Rapid Detection and Isolation of Escherichia coli O104:H4 from Milk Using Monoclonal Antibody-coated Magnetic Beads.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Mirella; Di Febo, Tiziana; Zilli, Katiuscia; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Armillotta, Gisella; Manna, Laura; Minelli, Fabio; Tittarelli, Manuela; Caprioli, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Escherichia coli O104:H4 were produced by fusion of Sp2/O-Ag-14 mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells of Balb/c mice, immunized with heat-inactivated and sonicated E. coli O104:H4 bacterial cells. Four MAbs specific for the E. coli O104:H4 LPS (1E6G6, 1F4C9, 3G6G7, and 4G10D2) were characterized and evaluated for the use in a method for the detection of E. coli O104:H4 in milk samples that involves antibody conjugation to magnetic microbeads to reduce time and increase the efficiency of isolation. MAb 1E6G6 was selected and coupled to microbeads, then used for immuno-magnetic separation (IMS); the efficiency of the IMS method for E. coli O104:H4 isolation from milk was evaluated and compared to that of the EU RL VTEC conventional culture-based isolation procedure. Milk suspensions also containing other pathogenic bacteria that could potentially be found in milk (Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus) were also tested to evaluate the specificity of MAb-coated beads. Beads coated with MAb 1E6G6 showed a good ability to capture the E. coli O104:H4, even in milk samples contaminated with other bacteria, with a higher number of E. coli O104:H4 CFU reisolated in comparison with the official method (121 and 41 CFU, respectively, at 10(3) E. coli O104:H4 initial load; 19 and 6 CFU, respectively, at 10(2) E. coli O104:H4 initial load; 1 and 0 CFU, respectively, at 10(1) E. coli O104:H4 initial load). The specificity was 100%. PMID:27379071

  4. Rapid Detection and Isolation of Escherichia coli O104:H4 from Milk Using Monoclonal Antibody-coated Magnetic Beads

    PubMed Central

    Luciani, Mirella; Di Febo, Tiziana; Zilli, Katiuscia; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Armillotta, Gisella; Manna, Laura; Minelli, Fabio; Tittarelli, Manuela; Caprioli, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Escherichia coli O104:H4 were produced by fusion of Sp2/O-Ag-14 mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells of Balb/c mice, immunized with heat-inactivated and sonicated E. coli O104:H4 bacterial cells. Four MAbs specific for the E. coli O104:H4 LPS (1E6G6, 1F4C9, 3G6G7, and 4G10D2) were characterized and evaluated for the use in a method for the detection of E. coli O104:H4 in milk samples that involves antibody conjugation to magnetic microbeads to reduce time and increase the efficiency of isolation. MAb 1E6G6 was selected and coupled to microbeads, then used for immuno-magnetic separation (IMS); the efficiency of the IMS method for E. coli O104:H4 isolation from milk was evaluated and compared to that of the EU RL VTEC conventional culture-based isolation procedure. Milk suspensions also containing other pathogenic bacteria that could potentially be found in milk (Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus) were also tested to evaluate the specificity of MAb-coated beads. Beads coated with MAb 1E6G6 showed a good ability to capture the E. coli O104:H4, even in milk samples contaminated with other bacteria, with a higher number of E. coli O104:H4 CFU reisolated in comparison with the official method (121 and 41 CFU, respectively, at 103 E. coli O104:H4 initial load; 19 and 6 CFU, respectively, at 102 E. coli O104:H4 initial load; 1 and 0 CFU, respectively, at 101 E. coli O104:H4 initial load). The specificity was 100%. PMID:27379071

  5. Magnetic Nanoparticle Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Isaac; Josephson, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Many types of biosensors employ magnetic nanoparticles (diameter = 5–300 nm) or magnetic particles (diameter = 300–5,000 nm) which have been surface functionalized to recognize specific molecular targets. Here we cover three types of biosensors that employ different biosensing principles, magnetic materials, and instrumentation. The first type consists of magnetic relaxation switch assay-sensors, which are based on the effects magnetic particles exert on water proton relaxation rates. The second type consists of magnetic particle relaxation sensors, which determine the relaxation of the magnetic moment within the magnetic particle. The third type is magnetoresistive sensors, which detect the presence of magnetic particles on the surface of electronic devices that are sensitive to changes in magnetic fields on their surface. Recent improvements in the design of magnetic nanoparticles (and magnetic particles), together with improvements in instrumentation, suggest that magnetic material-based biosensors may become widely used in the future. PMID:22408498

  6. Chemiluminescence immunoassay for the rapid and sensitive detection of antibody against porcine parvovirus by using horseradish peroxidase/detection antibody-coated gold nanoparticles as nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Rui; Hu, Yonggang

    2014-06-01

    A rapid, simple, facile, sensitive and enzyme-amplified chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA) method to detect antibodies against porcine parvovirus has been developed. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and the detection antibody were simultaneously co-immobilized on the surface of gold nanoparticles using the electrostatic method to form gold nanoparticle-based nanoprobes. This nanoprobe was employed in a sandwich-type CLIA, which enables CL signal readout from enzymatic catalysis and results in signal amplification. The presence of porcine parvovirus infection was determined in porcine parvovirus antibodies by measuring the CL intensity caused by the reaction of HRP-luminol with H2 O2 . Under optimal conditions, the obtained calibration plot for the standard positive serum was approximately linear within the dilution range of 1:80 to 1:5120. The limit of detection for the assay was 1:10,240 (S/N = 3), which is much lower than that typically achieved with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (1:160; S/N = 3). A series of repeatability measurements using 1:320-fold diluted standard positive serum gave reproducible results with a relative standard deviation of 4.9% (n = 11). The ability of the immunosensor to analyze clinical samples was tested on porcine sera. The immunosensor had an efficiency of 90%, a sensitivity of 93.3%, and a specificity of 87.5% relative to the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results. PMID:23832716

  7. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-05-15

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 deg. K between 20 and 50 deg. C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  8. Biotemplated magnetic nanoparticle arrays.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Johanna M; Bramble, Jonathan P; Rawlings, Andrea E; Burnell, Gavin; Evans, Stephen D; Staniland, Sarah S

    2012-01-23

    Immobilized biomineralizing protein Mms6 templates the formation of uniform magnetite nanoparticles in situ when selectively patterned onto a surface. Magnetic force microscopy shows that the stable magnetite particles maintain their magnetic orientation at room temperature, and may be exchange coupled. This precision-mixed biomimetic/soft-lithography methodology offers great potential for the future of nanodevice fabrication. PMID:22052737

  9. Magnetoacoustic Sensing of Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kellnberger, Stephan; Rosenthal, Amir; Myklatun, Ahne; Westmeyer, Gil G; Sergiadis, George; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-03-11

    The interaction of magnetic nanoparticles and electromagnetic fields can be determined through electrical signal induction in coils due to magnetization. However, the direct measurement of instant electromagnetic energy absorption by magnetic nanoparticles, as it relates to particle characterization or magnetic hyperthermia studies, has not been possible so far. We introduce the theory of magnetoacoustics, predicting the existence of second harmonic pressure waves from magnetic nanoparticles due to energy absorption from continuously modulated alternating magnetic fields. We then describe the first magnetoacoustic system reported, based on a fiber-interferometer pressure detector, necessary for avoiding electric interference. The magnetoacoustic system confirmed the existence of previously unobserved second harmonic magnetoacoustic responses from solids, magnetic nanoparticles, and nanoparticle-loaded cells, exposed to continuous wave magnetic fields at different frequencies. We discuss how magnetoacoustic signals can be employed as a nanoparticle or magnetic field sensor for biomedical and environmental applications. PMID:27015511

  10. Magnetoacoustic Sensing of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellnberger, Stephan; Rosenthal, Amir; Myklatun, Ahne; Westmeyer, Gil G.; Sergiadis, George; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-03-01

    The interaction of magnetic nanoparticles and electromagnetic fields can be determined through electrical signal induction in coils due to magnetization. However, the direct measurement of instant electromagnetic energy absorption by magnetic nanoparticles, as it relates to particle characterization or magnetic hyperthermia studies, has not been possible so far. We introduce the theory of magnetoacoustics, predicting the existence of second harmonic pressure waves from magnetic nanoparticles due to energy absorption from continuously modulated alternating magnetic fields. We then describe the first magnetoacoustic system reported, based on a fiber-interferometer pressure detector, necessary for avoiding electric interference. The magnetoacoustic system confirmed the existence of previously unobserved second harmonic magnetoacoustic responses from solids, magnetic nanoparticles, and nanoparticle-loaded cells, exposed to continuous wave magnetic fields at different frequencies. We discuss how magnetoacoustic signals can be employed as a nanoparticle or magnetic field sensor for biomedical and environmental applications.

  11. DNA templated magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsella, Joseph M.

    Recent discoveries in nanoscience are predicted to potentially revolutionize future technologies in an extensive number of fields. These developments are contingent upon discovering new and often unconventional methods to synthesize and control nanoscale components. Nature provides several examples of working nanotechnology such as the use of programmed self assembly to build and deconstruct complex molecular systems. We have adopted a method to control the one dimensional assembly of magnetic nanoparticles using DNA as a scaffold molecule. With this method we have demonstrated the ability to organize 5 nm particles into chains that stretch up to ˜20 mum in length. One advantage of using DNA compared is the ability of the molecule to interact with other biomolecules. After assembling particles onto DNA we have been able to cleave the molecule into smaller fragments using restriction enzymes. Using ligase enzymes we have re-connected these fragments, coated with either gold or iron oxide, to form long one-dimensional arrangements of the two different types of nanoparticles on a single molecular guide. We have also created a sensitive magnetic field sensor by incorporating magnetic nanoparticle coated DNA strands with microfabricated electrodes. The IV characteristics of the aligned nanoparticles are dependant on the magnitude of an externally applied magnetic field. This transport phenomenon known as tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) shows room temperature resistance of our devices over 80% for cobalt ferrite coated DNA when a field of 20 kOe is applied. In comparison, studies using two dimensional nanoparticle films of irox oxides xii only exhibit a 35% MR effect. Confinement into one dimension using the DNA guide produces a TMR mechanism which produces significant increases in magnetoresistance. This property can be utilized for applications in magnetic field sensing, data storage, and logic elements.

  12. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ying

    Nanotechnology is revolutionizing human's life. Synthesis and application of magnetic nanoparticles is a fast burgeoning field which has potential to bring significant advance in many fields, for example diagnosis and treatment in biomedical area. Novel nanoparticles to function efficiently and intelligently are in desire to improve the current technology. We used a magnetron-sputtering-based nanocluster deposition technique to synthesize magnetic nanoparticles in gas phase, and specifically engineered nanoparticles for different applications. Alternating magnetic field heating is emerging as a technique to assist cancer treatment or drug delivery. We proposed high-magnetic-moment Fe3Si particles with relatively large magnetic anisotropy energy should in principle provide superior performance. Such nanoparticles were experimentally synthesized and characterized. Their promising magnetic properties can contribute to heating performance under suitable alternating magnetic field conditions. When thermal energy is used for medical treatment, it is ideal to work in a designed temperature range. Biocompatible and "smart" magnetic nanoparticles with temperature self-regulation were designed from both materials science and biomedicine aspects. We chose Fe-Si material system to demonstrate the concept. Temperature dependent physical property was adjusted by tuning of exchange coupling between Fe atoms through incorporation of various amount of Si. The magnetic moment can still be kept in a promising range. The two elements are both biocompatible, which is favored by in-vivo medical applications. A combination of "smart" magnetic particles and thermo-sensitive polymer were demonstrated to potentially function as a platform for drug delivery. Highly sensitive diagnosis for point-of-care is in desire nowadays. We developed composition- and phase-controlled Fe-Co nanoparticles for bio-molecule detection. It has been demonstrated that Fe70Co30 nanoparticles and giant

  13. Enzymatic synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kolhatkar, Arati G; Dannongoda, Chamath; Kourentzi, Katerina; Jamison, Andrew C; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kar, Archana; Cacao, Eliedonna; Strych, Ulrich; Rusakova, Irene; Martirosyan, Karen S; Litvinov, Dmitri; Lee, T Randall; Willson, Richard C

    2015-01-01

    We report the first in vitro enzymatic synthesis of paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles toward magnetic ELISA reporting. With our procedure, alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of l-ascorbic-2-phosphate, which then serves as a reducing agent for salts of iron, gadolinium, and holmium, forming magnetic precipitates of Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5. The nanoparticles were found to be paramagnetic at 300 K and antiferromagnetic under 25 K. Although weakly magnetic at 300 K, the room-temperature magnetization of the nanoparticles found here is considerably greater than that of analogous chemically-synthesized LnxFeyOz (Ln = Gd, Ho) samples reported previously. At 5 K, the nanoparticles showed a significantly higher saturation magnetization of 45 and 30 emu/g for Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5, respectively. Our approach of enzymatically synthesizing magnetic labels reduces the cost and avoids diffusional mass-transfer limitations associated with pre-synthesized magnetic reporter particles, while retaining the advantages of magnetic sensing. PMID:25854425

  14. Enzymatic Synthesis of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kolhatkar, Arati G.; Dannongoda, Chamath; Kourentzi, Katerina; Jamison, Andrew C.; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kar, Archana; Cacao, Eliedonna; Strych, Ulrich; Rusakova, Irene; Martirosyan, Karen S.; Litvinov, Dmitri; Lee, T. Randall; Willson, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first in vitro enzymatic synthesis of paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles toward magnetic ELISA reporting. With our procedure, alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of l-ascorbic-2-phosphate, which then serves as a reducing agent for salts of iron, gadolinium, and holmium, forming magnetic precipitates of Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5. The nanoparticles were found to be paramagnetic at 300 K and antiferromagnetic under 25 K. Although weakly magnetic at 300 K, the room-temperature magnetization of the nanoparticles found here is considerably greater than that of analogous chemically-synthesized LnxFeyOz (Ln = Gd, Ho) samples reported previously. At 5 K, the nanoparticles showed a significantly higher saturation magnetization of 45 and 30 emu/g for Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5, respectively. Our approach of enzymatically synthesizing magnetic labels reduces the cost and avoids diffusional mass-transfer limitations associated with pre-synthesized magnetic reporter particles, while retaining the advantages of magnetic sensing. PMID:25854425

  15. Magnetic hyperthermia with hard-magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashevsky, Bronislav E.; Kashevsky, Sergey B.; Korenkov, Victor S.; Istomin, Yuri P.; Terpinskaya, Tatyana I.; Ulashchik, Vladimir S.

    2015-04-01

    Recent clinical trials of magnetic hyperthermia have proved, and even hardened, the Ankinson-Brezovich restriction as upon magnetic field conditions applicable to any site of human body. Subject to this restriction, which is harshly violated in numerous laboratory and small animal studies, magnetic hyperthermia can relay on rather moderate heat source, so that optimization of the whole hyperthermia system remains, after all, the basic problem predetermining its clinical perspectives. We present short account of our complex (theoretical, laboratory and small animal) studies to demonstrate that such perspectives should be related with the hyperthermia system based on hard-magnetic (Stoner-Wohlfarth type) nanoparticles and strong low-frequency fields rather than with superparamagnetic (Brownian or Neél) nanoparticles and weak high-frequency fields. This conclusion is backed by an analytical evaluation of the maximum absorption rates possible under the field restriction in the ideal hard-magnetic (Stoner-Wohlarth) and the ideal superparamagnetic (single relaxation time) systems, by theoretical and experimental studies of the dynamic magnetic hysteresis in suspensions of movable hard-magnetic particles, by producing nanoparticles with adjusted coercivity and suspensions of such particles capable of effective energy absorption and intratumoral penetration, and finally, by successful treatment of a mice model tumor under field conditions acceptable for whole human body.

  16. Magnetic nanoparticles for "smart liposomes".

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yoshitaka; Mustapić, Mislav; Ebrahimian, Haleh; Wagner, Pawel; Kim, Jung Ho; Hossain, Md Shahriar Al; Horvat, Joseph; Martinac, Boris

    2015-12-01

    Liposomal drug delivery systems (LDDSs) are promising tools used for the treatment of diseases where highly toxic pharmacological agents are administered. Currently, destabilising LDDSs by a specific stimulus at a target site remains a major challenge. The bacterial mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) presents an excellent candidate biomolecule that could be employed as a remotely controlled pore-forming nanovalve for triggered drug release from LDDSs. In this study, we developed superparamagnetic nanoparticles for activation of the MscL nanovalves by magnetic field. Synthesised CoFe2O4 nanoparticles with the radius less than 10 nm were labelled by SH groups for attachment to MscL. Activation of MscL by magnetic field with the nanoparticles attached was examined by the patch clamp technique showing that the number of activated channels under ramp pressure increased upon application of the magnetic field. In addition, we have not observed any cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles in human cultured cells. Our study suggests the possibility of using magnetic nanoparticles as a specific trigger for activation of MscL nanovalves for drug release in LDDSs. PMID:26184724

  17. Magnetism in nanoparticles: tuning properties with coatings.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Patricia; de la Presa, Patricia; Marín, Pilar; Multigner, Marta; Alonso, José María; Rivero, Guillermo; Yndurain, Félix; González-Calbet, José María; Hernando, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    This paper reviews the effect of organic and inorganic coatings on magnetic nanoparticles. The ferromagnetic-like behaviour observed in nanoparticles constituted by materials which are non-magnetic in bulk is analysed for two cases: (a) Pd and Pt nanoparticles, formed by substances close to the onset of ferromagnetism, and (b) Au and ZnO nanoparticles, which were found to be surprisingly magnetic at the nanoscale when coated by organic surfactants. An overview of theories accounting for this unexpected magnetism, induced by the nanosize influence, is presented. In addition, the effect of coating magnetic nanoparticles with biocompatible metals, oxides or organic molecules is also reviewed, focusing on their applications. PMID:24201075

  18. Magnetic Separation Dynamics of Colloidal Magnetic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, M.; Huijin Zhang,; You Qiang,

    2013-01-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are appealing candidates for analytical separation of heavy metal ions from waste water and separation of actinides from spent nuclear fuel. This work studies the separation dynamics and investigates the appropriate magnetic-field gradients. A dynamic study of colloidal MNPs was performed for steady-state flow. Measurements were conducted to record the separation time of particles as a function of magnetic field gradient. The drag and magnetic forces play a significant role on the separation time. A drop in saturation magnetization and variation of particle size occurs after surface functionalization of the MNPs; these are the primary factors that affect the separation time and velocity of the MNPs. The experimental results are correlated to a theoretical one-dimensional model.

  19. Intravenous magnetic nanoparticle cancer hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui S; Hainfeld, James F

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles heated by an alternating magnetic field could be used to treat cancers, either alone or in combination with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. However, direct intratumoral injections suffer from tumor incongruence and invasiveness, typically leaving undertreated regions, which lead to cancer regrowth. Intravenous injection more faithfully loads tumors, but, so far, it has been difficult achieving the necessary concentration in tumors before systemic toxicity occurs. Here, we describe use of a magnetic nanoparticle that, with a well-tolerated intravenous dose, achieved a tumor concentration of 1.9 mg Fe/g tumor in a subcutaneous squamous cell carcinoma mouse model, with a tumor to non-tumor ratio > 16. With an applied field of 38 kA/m at 980 kHz, tumors could be heated to 60°C in 2 minutes, durably ablating them with millimeter (mm) precision, leaving surrounding tissue intact. PMID:23901270

  20. Magnetic nanoparticles for gene and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    McBain, Stuart C; Yiu, Humphrey HP; Dobson, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Investigations of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery began over 30 years ago. Since that time, major progress has been made in particle design and synthesis techniques, however, very few clinical trials have taken place. Here we review advances in magnetic nanoparticle design, in vitro and animal experiments with magnetic nanoparticle-based drug and gene delivery, and clinical trials of drug targeting. PMID:18686777

  1. Measurements of Individual Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang

    2002-03-01

    Studying the limits between classical and quantum physics has become a very attractive field of research which is known as 'mesoscopic' physics. New and fascinating mesoscopic effects are expected. Nanometer-sized magnetic particles are situated at the frontier between classical and quantum magnetism. In addition, their magnetic properties are technologically very challenging (permanent magnets, information storage, etc.). First, we review briefly our micro-SQUID technique (For a review, see W. Wernsdorfer, Adv. Chem. Phys., 118, 99 (2001) or http://xxx.lanl.gov/abs/cond-mat/0101104) which allows us to study single nanometer-sized magnetic particles containing less than 1000 atoms, crystals of molecular clusters, or quantum spin chains. Then, we discuss our recent results concerning the magnetization reversal of individual Co and Fe clusters (3 nm). (M. Jamet, W. Wernsdorfer, C. Thirion, D. Mailly, V. Dupuis, P. Melinon, and A. Perez, Phys. Rev. Lett 86, 4676 (2001).) Using a generalized Stoner-Wohlfarth model, (E. Bonet, W. Wernsdorfer, B. Barbara, A. Benoit, D. Mailly, and A. Thiaville Phys. Rev. Lett., 83, 4188 (1999)) we show that 3D measurements of the angular dependence of the magnetization reversal yields the effective magnetic anisotropy function. The latter is important for our studies of the influence of temperature on the magnetization reversal. A new method allows us to study the magnetization switching up to the blocking temperature which is typically below 30 K. We achieved a new insight in the dynamics of magnetization reversal using ns-field pulses and micro-wave radiations. We conclude by showing how one might give a definite proof of the quantum character of a nanoparticle (S > 1000) at low temperatures.

  2. Fighting cancer with magnetic nanoparticles and immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, L.; Mejías, R.; Barber, D. F.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Serna, C. J.; Lázaro, F. J.; Morales, M. P.

    2012-03-01

    IFN-γ-adsorbed DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles can be used as an efficient in vivo drug delivery system for tumor immunotherapy. Magnetic nanoparticles, with adsorbed interferon-γ, were targeted to the tumor site by application of an external magnetic field. A relevant therapeutic dosage of interferon in the tumor was detected and led to a notable reduction in tumor size. In general, only 10% of the total injected nanoparticles after multiple exposures were found in tissues by AC susceptibility measurements of the corresponding resected tissues. Magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution is affected by the application of an external magnetic field.

  3. Magnetic Nanoparticles in Non-magnetic CNTs and Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayondo, Moses; Seifu, Dereje

    Magnetic nanoparticles were embedded in non-magnetic CNTs and graphene matrix to incorporate all the advantages and the unique properties of CNTs and graphene. Composites of CNTs and graphene with magnetic nanoparticles may offer new opportunities for a wide variety of potential applications such as magnetic data storage, magnetic force microscopy tip, electromagnetic interference shields, thermally conductive films, reinforced polymer composites, transparent electrodes for displays, solar cells, gas sensors, magnetic nanofluids, and magnetically guided drug delivery systems. Magnetic nanoparticles coated CNTs can also be used as an electrode in lithium ion battery to replace graphite because of the higher theoretical capacity. Graphene nanocomposites, coated with magnetic sensitive nanoparticles, have demonstrated enhanced magnetic property. We would like to acknowledge support by NSF-MRI-DMR-1337339.

  4. Materials science: Magnetic nanoparticles line up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faivre, Damien; Bennet, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    Certain bacteria contain strings of magnetic nanoparticles and therefore align with magnetic fields. Inspired by these natural structures, researchers have now fabricated synthetic one-dimensional arrays of such particles.

  5. Non-Bleaching Photoluminescent Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Lu; Kim, Chanjoong; Girgis, Emad; Khalil, Wagdy K. B.

    2013-03-01

    We report a new type of photoluminescent magnetic nanoparticles produced by a very simple process. The nanoparticle consists of an ordinary magnetic nanoparticle as core and a non-toxic polymer shell. The biocompatibility is evaluated using in-vivo tests on mice. They are non-bleaching photoluminescent without any addition of fluorophores, such as quantum dots or fluorescent dyes that can be toxic and easily photobleached, respectively. This work provides a low-cost, bio-safe, non-bleaching alternative of conventional fluoroscent magnetic nanoparticles which covers a wide range of applications, from bio-imaging to biomedical diagnostics and therapeutics, such as hyperthermia.

  6. Bioinspired synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    David, Anand

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles has long been an area of active research. Magnetic nanoparticles can be used in a wide variety of applications such as magnetic inks, magnetic memory devices, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, and pathogen detection in foods. In applications such as MRI, particle uniformity is particularly crucial, as is the magnetic response of the particles. Uniform magnetic particles with good magnetic properties are therefore required. One particularly effective technique for synthesizing nanoparticles involves biomineralization, which is a naturally occurring process that can produce highly complex nanostructures. Also, the technique involves mild conditions (ambient temperature and close to neutral pH) that make this approach suitable for a wide variety of materials. The term 'bioinspired' is important because biomineralization research is inspired by the naturally occurring process, which occurs in certain microorganisms called 'magnetotactic bacteria'. Magnetotactic bacteria use biomineralization proteins to produce magnetite crystals having very good uniformity in size and morphology. The bacteria use these magnetic particles to navigate according to external magnetic fields. Because these bacteria synthesize high quality crystals, research has focused on imitating aspects of this biomineralization in vitro. In particular, a biomineralization iron-binding protein found in a certain species of magnetotactic bacteria, magnetospirillum magneticum, AMB-1, has been extracted and used for in vitro magnetite synthesis; Pluronic F127 gel was used to increase the viscosity of the reaction medium to better mimic the conditions in the bacteria. It was shown that the biomineralization protein mms6 was able to facilitate uniform magnetite synthesis. In addition, a similar biomineralization process using mms6 and a shorter version of this protein, C25, has been used to synthesize cobalt ferrite particles. The overall

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of glioblastoma using aptamer conjugated magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongjune; Yang, Jaemoon; Hwang, Myeonghwan; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo

    2012-10-01

    Here we introduce a new class of smart imaging probes hybridizing polysorbate 80 coated-magnetic nanoparticles with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-targetable aptamer for specific magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of angiogenesis from glioblastoma.

  8. Dual immobilization and magnetic manipulation of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. Y.; Jian, Z. F.; Horng, H. E.; Hong, Chin-Yih; Yang, H. C.; Wu, C. C.; Lee, Y. H.

    By suitably bio-functionalizing the surfaces, magnetic nanoparticles are able to bind specific biomolecules, and may serve as vectors for delivering bio-entities to target tissues. In this work, the synthesis of bio-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles with two kinds of bio-probes is developed. Here, the stem cell is selected as a to-be-delivered bio-entity and infarcted myocardium is the target issue. Thus, cluster designation-34 (CD-34) on stem cell and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) (or troponin I) on infarcted myocardium are the specific biomolecules to be bound with bio-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles. In addition to demonstrating the co-coating of two kinds of bio-probes on a magnetic nanoparticle, the feasibility of manipulation on bio-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles by external magnetic fields is investigated.

  9. Magnetic Carbon Nanotubes Tethered with Maghemite Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Il Tae; Nunnery, Grady; Jacob, Karl; Schwartz, Justin; Liu, Xiaotao; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2011-03-01

    We describe a novel, facile method for the synthesis of magnetic carbon nanotubes (m-CNTs) decorated with monodisperse γ - Fe 2 O3 magnetic (maghemite) nanoparticles and their aligned feature in a magnetic field. The tethering of the nanoparticles was achieved by the initial activation of the surface of the CNTs with carboxylic acid groups, followed by the attachment of the γ - Fe 2 O3 nanoparticles via a modified sol-gel process. Sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (NaDDBS) was introduced into the suspension to prevent the formation of an iron oxide 3D network. Various characterization methods were used to confirm the formation of well-defined maghemite nanoparticles. The tethered nanoparticles imparted magnetic characteristics to the CNTs, which became superparamagnetic. The m-CNTs were oriented parallel to the direction of a magnetic field. This has the potential of enhancing various properties, e.g. mechanical and electrical properties, in composite materials.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Dipti; Peeples, Brianna N.; Spence, Destiny D.; Peeples, Caryn; Bell, Crystal N.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been used in a wide array of industrial and biomedical applications due to their unique properties at the nanoscale level. They are extensively used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic hyperthermia treatment, drug delivery, and in assays for biological separations. Furthermore, superparamagnetic nanoparticles are of large interest for in vivo applications. However, these unmodified nanoparticles aggregate and consequently lose their superparamagnetic behaviors, due to high surface to volume ratio and strong dipole to dipole interaction. For these reasons, surface coating is necessary for the enhancement and effectiveness of magnetic nanoparticles to be used in various applications. In addition to providing increased stability to the nanoparticles in different solvents or media, stabilizers such as surfactants, organic/inorganic molecules, polymer and co-polymers are employed as surface coatings, which yield magnetically responsive systems. In this work we present the synthesis and magnetic characterization of Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane (APS) and citric acid. The particles magnetic hysteresis was measured by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer with an in-plane magnetic field. The uncoated and coated magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by using fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV-vis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and thermo-gravimetric analysis.

  11. Magnetic Nanoparticles in Cancer Theranostics.

    PubMed

    Gobbo, Oliviero L; Sjaastad, Kristine; Radomski, Marek W; Volkov, Yuri; Prina-Mello, Adriele

    2015-01-01

    In a report from 2008, The International Agency for Research on Cancer predicted a tripled cancer incidence from 1975, projecting a possible 13-17 million cancer deaths worldwide by 2030. While new treatments are evolving and reaching approval for different cancer types, the main prevention of cancer mortality is through early diagnosis, detection and treatment of malignant cell growth. The last decades have seen a development of new imaging techniques now in widespread clinical use. The development of nano-imaging through fluorescent imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to detect and diagnose cancer at an earlier stage than with current imaging methods. The characteristic properties of nanoparticles result in their theranostic potential allowing for simultaneous detection of and treatment of the disease. This review provides state of the art of the nanotechnological applications for cancer therapy. Furthermore, it advances a novel concept of personalized nanomedical theranostic therapy using iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles in conjunction with MRI imaging. Regulatory and industrial perspectives are also included to outline future perspectives in nanotechnological cancer research. PMID:26379790

  12. Magnetic Nanoparticles in Cancer Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Gobbo, Oliviero L.; Sjaastad, Kristine; Radomski, Marek W.; Volkov, Yuri; Prina-Mello, Adriele

    2015-01-01

    In a report from 2008, The International Agency for Research on Cancer predicted a tripled cancer incidence from 1975, projecting a possible 13-17 million cancer deaths worldwide by 2030. While new treatments are evolving and reaching approval for different cancer types, the main prevention of cancer mortality is through early diagnosis, detection and treatment of malignant cell growth. The last decades have seen a development of new imaging techniques now in widespread clinical use. The development of nano-imaging through fluorescent imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to detect and diagnose cancer at an earlier stage than with current imaging methods. The characteristic properties of nanoparticles result in their theranostic potential allowing for simultaneous detection of and treatment of the disease. This review provides state of the art of the nanotechnological applications for cancer therapy. Furthermore, it advances a novel concept of personalized nanomedical theranostic therapy using iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles in conjunction with MRI imaging. Regulatory and industrial perspectives are also included to outline future perspectives in nanotechnological cancer research. PMID:26379790

  13. Engineering biofunctional magnetic nanoparticles for biotechnological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moros, Maria; Pelaz, Beatriz; López-Larrubia, Pilar; García-Martin, Maria L.; Grazú, Valeria; de La Fuente, Jesus M.

    2010-09-01

    Synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles with excellent size control are showed here. Their functionalization using an amphiphilic polymer is also described. This strategy allows the stabilization of magnetic nanoparticles in aqueous solvents and in addition, the polymer shell serves as a platform to incorporate relevant biomolecules, such as poly(ethylene glycol) and a number of carbohydrates. Nanoparticles functionalized with carbohydrates show the ability to avoid unspecific interactions between proteins present in the working medium and the nanoparticles, so can be used as an alternative to poly(ethylene glycol) molecules. Results confirm these nanoparticles as excellent contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Changes in the spin-spin transversal relaxation times of the surrounding water protons due to nanoparticle aggregation demonstrates the bioactivity of these nanoparticles functionalized with carbohydrates. To finish with, nanoparticle toxicity is evaluated by means of MTT assay. The obtained results clearly indicate that these nanoparticles are excellent candidates for their further application in nanomedicine or nanobiotechnology.Synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles with excellent size control are showed here. Their functionalization using an amphiphilic polymer is also described. This strategy allows the stabilization of magnetic nanoparticles in aqueous solvents and in addition, the polymer shell serves as a platform to incorporate relevant biomolecules, such as poly(ethylene glycol) and a number of carbohydrates. Nanoparticles functionalized with carbohydrates show the ability to avoid unspecific interactions between proteins present in the working medium and the nanoparticles, so can be used as an alternative to poly(ethylene glycol) molecules. Results confirm these nanoparticles as excellent contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Changes in the spin-spin transversal relaxation times of the

  14. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wenxian; Sun, Ziqi; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue; Tian, Dongliang

    2014-07-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ∼4 nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  15. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenxian; Sun, Ziqi; Tian, Dongliang; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ˜4 nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  16. Structural characterization of copolymer embedded magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedelcu, G. G.; Nastro, A.; Filippelli, L.; Cazacu, M.; Iacob, M.; Rossi, C. Oliviero; Popa, A.; Toloman, D.; Dobromir, M.; Iacomi, F.

    2015-10-01

    Small magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4) were synthesized by co-precipitation and coated by emulsion polymerization with poly(methyl methacrylate-co-acrylic acid) (PMMA-co-AAc) to create surface functional groups that can attach drug molecules and other biomolecules. The coated and uncoated magnetite nanoparticles were stored for two years in normal closed ships and than characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The solid phase transformation of magnetite to maghemite, as well as an increase in particle size were evidenced for the uncoated nanoparticles. The coated nanoparticles preserved their magnetite structure and magnetic properties. The influences of monomers and surfactant layers on interactions between the magnetic nanoparticles evidenced that the thickness of the polymer has a significant effect on magnetic properties.

  17. Synthesis of magnetic rhenium sulfide composite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Naimei; Tu, Weixia

    2009-10-01

    Rhenium sulfide nanoparticles are associated with magnetic iron oxide through coprecipitation of iron salts with tetramethylammonium hydroxide. Sizes of the formed magnetic rhenium sulfide composite particles are in the range 5.5-12.5 nm. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive analysis of X-rays spectra demonstrate the coexistence of Fe 3O 4 and ReS 2 in the composite particle, which confirm the formation of the magnetic rhenium sulfide composite nanoparticles. The association of rhenium sulfide with iron oxide not only keeps electronic state and composition of the rhenium sulfide nanoparticles, but also introduces magnetism with the level of 24.1 emu g -1 at 14 kOe. Surface modification with monocarboxyl-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) (MPEG-COOH) has the role of deaggregating the composite nanoparticles to be with average hydrodynamic size of 27.3 nm and improving the dispersion and the stability of the composite nanoparticles in water.

  18. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Sophie; Bridot, Jean-Luc; Elst, Luce Vander; Muller, Robert N

    2010-03-01

    Due to their high magnetization, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles induce an important decrease in the transverse relaxation of water protons and are, therefore, very efficient negative MRI contrast agents. The knowledge and control of the chemical and physical characteristics of nanoparticles are of great importance. The choice of the synthesis method (microemulsions, sol-gel synthesis, laser pyrolysis, sonochemical synthesis or coprecipitation) determines the magnetic nanoparticle's size and shape, as well as its size distribution and surface chemistry. Nanoparticles can be used for numerous in vivo applications, such as MRI contrast enhancement and hyperthermia drug delivery. New developments focus on targeting through molecular imaging and cell tracking. PMID:21426176

  19. Magnetic nanoparticle-based cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing; Huang, Dong-Yan; Muhammad Zubair, Yousaf; Hou, Yang-Long; Gao, Song

    2013-02-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) with easily modified surfaces have been playing an important role in biomedicine. As cancer is one of the major causes of death, tremendous efforts have been devoted to advance the methods of cancer diagnosis and therapy. Recently, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) that are responsive to a magnetic field have shown great promise in cancer therapy. Compared with traditional cancer therapy, magnetic field triggered therapeutic approaches can treat cancer in an unconventional but more effective and safer way. In this review, we will discuss the recent progress in cancer therapies based on MNPs, mainly including magnetic hyperthermia, magnetic specific targeting, magnetically controlled drug delivery, magnetofection, and magnetic switches for controlling cell fate. Some recently developed strategies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) monitoring cancer therapy and magnetic tissue engineering are also addressed.

  20. Improving magnetic properties of ultrasmall magnetic nanoparticles by biocompatible coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costo, R.; Morales, M. P.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.

    2015-02-01

    This paper deals with the effect of a biocompatible surface coating layer on the magnetic properties of ultrasmall iron oxide nanoparticles. Particles were synthesized by laser pyrolysis and fully oxidized to maghemite by acid treatment. The surface of the magnetic nanoparticles was systematically coated with either phosphonate (phosphonoacetic acid or pamidronic acid) or carboxylate-based (carboxymethyl dextran) molecules and the binding to the nanoparticle surface was analyzed. Magnetic properties at low temperature show a decrease in coercivity and an increase in magnetization after the coating process. Hysteresis loop displacement after field cooling is significantly reduced by the coating, in particular, for particles coated with pamidronic acid, which show a 10% reduction of the displacement of the loop. We conclude that the chemical coordination of carboxylates and phosphonates reduces the surface disorder and enhances the magnetic properties of ultrasmall maghemite nanoparticles.

  1. Terahertz magnetic modulator based on magnetically clustered nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaby, Mostafa; Peccianti, Marco; Ozturk, Yavuz; Al-Naib, Ibraheem; Hauri, Christoph P.; Morandotti, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    Random orientation of liquid-suspended magnetic nanoparticles (Ferrofluids) gives rise to a zero net magnetic orientation. An external magnetic field tends to align these nanoparticles into clusters, leading to a strong linear dichroism on a propagating wave. Using 10 nm-sized Fe3O4, we experimentally realize a polarization-sensitive magnetic modulator operating at terahertz wavelengths. We reached a modulation depth of 66% using a field as low as 35 mT. The proposed concept offers a solution towards fundamental terahertz magnetic modulators.

  2. Current methods for synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Majidi, Sima; Sehrig, Fatemeh Zeinali; Farkhani, Samad Mussa; Goloujeh, Mehdi Soleymani; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of different kinds of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) has attracted much attention. During the last few years, a large portion of the articles published about MNPs have described efficient routes to attain shape-controlled and highly stable MNPs with narrow size distribution. In this review, we have reported several popular methods including co-precipitation, microemulsion, thermal decomposition, solvothermal, sonochemical, microwave-assisted, chemical vapor deposition, combustion, carbon arc, and laser pyrolysis, for the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:25435409

  3. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Local Drug Delivery Using Magnetic Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Pacheco, Rodrigo; Valdivia, J. Gabriel; Ibarra, M. Ricardo

    This chapter is a brief description of the state of the art of the field of targeted drug delivery using magnetic implants. It describes the advantages and drawbacks of the use of internal magnets to concentrate magnetic nanoparticles near tumor locations, and the different approaches to this task performed in vitro and in vivo reviewed in literature are presented.

  4. Magnetic-Plasmonic Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Carly S.; Hofmann, Cristina; Ali, Tamer A.; Kelly, Anna T.; Morosan, Emilia; Nordlander, Peter; Whitmire, Kenton H.; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles composed of magnetic cores with continuous Au shell layers simultaneously possess both magnetic and plasmonic properties. Faceted and tetracubic nanocrystals consisting of wüstite with magnetite-rich corners and edges retain magnetic properties when coated with an Au shell layer, with the composite nanostructures showing ferrimagnetic behavior. The plasmonic properties are profoundly influenced by the high dielectric constant of the mixed-iron-oxide nanocrystalline core. A comprehensive theoretical analysis that examines the geometric plasmon tunability over a range of core permittivities enables us to identify the dielectric properties of the mixed-oxide magnetic core directly from the plasmonic behavior of the core-shell nanoparticle. PMID:19441794

  5. Multifunctional biocompatible coatings on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkova, A. V.; Sorokina, O. N.; Rosenfeld, M. A.; Kovarski, A. L.

    2012-11-01

    Methods for coating formation on magnetic nanoparticles used in biology and medicine are considered. Key requirements to the coatings are formulated, namely, biocompatibility, stability, the possibility of attachment of pharmaceutical agents, and the absence of toxicity. The behaviour of nanoparticle/coating nanosystems in the body including penetration through cellular membranes and the excretion rates and routes is analyzed. Parameters characterizing the magnetic properties of these systems and their magnetic controllability are described. Factors limiting the applications of magnetically controlled nanosystems for targeted drug delivery are discussed. The bibliography includes 405 references.

  6. Thermal potentiation of chemotherapy by magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of hyperthermia as an adjuvant for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, significant clinical challenges have been encountered, such as a broader spectrum of toxicity, lack of patient tolerance, temperature control and significant invasiveness. Hyperthermia induced by magnetic nanoparticles in high-frequency oscillating magnetic fields, commonly termed magnetic fluid hyperthermia, is a promising form of heat delivery in which thermal energy is supplied at the nanoscale to the tumor. This review discusses the mechanisms of heat dissipation of iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles, current methods and challenges to deliver heat in the clinic, and the current work related to the use of magnetic nanoparticles for the thermal-chemopotentiation of therapeutic drugs. PMID:24074390

  7. Quantifying the complex permittivity and permeability of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, B. M.; Gui, Y. S.; Worden, M.; Hegmann, T.; Xing, M.; Chen, X. S.; Lu, W.; Wroczynskyj, Y.; van Lierop, J.; Hu, C.-M.

    2015-04-01

    The complex permittivity and permeability of superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles has been quantified using a circular waveguide assembly with a static magnetic field to align the nanoparticle's magnetization. The high sensitivity of the measurement provides the precise resonant feature of nanoparticles. The complex permeability in the vicinity of ferromagnetic resonance is in agreement with the nanoparticle's measured magnetization via conventional magnetometry. A rigorous and self-consistent measure of complex permittivities and permeabilities of nanoparticles is crucial to ascertain accurately the dielectric behaviour as well as the frequency response of nanoparticle magnetization, necessary ingredients when designing and optimizing magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

  8. Using magnetic nanoparticles to manipulate biological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Gao, Yu; Xu, Chenjie

    2013-09-01

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for the manipulation of biological objects, including proteins, genes, cellular organelles, bacteria, cells, and organs, are reviewed. MNPs are popular candidates for controlling and probing biological objects with a magnetic force. In the past decade, progress in the synthesis and surface engineering of MNPs has further enhanced this popularity.

  9. MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLE HYPERTHERMIA IN CANCER TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Giustini, Andrew J.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Cassim, Shiraz M.; Tate, Jennifer A.; Baker, Ian; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-01-01

    The activation of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) by an alternating magnetic field (AMF) is currently being explored as technique for targeted therapeutic heating of tumors. Various types of superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic particles, with different coatings and targeting agents, allow for tumor site and type specificity. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is also being studied as an adjuvant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation therapy. This review provides an introduction to some of the relevant biology and materials science involved in the technical development and current and future use of mNP hyperthermia as clinical cancer therapy. PMID:24348868

  10. Approaches for modeling magnetic nanoparticle dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Daniel B; Weaver, John B

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful biological probes as well as therapeutic agents. There have been several approaches used to model nanoparticle magnetization dynamics for both Brownian as well as Néel rotation. The magnetizations are often of interest and can be compared with experimental results. Here we summarize these approaches including the Stoner-Wohlfarth approach, and stochastic approaches including thermal fluctuations. Non-equilibrium related temperature effects can be described by a distribution function approach (Fokker-Planck equation) or a stochastic differential equation (Langevin equation). Approximate models in several regimes can be derived from these general approaches to simplify implementation. PMID:25271360

  11. Biomedical Applications of Advanced Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Long, Nguyen Viet; Yang, Yong; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Thi, Cao Minh; Cao, Yanqin; Nogami, Masayuki

    2015-12-01

    In this review, we have presented the latest results and highlights on biomedical applications of a class of noble metal nanoparticles, such as gold, silver and platinum, and a class of magnetic nanoparticles, such as cobalt, nickel and iron. Their most important related compounds are also discussed for biomedical applications for treating various diseases, typically as cancers. At present, both physical and chemical methods have been proved very successful to synthesize, shape, control, and produce metal- and oxide-based homogeneous particle systems, e.g., nanoparticles and microparticles. Therefore, we have mainly focused on functional magnetic nanoparticles for nanomedicine because of their high bioadaptability to the organs inside human body. Here, bioconjugation techniques are very crucial to link nanoparticles with conventional drugs, nanodrugs, biomolecules or polymers for biomedical applications. Biofunctionalization of engineered nanoparticles for biomedicine is shown respective to in vitro and in vivo analysis protocols that typically include drug delivery, hyperthermia therapy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and recent outstanding progress in sweep imaging technique with Fourier transformation (SWIFT) MRI. The latter can be especially applied using magnetic nanoparticles, such as Co-, Fe-, Ni-based nanoparticles, α-Fe2O3, and Fe3O4 oxide nanoparticles for analysis and treatment of malignancies. Therefore, this review focuses on recent results of scientists, and related research on diagnosis and treatment methods of common and dangerous diseases by biomedical engineered nanoparticles. Importantly, nanosysems (nanoparticles) or microsystems (microparticles) or hybrid micronano systems are shortly introduced into nanomedicine. Here, Fe oxide nanoparticles ultimately enable potential and applicable technologies for tumor-targeted imaging and therapy. Finally, we have shown the latest aspects of the most important Fe-based particle systems, such as Fe,

  12. Targeting intracellular compartments by magnetic polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kocbek, Petra; Kralj, Slavko; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Kristl, Julijana

    2013-09-27

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) show a great promise for a wide specter of bioapplications, due to their characteristic magnetic properties exhibited only in the presence of magnetic field. Their advantages in the fields of magnetic drug targeting and imaging are well established and their safety is assumed, since iron oxide nanoparticles have already been approved for in vivo application, however, according to many literature reports the bare metal oxide nanoparticles may cause toxic effects on treated cells. Therefore, it is reasonable to prevent the direct interactions between metal oxide core and surrounding environment. In the current research ricinoleic acid coated maghemite nanoparticles were successfully synthesized, characterized and incorporated in the polymeric matrix, resulting in nanosized magnetic polymeric particles. The carrier system was shown to exhibit superparamagnetic properties and was therefore responsive towards external magnetic field. Bioevaluation using T47-D breast cancer cells confirmed internalization of magnetic polymeric nanoparticles (MNPs) and their intracellular localization in various subcellular compartments, depending on presence/absence of external magnetic field. However, the number of internalized MNPs observed by fluorescent and transmission electron microscopy was relatively low, making such way of targeting effective only for delivery of highly potent drugs. The scanning electron microscopy of treated cells revealed that MNPs influenced the cell adhesion, when external magnetic field was applied, and that treatment resulted in damaged apical plasma membrane right after exposure to the magnetic carrier. On the other hand, MNPs showed only reversibly reduced cellular metabolic activity in concentrations up to 200 μg/ml and, in the tested concentration the cell cycle distribution was within the normal range, indicating safety of the established magnetic carrier system for the treated cells. PMID:23603023

  13. Biological cell manipulation by magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertz, Frederick; Khitun, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We report a manipulation of biological cells (erythrocytes) by magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles in the presence of a magnetic field. The experiment was accomplished on the top of a micro-electromagnet consisting of two magnetic field generating contours. An electric current flowing through the contour(s) produces a non-uniform magnetic field, which is about 1.4 mT/μm in strength at 100 mA current in the vicinity of the current-carrying wire. In responses to the magnetic field, magnetic nanoparticles move towards the systems energy minima. In turn, magnetic nanoparticles drag biological cells in the same direction. We present experimental data showing cell manipulation through the control of electric current. This technique allows us to capture and move cells located in the vicinity (10-20 microns) of the current-carrying wires. One of the most interesting results shows a periodic motion of erythrocytes between the two conducting contours, whose frequency is controlled by an electric circuit. The obtained results demonstrate the feasibility of non-destructive cell manipulation by magnetic nanoparticles with micrometer-scale precision.

  14. Aptamer conjugated magnetic nanoparticles as nanosurgeons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Baiju G.; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Morimoto, Hisao; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D.

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have shown promise in the fields of targeted drug delivery, hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in cancer therapy. The ability of magnetic nanoparticles to undergo surface modification and the effect of external magnetic field in the dynamics of their movement make them an excellent nanoplatform for cancer destruction. Surgical removal of cancerous or unwanted cells selectively from the interior of an organ or tissue without any collateral damage is a serious problem due to the highly infiltrative nature of cancer. To address this problem in surgery, we have developed a nanosurgeon for the selective removal of target cells using aptamer conjugated magnetic nanoparticles controlled by an externally applied three-dimensional rotational magnetic field. With the help of the nanosurgeon, we were able to perform surgical actions on target cells in in vitro studies. LDH and intracellular calcium release assay confirmed the death of cancer cells due to the action of the nanosurgeon which in turn nullifies the possibility of proliferation by the removed cells. The nanosurgeon will be a useful tool in the medical field for selective surgery and cell manipulation studies. Additionally, this system could be upgraded for the selective removal of complex cancers from diverse tissues by incorporating various target specific ligands on magnetic nanoparticles.

  15. Effect of magnetic field in malaria diagnosis using magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quan; Yuen, Clement

    2011-07-01

    The current gold standard method of Malaria diagnosis relies on the blood smears examination. The method is laborintensive, time consuming and requires the expertise for data interpretation. In contrast, Raman scattering from a metabolic byproduct of the malaria parasite (Hemozoin) shows the possibility of rapid and objective diagnosis of malaria. However, hemozoin concentration is usually extremely low especially at the early stage of malaria infection, rendering weak Raman signal. In this work, we propose the sensitive detection of enriched β-hematin, whose spectroscopic properties are equivalent to hemozoin, based on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) by using magnetic nanoparticles. A few orders of magnitude enhancement in the Raman signal of β-hematin can be achieved using magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the effect of magnetic field on SERS enhancement is investigated. Our result demonstrates the potential of SERS using magnetic nanoparticles in the effective detection of hemozoin for malaria diagnosis.

  16. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles: A novel heterogeneous catalyst support

    EPA Science Inventory

    Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles have emerged as viable alternatives to conventional materials, as robust, high-surface-area heterogeneous catalyst supports. Post-synthetic surface modification protocol for magnetic nanoparticles has been developed that imparts desirable che...

  17. RF susceptibility of magnetic nanoparticles and nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharan, Srikanth; Hajndl, Ranko; Sanders, Jeff; Carpenter, Everett; Sudarshan, T.

    2002-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles embedded in non-magnetic matrices like polymers or dielectric oxides are of great technological interest as the coating provides encapsulation and prevents grain growth and agglomeration. Moreover, in electromagnetic applications, the systems can be considered as nanocomposites with possible multi-functionality resulting from the magnetic and dielectric response. We have studied the static and dynamic magnetic properties of as-prepared nanoparticles (Fe, Co, γ-Fe_2O_3, MnFe_2O_4) and particles dispersed in a matrix (like polystyrene, SiO_2). The systems ranged from polymerized magnetic nanopowders synthesized using a microwave plasma method to highly monodisperse nanoparticles prepared by reverse-micelle techniques. The magnetic anisotropy and switching fields in these materials were systematically tracked over a wide range in temperatures and fields using a novel resonant RF method based on a tunnel-diode oscillator (TDO) operating at 10 MHz. This technique accurately probes the dynamic transverse susceptibility and has been validated in several nanoparticle systems. While the overall behavior of the transverse susceptibility can be described by standard Stoner-Wohlfarth formalism, there are subtle variations in the transverse susceptibility features including the approach to saturation that are different in the particles embedded in a dielectric matrix. A comparison between several systems and the role of matrix-mediated interactions will be discussed. HS acknowledges support from NSF through grant # NSF-ECS-0102622

  18. Tuning the Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kolhatkar, Arati G.; Jamison, Andrew C.; Litvinov, Dmitri; Willson, Richard C.; Lee, T. Randall

    2013-01-01

    The tremendous interest in magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is reflected in published research that ranges from novel methods of synthesis of unique nanoparticle shapes and composite structures to a large number of MNP characterization techniques, and finally to their use in many biomedical and nanotechnology-based applications. The knowledge gained from this vast body of research can be made more useful if we organize the associated results to correlate key magnetic properties with the parameters that influence them. Tuning these properties of MNPs will allow us to tailor nanoparticles for specific applications, thus increasing their effectiveness. The complex magnetic behavior exhibited by MNPs is governed by many factors; these factors can either improve or adversely affect the desired magnetic properties. In this report, we have outlined a matrix of parameters that can be varied to tune the magnetic properties of nanoparticles. For practical utility, this review focuses on the effect of size, shape, composition, and shell-core structure on saturation magnetization, coercivity, blocking temperature, and relaxation time. PMID:23912237

  19. Simulations of magnetic nanoparticle Brownian motion

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Daniel B.; Weaver, John B.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful in many medical applications because they interact with biology on a cellular level thus allowing microenvironmental investigation. An enhanced understanding of the dynamics of magnetic particles may lead to advances in imaging directly in magnetic particle imaging or through enhanced MRI contrast and is essential for nanoparticle sensing as in magnetic spectroscopy of Brownian motion. Moreover, therapeutic techniques like hyperthermia require information about particle dynamics for effective, safe, and reliable use in the clinic. To that end, we have developed and validated a stochastic dynamical model of rotating Brownian nanoparticles from a Langevin equation approach. With no field, the relaxation time toward equilibrium matches Einstein's model of Brownian motion. In a static field, the equilibrium magnetization agrees with the Langevin function. For high frequency or low amplitude driving fields, behavior characteristic of the linearized Debye approximation is reproduced. In a higher field regime where magnetic saturation occurs, the magnetization and its harmonics compare well with the effective field model. On another level, the model has been benchmarked against experimental results, successfully demonstrating that harmonics of the magnetization carry enough information to infer environmental parameters like viscosity and temperature. PMID:23319830

  20. Microfluidic Biosensing Systems Using Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Giouroudi, Ioanna; Keplinger, Franz

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been rapidly growing interest in developing hand held, sensitive and cost-effective on-chip biosensing systems that directly translate the presence of certain bioanalytes (e.g., biomolecules, cells and viruses) into an electronic signal. The impressive and rapid progress in micro- and nanotechnology as well as in biotechnology enables the integration of a variety of analytical functions in a single chip. All necessary sample handling and analysis steps are then performed within the chip. Microfluidic systems for biomedical analysis usually consist of a set of units, which guarantees the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalytes in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for performing the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gaining interest. This is because magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the biosensing system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are utilized. Some of the merits of magnetic nanoparticles are the possibility of manipulating them inside microfluidic channels by utilizing high gradient magnetic fields, their detection by integrated magnetic microsensors, and their flexibility due to functionalization by means of surface modification and specific binding. Their multi-functionality is what makes them ideal candidates as the active component in miniaturized on-chip biosensing systems. In this review, focus will be given to the type of biosening systems that use microfluidics in combination with magnetoresistive sensors and detect the presence of bioanalyte tagged with magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:24022689

  1. Simulations of magnetic nanoparticle Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Daniel B.; Weaver, John B.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful in many medical applications because they interact with biology on a cellular level thus allowing microenvironmental investigation. An enhanced understanding of the dynamics of magnetic particles may lead to advances in imaging directly in magnetic particle imaging or through enhanced MRI contrast and is essential for nanoparticle sensing as in magnetic spectroscopy of Brownian motion. Moreover, therapeutic techniques like hyperthermia require information about particle dynamics for effective, safe, and reliable use in the clinic. To that end, we have developed and validated a stochastic dynamical model of rotating Brownian nanoparticles from a Langevin equation approach. With no field, the relaxation time toward equilibrium matches Einstein's model of Brownian motion. In a static field, the equilibrium magnetization agrees with the Langevin function. For high frequency or low amplitude driving fields, behavior characteristic of the linearized Debye approximation is reproduced. In a higher field regime where magnetic saturation occurs, the magnetization and its harmonics compare well with the effective field model. On another level, the model has been benchmarked against experimental results, successfully demonstrating that harmonics of the magnetization carry enough information to infer environmental parameters like viscosity and temperature.

  2. Moving magnetic nanoparticles through soft-hard magnetic composite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Hemachander; Han, Jong

    2007-03-01

    An important requirement during the design of a nano-electromechanical system is the ability to move a nanoparticle from one point to another in a predictable way. Through simulations, we demonstrate that soft-hard magnetic stuctures can help us move nanoparticles predictably. We simulated a 2-D system, in which the exchange-coupled soft-magnetic magnetization is frustrated with the boundary condition set by a hard magnetic array and rotating external field. We consider a geometry with three-fold degenerate magnetic local minima and show that the hysteretic transitions are manipulated by an external field. Due to the reduced interfacial energy from weak demagnetization energy in the composite magnets and magnetic hysteresis, the energy landscape can be manipulated in a well-defined and predictable manner. We apply this idea to control the movement of a magnetic particle placed on a non-magnetic layer on top of the structure. We are interested in extending this simple, preliminary study to include complex geometries. We expect that complex geometrical constraints would lead to interesting orbits of nanoparticles in these systems.

  3. Monodisperse Magnetic Nanoparticles for Theranostic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Don; Sun, Xiaolian; Sun, Shouheng

    2011-01-01

    Conspectus The development of highly effective medicine requires the on-time monitoring of the medical treatment process. This combination of monitoring and therapeutics allows a large degree of control on the treatment efficacy and is now commonly referred to as “theranostics”. Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) provide a unique nano-platform for theranostic applications due to their comparable sizes with various functional biomolecules, their biocompatibility and their responses to the external magnetic field. Recent efforts in studying magnetic NPs for both imaging and therapeutic applications have led to great advances in NP fabrication with controls in dimension, surface functionalization and magnetic property. These magnetic NPs have been proven to be robust agents that can be target-specific for enhancing magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity and magnetic heating efficiency. These, plus the deep tissue penetration of magnetic field, make magnetic NPs the most promising candidates for successful theranostics in the future. In this Account, we review the recent advances in the synthesis of magnetic NPs of iron oxide, Fe, as well as FePt and FeCo NPs for imaging and therapeutic applications. We will first introduce briefly nanomagnetism, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). We will then focus on chemical synthesis of monodisperse magnetic NPs with controlled sizes, morphologies, and magnetic properties. Typical examples in using monodisperse magnetic NPs for MRI and MFH are highlighted. PMID:21661754

  4. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor

    DOEpatents

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

    2014-03-25

    A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

  5. Triggered self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ye, L; Pearson, T; Cordeau, Y; Mefford, O T; Crawford, T M

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles are candidates for application in biology, medicine and nanomanufacturing. Understanding how these particles interact collectively in fluids, especially how they assemble and aggregate under external magnetic fields, is critical for high quality, safe, and reliable deployment of these particles. Here, by applying magnetic forces that vary strongly over the same length scale as the colloidal stabilizing force and then varying this colloidal repulsion, we can trigger self-assembly of these nanoparticles into parallel line patterns on the surface of a disk drive medium. Localized within nanometers of the medium surface, this effect is strongly dependent on the ionic properties of the colloidal fluid but at a level too small to cause bulk colloidal aggregation. We use real-time optical diffraction to monitor the dynamics of self-assembly, detecting local colloidal changes with greatly enhanced sensitivity compared with conventional light scattering. Simulations predict the triggering but not the dynamics, especially at short measurement times. Beyond using spatially-varying magnetic forces to balance interactions and drive assembly in magnetic nanoparticles, future measurements leveraging the sensitivity of this approach could identify novel colloidal effects that impact real-world applications of these nanoparticles. PMID:26975332

  6. Triggered self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T.; Crawford, T. M.

    2016-03-01

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles are candidates for application in biology, medicine and nanomanufac-turing. Understanding how these particles interact collectively in fluids, especially how they assemble and aggregate under external magnetic fields, is critical for high quality, safe, and reliable deployment of these particles. Here, by applying magnetic forces that vary strongly over the same length scale as the colloidal stabilizing force and then varying this colloidal repulsion, we can trigger self-assembly of these nanoparticles into parallel line patterns on the surface of a disk drive medium. Localized within nanometers of the medium surface, this effect is strongly dependent on the ionic properties of the colloidal fluid but at a level too small to cause bulk colloidal aggregation. We use real-time optical diffraction to monitor the dynamics of self-assembly, detecting local colloidal changes with greatly enhanced sensitivity compared with conventional light scattering. Simulations predict the triggering but not the dynamics, especially at short measurement times. Beyond using spatially-varying magnetic forces to balance interactions and drive assembly in magnetic nanoparticles, future measurements leveraging the sensitivity of this approach could identify novel colloidal effects that impact real-world applications of these nanoparticles.

  7. Triggered self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ye, L.; Pearson, T.; Cordeau, Y.; Mefford, O. T.; Crawford, T. M.

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal magnetic nanoparticles are candidates for application in biology, medicine and nanomanufac-turing. Understanding how these particles interact collectively in fluids, especially how they assemble and aggregate under external magnetic fields, is critical for high quality, safe, and reliable deployment of these particles. Here, by applying magnetic forces that vary strongly over the same length scale as the colloidal stabilizing force and then varying this colloidal repulsion, we can trigger self-assembly of these nanoparticles into parallel line patterns on the surface of a disk drive medium. Localized within nanometers of the medium surface, this effect is strongly dependent on the ionic properties of the colloidal fluid but at a level too small to cause bulk colloidal aggregation. We use real-time optical diffraction to monitor the dynamics of self-assembly, detecting local colloidal changes with greatly enhanced sensitivity compared with conventional light scattering. Simulations predict the triggering but not the dynamics, especially at short measurement times. Beyond using spatially-varying magnetic forces to balance interactions and drive assembly in magnetic nanoparticles, future measurements leveraging the sensitivity of this approach could identify novel colloidal effects that impact real-world applications of these nanoparticles. PMID:26975332

  8. Static magnetic properties of Maghemite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulfiqar; Rahman, Muneeb Ur; Usman, M.; Hasanain, Syed Khurshid; Zia-ur-Rahman; Ullah, Amir; Kim, Ill Won

    2014-12-01

    We report the static magnetic properties of Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles with an average crystallite size of 14 ± 1.8 nm synthesized via a co-precipitation method. The zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and the field-cooled (FC) magnetization measurements were performed using a physical properties measurements system (PPMS) at temperatures from 5 K to 300 K. The ZFC/FC measurements showed a typical superparamagnetic behavior with a narrow size distribution.

  9. EDITORIAL: Biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Grady, K.

    2002-07-01

    Magnetic materials have been used with grain sizes down to the nanoscale for longer than any other type of material. This is because of a fundamental change in the magnetic structure of ferro- and ferrimagnetic materials when grain sizes are reduced. In these circumstances, the normal macroscopic domain structure transforms into a single domain state at a critical size which typically lies below 100 nm. Once this transformation occurs the mechanism of magnetisation reversal can only be via the rotation of the magnetisation vector from one magnetic easy axis to another via a magnetically hard direction. This change of reversal mechanism has led to a new class of magnetic materials whose properties and the basic underlying physical mechanism governing them were defined in a seminal work first published by E C Stoner and E P Wolhfarth in 1949. As a consequence of this rotation mechanism, magnetic nanoparticles exist having coercivities which are highly controllable and lie between soft materials and normal permanent magnet materials. This ability to control coercivity in such particles has led to a number of significant technological advances, particularly in the field of information storage. The high value of information storage technology has meant that since the 1950s an enormous research and development effort has gone into techniques for the preparation of magnetic particles and thin films having well defined properties. Hence, certainly since the 1960s, a wide range of techniques to produce both metallic and oxide magnetic nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 4-100 nm has been developed. The availability of this wide range of materials led to speculation from the 1960s onwards that they may have applications in biology and medicine. The fact that a magnetic field gradient can be used to either remotely position or selectively filter biological materials leads to a number of obvious applications. These applications fall broadly into two categories: those

  10. Activity estimation in radioimmunotherapy using magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Hossein; Johari Daha, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estimation of activity accumulated in tumor and organs is very important in predicting the response of radiopharmaceuticals treatment. In this study, we synthesized 177Lutetium (177Lu)-trastuzumab-iron oxide nanoparticles as a double radiopharmaceutical agent for treatment and better estimation of organ activity in a new way by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods 177Lu-trastuzumab-iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and all the quality control tests such as labeling yield, nanoparticle size determination, stability in buffer and blood serum up to 4 d, immunoreactivity and biodistribution in normal mice were determined. In mice bearing breast tumor, liver and tumor activities were calculated with three methods: single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), MRI and organ extraction, which were compared with each other. Results The good results of quality control tests (labeling yield: 61%±2%, mean nanoparticle hydrodynamic size: 41±15 nm, stability in buffer: 86%±5%, stability in blood serum: 80%±3%, immunoreactivity: 80%±2%) indicated that 177Lu-trastuzumab-iron oxide nanoparticles could be used as a double radiopharmaceutical agent in mice bearing tumor. Results showed that 177Lu-trastuzumab-iron oxide nanoparticles with MRI had the ability to measure organ activities more accurate than SPECT. Conclusions Co-conjugating radiopharmaceutical to MRI contrast agents such as iron oxide nanoparticles may be a good way for better dosimetry in nuclear medicine treatment. PMID:25937783

  11. Nonlinear energy dissipation of magnetic nanoparticles in oscillating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Aquino, D.; Rinaldi, C.

    2015-11-01

    The heating of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields enables a variety of emerging applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia and triggered drug release. Rosensweig (2002) [25] obtained a model for the heat dissipation rate of a collection of non-interacting particles. However, the assumptions made in this analysis make it rigorously valid only in the limit of small applied magnetic field amplitude and frequency (i.e., values of the Langevin parameter that are much less than unity and frequencies below the inverse relaxation time). In this contribution we approach the problem from an alternative point of view by solving the phenomenological magnetization relaxation equation exactly for the case of arbitrary magnetic field amplitude and frequency and by solving a more accurate magnetization relaxation equation numerically. We also use rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of non-interacting magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field to estimate the rate of energy dissipation and compare the results of the phenomenological theories to the particle-scale simulations. The results are summarized in terms of a normalized energy dissipation rate and show that Rosensweig's expression provides an upper bound on the energy dissipation rate achieved at high field frequency and amplitude. Estimates of the predicted dependence of energy dissipation rate, quantified as specific absorption rate (SAR), on magnetic field amplitude and frequency, and particle core and hydrodynamic diameter, are also given.

  12. Plasmonic-magnetic bifunctional nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S.; Lei, C.; Ren, Y.; Cook, R. E.; Sun, Y.

    2011-03-01

    An amorphous seed-mediated strategy has been developed for the synthesis of hybrid nanoparticles that are composed of silver (yellow) and iron oxide (blue) nanodomains and exhibit unique optical properties. These properties originate from both the strong surface plasmon resonance of the silver and the strong superparamagnetic responses of the iron oxide nanodomains.

  13. Magnetic manipulation of bacterial magnetic nanoparticle-loaded neurospheres.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jaeha; Lee, Kyung-Mee; Lee, Jae Hyup; Lee, Junghoon; Cha, Misun

    2014-05-01

    Specific targeting of cells to sites of tissue damage and delivery of high numbers of transplanted cells to lesion tissue in vivo are critical parameters for the success of cell-based therapies. Here, we report a promising in vitro model system for studying the homing of transplanted cells, which may eventually be applicable for targeted regeneration of damaged neurons in spinal cord injury. In this model system, neurospheres derived from human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells labeled with bacterial magnetic nanoparticles were guided by a magnetic field and successfully accumulated near the focus site of the magnetic field. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of using an in vitro model for testing bacterial magnetic nanoparticles to develop successful stem cell targeting strategies during fluid flow, which may ultimately be translated into in vivo targeted delivery of cells through circulation in various tissue-repair models. PMID:24638869

  14. Arranging matter by magnetic nanoparticle assemblers

    PubMed Central

    Yellen, Benjamin B.; Hovorka, Ondrej; Friedman, Gary

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a method for transporting colloidal particles, large molecules, cells, and other materials across surfaces and for assembling them into highly regular patterns. In this method, nonmagnetic materials are manipulated by a fluid dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles. Manipulation of materials is guided by a program of magnetic information stored in a substrate. Dynamic control over the motion of nonmagnetic particles can be achieved by reprogramming the substrate magnetization on the fly. The unexpectedly large degree of control over particle motion can be used to manipulate large ensembles of particles in parallel, potentially with local control over particle trajectory. PMID:15956215

  15. Multi-vortex states in magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, W. L.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Wong, D. W.; Purnama, I.; Chiam, S. Y.; Wong, L. M.; Lew, W. S.

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate a fabrication technique to create cylindrical NiFe magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with controlled dimensions and composition. MNPs thicker than 200 nm can form a double vortex configuration, which consists of a pair of vortices with opposite chirality. When MNPs thicker than 300 nm are relaxed after saturation, it forms a frustrated triple vortex state which produces a higher net magnetization as verified by light transmissivity measurements. Therefore, a greater magnetic torque can be actuated on a MNP in the triple vortex state.

  16. Nonlinear simulations to optimize magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Daniel B. Weaver, John B.

    2014-03-10

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is an attractive emerging cancer treatment, but the acting microscopic energy deposition mechanisms are not well understood and optimization suffers. We describe several approximate forms for the characteristic time of Néel rotations with varying properties and external influences. We then present stochastic simulations that show agreement between the approximate expressions and the micromagnetic model. The simulations show nonlinear imaginary responses and associated relaxational hysteresis due to the field and frequency dependencies of the magnetization. This suggests that efficient heating is possible by matching fields to particles instead of resorting to maximizing the power of the applied magnetic fields.

  17. Tailoring magnetic nanoparticle for transformers application.

    PubMed

    Morais, P C; Silva, A S; Leite, E S; Garg, V K; Oliveira, A C; Viali, W R; Sartoratto, P P C

    2010-02-01

    In this study photoacoustic spectroscopy was used to investigate the effect of dilution of an oil-based magnetic fluid sample on the magnetic nanoparticle surface-coating. Changes of the photoacoustic signal intensity on the band-L region (640 to 830 nm) upon dilution of the stock magnetic fluid sample were discussed in terms of molecular surface desorption. The model proposed here assumes that the driving force taking the molecules out from the nanoparticle surface into the bulk solvent is the gradient of osmotic pressure. This gradient of osmotic pressure is established between the nanoparticle surface and the bulk suspension. It is further assumed that the photoacoustic signal intensity (area under the photoacoustic spectra) scales linearly with the number of coating molecules (surface grafting) at the nanoparticle surface. This model picture provides a non-linear analytical description for the reduction of the surface grafting coefficient upon dilution, which was successfully-used to curve-fit the photoacoustic experimental data. PMID:20352784

  18. Structural and magnetic study of dysprosium substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Hemaunt; Srivastava, R. C.; Pal Singh, Jitendra; Negi, P.; Agrawal, H. M.; Das, D.; Hwa Chae, Keun

    2016-03-01

    The present work investigates the magnetic behavior of Dy3+ substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction studies reveal presence of cubic spinel phases in these nanoparticles. Raman spectra of these nanoparticles show change in intensity of Raman bands, which reflects cation redistribution in cubic spinel lattice. Saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease with increase of Dy3+concentration in these nanoparticles. Room temperature Mössbauer measurements show the cation redistribution in these nanoparticles and corroborates the results obtained from Raman Spectroscopic measurements. Decrease in magnetization of Dy3+ substituted cobalt ferrite is attributed to the reduction in the magnetic interaction and cation redistribution.

  19. Electrochemical fabrication of nanocomposite films containing magnetic metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yoshiaki; Hashi, Shuichiro; Kura, Hiroaki; Yanai, Takeshi; Ogawa, Tomoyuki; Ishiyama, Kazushi; Nakano, Masaki; Fukunaga, Hirotoshi

    2015-07-01

    Controlling the structure composed of soft and hard magnetic phases at the nanoscale is the key to fabricating nanocomposite magnets with efficient exchange coupling. In our previous study, nanocomposite films containing ferrite nanoparticles were fabricated by a combination of electrophoretic deposition and electroplating to show one possibility of controlling the structure of nanocomposite magnets three-dimensionally by applying self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles. To expand this combination method to the fabrication of nanocomposite magnets, the use of magnetic metal nanoparticles is desired. In this paper, we attempted to fabricate nanocomposite films composed of Fe-Co nanoparticles in a Fe-Pt matrix by this combination method. Through cross-sectional observation and XRD analysis, a nanostructure composed of Fe-Co nanoparticles embedded in a L10 Fe-Pt matrix was confirmed. These results indicate that this method is capable of producing composite materials containing metal magnetic nanoparticles.

  20. The Effects of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liangruksa, Monrudee; Kappiyoor, Ravi; Ganguly, Ranjan; Puri, Ishwar

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a cancer treatment in which biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles are dispersed into a tumor and heated by an external AC magnetic field. Over a period of time, the tumor cells are locally heated, leading to hyperthermia which damages and kills the tumor cells with minimal damage to the surrounding normal tissue. The applied magnetic field must be high enough to induce hyperthermia for a specified magnetic particle concentration in the tumor but also lies within the safe limit for human exposure. Six materials, barium ferrite, cobalt ferrite, iron-cobalt, iron-platinum, magnetite and maghemite, are considered as candidates for MFH use. We find that fcc iron-platinum, magnetite and maghemite generate useful treatment temperatures and, when included in a ferrofluid, can produce sufficient and effective MFH for which optimal conditions are explored.

  1. EDITORIAL: Biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Grady, K.

    2002-07-01

    Magnetic materials have been used with grain sizes down to the nanoscale for longer than any other type of material. This is because of a fundamental change in the magnetic structure of ferro- and ferrimagnetic materials when grain sizes are reduced. In these circumstances, the normal macroscopic domain structure transforms into a single domain state at a critical size which typically lies below 100 nm. Once this transformation occurs the mechanism of magnetisation reversal can only be via the rotation of the magnetisation vector from one magnetic easy axis to another via a magnetically hard direction. This change of reversal mechanism has led to a new class of magnetic materials whose properties and the basic underlying physical mechanism governing them were defined in a seminal work first published by E C Stoner and E P Wolhfarth in 1949. As a consequence of this rotation mechanism, magnetic nanoparticles exist having coercivities which are highly controllable and lie between soft materials and normal permanent magnet materials. This ability to control coercivity in such particles has led to a number of significant technological advances, particularly in the field of information storage. The high value of information storage technology has meant that since the 1950s an enormous research and development effort has gone into techniques for the preparation of magnetic particles and thin films having well defined properties. Hence, certainly since the 1960s, a wide range of techniques to produce both metallic and oxide magnetic nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 4-100 nm has been developed. The availability of this wide range of materials led to speculation from the 1960s onwards that they may have applications in biology and medicine. The fact that a magnetic field gradient can be used to either remotely position or selectively filter biological materials leads to a number of obvious applications. These applications fall broadly into two categories: those

  2. Biomedical tools based on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saba, Anna R.; Castillo, Paula M.; Fantechi, Elvira; Sangregorio, Claudio; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Sbarbati, Andrea; Casu, Alberto; Falqui, Andrea; Casula, Maria F.

    2013-02-01

    Magnetic and superparamagnetic colloids represent a versatile platform for the design of functional nanostructures which may act as effective tools for biomedicine, being active in cancer therapy, tissue imaging and magnetic separation. The structural, morphological and hence magnetic features of the magnetic nanoparticles must be tuned for optimal perfomance in a given application. In this work, iron oxide nanocrystals have been prepared as prospective heat mediators in magnetic fluid hyperthermia therapy. A procedure based on the partial oxidation of iron (II) precursors in water based media has been adopted and the synthesis outcome has been investigated by X-Ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy. It was found that by adjusting the synthetic parameters (mainly the oxidation rate) magnetic iron oxide nanocrystals with cubic and cuboctahedral shape and average size 50 nm were obtained. The nanocrystals were tested as hyperthermic mediators through Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) measurements. The samples act as heat mediators, being able to increase the temperature from physiological temperature to the temperatures used for magnetic hyperthermia by short exposure to an alternative magnetic field and exhibit a reproducible temperature kinetic behavior.

  3. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Magnetically-Guided and Magnetically-Responsive Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Estelrich, Joan; Escribano, Elvira; Queralt, Josep; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the recent advances in and problems with the use of magnetically-guided and magnetically-responsive nanoparticles in drug delivery and magnetofection. In magnetically-guided nanoparticles, a constant external magnetic field is used to transport magnetic nanoparticles loaded with drugs to a specific site within the body or to increase the transfection capacity. Magnetofection is the delivery of nucleic acids under the influence of a magnetic field acting on nucleic acid vectors that are associated with magnetic nanoparticles. In magnetically-responsive nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles are encapsulated or embedded in a larger colloidal structure that carries a drug. In this last case, an alternating magnetic field can modify the structure of the colloid, thereby providing spatial and temporal control over drug release. PMID:25867479

  4. Iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetically-guided and magnetically-responsive drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Estelrich, Joan; Escribano, Elvira; Queralt, Josep; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the recent advances in and problems with the use of magnetically-guided and magnetically-responsive nanoparticles in drug delivery and magnetofection. In magnetically-guided nanoparticles, a constant external magnetic field is used to transport magnetic nanoparticles loaded with drugs to a specific site within the body or to increase the transfection capacity. Magnetofection is the delivery of nucleic acids under the influence of a magnetic field acting on nucleic acid vectors that are associated with magnetic nanoparticles. In magnetically-responsive nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles are encapsulated or embedded in a larger colloidal structure that carries a drug. In this last case, an alternating magnetic field can modify the structure of the colloid, thereby providing spatial and temporal control over drug release. PMID:25867479

  5. Technique to optimize magnetic response of gelatin coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Nidhi; Parekh, Kinnari

    2015-07-01

    The paper describes the results of optimization of magnetic response for highly stable bio-functionalize magnetic nanoparticles dispersion. Concentration of gelatin during in situ co-precipitation synthesis was varied from 8, 23 and 48 mg/mL to optimize magnetic properties. This variation results in a change in crystallite size from 10.3 to 7.8 ± 0.1 nm. TEM measurement of G3 sample shows highly crystalline spherical nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 7.2 ± 0.2 nm and diameter distribution (σ) of 0.27. FTIR spectra shows a shift of 22 cm(-1) at C=O stretching with absence of N-H stretching confirming the chemical binding of gelatin on magnetic nanoparticles. The concept of lone pair electron of the amide group explains the mechanism of binding. TGA shows 32.8-25.2% weight loss at 350 °C temperature substantiating decomposition of chemically bind gelatin. The magnetic response shows that for 8 mg/mL concentration of gelatin, the initial susceptibility and saturation magnetization is the maximum. The cytotoxicity of G3 sample was assessed in Normal Rat Kidney Epithelial Cells (NRK Line) by MTT assay. Results show an increase in viability for all concentrations, the indicative probability of a stimulating action of these particles in the nontoxic range. This shows the potential of this technique for biological applications as the coated particles are (i) superparamagnetic (ii) highly stable in physiological media (iii) possibility of attaching other drug with free functional group of gelatin and (iv) non-toxic. PMID:26152511

  6. Resonant Raman scattering from silicon nanoparticles enhanced by magnetic response.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Pavel A; Baranov, Denis G; Milichko, Valentin A; Makarov, Sergey V; Mukhin, Ivan S; Samusev, Anton K; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2016-05-01

    Enhancement of optical response with high-index dielectric nanoparticles is attributed to the excitation of their Mie-type magnetic and electric resonances. Here we study Raman scattering from crystalline silicon nanoparticles and reveal that magnetic dipole modes have a much stronger effect on the scattering than electric modes of the same order. We demonstrate experimentally a 140-fold enhancement of the Raman signal from individual silicon spherical nanoparticles at the magnetic dipole resonance. Our results confirm the importance of the optically-induced magnetic response of subwavelength dielectric nanoparticles for enhancing light-matter interactions. PMID:27113352

  7. Optical detection of magnetic nanoparticles in colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez, Alejandro J.; Ramirez-Wong, Diana G.; Favela-Camacho, Sarai E.; Sanchez, Isaac C.; Yáñez-Limón, J. M.; Luna-Bárcenas, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    This study reports the change of light transmittance and light scattering dispersion by colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles. Optical changes were observed during the application of transversal magnetic fields to magnetic nanoparticles and nanowires at concentrations spanning from 20 μg/mL to 2 ng/mL. Results show that light scattering modulation is a simple, fast and inexpensive method for detection of magnetic nanoparticles at low concentrations. Frequency and time response of the optical modulation strongly depends on the geometry of the particles. In this regard, light transmittance and scattering measurements may prove useful in characterizing the morphology of suspended nanoparticles.

  8. Dynamic Hysteresis in Compacted Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdary, Krishna M.

    The frequency and temperature dependent magnetic response of a bulk soft magnetic nanocomposite made by compacting Fe10Co 90 nanoparticles was measured and modeled. Electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to characterize the size, composition, and structure of the nanoparticles and nanocomposite. Polyol synthesis was used to produce 200 nm particles with average grain size 20 nm and large superparamagnetic fraction. The nanoparticles were consolidated to 90% theoretical density by plasma pressure compaction. The compacted nanoparticles retained the 20 nm average grain size and large superparamagnetic fraction. The nanocomposite resistivity was more than three times that of the bulk alloy. Vibrating sample and SQUID-MPMS magnetometers were used for low frequency magnetic measurements of the nanoparticles and nanocomposite. Compaction reduced the coercivity from 175 Oe to 8 Oe and the effective anisotropy from 124 x 10 3 ergs/cc to 7.9 x 103 ergs/cc. These reductions were caused by increased exchange coupling between surface nanograins, consistent with predictions from the Random Anisotropy model. Varying degrees of exchange coupling existed within the nanocomposite, contributing to a distribution of energy barriers. A permeameter was used for frequency dependent magnetic measurements on a toroid cut from the nanocomposite. Complex permeability, coercivity, and power loss were extracted from dynamic minor hysteresis loops measured over a range of temperatures (77 K - 873 K) and frequencies (0.1 kHz - 100 kHz). The real and imaginary parts of the complex permeability spectrum showed asymmetries consistent with a distribution of energy barriers and high damping. When the complex permeability, power loss, and coercivity were scaled relative to the peak frequency of the imaginary permeability, all fell on universal curves. Various microscopic and macroscopic models for the complex permeability were investigated. The complex permeability was successfully fit

  9. Exchange-coupled magnetic nanoparticles for efficient heat induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Jang, Jung-Tak; Choi, Jin-Sil; Moon, Seung Ho; Noh, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Wook; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Kim, Il-Sun; Park, Kook In; Cheon, Jinwoo

    2011-07-01

    The conversion of electromagnetic energy into heat by nanoparticles has the potential to be a powerful, non-invasive technique for biotechnology applications such as drug release, disease treatment and remote control of single cell functions, but poor conversion efficiencies have hindered practical applications so far. In this Letter, we demonstrate a significant increase in the efficiency of magnetic thermal induction by nanoparticles. We take advantage of the exchange coupling between a magnetically hard core and magnetically soft shell to tune the magnetic properties of the nanoparticle and maximize the specific loss power, which is a gauge of the conversion efficiency. The optimized core-shell magnetic nanoparticles have specific loss power values that are an order of magnitude larger than conventional iron-oxide nanoparticles. We also perform an antitumour study in mice, and find that the therapeutic efficacy of these nanoparticles is superior to that of a common anticancer drug.

  10. Ac magnetic susceptibility study of in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, L.; Mejías, R.; Barber, D. F.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Serna, C. J.; Lázaro, F. J.; Morales, M. P.

    2011-06-01

    We analysed magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution, before and after cytokine conjugation, in a mouse model by ac susceptibility measurements of the corresponding resected tissues. Mice received repeated intravenous injections of nanoparticle suspension for two weeks and they were euthanized 1 h after the last injection. In general, only 10% of the total injected nanoparticles after multiple exposures were found in tissues. The rest of the particles may probably be metabolized or excreted by the organism. Our findings indicate that the adsorption of interferon to DMSA-coated magnetic nanoparticles changes their biodistribution, reducing the presence of nanoparticles in lungs and therefore their possible toxicity. The specific targeting of the particles to tumour tissues by the use of an external magnetic field has also been studied. Magnetic nanoparticles were observed by transmission electron microscopy in the targeted tissue and quantified by ac magnetic susceptibility.

  11. Monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles for theranostic applications.

    PubMed

    Ho, Don; Sun, Xiaolian; Sun, Shouheng

    2011-10-18

    Effective medical care requires the concurrent monitoring of medical treatment. The combination of imaging and therapeutics allows a large degree of control over the treatment efficacy and is now commonly referred to as "theranostics". Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) provide a unique nanoplatform for theranostic applications because of their biocompatibility, their responses to the external magnetic field, and their sizes which are comparable to that of functional biomolecules. Recent studies of magnetic NPs for both imaging and therapeutic applications have led to greater control over size, surface functionalization, magnetic properties, and specific binding capabilities of the NPs. The combination of the deep tissue penetration of the magnetic field and the ability of magnetic NPs to enhance magnetic resonance imaging sensitivity and magnetic heating efficiency makes magnetic NPs promising candidates for successful future theranostics. In this Account, we review recent advances in the synthesis of magnetic NPs for biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). Our focus is on iron oxide (Fe(3)O(4)) NPs, gold-iron oxide (Au-Fe(3)O(4)) NPs, metallic iron (Fe) NPs, and Fe-based alloy NPs, such as iron-cobalt (FeCo) and iron-platinum (FePt) NPs. Because of the ease of fabrication and their approved clinical usage, Fe(3)O(4) NPs with controlled sizes and surface chemistry have been studied extensively for MRI and MFH applications. Porous hollow Fe(3)O(4) NPs are expected to have similar magnetic, chemical, and biological properties as the solid Fe(3)O(4) NPs, and their structures offer the additional opportunity to store and release drugs at a target. The Au-Fe(3)O(4) NPs combine both magnetically active Fe(3)O(4) and optically active Au within one nanostructure and are a promising NP platform for multimodal imaging and therapeutics. Metallic Fe and FeCo NPs offer the opportunity for probes with even higher

  12. Ultralow field magnetization reversal of two-body magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei; Lu, Jincheng; Lu, Xiaofeng; Tang, Rujun; Sun, Z. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Field induced magnetization reversal was investigated in a system of two magnetic nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropies and magnetostatic interaction. By using the micromagnetic simulation, ultralow switching field strength was found when the separation distance between the two particles reaches a critical small value (on nanometer scale) in the perpendicular configuration where the anisotropic axes of the two particles are perpendicular to the separation line. The switching field increases sharply when the separation is away from the critical distance. The ultralow field switching phenomenon was missed in the parallel configuration where both the anisotropic axes are aligned along the separation line of the two particles. The micromagnetic results are consistent with the previous theoretical prediction [J. Appl. Phys. 109, 104303 (2011)] where dipolar interaction between two single-domain magnetic particles was considered. Our present simulations offered further proofs and possibilities for the low-power applications of information storage as the two-body magnetic nanoparticles might be implemented as a composite information bit.

  13. MRI contrast enhancement using Magnetic Carbon Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Rakesh P.; Kangasniemi, Kim; Takahashi, Masaya; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Koymen, Ali R.; Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington Team; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Team

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, nanotechnology has become one of the most exciting forefront fields in cancer diagnosis and therapeutics such as drug delivery, thermal therapy and detection of cancer. Here, we report development of core (Fe)-shell (carbon) nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for contrast enhancement in MRI imaging. These new classes of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) are synthesized using a bottom-up approach in various organic solvents, using the electric plasma discharge generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. Gradient echo MRI images of well-dispersed MCNP-solutions (in tube) were acquired. For T2 measurements, a multi echo spin echo sequence was performed. From the slope of the 1/T2 versus concentration plot, the R2 value for different CMCNP-samples was measured. Since MCNPs were found to be extremely non-reactive, and highly absorbing in NIR regime, development of carbon-based MRI contrast enhancement will allow its simultaneous use in biomedical applications. We aim to localize the MCNPs in targeted tissue regions by external DC magnetic field, followed by MRI imaging and subsequent photothermal therapy.

  14. Dielectrophoresis-magnetophoresis force driven magnetic nanoparticle movement in transformer oil based magnetic fluids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Chul; Lee, Sangyoup

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic fluid is a stable colloidal mixture contained magnetic nanoparticles coated with a surfactant. Recently, it was found that the fluid has properties to increase heat transfer and dielectric characteristics due to the added magnetic nanoparticles in transformer oils. The magnetic nanoparticles in the fluid experience an electrical force directed toward the place of maximum electric field strength when the electric field is applied. And when the external magnetic field is applied, the magnetic nanoparticles form long chains oriented along the direction of the field. The behaviors of magnetic nanoparticles in both the fields must play an important role in changing the heat transfer and dielectric characteristics of the fluids. In this study, we visualized the movement of magnetic nanoparticles influenced by both the fields applied in-situ. It was found that the magnetic nanoparticles travel in the region near the electrode by the electric field and form long chains along the field direction by the magnetic field. It can be inferred that the movement of magnetic nanoparticles appears by both the fields, and the breakdown voltage of transformer oil based magnetic fluids might be influenced according to the dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:24205624

  15. Magnetoacoustic imaging of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles embedded in biological tissues with microsecond magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Gang; He, Bin

    2012-01-01

    We present an experimental study on magnetoacoustic imaging of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles embedded in biological tissues. In experiments, a large-current-carrying coil is used to deliver microsecond pulsed magnetic stimulation to samples. The ultrasound signals induced by magnetic forces on SPIO nanoparticles are measured by a rotating transducer. The distribution of nanoparticles is reconstructed by a back-projection imaging algorithm. The results demonstrated the feasibility to obtain cross-sectional image of magnetic nanoparticle targets with faithful dimensional and positional information, which suggests a promising tool for tomographic reconstruction of magnetic nanoparticle-labeled diseased tissues (e.g., cancerous tumor) in molecular or clinic imaging.

  16. Magnetic nanoparticles for applications in oscillating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Peeraphatdit, Chorthip

    2009-01-01

    Enzymatic and thermochemical catalysis are both important industrial processes. However, the thermal requirements for each process often render them mutually exclusive: thermochemical catalysis requires high temperature that denatures enzymes. One of the long-term goals of this project is to design a thermocatalytic system that could be used with enzymatic systems in situ to catalyze reaction sequences in one pot; this system would be useful for numerous applications e.g. conversion of biomass to biofuel and other commodity products. The desired thermocatalytic system would need to supply enough thermal energy to catalyze thermochemical reactions, while keeping the enzymes from high temperature denaturation. Magnetic nanoparticles are known to generate heat in an oscillating magnetic field through mechanisms including hysteresis and relaxational losses. We envisioned using these magnetic nanoparticles as the local heat source embedded in sub-micron size mesoporous support to spatially separate the particles from the enzymes. In this study, we set out to find the magnetic materials and instrumental conditions that are sufficient for this purpose. Magnetite was chosen as the first model magnetic material in this study because of its high magnetization values, synthetic control over particle size, shape, functionalization and proven biocompatibility. Our experimental designs were guided by a series of theoretical calculations, which provided clues to the effects of particle size, size distribution, magnetic field, frequency and reaction medium. Materials of theoretically optimal size were synthesized, functionalized, and their effects in the oscillating magnetic field were subsequently investigated. Under our conditions, the materials that clustered e.g. silica-coated and PNIPAM-coated iron oxides exhibited the highest heat generation, while iron oxides embedded in MSNs and mesoporous iron oxides exhibited the least bulk heating. It is worth noting that the specific

  17. Magnetic vectoring of magnetically responsive nanoparticles within the murine peritoneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klostergaard, Jim; Bankson, James; Auzenne, Edmond; Gibson, Don; Yuill, William; Seeney, Charles E.

    2007-04-01

    Magnetically responsive nanoparticles (MNPs) might be candidates for pro-drug formulations for intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of ovarian cancer. We conducted feasibility experiments in an i.p. human ovarian carcinoma xenograft model to determine whether MNPs can be effectively vectored within this environment. Our initial results based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicate that i.p.-injected ˜15 nm magnetite-based MNPs can in fact migrate toward NdFeB magnets externally juxtaposed to the peritoneal cavity above the xenografts growing in the anterior abdominal wall. MNP localization to the tumor/peri-tumoral environment occurs. Further development of this MNP pro-drug strategy is underway.

  18. Photo-Switching of Magnetization in Iron Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Aqtash, Nabil; Hostetter, Alexander; Sabirianov, Renat

    2012-02-01

    We report the theoretical studies of light induced switching in core-shell nanoparticles. The core of the nanoparticle is made of Fe coated with the shell of azobenzene. The latter is a photochromic material with the reversible trans-cis photoisomerization upon irradiation by UV and visible light. The magnetization of nanoparticles can be reversibly switched by using specific wavelengths of light. trans-cis photoisomerization of azobenzene induces both the change in surface local magnetic moments and alters the exchange interactions on the surfaces of the nanoparticles. These two mechanisms can lead to induced magnetization switchable by light pulse. We study the effects of photoisomerization of azobenzene on iron (Fe) nanoparticle. Ab initio calculations using SIESTA code show that the ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange interaction in Fe dimer increase by 40% due to photoisomerization of azobenzene. While an infinite flat Fe monolayer shows variation on the exchange interactions on the surfaces as result of photoisomerization. The local magnetic moments of Fe sheet increase by 6% due to photoisomerization. Using an ab initio parameterization of magnetic interactions, we propose statistical model based on competing exchange interactions for the investigation of Fe nanoparticle magnetization. We performed Monte Carlo simulations of magnetization of the core-shell nanoparticle as a function of temperature. The results show that Fe nanoparticles magnetization at room temperature can change by at least 40% due to photoisomerization of azobenzene.

  19. Resonant Raman scattering from silicon nanoparticles enhanced by magnetic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Pavel A.; Baranov, Denis G.; Milichko, Valentin A.; Makarov, Sergey V.; Mukhin, Ivan S.; Samusev, Anton K.; Krasnok, Alexander E.; Belov, Pavel A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2016-05-01

    Enhancement of optical response with high-index dielectric nanoparticles is attributed to the excitation of their Mie-type magnetic and electric resonances. Here we study Raman scattering from crystalline silicon nanoparticles and reveal that magnetic dipole modes have a much stronger effect on the scattering than electric modes of the same order. We demonstrate experimentally a 140-fold enhancement of the Raman signal from individual silicon spherical nanoparticles at the magnetic dipole resonance. Our results confirm the importance of the optically-induced magnetic response of subwavelength dielectric nanoparticles for enhancing light-matter interactions.Enhancement of optical response with high-index dielectric nanoparticles is attributed to the excitation of their Mie-type magnetic and electric resonances. Here we study Raman scattering from crystalline silicon nanoparticles and reveal that magnetic dipole modes have a much stronger effect on the scattering than electric modes of the same order. We demonstrate experimentally a 140-fold enhancement of the Raman signal from individual silicon spherical nanoparticles at the magnetic dipole resonance. Our results confirm the importance of the optically-induced magnetic response of subwavelength dielectric nanoparticles for enhancing light-matter interactions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07965a

  20. A feasibility study of magnetic separation of magnetic nanoparticle for forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y C; Han, S; Hong, S

    2011-01-01

    It was recently reported that a UK company has developed a naturally non-toxic magnetoferritin to act as a draw solute for drawing water in forward osmosis process. The gist of this technology is the utilization of the magnetic nanoparticle and high-gradient magnetic separation for draw solute separation and reuse. However, any demonstration on this technology has not been reported yet. In this study, a feasibility test of magnetic separation using magnetic nanoparticle was therefore performed to investigate the possibility of magnetic separation in water treatment such as desalination. Basically, a magnetic separation system consisted of a column packed with a bed of magnetically susceptible wools placed between the poles of electromagnet and Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle was used as a model nanoparticle. The effect of nanoparticle size to applied magnetic field in separation column was experimentally investigated and the magnetic field distribution in a magnet gap and the magnetic field gradient around stainless steel wool wire were analyzed through numerical simulation. The amount of magnetic nanoparticle captured in the separator column increased as the magnetic field strength and particle size increased. As a result, if magnetic separation is intended to be used for draw solute separation and reuse, both novel nanoparticle and large-scale high performance magnetic separator must be developed. PMID:22097022

  1. 2D magnetic nanoparticle imaging using magnetization response second harmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Saburo; Murata, Hayaki; Oishi, Tomoya; Suzuki, Toshifumi; Zhang, Yi

    2015-06-01

    A detection method and an imaging technique for magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been investigated. In MNP detection and in magnetic particle imaging (MPI), the most commonly employed method is the detection of the odd harmonics of the magnetization response. We examined the advantage of using the second harmonic response when applying an AC magnetic modulation field and a DC bias field. If the magnetization response is detected by a Cu-wound-coil detection system, the output voltage from the coil is proportional to the change in the flux, dϕ/dt. Thus, the dependence of the derivative of the magnetization, M, on an AC magnetic modulation field and a DC bias field were calculated and investigated. The calculations were in good agreement with the experimental results. We demonstrated that the use of the second harmonic response for the detection of MNPs has an advantage compared with the usage of the third harmonic response, when the Cu-wound-coil detection system is employed and the amplitude of the ratio of the AC modulation field and a knee field Hac/Hk is less than 2. We also constructed a 2D MPI scanner using a pair of permanent ring magnets with a bore of ϕ80 mm separated by 90 mm. The magnets generated a gradient of Gz=3.17 T/m transverse to the imaging bore and Gx=1.33 T/m along the longitudinal axis. An original concentrated 10 μl Resovist solution in a ϕ2×3 mm2 vessel was used as a sample, and it was imaged by the scanner. As a result, a 2D contour map image could be successfully generated using the method with a lock-in amplifier.

  2. Surface modification of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xin; Yu, Jing; Hou, Yang-Long

    2015-01-01

    Progress in surface modification of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is summarized with regard to organic molecules, macromolecules and inorganic materials. Many researchers are now devoted to synthesizing new types of multi-functional MNPs, which show great application potential in both diagnosis and treatment of disease. By employing an ever-greater variety of surface modification techniques, MNPs can satisfy more and more of the demands of medical practice in areas like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), fluorescent marking, cell targeting, and drug delivery. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51125001 and 51172005), the Natural Science Foundation of Beijing,China (Grant No. 2122022), the Science Fund for Creative Research Groups of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 81421004), and the Doctoral Program of the Education Ministry of China (Grant No. 20120001110078).

  3. Polysaccharide-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles for Imaging and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Uthaman, Saji; Cherukula, Kondareddy; Cho, Chong-Su; Park, In-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Today, nanotechnology plays a vital role in biomedical applications, especially for the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases. Among the many different types of fabricated nanoparticles, magnetic metal oxide nanoparticles stand out as unique and useful tools for biomedical applications, because of their imaging characteristics and therapeutic properties such as drug and gene carriers. Polymer-coated magnetic particles are currently of particular interest to investigators in the fields of nanobiomedicine and fundamental biomaterials. Theranostic magnetic nanoparticles that are encapsulated or coated with polymers not only exhibit imaging properties in response to stimuli, but also can efficiently deliver various drugs and therapeutic genes. Even though a large number of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles have been fabricated over the last decade, most of these have only been used for imaging purposes. The focus of this review is on polysaccharide-coated magnetic nanoparticles used for imaging and gene delivery. PMID:26078971

  4. The effects of magnetic nanoparticle properties on magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappiyoor, Ravi; Liangruksa, Monrudee; Ganguly, Ranjan; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a noninvasive treatment that destroys cancer cells by heating a ferrofluid-impregnated malignant tissue with an ac magnetic field while causing minimal damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. The strength of the magnetic field must be sufficient to induce hyperthermia but it is also limited by the human ability to safely withstand it. The ferrofluid material used for hyperthermia should be one that is readily produced and is nontoxic while providing sufficient heating. We examine six materials that have been considered as candidates for MFH use. Examining the heating produced by nanoparticles of these materials, barium-ferrite and cobalt-ferrite are unable to produce sufficient MFH heating, that from iron-cobalt occurs at a far too rapid rate to be safe, while fcc iron-platinum, magnetite, and maghemite are all capable of producing stable controlled heating. We simulate the heating of ferrofluid-loaded tumors containing nanoparticles of the latter three materials to determine their effects on tumor tissue. These materials are viable MFH candidates since they can produce significant heating at the tumor center yet maintain the surrounding healthy tissue interface at a relatively safe temperature.

  5. Influence Of Nanoparticles Diameter On Structural Properties Of Magnetic Fluid In Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kúdelčík, Jozef; Bury, Peter; Hardoň, Štefan; Kopčanský, Peter; Timko, Milan

    2015-07-01

    The properties of magnetic fluids depend on the nanoparticle diameter, their concentration and the carrier liquid. The structural changes in magnetic fluids with different nanoparticle diameter based on transformer oils TECHNOL and MOGUL under the effect of a magnetic field and temperature were studied by acoustic spectroscopy. At a linear and jump changes of the magnetic field at various temperatures a continuous change was observed of acoustic attenuation caused by aggregation of the magnetic nanoparticles to structures. From the anisotropy of acoustic attenuation and using the Taketomi theory the basic parameters of the structures are calculated and the impact of nanoparticle diameters on the size of structures is confirmed.

  6. Nonlinear Susceptibility Magnitude Imaging of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the resolution of susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) using spatial information that arises from the nonlinear magnetization characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs). In this proof-of-concept study of nonlinear SMI, a pair of drive coils and several permanent magnets generate applied magnetic fields and a coil is used as a magnetic field sensor. Sinusoidal alternating current (AC) in the drive coils results in linear mNP magnetization responses at primary frequencies, and nonlinear responses at harmonic frequencies and intermodulation frequencies. The spatial information content of the nonlinear responses is evaluated by reconstructing tomographic images with sequentially increasing voxel counts using the combined linear and nonlinear data. Using the linear data alone it is not possible to accurately reconstruct more than 2 voxels with a pair of drive coils and a single sensor. However, nonlinear SMI is found to accurately reconstruct 12 voxels (R2 = 0.99, CNR = 84.9) using the same physical configuration. Several time-multiplexing methods are then explored to determine if additional spatial information can be obtained by varying the amplitude, phase and frequency of the applied magnetic fields from the two drive coils. Asynchronous phase modulation, amplitude modulation, intermodulation phase modulation, and frequency modulation all resulted in accurate reconstruction of 6 voxels (R2 > 0.9) indicating that time multiplexing is a valid approach to further increase the resolution of nonlinear SMI. The spatial information content of nonlinear mNP responses and the potential for resolution enhancement with time multiplexing demonstrate the concept and advantages of nonlinear SMI. PMID:25505816

  7. Local Control of Ultrafast Dynamics of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhov, A.; Berakdar, J.

    2009-02-06

    Using the local control theory we derive analytical expressions for magnetic field pulses that steer the magnetization of a monodomain magnetic nanoparticle to a predefined state. Finite-temperature full numerical simulations confirm the analytical results and show that a magnetization switching or freezing is achievable within few precessional periods and that the scheme is exploitable for fast thermal switching.

  8. Magnetic-Field-Assisted Assembly of Anisotropic Superstructures by Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Enhanced Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chengpeng; Leung, Chi Wah; Pong, Philip W. T.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle superstructures with controlled magnetic alignment and desired structural anisotropy hold promise for applications in data storage and energy storage. Assembly of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles under a magnetic field could lead to highly ordered superstructures, providing distinctive magnetic properties. In this work, a low-cost fabrication technique was demonstrated to assemble sub-20-nm iron oxide nanoparticles into crystalline superstructures under an in-plane magnetic field. The gradient of the applied magnetic field contributes to the anisotropic formation of micron-sized superstructures. The magnitude of the applied magnetic field promotes the alignment of magnetic moments of the nanoparticles. The strong dipole-dipole interactions between the neighboring nanoparticles lead to a close-packed pattern as an energetically favorable configuration. Rod-shaped and spindle-shaped superstructures with uniform size and controlled spacing were obtained using spherical and polyhedral nanoparticles, respectively. The arrangement and alignment of the superstructures can be tuned by changing the experimental conditions. The two types of superstructures both show enhancement of coercivity and saturation magnetization along the applied field direction, which is presumably associated with the magnetic anisotropy and magnetic dipole interactions of the constituent nanoparticles and the increased shape anisotropy of the superstructures. Our results show that the magnetic-field-assisted assembly technique could be used for fabricating nanomaterial-based structures with controlled geometric dimensions and enhanced magnetic properties for magnetic and energy storage applications.

  9. Magnetic-Field-Assisted Assembly of Anisotropic Superstructures by Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Enhanced Magnetism.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chengpeng; Leung, Chi Wah; Pong, Philip W T

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle superstructures with controlled magnetic alignment and desired structural anisotropy hold promise for applications in data storage and energy storage. Assembly of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles under a magnetic field could lead to highly ordered superstructures, providing distinctive magnetic properties. In this work, a low-cost fabrication technique was demonstrated to assemble sub-20-nm iron oxide nanoparticles into crystalline superstructures under an in-plane magnetic field. The gradient of the applied magnetic field contributes to the anisotropic formation of micron-sized superstructures. The magnitude of the applied magnetic field promotes the alignment of magnetic moments of the nanoparticles. The strong dipole-dipole interactions between the neighboring nanoparticles lead to a close-packed pattern as an energetically favorable configuration. Rod-shaped and spindle-shaped superstructures with uniform size and controlled spacing were obtained using spherical and polyhedral nanoparticles, respectively. The arrangement and alignment of the superstructures can be tuned by changing the experimental conditions. The two types of superstructures both show enhancement of coercivity and saturation magnetization along the applied field direction, which is presumably associated with the magnetic anisotropy and magnetic dipole interactions of the constituent nanoparticles and the increased shape anisotropy of the superstructures. Our results show that the magnetic-field-assisted assembly technique could be used for fabricating nanomaterial-based structures with controlled geometric dimensions and enhanced magnetic properties for magnetic and energy storage applications. PMID:27067737

  10. Surface controlled magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Jeotikanta; Mitra, Arijit; Bahadur, D.; Aslam, M.

    2013-02-01

    To understand the influence of surface organic-inorganic interactions on the magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles, magnetite (Fe3O4) of mean size 4-16 nm (standard deviation σ ≤ 15 %) are synthesized by three different thermolysis techniques. The surface functionality is controlled through either amine or amine-acid both taking as surfactant for Fe3O4 nanoparticles synthesis. Magnetic investigations revealed that samples prepared using amine as a multifunctional agent (only one surfactant) shows superior magnetic properties than the nanoparticles produced by the approach utilizing oleic acid and oleylamine.

  11. Biomedical and environmental applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Dai Lam; Le, Van Hong; Linh Pham, Hoai; Nhung Hoang, Thi My; Quy Nguyen, Thi; Luong, Thien Tai; Thu Ha, Phuong; Phuc Nguyen, Xuan

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents an overview of syntheses and applications of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) at the Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology. Three families of oxide MNPs, magnetite, manganite and spinel ferrite materials, were prepared in various ways: coprecipitation, sol–gel and high energy mechanical milling. Basic properties of MNPs were characterized by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) and Physical Properties Measurement Systems (PPMS). As for biomedical application, the aim was to design a novel multifunctional, nanosized magnetofluorescent water-dispersible Fe3O4-curcumin conjugate, and its ability to label, target and treat tumor cells was described. The conjugate possesses a magnetic nano Fe3O4 core, chitosan (CS) or Oleic acid (OL) as an outer shell and entrapped curcumin (Cur), serving the dual function of naturally autofluorescent dye as well as antitumor model drug. Fe3O4-Cur conjugate exhibited a high loading cellular uptake with the help of a macrophage, which was clearly visualized dually by Fluorescence Microscope and Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope (LSCM), as well as by magnetization measurement (PPMS). A preliminary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study also showed a clear contrast enhancement by using the conjugate. As for the environmental aspect, the use of magnetite MNPs for the removal of heavy toxic metals, such as Arsenic (As) and Lead (Pb), from contaminated water was studied.

  12. A Renewable Electrochemical Magnetic Immunosensor Based on Gold Nanoparticle Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-05-24

    A particle-based renewable electrochemical magnetic immunosensor was developed by using magnetic beads and a gold nanoparticle label. Anti-IgG antibody-modified magnetic beads were attached to a renewable carbon paste transducer surface by magnets that were fixed inside the sensor. A gold nanoparticle label was capsulated to the surface of magnetic beads by sandwich immunoassay. Highly sensitive electrochemical stripping analysis offers a simple and fast method to quantify the capatured gold nanoparticle tracer and avoid the use of an enzyme label and substrate. The stripping signal of gold nanoparticle is related to the concentration of target IgG in the sample solution. A transmission electron microscopy image shows that the gold nanoparticles were successfully capsulated to the surface of magnetic beads through sandwich immunoreaction events. The parameters of immunoassay, including the loading of magnetic beads, the amount of gold nanoparticle conjugate, and the immunoreaction time, were optimized. The detection limit of 0.02 μg ml-1of IgG was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. Such particle-based electrochemical magnetic immunosensors could be readily used for simultaneous parallel detection of multiple proteins by using multiple inorganic metal nanoparticle tracers and are expected to open new opportunities for disease diagnostics and biosecurity.

  13. Advanced magnetic anisotropy determination through isothermal remanent magnetization of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillion, A.; Tamion, A.; Tournus, F.; Gaier, O.; Bonet, E.; Albin, C.; Dupuis, V.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a theoretical framework enabling the simulation of isothermal remanence magnetization (IRM) curves, based on the Stoner-Wohlfarth model combined with the Néel macrospin relaxation time description. We show how low temperature IRM curves, which have many advantages compared to hysteresis loops, can be efficiently computed for realistic assemblies of magnetic particles with both a size and anisotropy constant distribution, and a biaxial anisotropy. The IRM curves, which probe the irreversible switching provoked by an applied field, are shown to be complementary to other usual measurements (in particular low-field susceptibility curves where a thermal switching is involved). As an application, the experimental IRM curve of Co clusters embedded in a carbon matrix is analyzed. We demonstrate how powerful such an analysis can be, which in the present case allows us to put into evidence an anisotropy constant dispersion among the Co nanoparticles.

  14. Biotin avidin amplified magnetic immunoassay for hepatitis B surface antigen detection using GoldMag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, An; Geng, Tingting; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Chao; Cui, Yali

    2007-04-01

    Using GoldMag (Fe3O4/Au) nanoparticles as a carrier, a biotin-avidin amplified ELISA was developed to detect hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). A specific antibody was labeled with biotin and then used to detect the antigen with an antibody coated on GoldMag nanoparticles by a sandwich ELISA assay. The results showed that 5 mol of biotin were surface bound per mole of antibody. The biotin-avidin amplified ELISA assay has a higher sensitivity than that of the direct ELISA assay. There is 5-fold difference between HBsAg positive and negative serum even at dilution of 1:10000, and the relative standard deviation of the parallel positive serum at dilution of 1:4000 is 5.98% (n=11).

  15. Peptide-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Anastasia Kruse

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the United States. Radiation and chemotherapy are conventional treatments, but they result in serious side effects and the probability of tumor recurrence remains high. Therefore, there is an increasing need to enhance the efficacy of conventional treatments. Magnetic nanoparticles have been previously studied for a variety of applications such as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, anemia treatment, magnetic cell sorting and magnetically mediated hyperthermia (MMH). In this work, dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles were developed and functionalized with peptides to target the nanoparticles to either the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tumor tissue or to localize the nanoparticles in subcellular regions after cell uptake. The magnetic nanoparticles were utilized for a variety of applications. First, heating properties of the nanoparticles were utilized to administer hyperthermia treatments combined with chemotherapy. The nanoparticles were functionalized with peptides to target fibrinogen in the ECM and extensively characterized for their physicochemical properties, and MMH combined with chemotherapy was able to enhance the toxicity of chemotherapy. The second application of the nanoparticles was magnetically mediated energy delivery. This treatment does not result in a bulk temperature rise upon actuation of the nanoparticles by an alternating magnetic field (AMF) but rather results in intracellular damage via friction from Brownian rotation or nanoscale heating effects from Neel relaxations. The nanoparticles were functionalized with a cell penetrating peptide to facilitate cell uptake and lysosomal escape. The intracellular effects of the internalized nanoparticles alone and with activation by an AMF were evaluated. Iron concentrations in vivo are highly regulated as excess iron can catalyze the formation of the hydroxyl radical through Fenton chemistry. Although often a concern of using iron

  16. Nanoparticle distribution and temperature elevations in prostatic tumours in mice during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Attaluri, Anilchandra; Ma, Ronghui; Qiu, Yun; Li, Wei; Zhu, Liang

    2011-01-01

    Among a variety of hyperthermia methods, magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is a highly promising approach for its confined heating within the tumour. In this study we perform in vivo animal experiments on implanted prostatic tumours in mice to measure temperature distribution in the tumour during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. Temperature elevations are induced by a commercially available ferrofluid injected via a single injection to the centre of the tumour, when the tumour is subject to an alternating magnetic field. Temperature mapping in the tumours during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia has demonstrated the feasibility of elevating tumour temperatures higher than 50°C using only 0.1 cm(3) ferrofluid injected in the tumour under a relatively low magnetic field (3 kA/m). Detailed 3-D nanoparticle concentration distribution is quantified using a high-resolution microCT imaging system. The calculated nanoparticle distribution volume based on the microCT scans is useful to analyse nanoparticle deposition in the tumours. Slower ferrofluid infusion rates result in smaller nanoparticle distribution volumes in the tumours. Nanoparticles are more confined in the vicinity of the injection site with slower infusion rates, causing higher temperature elevations in the tumours. The increase in the nanoparticle distribution volume in the tumour group after the heating from that in the tumour group without heating suggests possible nanoparticle re-distribution in the tumours during the heating. PMID:21756046

  17. Navigation with magnetic nanoparticles: magnetotactic bacteria and magnetic micro-robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, Stefan; Kiani, Bahareh; Vach, Peter; Faivre, Damien

    2015-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria navigate in the magnetic field of the Earth by aligning and swimming along field lines with the help of special magnetic organelles called magnetosomes. These organelles contain magnetic nanoparticles and are organized into chain structures in cells. Here we review recent work on the formation of these chains and provide some estimates of the magnetic interaction energies and the corresponding forces involved in this process. In addition, we briefly discuss the propulsion of synthetic micro- or nanopropellers based on magnetic nanoparticles.

  18. Magnetic nanoparticles: synthesis, functionalization, and applications in bioimaging and magnetic energy storage

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Natalie A.; Peng, Sheng; Cheng, Kai; Sun, Shouheng

    2009-01-01

    This tutorial review summarizes the recent advances in the chemical synthesis and potential applications of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles. After a brief introduction to nanomagnetism, the review focuses on recent developments in solution phase syntheses of monodisperse MFe2O4, Co, Fe, CoFe, FePt and SmCo5 nanoparticles. The review further outlines the surface, structural, and magnetic properties of these nanoparticles for biomedicine and magnetic energy storage applications. PMID:19690734

  19. Composite Materials with Magnetically Aligned Carbon Nanoparticles Having Enhanced Electrical Properties and Methods of Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Haiping (Inventor); Peterson, G.P. (Bud) (Inventor); Salem, David R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically aligned carbon nanoparticle composites have enhanced electrical properties. The composites comprise carbon nanoparticles, a host material, magnetically sensitive nanoparticles and a surfactant. In addition to enhanced electrical properties, the composites can have enhanced mechanical and thermal properties.

  20. Size control of magnetic carbon nanoparticles for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Oh, W-K; Yoon, H; Jang, J

    2010-02-01

    Carbonized polypyrrole nanoparticles with controlled diameters were readily fabricated by the pyrolysis of polypyrrole nanoparticles. The carbonized polypyrrole nanoparticles showed narrow size distribution, large micropore volume, and high surface area. Magnetic phases were introduced into the carbon nanoparticles during the pyrolysis without sophisticated process, which resulted in useful magnetic properties for selective nanoparticle separation. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectrometer, N(2) adsorption/desorption, X-ray diffraction, and superconducting interference device were employed for characterizing the carbonized polypyrrole nanoparticles. Hydrophobic guest molecules were incorporated into the carbonized polypyrrole nanoparticles by surface adsorption, pore filling, and surface covalent coupling. The carbonized polypyrrole nanoparticles exhibited embedding capability using pyrene as a typical hydrophobic fluorescent molecule. In addition, ibuprofen was incorporated into the carbon nanoparticles, and drug-loaded carbon nanoparticles sustained release property. In addition, the carbonized polypyrrole nanoparticles revealed low toxicity at concentrations below 100 microg mL(-1) via cell viability test and were uptaken inside the cells. These results suggest a new platform for the drug delivery using carbonized polypyrrole nanoparticles. PMID:19878989

  1. Magnetic nanoparticle assembly arrays prepared by hierarchical self-assembly on a patterned surface.

    PubMed

    Wen, Tianlong; Zhang, Dainan; Wen, Qiye; Zhang, Huaiwu; Liao, Yulong; Li, Qiang; Yang, Qinghui; Bai, Feiming; Zhong, Zhiyong

    2015-03-21

    Inverted pyramid hole arrays were fabricated by photolithography and used as templates to direct the growth of colloidal nanoparticle assemblies. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles deposit in the holes to yield high quality pyramid magnetic nanoparticle assembly arrays by carefully controlling the evaporation of the carrier fluid. Magnetic measurements indicate that the pyramid magnetic nanoparticle assembly arrays preferentially magnetize perpendicular to the substrate. PMID:25712606

  2. Magnetic nanoparticle-based drug delivery for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tietze, Rainer; Zaloga, Jan; Unterweger, Harald; Lyer, Stefan; Friedrich, Ralf P; Janko, Christina; Pöttler, Marina; Dürr, Stephan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-12-18

    Nanoparticles have belonged to various fields of biomedical research for quite some time. A promising site-directed application in the field of nanomedicine is drug targeting using magnetic nanoparticles which are directed at the target tissue by means of an external magnetic field. Materials most commonly used for magnetic drug delivery contain metal or metal oxide nanoparticles, such as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). SPIONs consist of an iron oxide core, often coated with organic materials such as fatty acids, polysaccharides or polymers to improve colloidal stability and to prevent separation into particles and carrier medium [1]. In general, magnetite and maghemite particles are those most commonly used in medicine and are, as a rule, well-tolerated. The magnetic properties of SPIONs allow the remote control of their accumulation by means of an external magnetic field. Conjugation of SPIONs with drugs, in combination with an external magnetic field to target the nanoparticles (so-called "magnetic drug targeting", MDT), has additionally emerged as a promising strategy of drug delivery. Magnetic nanoparticle-based drug delivery is a sophisticated overall concept and a multitude of magnetic delivery vehicles have been developed. Targeting mechanism-exploiting, tumor-specific attributes are becoming more and more sophisticated. The same is true for controlled-release strategies for the diseased site. As it is nearly impossible to record every magnetic nanoparticle system developed so far, this review summarizes interesting approaches which have recently emerged in the field of targeted drug delivery for cancer therapy based on magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:26271592

  3. Switching the Magnetic Vortex Core in a Single Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Pinilla-Cienfuegos, Elena; Mañas-Valero, Samuel; Forment-Aliaga, Alicia; Coronado, Eugenio

    2016-02-23

    Imaging and manipulating the spin structure of nano- and mesoscale magnetic systems is a challenging topic in magnetism, yielding a wide range of spin phenomena such as skyrmions, hedgehog-like spin structures, or vortices. A key example has been provided by the vortex spin texture, which can be addressed in four independent states of magnetization, enabling the development of multibit magnetic storage media. Most of the works devoted to the study of the magnetization reversal mechanisms of the magnetic vortices have been focused on micrometer-size magnetic platelets. Here we report the experimental observation of the vortex state formation and annihilation in individual 25 nm molecular-based magnetic nanoparticles measured by low-temperature variable-field magnetic force microscopy. Interestingly, in these nanoparticles the switching of the vortex core can be induced with very small values of the applied static magnetic field. PMID:26745548

  4. Measurement of Nanoparticle Magnetic Hyperthermia Using Fluorescent Microthermal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaowan; van Keuren, Edward

    Nanoparticle magnetic hyperthermia uses the application of an AC magnetic field to ferromagnetic nanoparticles to elevate the temperature of cancer cells. The principle of hyperthermia as a true cell-specific therapy is that tumor cells are more sensitive to high temperature, so it is of great importance to control the locality and magnitude of the temperature differences. One technique to measure temperature variations on microscopic length scales is fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI). Since it is the local temperature that is measured in FMI, effects such as heating due to nearby field coils can be accounted for. A dye, the rare earth chelate europium thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (Eu:TTA), with a strong temperature-dependent fluorescence emission has been incorporated into magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a polymer films. FMI experiments were carried out on these samples under an applied high frequency magnetic field. Preliminary results show that FMI is a promising technique for characterizing the local generation of heat in nanoparticle magnetic hyperthermia.

  5. Proteins and Patients — Magnetic Nanoparticles as Analytic Markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    Exciting new applications of low noise magnetic sensors in biotechnology, medical diagnosis and therapy are at hand for magnetic nanoparticles (MNP), which are already used in the clinical routine. The relaxation of magnetic nanoparticles is a fascinating method which can be employed for the characterization of ferrofluids and is further developed as analytical tool for biochemistry. In this article the basics and methods of the characterization of diluted ferrofluids by magnetore-laxometry (MRX) are described. We start with the properties of the ferrofluid which consists of magnetic nanoparticles. The time schedule for relaxation measurements is discussed. The details of our fluxgate based experimental set-up are presented. To achieve high sensitivity even at low concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles we optimize fluxgate sensors for low intrinsic noise, high sensitivity and large bandwidth.

  6. Pulsed Laser Synthesized Magnetic Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Hari; Gupta, Ram; Ghosh, Kartik; Kahol, Pawan; Delong, Robert; Wanekawa, Adam

    2011-03-01

    Nanomaterials research has become a major attraction in the field of advanced materials research in the area of Physics, Chemistry, and Materials Science. Biocompatible and chemically stable magnetic metal oxide nanoparticles have biomedical applications that includes drug delivery, cell and DNA separation, gene cloning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This research is aimed at the fabrication of magnetic cobalt oxide nanoparticles using a safe, cost effective, and easy to handle technique that is capable of producing nanoparticles free of any contamination. Cobalt oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized at room temperature using cobalt foil by pulsed laser ablation technique. These cobalt oxide nanoparticles were characterized using UV-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and dynamic laser light scattering (DLLS). The magnetic cobalt oxides nanoparticles were stabilized in glucose solutions of various concentrations in deionized water. The presence of UV-Vis absorption peak at 270 nm validates the nature of cobalt oxide nanoparticles. The DLLS size distributions of nanoparticles are in the range of 110 to 300 nm, which further confirms the presence nanoparticles. This work is partially supported by National Science Foundation (DMR- 0907037).

  7. Kinetics and pathogenesis of intracellular magnetic nanoparticle cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Giustini, Andrew. J.; Gottesman, Rachel E.; Petryk, A.A.; Rauwerdink, A.M.; Hoopes, P. Jack.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles excited by alternating magnetic fields (AMF) have demonstrated effective tumor-specific hyperthermia. This treatment is effective as a monotherapy as well as a therapeutic adjuvant to chemotherapy and radiation. Iron oxide nanoparticles have been shown, so far, to be non-toxic, as are the exciting AMF fields when used at moderate levels. Although higher levels of AMF can be more effective, depending on the type of iron oxide nanoparticles use, these higher field strengths and/or frequencies can induce normal tissue heating and toxicity. Thus, the use of nanoparticles exhibiting significant heating at low AMF strengths and frequencies is desirable. Our preliminary experiments have shown that the aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles within tumor cells improves their heating effect and cytotoxicity per nanoparticle. We have used transmission electron microscopy to track the endocytosis of nanoparticles into tumor cells (both breast adenocarcinoma (MTG-B) and acute monocytic leukemia (THP-1) cells). Our preliminary results suggest that nanoparticles internalized into tumor cells demonstrate greater cytotoxicity when excited with AMF than an equivalent heat dose from excited external nanoparticles or cells exposed to a hot water bath. We have also demonstrated that this increase in SAR caused by aggregation improves the cytotoxicity of nanoparticle hyperthermia therapy in vitro. PMID:24382988

  8. Kinetics and pathogenesis of intracellular magnetic nanoparticle cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustini, Andrew J.; Gottesman, Rachel E.; Petryk, A. A.; Rauwerdink, A. M.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles excited by alternating magnetic fields (AMF) have demonstrated effective tumor-specific hyperthermia. This treatment is effective as a monotherapy as well as a therapeutic adjuvant to chemotherapy and radiation. Iron oxide nanoparticles have been shown, so far, to be non-toxic, as are the exciting AMF fields when used at moderate levels. Although higher levels of AMF can be more effective, depending on the type of iron oxide nanoparticles use, these higher field strengths and/or frequencies can induce normal tissue heating and toxicity. Thus, the use of nanoparticles exhibiting significant heating at low AMF strengths and frequencies is desirable. Our preliminary experiments have shown that the aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles within tumor cells improves their heating effect and cytotoxicity per nanoparticle. We have used transmission electron microscopy to track the endocytosis of nanoparticles into tumor cells (both breast adenocarcinoma (MTG-B) and acute monocytic leukemia (THP-1) cells). Our preliminary results suggest that nanoparticles internalized into tumor cells demonstrate greater cytotoxicity when excited with AMF than an equivalent heat dose from excited external nanoparticles or cells exposed to a hot water bath. We have also demonstrated that this increase in SAR caused by aggregation improves the cytotoxicity of nanoparticle hyperthermia therapy in vitro.

  9. The role of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles in medical science.

    PubMed

    Amiri, S; Shokrollahi, H

    2013-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is rapidly growing and promises that the substantial changes that will have significant economic and scientific impacts be applicable to a wide range of areas, such as aerospace engineering, nano-electronics, environmental remediation and medical healthcare. In this area, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been regarded as one of the competitive candidates because of their suitable physical, chemical and magnetic properties like the high anisotropy constant, high coercivity and high Curie temperature, moderate saturation magnetization and ease of synthesis. This paper introduces the magnetic properties, synthesis methods and some medical applications, including the hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic separation and drug delivery of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. PMID:25428034

  10. Functionalization of polydopamine coated magnetic nanoparticles with biological entities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mǎgeruşan, Lidia; Mrówczyński, Radosław; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-01

    New hybrid materials, obtained through introduction of cysteine, lysine and folic acid as biological entities into polydopamine-coated magnetite nanoparticles, are reported. The syntheses are straight forward and various methods were applied for structural and morphological characterization of the resulting nanoparticles. XPS proved a very powerful tool for surface chemical analysis and it evidences the functionalization of polydopamine coated magnetite nanoparticles. The superparamagnetic behavior and the high values of saturation magnetization recommend all products for further application where magnetism is important for targeting, separation, or heating by alternative magnetic fields.

  11. Dynamic magnetic hysteresis and nonlinear susceptibility of antiferromagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, Yuri P.; Ouari, Bachir; Titov, Serguey V.

    2016-08-01

    The nonlinear ac stationary response of antiferromagnetic nanoparticles subjected to both external ac and dc fields of arbitrary strength and orientation is investigated using Brown's continuous diffusion model. The nonlinear complex susceptibility and dynamic magnetic hysteresis (DMH) loops of an individual antiferromagnetic nanoparticle are evaluated and compared with the linear regime for extensive ranges of the anisotropy, the ac and dc magnetic fields, damping, and the specific antiferromagnetic parameter. It is shown that the shape and area of the DMH loops of antiferromagnetic particles are substantially altered by applying a dc field that permits tuning of the specific magnetic power loss in the nanoparticles.

  12. Inhalable Magnetic Nanoparticles for Targeted Hyperthermia in Lung Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Wiedmann, Timothy Scott; Panyam, Jayanth

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer (specifically, non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Poor response rates and survival with current treatments clearly indicate the urgent need for developing an effective means to treat NSCLC. Magnetic hyperthermia is a non-invasive approach for tumor ablation, and is based on heat generation by magnetic materials, such as superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles, when subjected to an alternating magnetic field. However, inadequate delivery of magnetic nanoparticles to tumor cells can result in sub-lethal temperature change and induce resistance while non-targeted delivery of these particles to the healthy tissues can result in toxicity. In our studies, we evaluated the effectiveness of tumor-targeted SPIO nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia of lung cancer. EGFR-targeted, inhalable SPIO nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized for targeting lung tumor cells as well as for magnetic hyperthermia-mediated antitumor efficacy in a mouse orthotopic model of NSCLC. Our results show that EGFR targeting enhances tumor retention of SPIO nanoparticles. Further, magnetic hyperthermia treatment using targeted SPIO nanoparticles resulted in significant inhibition of in vivo lung tumor growth. Overall, this work demonstrates the potential for developing an effective anticancer treatment modality for the treatment of NSCLC based on targeted magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:23591395

  13. Bacterially synthesized ferrite nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia applications.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Eva; Byrne, James M; Farrow, Neil; Moise, Sandhya; Coker, Victoria S; Bencsik, Martin; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Telling, Neil D

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia uses AC stimulation of magnetic nanoparticles to generate heat for cancer cell destruction. Whilst nanoparticles produced inside magnetotactic bacteria have shown amongst the highest reported heating to date, these particles are magnetically blocked so that strong heating occurs only for mobile particles, unless magnetic field parameters are far outside clinical limits. Here, nanoparticles extracellularly produced by the bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens are investigated that contain Co or Zn dopants to tune the magnetic anisotropy, saturation magnetization and nanoparticle sizes, enabling heating within clinical field constraints. The heating mechanisms specific to either Co or Zn doping are determined from frequency dependent specific absorption rate (SAR) measurements and innovative AC susceptometry simulations that use a realistic model concerning clusters of polydisperse nanoparticles in suspension. Whilst both particle types undergo magnetization relaxation and show heating effects in water under low AC frequency and field, only Zn doped particles maintain relaxation combined with hysteresis losses even when immobilized. This magnetic heating process could prove important in the biological environment where nanoparticle mobility may not be possible. Obtained SARs are discussed regarding clinical conditions which, together with their enhanced MRI contrast, indicate that biogenic Zn doped particles are promising for combined diagnostics and cancer therapy. PMID:25232657

  14. Immobilization of bovine catalase onto magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Doğaç, Yasemin İspirli; Teke, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this study is to achieve carrier-bound immobilization of catalase onto magnetic particles (Fe₃O₄ and Fe₂O₃NiO₂ · H₂O) to specify the optimum conditions of immobilization. Removal of H2O2 and the properties of immobilized sets were also investigated. To that end, adsorption and then cross-linking methods onto magnetic particles were performed. The optimum immobilization conditions were found for catalase: immobilization time (15 min for Fe₃O₄; 10 min for Fe2O₃NiO₂ · H₂O), the initial enzyme concentration (1 mg/mL), amount of magnetic particles (25 mg), and glutaraldehyde concentration (3%). The activity reaction conditions (optimum temperature, optimum pH, pH stability, thermal stability, operational stability, and reusability) were characterized. Also kinetic parameters were calculated by Lineweaver-Burk plots. The optimum pH values were found to be 7.0, 7.0, and 8.0 for free enzyme, Fe₃O₄-immobilized catalases, and Fe₂O₃NiO₂ · H₂O-immobilized catalases, respectively. All immobilized catalase systems displayed the optimum temperature between 25 and 35°C. Reusability studies showed that Fe₃O₄-immobilized catalase can be used 11 times with 50% loss in original activity, while Fe2O₃NiO₂ · H₂O-immobilized catalase lost 67% of activity after the same number of uses. Furthermore, immobilized catalase systems exhibited improved thermal and pH stability. The results transparently indicate that it is possible to have binding between enzyme and magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:23876136

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles for bio-analytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedlapalli, Sri Lakshmi

    Magnetic nanoparticles are widely being used in various fields of medicine, biology and separations. This dissertation focuses on the synthesis and use of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and analytical separations. The goals of this research include synthesis of biocompatible surface modified monodisperse superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) by novel techniques for targeted drug delivery and use of SPIONs as analytical sensing tools. Surface modification of SPIONs was performed with two different co-polymers: tri block co-polymer Pluronics and octylamine modified polyacrylic acid. Samples of SPIONs were subsequently modified with 4 different commercially available, FDA approved tri-block copolymers (Pluronics), covering a wide range of molecular weights (5.75-14.6 kDa). A novel, technically simpler and faster phase transfer approach was developed to surface modify the SPIONs with Pluronics for drug delivery and other biomedical applications. The hydrodynamic diameter and aggregation properties of the Pluronic modified SPIONs were studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The coverage of SPIONs with Pluronics was supported with IR Spectroscopy and characterized by Thermo gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The drug entrapment capacity of SPIONs was studied by UV-VIS spectroscopy using a hydrophobic carbocyanine dye, which serves as a model for hydrophobic drugs. These studies resulted in a comparison of physical properties and their implications for drug loading capacities of the four types of Pluronic coated SPIONs for drug delivery assessment. These drug delivery systems could be used for passive drug targeting. However, Pluronics lack the functional group necessary for bioconjugation and hence cannot achieve active targeting. SPIONs were functionalized with octylamine modified polyacrylic acid-based copolymer, providing water solubility and facile biomolecular conjugation. Epirubicin was loaded onto SPIONs and the drug entrapment was

  16. Mass production of magnetic nickel nanoparticle in thermal plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, Ashok B.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Das, A. K.; Mathe, V. L.

    2014-04-01

    We report the mass production of Ni metal nanoparticles using dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by homogeneous gas phase condensation process. To increase the evaporation rate and purity of Ni nanoparticles small amount of hydrogen added along with argon in the plasma. Crystal structure analysis was done by using X-ray diffraction technique. The morphology of as synthesized nanoparticles was carried out using FESEM images. The magnetic properties were measured by using vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature.

  17. Magnetic Properties of FePd Nanoparticles Prepared by Sonoelectrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Nguyen Hoang; Trung, Truong Thanh; Loan, Tran Phuong; Kien, Luu Manh; Hong, Tran Thi; Nam, Nguyen Hoang

    2016-05-01

    Fe60Pd40 nanoparticles were prepared by sonoelectrodeposition. After annealing at various temperatures from 450°C to 700°C, the nanoparticles were found to have an ordered L10 structure and to show hard magnetic properties. Among the samples investigated, the nanoparticles annealed at 600°C exhibited the highest coercivity which amounts to 2.31 kOe at 2 K and 1.83 kOe at 300 K.

  18. Mass production of magnetic nickel nanoparticle in thermal plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, Ashok B.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2014-04-24

    We report the mass production of Ni metal nanoparticles using dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by homogeneous gas phase condensation process. To increase the evaporation rate and purity of Ni nanoparticles small amount of hydrogen added along with argon in the plasma. Crystal structure analysis was done by using X-ray diffraction technique. The morphology of as synthesized nanoparticles was carried out using FESEM images. The magnetic properties were measured by using vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature.

  19. Magnetic Properties of FePd Nanoparticles Prepared by Sonoelectrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Nguyen Hoang; Trung, Truong Thanh; Loan, Tran Phuong; Kien, Luu Manh; Hong, Tran Thi; Nam, Nguyen Hoang

    2016-08-01

    Fe60Pd40 nanoparticles were prepared by sonoelectrodeposition. After annealing at various temperatures from 450°C to 700°C, the nanoparticles were found to have an ordered L10 structure and to show hard magnetic properties. Among the samples investigated, the nanoparticles annealed at 600°C exhibited the highest coercivity which amounts to 2.31 kOe at 2 K and 1.83 kOe at 300 K.

  20. Magnetic order of Au nanoparticle with clean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ryuju; Ishikawa, Soichiro; Sato, Hiroyuki; Sato, Tetsuya

    2015-11-01

    Au nanoparticles, which are kept in vacuum after the preparation by gas evaporation method, show ferromagnetism even in 1.7 nm in diameter. The intrinsic magnetism is examined by detecting the disappearance of spontaneous magnetization in Au bulk prepared by heating the nanoparticles without exposure to the air. The temperature dependence of spontaneous magnetization is not monotonic and the increase in magnetization is observed after Au nanoparticles are exposed to the air. The magnetic behavior can be interpreted by the ferrimagnetic-like core-shell structure with shell thickness of 0.16±0.01 nm and magnetic moment of (1.5±0.1)×10-2 μB/Au atom, respectively.

  1. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Multi-Imaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Ji-wook; Cheon, Jinwoo

    2013-01-01

    Various bio-medical applications of magnetic nanoparticles have been explored during the past few decades. As tools that hold great potential for advancing biological sciences, magnetic nanoparticles have been used as platform materials for enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agents, biological separation and magnetic drug delivery systems, and magnetic hyperthermia treatment. Furthermore, approaches that integrate various imaging and bioactive moieties have been used in the design of multi-modality systems, which possess synergistically enhanced properties such as better imaging resolution and sensitivity, molecular recognition capabilities, stimulus responsive drug delivery with on-demand control, and spatio-temporally controlled cell signal activation. Below, recent studies that focus on the design and synthesis of multi-mode magnetic nanoparticles will be briefly reviewed and their potential applications in the imaging and therapy areas will be also discussed. PMID:23579479

  2. Lectin-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for reproductive improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Semen ejaculates contain heterogeneous sperm populations that can jeopardize male fertility. Recent development of nanotechnology in physiological systems may have applications in reproductive biology. Here, we used magnetic nanoparticles as a novel strategy for sperm purification to imp...

  3. Magnetic nanoparticle-supported glutathione: a conceptually sustainable organocatalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    A conceptually novel nanoparticle-supported and magnetically recoverable organocatalyst has been developed, which is readily prepared from inexpensive starting materials in a truly sustainable manner; which catalyzes Paal-Knorr reaction with high yield in pure aqueous medium that...

  4. Temperature of the magnetic nanoparticle microenvironment: estimation from relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perreard, I. M.; Reeves, D. B.; Zhang, X.; Kuehlert, E.; Forauer, E. R.; Weaver, J. B.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate temperature measurements are essential to safe and effective thermal therapies for cancer and other diseases. However, conventional thermometry is challenging so using the heating agents themselves as probes allows for ideal local measurements. Here, we present a new noninvasive method for measuring the temperature of the microenvironment surrounding magnetic nanoparticles from the Brownian relaxation time of nanoparticles. Experimentally, the relaxation time can be determined from the nanoparticle magnetization induced by an alternating magnetic field at various applied frequencies. A previously described method for nanoparticle temperature estimation used a low frequency Langevin function description of magnetic dipoles and varied the excitation field amplitude to estimate the energy state distribution and the corresponding temperature. We show that the new method is more accurate than the previous method at higher applied field frequencies that push the system farther from equilibrium.

  5. Synthesis and application of magnetic chitosan nanoparticles in oilfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Qi; Zheng, Xuefang

    2016-01-01

    The novel magnetic Co0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4-chitosan nanoparticles has the advantage of excellent biodegradation and a high level of controllability. The Co0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4-chitosan nanoparticles was prepared successfully. The size of the Co0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4-chitosan nanoparticles were all below 100 nm. The saturated magnetization of the Co0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4-chitosan nanoparticles could reach 80 emu/g and showed the characteristics of superparamagnetism at the same time. The image of TEM and SEM electron microscopy showed that the cubic-shape magnetic Co0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 particles were encapsulated by the spherical chitosan nanoparticles. The evaluation on the interfacial properties of the product showed that the interfacial tension between crude oil and water could be reduce to ultra-low values as low as 10-3 mN/m when the magnetic Co0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4-chitosan nanoparticle was used in several blocks in Shengli Oilfield without other additives. Meanwhile, the magnetic Co0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4-chitosan nanoparticles possessed good salt-resisting capacity.

  6. Bacterially synthesized ferrite nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Céspedes, Eva; Byrne, James M.; Farrow, Neil; Moise, Sandhya; Coker, Victoria S.; Bencsik, Martin; Lloyd, Jonathan R.; Telling, Neil D.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic hyperthermia uses AC stimulation of magnetic nanoparticles to generate heat for cancer cell destruction. Whilst nanoparticles produced inside magnetotactic bacteria have shown amongst the highest reported heating to date, these particles are magnetically blocked so that strong heating occurs only for mobile particles, unless magnetic field parameters are far outside clinical limits. Here, nanoparticles extracellularly produced by the bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens are investigated that contain Co or Zn dopants to tune the magnetic anisotropy, saturation magnetization and nanoparticle sizes, enabling heating within clinical field constraints. The heating mechanisms specific to either Co or Zn doping are determined from frequency dependent specific absorption rate (SAR) measurements and innovative AC susceptometry simulations that use a realistic model concerning clusters of polydisperse nanoparticles in suspension. Whilst both particle types undergo magnetization relaxation and show heating effects in water under low AC frequency and field, only Zn doped particles maintain relaxation combined with hysteresis losses even when immobilized. This magnetic heating process could prove important in the biological environment where nanoparticle mobility may not be possible. Obtained SARs are discussed regarding clinical conditions which, together with their enhanced MRI contrast, indicate that biogenic Zn doped particles are promising for combined diagnostics and cancer therapy.Magnetic hyperthermia uses AC stimulation of magnetic nanoparticles to generate heat for cancer cell destruction. Whilst nanoparticles produced inside magnetotactic bacteria have shown amongst the highest reported heating to date, these particles are magnetically blocked so that strong heating occurs only for mobile particles, unless magnetic field parameters are far outside clinical limits. Here, nanoparticles extracellularly produced by the bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens are

  7. Tailored Magnetic Nanoparticles for Optimizing Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Khandhar, Amit; Ferguson, R. Matthew; Simon, Julian A.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH) is a promising approach towards adjuvant cancer therapy that is based on the localized heating of tumors using the relaxation losses of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in alternating magnetic fields (AMF). In this study, we demonstrate optimization of MFH by tailoring MNP size to an applied AMF frequency. Unlike conventional aqueous synthesis routes, we use organic synthesis routes that offer precise control over MNP size (diameter ~ 10–25 nm), size distribution and phase purity. Furthermore, the particles are successfully transferred to the aqueous phase using a biocompatible amphiphilic polymer, and demonstrate long-term shelf life. A rigorous characterization protocol ensures that the water-stable MNPs meet all the critical requirements: (1) uniform shape and monodispersity, (2) phase purity, (3) stable magnetic properties approaching that of the bulk, (4) colloidal stability, (5) substantial shelf life and (6) pose no significant in vitro toxicity. Using a dedicated hyperthermia system, we then identified that 16 nm monodisperse MNPs (σ ~ 0.175) respond optimally to our chosen AMF conditions (f = 373 kHz, Ho = 14 kA/m); however, with a broader size distribution (σ ~ 0.284) the Specific Loss Power (SLP) decreases by 30%. Finally, we show that these tailored MNPs demonstrate maximum hyperthermia efficiency by reducing viability of Jurkat cells in vitro, suggesting our optimization translates truthfully to cell populations. In summary, we present a way to intrinsically optimize MFH by tailoring the MNPs to any applied AMF, a required precursor to optimize dose and time of treatment. PMID:22213652

  8. Tailored magnetic nanoparticles for optimizing magnetic fluid hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Khandhar, Amit P; Ferguson, R Matthew; Simon, Julian A; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2012-03-01

    Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia (MFH) is a promising approach towards adjuvant cancer therapy that is based on the localized heating of tumors using the relaxation losses of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in alternating magnetic fields (AMF). In this study, we demonstrate optimization of MFH by tailoring MNP size to an applied AMF frequency. Unlike conventional aqueous synthesis routes, we use organic synthesis routes that offer precise control over MNP size (diameter ∼10 to 25 nm), size distribution, and phase purity. Furthermore, the particles are successfully transferred to the aqueous phase using a biocompatible amphiphilic polymer, and demonstrate long-term shelf life. A rigorous characterization protocol ensures that the water-stable MNPs meet all the critical requirements: (1) uniform shape and monodispersity, (2) phase purity, (3) stable magnetic properties approaching that of the bulk, (4) colloidal stability, (5) substantial shelf life, and (6) pose no significant in vitro toxicity. Using a dedicated hyperthermia system, we then identified that 16 nm monodisperse MNPs (σ-0.175) respond optimally to our chosen AMF conditions (f = 373 kHz, H₀ = 14 kA/m); however, with a broader size distribution (σ-0.284) the Specific Loss Power (SLP) decreases by 30%. Finally, we show that these tailored MNPs demonstrate maximum hyperthermia efficiency by reducing viability of Jurkat cells in vitro, suggesting our optimization translates truthfully to cell populations. In summary, we present a way to intrinsically optimize MFH by tailoring the MNPs to any applied AMF, a required precursor to optimize dose and time of treatment. PMID:22213652

  9. Application of magnetic nanoparticles in smart enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Vaghari, Hamideh; Jafarizadeh-Malmiri, Hoda; Mohammadlou, Mojgan; Berenjian, Aydin; Anarjan, Navideh; Jafari, Nahideh; Nasiri, Shahin

    2016-02-01

    Immobilization of enzymes enhances their properties for efficient utilization in industrial processes. Magnetic nanoparticles, due to their high surface area, large surface-to-volume ratio and easy separation under external magnetic fields, are highly valued. Significant progress has been made to develop new catalytic systems that are immobilized onto magnetic nanocarriers. This review provides an overview of recent developments in enzyme immobilization and stabilization protocols using this technology. The current applications of immobilized enzymes based on magnetic nanoparticles are summarized and future growth prospects are discussed. Recommendations are also given for areas of future research. PMID:26472272

  10. Magnetic Nanoparticles: Surface Effects and Properties Related to Biomedicine Applications

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Bashar; Obaidat, Ihab M.; Albiss, Borhan A.; Haik, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    Due to finite size effects, such as the high surface-to-volume ratio and different crystal structures, magnetic nanoparticles are found to exhibit interesting and considerably different magnetic properties than those found in their corresponding bulk materials. These nanoparticles can be synthesized in several ways (e.g., chemical and physical) with controllable sizes enabling their comparison to biological organisms from cells (10–100 μm), viruses, genes, down to proteins (3–50 nm). The optimization of the nanoparticles’ size, size distribution, agglomeration, coating, and shapes along with their unique magnetic properties prompted the application of nanoparticles of this type in diverse fields. Biomedicine is one of these fields where intensive research is currently being conducted. In this review, we will discuss the magnetic properties of nanoparticles which are directly related to their applications in biomedicine. We will focus mainly on surface effects and ferrite nanoparticles, and on one diagnostic application of magnetic nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. PMID:24232575

  11. Bare magnetic nanoparticles as fluorescence quenchers for detection of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiemiao; Yang, Liangrong; Liang, Xiangfeng; Dong, Tingting; Liu, Huizhou

    2015-06-21

    Rapid and sensitive detection of thrombin has very important significance in clinical diagnosis. In this work, bare magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (magnetic nanoparticles) without any modification were used as fluorescence quenchers. In the absence of thrombin, a fluorescent dye (CY3) labeled thrombin aptamer (named CY3-aptamer) was adsorbed on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles through interaction between a phosphate backbone of the CY3-aptamer and hydroxyl groups on the bare magnetic nanoparticles in binding solution, leading to fluorescence quenching. Once thrombin was introduced, the CY3-aptamer formed a G-quartet structure and combined with thrombin, which resulted in the CY3-aptamer being separated from the magnetic nanoparticles and restoration of fluorescence. This proposed assay took advantage of binding affinity between the CY3-aptamer and thrombin for specificity, and bare magnetic nanoparticles for fluorescence quenching. The fluorescence signal had a good linear relationship with thrombin concentration in the range of 1-60 nM, and the limit of detection for thrombin was estimated as low as 0.5 nM. Furthermore, this method could be applied for other target detection using the corresponding fluorescence labeled aptamer. PMID:25894923

  12. Design and Application of Magnetic-based Theranostic Nanoparticle Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wadajkar, Aniket S.; Menon, Jyothi U.; Kadapure, Tejaswi; Tran, Richard T.; Yang, Jian; Nguyen, Kytai T.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, magnetic-based theranostic nanoparticle (MBTN) systems have been studied, researched, and applied extensively to detect and treat various diseases including cancer. Theranostic nanoparticles are advantageous in that the diagnosis and treatment of a disease can be performed in a single setting using combinational strategies of targeting, imaging, and/or therapy. Of these theranostic strategies, magnetic-based systems containing magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have gained popularity because of their unique ability to be used in magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic targeting, hyperthermia, and controlled drug release. To increase their effectiveness, MNPs have been decorated with a wide variety of materials to improve their biocompatibility, carry therapeutic payloads, encapsulate/bind imaging agents, and provide functional groups for conjugation of biomolecules that provide receptor-mediated targeting of the disease. This review summarizes recent patents involving various polymer coatings, imaging agents, therapeutic agents, targeting mechanisms, and applications along with the major requirements and challenges faced in using MBTN for disease management. PMID:23795343

  13. Design of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI)

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yimeng; Lai, Pui To; Leung, Cheung Hoi; Pong, Philip W. T.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a promising medical imaging technique producing quantitative images of the distribution of tracer materials (superparamagnetic nanoparticles) without interference from the anatomical background of the imaging objects (either phantoms or lab animals). Theoretically, the MPI platform can image with relatively high temporal and spatial resolution and sensitivity. In practice, the quality of the MPI images hinges on both the applied magnetic field and the properties of the tracer nanoparticles. Langevin theory can model the performance of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and predict the crucial influence of nanoparticle core size on the MPI signal. In addition, the core size distribution, anisotropy of the magnetic core and surface modification of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles also determine the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the MPI images. As a result, through rational design of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, the performance of MPI could be effectively optimized. In this review, the performance of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in MPI is investigated. Rational synthesis and modification of superparamagnetic nanoparticles are discussed and summarized. The potential medical application areas for MPI, including cardiovascular system, oncology, stem cell tracking and immune related imaging are also analyzed and forecasted. PMID:24030719

  14. Noninvasive assessment of magnetic nanoparticle-cancer cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Giustini, Andrew J.; Perreard, Irina; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Weaver, John B.

    2012-01-01

    The success of magnetic nanoparticle (mNP)-based diagnostic and therapeutic techniques is dependent upon how the mNP are distributed in vivo. The potential efficacy and timing of a given magnetic nanoparticle treatment or diagnostic test is largely determined by the number of nanoparticles in each tissue and microscopic compartment: e.g., in the intravascular and extravascular spaces, in the interstitial space, cell surface and in cell cytoplasm. Techniques for monitoring these cell-level interactions generally require the harvesting and destruction of tissues or cells at each time point of interest. We present a method (magnetic spectroscopy of Brownian motion, MSB) for longitudinally monitoring nanoparticle binding to cell surface proteins and uptake by cancer cells in vitro using the harmonics of the magnetization produced by the nanoparticles. These harmonics can be measured rapidly and noninvasively without the need for nanoparticle modifications and without damaging the cells. We demonstrate sensitivity of this harmonic signal to the nanoparticles’ microenvironment and use this technique to monitor the nanoparticle binding activities of different cell lines. PMID:22945022

  15. Applications of Magnetic Micro- and Nanoparticles in Biology and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, J.

    2005-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles were first proposed for biomedical applications in the 1970s - primarily as targeted drug delivery vehicles and MRI contrast agents. Since that time, such particles have found application in a variety of biomedical techniques. In addition to drug delivery, magnetic nanoparticles are now used routinely as MRI contrast agents as well as for magneto-immunoassay and cell sorting. More recently, magnetic micro- and nanoparticles have been used to investigate and manipulate cellular processes both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, biogenic magnetic nanoparticles are also produced in the human body. The iron storage protein, ferritin, consists of a superparamagnetic ferrihydrite core and biogenic magnetite (a ferrimagnet) has also been found in the brain and other organs. Though the role of ferritin and several other magnetic iron oxides in the body is well understood, the origin and role of biogenic magnetite is only now coming to light - and this may have profound implications for our understanding of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. This talk will review applications related to magnetic particle-mediated activation of cellular processes for tissue engineering applications and novel methods of magnetofection which have the potential to provide enhanced transfection for non-viral therapeutic gene delivery. It will also briefly highlight new techniques recently developed for the mapping and characterization of magnetic iron compounds related to neurodegenerative diseases and how rock magnetic techniques have been adapted to study magnetic iron compounds in the brain and other organs.

  16. Taking the Temperature of the Interiors of Magnetically Heated Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The temperature increase inside mesoporous silica nanoparticles induced by encapsulated smaller superparamagnetic nanocrystals in an oscillating magnetic field is measured using a crystalline optical nanothermometer. The detection mechanism is based on the temperature-dependent intensity ratio of two luminescence bands in the upconversion emission spectrum of NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+. A facile stepwise phase transfer method is developed to construct a dual-core mesoporous silica nanoparticle that contains both a nanoheater and a nanothermometer in its interior. The magnetically induced heating inside the nanoparticles varies with different experimental conditions, including the magnetic field induction power, the exposure time to the magnetic field, and the magnetic nanocrystal size. The temperature increase of the immediate nanoenvironment around the magnetic nanocrystals is monitored continuously during the magnetic oscillating field exposure. The interior of the nanoparticles becomes much hotter than the macroscopic solution and cools to the temperature of the ambient fluid on a time scale of seconds after the magnetic field is turned off. This continuous absolute temperature detection method offers quantitative insight into the nanoenvironment around magnetic materials and opens a path for optimizing local temperature controls for physical and biomedical applications. PMID:24779552

  17. Taking the temperature of the interiors of magnetically heated nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juyao; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2014-05-27

    The temperature increase inside mesoporous silica nanoparticles induced by encapsulated smaller superparamagnetic nanocrystals in an oscillating magnetic field is measured using a crystalline optical nanothermometer. The detection mechanism is based on the temperature-dependent intensity ratio of two luminescence bands in the upconversion emission spectrum of NaYF4:Yb(3+), Er(3+). A facile stepwise phase transfer method is developed to construct a dual-core mesoporous silica nanoparticle that contains both a nanoheater and a nanothermometer in its interior. The magnetically induced heating inside the nanoparticles varies with different experimental conditions, including the magnetic field induction power, the exposure time to the magnetic field, and the magnetic nanocrystal size. The temperature increase of the immediate nanoenvironment around the magnetic nanocrystals is monitored continuously during the magnetic oscillating field exposure. The interior of the nanoparticles becomes much hotter than the macroscopic solution and cools to the temperature of the ambient fluid on a time scale of seconds after the magnetic field is turned off. This continuous absolute temperature detection method offers quantitative insight into the nanoenvironment around magnetic materials and opens a path for optimizing local temperature controls for physical and biomedical applications. PMID:24779552

  18. Magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications: Progress and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Doaga, A.; Cojocariu, A. M.; Constantin, C. P.; Caltun, O. F.; Hempelmann, R.

    2013-11-13

    Magnetic nanoparticles present unique properties that make them suitable for applications in biomedical field such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia and drug delivery systems. Magnetic hyperthermia involves heating the cancer cells by using magnetic particles exposed to an alternating magnetic field. The cell temperature increases due to the thermal propagation of the heat induced by the nanoparticles into the affected region. In order to increase the effectiveness of the treatment hyperthermia can be combined with drug delivery techniques. As a spectroscopic technique MRI is used in medicine for the imaging of tissues especially the soft ones and diagnosing malignant or benign tumors. For this purpose Zn{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles with x between 0 and 1 have been prepared by co-precipitation method. The cristallite size was determined by X-ray diffraction, while the transmission electron microscopy illustrates the spherical shape of the nanoparticles. Magnetic characterizations of the nanoparticles were carried out at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was measured by calorimetric method at different frequencies and it has been observed that this value depends on the chemical formula, the applied magnetic fields and the frequency. The study consists of evaluating the images, obtained from an MRI facility, when the nanoparticles are dispersed in agar phantoms compared with the enhanced ones when Omniscan was used as contrast agent. Layer-by-layer technique was used to achieve the necessary requirement of biocompatibility. The surface of the magnetic nanoparticles was modified by coating it with oppositely charged polyelectrolites, making it possible for the binding of a specific drug.

  19. Magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications: Progress and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doaga, A.; Cojocariu, A. M.; Constantin, C. P.; Hempelmann, R.; Caltun, O. F.

    2013-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles present unique properties that make them suitable for applications in biomedical field such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia and drug delivery systems. Magnetic hyperthermia involves heating the cancer cells by using magnetic particles exposed to an alternating magnetic field. The cell temperature increases due to the thermal propagation of the heat induced by the nanoparticles into the affected region. In order to increase the effectiveness of the treatment hyperthermia can be combined with drug delivery techniques. As a spectroscopic technique MRI is used in medicine for the imaging of tissues especially the soft ones and diagnosing malignant or benign tumors. For this purpose ZnxCo1-xFe2O4 ferrite nanoparticles with x between 0 and 1 have been prepared by co-precipitation method. The cristallite size was determined by X-ray diffraction, while the transmission electron microscopy illustrates the spherical shape of the nanoparticles. Magnetic characterizations of the nanoparticles were carried out at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was measured by calorimetric method at different frequencies and it has been observed that this value depends on the chemical formula, the applied magnetic fields and the frequency. The study consists of evaluating the images, obtained from an MRI facility, when the nanoparticles are dispersed in agar phantoms compared with the enhanced ones when Omniscan was used as contrast agent. Layer-by-layer technique was used to achieve the necessary requirement of biocompatibility. The surface of the magnetic nanoparticles was modified by coating it with oppositely charged polyelectrolites, making it possible for the binding of a specific drug.

  20. Magnetic Properties of Bio-Synthesized Magnetite Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rawn, Claudia J; Yeary, Lucas W; Moon, Ji Won; Love, Lonnie J; Thompson, James R; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles, which are unique because of both structural and functional elements, have various novel applications. The popularity and practicality of nanoparticle materials create a need for a synthesis method that produces quality particles in sizable quantities. This paper describes such a method, one that uses bacterial synthesis to create nanoparticles of magnetite. The thermophilic bacterial strain Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus TOR-39 was incubated under anaerobic conditions at 65 C for two weeks in aqueous solution containing Fe ions from a magnetite precursor (akaganeite). Magnetite particles formed outside of bacterial cells. We verified particle size and morphology by using dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Average crystallite size was 45 nm. We characterized the magnetic properties by using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer; a saturation magnetization of 77 emu/g was observed at 5 K. These results are comparable to those for chemically synthesized magnetite nanoparticles.

  1. Photodegradation of Eosin Y Using Silver-Doped Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Alzahrani, Eman

    2015-01-01

    The purification of industrial wastewater from dyes is becoming increasingly important since they are toxic or carcinogenic to human beings. Nanomaterials have been receiving significant attention due to their unique physical and chemical properties compared with their larger-size counterparts. The aim of the present investigation was to fabricate magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) using a coprecipitation method, followed by coating with silver (Ag) in order to enhance the photocatalytic activity of the MNPs by loading metal onto them. The fabricated magnetic nanoparticles coated with Ag were characterised using different instruments such as a scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDAX) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The average size of the magnetic nanoparticles had a mean diameter of about 48 nm, and the average particle size changed to 55 nm after doping. The fabricated Ag-doped magnetic nanoparticles were used for the degradation of eosin Y under UV-lamp irradiation. The experimental results revealed that the use of fabricated magnetic nanoparticles coated with Ag can be considered as reliable methods for the removal of eosin Y since the slope of evaluation of pseudo-first-order rate constant from the slope of the plot between ln⁡(Co/C) and the irradiation time was found to be linear. Ag-Fe3O4 nanoparticles would be considered an efficient photocatalyst to degrade textile dyes avoiding the tedious filtration step. PMID:26617638

  2. Photodegradation of Eosin Y Using Silver-Doped Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Eman

    2015-01-01

    The purification of industrial wastewater from dyes is becoming increasingly important since they are toxic or carcinogenic to human beings. Nanomaterials have been receiving significant attention due to their unique physical and chemical properties compared with their larger-size counterparts. The aim of the present investigation was to fabricate magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) using a coprecipitation method, followed by coating with silver (Ag) in order to enhance the photocatalytic activity of the MNPs by loading metal onto them. The fabricated magnetic nanoparticles coated with Ag were characterised using different instruments such as a scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDAX) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The average size of the magnetic nanoparticles had a mean diameter of about 48 nm, and the average particle size changed to 55 nm after doping. The fabricated Ag-doped magnetic nanoparticles were used for the degradation of eosin Y under UV-lamp irradiation. The experimental results revealed that the use of fabricated magnetic nanoparticles coated with Ag can be considered as reliable methods for the removal of eosin Y since the slope of evaluation of pseudo-first-order rate constant from the slope of the plot between ln⁡(C o /C) and the irradiation time was found to be linear. Ag-Fe3O4 nanoparticles would be considered an efficient photocatalyst to degrade textile dyes avoiding the tedious filtration step. PMID:26617638

  3. Structural origin of low temperature glassy relaxation in magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Suvra; Regmi, Rajesh; Lawes, Gavin

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles often exhibit glass-like relaxation features at low temperatures. Here we discuss the effects of doping boron, cobalt, gadolinium and lanthanum on the low temperature magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. We investigated the structure of the nanoparticles using both X-ray diffraction and Raman studies, and find evidence for secondary phase formation in certain samples. We acquired Transmission Electron Microscopic images to give direct information on the morphology and microstructure of these doped nanoparticles. We measured the ac out-of-phase susceptibility (χ//) vs temperature (T) to parameterize the low temperature glassy magnetic relaxation. All samples show low temperature magnetic relaxation, but the amplitude of the signal increases dramatically for certain dopants. We attribute these low temperature frequency-dependent magnetic relaxation features to structural defects, which are enhanced in some of the doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles. These studies also confirm that the low temperature relaxation in nanoparticles arises from single particle effects and are not associated with interparticle interactions.

  4. Activity of glucose oxidase functionalized onto magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kouassi, Gilles K; Irudayaraj, Joseph; McCarty, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    Background Magnetic nanoparticles have been significantly used for coupling with biomolecules, due to their unique properties. Methods Magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal co-precipitation of ferric and ferrous chloride using two different base solutions. Glucose oxidase was bound to the particles by direct attachment via carbodiimide activation or by thiophene acetylation of magnetic nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize the size and structure of the particles while the binding of glucose oxidase to the particles was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results The direct binding of glucose oxidase via carbodiimide activity was found to be more effective, resulting in bound enzyme efficiencies between 94–100% while thiophene acetylation was 66–72% efficient. Kinetic and stability studies showed that the enzyme activity was more preserved upon binding onto the nanoparticles when subjected to thermal and various pH conditions. The overall activity of glucose oxidase was improved when bound to magnetic nanoparticles Conclusion Binding of enzyme onto magnetic nanoparticles via carbodiimide activation is a very efficient method for developing bioconjugates for biological applications PMID:15762994

  5. Thermoseeds for interstitial magnetic hyperthermia: from bioceramics to nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeza, A.; Arcos, D.; Vallet-Regí, M.

    2013-12-01

    The development of magnetic materials for interstitial hyperthermia treatment of cancer is an ever evolving research field which provides new alternatives to antitumoral therapies. The development of biocompatible magnetic materials has resulted in new biomaterials with multifunctional properties, which are able to adapt to the complex scenario of tumoral processes. Once implanted or injected in the body, magnetic materials can behave as thermoseeds under the effect of AC magnetic fields. Magnetic bioceramics aimed to treat bone tumors and magnetic nanoparticles are among the most studied thermoseeds, and supply different solutions for the different scenarios in cancerous processes. This paper reviews some of the biomaterials used for bone cancer treatment and skeletal reinforcing, as well as the more complex topic of magnetic nanoparticles for intracellular targeting and hyperthermia.

  6. Transient magnetic birefringence for determining magnetic nanoparticle diameters in dense, highly light scattering media.

    PubMed

    Köber, Mariana; Moros, Maria; Grazú, Valeria; de la Fuente, Jesus M; Luna, Mónica; Briones, Fernando

    2012-04-20

    The increasing use of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications calls for further development of characterization tools that allow for determining the interactions of the nanoparticles with the biological medium in situ. In cell-incubating conditions, for example, nanoparticles may aggregate and serum proteins adsorb on the particles, altering the nanoparticles' performance and their interaction with cell membranes. In this work we show that the aggregation of spherical magnetite nanoparticles can be detected with high sensitivity in dense, highly light scattering media by making use of magnetically induced birefringence. Moreover, the hydrodynamic particle diameter distribution of anisometric nanoparticle aggregates can be determined directly in these media by monitoring the relaxation time of the magnetically induced birefringence. As a proof of concept, we performed measurements on nanoparticles included in an agarose gel, which scatters light in a similar way as a more complex biological medium but where particle-matrix interactions are weak. Magnetite nanoparticles were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and the hydrodynamic diameter distribution was determined in situ. For the different particle functionalizations and agarose concentrations tested, we could show that gel electrophoresis did not yield a complete separation of monomers and small aggregates, and that the electrophoretic mobility of the aggregates decreased linearly with the hydrodynamic diameter. Furthermore, the rotational particle diffusion was not clearly affected by nanoparticle-gel interactions. The possibility to detect nanoparticle aggregates and their hydrodynamic diameters in complex scattering media like cell tissue makes transient magnetic birefringence an interesting technique for biological applications. PMID:22456180

  7. Synthesis and properties of magnetic ceramic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorescu, Monica

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic ceramic nanoparticles of the type xIn2O3-(1-x)alpha-Fe2O3, xV2O5-(1-x)alpha-Fe2O3 and xZnO-(1-x)alpha-Fe2O3 (x=0.1-0.7) were synthesized from the mixed oxides using mechanochemical activation for 0-12 hours. X-ray diffraction was used to derive the phase content, lattice constants and particle size information as function of ball milling time. Mossbauer spectroscopy results correlated with In3+, V5+ and Zn2+ substitution of Fe3+ in the hematite lattice. SEM/EDS measurements revealed that the mechanochemical activation by ball milling produced systems with a wide range of particle size distribution, from nanometer particles to micrometer agglomerates, but with a uniform distribution of the elements. Simultaneous DSC-TGA investigations up to 800 degrees C provided information on the heat flow, weight loss and the enthalpy of transformation in the systems under investigation. This study demonstrates the formation of a nanostructured solid solution for the indium oxide, an iron vanadate (FeVO4) for the vanadium oxide, and of the zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4) for the zinc oxide. The transformation pathway for each case can be related to the oxidation state of the metallic specie of the oxide used in connection with hematite.

  8. Magnetic Nanoparticles for Imaging Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobukai, Saho; Baheza, Richard; Cobb, Jared G.; Virostko, Jack; Xie, Jingping; Gillman, Amelie; Koktysh, Dmitry; Kerns, Denny; Does, Mark; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIOs) nanoparticles and investigate the migration of SPIO-labeled dendritic cells (DCs) in a syngeneic mouse model using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The size of the dextran-coated SPIO is roughly 30 nm, and the DCs are capable of independent uptake of these particles, although not at levels comparable to particle uptake in the presence of a transfecting reagent. On average, with the assistance of polylysine, the particles were efficiently delivered inside DCs within one hour of incubation. The SPIO particles occupy approximately 0.35% of cell surface and are equivalent to 34.6 pg of iron per cell. In vivo imaging demonstrated that the labeled cells migrated from the injection site in the footpad to the corresponding popliteal lymph node. The homing of labeled cells in the lymph nodes resulted in a signal drop of up to 79%. Furthermore, labeling DCs with SPIO particles did not compromise cell function, we demonstrated that SPIO-enhanced MR imaging can be used to track the migration of DCs effectively in vivo. Magn Reson Med 63:1383–1390, 2010. PMID:20432309

  9. Assembly and magnetic properties of nickel nanoparticles on silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, Samuel T; Manandhar, Pradeep; Nazaretski, E; Thompson, J

    2009-01-01

    The directed assembly of magnetic Ni nanoparticles at the tips of silicon nanowires is reported. Using electrodeposition Ni shells of thickness from 10 to 100 nm were selectively deposited on Au catalytic seeds at the ends of nanowires. Magnetic characterization confirms a low coercivity ({approx}115 Oe) ferromagnetic behavior at 300 K. This approach to multifunctional magnetic-semiconducting nanostructure assembly could be extended to electrodeposition of other materials on the nanowire ends, opening up novel ways of device integration. Such magnetically functionalized nanowires offer a new approach to developing novel highly localized magnetic probes for high resolution magnetic resonance force microscopy.

  10. Magnetic Nanoparticle Quantitation with Low Frequency Magnetic Fields: Compensating for Relaxation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, John B.; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Kuehlert, Esra; Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Reeves, Daniel B.; Perreard, Irina M.; Fiering, Steven N.

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying the number of nanoparticles present in tissue is central to many in vivo and in vitro applications. Magnetic nanoparticles can be detected with high sensitivity both in vivo and in vitro using the harmonics of their magnetization produced in a sinusoidal magnetic field. However, relaxation effects damp the magnetic harmonics rendering them of limited use in quantitation. We show that an accurate measure of the number of nanoparticles can be made by correcting for relaxation effects. Correction for relaxation reduced errors of 50% for larger nanoparticles in high relaxation environments to 2%. The result is a method of nanoparticle quantitation capable of in vivo and in vitro applications including histopathology assays, quantitative imaging, drug delivery and thermal therapy preparation. PMID:23867287

  11. Magnetic properties of heat treated bacterial ferrihydrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, D. A.; Krasikov, A. A.; Dubrovskiy, A. A.; Popkov, S. I.; Stolyar, S. V.; Bayukov, O. A.; Iskhakov, R. S.; Ladygina, V. P.; Yaroslavtsev, R. N.

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic properties of ferrihydrite nanoparticles, which are products of vital functions of Klebsiella oxitoca bacteria, have been studied. The initial powder containing the nanoparticles in an organic shell was subjected to low-temperature (T=160 °C) heat treatment for up to 240 h. The bacterial ferrihydrite particles exhibit a superparamagnetic behavior. Their characteristic blocking temperature increases from 26 to 80 K with the heat treatment. Analysis of the magnetization curves with regard to the magnetic moment distribution function and antiferromagnetic contribution shows that the low-temperature heat treatment enhances the average magnetic moment of a particle; i.e., the nanoparticles coarsen, probably due to their partial agglomeration during heat treatment. It was established that the blocking temperature nonlinearly depends on the particle volume. Therefore, a model was proposed that takes into account both the bulk and surface magnetic anisotropy. Using this model, the bulk and surface magnetic anisotropy constants KV≈1.7×105 erg/cm3 and KS≈0.055 erg/cm2 have been determined. The effect of the surface magnetic anisotropy of ferrihydrite nanoparticles on the observed magnetic hysteresis loops is discussed.

  12. Lanthanide doped nanoparticles as remote sensors for magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Zhang, Junpei; Xu, Beibei; Sang, Xiangwen; Chen, Weibo; Liu, Xiaofeng; Han, Junbo; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-10-01

    We report the effect of magnetic fields (MFs) on emission Eu-doped NaYF4 nanoparticles. A notable shift in the position of emission bands and the suppressed emission intensity are observed with the MF. These magnetic-optical interactions are explained in terms of the Zeeman effect, enhanced cross-relaxation rate and change of site symmetry. PMID:25123099

  13. Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of CoPt Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trung, Truong Thanh; Nhung, Do Thi; Nam, Nguyen Hoang; Luong, Nguyen Hoang

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles CoPt were prepared by the chemical reduction of cobalt (II) chloride and chloroplatinic acid, then the samples were ultrasonicated for 2 h. After annealing at various temperatures from 400°C to 700°C for 1 h, the samples showed hard magnetic properties with coercivity up to 1.15 kOe at room temperature.

  14. Physics of heat generation using magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Cindi L; Ivkov, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia and thermal ablation have been actively studied experimentally and theoretically. In this review, we provide a summary of the literature describing the properties of nanometer-scale magnetic materials suspended in biocompatible fluids and their interactions with external magnetic fields. Summarised are the properties and mechanisms understood to be responsible for magnetic heating, and the models developed to understand the behaviour of single-domain magnets exposed to alternating magnetic fields. Linear response theory and its assumptions have provided a useful beginning point; however, its limitations are apparent when nanoparticle heating is measured over a wide range of magnetic fields. Well-developed models (e.g. for magnetisation reversal mechanisms and pseudo-single domain formation) available from other fields of research are explored. Some of the methods described include effects of moment relaxation, anisotropy, nanoparticle and moment rotation mechanisms, interactions and collective behaviour, which have been experimentally identified to be important. Here, we will discuss the implicit assumptions underlying these analytical models and their relevance to experiments. Numerical simulations will be discussed as an alternative to these simple analytical models, including their applicability to experimental data. Finally, guidelines for the design of optimal magnetic nanoparticles will be presented. PMID:24131317

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles coated with polyaniline to stabilize immobilized trypsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, J. C.; D. Mercês, A. A.; Cabrera, M.; Shigeyosi, W. T.; de Souza, S. D.; Olzon-Dionysio, M.; Fabris, J. D.; Cardoso, C. A.; Neri, D. F. M.; C. Silva, M. P.; Carvalho, L. B.

    2016-12-01

    It is reported the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles via the chemical co-precipitation of Fe 3+ ions and their preparation by coating them with polyaniline. The electronic micrograph analysis showed that the mean diameter for the nanoparticles is ˜15 nm. FTIR, powder X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to understand the chemical, crystallographic and 57Fe hyperfine structures for the two samples. The nanoparticles, which exhibited magnetic behavior with relatively high spontaneous magnetization at room temperature, were identified as being mainly formed by maghemite ( γFe2O3). The coated magnetic nanoparticles (sample labeled "mPANI") presented a real ability to bind biological molecules such as trypsin, forming the magnetic enzyme derivative (sample "mPANIG-Trypsin"). The amount of protein and specific activity of the immobilized trypsin were found to be 13±5 μg of protein/mg of mPANI (49.3 % of immobilized protein) and 24.1±0.7 U/mg of immobilized protein, respectively. After 48 days of storage at 4 ∘C, the activity of the immobilized trypsin was found to be 89 % of its initial activity. This simple, fast and low-cost procedure was revealed to be a promising way to prepare mPANI nanoparticles if technological applications addressed to covalently link biomolecules are envisaged. This route yields chemically stable derivatives, which can be easily recovered from the reaction mixture with a magnetic field and recyclable reused.

  16. A magnonic gas sensor based on magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Matatagui, D; Kolokoltsev, O V; Qureshi, N; Mejía-Uriarte, E V; Saniger, J M

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we propose an innovative, simple and inexpensive gas sensor based on the variation in the magnetic properties of nanoparticles due to their interaction with gases. To measure the nanoparticle response a magnetostatic spin wave (MSW) tunable oscillator has been developed using an yttrium iron garnet (YIG) epitaxial thin film as a delay line (DL). The sensor has been prepared by coating a uniform layer of CuFe2O4 nanoparticles on the YIG film. The unperturbed frequency of the oscillator is determined by a bias magnetic field, which is applied parallel to the YIG film and perpendicularly to the wave propagation direction. In this device, the total bias magnetic field is the superposition of the field of a permanent magnet and the field associated with the layer of magnetic nanoparticles. The perturbation produced in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticle layer due to its interaction with gases induces a frequency shift in the oscillator, allowing the detection of low concentrations of gases. In order to demonstrate the ability of the sensor to detect gases, it has been tested with organic volatile compounds (VOCs) which have harmful effects on human health, such as dimethylformamide, isopropanol and ethanol, or the aromatic hydrocarbons like benzene, toluene and xylene more commonly known by its abbreviation (BTX). All of these were detected with high sensitivity, short response time, and good reproducibility. PMID:25952501

  17. A magnonic gas sensor based on magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matatagui, D.; Kolokoltsev, O. V.; Qureshi, N.; Mejía-Uriarte, E. V.; Saniger, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we propose an innovative, simple and inexpensive gas sensor based on the variation in the magnetic properties of nanoparticles due to their interaction with gases. To measure the nanoparticle response a magnetostatic spin wave (MSW) tunable oscillator has been developed using an yttrium iron garnet (YIG) epitaxial thin film as a delay line (DL). The sensor has been prepared by coating a uniform layer of CuFe2O4 nanoparticles on the YIG film. The unperturbed frequency of the oscillator is determined by a bias magnetic field, which is applied parallel to the YIG film and perpendicularly to the wave propagation direction. In this device, the total bias magnetic field is the superposition of the field of a permanent magnet and the field associated with the layer of magnetic nanoparticles. The perturbation produced in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticle layer due to its interaction with gases induces a frequency shift in the oscillator, allowing the detection of low concentrations of gases. In order to demonstrate the ability of the sensor to detect gases, it has been tested with organic volatile compounds (VOCs) which have harmful effects on human health, such as dimethylformamide, isopropanol and ethanol, or the aromatic hydrocarbons like benzene, toluene and xylene more commonly known by its abbreviation (BTX). All of these were detected with high sensitivity, short response time, and good reproducibility.

  18. Microfluidic separation of magnetic nanoparticles on an ordered array of magnetized micropillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, G.; Kuzhir, P.; Izmaylov, Y.; Alves Marins, J.; Ezzaier, H.; Robert, L.; Doutre, F.; Noblin, X.; Lomenech, C.; Bossis, G.; Meunier, A.; Sandoz, G.; Zubarev, A.

    2016-06-01

    Microfluidic separation of magnetic particles is based on their capture by magnetized microcollectors while the suspending fluid flows past the microcollectors inside a microchannel. Separation of nanoparticles is often challenging because of strong Brownian motion. Low capture efficiency of nanoparticles limits their applications in bioanalysis. However, at some conditions, magnetic nanoparticles may undergo field-induced aggregation that amplifies the magnetic attractive force proportionally to the aggregate volume and considerably increases nanoparticle capture efficiency. In this paper, we have demonstrated the role of such aggregation on an efficient capture of magnetic nanoparticles (about 80 nm in diameter) in a microfluidic channel equipped with a nickel micropillar array. This array was magnetized by an external uniform magnetic field, of intensity as low as 6-10 kA/m, and experiments were carried out at flow rates ranging between 0.3 and 30 μ L /min . Nanoparticle capture is shown to be mostly governed by the Mason number Ma, while the dipolar coupling parameter α does not exhibit a clear effect in the studied range, 1.4 < α < 4.5. The capture efficiency Λ shows a strongly decreasing Mason number behavior, Λ ∝M a-1.78 within the range 32 ≤ Ma ≤ 3250. We have proposed a simple theoretical model which considers destructible nanoparticle chains and gives the scaling behavior, Λ ∝M a-1.7 , close to the experimental findings.

  19. Enhancement in magnetic properties of magnesium substituted bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jianlong; Xie, Dan E-mail: RenTL@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Teng, Changjiu; Zhang, Xiaowen; Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Yilin; Ren, Tian-Ling E-mail: RenTL@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Zeng, Min; Gao, Xingsen; Zhao, Yonggang

    2015-06-14

    We report a potential way to effectively improve the magnetic properties of BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) nanoparticles through Mg{sup 2+} ion substitution at the Fe-sites of BFO lattice. The high purity and structural changes induced by Mg doping are confirmed by X-ray powder diffractometer and Raman spectra. Enhanced magnetic properties are observed in Mg substituted samples, which simultaneously exhibit ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic properties at room temperature. A physical model is proposed to support the observed ferromagnetism of Mg doped samples, and the superparamagnetic properties are revealed by the temperature dependent magnetization measurements. The improved magnetic properties and soft nature obtained by Mg doping in BFO nanoparticles demonstrate the possibility of BFO nanoparticles to practical applications.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Polymer-Templated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamakloe, Beatrice

    This research reports on the investigation into the synthesis and stabilization of iron oxide nanoparticles for theranostic applications using amine-epoxide polymers. Although theranostic agents such as magnetic nanoparticles have been designed and developed for a few decades, there is still more work that needs to be done with the type of materials that can be used to stabilize or functionalize these particles if they are to be used for applications such as drug delivery, imaging and hyperthermia. For in-vivo applications, it is crucial that organic coatings enclose the nanoparticles in order to prevent aggregation and facilitate efficient removal from the body as well as protect the body from toxic material. The objective of this thesis is to design polymer coated magnetite nanoparticles with polymers that are biocompatible and can stabilize the iron oxide nanoparticle to help create mono-dispersed particles in solution. It is desirable to also have these nanoparticles possess high magnetic susceptibility in response to an applied magnetic field. The co-precipitation method was selected because it is probably the simplest and most efficient chemical pathway to obtain magnetic nanoparticles. In literature, cationic polymers such as Polyethylenimine (PEI), which is the industry standard, have been used to stabilize IONPs because they can be used in magnetofections to deliver DNA or RNA. PEI however is known to interact very strongly with proteins and is cytotoxic, so as mentioned previously the Iron Oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) synthesized in this study were stabilized with amine-epoxide polymers because of the limitations of PEI. Four different amine-epoxide polymers which have good water solubility, biodegradability and less toxic than PEI were synthesized and used in the synthesis and stabilization of the magnetic nanoparticles and compared to PEI templated IONPs. These polymer-templated magnetic nanoparticles were also characterized by size, surface charge, Iron

  1. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Amit M.; Qiang, You; Meyer, Daniel R.; Souza, Ryan; Mcconnaughoy, Alan; Muldoon, Leslie; Baer, Donald R.

    2008-04-01

    Non-toxic magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have expanded the treatment delivery options in the medical world. With a size range from 2 to 200 nm MNPs can be compiled with most of the small cells and tissues in living body. Monodispersive iron-iron oxide core shell nanoparticles were prepared in our novel cluster deposition system. This unique method of preparing the core shell MNPs gives nanoparticles very high magnetic moment. We tested the nontoxicity and uptake of MNPs coated with/without dextrin by incubating them with rat LX-1 small cell lung cancer cells (SCLC). Since core iron enhances the heating effect [7] the rate of oxidation of iron nanoparticles was tested in deionized water at certain time interval. Both coated and noncoated MNPs were successfully uptaken by the cells, indicating that the nanoparticles were not toxic. The stability of MNPs was verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) scan after 0, 24, 48, 96, 204 hours. Due to the high magnetic moment offered by MNPs produced in our lab, we predict that even in low applied external alternating field desired temperature can be reached in cancer cells in comparison to the commercially available nanoparticles. Moreover, our MNPs do not require additional anti-coagulating agents and provide a cost effective means of treatment with significantly lower dosage in the body in comparison to commercially available nanoparticles.

  2. Measuring Cytokine Concentrations Using Magnetic Spectroscopy of Nanoparticle Brownian Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Hafsa; Shi, Yipeng; Weaver, John

    The magnetic particle spectroscopy is a newly developed non-invasive technique for obtaining information about the nanoparticles' micro environment. In this technique the nanoparticles' magnetization, induced by an alternating magnetic field at various applied frequencies, is processed to analyze rotational freedom of nanoparticles. By analyzing average rotational freedom, it is possible to measure the nanoparticle's relaxation time, and hence get an estimate of the temperature and viscosity of the medium. In molecular concentration sensing, the rotational freedom indicates the number of nanoparticles that are bound by a selected analyte. We have developed microscopic nanoparticles probes to measure the concentration of selected molecules. The nanoparticles are targeted to bind the selected molecule and the resulting reduction in rotational freedom can be quantified remotely. Previously, sensitivity measurements has been reported to be of the factor of 200. However, with our newer perpendicular field setup (US Patent Application Serial No 61/721,378), it possible to sense cytokine concentrations as low as 5 Pico-Molar in-vitro. The excellent sensitivity of this apparatus is due to isolation of the drive field from the signal so the output can be amplified to a higher level. Dartmouth College.

  3. Nonequilibrium Magnetic Response of Anisotropic Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles and Possible Artifacts in Magnetic Particle Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mamiya, Hiroaki; Jeyadevan, Balachandran

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic responses of superparamagnetic nanoparticles to high-frequency AC magnetic fields with sufficiently large amplitudes are numerically simulated to exactly clarify the phenomena occurring in magnetic particle imaging. When the magnetic anisotropy energy inevitable in actual nanoparticles is taken into account in considering the magnetic potential, larger nanoparticles exhibit a delayed response to alternations of the magnetic fields. This kind of delay is rather remarkable in the lower-amplitude range of the field, where the assistance by the Zeeman energy to thermally activated magnetization reversal is insufficient. In some cases, a sign inversion of the third-order harmonic response was found to occur at some specific amplitude, despite the lack in DC bias magnetic field strength. Considering the attenuation of the AC magnetic field generated in the human body, it is possible that the phases of the signals from nanoparticles deep inside the body and those near the body surface are completely different. This may lead to artifacts in the reconstructed image. Furthermore, when the magnetic/thermal torque-driven rotation of the anisotropic nanoparticles as well as the magnetic anisotropy energy are taken into account, the simulated results show that, once the easy axes are aligned toward the direction of the DC bias magnetic field, it takes time to randomize them at the field-free point. During this relaxation, the third-order harmonic response depends highly upon the history of the magnetic field. This is because non-linearity of the anhysteretic magnetization curve for the superparamagnetic nanoparticles varies with the orientations of the easy axes. This history dependence may also lead to another artifact in magnetic particle imaging, when the scanning of the field-free point is faster than the Brownian relaxations. PMID:25775017

  4. Mathematical modelling for trajectories of magnetic nanoparticles in a blood vessel under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shashi; Katiyar, V. K.; Singh, Uaday

    2015-04-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the trajectories of a cluster of magnetic nanoparticles in a blood vessel for the application of magnetic drug targeting (MDT). The magnetic nanoparticles are injected into a blood vessel upstream from a malignant tissue and are captured at the tumour site with help of an applied magnetic field. The applied field is produced by a rare earth cylindrical magnet positioned outside the body. All forces expected to significantly affect the transport of nanoparticles were incorporated, including magnetization force, drag force and buoyancy force. The results show that particles are slow down and captured under the influence of magnetic force, which is responsible to attract the magnetic particles towards the magnet. It is optimized that all particles are captured either before or at the centre of the magnet (z≤0) when blood vessel is very close proximity to the magnet (d=2.5 cm). However, as the distance between blood vessel and magnet (d) increases (above 4.5 cm), the magnetic nanoparticles particles become free and they flow away down the blood vessel. Further, the present model results are validated by the simulations performed using the finite element based COMSOL software.

  5. Magnetic domains and surface effects in hollow maghemite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, Andreu; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Puntes, Victor; Balcells, Lluis; Iglesias, Oscar; Labarta, Amilcar

    2008-09-30

    In the present work, we investigate the magnetic properties of ferrimagnetic and non-interacting maghemite hollow nanoparticles obtained by the Kirkendall effect. From the experimental characterization of their magnetic behavior, we find that polycrystalline hollow maghemite nanoparticles exhibit low blocked-to-superparamagnetic transition temperatures, small magnetic moments, significant coercivities and irreversibility fields, and no magnetic saturation on external magnetic fields up to 5 T. These results are interpreted in terms of the microstructural parameters characterizing the maghemite shells by means of atomistic Monte Carlo simulations of an individual spherical shell. The model comprises strongly interacting crystallographic domains arranged in a spherical shell with random orientations and anisotropy axis. The Monte Carlo simulation allows discernment between the influence of the polycrystalline structure and its hollow geometry, while revealing the magnetic domain arranggement in the different temperataure regimes.

  6. Binding of biological effectors on magnetic nanoparticles measured by a magnetically induced transient birefringence experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, C.; Gazeau, F.; Roger, J.; Pons, J. N.; Salis, M. F.; Perzynski, R.; Bacri, J. C.

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the relaxation of the magnetically induced birefringence in a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles in order to detect the binding reaction of polyclonal antibodies on the particle surface. The birefringence relaxation is driven by the rotational diffusion of the complex formed by the magnetic nanoparticles bound to the antibody and thus is directly related to the hydrodynamic size of this complex. Birefringence relaxations are well described by stretched exponential laws revealing a polydisperse distribution of hydrodynamic diameters. Comparing the size distribution of samples with different initial ratios of immunoglobuline added per magnetic nanoparticles, we evidence the graft of an antibody on particle and eventually the onset of particles agregation. Measurements on samples separated in size by gel filtration demonstrate the robustness of our experiment for the determination of size distribution and its modification due to the adsorption of a macromolecule. The immunoglobuline binding assay is performed comparatively for ionic magnetic nanoparticles with different coatings.

  7. Transient magnetic birefringence for determining magnetic nanoparticle diameters in dense, highly light scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köber, Mariana; Moros, Maria; Grazú, Valeria; de la Fuente, Jesus M.; Luna, Mónica; Briones, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    The increasing use of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications calls for further development of characterization tools that allow for determining the interactions of the nanoparticles with the biological medium in situ. In cell-incubating conditions, for example, nanoparticles may aggregate and serum proteins adsorb on the particles, altering the nanoparticles’ performance and their interaction with cell membranes. In this work we show that the aggregation of spherical magnetite nanoparticles can be detected with high sensitivity in dense, highly light scattering media by making use of magnetically induced birefringence. Moreover, the hydrodynamic particle diameter distribution of anisometric nanoparticle aggregates can be determined directly in these media by monitoring the relaxation time of the magnetically induced birefringence. As a proof of concept, we performed measurements on nanoparticles included in an agarose gel, which scatters light in a similar way as a more complex biological medium but where particle-matrix interactions are weak. Magnetite nanoparticles were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and the hydrodynamic diameter distribution was determined in situ. For the different particle functionalizations and agarose concentrations tested, we could show that gel electrophoresis did not yield a complete separation of monomers and small aggregates, and that the electrophoretic mobility of the aggregates decreased linearly with the hydrodynamic diameter. Furthermore, the rotational particle diffusion was not clearly affected by nanoparticle-gel interactions. The possibility to detect nanoparticle aggregates and their hydrodynamic diameters in complex scattering media like cell tissue makes transient magnetic birefringence an interesting technique for biological applications.

  8. Biodegradation of magnetic nanoparticles evaluated from Mössbauer and magnetization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischenko, I.; Chuev, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Polikarpov, M.; Panchenko, V.

    2013-04-01

    In order to extract a quantitative information about characteristics of the magnetic nanoparticles injected into a living organism it is necessary to define a model of the magnetic dynamics for fitting self-consistently the whole set of the experimental data, specifically, the evolution of Mössbauer spectral shape with temperature and external magnetic field as well as the magnetization curves. We have developed such a model and performed such an analysis of the temperature- and magnetic field-dependent spectra and magnetization curves of nanoparticles injected into mice. This allowed us to reliably evaluate changes in the characteristics of the residual particles and their chemical transformation to paramagnetic ferritin-like forms in different mouse organs as a function of time. Actually, the approach makes it possible to quantitatively characterize biodegradation and biotransformation of magnetic nanoparticles delivered in a body.

  9. Size and polydispersity effect on the magnetization of densely packed magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russier, Vincent; de Montferrand, Caroline; Lalatonne, Yoann; Motte, Laurence

    2012-10-01

    The magnetic properties of densely packed magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) assemblies are investigated from Monte Carlo simulations. The case of iron oxide nanoparticles is considered as a typical example of MNP. The main focus is put on particle size, and size polydispersity influences on the magnetization curve. The particles are modeled as uniformly magnetized spheres isolated one from each other by a non magnetic layer representing the organic coating. A comparison with recent experimental results on γ -Fe2O3 powder samples differing by their size is given.

  10. Rationalisation of distribution functions for models of nanoparticle magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hilo, M.; Chantrell, R. W.

    2012-08-01

    A formalism is presented which reconciles the use of different distribution functions of particle diameter in analytical models of the magnetic properties of nanoparticle systems. For the lognormal distribution a transformation is derived which shows that a distribution of volume fraction transforms into a lognormal distribution of particle number albeit with a modified median diameter. This transformation resolves an apparent discrepancy reported in Tournus and Tamion [Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 323 (2011) 1118].

  11. Processing, properties and some novel applications of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, D.; Giri, J.; Nayak, Bibhuti B.; Sriharsha, T.; Pradhan, P.; Prasad, N. K.; Barick, K. C.; Ambashta, R. D.

    2005-10-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been prepared by various soft chemical methods including self-assembly. The bare or surface-modified particles find applications in areas such as hyperthermia treatment of cancer and magnetic field-assisted radioactive chemical separation. We present here some of the salient features of processing of nanostructured magnetic materials of different sizes and shapes, their properties and some possible applications. The materials studied included metals, metal--ceramic composites, and ferrites.

  12. Differential magnetic catch and release: Separation, purification, and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles and particle assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beveridge, Jacob S.

    Magnetic nanoparticles uniquely combine superparamagnetic behavior with dimensions that are smaller than or the same size as molecular analytes. The integration of magnetic nanoparticles with analytical methods has opened new avenues for sensing, purification, and quantitative analysis. Applied magnetic fields can be used to control the motion and properties of magnetic nanoparticles; in analytical chemistry, use of magnetic fields provides methods for manipulating and analyzing species at the molecular level. The ability to use applied magnetic fields to control the motion and properties of magnetic nanoparticles is a tool for manipulating and analyzing species at the molecular level, and has led to applications including analyte handing, chemical sensors, and imaging techniques. This is clearly an area where significant growth and impact in separation science and analysis is expected in the future. In Chapter 1, we describe applications of magnetic nanoparticles to analyte handling, chemical sensors, and imaging techniques. Chapter 2 reports the purification and separation of magnetic nanoparticle mixtures using the technique developed in our lab called differential magnetic catch and release (DMCR). This method applies a variable magnetic flux orthogonal to the flow direction in an open tubular capillary to trap and controllably release magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetic moments of 8, 12, and 17 nm diameter CoFe2O4 nanoparticles are calculated using the applied magnetic flux density and experimentally determined force required to trap 50% of the particle sample. Balancing the relative strengths of the drag and magnetic forces enable separation and purification of magnetic CoFe2 O4 nanoparticle samples with < 20 nm diameters. Samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy to determine the average size and size dispersity of the sample population. DMCR is further demonstrated to be useful for separation of a magnetic nanoparticle mixture, resulting

  13. Spherical magnetic nanoparticles fabricated by laser target evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronov, A. P.; Beketov, I. V.; Komogortsev, S. V.; Kurlyandskaya, G. V.; Medvedev, A. I.; Leiman, D. V.; Larrañaga, A.; Bhagat, S. M.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles of iron oxide (MNPs) were prepared by the laser target evaporation technique (LTE). The main focus was on the fabrication of de-aggregated spherical maghemite MNPs with a narrow size distribution and enhanced effective magnetization. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, magnetization and microwave absorption measurements were comparatively analyzed. The shape of the MNPs (mean diameter of 9 nm) was very close to being spherical. The lattice constant of the crystalline phase was substantially smaller than that of stoichiometric magnetite but larger than the lattice constant of maghemite. High value of Ms up to 300 K was established. The 300 K ferromagnetic resonance signal is a single line located at a field expected from spherical magnetic particles with negligible magnetic anisotropy. The maximum obtained concentration of water based ferrofluid was as high as 10g/l of magnetic material. In order to understand the temperature and field dependence of MNPs magnetization, we invoke the core-shell model. The nanoparticles is said to have a ferrimagnetic core (roughly 70 percent of the caliper size) while the shell consists of surface layers in which the spins are frozen having no long range magnetic order. The core-shell interactions were estimated in frame of random anisotropy model. The obtained assembly of de-aggregated nanoparticles is an example of magnetic nanofluid stable under ambient conditions even without an electrostatic stabilizer.

  14. Characterization of magnetic nanoparticles using Magnetic Hyperthermia System (MHS) for the application in cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadat, M. E.; Patel, Ronak; Mast, David B.; Shi, Donglu; Bud'Ko, Sergey L.; Zhang, Jiaming; Xu, Hong

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the heating profiles of various concentrations of three Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle systems were measured when the nanoparticles were exposed to alternating magnetic fields in a RF Magnetic Hyperthermia System. The Fe3O4 core nanoparticles of each system were approximately 10nm in diameter, but each system had different nanoparticle configurations and surface modifications. The heating profiles were used to investigate the dominant heating mechanism, the heat transfer into the surrounding fluid, and the overall effectiveness of each nanoparticle system for possible use in hyperthermia cancer treatments. Magnetization measurements showed that all samples were superparamagnetic in nature with almost zero retentivity and coercivity. For all samples, the saturation magnetization was observed to increase linearly with increasing concentration of Fe3O4. Five different concentrations of the three Fe3O4 nanoparticle samples were exposed to a 13.56 MHz alternating magnetic field with an amplitude of 4500 A/m, while the solution temperature was measured as a function of time using an optical fiber temperature probe. A correlation was observed between the heating rate, the initial susceptibility, and the type of surface modification of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

  15. A Two-Magnet System to Push Therapeutic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Benjamin; Dormer, Kenneth; Rutel, Isaac B.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic fields can be used to direct magnetically susceptible nanoparticles to disease locations: to infections, blood clots, or tumors. Any single magnet always attracts (pulls) ferro- or para-magnetic particles towards it. External magnets have been used to pull therapeutics into tumors near the skin in animals and human clinical trials. Implanting magnetic materials into patients (a feasible approach in some cases) has been envisioned as a means of reaching deeper targets. Yet there are a number of clinical needs, ranging from treatments of the inner ear, to antibiotic-resistant skin infections and cardiac arrhythmias, which would benefit from an ability to magnetically “inject”, or push in, nanomedicines. We develop, analyze, and experimentally demonstrate a novel, simple, and effective arrangement of just two permanent magnets that can magnetically push particles. Such a system might treat diseases of the inner ear; diseases which intravenously injected or orally administered treatments cannot reach due to the blood-brain barrier. PMID:21243119

  16. A Two-Magnet System to Push Therapeutic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Benjamin; Dormer, Kenneth; Rutel, Isaac B.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic fields can be used to direct magnetically susceptible nanoparticles to disease locations: to infections, blood clots, or tumors. Any single magnet always attracts (pulls) ferro- or para-magnetic particles towards it. External magnets have been used to pull therapeutics into tumors near the skin in animals and human clinical trials. Implanting magnetic materials into patients (a feasible approach in some cases) has been envisioned as a means of reaching deeper targets. Yet there are a number of clinical needs, ranging from treatments of the inner ear, to antibiotic-resistant skin infections and cardiac arrhythmias, which would benefit from an ability to magnetically "inject", or push in, nanomedicines. We develop, analyze, and experimentally demonstrate a novel, simple, and effective arrangement of just two permanent magnets that can magnetically push particles. Such a system might treat diseases of the inner ear; diseases which intravenously injected or orally administered treatments cannot reach due to the blood-brain barrier.

  17. Magnonics: Selective heat production in nanocomposites with different magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yu; Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically study Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) in nanocomposites focusing on the analysis of heat production. It is demonstrated that at the FMR frequency, the temperature of nanoparticles can be raised at the rate of a few degrees per second at the electromagnetic (EM) irradiation power equivalent to the sunlight power. Thus, using FMR, one can initiate either surface or bulk reaction in the vicinity of a particular magnetic inclusion by purposely delivering heat to the nanoscale at a sufficiently fast rate. We examined the FMR features in (a) the film with a mixture of nanoparticles made of different materials; (b) the laminated films where each layer is filled with a particular type of magnetic nanoparticles. It is shown that different nanoparticles can be selectively heated at the different bands of EM spectrum. This effect opens up new exciting opportunities to control the microwave assisted chemical reactions depending on the heating rate.

  18. Nematic-like organization of magnetic mesogen-hybridized nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Demortière, Arnaud; Buathong, Saïwan; Pichon, Benoît P; Panissod, Pierre; Guillon, Daniel; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Donnio, Bertrand

    2010-06-21

    A fluid nematic-like phase is induced in monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles with a diameter of 3.3 nm. This supramolecular arrangement is governed by the covalent functionalization of the nanoparticle surface with cyanobiphenyl-based ligands as mesogenic promoters. The design and synthesis of these hybrid materials and the study of their mesogenic properties are reported. In addition, the modifications of the magnetic properties of the hybridized nanoparticles are investigated as a function of the different grafted ligands. Owing to the rather large interparticular distances (about 7 nm), the dipolar interaction between nanoparticles is shown to play only a minor role. Conversely, the surface magnetic anisotropy of the particles is significantly affected by the surface derivatization. PMID:20486228

  19. The unusual magnetism of nanoparticle LaCoO3

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Durand, A. M.; Belanger, D. P.; Hamil, T. J.; Ye, F.; Chi, S.; Fernandez-Baca, J. A.; Booth, C. H.; Abdollahian, Y.; Bhat, M.

    2015-04-15

    Bulk and nanoparticle powders of LaCoO3 (LCO) were synthesized and their magnetic and structural properties were studied using SQUID magnetometry and neutron diffraction. The bulk and large nanoparticles exhibit weak ferromagnetism (FM) below T≈85K and a crossover from strong to weak antiferromagnetic (AFM) correlations near a transition expressed in the lattice parameters, To ≈ 40 K. This crossover does not occur in the smallest nanoparticles; instead, the magnetic behavior is predominantly ferromagnetic. The amount of FM in the nanoparticles depends on the amount of Co3O4 impurity phase, which induces tensile strain on the LCO lattice. A core-interface model is introduced,more » with the core region exhibiting the AFM crossover and with FM in the interface region near surfaces and impurity phases.« less

  20. Cobalt-based Magnetic Nanoparticles: Design, Synthesis and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamanpour, Mehdi

    The ever-increasing desire for more energy attainable from a smaller volume of matter has driven researchers to explore advanced materials at the molecular or even atomic size scale. Magnetic materials at the nanometer size scale have been the subject of enormous research effort worldwide for more than half a century. Different magnetic nanoparticles have shown different behavior in the absence and presence of an external magnetic field, which has led them to be categorized as soft (easy to demagnetize) or hard (resistive against demagnetization) magnets. Applications range from medical and biomedical devices to magnetic recording media and magnetic sensing have emphasized the importance of this class of materials. Soft magnetic phases have found application in power generation and magnetic targeted drug delivery, while hard magnets have been subject of extensive research for application as energy storage media. Discovery of the exchange-coupling phenomenon between the spins of two adjacent hard and soft magnetic phases which means taking advantage of both high magnetic moment of the soft phase as well as high coercivity of the hard phase has attracted scientists to develop advanced materials for energy storage with no usage of fossil fuels: clean energy. In this Dissertation, synthesis of pure phase, soft FeCo nanoparticles with high magnetic moment and hard phase CoxC nanoparticles possessing high coercivity is reported. The polyol method (chemical co-precipitating at polyhydric alcohol as reducing agent) is used to make FeCo and Co xC nanoparticles and the effects of important reaction kinetics parameters on the structure and magnetic properties of the products are studied. Careful analysis of correlations between these parameters and the properties of the magnetic particles has made synthesis of FeCo and CoxC nanoparticles with desired properties possible. Fabrication of MnAlC-FeCo heterostructures as a rare earth-free alternative for high-performance permanent

  1. Collective magnetic response of CeO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coey, Michael; Ackland, Karl; Venkatesan, Munuswamy; Sen, Siddhartha

    2016-07-01

    The magnetism of nanoparticles and thin films of wide-bandgap oxides that include no magnetic cations is an unsolved puzzle. Progress has been hampered by both the irreproducibility of much of the experimental data, and the lack of any generally accepted theoretical explanation. The characteristic signature is a virtually anhysteretic, temperature-independent magnetization curve that saturates in an applied field that is several orders of magnitude greater than the magnetization. It would seem as if a tiny volume fraction, <~0.1%, of the samples is magnetic and that the energy scale is unusually high for spin magnetism. Here we investigate the effect of dispersing 4 nm CeO2 nanoparticles with powders of γAl2O3, sugar or latex microspheres. The saturation magnetization, Ms ≍ 60 A m-1 for compact samples, is maximized by 1 wt% lanthanum doping. Dispersing the CeO2 nanopowder reduces its magnetic moment by up to an order of magnitude, and there is a characteristic length scale of order 100 nm for the magnetism to appear in CeO2 nanoparticle clusters. The phenomenon is explained in terms of a giant orbital paramagnetism that appears in coherent mesoscopic domains due to resonant interaction with zero-point fluctuations of the vacuum electromagnetic field. The theory explains the observed temperature-independent magnetization curve and its doping and dispersion dependence, based on a length scale of 300 nm that corresponds to the wavelength of a maximum in the ultraviolet absorption spectrum of the magnetic CeO2 nanoparticles. The coherent domains occupy roughly 10% of the sample volume.

  2. Bifunctional magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjiao; Zheng, Yang; You, Shusen; Wang, Feng; Gao, Zhuo; Shen, Jie; Yang, Wantai; Yin, Meizhen

    2015-03-11

    A new type of bifunctional magnetic-fluorescent Fe3O4@SiO2-PDI-PAA/Ca(2+) nanoparticles has been prepared by coating PDI-cored star polymers (PDI-PAA) onto the surface of Fe3O4@SiO2 core-shell nanostructures. The morphology and properties of the composite nanoparticles are investigated by transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, fluorescence spectrometry, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The composite nanoparticles display a strong red emission and superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. The cell viability and uptake assays reveal good biocompatibility of these hybrid nanoparticles. Hence, the composite nanoparticles are of potential to be further explored as therapeutic vector in biomedical field. PMID:25691125

  3. Magnetic Nanoparticle Drug Carriers and their Study by Quadrupole Magnetic Field-Flow Fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P. Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancers and other pathological conditions. The efficient delivery of therapeutic levels of drug to a target site while limiting nonspecific, systemic toxicity requires optimization of the drug delivery materials, the applied magnetic field, and the treatment protocol. The history and current state of magnetic drug targeting is reviewed. While initial studies involved micron-sized and larger carriers, and work with these microcarriers continues, it is the sub-micron carriers or nanocarriers that are of increasing interest. An aspect of magnetic drug targeting using nanoparticle carriers that has not been considered is then addressed. This aspect involves the variation in the magnetic properties of the nanocarriers. Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation (QMgFFF) is a relatively new technique for characterizing magnetic nanoparticles. It is unique in its capability of determining the distribution in magnetic properties of a nanoparticle sample in suspension. The development and current state of this technique is also reviewed. Magnetic nanoparticle drug carriers have been found by QMgFFF analysis to be highly polydisperse in their magnetic properties, and the strength of response of the particles to magnetic field gradients is predicted to vary by orders of magnitude. It is expected that the least magnetic fraction of a formulation will contribute the most to systemic toxicity, and the depletion of this fraction will result in a more effective drug carrying material. A material that has a reduced systemic toxicity will allow higher doses of cytotoxic drugs to be delivered to the tumor with reduced side effects. Preliminary experiments involving a novel method of refining a magnetic nanoparticle drug carrier to achieve this result are described. QMgFFF is used to characterize the refined and unrefined material. PMID:19591456

  4. Detection of molecules and cells using nuclear magnetic resonance with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Mannherz, Hans Georg; Haase, Axel

    2015-04-01

    For the detection of small molecules, proteins or even cells in vitro, functionalised magnetic nanoparticles and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements can be applied. In this work, magnetic nanoparticles with the size of 5-7 nm were functionalised with antibodies to detect two model systems of different sizes, the protein avidin and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the model organism. The synthesised magnetic nanoparticles showed a narrow size distribution, which was determined using transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The magnetic nanoparticles were functionalised with the according antibodies via EDC/NHS chemistry. The binding of the antigen to magnetic nanoparticles was detected through the change in the NMR T2 relaxation time at 0.5 T (≈21.7 MHz). In case of a specific binding the particles cluster and the T2 relaxation time of the sample changes. The detection limit in buffer for FITC-avidin was determined to be 1.35 nM and 107 cells/ml for S. cerevisiae. For fluorescent microscopy the avidin molecules were labelled with FITC and for the detection of S. cerevisiae the magnetic nanoparticles were additionally functionalised with rhodamine. The binding of the particles to S. cerevisiae and the resulting clustering was also seen by transmission electron microscopy.

  5. Size confined magnetic phase in NiO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhaganlal Gandhi, Ashish; Cheng, Hui-Yu; Chang, Yu-Ming; Lin, Jauyn Grace

    2016-03-01

    The question of whether NiO nanoparticles contain metallic ferromagnetic Ni clusters is still a matter of debate, and it is very important from an application point of view. Resolving this problem relies on proper detection probes with high sensitivity and a systematic analysis that would be demonstrated in this study. NiO nanoparticles with mean size ranging from ∼4 to 80 nm are synthesized by sol-gel method. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy are used to study the size effects on the structures and magnetic properties of nanoparticles. It is found that a minor Ni phase below 1% in NiO nanoparticles is traceable with synchrotron XRD, selective area electron diffraction and static/dynamic magnetic measurements. The Ni phase only exists in NiO nanoparticles with the size ranging from 8 to 20 nm, attributed to the oxygen vacancies in core structure. Our findings provide important information for controlling the magnetic properties of NiO nanoparticles.

  6. Magnetic nanoparticles for enhancing the effectiveness of ultrasonic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Józefczak, A.; Kaczmarek, K.; Hornowski, T.; Kubovčíková, M.; Rozynek, Z.; Timko, M.; Skumiel, A.

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasonic hyperthermia is a method of cancer treatment in which tumors are exposed to an elevated cytotoxic temperature using ultrasound (US). In conventional ultrasonic hyperthermia, the ultrasound-induced heating in the tumor is achieved through the absorption of wave energy. However, to obtain appropriate temperature in reasonable time, high US intensities, which can have a negative impact on healthy tissues, are required. The effectiveness of US for medical purposes can be significantly improved by using the so-called sonosensitizers, which can enhance the thermal effect of US on the tissue by increasing US absorption. One possible candidate for such sonosensitizers is magnetic nanoparticles with mean sizes of 10-300 nm, which can be efficiently heated because of additional attenuation and scattering of US. Additionally, magnetic nanoparticles are able to produce heat in the alternating magnetic field (magnetic hyperthermia). The synergetic application of ultrasonic and magnetic hyperthermia can lead to a promising treatment modality.

  7. Physical Justification for Negative Remanent Magnetization in Homogeneous Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shuo; He, Weidong; Zhang, Ming; Zhuang, Taisen; Jin, Yi; ElBidweihy, Hatem; Mao, Yiwu; Dickerson, James H.; Wagner, Michael J.; Torre, Edward Della; Bennett, Lawrence H.

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of negative remanent magnetization (NRM) has been observed experimentally in a number of heterogeneous magnetic systems and has been considered anomalous. The existence of NRM in homogenous magnetic materials is still in debate, mainly due to the lack of compelling support from experimental data and a convincing theoretical explanation for its thermodynamic validation. Here we resolve the long-existing controversy by presenting experimental evidence and physical justification that NRM is real in a prototype homogeneous ferromagnetic nanoparticle, an europium sulfide nanoparticle. We provide novel insights into major and minor hysteresis behavior that illuminate the true nature of the observed inverted hysteresis and validate its thermodynamic permissibility and, for the first time, present counterintuitive magnetic aftereffect behavior that is consistent with the mechanism of magnetization reversal, possessing unique capability to identify NRM. The origin and conditions of NRM are explained quantitatively via a wasp-waist model, in combination of energy calculations. PMID:25183061

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: Functionalisation of magnetic nanoparticles for applications in biomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Catherine C.; Curtis, Adam S. G.

    2003-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been proposed for use as biomedical purposes to a large extent for several years. In recent years, nanotechnology has developed to a stage that makes it possible to produce, characterize and specifically tailor the functional properties of nanoparticles for clinical applications. This has led to various opportunities such as improving the quality of magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermic treatment for malignant cells, site-specific drug delivery and the manipulation of cell membranes. To this end a variety of iron oxide particles have been synthesized. A common failure in targeted systems is due to the opsonization of the particles on entry into the bloodstream, rendering the particles recognizable by the body's major defence system, the reticulo-endothelial system. This review discusses each of the above bio-applications of such magnetic nanoparticles and details some of the main recent advances in biological research.

  9. Characterization of magnetic nanoparticles using programmed quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P. Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation is a relatively new technique for the separation and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles are often of composite nature having a magnetic component, which may be a very finely divided material, and a polymeric or other material coating that incorporates this magnetic material and stabilizes the particles in suspension. There may be other components such as antibodies on the surface for specific binding to biological cells, or chemotherapeutic drugs for magnetic drug delivery. Magnetic field-flow fractionation (MgFFF) has the potential for determining the distribution of the magnetic material among the particles in a given sample. MgFFF differs from most other forms of field-flow fractionation in that the magnetic field that brings about particle separation induces magnetic dipole moments in the nanoparticles, and these potentially can interact with one another and perturb the separation. This aspect is examined in the present work. Samples of magnetic nanoparticles were analysed under different experimental conditions to determine the sensitivity of the method to variation of conditions. The results are shown to be consistent and insensitive to conditions, although magnetite content appeared to be somewhat higher than expected. PMID:20732895

  10. Lymph node localization of non-specific antibody-coated liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Mangat, S.; Patel, H.M.

    1985-05-20

    Subcutaneously injected small unilamellar liposomes are drained into the lymphatics and localized in the regional lymph nodes, and thus they can be used for the detection of metastatic spread in breast cancer patients and for delivery of drugs to diseased lymph nodes. An aqueous phase marker, (/sup 125/I)-polyvinylpyrrolidone, and a lipid phase marker, (/sup 3/H)-cholesterol, were used to study the lymph node localization of IgG-coated liposomes injected subcutaneously into mouse and rat footpads. The results show that human immunoglobulin G (IgG) coated liposomes are rapidly removed from the site of injection and are localized in the regional lymph nodes to a greater extent than control liposomes (i.e. liposomes without IgG). Free IgG was found to inhibit the uptake of IgG-coated liposomes by the lymph nodes. The localization of IgG-coated liposomes in the regional lymph nodes is influenced by charge of the liposomes. The results presented here suggest that antibody-coated liposomes may provide a more efficient way of delivering therapeutic agents to the lymph nodes in the treatment of diseases such as breast cancer with lymph node involvement. Similarly, monoclonal antibody-coated liposomes containing lymphoscintigraphic material may improve the detection of lymph node metastases. 26 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles for targeted imaging and therapy

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Jason R.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have become important tools for the imaging of prevalent diseases, such as cancer, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and others. While first generation nanoparticles were fairly nonspecific, newer generations have been targeted to specific cell types and molecular targets via affinity ligands. Commonly, these ligands emerge from phage or small molecule screens, or are based on antibodies or aptamers. Secondary reporters and combined therapeutic molecules have further opened potential clinical applications of these materials. This review summarizes some of the recent biomedical applications of these newer magnetic nanomaterials. PMID:18508157

  12. Geometrical Effects on the Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Cono; D'Agosta, Roberto; Baletto, Francesca

    2016-04-13

    Elucidating the connection between shape and properties is a challenging but essential task for a rational design of nanoparticles at the atomic level. As a paradigmatic example we investigate how geometry can influence the magnetic properties of nanoparticles, focusing in particular on platinum clusters of 1-2 nm in size. Through first-principle calculations, we have found that the total magnetization depends strongly on the local atomic arrangements. This is due to a contraction of the nearest neighbor distance together with an elongation of the second nearest neighbor distance, resulting in an interatomic partial charge transfer from the atoms lying on the subsurface layer (donors) toward the vertexes (acceptors). PMID:27007172

  13. Structure and magnetism in Cr-embedded Co nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S. H.; Kurt, M. S.; Roy, M.; Lees, M. R.; Binns, C.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of an investigation into the atomic structure and magnetism of 2 nm diameter Co nanoparticles embedded in an antiferromagnetic Cr matrix. The nanocomposite films used in this study were prepared by co-deposition directly from the gas phase, using a gas aggregation source for the Co nanoparticles and a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) source for the Cr matrix material. Co K and Cr K edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) experiments were performed in order to investigate atomic structure in the embedded nanoparticles and matrix respectively, while magnetism was investigated by means of a vibrating sample magnetometer. The atomic structure type of the Co nanoparticles is the same as that of the Cr matrix (bcc) although with a degree of disorder. The net Co moment per atom in the Co/Cr nanocomposite films is significantly reduced from the value for bulk Co, and decreases as the proportion of Co nanoparticles in the film is decreased; for the sample with the most dilute concentration of Co nanoparticles (4.9% by volume), the net Co moment was 0.25 μ B/atom. After field cooling to below 30 K all samples showed an exchange bias, which was largest for the most dilute sample. Both the structural and magnetic results point towards a degree of alloying at the nanoparticle/matrix interface, leading to a core/shell structure in the embedded nanoparticles consisting of an antiferromagnetic CoCr alloy shell surrounding a reduced ferromagnetic Co core.

  14. Structure and magnetism in Cr-embedded Co nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Baker, S H; Kurt, M S; Roy, M; Lees, M R; Binns, C

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of an investigation into the atomic structure and magnetism of 2 nm diameter Co nanoparticles embedded in an antiferromagnetic Cr matrix. The nanocomposite films used in this study were prepared by co-deposition directly from the gas phase, using a gas aggregation source for the Co nanoparticles and a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) source for the Cr matrix material. Co K and Cr K edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) experiments were performed in order to investigate atomic structure in the embedded nanoparticles and matrix respectively, while magnetism was investigated by means of a vibrating sample magnetometer. The atomic structure type of the Co nanoparticles is the same as that of the Cr matrix (bcc) although with a degree of disorder. The net Co moment per atom in the Co/Cr nanocomposite films is significantly reduced from the value for bulk Co, and decreases as the proportion of Co nanoparticles in the film is decreased; for the sample with the most dilute concentration of Co nanoparticles (4.9% by volume), the net Co moment was 0.25 μ B/atom. After field cooling to below 30 K all samples showed an exchange bias, which was largest for the most dilute sample. Both the structural and magnetic results point towards a degree of alloying at the nanoparticle/matrix interface, leading to a core/shell structure in the embedded nanoparticles consisting of an antiferromagnetic CoCr alloy shell surrounding a reduced ferromagnetic Co core. PMID:26740510

  15. Magnetic Nanoparticle Arrays Self-Assembled on Perpendicular Magnetic Recording Media.

    PubMed

    Mohtasebzadeh, Abdul Rahman; Ye, Longfei; Crawford, Thomas M

    2015-01-01

    We study magnetic-field directed self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles onto templates recorded on perpendicular magnetic recording media, and quantify feature width and height as a function of assembly time. Feature widths are determined from Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images, while heights are obtained with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). For short assembly times, widths were ~150 nm, while heights were ~14 nm, a single nanoparticle on average with a 10:1 aspect ratio. For long assembly times, widths approach 550 nm, while the average height grows to 3 nanoparticles, ~35 nm; a 16:1 aspect ratio. We perform magnetometry on these self-assembled structures and observe the slope of the magnetic moment vs. field curve increases with time. This increase suggests magnetic nanoparticle interactions evolve from nanoparticle-nanoparticle interactions to cluster-cluster interactions as opposed to feature-feature interactions. We suggest the aspect ratio increase occurs because the magnetic field gradients are strongest near the transitions between recorded regions in perpendicular media. If these gradients can be optimized for assembly, strong potential exists for using perpendicular recording templates to assemble complex heterogeneous materials. PMID:26307967

  16. Universal behavior of dense clusters of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usov, N. A.; Serebryakova, O. N.

    2016-07-01

    A detailed numerical simulation of quasistatic hysteresis loops of dense clusters of interacting magnetic nanoparticles is carried out. Both clusters of magnetically soft and magnetically hard nanoparticles are considered. The clusters are characterized by an average particle diameter D, the cluster radius Rc, the particle saturation magnetization Ms, and the uniaxial anisotropy constant K. The number of particles in the cluster varies between Np = 30 - 120. The particle centers are randomly distributed within the cluster, their easy anisotropy axes being randomly oriented. It is shown that a dilute assembly of identical random clusters of magnetic nanoparticles can be characterized by two dimensionless parameters: 1) the relative strength of magneto-dipole interaction, K/Ms2, and the average particle concentration within the cluster, η = V Np/Vc. Here V is the nanoparticle volume, and Vc is the volume of the cluster, respectively. In the strong interaction limit, Msη/Ha > > 1, where Ha = 2K/Ms is the anisotropy field, the ultimate hysteresis loops of dilute assemblies of clusters have been constructed. In the variables (M/Ms, H/Ms) these hysteresis loops depend only on the particle volume fraction η. In the weak interaction limit, Msη/Ha < < 1, the assembly hysteresis loops in the variables (M/Ms, H/Ha) are close to the standard Stoner-Wohlfarth hysteresis loop.

  17. Magnetic Nanoparticles in-vivo Detection of Transplant Rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, E. R.; Bryant, H. C.; Larson, R. S.; Sergatskov, D. A.

    2006-03-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles are being used to develop methodology for the in-vivo detection and imaging of immune system attacks on transplanted organs. The signature for impending rejection of a transplant is enhanced presence of T-cells. Magnetic nanoparticles coated with specific antibodies (CD-2 and CD-3) will target and attach to these T-cells. Approximately 3 .10^5 nanoparticles can attach to each cell. When a pulsed external magnetic field is applied to the decorated cells for a fraction of a second, magnetic moments of the nanoparticles aligned with the field. After the pulse is switched off, the net magnetic moment decays over several seconds by the Nèel mechanism. The resulting magnetic remanence field (typically 10-11 T) is measured using a multi-channel SQUID array. We present the data from live T-cells placed in realistic kidney phantom. The detection sensitivity was ˜2.10^3 T-cells - a small fraction of the number actually invading the rejected transplant. The 7-channel SQUID array allows us to image the cell clusters with a few millimeters resolution.

  18. Magnetic nanoparticle and magnetic field assisted siRNA delivery in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mykhaylyk, Olga; Sanchez-Antequera, Yolanda; Vlaskou, Dialechti; Cerda, Maria Belen; Bokharaei, Mehrdad; Hammerschmid, Edelburga; Anton, Martina; Plank, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes how to design and conduct experiments to deliver siRNA to adherent cell cultures in vitro by magnetic force-assisted transfection using self-assembled complexes of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and cationic lipids or polymers that are associated with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). These magnetic complexes are targeted to the cell surface by the application of a gradient magnetic field. A further development of the magnetic drug-targeting concept is combining it with an ultrasound-triggered delivery using magnetic microbubbles as a carrier for gene or drug delivery. For this purpose, selected MNPs, phospholipids, and siRNAs are assembled in the presence of perfluorocarbon gas into flexible formulations of magnetic lipospheres (microbubbles). Methods are described how to accomplish the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles for magnetofection and how to test the association of siRNA with the magnetic components of the transfection vector. A simple method is described to evaluate magnetic responsiveness of the magnetic siRNA transfection complexes and estimate the complex loading with magnetic nanoparticles. Procedures are provided for the preparation of magnetic lipoplexes and polyplexes of siRNA as well as magnetic microbubbles for magnetofection and downregulation of the target gene expression analysis with account for the toxicity determined using an MTT-based respiration activity test. A modification of the magnetic transfection triplexes with INF-7, fusogenic peptide, is described resulting in reporter gene silencing improvement in HeLa, Caco-2, and ARPE-19 cells. The methods described can also be useful for screening vector compositions and novel magnetic nanoparticle preparations for optimized siRNA transfection by magnetofection in any cell type. PMID:25319646

  19. Lanthanide-Functionalized Hydrophilic Magnetic Hybrid Nanoparticles: Assembly, Magnetic Behaviour, and Photophysical Properties.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuai; Tang, Yu; Guo, Haijun; Qin, Shenjun; Wu, Jiang

    2016-12-01

    The lanthanide-functionalized multifunctional hybrid nanoparticles combining the superparamagnetic core and the luminescent europium complex were successfully designed and assembled via layer-by-layer strategy in this work. It is noted that the hybrid nanoparticles were modified by a hydrophilic polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI) through hydrogen bonding which bestowed excellent hydrophilicity and biocompatibility on this material. A bright-red luminescence was observed by fluorescence microscopy, revealing that these magnetic-luminescent nanoparticles were both colloidally and chemically stable in PBS solution. Therefore, the nanocomposite with magnetic resonance response and fluorescence probe property is considered to be of great potential in multi-modal bioimaging and diagnostic applications. PMID:27245169

  20. Lanthanide-Functionalized Hydrophilic Magnetic Hybrid Nanoparticles: Assembly, Magnetic Behaviour, and Photophysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shuai; Tang, Yu; Guo, Haijun; Qin, Shenjun; Wu, Jiang

    2016-05-01

    The lanthanide-functionalized multifunctional hybrid nanoparticles combining the superparamagnetic core and the luminescent europium complex were successfully designed and assembled via layer-by-layer strategy in this work. It is noted that the hybrid nanoparticles were modified by a hydrophilic polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI) through hydrogen bonding which bestowed excellent hydrophilicity and biocompatibility on this material. A bright-red luminescence was observed by fluorescence microscopy, revealing that these magnetic-luminescent nanoparticles were both colloidally and chemically stable in PBS solution. Therefore, the nanocomposite with magnetic resonance response and fluorescence probe property is considered to be of great potential in multi-modal bioimaging and diagnostic applications.

  1. Synthesis of Ultralong Polyaniline Nanorods by Magnetic Nanoparticles as Templates Under External Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Miao, Tingting; Li, Yijing; Zhang, Dongmei

    2016-06-01

    We report the successful synthesis of ultralong polyaniline nanorods (UL-PANI-NRs) via using water-soluble magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles as soft templates under the assistance of external magnetic field. It was found that the concentration of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, the aniline concentration and the use of an external magnetic field significantly affect the morphology of the PANI products. The following characterizations including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD). and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were conducted to investigate the electronic structure and composition of as-prepared UL-PANI-NRs. Our preliminary result indicates that complicated polymer structures (such as ultralong rods with vertical branches) may be prepared by water-soluble magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles as soft templates under the assistance of alternatively external magnetic fields. PMID:27427623

  2. Magnetic nanoparticle targeted hyperthermia of cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Yamayoshi, Itsukyo; Mathew, Steven; Lin, Hubert; Nayfach, Joseph; Simon, Scott I

    2013-03-01

    The incidence of wound infections that do not adequately respond to standard-of-care antimicrobial treatment has been increasing. To address this challenge, a novel antimicrobial magnetic thermotherapy platform has been developed in which a high-amplitude, high-frequency, alternating magnetic field is used to rapidly heat magnetic nanoparticles that are bound to Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The antimicrobial efficacy of this platform was evaluated in the treatment of both an in vitro culture model of S. aureus biofilm and a mouse model of cutaneous S. aureus infection. We demonstrated that an antibody-targeted magnetic nanoparticle bound to S. aureus was effective at thermally inactivating S. aureus and achieving accelerated wound healing without causing tissue injury. PMID:23149904

  3. Versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing magnetic properties of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, J. F. D. F.; Bruno, A. C.; Louro, S. R. W.

    2015-10-01

    We constructed a versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing iron oxide nanoparticles. The magnetometer can be operated at room temperature or inside a cryocooler at temperatures as low as 6 K. The magnetometer's sensor can be easily exchanged and different detection electronics can be used. We tested the assembly with a non-cryogenic commercial Hall sensor and a benchtop multimeter in a four-wire resistance measurement scheme. A magnetic moment sensitivity of 8.5 × 10-8 Am2 was obtained with this configuration. To illustrate the capability of the assembly, we synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles coated with different amounts of a triblock copolymer, Pluronic F-127, and characterized their magnetic properties. We determined that the polymer coating does not affect the magnetization of the particles at room temperature and demonstrates that it is possible to estimate the average size of coating layers from measurements of the magnetic field of the sample.

  4. Magnetic nanoparticle targeted hyperthermia of cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ho; Yamayoshi, Itsukyo; Mathew, Steven; Liln, Hubert; Nayfach, Joseph; Simon, Scott I.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of wound infections that do not adequately respond to standard-of-care antimicrobial treatment has been increasing. To address this challenge, a novel antimicrobial magnetic thermotherapy platform has been developed in which a high-amplitude, high-frequency, alternating magnetic field (AMF) is used to rapidly heat magnetic nanoparticles that are bound to Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The antimicrobial efficacy of this platform was evaluated in the treatment of both an in vitro culture model of S. aureus biofilm and a mouse model of cutaneous S. aureus infection. We demonstrated that an antibody-targeted magnetic nanoparticle bound to S. aureus was effective at thermally inactivating S. aureus and achieving accelerated wound healing without causing tissue injury. PMID:23149904

  5. Versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing magnetic properties of nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, J. F. D. F.; Bruno, A. C.; Louro, S. R. W.

    2015-10-15

    We constructed a versatile magnetometer assembly for characterizing iron oxide nanoparticles. The magnetometer can be operated at room temperature or inside a cryocooler at temperatures as low as 6 K. The magnetometer’s sensor can be easily exchanged and different detection electronics can be used. We tested the assembly with a non-cryogenic commercial Hall sensor and a benchtop multimeter in a four-wire resistance measurement scheme. A magnetic moment sensitivity of 8.5 × 10{sup −8} Am{sup 2} was obtained with this configuration. To illustrate the capability of the assembly, we synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles coated with different amounts of a triblock copolymer, Pluronic F-127, and characterized their magnetic properties. We determined that the polymer coating does not affect the magnetization of the particles at room temperature and demonstrates that it is possible to estimate the average size of coating layers from measurements of the magnetic field of the sample.

  6. Citrinin mycotoxin recognition and removal by naked magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Magro, Massimiliano; Moritz, Denise Esteves; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Baratella, Davide; Terzo, Milo; Jakubec, Petr; Malina, Ondřej; Čépe, Klára; de Aragao, Glaucia Maria Falcao; Zboril, Radek; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-07-15

    Citrinin is a nephrotoxic mycotoxin which can be synthesized by Monascus mold during the fermentation process in foods. Monascus, generally described as red mold, is a red-pigmented filamentous fungus attracting a great interest for the production of natural dyes and cholesterol-lowering statins. We individuated a specie of Monascus producing high amount of natural dyes. However, this high pigmentation was correlated with the production of citrinin. Peculiar magnetic nanoparticles, synthesized in-house and called "Surface Active Maghemite Nanoparticles" (SAMNs), are proposed as an efficient and reliable mean for citrinin removal from Monascus treated foods. The nanomaterial efficiency for citrinin binding was proved on Monascus suspensions, and SAMN@citrinin complex was characterized by Mӧssbauer spectroscopy and magnetization measurements, showing that SAMNs resulted structurally and magnetically well conserved after citrinin binding. SAMNs are excellent and stable magnetic nano-carrier for toxin removal, which can be applied in food industry. PMID:26948644

  7. Simulation of magnetophoresis of magnetic nanoparticles in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zongqian; Sun, Jiajia; Jia, Shenli; Zhang, Pengbo

    2016-08-01

    Magnetophoresis, which is known as a process of driving magnetic particles to depart from the dispersion in the presence of an external inhomogeneous magnetic field, has gained substantial investigations due to its significance in various fields. The main objective of this paper is to analyze the magnetophoretic mechanism of magnetic nanoparticles in fluids with a Lagrangian approach. The equivalent current source method is used to calculate the magnetic field of a cylindrical permanent magnet, which provides a feasible way to simulate the magnetophoresis process. Then the magnetophoretic velocity of particles and the influence of various key factors, e.g. the dimension of a cylindrical permanent magnet, the saturation magnetization of particles and the viscosity of fluid, are investigated. Furthermore, an efficient algorithm is proposed to calculate the trajectory of particles, and to describe the capture efficiency of the particles and the distribution of the captured particles at different times. In addition, the applicability of the Lagrangian approach is also discussed.

  8. Engineering spatial gradients of signaling proteins using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bonnemay, L; Hostachy, S; Hoffmann, C; Gautier, J; Gueroui, Z

    2013-11-13

    Intracellular biochemical reactions are often localized in space and time, inducing gradients of enzymatic activity that may play decisive roles in determining cell's fate and functions. However, the techniques available to examine such enzymatic gradients of activity remain limited. Here, we propose a new method to engineer a spatial gradient of signaling protein concentration within Xenopus egg extracts using superparamagnetic nanoparticles. We show that, upon the application of a magnetic field, a concentration gradient of nanoparticles with a tunable length extension is established within confined egg extracts. We then conjugate the nanoparticles to RanGTP, a small G-protein controlling microtubule assembly. We found that the generation of an artificial gradient of Ran-nanoparticles modifies the spatial positioning of microtubule assemblies. Furthermore, the spatial control of the level of Ran concentration allows us to correlate the local fold increase in Ran-nanoparticle concentration with the spatial positioning of the microtubule-asters. Our assay provides a bottom-up approach to examine the minimum ingredients generating polarization and symmetry breaking within cells. More generally, these results show how magnetic nanoparticles and magnetogenetic tools can be used to control the spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling pathways. PMID:24111679

  9. Magnetic nanoparticles for thermal lysis and application in cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sumana; Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Veerla, Sarath Chandra; Roy Mahapatra, D.

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy and radiation-therapy are conventional treatment procedure of cancer. Though radiation therapy is very common practice for cancer treatment, it has limitations including incomplete and non specific destruction. Heating characteristics of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) is modelled using molecular dynamics simulation setup. This model would give an understanding for the treatment of cancer cell through MNP associated radiation-therapy. In this paper, alternating magnetic field driven heat generation of MNP is studied using classical molecular dynamics. Temperature is measured as an ensemble average of velocity of the atoms. Temperature stabilization is achieved. Under this simulation setting with certain parameters, 45°C temperature was obtained in our simulations. Simulation data would be helpful for experimental analysis to treat cancerous cell in presence of MNP under exposure to radiofrequency. The in vitro thermal characteristics of magnetite nanoparticles using magnetic coil of various frequencies (5, 7.5, 10 and 15 kHz), the saturation temperature was found at 0.5 mg/mL concentration. At frequency 50 kHz the live/dead and MTT assay was performed on magnetite nanoparticles using MC3T3 cells for 10 min duration. Low radio frequency (RF) radiation induced localized heat into the metallic nanoparticles which is clearly understood using the molecular dynamics simulation setup. Heating of nanoparticle trigger the killing of the tumor cells, acts as a local therapy, as it generates less side effects in comparison to other treatments like chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  10. Ultrafine MnWO4 nanoparticles and their magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungelenk, Jan; Roming, Sabine; Adler, Peter; Schnelle, Walter; Winterlik, Jürgen; Felser, Claudia; Feldmann, Claus

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafine nanoparticles of MnWO4, a compound showing low-temperature multiferroicity in the bulk, were synthesized by the polyol method. Studies using powder X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, differential sedimentation and sorption techniques show the formation of a single-phase material, which is composed of MnWO4 nanoparticles with a prolate ellipsoidal shape (short axis of 4-5 nm, long axis of 11-12 nm) and an unprecedented high specific surface area of 166 m2 g-1. The as-prepared MnWO4 nanoparticles are readily crystalline after the liquid-phase synthesis. Temperature and field dependent magnetization measurements indicate antiferromagnetic behavior with a single magnetic phase transition near TN ≈ 6 K. In contrast, three successive transitions below 14 K were reported for multiferroic bulk-MnWO4. Above TN, the nanoparticles show Curie-Weiss-type paramagnetic behavior. Due to the large paramagnetic moment of Mn2+ (μeff ≈ 6.2 μB), the nanoparticles can be easily manipulated by a bar magnet at ambient temperature.

  11. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles for enhanced magnetic resonance and multimodal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikma, Elise Ann Schultz

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for noninvasive tomographic imaging of biological systems with high spatial and temporal resolution. Superparamagnetic (SPM) nanoparticles have emerged as highly effective MR contrast agents due to their biocompatibility, ease of surface modification and magnetic properties. Conventional nanoparticle contrast agents suffer from difficult synthetic reproducibility, polydisperse sizes and weak magnetism. Numerous synthetic techniques and nanoparticle formulations have been developed to overcome these barriers. However, there are still major limitations in the development of new nanoparticle-based probes for MR and multimodal imaging including low signal amplification and absence of biochemical reporters. To address these issues, a set of multimodal (T2/optical) and dual contrast (T1/T2) nanoparticle probes has been developed. Their unique magnetic properties and imaging capabilities were thoroughly explored. An enzyme-activatable contrast agent is currently being developed as an innovative means for early in vivo detection of cancer at the cellular level. Multimodal probes function by combining the strengths of multiple imaging techniques into a single agent. Co-registration of data obtained by multiple imaging modalities validates the data, enhancing its quality and reliability. A series of T2/optical probes were successfully synthesized by attachment of a fluorescent dye to the surface of different types of nanoparticles. The multimodal nanoparticles generated sufficient MR and fluorescence signal to image transplanted islets in vivo. Dual contrast T1/T2 imaging probes were designed to overcome disadvantages inherent in the individual T1 and T2 components. A class of T1/T2 agents was developed consisting of a gadolinium (III) complex (DTPA chelate or DO3A macrocycle) conjugated to a biocompatible silica-coated metal oxide nanoparticle through a disulfide linker. The disulfide linker has the ability to be reduced

  12. Magnetic properties of multisegmented cylindrical nanoparticles with alternating magnetic wire and tube segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Aravena, D.; Corona, R. M.; Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K.; Escrig, J.

    2013-11-01

    The magnetic properties in multisegmented cylindrical nanostructures comprised of nanowire and nanotube segments are investigated numerically as a function of their geometry. In this work we report systematic changes in the coercivity and remanence in these systems. Besides, we have found the ideal conditions for a magnetic configuration with two antiparallel domains that could be used to help to stabilize magnetic nanoparticles inside ferromagnetic multisegmented cylindrical nanoparticles. This magnetic behavior is due to the fact that the tube segment reverses its magnetization before the wire segment, allowing the control of the magnetic domain walls motion between two segments. In this way, these magnetic nanoobjects can be an alternative to store information or even perform logic functions.

  13. Magnetic Assembly and Cross-Linking of Nanoparticles for Releasable Magnetic Microstructures.

    PubMed

    Velez, Camilo; Torres-Díaz, Isaac; Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena; Rinaldi, Carlos; Arnold, David P

    2015-10-27

    This article describes a versatile method to fabricate magnetic microstructures with complex two-dimensional geometric shapes using magnetically assembled iron oxide (Fe3O4) and cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles. Magnetic pole patterns are imprinted into magnetizable media, onto which magnetic nanoparticles are assembled from a colloidal suspension into defined shapes via the shaped magnetic field gradients. The kinetics of this assembly process are studied by evaluation of the microstructure features (e.g., line width and height) as a function of time, particle type, and volume fraction. After assembly, the iron oxide particles are cross-linked in situ and subsequently released by dissolving a sacrificial layer. The free-floating magnetic structures are shown to retain their patterned shape during manipulation with external magnetic fields. PMID:26364509

  14. Computational studies of steering nanoparticles with magnetic gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aylak, Sultan Suleyman

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) guided nanorobotic systems that could perform diagnostic, curative, and reconstructive treatments in the human body at the cellular and subcellular level in a controllable manner have recently been proposed. The concept of a MRI-guided nanorobotic system is based on the use of a MRI scanner to induce the required external driving forces to guide magnetic nanocapsules to a specific target. However, the maximum magnetic gradient specifications of existing clinical MRI systems are not capable of driving magnetic nanocapsules against the blood flow. This thesis presents the visualization of nanoparticles inside blood vessel, Graphical User Interface (GUI) for updating file including initial parameters and demonstrating the simulation of particles and C++ code for computing magnetic forces and fluidic forces. The visualization and GUI were designed using Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML), MATLAB and C#. The addition of software for MRI-guided nanorobotic system provides simulation results. Preliminary simulation results demonstrate that external magnetic field causes aggregation of nanoparticles while they flow in the vessel. This is a promising result --in accordance with similar experimental results- and encourages further investigation on the nanoparticle-based self-assembly structures for use in nanorobotic drug delivery.

  15. Dynamic nanomagnetism characterization of individual magnetic nanoparticles by frequency-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Li, Zhenghua; Pan, Deng; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    In this study, stroboscopic imaging of an alternating magnetic field (AC magnetic field) from individual superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles was achieved using the developed frequency modulated-magnetic force microscopy (FM-MFM) technique, which enables the imaging of the vector signals of AC magnetic fields, such as a combination of in-phase and quadrature signals or that of amplitude and phase signals. FM-MFM uses the frequency modulation of cantilever oscillation, caused by the application of an off-resonant AC magnetic field to a mechanically oscillated cantilever, and visualises the vector signals of the AC magnetic field by adding a frequency demodulator and a lock-in amplifier to a conventional magnetic force microscope. Stroboscopic imaging of an AC magnetic field was carried out by varying the phase of the measured in-phase and quadrature signals via a signal processing technique. For the superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, stroboscopic imaging of the time-variable AC magnetic field, caused by the rotation of the magnetic moments within the particles, was demonstrated. This article describes the present status of FM-MFM technology, with particular attention to the feasibility of detecting magnetic moments of individual nanoparticles, and the possible application of FM-MFM in biological imaging.

  16. Cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles: Opportunity for magnetic cell imaging and cell manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This tutorial describes a method of controlled cell labeling with citrate-coated ultra small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. This method may provide basically all kinds of cells with sufficient magnetization to allow cell detection by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to enable potential magnetic manipulation. In order to efficiently exploit labeled cells, quantify the magnetic load and deliver or follow-up magnetic cells, we herein describe the main requirements that should be applied during the labeling procedure. Moreover we present some recommendations for cell detection and quantification by MRI and detail magnetic guiding on some real-case studies in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24564857

  17. Theoretical studies to elucidate the influence of magnetic dipolar interactions occurring in the magnetic nanoparticle systems, for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osaci, M.; Cacciola, M.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the study of magnetic nanoparticles has been intensively developed not only for their fundamental theoretical interest, but also for their many technological applications, especially biomedical applications, ranging from contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging to the deterioration of cancer cells via hyperthermia treatment. The theoretical and experimental research has shown until now that the magnetic dipolar interactions between nanoparticles can have a significant influence on the magnetic behaviour of the system. But, this influence is not well understood. It is clear that the magnetic dipolar interaction intensity is correlated with the nanoparticle concentration, volume fraction and magnetic moment orientations. In this paper, we try to understand the influence of magnetic dipolar interactions on the behaviour of magnetic nanoparticle systems, for biomedical applications. For the model, we considered spherical nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropy and lognormal distribution of the sizes. The model involves a simulation stage of the spatial distribution and orientation of the nanoparticles and their easy axes of magnetic anisotropy, and an evaluation stage of the Néel relaxation time. To assess the Néel relaxation time, we are going to discretise and adapt, to the local magnetic field, the Coffey analytical solution for the equation Fokker-Planck describing the dynamics of magnetic moments of nanoparticles in oblique external magnetic field. There are three fundamental aspects of interest in our studies on the magnetic nanoparticles: their spatial & orientational distributions, concentrations and sizes.

  18. Magnet-induced temporary superhydrophobic coatings from one-pot synthesized hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jian; Wang, Hongxia; Xue, Yuhua; Wang, Xungai; Lin, Tong

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we report on the production of superhydrophobic coatings on various substrates (e.g., glass slide, silicon wafer, aluminum foil, plastic film, nanofiber mat, textile fabrics) using hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles and a magnet-assembly technique. Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with a thin layer of fluoroalkyl silica on the surface were synthesized by one-step coprecipitation of Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) under an alkaline condition in the presence of a fluorinated alkyl silane. Under a magnetic field, the magnetic nanoparticles can be easily deposited on any solid substrate to form a thin superhydrophobic coating with water contact angle as high as 172 degrees , and the surface superhydrophobicity showed very little dependence on the substrate type. The particulate coating showed reasonable durability because of strong aggregation effect of nanoparticles, but the coating layer can be removed (e.g., by ultrasonication) to restore the original surface feature of the substrates. By comparison, the thin particle layer deposited under no magnetic field showed much lower hydrophobicity. The main reason for magnet-induced superhydrophobic surfaces is the formation of nano- and microstructured surface features. Such a magnet-induced temporary superhydrophobic coating may have wide applications in electronic, biomedical, and defense-related areas. PMID:20397642

  19. Magnetic Nanoparticle Arrays Self-Assembled on Perpendicular Magnetic Recording Media

    PubMed Central

    Mohtasebzadeh, Abdul Rahman; Ye, Longfei; Crawford, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    We study magnetic-field directed self-assembly of magnetic nanoparticles onto templates recorded on perpendicular magnetic recording media, and quantify feature width and height as a function of assembly time. Feature widths are determined from Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images, while heights are obtained with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). For short assembly times, widths were ~150 nm, while heights were ~14 nm, a single nanoparticle on average with a 10:1 aspect ratio. For long assembly times, widths approach 550 nm, while the average height grows to 3 nanoparticles, ~35 nm; a 16:1 aspect ratio. We perform magnetometry on these self-assembled structures and observe the slope of the magnetic moment vs. field curve increases with time. This increase suggests magnetic nanoparticle interactions evolve from nanoparticle–nanoparticle interactions to cluster–cluster interactions as opposed to feature–feature interactions. We suggest the aspect ratio increase occurs because the magnetic field gradients are strongest near the transitions between recorded regions in perpendicular media. If these gradients can be optimized for assembly, strong potential exists for using perpendicular recording templates to assemble complex heterogeneous materials. PMID:26307967

  20. Exploiting Size-Dependent Drag and Magnetic Forces for Size-Specific Separation of Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Hunter B; Anani, Tareq; Choi, Young Suk; Beyers, Ronald J; David, Allan E

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the full potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in nanomedicine requires the optimization of their physical and chemical properties. Elucidation of the effects of these properties on clinical diagnostic or therapeutic properties, however, requires the synthesis or purification of homogenous samples, which has proved to be difficult. While initial simulations indicated that size-selective separation could be achieved by flowing magnetic nanoparticles through a magnetic field, subsequent in vitro experiments were unable to reproduce the predicted results. Magnetic field-flow fractionation, however, was found to be an effective method for the separation of polydisperse suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 nm. While similar methods have been used to separate magnetic nanoparticles before, no previous work has been done with magnetic nanoparticles between 20 and 200 nm. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis were used to confirm the size of the MNPs. Further development of this work could lead to MNPs with the narrow size distributions necessary for their in vitro and in vivo optimization. PMID:26307980

  1. Exploiting Size-Dependent Drag and Magnetic Forces for Size-Specific Separation of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Hunter B.; Anani, Tareq; Choi, Young Suk; Beyers, Ronald J.; David, Allan E.

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the full potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in nanomedicine requires the optimization of their physical and chemical properties. Elucidation of the effects of these properties on clinical diagnostic or therapeutic properties, however, requires the synthesis or purification of homogenous samples, which has proved to be difficult. While initial simulations indicated that size-selective separation could be achieved by flowing magnetic nanoparticles through a magnetic field, subsequent in vitro experiments were unable to reproduce the predicted results. Magnetic field-flow fractionation, however, was found to be an effective method for the separation of polydisperse suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 nm. While similar methods have been used to separate magnetic nanoparticles before, no previous work has been done with magnetic nanoparticles between 20 and 200 nm. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis were used to confirm the size of the MNPs. Further development of this work could lead to MNPs with the narrow size distributions necessary for their in vitro and in vivo optimization. PMID:26307980

  2. Development of Novel Magnetic Nanoparticles for Hyperthermia Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cassim, Shiraz M.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Baker, Ian; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-01-01

    Advances in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia are opening new doors in cancer therapy. As a standalone or adjuvant therapy this new modality has the opportunity significantly advance thermal medicine. Major advantages of using magnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles are their highly localized power deposition and the fact that the alternating magnetic fields (AMF) used to excite them can penetrate deeply into the body without harmful effect. One limitation, however, which hinders the technology, is the problem of inductive heating of normal tissue by the AMF if the frequency and fields strength are not appropriately matched to the tissue. Restricting AMF amplitude and frequency limits the heat dose which can be selectively applied to cancerous tissue via the magnetic nanoparticle, thus lowering therapeutic effect. In an effort to address this problem, particles with optimized magnetic properties must be developed. Using particles with higher saturation magnetizations and coercivity will enhance hysteresis heating increasing particle power density at milder AMF strengths and frequencies. In this study we used oil in water microemulsions to develop nanoparticles with zero-valent Fe cores and magnetite shells. The superior magnetic properties of zero-valent Fe give these particles the potential for improved SAR over pure magnetite particles. Silane and subsequently dextran have been attached to the particle surface in order to provide a biocompatible surfactant coating. The heating capability of the particles was tested in-vivo using a mouse tumor model. Although we determined that the final stage of synthesis, purification of the dextran coated particles, permits significant corrosion/oxidation of the iron core to hematite, the particles can effectively heat tumor tissue. Improving the purification procedure will allow the generation Fe/Fe3O4 with superior SAR values. PMID:24619487

  3. Development of Novel Magnetic Nanoparticles for Hyperthermia Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cassim, Shiraz M; Giustini, Andrew J; Baker, Ian; Hoopes, P Jack

    2011-02-23

    Advances in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia are opening new doors in cancer therapy. As a standalone or adjuvant therapy this new modality has the opportunity significantly advance thermal medicine. Major advantages of using magnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles are their highly localized power deposition and the fact that the alternating magnetic fields (AMF) used to excite them can penetrate deeply into the body without harmful effect. One limitation, however, which hinders the technology, is the problem of inductive heating of normal tissue by the AMF if the frequency and fields strength are not appropriately matched to the tissue. Restricting AMF amplitude and frequency limits the heat dose which can be selectively applied to cancerous tissue via the magnetic nanoparticle, thus lowering therapeutic effect. In an effort to address this problem, particles with optimized magnetic properties must be developed. Using particles with higher saturation magnetizations and coercivity will enhance hysteresis heating increasing particle power density at milder AMF strengths and frequencies. In this study we used oil in water microemulsions to develop nanoparticles with zero-valent Fe cores and magnetite shells. The superior magnetic properties of zero-valent Fe give these particles the potential for improved SAR over pure magnetite particles. Silane and subsequently dextran have been attached to the particle surface in order to provide a biocompatible surfactant coating. The heating capability of the particles was tested in-vivo using a mouse tumor model. Although we determined that the final stage of synthesis, purification of the dextran coated particles, permits significant corrosion/oxidation of the iron core to hematite, the particles can effectively heat tumor tissue. Improving the purification procedure will allow the generation Fe/Fe3O4 with superior SAR values. PMID:24619487

  4. Development of novel magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassim, Shiraz M.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Baker, Ian; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2011-03-01

    Advances in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia are opening new doors in cancer therapy. As a standalone or adjuvant therapy this new modality has the opportunity significantly advance thermal medicine. Major advantages of using magnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles are their highly localized power deposition and the fact that the alternating magnetic fields (AMF) used to excite them can penetrate deeply into the body without harmful effect. One limitation, however, which hinders the technology, is the problem of inductive heating of normal tissue by the AMF if the frequency and fields strength are not appropriately matched to the tissue. Restricting AMF amplitude and frequency limits the heat dose which can be selectively applied to cancerous tissue via the magnetic nanoparticle, thus lowering therapeutic effect. In an effort to address this problem, particles with optimized magnetic properties must be developed. Using particles with higher saturation magnetizations and coercivity will enhance hysteresis heating increasing particle power density at milder AMF strengths and frequencies. In this study we used oil in water microemulsions to develop nanoparticles with zero-valent Fe cores and magnetite shells. The superior magnetic properties of zero-valent Fe give these particles the potential for improved SAR over pure magnetite particles. Silane and subsequently dextran have been attached to the particle surface in order to provide a biocompatible surfactant coating. The heating capability of the particles was tested in-vivo using a mouse tumor model. Although we determined that the final stage of synthesis, purification of the dextran coated particles, permits significant corrosion/oxidation of the iron core to hematite, the particles can effectively heat tumor tissue. Improving the purification procedure will allow the generation Fe/Fe3O4 with superior SAR values.

  5. Strong and moldable cellulose magnets with high ferrite nanoparticle content.

    PubMed

    Galland, Sylvain; Andersson, Richard L; Ström, Valter; Olsson, Richard T; Berglund, Lars A

    2014-11-26

    A major limitation in the development of highly functional hybrid nanocomposites is brittleness and low tensile strength at high inorganic nanoparticle content. Herein, cellulose nanofibers were extracted from wood and individually decorated with cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles and then for the first time molded at low temperature (<120 °C) into magnetic nanocomposites with up to 93 wt % inorganic content. The material structure was characterized by TEM and FE-SEM and mechanically tested as compression molded samples. The obtained porous magnetic sheets were further impregnated with a thermosetting epoxy resin, which improved the load-bearing functions of ferrite and cellulose material. A nanocomposite with 70 wt % ferrite, 20 wt % cellulose nanofibers, and 10 wt % epoxy showed a modulus of 12.6 GPa, a tensile strength of 97 MPa, and a strain at failure of ca. 4%. Magnetic characterization was performed in a vibrating sample magnetometer, which showed that the coercivity was unaffected and that the saturation magnetization was in proportion with the ferrite content. The used ferrite, CoFe2O4, is a magnetically hard material, demonstrated by that the composite material behaved as a traditional permanent magnet. The presented processing route is easily adaptable to prepare millimeter-thick and moldable magnetic objects. This suggests that the processing method has the potential to be scaled-up for industrial use for the preparation of a new subcategory of magnetic, low-cost, and moldable objects based on cellulose nanofibers. PMID:25331121

  6. Magnetically-Responsive Nanoparticles for Vectored Delivery of Cancer Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klostergaard, Jim; Bankson, James; Woodward, Wendy; Gibson, Don; Seeney, Charles

    2010-12-01

    We propose that physical targeting of therapeutics to tumors using magnetically-responsive nanoparticles (MNPs) will enhance intratumoral drug levels compared to free drugs in an effort to overcome tumor resistance. We evaluated the feasibility of magnetic enhancement of tumor extravasation of systemically-administered MNPs in human xenografts implanted in the mammary fatpads of nude mice. Mice with orthotopic tumors were injected systemically with MNPs, with a focused magnetic field juxtaposed over the tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging and scanning electron microscopy both indicated successful tumor localization of MNPs. Next, MNPs were modified with poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG) and their clearance compared by estimating signal attenuation in liver due to iron accumulation. The results suggested that PEG substitution could retard the rate of MNP plasma clearance, which may allow greater magnetically-enhanced tumor localization. We propose that this technology is clinically scalable to many types of both superficial as well as some viscerable tumors with existing magnetic technology.

  7. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenbiao; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Pu

    2016-05-01

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research.

  8. Nanosecond-resolved temperature measurements using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenbiao; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Pu

    2016-05-01

    Instantaneous and noninvasive temperature measurements are important when laser thermotherapy or welding is performed. A noninvasive nanosecond-resolved magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) temperature measurement system is described in which a transient change in temperature causes an instantaneous change in the magnetic susceptibilities of the MNPs. These transient changes in the magnetic susceptibilities are rapidly recorded using a wideband magnetic measurement system with an upper frequency limit of 0.5 GHz. The Langevin function (the thermodynamic model characterizing the MNP magnetization process) is used to obtain the temperature information. Experiments showed that the MNP DC magnetization temperature-measurement system can detect a 14.4 ns laser pulse at least. This method of measuring temperature is likely to be useful for acquiring the internal temperatures of materials irradiated with lasers, as well as in other areas of research. PMID:27250457

  9. Enzymatic conversion of magnetic nanoparticles to a non-magnetic precipitate: a new approach to magnetic sensing.

    PubMed

    Kolhatkar, Arati G; Jamison, Andrew C; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kourentzi, Katerina; Litvinov, Dmitri; Brazdeikis, Audrius; Willson, Richard C; Randall Lee, T

    2016-09-21

    Magnetic sensing utilizes the detection of biomolecule-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Our new strategy offers a novel approach to magnetic sensing where in situ conversion produces a "loss of signal" in the sensing device. This report demonstrates the enzymatic conversion of Fe3O4 MNPs to a non-magnetic precipitate via reduction by l-ascorbic acid generated by the action of alkaline phosphatase. PMID:27518879

  10. Scaling of transverse nuclear magnetic relaxation due to magnetic nanoparticle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Keith A; Vassiliou, Christophoros C; Issadore, David; Berezovsky, Jesse; Cima, Michael J; Westervelt, R M

    2010-10-01

    The aggregation of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles decreases the transverse nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time T2CP of adjacent water molecules measured by a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse-echo sequence. This effect is commonly used to measure the concentrations of a variety of small molecules. We perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations of water diffusing around SPIO nanoparticle aggregates to determine the relationship between T2CP and details of the aggregate. We find that in the motional averaging regime T2CP scales as a power law with the number N of nanoparticles in an aggregate. The specific scaling is dependent on the fractal dimension d of the aggregates. We find T2CP∝N-0.44 for aggregates with d = 2.2, a value typical of diffusion limited aggregation. We also find that in two-nanoparticle systems, T2CP is strongly dependent on the orientation of the two nanoparticles relative to the external magnetic field, which implies that it may be possible to sense the orientation of a two-nanoparticle aggregate. To optimize the sensitivity of SPIO nanoparticle sensors, we propose that it is best to have aggregates with few nanoparticles, close together, measured with long pulse-echo times. PMID:20689678