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Sample records for anticancer therapeutics targeting

  1. Novel anticancer therapeutics targeting telomerase.

    PubMed

    Ruden, Maria; Puri, Neelu

    2013-08-01

    Telomeres are protective caps at the ends of human chromosomes. Telomeres shorten with each successive cell division in normal human cells whereas, in tumors, they are continuously elongated by human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). Telomerase is overexpressed in 80-95% of cancers and is present in very low levels or is almost undetectable in normal cells. Because telomerase plays a pivotal role in cancer cell growth it may serve as an ideal target for anticancer therapeutics. Inhibition of telomerase may lead to a decrease of telomere length resulting in cell senescence and apoptosis in telomerase positive tumors. Several strategies of telomerase inhibition are reviewed, including small molecule inhibitors, antisense oligonucleotides, immunotherapies and gene therapies, targeting the hTERT or the ribonucleoprotein subunit hTER. G-quadruplex stabilizers, tankyrase and HSP90 inhibitors targeting telomere and telomerase assembly, and T-oligo approach are also covered. Based on this review, the most promising current telomerase targeting therapeutics are the antisense oligonucleotide inhibitor GRN163L and immunotherapies that use dendritic cells (GRVAC1), hTERT peptide (GV1001) or cryptic peptides (Vx-001). Most of these agents have entered phase I and II clinical trials in patients with various tumors, and have shown good response rates as evidenced by a reduction in tumor cell growth, increased overall disease survival, disease stabilization in advanced staged tumors and complete/partial responses. Most therapeutics have shown to be more effective when used in combination with standard therapies, resulting in concomitant telomere shortening and tumor mass shrinkage, as well as preventing tumor relapse and resistance to single agent therapy. PMID:22841437

  2. Sphingosine kinase 1 as an anticancer therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Gao, Fei; Chen, Kan; Tian, Mei-li; Zhao, Dong-li

    2015-01-01

    The development of chemotherapeutic resistance is a major challenge in oncology. Elevated sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) levels is predictive of a poor prognosis, and SK1 overexpression may confer resistance to chemotherapeutics. The SK/sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)/sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR) signaling pathway has been implicated in the progression of various cancers and in chemotherapeutic drug resistance. Therefore, SK1 may represent an important target for cancer therapy. Targeting the SK/S1P/S1PR signaling pathway may be an effective anticancer therapeutic strategy, particularly in the context of overcoming drug resistance. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of SK/S1P/S1PR signaling in cancer and development of SK1 inhibitors. PMID:26150697

  3. Anticancer strategies based on the metabolic profile of tumor cells: therapeutic targeting of the Warburg effect

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi-sha; Li, Lan-ya; Guan, Yi-di; Yang, Jin-ming; Cheng, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells rely mainly on glycolysis for energy production even in the presence of sufficient oxygen, a phenomenon termed the Warburg effect, which is the most outstanding characteristic of energy metabolism in cancer cells. This metabolic adaptation is believed to be critical for tumor cell growth and proliferation, and a number of onco-proteins and tumor suppressors, including the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, Myc, hypoxia-inducible factor and p53, are involved in the regulation of this metabolic adaptation. Moreover, glycolytic cancer cells are often invasive and impervious to therapeutic intervention. Thus, altered energy metabolism is now appreciated as a hallmark of cancer and a promising target for cancer treatment. A better understanding of the biology and the regulatory mechanisms of aerobic glycolysis has the potential to facilitate the development of glycolysis-based therapeutic interventions for cancer. In addition, glycolysis inhibition combined with DNA damaging drugs or chemotherapeutic agents may be effective anticancer strategies through weakening cell damage repair capacity and enhancing drug cytotoxicity. PMID:27374491

  4. Anticancer strategies based on the metabolic profile of tumor cells: therapeutic targeting of the Warburg effect.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi-Sha; Li, Lan-Ya; Guan, Yi-di; Yang, Jin-Ming; Cheng, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Tumor cells rely mainly on glycolysis for energy production even in the presence of sufficient oxygen, a phenomenon termed the Warburg effect, which is the most outstanding characteristic of energy metabolism in cancer cells. This metabolic adaptation is believed to be critical for tumor cell growth and proliferation, and a number of onco-proteins and tumor suppressors, including the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, Myc, hypoxia-inducible factor and p53, are involved in the regulation of this metabolic adaptation. Moreover, glycolytic cancer cells are often invasive and impervious to therapeutic intervention. Thus, altered energy metabolism is now appreciated as a hallmark of cancer and a promising target for cancer treatment. A better understanding of the biology and the regulatory mechanisms of aerobic glycolysis has the potential to facilitate the development of glycolysis-based therapeutic interventions for cancer. In addition, glycolysis inhibition combined with DNA damaging drugs or chemotherapeutic agents may be effective anticancer strategies through weakening cell damage repair capacity and enhancing drug cytotoxicity. PMID:27374491

  5. Anticancer Therapeutics: Targeting Macromolecules and Nanocarriers to Hyaluronan or CD44, a Hyaluronan Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Virginia M.; Szoka, Francis C.

    2009-01-01

    The complex system involved in the synthesis, degradation, and binding of the high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid (hyaluronan or HA) provides a variety of structures that can be exploited for targeted cancer therapy. In many cancers of epithelial origin there is an up-regulation of CD44, a receptor that binds HA. In other cancers, HA in the tumor matrix is over-expressed. Both CD44 on cancer cells and HA in the matrix have been targets for anti-cancer therapy. Even though CD44 is expressed in normal epithelial cells and HA is part of the matrix of normal tissues, selective targeting to cancer is possible. This is because macromolecular carriers predominantly extravasate into the tumor and not normal tissue; thus CD44-HA targeted carriers administered intravenously localize preferentially into tumors. Anti-CD44 antibodies have been used in patients to deliver radioisotopes or mertansine for treatment of CD44 expressing tumors. In early phase clinical trials, patients with breast or head and neck tumors treated with anti-CD44 conjugates experienced stabilized disease. A dose-limiting toxicity was associated with distribution of the antibody-drug conjugate to the skin, a site in the body with a high level of CD44. HA has been used as a drug carrier and a ligand on liposomes or nanoparticles to target drugs to CD44 over-expressing cells. Drugs can be attached to HA via the carboxylate on the glucuronic acid residue, the hydroxyl on the N-acetylglucosamine, or the reducing end which are located on a repeating disaccharide. Drugs delivered in HA-modified liposomes exhibited excellent anti-tumor activity both in vitro and in murine tumor models. The HA matrix is also a potential target for anti-cancer therapies. By manipulating the interaction of HA with cell surface receptors, either by degrading it with hyaluronidase or by interfering with CD44-HA interactions using soluble CD44 proteins, tumor progression was blocked. Finally, cytotoxic drugs or pro

  6. Histone/protein deacetylase SIRT1 is an anticancer therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Bor-Jang; Madabushi, Amrita; Jin, Jin; Lin, Shiou-Yuh S; Lu, A-Lien

    2014-01-01

    SIRT1, a member of the NAD+-dependent histone/protein deacetylase family, is involved in chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, and stress response and is a potential drug target. 5-fluorouracil (FU) and the SN1-type DNA methylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) are anticancer agents. In this study, we demonstrate that sirt1 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblast cells are more sensitive to FU and DNA methylating agents than normal cells. Based on these findings, the chemotherapy efficacy of SIRT1 inhibitors in combination with FU or TMZ were tested with human breast cancer cells. We found that treatments combining SIRT1 inhibitors with FU or TMZ show synergistic reduction of cell viability and colony formation of breast cancer cells. Thus, inhibition of SIRT1 activity provides a novel anticancer strategy. PMID:24959376

  7. The BCL-2 family: key mediators of the apoptotic response to targeted anti-cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Aaron N.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Faber, Anthony C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of cancer cells to suppress apoptosis is critical for carcinogenesis. The BCL-2 family proteins comprise the sentinel network that regulates the mitochondrial or intrinsic apoptotic response. Recent advances in our understanding of apoptotic signaling pathways have enabled methods to identify cancers that are “primed” to undergo apoptosis, and have revealed potential biomarkers that may predict which cancers will undergo apoptosis in response to specific therapies. Complementary efforts have focused on developing novel drugs that directly target anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family proteins. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role of BCL-2 family members in cancer development and response to therapy, focusing on targeted therapeutics, recent progress in the development of apoptotic biomarkers, and therapeutic strategies designed to overcome deficiencies in apoptosis. PMID:25895919

  8. Apoptosis as anticancer mechanism: function and dysfunction of its modulators and targeted therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Pistritto, Giuseppa; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Ceci, Claudia; Garufi, Alessia; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a form of programmed cell death that results in the orderly and efficient removal of damaged cells, such as those resulting from DNA damage or during development. Apoptosis can be triggered by signals from within the cell, such as genotoxic stress, or by extrinsic signals, such as the binding of ligands to cell surface death receptors. Deregulation in apoptotic cell death machinery is an hallmark of cancer. Apoptosis alteration is responsible not only for tumor development and progression but also for tumor resistance to therapies. Most anticancer drugs currently used in clinical oncology exploit the intact apoptotic signaling pathways to trigger cancer cell death. Thus, defects in the death pathways may result in drug resistance so limiting the efficacy of therapies. Therefore, a better understanding of the apoptotic cell death signaling pathways may improve the efficacy of cancer therapy and bypass resistance. This review will highlight the role of the fundamental regulators of apoptosis and how their deregulation, including activation of anti-apoptotic factors (i.e., Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, etc) or inactivation of pro-apoptotic factors (i.e., p53 pathway) ends up in cancer cell resistance to therapies. In addition, therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating apoptotic activity are briefly discussed. PMID:27019364

  9. Apoptosis as anticancer mechanism: function and dysfunction of its modulators and targeted therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Pistritto, Giuseppa; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Ceci, Claudia; Garufi, Alessia; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2016-04-01

    Apoptosis is a form of programmed cell death that results in the orderly and efficient removal of damaged cells, such as those resulting from DNA damage or during development. Apoptosis can be triggered by signals from within the cell, such as genotoxic stress, or by extrinsic signals, such as the binding of ligands to cell surface death receptors. Deregulation in apoptotic cell death machinery is an hallmark of cancer. Apoptosis alteration is responsible not only for tumor development and progression but also for tumor resistance to therapies. Most anticancer drugs currently used in clinical oncology exploit the intact apoptotic signaling pathways to trigger cancer cell death. Thus, defects in the death pathways may result in drug resistance so limiting the efficacy of therapies. Therefore, a better understanding of the apoptotic cell death signaling pathways may improve the efficacy of cancer therapy and bypass resistance. This review will highlight the role of the fundamental regulators of apoptosis and how their deregulation, including activation of anti-apoptotic factors (i.e., Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, etc) or inactivation of pro-apoptotic factors (i.e., p53 pathway) ends up in cancer cell resistance to therapies. In addition, therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating apoptotic activity are briefly discussed. PMID:27019364

  10. Development of Synthetic Lethality Anticancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The concept of synthetic lethality (the creation of a lethal phenotype from the combined effects of mutations in two or more genes) has recently been exploited in various efforts to develop new genotype-selective anticancer therapeutics. These efforts include screening for novel anticancer agents, identifying novel therapeutic targets, characterizing mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy, and improving efficacies through the rational design of combination therapy. This review discusses recent developments in synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics, including poly ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitors for BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutant cancers, checkpoint inhibitors for p53 mutant cancers, and small molecule agents targeting RAS gene mutant cancers. Because cancers are caused by mutations in multiple genes and abnormalities in multiple signaling pathways, synthetic lethality for a specific tumor suppressor gene or oncogene is likely cell context-dependent. Delineation of the mechanisms underlying synthetic lethality and identification of treatment response biomarkers will be critical for the success of synthetic lethality anticancer therapy. PMID:24893124

  11. Chemical Inhibitors and microRNAs (miRNA) Targeting the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Pathway: Potential for Novel Anticancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    AlQurashi, Naif; Hashimi, Saeed M.; Wei, Ming Q.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of many fundamental features in response to upstream cellular signals, such as growth factors, energy, stress and nutrients, controlling cell growth, proliferation and metabolism through two complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. Dysregulation of mTOR signalling often occurs in a variety of human malignant diseases making it a crucial and validated target in the treatment of cancer. Tumour cells have shown high susceptibility to mTOR inhibitors. Rapamycin and its derivatives (rapalogs) have been tested in clinical trials in several tumour types and found to be effective as anticancer agents in patients with advanced cancers. To block mTOR function, they form a complex with FKBP12 and then bind the FRB domain of mTOR. Furthermore, a new generation of mTOR inhibitors targeting ATP-binding in the catalytic site of mTOR showed potent and more selective inhibition. More recently, microRNAs (miRNA) have emerged as modulators of biological pathways that are essential in cancer initiation, development and progression. Evidence collected to date shows that miRNAs may function as tumour suppressors or oncogenes in several human neoplasms. The mTOR pathway is a promising target by miRNAs for anticancer therapy. Extensive studies have indicated that regulation of the mTOR pathway by miRNAs plays a major role in cancer progression, indicating a novel way to investigate the tumorigenesis and therapy of cancer. Here, we summarize current findings of the role of mTOR inhibitors and miRNAs in carcinogenesis through targeting mTOR signalling pathways and determine their potential as novel anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:23434669

  12. Targeting Mutant KRAS for Anticancer Therapeutics: A Review of Novel Small Molecule Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanxiang; Kaiser, Christine E.; Frett, Brendan; Li, Hong-yu

    2015-01-01

    The RAS proteins play a role in cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. Aberrant RAS signaling has been found to play a role in 30% of all cancers. KRAS, a key member of the RAS protein family, is an attractive cancer target, as frequent point mutations in the KRAS gene render the protein constitutively active. A number of attempts have been made to target aberrant KRAS signaling by identifying small molecule compounds that (1) are synthetic lethal to mutant KRAS, (2) block KRAS/GEF interactions, (3) inhibit downstream KRAS effectors, or (4) inhibit the post-translational processing of RAS proteins. In addition, inhibition of novel targets outside the main KRAS signaling pathway, specifically the cell cycle related kinase PLK1, has been shown have an effect in cells that harbor mutant KRAS. Herein we review the use of various high-throughput screening assays utilized to identify new small-molecule compounds capable of targeting mutant KRAS-driven cancers. PMID:23566315

  13. Therapeutic aptamers: developmental potential as anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Won; Kim, Hyun Jung; Heo, Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, composed of single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that interact with target molecules through a specific three-dimensional structure, are selected from pools of combinatorial oligonucleotide libraries. With their high specificity and affinity for target proteins, ease of synthesis and modification, and low immunogenicity and toxicity, aptamers are considered to be attractive molecules for development as anticancer therapeutics. Two aptamers - one targeting nucleolin and a second targeting CXCL12 - are currently undergoing clinical trials for treating cancer patients, and many more are under study. In this mini-review, we present the current clinical status of aptamers and aptamer-based cancer therapeutics. We also discuss advantages, limitations, and prospects for aptamers as cancer therapeutics. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(4): 234-237] PMID:25560701

  14. 'Smartening' anticancer therapeutic nanosystems using biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Lozano, Rebeca; Cano, Manuel; Pimentel, Belén; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    To be effective, anticancer agents must induce cell killing in a selective manner, something that is proving difficult to achieve. Drug delivery systems could help to solve problems associated with the lack of selectivity of classical chemotherapeutic agents. However, to realize this, such systems must overcome multiple physiological barriers. For instance, they must evade surveillance by the immune system, attach selectively to target cells, and gain access to their interior. Furthermore, there they must escape endosomal entrapment, and release their cargoes in a controlled manner, without affecting their functionality. Here we review recent efforts aiming at using biomolecules to confer these abilities to bare nanoparticles, to transform them into smart anticancer therapeutic nanosystems. PMID:26277646

  15. Molecular Interaction of a Kinase Inhibitor Midostaurin with Anticancer Drug Targets, S100A8 and EGFR: Transcriptional Profiling and Molecular Docking Study for Kidney Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Zeenat; Schulten, Hans-Juergen; Farsi, Hasan Ma; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A.; Gari, Mamdooh A.; Chaudhary, Adeel Ga; Abuzenadah, Adel M.; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed H.; Karim, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    The S100A8 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) proteins are proto-oncogenes that are strongly expressed in a number of cancer types. EGFR promotes cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival by activating molecular pathways. Involvement of proinflammatory S100A8 in tumor cell differentiation and progression is largely unclear and not studied in kidney cancer (KC). S100A8 and EGFR are potential therapeutic biomarkers and anticancer drug targets for KC. In this study, we explored molecular mechanisms of interaction profiles of both molecules with potential anticancer drugs. We undertook transcriptional profiling in Saudi KCs using Affymetrix HuGene 1.0 ST arrays. We identified 1478 significantly expressed genes, including S100A8 and EGFR overexpression, using cut-off p value <0.05 and fold change ≥2. Additionally, we compared and confirmed our findings with expression data available at NCBI’s GEO database. A significant number of genes associated with cancer showed involvement in cell cycle progression, DNA repair, tumor morphology, tissue development, and cell survival. Atherosclerosis signaling, leukocyte extravasation signaling, notch signaling, and IL-12 signaling were the most significantly disrupted signaling pathways. The present study provides an initial transcriptional profiling of Saudi KC patients. Our analysis suggests distinct transcriptomic signatures and pathways underlying molecular mechanisms of KC progression. Molecular docking analysis revealed that the kinase inhibitor "midostaurin" has amongst the selected drug targets, the best ligand properties to S100A8 and EGFR, with the implication that its binding inhibits downstream signaling in KC. This is the first structure-based docking study for the selected protein targets and anticancer drug, and the results indicate S100A8 and EGFR as attractive anticancer targets and midostaurin with effective drug properties for therapeutic intervention in KC. PMID:25789858

  16. A novel nitric oxide-based anticancer therapeutics by macrophage-targeted poly(l-arginine)-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Shinpei; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-11-10

    In the immune system, macrophages in tumor tissue generate nitric oxide (NO), producing versatile effects including apoptosis of tumor cells, because inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the cytoplasm of a macrophage produces NO using l-arginine as a substrate. Here, we propose novel NO-triggered immune therapeutics based on our newly designed nanoparticle system. We designed a poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(l-arginine) (i.e., PEG-b-P(l-Arg)) block copolymer and prepared polyion complex micelles (PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m) composed of PEG-b-P(l-Arg) and chondroitin sulfate for systemic anticancer immunotherapy. iNOS treatment of PEG-b-P(l-Arg) did not generate NO, but NO molecules were detected after trypsin pretreatment, indicating that hydrolysis of P(l-Arg) to monomeric arginine was taking place in vitro. RAW264.7 macrophages abundantly generated NO from the PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m in comparison with control micelles; this finding is indicative of robustness of the proposed method. It is interesting to note that systemic administration of PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m had no noticeable adverse effects and suppressed the tumor growth rate in C26 tumor-bearing mice in a dose-dependent manner. Our newly designed nanoparticle-assisted arginine delivery system seems to hold promise as an NO-mediated anticancer immunotherapy. PMID:26386436

  17. Conventional anticancer therapeutics and telomere maintenance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Uziel, Orit; Lahav, Meir

    2014-01-01

    The telomere-telomerase system has a unique role in the biology of cancer. Telomere maintenance, mostly affected by the up regulation of telomerase activity, is a prerequisite for perpetuation of malignant cells. This fundamental biologic feature defines telomere maintenance as an attractive therapeutic target for most types of cancer. This review summarizes some critical aspects of telomere biology with special emphasis on the connection to anticancer therapy. In particular, the effects on the telomere - telomerase system of conventional anticancer treatments, including various cytotoxic drugs, targeted biological agents and radiotherapy, and their possible combination with telomerase-directed therapy are discussed. Several potential problems, including side effects and complications inherent to perturbations of telomere biology in normal cells, are also highlighted. In spite of significant progress in this field, there are still several issues that have to be addressed and ultimately resolved in order to obtain a better characterization of the pros and cons of telomerase-directed therapies and, consequently, their clinical relevance. PMID:24975606

  18. Melanoma cell surface-expressed phosphatidylserine as a therapeutic target for cationic anticancer peptide, temporin-1CEa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Che; Chen, Yin-Wang; Zhang, Liang; Gong, Xian-Ge; Zhou, Yang; Shang, De-Jing

    2016-07-01

    We have previously reported that temporin-1CEa, a cationic antimicrobial peptide, exerts preferential cytotoxicity toward cancer cells. However, the exact molecular mechanism for this cancer-selectivity is still largely unknown. Here, we found that the negatively charged phosphatidylserine (PS) expressed on cancer cell surface serves as a target for temporin-1CEa. Our results indicate that human A375 melanoma cells express 50-fold more PS than non-cancerous HaCaT cells. The expression of cell surface PS in various cancer cell lines closely correlated with their ability to be recognized, bound and killed by temporin-1CEa. Additionally, the cytotoxicity of temporin-1CEa against A375 cells can be ameliorated by annexin V, which binds to cell surface PS with high affinity. Moreover, the data of isothermal titration calorimetry assay further confirmed a direct binding of temporin-1CEa to PS, at a ratio of 1:5 (temporin-1CEa:PS). Interestingly, the circular dichroism spectra analysis using artificial biomembrane revealed that PS not only provides electrostatic attractive sites for temporin-1CEa but also confers the membrane-bound temporin-1CEa to form α-helical structure, therefore, enhances the affinity and membrane disrupting ability of temporin-1CEa. In summary, these findings suggested that the melanoma cells expressed PS may serve as a promising target for temporin-1CEa or other cationic anticancer peptides. PMID:26596643

  19. Therapeutic Effectiveness of Anticancer Phytochemicals on Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jisun; Hlatky, Lynn; Jeong, Yong-Seob; Kim, Dohoon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how to target cancer stem cells (CSCs) may provide helpful insights for the development of therapeutic or preventive strategies against cancers. Dietary phytochemicals with anticancer properties are promising candidates and have selective impact on CSCs. This review summarizes the influence of phytochemicals on heterogeneous cancer cell populations as well as on specific targeting of CSCs. PMID:27376325

  20. Pegylated folate and peptide-decorated graphene oxide nanovehicle for in vivo targeted delivery of anticancer drugs and therapeutic self-monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiangwei; Luo, Yingping; Huang, Liwei; Feng, Yaqiang; Ju, Huangxian; Yu, Bo-Yang

    2016-06-15

    This work reports a graphene oxide-based nanovehicle with conjugation of pegylated folate for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs and fluorescein-labeled peptide for therapeutic self-monitoring in vitro and in vivo. The nanovehicle could absorb hydrophobic and aromatic drug molecules with high loading capacity and efficiency of more than 1.7mgmg(-1) and 90%, respectively. MTT and flow cytometric assays demonstrated that the drug-loaded nanovehicle could specifically transport and release the drugs into the folate receptor high-expressed cancer cells, which ensured a high therapeutic efficiency to cancer cells and prevented the injury to normal cells. Moreover, confocal fluorescence imaging confirmed that the drug-induced cancer cell death could be visualized with the light-up fluorescence of fluorescein activated by caspase-3. The targeted delivery of drug and self-evaluation of therapeutic efficacy were further successfully realized by living imaging in tumor-bearing mice, which broaden the applications of this theranostic system in vivo and may offer new opportunities for precise cancer treatment. PMID:26890827

  1. Pin1 as an anticancer drug target.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoyan G; Etzkorn, Felicia A

    2009-09-01

    Pin1 specifically catalyzes the cis/trans isomerization of phospho-Ser/Thr-Pro bonds and plays an important role in many cellular events through the effects of conformational change on the function of its biological substrates, including cell division cycle 25 C (Cdc25C), c-Jun and p53. Pin1 is overexpressed in many human cancer tissues, including breast, prostate and lung cancer. Its expression correlates with cyclin D1 levels, which contribute to cell transformation. Overexpression of Pin1 promotes tumor growth, while inhibition of Pin1 causes tumor cell apoptosis. Pin1 plays an important role in oncogenesis and therefore may serve as an effective anticancer target. Many inhibitors of Pin1 have been discovered, including several classes of designed inhibitors (alkene isosteres, reduced amides, indanyl ketones) and natural products (juglone, pepticinnamin E analogues, PiB and its derivatives obtained from a library screen). Pin1 inhibitors could be used as a novel type of anticancer drug by blocking cell cycle progression. Therefore, Pin1 represents a new diagnostic and therapeutic anticancer drug target. PMID:19890497

  2. Clinically Relevant Anticancer Polymer Paclitaxel Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Danbo; Yu, Lei; Van, Sang

    2011-01-01

    The concept of utilizing polymers in drug delivery has been extensively explored for improving the therapeutic index of small molecule drugs. In general, polymers can be used as polymer-drug conjugates or polymeric micelles. Each unique application mandates its own chemistry and controlled release of active drugs. Each polymer exhibits its own intrinsic issues providing the advantage of flexibility. However, none have as yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. General aspects of polymer and nano-particle therapeutics have been reviewed. Here we focus this review on specific clinically relevant anticancer polymer paclitaxel therapeutics. We emphasize their chemistry and formulation, in vitro activity on some human cancer cell lines, plasma pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation, in vivo efficacy, and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we include a short review of our recent developments of a novel poly(l-γ-glutamylglutamine)-paclitaxel nano-conjugate (PGG-PTX). PGG-PTX has its own unique property of forming nano-particles. It has also been shown to possess a favorable profile of pharmacokinetics and to exhibit efficacious potency. This review might shed light on designing new and better polymer paclitaxel therapeutics for potential anticancer applications in the clinic. PMID:24212604

  3. Enabling Anticancer Therapeutics by Nanoparticle Carriers: The Delivery of Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongjin; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Bing

    2011-01-01

    Anticancer drugs, such as paclitaxel (PTX), are indispensable for the treatment of a variety of malignancies. However, the application of most drugs is greatly limited by the low water solubility, poor permeability, or high efflux from cells. Nanoparticles have been widely investigated to enable drug delivery due to their low toxicity, sustained drug release, molecular targeting, and additional therapeutic and imaging functions. This review takes paclitaxel as an example and compares different nanoparticle-based delivery systems for their effectiveness in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:21845085

  4. Tumour vasculature--a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, C. T.; Winslet, M. C.; Bradley, N. J.

    1995-01-01

    The tumour vasculature is vital for the establishment, growth and metastasis of solid tumours. Its physiological properties limit the effectiveness of conventional anti-cancer strategies. Therapeutic approaches directed at the tumour vasculature are reviewed, suggesting the potential of anti-angiogenesis and the targeting of vascular proliferation antigens as cancer treatments. PMID:7543770

  5. Therapeutic efficacy of ferrofluid bound anticancer agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexiou, Ch.; Arnold, W.; Hulin, P.; Klein, R.; Schmidt, A.; Bergemannand, Ch.; Parak, F. G.

    2001-09-01

    Ferrofluids coated with starch polymers can be used as biocompatible carriers in a new field of locoregional tumor therapy called "magnetic drug targeting". Bound to medical drugs, such magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a desired body compartment using an external magnetic field. In the present study, we confirm the concentration of ferrofluids in VX2 squamous cell carcinoma tissue of the rabbit using histological investigations and MR imaging. The therapeutic efficacy of "magnetic drug targeting" was studied using the rabbit VX2 squamous cell carcinoma model. Mitoxantrone coupled ferrofluids were injected intraarterially into the artery supplying the tumor (femoral artery). The magnetic field (1.7 Tesla) was focused to the tumor placed at the medial portion of the hind limb of New Zealand White rabbits. Complete tumor remissions could be seen without any negative side effects by using only 20% of the normal systemic dosage of the chemotherapeutic agent mitoxantrone. Figs 3, Refs 14.

  6. Anticancer therapeutic potential of soy isoflavone, genistein.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Mepur H; Muthugounder, Sakunthala; Presser, Naftali; Viswanathan, Subramanian

    2004-01-01

    to recombinant EGF to target cancers overexpressing the EGF receptor. Although genistein has many potentially therapeutic actions against cancer, its biphasic bioactivity (inhibitory at high concentrations and activating at low concentrations) requires caution in determining therapeutic doses of genistein alone or in combination with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and/or immunotherapies. Of the more than 4500 genistein studies in peer-reviewed primary publications, almost one fifth pertain to its antitumor capabilities and more than 400 describe its mechanism of action in normal and malignant human and animal cells, animal models, in vitro experiments, or phase I/II clinical trials. Several biotechnological firms in Japan, Australia and in the United States (e.g., Nutrilite) manufacture genistein as a natural supplement under quality controlled and assured conditions. PMID:15584372

  7. Targeting aerobic glycolysis: 3-bromopyruvate as a promising anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Cardaci, Simone; Desideri, Enrico; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-02-01

    The Warburg effect refers to the phenomenon whereby cancer cells avidly take up glucose and produce lactic acid under aerobic conditions. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor reliance on glycolysis remains not completely clear, its inhibition opens feasible therapeutic windows for cancer treatment. Indeed, several small molecules have emerged by combinatorial studies exhibiting promising anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo, as a single agent or in combination with other therapeutic modalities. Therefore, besides reviewing the alterations of glycolysis that occur with malignant transformation, this manuscript aims at recapitulating the most effective pharmacological therapeutics of its targeting. In particular, we describe the principal mechanisms of action and the main targets of 3-bromopyruvate, an alkylating agent with impressive antitumor effects in several models of animal tumors. Moreover, we discuss the chemo-potentiating strategies that would make unparalleled the putative therapeutic efficacy of its use in clinical settings. PMID:22328057

  8. Targeted NF1 cancer therapeutics with multiple modes of action: small molecule hormone-like agents resembling the natural anticancer metabolite, 2-methoxyoestradiol

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yu-chi; Upadhyayula, Ravi; Cevallos, Stephanie; Messick, Ryan J; Hsia, Tammy; Leese, Mathew P; Jewett, Douglas M; Ferrer-Torres, Daysha; Roth, Therese M; Dohle, Wolfgang; Potter, Barry V L; Barald, Kate F

    2015-01-01

    Background: Both the number and size of tumours in NF1 patients increase in response to the rise in steroid hormones seen at puberty and during pregnancy. The size of tumours decreases after delivery, suggesting that hormone-targeting therapy might provide a viable new NF1 treatment approach. Our earlier studies demonstrated that human NF1 tumour cell lines either went through apoptosis or ceased growth in the presence of 2-methoxyoestradiol (2ME2), a naturally occurring anticancer metabolite of 17-β estradiol. Previous reports of treatment with sulfamoylated steroidal and non-steroidal derivatives of 2ME2 showed promising reductions in tumour burden in hormone-responsive cancers other than NF1. Here we present the first studies indicating that 2ME2 derivatives could also provide an avenue for treating NF1, for which few treatment options are available. Methods: STX3451, (2-(3-Bromo-4,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-7-methoxy-6-sulfamoyloxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline), a non-steroidal sulphamate analogue of 2ME2, was tested in dose-dependent studies of malignant and benign NF1 human tumour cell lines and cell lines with variable controlled neurofibromin expression. The mechanisms of action of STX3451 were also analysed. Results: We found that STX3451-induced apoptosis in human malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) cell lines, even in the presence of elevated oestrogen and progesterone. It inhibits both PI3 kinase and mTOR signalling pathways. It disrupts actin- and microtubule-based cytoskeletal structures in cell lines derived from human MPNSTs and in cells derived from benign plexiform neurofibromas. STX3451 selectively kills MPNST-derived cells, but also halts growth of other tumour-derived NF1 cell lines. Conclusion: STX3451 provides a new approach for inducing cell death and lowering tumour burden in NF1 and other hormone-responsive cancers with limited treatment options. PMID:26461061

  9. Targets in anticancer research--A review.

    PubMed

    Jayashree, B S; Nigam, Sukriti; Pai, Aravinda; Patel, Harsh K; Reddy, N D; Kumar, Nitesh; Rao, C M

    2015-08-01

    Cancer is a complex disease characterized by a loss in the normal cell regulatory mechanisms that govern cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Current chemotherapeutics, as anticancer agents, are developing resistance to single drug and also to treatment therapies involving multiple drugs. Cross resistance associated with the specificity and selectivity of existing drugs has restricted the application of chemotherapy. Alternatively, these limitations have given better insight in understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of various stages in cancer. In the light of this, continuous efforts are being made in order to identify and validate newer anticancer targets. This review presents some of the important targets that have been already reported, such as aromatase, farnesyl transferase, histone deacetylase, tyrosine kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase. A few molecules designed against these targets have successfully reached clinical trials. However, only limited marketed drugs are available from these classes. Besides, the review also highlights some of the other important targets and strategies that have also drawn considerable attention in the area of anticancer drug development such as, cancer stem cells and monoclonal antibodies. Further, the integration of the tools in molecular biology with the results from preclinical and clinical trials would strengthen the effectiveness of treatment regimens in cancer patients. There lies a much scope for designing promising lead compounds and treatment therapies against these established targets. PMID:26349312

  10. Tubulins - the target for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Vindya, N G; Sharma, Nishant; Yadav, Mukesh; Ethiraj, K R

    2015-01-01

    Tubulin has picked up great focus as a major target in drug discovery and consequently, tubulin inhibitors have pulling in a considerable attention as anticancer agents. Numerable naturally occurring agents have focused on tubulin system act as an imperative target of cancer chemotherapy. Substantial number of tubulin inhibitors has been discovered so far and these agents are classified as indicated by their interaction. They are colchicine site binder, vinca- alkaloid related drugs and those interacting with the Taxol binding site and functioning as stabilising agents. We review the recent advances in the advancement of tubulin interfering agents and will render the current trend in the improvement of tubulin inhibitors as anticancer agents. PMID:25579568

  11. Targeting protein-protein interactions as an anticancer strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei A.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Fu, Haian

    2013-01-01

    The emergence and convergence of cancer genomics, targeted therapies, and network oncology have significantly expanded the landscape of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks in cancer for therapeutic discovery. Extensive biological and clinical investigations have led to the identification of protein interaction hubs and nodes that are critical for the acquisition and maintaining characteristics of cancer essential for cell transformation. Such cancer enabling PPIs have become promising therapeutic targets. With technological advances in PPI modulator discovery and validation of PPI-targeting agents in clinical settings, targeting PPI interfaces as an anticancer strategy has become a reality. Future research directed at genomics-based PPI target discovery, PPI interface characterization, PPI-focused chemical library design, and patient-genomic subpopulation-driven clinical studies is expected to accelerate the development of the next generation of PPI-based anticancer agents for personalized precision medicine. Here we briefly review prominent PPIs that mediate cancer-acquired properties, highlight recognized challenges and promising clinical results in targeting PPIs, and outline emerging opportunities. PMID:23725674

  12. Epigenomes as therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Christopher A; Costa, Fabricio F

    2015-07-01

    Epigenetics is a molecular phenomenon that pertains to heritable changes in gene expression that do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications in a whole genome, known as the epigenome, play an essential role in the regulation of gene expression in both normal development and disease. Traditional epigenetic changes include DNA methylation and histone modifications. Recent evidence reveals that other players, such as non-coding RNAs, may have an epigenetic regulatory role. Aberrant epigenetic signaling is becoming to be known as a central component of human disease, and the reversible nature of the epigenetic modifications provides an exciting opportunity for the development of clinically relevant therapeutics. Current epigenetic therapies provide a clinical benefit through disrupting DNA methyltransferases or histone deacetylases. However, the emergence of next-generation epigenetic therapies provides an opportunity to more effectively disrupt epigenetic disease states. Novel epigenetic therapies may improve drug targeting and drug delivery, optimize dosing schedules, and improve the efficacy of preexisting treatment modalities (chemotherapy, radiation, and immunotherapy). This review discusses the epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to the disease, available epigenetic therapies, epigenetic therapies currently in development, and the potential future use of epigenetic therapeutics in a clinical setting. PMID:25797698

  13. Immune regulation of therapy-resistant niches: emerging targets for improving anticancer drug responses.

    PubMed

    Jinushi, Masahisa

    2014-09-01

    Emerging evidence has unveiled a critical role for immunological parameters in predicting tumor prognosis and clinical responses to anticancer therapeutics. On the other hand, responsiveness to anticancer drugs greatly modifies the repertoires, phenotypes, and immunogenicity of tumor-infiltrating immune cells, serving as a critical factor to regulate tumorigenic activities and the emergence of therapy-resistant phenotypes. Tumor-associated immune functions are influenced by distinct or overlapping sets of therapeutic modalities, such as cytotoxic chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or molecular-targeted therapy, and various anticancer modalities have unique properties to influence the mode of cross-talk between tumor cells and immune cells in tumor microenvironments. Thus, it is critical to understand precise molecular machineries whereby each anticancer strategy has a distinct or overlapping role in regulating the dynamism of reciprocal communication between tumor and immune cells in tumor microenvironments. Such an understanding will open new therapeutic opportunities by harnessing the immune system to overcome resistance to conventional anticancer drugs. PMID:24756203

  14. The anticancer immune response: indispensable for therapeutic success?

    PubMed Central

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François; André, Fabrice; Tesniere, Antoine; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Although the impact of tumor immunology on the clinical management of most cancers is still negligible, there is increasing evidence that anticancer immune responses may contribute to the control of cancer after conventional chemotherapy. Thus, radiotherapy and some chemotherapeutic agents, in particular anthracyclines, can induce specific immune responses that result either in immunogenic cancer cell death or in immunostimulatory side effects. This anticancer immune response then helps to eliminate residual cancer cells (those that fail to be killed by chemotherapy) or maintains micrometastases in a stage of dormancy. Based on these premises, in this Review we address the question, How may it be possible to ameliorate conventional therapies by stimulating the anticancer immune response? Moreover, we discuss the rationale of clinical trials to evaluate and eventually increase the contribution of antitumor immune responses to the therapeutic management of neoplasia. PMID:18523649

  15. Polyphenols as mitochondria-targeted anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Gorlach, Sylwia; Fichna, Jakub; Lewandowska, Urszula

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondria are the respiratory and energetic centers of the cell where multiple intra- and extracellular signal transduction pathways converge leading to dysfunction of those organelles and, consequently, apoptotic or/and necrotic cell death. Mitochondria-targeted anticancer drugs are referred to as mitocans; they have recently been classified by Neuzil et al. (2013) according to their molecular mode of action into: hexokinase inhibitors; mimickers of the Bcl-2 homology-3 (BH3) domains; thiol redox inhibitors; deregulators of voltage-dependent anionic channel (VDAC)/adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) complex; electron redox chain-targeting agents; lipophilic cations targeting the mitochondrial inner membrane; tricarboxylic acid cycle-targeting agents; and mitochondrial DNA-targeting agents. Polyphenols of plant origin and their synthetic or semisynthetic derivatives exhibit pleiotropic biological activities, including the above-mentioned modes of action characteristic of mitocans. Some of them have already been tested in clinical trials. Gossypol has served as a lead compound for developing more efficient BH3 mimetics such as ABT-737 and its orally available structural analog ABT-263 (Navitoclax). Furthermore, mitochondriotropic derivatives of phenolic compounds such as quercetin and resveratrol have been synthesized and reported to efficiently induce cancer cell death in vitro. PMID:26185003

  16. Therapeutic target database update 2014: a resource for targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chu; Zhang, Cheng; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Feng; Chen, Shang Ying; Zhang, Peng; Li, Ying Hong; Yang, Sheng Yong; Wei, Yu Quan; Tao, Lin; Chen, Yu Zong

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe an update of the Therapeutic Target Database (http://bidd.nus.edu.sg/group/ttd/ttd.asp) for better serving the bench-to-clinic communities and for enabling more convenient data access, processing and exchange. Extensive efforts from the research, industry, clinical, regulatory and management communities have been collectively directed at the discovery, investigation, application, monitoring and management of targeted therapeutics. Increasing efforts have been directed at the development of stratified and personalized medicines. These efforts may be facilitated by the knowledge of the efficacy targets and biomarkers of targeted therapeutics. Therefore, we added search tools for using the International Classification of Disease ICD-10-CM and ICD-9-CM codes to retrieve the target, biomarker and drug information (currently enabling the search of almost 900 targets, 1800 biomarkers and 6000 drugs related to 900 disease conditions). We added information of almost 1800 biomarkers for 300 disease conditions and 200 drug scaffolds for 700 drugs. We significantly expanded Therapeutic Target Database data contents to cover >2300 targets (388 successful and 461 clinical trial targets), 20 600 drugs (2003 approved and 3147 clinical trial drugs), 20 000 multitarget agents against almost 400 target-pairs and the activity data of 1400 agents against 300 cell lines. PMID:24265219

  17. Biomaterials and Emerging Anticancer Therapeutics: Engineering the Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Luo; Mooney, David J

    2016-01-01

    The microenvironment is increasingly recognized to play key roles in cancer, and biomaterials provide a means to engineer microenvironments both in vitro and in vivo to study and manipulate cancer. In vitro cancer models using 3D matrices recapitulate key elements of the tumor microenvironment and have revealed new aspects of cancer biology. Cancer vaccines based on some of the same biomaterials have, in parallel, allowed for the engineering of durable prophylactic and therapeutic anticancer activity in preclinical studies, and some of these vaccines have moved to clinical trials. The impact of biomaterials engineering on cancer treatment is expected to further increase in importance in the years to come. PMID:26694936

  18. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-01-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  19. Therapeutic strategies targeting cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ning, Xiaoyan; Shu, Jianchang; Du, Yiqi; Ben, Qiwen; Li, Zhaoshen

    2013-04-01

    Increasing studies have demonstrated a small proportion of cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in the cancer cell population. CSCs have powerful self-renewal capacity and tumor-initiating ability and are resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. Conventional anticancer therapies kill the rapidly proliferating bulk cancer cells but spare the relatively quiescent CSCs, which cause cancer recurrence. So it is necessary to develop therapeutic strategies acting specifically on CSCs. In recent years, studies have shown that therapeutic agents such as metformin, salinomycin, DECA-14, rapamycin, oncostatin M (OSM), some natural compounds, oncolytic viruses, microRNAs, cell signaling pathway inhibitors, TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon (IFN), telomerase inhibitors, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and monoclonal antibodies can suppress the self-renewal of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. A combination of these agents and conventional chemotherapy drugs can significantly inhibit tumor growth, metastasis and recurrence. These strategies targeting CSCs may bring new hopes to cancer therapy. PMID:23358473

  20. Targeting Tumor Metabolism for Cancer Treatment: Is Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinases (PDKs) a Viable Anticancer Target?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Hu, Xiaohui; Tam, Kin Yip

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains a lethal threat to global lives. Development of novel anticancer therapeutics is still a challenge to scientists in the field of biomedicine. In cancer cells, the metabolic features are significantly different from those of normal ones, which are hallmarks of several malignancies. Recent studies brought atypical cellular metabolism, such as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect, into the scientific limelight. Targeting these altered metabolic pathways in cancer cells presents a promising therapeutic strategy. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs), key enzymes in the pathway of glucose metabolism, could inactivate the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) by phosphorylating it and preserving the substrates pyruvate, lactate and alanine for gluconeogenesis. Overexpression of PDKs could block the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to satisfy high oxygen demand in cancer cells, while inhibition of PDKs could upregulate the activity of PDC and rectify the balance between the demand and supply of oxygen, which could lead to cancer cell death. Thus, inhibitors targeting PDKs represent a promising strategy for cancer treatment by acting on glycolytic tumors while showing minimal side effects on the oxidative healthy organs. This review considers the role of PDKs as regulator of PDC that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate in mitochondrion. It is concluded that PDKs are solid therapeutic targets. Inhibition of PDKs could be an attractive therapeutic approach for the development of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26681918

  1. Validating Aurora B as an anti-cancer drug target.

    PubMed

    Girdler, Fiona; Gascoigne, Karen E; Eyers, Patrick A; Hartmuth, Sonya; Crafter, Claire; Foote, Kevin M; Keen, Nicholas J; Taylor, Stephen S

    2006-09-01

    The Aurora kinases, a family of mitotic regulators, have received much attention as potential targets for novel anti-cancer therapeutics. Several Aurora kinase inhibitors have been described including ZM447439, which prevents chromosome alignment, spindle checkpoint function and cytokinesis. Subsequently, ZM447439-treated cells exit mitosis without dividing and lose viability. Because ZM447439 inhibits both Aurora A and B, we set out to determine which phenotypes are due to inhibition of which kinase. Using molecular genetic approaches, we show that inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity phenocopies ZM447439. Furthermore, a novel ZM compound, which is 100 times more selective for Aurora B over Aurora A in vitro, induces identical phenotypes. Importantly, inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity induces a penetrant anti-proliferative phenotype, indicating that Aurora B is an attractive anti-cancer drug target. Using molecular genetic and chemical-genetic approaches, we also probe the role of Aurora A kinase activity. We show that simultaneous repression of Aurora A plus induction of a catalytic mutant induces a monopolar phenotype. Consistently, another novel ZM-related inhibitor, which is 20 times as potent against Aurora A compared with ZM447439, induces a monopolar phenotype. Expression of a drug-resistant Aurora A mutant reverts this phenotype, demonstrating that Aurora A kinase activity is required for spindle bipolarity in human cells. Because small molecule-mediated inhibition of Aurora A and Aurora B yields distinct phenotypes, our observations indicate that the Auroras may present two avenues for anti-cancer drug discovery. PMID:16912073

  2. Biological and therapeutic activities, and anticancer properties of curcumin

    PubMed Central

    PERRONE, DONATELLA; ARDITO, FATIMA; GIANNATEMPO, GIOVANNI; DIOGUARDI, MARIO; TROIANO, GIUSEPPE; LO RUSSO, LUCIO; DE LILLO, ALFREDO; LAINO, LUIGI; LO MUZIO, LORENZO

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant. Curcumin has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine, as it is nontoxic and exhibits a variety of therapeutic properties, including antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activities. Recently, certain studies have indicated that curcumin may exert anticancer effects in a variety of biological pathways involved in mutagenesis, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, cell cycle regulation and metastasis. The present study reviewed previous studies in the literature, which support the therapeutic activity of curcumin in cancer. In addition, the present study elucidated a number of the challenges concerning the use of curcumin as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent. All the studies reviewed herein suggest that curcumin is able to exert anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, antioxidative, hepatoprotective and antitumor activities, particularly against cancers of the liver, skin, pancreas, prostate, ovary, lung and head neck, as well as having a positive effect in the treatment of arthritis. PMID:26640527

  3. Therapeutic targets in subependymoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ling-Yuan; Wei, Jun; Haider, Ali S; Liebelt, Brandon D; Ling, Xiaoyang; Conrad, Charles A; Fuller, Gregory N; Levine, Nicholas B; Priebe, Waldemar; Sawaya, Raymond; Heimberger, Amy B

    2014-12-15

    Subependymomas are usually treated with surgical resection; however, no standard, defined alternative medical therapy is recommended for patients who are not surgical candidates, owing to a paucity of molecular, immunological, and genetic characterization. To address this, an ex vivo functional analysis of the immune microenvironment in subependymoma was conducted, a subependymoma cytokine/chemokine microarray was constructed for the evaluation of operational immune and molecular pathways, and a subependymoma cell line was derived and used to test a variety of cytotoxic agents that target operational pathways identified in subependymoma. We found that immune effectors are detectable within the microenvironment of subependymoma; however, marked immune suppression is not observed. The subependymoma tissue microarrays demonstrated tumor expression of p53, MDM2, HIF-1α, topoisomerase II-β, p-STAT3, and nucleolin, but not EGFRvIII, EphA2, IL-13RA2, CMV, CTLA-4, FoxP3, PD-1, PD-L1, EGFR, PDGF-α, PDGF-β, PDGFR-α, PDGFR-β, PTEN, IGFBP2, PI3K, MDM4, IDH1, mTOR, or Jak2. A topoisomerase inhibitor (WP744, IC50=0.83 μM) and a p-STAT3/HIF-1α inhibitor (WP1066, IC50=3.15 μM) demonstrated a growth inhibition of the subependymoma cell proliferation. Cumulatively, these data suggest that those agents that interfere with oncogenes operational in subependymoma may have clinical impact. PMID:25465288

  4. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  5. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Kathrin; Walter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT), which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination methods, and

  6. Anti-cancer drugs targeting fatty acid synthase (FAS).

    PubMed

    Pandey, Puspa R; Liu, Wen; Xing, Fei; Fukuda, Koji; Watabe, Kounosuke

    2012-05-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is a key enzyme of the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway which catalyzes de novo lipid synthesis. FAS expression in normal adult tissues is generally very low or undetectable as majority of fatty acids obtained are from dietary sources, whereas it is significantly upregulated in cancer cells despite adequate nutritional lipid supply. Activation of FAS provides rapidly proliferating tumor cells sufficient amount of lipids for membrane biogenesis and confers growth and survival advantage possibly acting as a metabolic oncogene. Importantly, inhibition of FAS in cancer cells using the pharmacological FAS inhibitors results in tumor cell death by apoptosis whereas normal cells are resistant. Due to this differential expression of FAS, the inhibitors of this enzyme are selectively toxic to tumor cells and therefore FAS is considered an attractive therapeutic target for cancer. Several FAS inhibitors are already patented and commercially available; however, the potential toxicity of these FAS inhibitors remains to be tested in clinical trials. In this review, we discuss some of the potent FAS inhibitors along with their patent information, the mechanism of anti-cancer effects and the development of more specific and potent FAS inhibitors with lower side effects that are expected to emerge as anti-cancer treatment in the near future. PMID:22338595

  7. Hierarchical targeted hepatocyte mitochondrial multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liujie; Song, Yang; He, Jiayu; Wu, Li; Zhao, Can; Xiao, Yanyu; Li, Wei; Cai, Baochang; Cheng, Haibo; Li, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    The overwhelming majority of drugs exert their pharmacological effects after reaching their target sites of action, however, these target sites are mainly located in the cytosol or intracellular organelles. Consequently, delivering drugs to the specific organelle is the key to achieve maximum therapeutic effects and minimum side-effects. In the work reported here, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel mitochondrial-targeted multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) based on chitosan derivatives according to the physiological environment of the tumor and the requirement of mitochondrial targeting drug delivery. The intelligent chitosan nanoparticles possess various functions such as stealth, hepatocyte targeting, multistage pH-response, lysosomal escape and mitochondrial targeting, which lead to targeted drug release after the progressively shedding of functional groups, thus realize the efficient intracellular delivery and mitochondrial localization, inhibit the growth of tumor, elevate the antitumor efficacy, and reduce the toxicity of anticancer drugs. It provides a safe and efficient nanocarrier platform for mitochondria targeting anticancer drug delivery. PMID:25818430

  8. Myc proteins as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, WC; Weiss, WA

    2010-01-01

    Myc proteins (c-myc, Mycn and Mycl) target proliferative and apoptotic pathways vital for progression in cancer. Amplification of the MYCN gene has emerged as one of the clearest indicators of aggressive and chemotherapy-refractory disease in children with neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood. Phosphorylation and ubiquitin-mediated modulation of Myc protein influence stability and represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Phosphorylation of Myc proteins is controlled in-part by the receptor tyrosine kinase/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mTOR signaling, with additional contributions from Aurora A kinase. Myc proteins regulate apoptosis in part through interactions with the p53/Mdm2/Arf signaling pathway. Mutation in p53 is commonly observed in patients with relapsed neuroblastoma, contributing to both biology and therapeutic resistance. This review examines Myc function and regulation in neuroblastoma, and discusses emerging therapies that target Mycn. PMID:20101214

  9. Targeting telomerase for cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Shay, J W; Keith, W N

    2008-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of advanced malignancies is continuous cell growth and this almost universally correlates with the reactivation of telomerase. Although there is still much we do not understand about the regulation of telomerase, it remains a very attractive and novel target for cancer therapeutics. Several clinical trials have been initiated, and in this review we highlight some of the most promising approaches and conclude by speculating on the role of telomerase in cancer stem cells. PMID:18231105

  10. Therapeutic targets for premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Karl-Erik; Abdel-Hamid, Ibrahim A

    2011-09-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common male sexual complaint, and may exert a profound negative impact on the man's life and partnership. Using currently available treatment alternatives (e.g., selective serotonin uptake inhibitor, agents acting locally on the penis), PE can be treated in most, but not all patients. However, since long term success rates have been disappointing, and the only approved treatment so far is the short-acting selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor dapoxetine, there is currently an intensive search for new treatment modalities. Selection of the most promising therapeutic targets from a host of current and potential candidates depends heavily on their roles in the pathophysiology of PE. Possible central nervous targets that will be discussed are serotonin transporters, and CNS receptors for 5-HT(IA) and 5-HT(1B), dopamine, oxytocin, opioids, neurokinin-1, and glutamate. Putative peripheral targets include α(1)-adrenoceptors, phosphodiestrase enzymes, Rho kinases, purinergic (P2X) receptors, and penile sensory nerves. It is clear that exploiting the full therapeutic potential of these targets will require additional basic and clinical research. PMID:21816550

  11. Multilevel therapeutic targeting by topoisomerase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P. J.; Souès, S.

    1994-01-01

    The successful use of cytotoxic agents in the clinical management of LCH depends upon the selective targeting of cells participating in the disease process. The topoisomerase 'poisons', currently used extensively in the treatment of aggressive malignancies, represent an intriguing class of cytotoxic agents exerting their cytostatic and cytotoxic effects at multiple levels according to cell type. The non-DNA intercalating topoisomerase II poison, etoposide (VP-16), is the "drug of first choice" in the treatment of LCH by cytotoxic chemotherapy. This major anticancer agent traps the nuclear enzyme DNA topoisomerase II on DNA in a sequence-specific manner, the processing of trapped complexes giving rise to a plethora of cellular effects not least the potential activation of pathways leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This short review describes the principles of topoisomerase inhibition, the multiplicity of cellular effects and the concept of cellular targeting in LCH. The successful treatment of LCH by cytotoxic chemotherapy will depend on both the identity of the target tissues and a clear view of therapeutic intent, given the potential for induction of haematological neoplasia. PMID:8075006

  12. Mitochondria and Mitochondrial ROS in Cancer: Novel Targets for Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuhui; Karakhanova, Svetlana; Hartwig, Werner; D'Haese, Jan G; Philippov, Pavel P; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria are indispensable for energy metabolism, apoptosis regulation, and cell signaling. Mitochondria in malignant cells differ structurally and functionally from those in normal cells and participate actively in metabolic reprogramming. Mitochondria in cancer cells are characterized by reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, which promotes cancer development by inducing genomic instability, modifying gene expression, and participating in signaling pathways. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA mutations caused by oxidative damage that impair the oxidative phosphorylation process will result in further mitochondrial ROS production, completing the "vicious cycle" between mitochondria, ROS, genomic instability, and cancer development. The multiple essential roles of mitochondria have been utilized for designing novel mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents. Selective drug delivery to mitochondria helps to increase specificity and reduce toxicity of these agents. In order to reduce mitochondrial ROS production, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants can specifically accumulate in mitochondria by affiliating to a lipophilic penetrating cation and prevent mitochondria from oxidative damage. In consistence with the oncogenic role of ROS, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants are found to be effective in cancer prevention and anticancer therapy. A better understanding of the role played by mitochondria in cancer development will help to reveal more therapeutic targets, and will help to increase the activity and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer drugs. In this review we summarized the impact of mitochondria on cancer and gave summary about the possibilities to target mitochondria for anticancer therapies. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2570-2581, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26895995

  13. Fibromyalgia syndrome: novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Ablin, Jacob N; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic disorder characterized by widespread pain and tenderness, accompanied by disturbed sleep, chronic fatigue and multiple additional functional symptoms. FMS continues to pose an unmet need regarding pharmacological treatment and many patients fail to achieve sufficient relief from existing treatments. As FMS is considered to be a condition in which pain amplification occurs within the CNS, therapeutic interventions, both pharmacological and otherwise, have revolved around attempts to influence pain processing in the CNS. In the current review, we present an update on novel targets in the search for effective treatment of FMS. PMID:27296699

  14. KRAS as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Frank

    2015-01-01

    KRAS proteins play a major role in human cancer, but have not yielded to therapeutic attack. New technologies in drug discovery and insights into signaling pathways that KRAS controls have promoted renewed efforts to develop therapies, either through direct targeting of KRAS itself, new ways of blocking KRAS processing, or by identifying targets that KRAS cancers depend on for survival. While drugs that block the well-established downstream pathways, RAF-MAPK and PI 3 kinase, are being tested in the clinic, new efforts are underway to exploit previously unrecognized vulnerabilities, such as altered metabolic networks, or novel pathways identified through synthetic lethal screens. Furthermore, new ways of suppressing KRAS gene expression and of harnessing the immune system offer further hope that new ways of treating KRAS are finally coming into view. These issues are discussed in this edition of CCR Focus. PMID:25878360

  15. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  16. Hydrogen Peroxide Inducible DNA Cross-Linking Agents: Targeted Anticancer Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Yunyan; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Gandhi, Varsha; Peng, Xiaohua

    2011-01-01

    The major concern for anticancer chemotherapeutic agents is the host toxicity. The development of anti-cancer prodrugs targeting the unique biochemical alterations in cancer cells is an attractive approach to achieve therapeutic activity and selectivity. We designed and synthesized a new type of nitrogen mustard prodrug that can be activated by high level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) found in cancer cells to release the active chemotherapy agent. The activation mechanism was determined by NMR analysis. The activity and selectivity of these prodrugs towards ROS was determined by measuring DNA interstrand crosslinks and/or DNA alkylations. These compounds showed 60–90% inhibition toward various cancer cells, while normal lymphocytes were not affected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of H2O2-activated anticancer prodrugs. PMID:22035519

  17. Therapeutic target for protozoal diseases

    DOEpatents

    Rathore, Dharmendar; Jani, Dewal; Nagarkatti, Rana

    2008-10-21

    A novel Fasciclin Related Adhesive Protein (FRAP) from Plasmodium and related parasites is provided as a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases caused by the parasites. FRAP has been shown to play a critical role in adhesion to, or invasion into, host cells by the parasite. Furthermore, FRAP catalyzes the neutralization of heme by the parasite, by promoting its polymerization into hemozoin. This invention provides methods and compositions for therapies based on the administration of protein, DNA or cell-based vaccines and/or antibodies based on FRAP, or antigenic epitopes of FRAP, either alone or in combination with other parasite antigens. Methods for the development of compounds that inhibit the catalytic activity of FRAP, and diagnostic and laboratory methods utilizing FRAP are also provided.

  18. Targeting Apoptosis Signaling Pathways for Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fulda, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Treatment approaches for cancer, for example chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or immunotherapy, primarily act by inducing cell death in cancer cells. Consequently, the inability to trigger cell death pathways or alternatively, evasion of cancer cells to the induction of cell death pathways can result in resistance of cancers to current treatment protocols. Therefore, in order to overcome treatment resistance a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate cell death and survival pathways in cancers and in response to cancer therapy is necessary to develop molecular-targeted therapies. This strategy should lead to more effective and individualized treatment strategies that selectively target deregulated signaling pathways in a tumor type- and patient-specific manner. PMID:22655234

  19. Recent developments in receptor tyrosine kinases targeted anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Samir H.; Singh, Ratn D.; Joshi, Dilip V.; Patel, Hitesh B.; Mody, Shailesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Novel concepts and understanding of receptors lead to discoveries and optimization of many small molecules and antibodies as anti-cancerous drugs. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are such a promising class of receptors under the investigation in past three decades. RTKs are one of the essential mediators of cell signaling mechanism for various cellular processes. Transformations such as overexpression, dysregulation, or mutations of RTKs may result into malignancy, and thus are an important target for anticancer therapy. Numerous subfamilies of RTKs, such as epidermal growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptors, insulin-like growth factor receptor, and hepatocyte growth factor receptor, have been being investigated in recent years as target for anticancer therapy. The present review focuses several small molecules drugs as well as monoclonal antibodies targeting aforesaid subfamilies either approved or under investigation to treat the various cancers. PMID:27051190

  20. Toward Intracellular Targeted Delivery of Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hetal; Debinski, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    A number of anti-cancer drugs have their targets localized to particular intracellular compartments. These drugs reach the targets mainly through diffusion, dependent on biophysical and biochemical forces that allow cell penetration. This means that both cancer cells and normal cells will be subjected to such diffusion; hence many of these drugs, like chemotherapeutics, are potentially toxic and the concentration achieved at the site of their action is often suboptimal. The same relates to radiation that indiscriminately affects normal and diseased cells. However, nature-designed systems enable compounds present in the extracellular environment to end up inside the cell and even travel to more specific intracellular compartments. For example, viruses and bacterial toxins can more or less specifically recognize eukaryotic cells, enter these cells, and direct some protein portions to designated intracellular areas. These phenomena have led to creative thinking, such as employing viruses or bacterial toxins for cargo delivery to cells and, more specifically, to cancer cells. Proteins can be genetically engineered in order to not only mimic what viruses and bacterial toxins can do, but also to add new functions, extending or changing the intracellular routes. It is possible to make conjugates or, more preferably, single-chain proteins that recognize cancer cells and deliver cargo inside the cells, even to the desired subcellular compartment. These findings offer new opportunities to deliver drugs/labels only to cancer cells and only to their site of action within the cells. The development of such dual-specificity vectors for targeting cancer cells is an attractive and potentially safer and more efficacious way of delivering drugs. We provide examples of this approach for delivering brain cancer therapeutics, using a specific biomarker on glioblastoma tumor cells. PMID:22671766

  1. Anticancer Drug-Incorporated Layered Double Hydroxide Nanohybrids and Their Enhanced Anticancer Therapeutic Efficacy in Combination Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyeong Jin; Kang, Joo-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoparticles have been studied as cellular delivery carriers for anionic anticancer agents. As MTX and 5-FU are clinically utilized anticancer drugs in combination therapy, we aimed to enhance the therapeutic performance with the help of LDH nanoparticles. Method. Anticancer drugs, MTX and 5-FU, and their combination, were incorporated into LDH by reconstruction method. Simply, LDHs were thermally pretreated at 400°C, and then reacted with drug solution to simultaneously form drug-incorporated LDH. Thus prepared MTX/LDH (ML), 5-FU/LDH (FL), and (MTX + 5-FU)/LDH (MFL) nanohybrids were characterized by X-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, zeta potential measurement, dynamic light scattering, and so forth. The nanohybrids were administrated to the human cervical adenocarcinoma, HeLa cells, in concentration-dependent manner, comparing with drug itself to verify the enhanced therapeutic efficacy. Conclusion. All the nanohybrids successfully accommodated intended drug molecules in their house-of-card-like structures during reconstruction reaction. It was found that the anticancer efficacy of MFL nanohybrid was higher than other nanohybrids, free drugs, or their mixtures, which means the multidrug-incorporated LDH nanohybrids could be potential drug delivery carriers for efficient cancer treatment via combination therapy. PMID:24860812

  2. Development of anticancer agents targeting the Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Hao, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays indispensable roles in both embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of this pathway is implicated in many types of cancer. Consequently, substantial efforts have made to develop therapeutic agents as anticancer drugs by specifically targeting the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Here we systematically review the potential therapeutic agents that have been developed to date for inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin cascade as well as current status of clinical trials of some of these agents. PMID:26396911

  3. Integration of Mitochondrial Targeting for Molecular Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Philippe; Guerreschi, Pierre; Mortier, Laurent; Kluza, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism greatly influences cancer cell survival, invasion, metastasis, and resistance to many anticancer drugs. Furthermore, molecular-targeted therapies (e.g., oncogenic kinase inhibitors) create a dependence of surviving cells on mitochondrial metabolism. For these reasons, inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism represents promising therapeutic pathways in cancer. This review provides an overview of mitochondrial metabolism in cancer and discusses the limitations of mitochondrial inhibition for cancer treatment. Finally, we present preclinical evidence that mitochondrial inhibition could be associated with oncogenic “drivers” inhibitors, which may lead to innovative drug combinations for improving the efficacy of molecular-targeted therapy. PMID:26713093

  4. Anticancer Gold(III) Porphyrins Target Mitochondrial Chaperone Hsp60.

    PubMed

    Hu, Di; Liu, Yungen; Lai, Yau-Tsz; Tong, Ka-Chung; Fung, Yi-Man; Lok, Chun-Nam; Che, Chi-Ming

    2016-01-22

    Identification of the molecular target(s) of anticancer metal complexes is a formidable challenge since most of them are unstable toward ligand exchange reaction(s) or biological reduction under physiological conditions. Gold(III) meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (gold-1 a) is notable for its high stability in biological milieux and potent in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities. Herein, extensive chemical biology approaches employing photo-affinity labeling, click chemistry, chemical proteomics, cellular thermal shift, saturation-transfer difference NMR, protein fluorescence quenching, and protein chaperone assays were used to provide compelling evidence that heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60), a mitochondrial chaperone and potential anticancer target, is a direct target of gold-1 a in vitro and in cells. Structure-activity studies with a panel of non-porphyrin gold(III) complexes and other metalloporphyrins revealed that Hsp60 inhibition is specifically dependent on both the gold(III) ion and the porphyrin ligand. PMID:26663758

  5. Renal toxicity of anticancer agents targeting HER2 and EGFR.

    PubMed

    Cosmai, Laura; Gallieni, Maurizio; Porta, Camillo

    2015-12-01

    EGFR and HER2 are found overexpressed and/or activated in many different human malignancies (e.g. breast and colon cancer), and a number of drugs specifically targeting these two tyrosine kinases have been developed over the years as anticancer agents. In the present review, the renal safety profile of presently available agents targeting either HER2 or EGFR will be discussed, together with the peculiarities related to their clinical use in patients with impaired renal function, or even in dialysis. Indeed, even though renal toxicity is not so common with these agents, it may nevertheless happen, especially when these agents are combined with traditional chemotherapeutic agents. As a whole, kidney impairment or dialysis should not be regarded per se as reasons not to administer or to stop an active anti-HER or anti-EGFR anticancer treatment, especially given the possibility of significantly improving the life expectancy of many cancer patients with the use of these agents. PMID:26341657

  6. Therapeutic targeting of replicative immortality

    PubMed Central

    Yaswen, Paul; MacKenzie, Karen L.; Keith, W. Nicol; Hentosh, Patricia; Rodier, Francis; Zhu, Jiyue; Firestone, Gary L.; Matheu, Ander; Carnero, Amancio; Bilsland, Alan; Sundin, Tabetha; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Helferich, Bill; Boosani, Chandra S.; Guha, Gunjan; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Chen, Sophie; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Azmi, Asfar S.; Bhakta, Dipita; Halicka, Dorota; Niccolai, Elena; Aquilano, Katia; Ashraf, S. Salman; Nowsheen, Somaira; Yang, Xujuan

    2015-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of malignant cell populations is the ability to undergo continuous proliferation. This property allows clonal lineages to acquire sequential aberrations that can fuel increasingly autonomous growth, invasiveness, and therapeutic resistance. Innate cellular mechanisms have evolved to regulate replicative potential as a hedge against malignant progression. When activated in the absence of normal terminal differentiation cues, these mechanisms can result in a state of persistent cytostasis. This state, termed “senescence,” can be triggered by intrinsic cellular processes such as telomere dysfunction and oncogene expression, and by exogenous factors such as DNA damaging agents or oxidative environments. Despite differences in upstream signaling, senescence often involves convergent interdependent activation of tumor suppressors p53 and p16/pRB, but can be induced, albeit with reduced sensitivity, when these suppressors are compromised. Doses of conventional genotoxic drugs required to achieve cancer cell senescence are often much lower than doses required to achieve outright cell death. Additional therapies, such as those targeting cyclin dependent kinases or components of the PI3K signaling pathway, may induce senescence specifically in cancer cells by circumventing defects in tumor suppressor pathways or exploiting cancer cells’ heightened requirements for telomerase. Such treatments sufficient to induce cancer cell senescence could provide increased patient survival with fewer and less severe side effects than conventional cytotoxic regimens. This positive aspect is countered by important caveats regarding senescence reversibility, genomic instability, and paracrine effects that may increase heterogeneity and adaptive resistance of surviving cancer cells. Nevertheless, agents that effectively disrupt replicative immortality will likely be valuable components of new combinatorial approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:25869441

  7. Antioxidant therapeutic targets in COPD.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Irfan; Kilty, Iain

    2006-06-01

    Oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are important features in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Oxidative stress has important consequences for several elements of lung physiology and for the pathogenesis of COPD, including oxidative inactivation of antiproteases and surfactants, mucus hypersecretion, membrane lipid peroxidation, alveolar epithelial injury, remodeling of extracellular matrix, and apoptosis. Therefore, targeting oxidative stress with antioxidants or boosting the endogenous levels of antioxidants is likely to be beneficial in the treatment of COPD. Antioxidant and/or anti-inflammatory agents such as thiol molecules (glutathione and mucolytic drugs, such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine and N-acystelyn), dietary polyphenol (curcumin-diferuloylmethane, a principal component of turmeric), resveratrol (a flavanoid found in red wine), green tea (theophylline and epigallocatechin-3- gallate), ergothioneine (xanthine and peroxynitrite inhibitor), quercetin, erdosteine and carbocysteine lysine salt, have been reported to control NF-kappaB activation, regulation of glutathione biosynthesis genes, chromatin remodeling and hence inflammatory gene expression. Specific spin traps such as alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone, a catalytic antioxidant (ECSOD mimetic), manganese (III) meso-tetrakis (N,N'-diethyl-1,3-imidazolium-2-yl) porphyrin (AEOL 10150 and AEOL 10113), and a SOD mimetic M40419 have also been reported to inhibit cigarette smoke-induced inflammatory responses in vivo. Since a variety of oxidants, free radicals and aldehydes are implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD it is possible that therapeutic administration of multiple antioxidants will be effective in the treatment of COPD. Various approaches to enhance lung antioxidant capacity and clinical trials of antioxidant compounds in COPD are discussed. PMID:16787173

  8. Therapeutic targeting of replicative immortality.

    PubMed

    Yaswen, Paul; MacKenzie, Karen L; Keith, W Nicol; Hentosh, Patricia; Rodier, Francis; Zhu, Jiyue; Firestone, Gary L; Matheu, Ander; Carnero, Amancio; Bilsland, Alan; Sundin, Tabetha; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, Amr; Helferich, Bill; Boosani, Chandra S; Guha, Gunjan; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Chen, Sophie; Mohammed, Sulma I; Azmi, Asfar S; Bhakta, Dipita; Halicka, Dorota; Niccolai, Elena; Aquilano, Katia; Ashraf, S Salman; Nowsheen, Somaira; Yang, Xujuan

    2015-12-01

    One of the hallmarks of malignant cell populations is the ability to undergo continuous proliferation. This property allows clonal lineages to acquire sequential aberrations that can fuel increasingly autonomous growth, invasiveness, and therapeutic resistance. Innate cellular mechanisms have evolved to regulate replicative potential as a hedge against malignant progression. When activated in the absence of normal terminal differentiation cues, these mechanisms can result in a state of persistent cytostasis. This state, termed "senescence," can be triggered by intrinsic cellular processes such as telomere dysfunction and oncogene expression, and by exogenous factors such as DNA damaging agents or oxidative environments. Despite differences in upstream signaling, senescence often involves convergent interdependent activation of tumor suppressors p53 and p16/pRB, but can be induced, albeit with reduced sensitivity, when these suppressors are compromised. Doses of conventional genotoxic drugs required to achieve cancer cell senescence are often much lower than doses required to achieve outright cell death. Additional therapies, such as those targeting cyclin dependent kinases or components of the PI3K signaling pathway, may induce senescence specifically in cancer cells by circumventing defects in tumor suppressor pathways or exploiting cancer cells' heightened requirements for telomerase. Such treatments sufficient to induce cancer cell senescence could provide increased patient survival with fewer and less severe side effects than conventional cytotoxic regimens. This positive aspect is countered by important caveats regarding senescence reversibility, genomic instability, and paracrine effects that may increase heterogeneity and adaptive resistance of surviving cancer cells. Nevertheless, agents that effectively disrupt replicative immortality will likely be valuable components of new combinatorial approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:25869441

  9. Multiple Molecular Pathways in Melanomagenesis: Characterization of Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Giuseppe; Ombra, MariaNeve; Colombino, Maria; Casula, Milena; Sini, MariaCristina; Manca, Antonella; Paliogiannis, Panagiotis; Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Cossu, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of malignant melanoma have been widely studied and novel therapeutic treatments developed in recent past years. Molecular targets for therapy have mostly been recognized in the RAS–RAF–MEK–ERK and PI3K–AKT signaling pathways; small-molecule inhibitors were drawn to specifically target key kinases. Unfortunately, these targeted drugs may display intrinsic or acquired resistance and various evidences suggest that inhibition of a single effector of the signal transduction cascades involved in melanoma pathogenesis may be ineffective in blocking the tumor growth. In this sense, a wider comprehension of the multiple molecular alterations accounting for either response or resistance to treatments with targeted inhibitors may be helpful in assessing, which is the most effective combination of such therapies. In the present review, we summarize the known molecular mechanisms underlying either intrinsic and acquired drug resistance either alternative roads to melanoma pathogenesis, which may become targets for innovative anticancer approaches. PMID:26322273

  10. Immunological Effects of Conventional Chemotherapy and Targeted Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Buqué, Aitziber; Kepp, Oliver; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-12-14

    The tremendous clinical success of checkpoint blockers illustrates the potential of reestablishing latent immunosurveillance for cancer therapy. Although largely neglected in the clinical practice, accumulating evidence indicates that the efficacy of conventional and targeted anticancer agents does not only involve direct cytostatic/cytotoxic effects, but also relies on the (re)activation of tumor-targeting immune responses. Chemotherapy can promote such responses by increasing the immunogenicity of malignant cells, or by inhibiting immunosuppressive circuitries that are established by developing neoplasms. These immunological "side" effects of chemotherapy are desirable, and their in-depth comprehension will facilitate the design of novel combinatorial regimens with improved clinical efficacy. PMID:26678337

  11. Recent Trends in Targeted Anticancer Prodrug and Conjugate Design

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yashveer; Palombo, Matthew; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    Anticancer drugs are often nonselective antiproliferative agents (cytotoxins) that preferentially kill dividing cells by attacking their DNA at some level. The lack of selectivity results in significant toxicity to noncancerous proliferating cells. These toxicities along with drug resistance exhibited by the solid tumors are major therapy limiting factors that results into poor prognosis for patients. Prodrug and conjugate design involves the synthesis of inactive drug derivatives that are converted to an active form inside the body and preferably at the site of action. Classical prodrug and conjugate design has focused on the development of prodrugs that can overcome physicochemical (e.g., solubility, chemical instability) or biopharmaceutical problems (e.g., bioavailability, toxicity) associated with common anticancer drugs. The recent targeted prodrug and conjugate design, on the other hand, hinges on the selective delivery of anticancer agents to tumor tissues thereby avoiding their cytotoxic effects on noncancerous cells. Targeting strategies have attempted to take advantage of low extracellular pH, elevated enzymes in tumor tissues, the hypoxic environment inside the tumor core, and tumor-specific antigens expressed on tumor cell surfaces. The present review highlights recent trends in prodrug and conjugate rationale and design for cancer treatment. The various approaches that are currently being explored are critically analyzed and a comparative account of the advantages and disadvantages associated with each approach is presented. PMID:18691040

  12. Targeted anticancer prodrug with mesoporous silica nanoparticles as vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jianquan; Fang, Gang; Wang, Xiaodan; Zeng, Fang; Xiang, Yufei; Wu, Shuizhu

    2011-11-01

    A targeted anticancer prodrug system was fabricated with 180 nm mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) as carriers. The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was conjugated to the particles through an acid-sensitive carboxylic hydrazone linker which is cleavable under acidic conditions. Moreover, folic acid (FA) was covalently conjugated to the particle surface as the targeting ligand for folate receptors (FRs) overexpressed in some cancer cells. The in vitro release profiles of DOX from the MSN-based prodrug systems showed a strong dependence on the environmental pH values. The fluorescent dye FITC was incorporated in the MSNs so as to trace the cellular uptake on a fluorescence microscope. Cellular uptakes by HeLa, A549 and L929 cell lines were tested for FA-conjugated MSNs and plain MSNs respectively, and a much more efficient uptake by FR-positive cancer cells (HeLa) can be achieved by conjugation of folic acid onto the particles because of the folate-receptor-mediated endocytosis. The cytotoxicities for the FA-conjugated MSN prodrug, the plain MSN prodrug and free DOX against three cell lines were determined, and the result indicates that the FA-conjugated MSN prodrug exhibits higher cytotoxicity to FR-positive cells, and reduced cytotoxicity to FR-negative cells. Thus, with 180 nm MSNs as the carriers for the prodrug system, good drug loading, selective targeting and sustained release of drug molecules within targeted cancer cells can be realized. This study may provide useful insights for designing and improving the applicability of MSNs in targeted anticancer prodrug systems.

  13. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene therapy research and its application in relation to anti-cancer treatment. PMID:22977356

  14. Sphingolipid metabolism enzymes as targets for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kok, J W; Sietsma, H

    2004-05-01

    Treatment with anti-cancer agents in most cases ultimately results in apoptotic cell death of the target tumor cells. Unfortunately, tumor cells can develop multidrug resistance, e.g., by a reduced propensity to engage in apoptosis by which they become insensitive to multiple chemotherapeutics. Ceramide. the central molecule in cellular sphingolipid metabolism, has been recognized as an important mediator of apoptosis. Moreover, an increased cellular capacity for ceramide glycosylation has been identified as a novel multidrug resistance mechanism. Indeed, virtually all multidrug resistant cell types exhibit a deviating sphingolipid composition, most typically an increased level of glucosylceramide. Thus, the enzyme glucosylceramide synthase, which converts ceramide into glucosylceramide, has emerged as a potential target to increase apoptosis and decrease drug resistance of tumor cells. In addition, several other steps in the pathways of sphingolipid metabolism arc altered in multidrug resistant cells, opening a perspective on additional sphingolipid metabolism enzymes as targets for anti-cancer therapy. In this article, we present an overview of the current understanding concerning drug resistance-related changes in sphingolipid metabolism and how interference with this metabolism can be exploited to over come multidrug resistance. PMID:15134220

  15. Targeting G-quadruplexes in gene promoters: a novel anticancer strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Shankar; Hurley, Laurence H.; Neidle, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    G-quadruplexes are four-stranded DNA structures that are over-represented in gene promoter regions and are viewed as emerging therapeutic targets in oncology, as transcriptional repression of oncogenes through stabilization of these structures could be a novel anticancer strategy. Many gene promoter G-quadruplexes have physicochemical properties and structural characteristics that might make them druggable, and their structural diversity suggests that a high degree of selectivity might be possible. Here, we describe the evidence for G-quadruplexes in gene promoters and discuss their potential as therapeutic targets, as well as progress in the development of strategies to harness this potential through intervention with small-molecule ligands. PMID:21455236

  16. Bcl-2 family proteins as targets for anticancer drug design.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z

    2000-12-27

    Bcl-2 family proteins are key regulators of programmed cell death or apoptosis that is implicated in many human diseases, particularly cancer. In recent years, they have attracted intensive interest in both basic research to understand the fundamental principles of cell survival and cell death and drug discovery to develop a new class of anticancer agents. The Bcl-2 family includes both anti- and pro-apoptotic proteins with opposing biological functions in either inhibiting or promoting cell death. High expression of anti-apoptotic members such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL commonly found in human cancers contributes to neoplastic cell expansion and interferes with the therapeutic action of many chemotherapeutic drugs. The functional blockade of Bcl-2 or Bcl-XL could either restore the apoptotic process in tumor cells or sensitize these tumors for chemo- and radiotherapies. This article reviews the recent progress in the design and discovery of small molecules that block the anti-apoptotic function of Bcl-2 or Bcl-XL. These chemical inhibitors are effective modulators of apoptosis and promising leads for the further development of new anticancer agents. PMID:11426648

  17. Getting Syk: Spleen Tyrosine Kinase as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Geahlen, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Syk is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase well known for its ability to couple immune cell receptors to intracellular signaling pathways that regulate cellular responses to extracellular antigens and antigen-immunoglobulin complexes of particular importance to the initiation of inflammatory responses. Thus, Syk is an attractive target for therapeutic kinase inhibitors designed to ameliorate symptoms and consequences of acute and chronic inflammation. Its more recently recognized role as a promoter of cell survival in numerous cancer cell types ranging from leukemia to retinoblastoma has attracted considerable interest as a target for a new generation of anticancer drugs. This review discusses the biological processes in which Syk participates that have made this kinase such a compelling drug target. PMID:24975478

  18. Lymphatic Targeting of Nanosystems for Anticancer Drug Therapy.

    PubMed

    Abellan-Pose, Raquel; Csaba, Noemi; Alonso, Maria Jose

    2016-01-01

    The lymphatic system represents a major route of dissemination in metastatic cancer. Given the lack of selectivity of conventional chemotherapy to prevent lymphatic metastasis, in the last years there has been a growing interest in the development of nanocarriers showing lymphotropic characteristics. The goal of this lymphotargeting strategy is to facilitate the delivery of anticancer drugs to the lymph node-resident cancer cells, thereby enhancing the effectiveness of the anti-cancer therapies. This article focuses on the nanosystems described so far for the active or passive targeting of oncological drugs to the lymphatic circulation. To understand the design and performance of these nanosystems, we will discuss first the physiology of the lymphatic system and how physiopathological changes associated to tumor growth influence the biodistribution of nanocarriers. Second, we provide evidence on how the tailoring of the physicochemical characteristics of nanosystems, i.e. particle size, surface charge and hydrophilicity, allows the modulation of their access to the lymphatic circulation. Finally, we provide an overview of the relationship between the biodistribution and antimetastatic activity of the nanocarriers loaded with oncological drugs, and illustrate the most promising active targeting approaches investigated so far. PMID:26675222

  19. MicroRNA Targeted Therapeutic Approach for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiwei; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the US and is expected to be the second leading cause of cancer-related death by 2030. Therefore, it is important to better understand the molecular pathogenesis, phenotypes and features of pancreatic cancer in order to design novel molecularly targeted therapies for achieving better therapeutic outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer. Recently, the roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer became a hot topic in the scientific community of pancreatic cancer research. By conducting miRNA expression profiling, the aberrant expression of miRNAs was revealed in the serum and in cancer tissues from patients with pancreatic cancer. These aberrantly expressed miRNAs are critically correlated with the disease stage, drug resistance, and survival of pancreatic cancer patients. Hence, targeting these tiny molecules, the specific miRNAs, could provide an efficient and optimal approach in the therapy of pancreatic cancer. Indeed, the pre-clinical and in vivo experiments showed that nanoparticle delivery of synthetic oligonucleotides or treatment with natural agents could be useful to modulate the expression of miRNAs and thereby inhibit pancreatic cancer growth and progression, suggesting that targeting miRNAs combined with conventional anti-cancer therapeutics could be a novel therapeutic strategy for increasing drug sensitivity and achieving better therapeutic outcome of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. PMID:26929739

  20. Cisplatin encapsulated nanoparticle as a therapeutic agent for anticancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eka Putra, Gusti Ngurah Putu; Huang, Leaf; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2016-03-01

    The knowledge of manipulating size of biomaterials encapsulated drug into nano-scale particles has been researched and developed in treating cancer. Cancer is the second worldwide cause of death, therefore it is critical to treat cancers challenging with therapeutic modality of various mechanisms. Our preliminary investigation has studied cisplatin encapsulated into lipid-based nanoparticle and examined the therapeutic effect on xenografted animal model. We used mice with tumor volume ranging from 195 to 214 mm3 and then few mice were grouped into three groups including: control (PBS), lipid platinum chloride (LPC) nanoparticles and CDDP (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) at dose of 3mg cisplatin /kg body weight. The effect of the treatment was observed for 12 days post-injection. It showed that LPC NPs demonstrated a better therapeutic effect compared to CDDP at same 3mg cisplatin/kg drug dose of tumor size reduction, 96.6% and 11.1% respectively. In addition, mouse body weight loss of LPC, CDDP and PBS treated group are 12.1%, 24.3% and 1.4%. It means that by compared to CDDP group, LPC group demonstrated less side effect as not much reduction of body weight have found. Our findings have shown to be a potential modality to further investigate as a feasible cancer therapy modality.

  1. Promising therapeutic targets in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Matthay, Katherine K; George, Rani E; Yu, Alice L

    2012-05-15

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor in children, is derived from neural crest cells. Nearly half of patients present with metastatic disease and have a 5-year event-free survival of <50%. New approaches with targeted therapy may improve efficacy without increased toxicity. In this review we evaluate 3 promising targeted therapies: (i) (131)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a radiopharmaceutical that is taken up by human norepinephrine transporter (hNET), which is expressed in 90% of neuroblastomas; (ii) immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting the GD2 ganglioside, which is expressed on 98% of neuroblastoma cells; and (iii) inhibitors of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a tyrosine kinase that is mutated or amplified in ~10% of neuroblastomas and expressed on the surface of most neuroblastoma cells. Early-phase trials have confirmed the activity of (131)I-MIBG in relapsed neuroblastoma, with response rates of ~30%, but the technical aspects of administering large amounts of radioactivity in young children and limited access to this agent have hindered its incorporation into treatment of newly diagnosed patients. Anti-GD2 antibodies have also shown activity in relapsed disease, and a recent phase III randomized trial showed a significant improvement in event-free survival for patients receiving chimeric anti-GD2 (ch14.18) combined with cytokines and isotretinoin after myeloablative consolidation therapy. A recently approved small-molecule inhibitor of ALK has shown promising preclinical activity for neuroblastoma and is currently in phase I and II trials. This is the first agent directed to a specific mutation in neuroblastoma, and marks a new step toward personalized therapy for neuroblastoma. Further clinical development of targeted treatments offers new hope for children with neuroblastoma. PMID:22589483

  2. Promising therapeutic targets in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Matthay, Katherine K.; George, Rani E.; Yu, Alice L.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extra- cranial solid tumor in children, is derived from neural crest cells. Nearly half of patients present with metastatic disease, and have 5-year EFS of less than 50%. New approaches with targeted therapy may improve efficacy without increased toxicity. The current review will evaluate three promising targeted therapies, including 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a radiopharmaceutical taken up by the human norepinephrine transporter expressed in 90% of neuroblastomas, immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting the GD2 ganglioside, expressed on 98% of neuroblastoma cells, and inhibitors of ALK, a tyrosine kinase which is mutated or amplified in approximately 10% of neuroblastoma and expressed on the surface of most neuroblastoma cells. Early phase trials have confirmed the activity of 131I-MIBG in relapsed neuroblastoma, with response rates of about 30%, but the technical aspects of administration of large amounts of radioactivity in young children and the limited access have hindered incorporation into treatment of newly diagnosed patients. Anti-GD2 antibodies have also demonstrated activity in relapsed disease, and a recent phase III randomized trial showed a significant improvement in event-free survival for patients receiving chimeric anti-GD2 (ch14.18) combined with cytokines and isotretinoin after myeloablative consolidation therapy. A recently approved small molecule inhibitor of ALK has promising pre-clinical activity for neuroblastoma, and is currently in phase I and II trials. This is the first agent directed to a specific mutation in neuroblastoma, and marks a new step toward personalized therapy for neuroblastoma. Further clinical development of targeted treatments offers new hope for children with neuroblastoma. PMID:22589483

  3. Targeted delivery of therapeutics to endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Eric; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2009-01-01

    The endothelium is a target for therapeutic and diagnostic interventions in a plethora of human disease conditions including ischemia, inflammation, edema, oxidative stress, thrombosis and hemorrhage, and metabolic and oncological diseases. Unfortunately, drugs have no affinity to the endothelium, thereby limiting the localization, timing, specificity, safety, and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Molecular determinants on the surface of resting and pathologically altered endothelial cells, including cell adhesion molecules, peptidases, and receptors involved in endocytosis, can be used for drug delivery to the endothelial surface and into intracellular compartments. Drug delivery platforms such as protein conjugates, recombinant fusion constructs, targeted liposomes, and stealth polymer carriers have been designed to target drugs and imaging agents to these determinants. We review endothelial target determinants and drug delivery systems, describe parameters that control the binding of drug carriers to the endothelium, and provide examples of the endothelial targeting of therapeutic enzymes designed for the treatment of acute vascular disorders including ischemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, and thrombosis. PMID:18815813

  4. Conotoxins: Molecular and Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Richard J.

    Marine molluscs known as cone snails produce beautiful shells and a complex array of over 50,000 venom peptides evolved for prey capture and defence. Many of these peptides selectively modulate ion channels and transporters, making them a valuable source of new ligands for studying the role these targets play in normal and disease physiology. A number of conopeptides reduce pain in animal models, and several are now in pre-clinical and clinical development for the treatment of severe pain often associated with diseases such as cancer. Less than 1% of cone snail venom peptides are pharmacologically characterised.

  5. Dual-drug loaded nanoformulation with a galactosamine homing moiety for liver-targeted anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Nafees; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Kun; Zhu, Chengcheng; Zhu, Zhenzhu; Jiao, Yang; Guo, Zijian

    2016-08-16

    Drug resistance and unfavorable pharmacokinetics are the major obstacles for conventional anticancer drugs. A combination of different anticancer drugs into one formulation is a common strategy to alleviate the side effects of individual drugs in clinical practice. Platinum anticancer drugs are the typical defective therapeutic agents for cancer chemotherapy and have poor selectivity for tumor cells. In this study, a nanosystem composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), Pt(IV) prodrug (PPD) and α-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS) was designed to overcome these defects. The Pt(IV) prodrug, c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(O2CC(CH3)3)2], was prepared by the reaction of oxoplatin with trimethylacetic anhydride and its structure was characterized by X-ray crystallography. The PPD and α-TOS self-assembled with PLGA, forming a dual-drug loaded nanoparticle (DDNP). The surface of the DDNP was decorated with galactosamine (G), giving rise to a G-DDNP that can actively target the liver cancer cells through the overexpressed asialoglycoprotein receptors. The DDNPs and G-DDNPs were characterized by SEM, TEM, and DLS. They are spherical in shape with required polydispersity and suitable mean size (ca. 150 nm). The in vitro cytotoxicity of DDNPs and G-DDNPs was tested against the human SMMC-7721 liver cancer cell line. G-DDNPs are more potent than the corresponding free drugs and untargeted DDNP, showing that some synergistic and tumor-specific effects are achieved by this strategy. The results demonstrate that dual-drug loaded nanoformulations with tumor-targeting function could be effective anticancer agents for conquering the shortcomings related to single-drug chemotherapy. PMID:27333997

  6. Green design "bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy" applied for improved tumor-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoning; Gu, Xiaochen; Zhou, Jianping; Shen, Lingjia; Yin, Lifang; Hua, Peiying; Ding, Yang

    2016-08-10

    In this study, a simple and green approach 'bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy' was employed to reconstitute lipoprotein nanoparticles (RLNs) using whole-components of endogenous ones (contained dehydrated human lipids and native apolipoproteins). These RLNs were engineered to mimic the configuration and properties of natural lipoproteins for efficient drug delivery. In testing therapeutic targeting to microtubules, paclitaxel (PTX) was reassembled into RLNs to achieve improved targeted anti-carcinoma treatment and minimize adverse effects, demonstrating ultimately more applicable than HDL-like particles which are based on exogenous lipid sources. We have characterized that apolipoprotein-decoration of PTX-loaded RLNs (RLNs-PTX) led to favoring uniformly dispersed distribution, increasing PTX-encapsulation with a sustained-release pattern, while enhancing biostability during blood circulation. The innate biological RLNs induced efficient intracellular trafficking of cargos in situ via multi-targeting mechanisms, including scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated direct transmembrane delivery, as well as other lipoprotein-receptors associated endocytic pathways. The resulting anticancer treatment from RLNs-PTX was demonstrated a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 0.20μg/mL, cell apoptosis of 18.04% 24h post-incubation mainly arresting G2/M cell cycle in vitro, and tumor weight inhibition of 70.51% in vivo. Collectively, green-step assembly-based RLNs provided an efficient strategy for mediating tumor-targeted accumulation of PTX and enhanced anticancer efficacy. PMID:27238442

  7. Discovery of a new function of curcumin which enhances its anticancer therapeutic potency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahama, Koji; Utsumi, Tomoya; Kumano, Takayuki; Maekawa, Saeko; Oyama, Naho; Kawakami, Junji

    2016-08-01

    Curcumin has received immense attention over the past decades because of its diverse biological activities and recognized as a promising drug candidate in a large number of diseases. However, its clinical application has been hindered due to extremely low aqueous solubility, chemical stability, and cellular uptake. In this study, we discovered quite a new function of curcumin, i.e. pH-responsive endosomal disrupting activity, derived from curcumin’s self-assembly. We selected anticancer activity as an example of biological activities of curcumin, and investigated the contribution of pH-responsive property to its anticancer activity. As a result, we demonstrated that the pH-responsive property significantly enhances the anticancer activity of curcumin. Furthermore, we demonstrated a utility of the pH-responsive property of curcumin as delivery nanocarriers for doxorubicin toward combination cancer therapy. These results clearly indicate that the smart curcumin assemblies act as promising nanoplatform for development of curcumin-based therapeutics.

  8. Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins: new targets for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Mohammad; Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Perveen, Nadia; Ahmad, Bashir; Saleem, Uzma; Irshad, Tehseen; Ahmad, Bashir

    2013-09-01

    Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) can play an important role in inhibiting apoptosis by exerting their negative action on caspases (apoptotic proteins). There are eight proteins in this family: NAIP/BIRC1/NLRB, cellular IAP1 (cIAP1)/human IAP2/BIRC2, cellular IAP2 (cIAP2)/human IAP1/BIRC3, X-linked IAP (XIAP)/BIRC4, survivin/BIRC5, baculoviral IAP repeat (BIR)-containing ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme/apollon/BIRC6, livin/melanoma-IAP (ML-IAP)/BIRC7/KIAP, and testis-specific IAP (Ts-IAP)/hILP-2/BIRC8. Deregulation of these inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) may push cell toward cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibitors of apoptotic proteins (IAPs) may provide new target for anticancer therapy. Drugs may be developed that are inhibiting these IAPs to induce apoptosis in cancerous cells. PMID:23790005

  9. ER-Golgi network– a future target for anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wlodkowic, Donald; Skommer, Joanna; McGuinness, Dagmara; Hillier, Chris; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2009-01-01

    Tumor cell demise is an important event in the elimination of abnormal malignant cells and provides an important mechanism of natural tumor suppression. Abnormalities incapacitating these finely tuned processes provide a strong advantage for cancer clones to succeed in evading both the physiological control systems and therapeutic intervention. Expanding our knowledge of the molecular “cross-talks” that regulate tumor cell demise is crucial in guiding the successful design of future anti-cancer therapeutics. Although currently available data indicate that elimination of malignant cells often depends on classical apoptotic pathways (mitochondrial and/or death receptor pathways), the evidence is mounting that alternative apoptotic and non-apoptotic pathways may effectively contribute to tumor cell death. The assumption that every organelle is capable of sensing, amplificating and executing cell death is also a relatively novel and unexplored concept. As recently shown, the secretory pathway can be actively involved in sensing stress stimuli and possibly even initiating and propagating cell death signaling. Experimental evidence indicates that ER and Golgi apparatus can activate both pro-survival (recovery) mechanisms as well as cell suicide programs if the stress-signaling threshold is exceeded. It is thus conceivable that the fragile balance of protein trafficking between various subcellular compartments provides an exceptional therapeutic opportunity. Interestingly, a growing number of reports recognize novel therapeutic targets, including proteins in control of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi homeostasis. Further studies are, however, needed to elucidate precise signaling pathways emanating from ER-Golgi compartment. Development of more potent and selective small-molecule drugs that activate ER-Golgi mediated cell demise is also needed. As the interest in the role of ER-Golgi network during cancer cell death has been gaining momentum, we attempt here to

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Anticancer TCMs Targeted at Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Yu, Ru-Yuan; He, Qing-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a rich resource of anticancer drugs. Increasing bioactive natural compounds extracted from TCMs are known to exert significant antitumor effects, but the action mechanisms of TCMs are far from clear. Proteomics, a powerful platform to comprehensively profile drug-regulated proteins, has been widely applied to the mechanistic investigation of TCMs and the identification of drug targets. In this paper, we discuss several bioactive TCM products including terpenoids, flavonoids, and glycosides that were extensively investigated by proteomics to illustrate their antitumor mechanisms in various cancers. Interestingly, many of these natural compounds isolated from TCMs mostly exert their tumor-suppressing functions by specifically targeting mitochondria in cancer cells. These TCM components induce the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome c, and the accumulation of ROS, initiating apoptosis cascade signaling. Proteomics provides systematic views that help to understand the molecular mechanisms of the TCM in tumor cells; it bears the inherent limitations in uncovering the drug-protein interactions, however. Subcellular fractionation may be coupled with proteomics to capture and identify target proteins in mitochondria-enriched lysates. Furthermore, translating mRNA analysis, a new technology profiling the drug-regulated genes in translatome level, may be integrated into the systematic investigation, revealing global information valuable for understanding the action mechanism of TCMs. PMID:26568766

  11. Targeting NK Cells for Anticancer Immunotherapy: Clinical and Preclinical Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Carotta, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. Although the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer (NK) cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells, as they kill target cells in an antigen-independent manner. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the active role of NK cells in cancer immune surveillance, only few clinically approved therapies currently exist that harness their potential. Our increased understanding of NK cell biology over the past few years has renewed the interest in NK cell-based anticancer therapies, which has lead to a steady increase of NK cell-based clinical and preclinical trials. Here, the role of NK cells in cancer immune surveillance is summarized, and several novel approaches to enhance NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer are discussed. PMID:27148271

  12. Heat-Shock Protein 90-Targeted Nano Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rochani, Ankit K; Ravindran Girija, Aswathy; Borah, Ankita; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D

    2016-04-01

    Suboptimal chemotherapy of anticancer drugs may be attributed to a variety of cellular mechanisms, which synergize to dodge the drug responses. Nearly 2 decades of heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90)-targeted drug discovery has shown that the mono-therapy with Hsp90 inhibitors seems to be relatively ineffective compared with combination treatment due to several cellular dodging mechanisms. In this article, we have tried to analyze and review the Hsp90 and mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR)-mediated drug resistance mechanisms. By using this information we have discussed about the rationale behind use of drug combinations that includes both or any one of these inhibitors for cancer therapy. Currently, biodegradable nano vector (NV)-loaded novel drug delivery systems have shown to resolve the problems of poor bioavailability. NVs of drugs such as paclitaxel, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and others have been successfully introduced for medicinal use. Hence, looking at the success of NVs, in this article we have also discussed the progress made in the delivery of biodegradable NV-loaded Hsp90 and m-TOR-targeted inhibitors in multiple drug combinations. We have also discussed the possible ways by which the market success of biodegradable NVs can positively impact the clinical trials of anti-Hsp90 and m-TOR combination strategy. PMID:26886301

  13. Anticancer and toxic properties of cyclotides are dependent on phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipid targeting.

    PubMed

    Troeira Henriques, Sónia; Huang, Yen-Hua; Chaousis, Stephanie; Wang, Conan K; Craik, David J

    2014-09-01

    Cyclotides, ultrastable disulfide-rich cyclic peptides, can be engineered to bind and inhibit specific cancer targets. In addition, some cyclotides are toxic to cancer cells, though not much is known about their mechanisms of action. Here we delineated the potential mode of action of cyclotides towards cancer cells. A novel set of analogues of kalata B1 (the prototypic cyclotide) and kalata B2 and cycloviolacin O2 were examined for their membrane-binding affinity and selectivity towards cancer cells. By using solution-state NMR, surface plasmon resonance, flow cytometry and bioassays we show that cyclotides are toxic against cancer and non-cancerous cells and their toxicity correlates with their ability to target and disrupt lipid bilayers that contain phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipids. Our results suggest that the potential of cyclotides as anticancer therapeutics might best be realised by combining their amenability to epitope engineering with their ability to bind cancer cell membranes. PMID:25099014

  14. Dual-Responsive Carbon Dots for Tumor Extracellular Microenvironment Triggered Targeting and Enhanced Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tao; Ai, Xiangzhao; Ong, Huimin; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-07-27

    In this work, pH/redox dual-responsive carbon dots (CDs-RGD-Pt(IV)-PEG) were fabricated for tumor extracellular microenvironment triggered targeting and enhanced anticancer drug delivery. The system consists of fluorescent carbon dots as imaging-guided drug nanocarriers, cisplatin(IV) as prodrug, and RGD peptide as active targeting ligand, which is covered by monomethoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG) through tumor extracellular pH (6.5-6.8) responsive benzoic-imine bond. The drug nanocarriers could be tracked by multicolor fluorescence of carbon dots. After the hydrolysis of benzoic-imine bond at the tumor extracellular pH to expose the inner targeting RGD peptide, the drug nanocarriers showed effective uptake by cancer cells through RGD-integrin αvβ3 (ligand-receptor) interaction. Upon the internalization, the loaded cisplatin(IV) prodrug was reduced to cytotoxic cisplatin in reductive cytosol of cancer cells to exhibit therapeutic effects. Confocal imaging, flow cytometry, and cell viability assays using CDs-RGD-Pt(IV)-PEG were performed to reveal the enhanced uptake and better therapeutic efficiency to cancer cells with high integrin αvβ3 expression at tumor extracellular pH than that in physiological condition. The developed CDs-RGD-Pt(IV)-PEG offers a new strategy to provide safe and effective therapeutic agents based on carbon dots for promising cancer therapy. PMID:27367152

  15. Targeted Delivery of Bleomycin: A Comprehensive Anticancer Review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiqiang; Yan, Bo; Gao, Liqian; Dong, Chenbo; Zhong, Jian; D Ortenzio, Mathew; Nguyen, Brandon; Seong Lee, Su; Hu, Xianglong; Liang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most effective broad-spectrum chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cancers, the clinical applications of bleomycins (BLMs) have been limited due to their poor drug delivery abilities, and the side effect of causing lung fibrosis. With the increased therapeutics and the reduction of side effects, research and development of targeted drug delivery systems (TDDS) with BLMs have become essential for the expansive clinical usage of BLM-based therapeutics. This review summarizes the recent developments of various TDDS for BLMs, including techniques such as photochemical internalization, ultrasound, and micelle, liposome, and nanoparticle formation. The advantages and disadvantages for each delivery approach are outlined, along with the specific challenges associated with each delivery system. PMID:26632436

  16. Liposarcoma: molecular targets and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Bill, Kate Lynn J; Casadei, Lucia; Prudner, Bethany C; Iwenofu, Hans; Strohecker, Anne M; Pollock, Raphael E

    2016-10-01

    Liposarcoma (LPS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma and accounts for approximately 20 % of all adult sarcomas. Current treatment modalities (surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy) all have limitations; therefore, molecularly driven studies are needed to improve the identification and increased understanding of genetic and epigenetic deregulations in LPS if we are to successfully target specific tumorigenic drivers. It can be anticipated that such biology-driven therapeutics will improve treatments by selectively deleting cancer cells while sparing normal tissues. This review will focus on several therapeutically actionable molecular markers identified in well-differentiated LPS and dedifferentiated LPS, highlighting their potential clinical applicability. PMID:27173057

  17. Molecular mechanisms and proposed targets for selected anticancer gold compounds.

    PubMed

    Casini, Angela; Messori, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, gold compounds constitute a family of very promising experimental agents for cancer treatment. Indeed, several gold(I) and gold(III) compounds were shown to manifest outstanding antiproliferative properties in vitro against selected human tumor cell lines and some of them performed remarkably well even in tumor models in vivo. Notably, the peculiar chemical properties of the gold centre impart innovative pharmacological profiles to gold-based metallodrugs most likely in relation to novel molecular mechanisms. The precise mechanisms through which cytotoxic gold compounds produce their biological effects are still largely unknown. Within this frame, the major aim of this review is to define the possible modes of action and the most probable biomolecular targets for a few representative gold compounds on which extensive biochemical and cellular data have been gathered. In particular, we will focus on auranofin and analogues, on gold(III) porphyrins and gold(III) dithiocarbamates. For these three families markedly distinct molecular mechanisms were recently invoked: a direct mitochondrial mechanism involving thioredoxin reductase inhibition in the case of the gold(I) complexes, the influence on some apoptotic proteins--i.e. MAPKs and Bcl-2--for gold(III) porphyrins, and the proteasome inhibition for gold(III) dithiocarbamates. In a few cases the distinct mechanisms may overlap. The general perspectives for the development of new gold compounds as effective anticancer agents with innovative modes of action are critically discussed. PMID:22039866

  18. Quercetin nanocomposite as novel anticancer therapeutic: improved efficiency and reduced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Giuseppe; Vittorio, Orazio; Hampel, Silke; Iemma, Francesca; Parchi, Paolo; Cecchini, Marco; Puoci, Francesco; Picci, Nevio

    2013-06-14

    A three-functional nanocomposite was prepared by radical polymerization of methacrylic acid around carbon nanotubes in the presence of Quercetin as biologically active molecule and proposed as new anticancer therapeutic. The so-obtained hybrid material was characterized by FT-IR, Raman, SEM, TEM analyses, while the functionalization degree of 2.33 mg of Quercetin per g of composite was assessed by Folin-Ciocalteu test. Antioxidant test (DPPH and ABTS) showed that the covalent coupling did not interfere with the antioxidant properties of the flavonoid, while the anticancer activity was greatly enhanced with a recorded IC50 value much lower than free Quercetin. Cell viability tests on healthy cells demonstrated no-toxicity of the conjugate. PMID:23602995

  19. Modelling targets for anticancer drug control optimization in physiologically structured cell population models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billy, Frédérique; Clairambault, Jean; Fercoq, Olivier; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Perthame, Benoît

    2012-09-01

    The main two pitfalls of therapeutics in clinical oncology, that limit increasing drug doses, are unwanted toxic side effects on healthy cell populations and occurrence of resistance to drugs in cancer cell populations. Depending on the constraint considered in the control problem at stake, toxicity or drug resistance, we present two different ways to model the evolution of proliferating cell populations, healthy and cancer, under the control of anti-cancer drugs. In the first case, we use a McKendrick age-structured model of the cell cycle, whereas in the second case, we use a model of evolutionary dynamics, physiologically structured according to a continuous phenotype standing for drug resistance. In both cases, we mention how drug targets may be chosen so as to accurately represent the effects of cytotoxic and of cytostatic drugs, separately, and how one may consider the problem of optimisation of combined therapies.

  20. Metformin and prostate cancer stem cells: a novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M J; Klotz, L H; Venkateswaran, V

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in the world. Localized disease can be effectively treated with radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. However, advanced prostate cancer is more difficult to treat and if metastatic, is incurable. There is a need for more effective therapy for advanced prostate cancer. One potential target is the cancer stem cell (CSC). CSCs have been described in several solid tumors, including prostate cancer, and contribute to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Metformin, a common oral biguanide used to treat type 2 diabetes, has been demonstrated to have anti-neoplastic effects. Specifically, metformin targets CSCs in breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, glioblastoma and colon cancer. Metformin acts directly on the mitochondria to inhibit oxidative phosphorylation and reduce mitochondrial ATP production. This forces tumor cells to compensate by increasing the rate of glycolysis. CSCs rely heavily on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. The glycolytic switch results in an energy crisis in these cells. Metformin could be used to exploit this metabolic weakness in CSCs. This would increase CSC sensitivity to conventional cancer therapies, circumventing treatment resistance and enhancing treatment efficacy. This review will explore the characteristics of prostate CSCs, their role in tumor propagation and therapeutic resistance and the role of metformin as a potential prostate CSC sensitizer to current anticancer therapies. PMID:26215782

  1. Angiotensins as therapeutic targets beyond heart disease.

    PubMed

    Passos-Silva, Danielle Gomes; Brandan, Enrique; Santos, Robson Augusto Souza

    2015-05-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular and hydro-electrolyte homeostasis. Blockade of the RAS as a therapeutic strategy for treating hypertension and related cardiovascular diseases is well established. However, actions of the RAS go far beyond the targets initially described. In this regard, the recent identification of novel components of the RAS, including angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], Ang-(1-9), and alamandine, have opened new possibilities for interfering with the development and manifestations of cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular diseases. In this article, we briefly review novel targets for angiotensins and its therapeutic implications in diverse areas, including cancer, inflammation, and glaucoma. PMID:25847571

  2. Memory as a new therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Karim; Hardt, Oliver; Lanius, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to demonstrate how an understanding of the brain mechanisms involved in memory provides a basis for; (i) reconceptualizing some mental disorders; (ii) refining existing therapeutic tools; and (iii) designing new ones for targeting processes that maintain these disorders. First, some of the stages which a memory undergoes are defined, and the clinical relevance of an understanding of memory processing by the brain is discussed. This is followed by a brief review of some of the clinical studies that have targeted memory processes. Finally, some new insights provided by the field of neuroscience with implications for conceptualizing mental disorders are presented. PMID:24459414

  3. Protein kinase C, an elusive therapeutic target?

    PubMed Central

    Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Das, Kanad; Grimes, Kevin V

    2013-01-01

    Preface Protein kinase C (PKC) has been a tantalizing target for drug discovery ever since it was first identified as the receptor for the tumor promoter phorbol ester in 19821. Although initial therapeutic efforts focused on cancer, additional diseases, including diabetic complications, heart failure, myocardial infarction, pain and bipolar disease were targeted as researchers developed a better understanding of the roles that PKC’s eight conventional and novel isozymes play in health and disease. Unfortunately, both academic and pharmaceutical efforts have yet to result in the approval of a single new drug that specifically targets PKC. Why does PKC remain an elusive drug target? This review will provide a short account of some of the efforts, challenges and opportunities in developing PKC modulators to address unmet clinical needs. PMID:23197040

  4. Cytochrome P450s in the development of target-based anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Purnapatre, Kedar; Khattar, Sunil K; Saini, Kulvinder Singh

    2008-01-18

    Enzymes of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily are the major determinants of half-life and execute pharmacological effects of many therapeutic drugs. In new drug discovery research, recombinant (human) CYPs are also used for identifying active or inactive metabolites that could lead to increased potency or toxicity of a molecule. In addition, CYP inhibition by anticancer drugs might lead to adverse drug reactions, multiple-drug resistance, and drug-drug interactions. During the discovery and pre-clinical evaluation of a New Chemical Entity (NCE), large amounts of purified recombinant CYPs are required for studying metabolism and pharmacokinetic parameters. Therefore, present research efforts are focused to over-express these human CYPs in bacteria, yeast, insect and mammalian cells, followed by their purification on an industrial scale to facilitate identification of novel anticancer drugs. This review summarizes the merits and limitations of these expression systems for an optimized production of individual CYP isoforms, and their usefulness in the discovery and development of target-based, safe and efficacious NCEs for the treatment of cancer. PMID:18053638

  5. A Novel Isoquinoline Derivative Anticancer Agent and Its Targeted Delivery to Tumor Cells Using Transferrin-Conjugated Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuewei; Yang, Shuang; Chai, Hongyu; Yang, Zhaogang; Lee, Robert J.; Liao, Weiwei; Teng, Lesheng

    2015-01-01

    We have screened 11 isoquinoline derivatives and α-methylene-γ-butyrolactones using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthi-azol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cytotoxicity assay in HeLa and HEK-293T cells. Compound 2 was identified as potential anticancer agent. To further improve its therapeutic potential, this agent was incorporated into transferrin (Tf)-conjugated liposomes (LPs) for targeted delivery to tumor cells. We have demonstrated Tf-LP-Compound 2 have superior antitumor activity compared to non-targeted controls and the free drug. These data show Tf-LP-Compound 2 to be a promising agent that warrants further evaluation. PMID:26309138

  6. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor A Ligands as Anticancer Drugs Targeting Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Grabacka, Maja; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cells show metabolic features distinctive from normal tissues, with characteristically enhanced aerobic glycolysis, glutaminolysis and lipid synthesis. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPAR α) is activated by nutrients (fatty acids and their derivatives) and influences these metabolic pathways acting antagonistically to oncogenic Akt and c-Myc. Therefore PPAR α can be regarded as a candidate target molecule in supplementary anticancer pharmacotherapy as well as dietary therapeutic approach. This idea is based on hitting the cancer cell metabolic weak points through PPAR α mediated stimulation of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis with simultaneous reduction of glucose and glutamine consumption. PPAR α activity is induced by fasting and its molecular consequences overlap with the effects of calorie restriction and ketogenic diet (CRKD). CRKD induces increase of NAD+/NADH ratio and drop in ATP/AMP ratio. The first one is the main stimulus for enhanced protein deacetylase SIRT1 activity; the second one activates AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). Both SIRT1 and AMPK exert their major metabolic activities such as fatty acid oxidation and block of glycolysis and protein, nucleotide and fatty acid synthesis through the effector protein peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma 1 α coactivator (PGC-1α). PGC-1α cooperates with PPAR α and their activities might contribute to potential anticancer effects of CRKD, which were reported for various brain tumors. Therefore, PPAR α activation can engage molecular interplay among SIRT1, AMPK, and PGC-1α that provides a new, low toxicity dietary approach supplementing traditional anticancer regimen. PMID:21133850

  7. Adherence and awareness of the therapeutic intent of oral anticancer agents in an outpatient setting

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, MICHIO; NAKASHIMA, KEIJI; USAMI, EISEKI; IWAI, MINA; NAKAO, TOSHIYA; YOSHIMURA, TOMOAKI; MORI, HIROMI; TERAMACHI, HITOMI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the adherence and awareness of oral anticancer agents by type and therapeutic purpose in outpatients prescribed with tegafur/gimeracil/oteracil potassium (S-1) or capecitabine. Outpatients undergoing treatment with the S-1 or capecitabine oral anticancer agents at Ogaki Municipal Hospital (Ogaki, Japan) in June 2013 completed a questionnaire survey and the survey findings were evaluated. No significant differences in medication adherence were identified between the patients administered S-1 and the patients administered capecitabine (P=0.4586). In addition, no significant differences were identified in therapeutic purpose between adjuvant therapy, and advanced and recurrent therapies. However, for S-1 and capecitabine, medication adherence was significantly higher in those undergoing combination therapy compared with those undergoing monotherapy (P=0.0046). In addition, for patients taking S-1, the median age for good adherence was significantly lower than that for insufficient adherence (66.1±10.5 vs. 72.1±7.9 years, respectively; P=0.0035). Furthermore, a significant negative correlation was identified between the awareness score of research regarding the medication and age (n=109; P=0.0045). In conclusion, for patients treated with S-1 or capecitabine, the type and therapeutic purpose of oral anticancer agents did not affect medication adherence. Elderly patients expressed a low interest in medications and typically exhibited insufficient medication adherence. Therefore, patient guidance by pharmacists is important, as it may result in improved medication adherence and an improved understanding of the treatment side-effects in patients self-administering prescribed drugs. PMID:26137068

  8. Targeted Tumor Therapy with "Magnetic Drug Targeting": Therapeutic Efficacy of Ferrofluid Bound Mitoxantrone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexiou, Ch.; Schmid, R.; Jurgons, R.; Bergemann, Ch.; Arnold, W.; Parak, F.G.

    The difference between success or failure of chemotherapy depends not only on the drug itself but also on how it is delivered to its target. Biocompatible ferrofluids (FF) are paramagnetic nanoparticles, that may be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents in locoregional tumor therapy, called "magnetic drug targeting". Bound to medical drugs, such magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a desired body compartment (tumor) using an external magnetic field, which is focused on the area of the tumor. Through this form of target directed drug application, one attempts to concentrate a pharmacological agent at its site of action in order to minimize unwanted side effects in the organism and to increase its locoregional effectiveness. Tumor bearing rabbits (VX2 squamous cell carcinoma) in the area of the hind limb, were treated by a single intra-arterial injection (A. femoralis) of mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids (FF-MTX), while focusing an external magnetic field (1.7 Tesla) onto the tumor for 60 minutes. Complete tumor remissions could be achieved in these animals in a dose related manner (20% and 50% of the systemic dose of mitoxantrone), without any negative side effects, like e.g. leucocytopenia, alopecia or gastrointestinal disorders. The strong and specific therapeutic efficacy in tumor treatment with mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids may indicate that this system could be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents, like radionuclids, cancer-specific antibodies, anti-angiogenetic factors, genes etc.

  9. Farnesyltransferase as a target for anticancer drug design.

    PubMed

    Qian, Y; Sebti, S M; Hamilton, A D

    1997-01-01

    The currently understood function for Ras in signal transduction is in mediating the transmission of signals from external growth factors to the cell nucleus. Mutated forms of this GTP-binding protein are found in 30% of human cancers with particularly high prevalence in colon and pancreatic carcinomas. These mutations destroy the GTPase activity of Ras and cause the protein to be locked in its active, GTP bound form. As a result, the signaling pathways are activated, leading to uncontrolled tumor growth. Ras function in signaling requires its association with the plasma membrane. This is achieved by posttranslational farnesylation of a cysteine residue present as part of the CA1A2X carboxyl terminal tetrapeptide of all Ras proteins. The enzyme that recognizes and farnesylates the CA1A2X sequence, Ras farnesyltransferase (FTase), has become an important target for the design of inhibitors that might be interesting as antitumor agents. Several approaches have been taken in the search for in vivo active inhibitors of farnesyltransferase. These include the identification of natural products such as the chaetomellic and zaragozic acids that mimic farnesylpyrophosphate, bisubstrate transition state analogs combining elements of the farnesyl and tetrapeptide substrates and peptidomimetics that reproduce features of the carboxyl terminal tetrapeptide CA1A2X sequence. This last group of compounds has been most successful in showing highly potent inhibition of FTase and selective blocking of Ras processing in a range of Ras transformed tumor cell lines at concentrations as low as 10 nM. Certain peptidomimetics will also block tumor growth in various mouse models, with apparently few toxic side effects. These results suggest that farnesyltransferase inhibitors hold considerable promise as anticancer drugs in the clinic. PMID:9174410

  10. Novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shing-Chun; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has become the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the last two decades. Only 3%-15% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer had 5 year survival rate. Drug resistance, high metastasis, poor prognosis and tumour relapse contributed to the malignancies and difficulties in treating pancreatic cancer. The current standard chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer is gemcitabine, however its efficacy is far from satisfactory, one of the reasons is due to the complex tumour microenvironment which decreases effective drug delivery to target cancer cell. Studies of the molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer have revealed that activation of KRAS, overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2, inactivation of p16INK4A and loss of p53 activities occurred in pancreatic cancer. Co-administration of gemcitabine and targeting the molecular pathological events happened in pancreatic cancer has brought an enhanced therapeutic effectiveness of gemcitabine. Therefore, studies looking for novel targets in hindering pancreatic tumour growth are emerging rapidly. In order to give a better understanding of the current findings and to seek the direction in future pancreatic cancer research; in this review we will focus on targets suppressing tumour metastatsis and progression, KRAS activated downstream effectors, the relationship of Notch signaling and Nodal/Activin signaling with pancreatic cancer cells, the current findings of non-coding RNAs in inhibiting pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, brief discussion in transcription remodeling by epigenetic modifiers (e.g., HDAC, BMI1, EZH2) and the plausible therapeutic applications of cancer stem cell and hyaluronan in tumour environment. PMID:25152585

  11. Discovery of a new function of curcumin which enhances its anticancer therapeutic potency

    PubMed Central

    Nagahama, Koji; Utsumi, Tomoya; Kumano, Takayuki; Maekawa, Saeko; Oyama, Naho; Kawakami, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin has received immense attention over the past decades because of its diverse biological activities and recognized as a promising drug candidate in a large number of diseases. However, its clinical application has been hindered due to extremely low aqueous solubility, chemical stability, and cellular uptake. In this study, we discovered quite a new function of curcumin, i.e. pH-responsive endosomal disrupting activity, derived from curcumin’s self-assembly. We selected anticancer activity as an example of biological activities of curcumin, and investigated the contribution of pH-responsive property to its anticancer activity. As a result, we demonstrated that the pH-responsive property significantly enhances the anticancer activity of curcumin. Furthermore, we demonstrated a utility of the pH-responsive property of curcumin as delivery nanocarriers for doxorubicin toward combination cancer therapy. These results clearly indicate that the smart curcumin assemblies act as promising nanoplatform for development of curcumin-based therapeutics. PMID:27476814

  12. SLC Transporters as Therapeutic Targets: Emerging Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lawrence; Yee, Sook Wah; Kim, Richard B.; Giacomini, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Solute carrier (SLC) transporters — a family of more than 300 membrane-bound proteins that facilitate the transport of a wide array of substrates across biological membranes — have important roles in physiological processes ranging from the cellular uptake of nutrients to the absorption of drugs and other xenobiotics. Several classes of marketed drugs target well-known SLC transporters, such as neurotransmitter transporters, and human genetic studies have provided powerful insight into the roles of more-recently characterized SLC transporters in both rare and common diseases, indicating a wealth of new therapeutic opportunities. This Review summarizes knowledge on the roles of SLC transporters in human disease, describes strategies to target such transporters, and highlights current and investigational drugs that modulate SLC transporters, as well as promising drug targets. PMID:26111766

  13. Modulation of Epigenetic Targets for Anticancer Therapy: Clinicopathological Relevance, Structural Data and Drug Discovery Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Andreol, Federico; Barbosa, Arménio Jorge Moura; Daniele Parenti, Marco; Rio, Alberto Del

    2013-01-01

    Research on cancer epigenetics has flourished in the last decade. Nevertheless growing evidence point on the importance to understand the mechanisms by which epigenetic changes regulate the genesis and progression of cancer growth. Several epigenetic targets have been discovered and are currently under validation for new anticancer therapies. Drug discovery approaches aiming to target these epigenetic enzymes with small-molecules inhibitors have produced the first pre-clinical and clinical outcomes and many other compounds are now entering the pipeline as new candidate epidrugs. The most studied targets can be ascribed to histone deacetylases and DNA methyltransferases, although several other classes of enzymes are able to operate post-translational modifications to histone tails are also likely to represent new frontiers for therapeutic interventions. By acknowledging that the field of cancer epigenetics is evolving with an impressive rate of new findings, with this review we aim to provide a current overview of pre-clinical applications of small-molecules for cancer pathologies, combining them with the current knowledge of epigenetic targets in terms of available structural data and drug design perspectives. PMID:23016851

  14. Sphingosine kinase-1--a potential therapeutic target in cancer.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier

    2007-02-01

    Sphingolipid metabolites play critical functions in the regulation of a number of fundamental biological processes including cancer. Whereas ceramide and sphingosine mediate and trigger apoptosis or cell growth arrest, sphingosine 1-phosphate promotes proliferation and cell survival. The delicate equilibrium between the intracellular levels of each of these sphingolipids is controlled by the enzymes that either produce or degrade these metabolites. Sphingosine kinase-1 is a crucial regulator of this two-pan balance, because it produces the prosurvival sphingosine 1-phosphate, and reduces the content of both ceramide and sphingosine, the proapoptotic sphingolipids. Sphingosine kinase-1 controls the levels of sphingolipids having opposite effects on cell survival/death, its gene was found to be of oncogenic nature, its mRNA is overexpressed in many solid tumors, its overexpression protects cells from apoptosis and its activity is decreased during anticancer treatments. Therefore, sphingosine kinase-1 appears to be a target of interest for therapeutic manipulation via its pharmacological inhibition. Strategies to kill tumor cells by increasing their ceramide and/or sphingosine content while blocking sphingosine 1-phosphate generation should have a favorable therapeutic index. PMID:17159597

  15. Advancements in therapeutically targeting orphan GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Stockert, Jennifer A; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2015-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are popular biological targets for drug discovery and development. To date there are more than 140 orphan GPCRs, i.e., receptors whose endogenous ligands are unknown. Traditionally orphan GPCRs have been difficult to study and the development of therapeutic compounds targeting these receptors has been extremely slow although these GPCRs are considered important targets based on their distribution and behavioral phenotype as revealed by animals lacking the receptor. Recent advances in several methods used to study orphan receptors, including protein crystallography and homology modeling are likely to be useful in the identification of therapeutics targeting these receptors. In the past 13 years, over a dozen different Class A GPCRs have been crystallized; this trend is exciting, since homology modeling of GPCRs has previously been limited by the availability of solved structures. As the number of solved GPCR structures continues to grow so does the number of templates that can be used to generate increasingly accurate models of phylogenetically related orphan GPCRs. The availability of solved structures along with the advances in using multiple templates to build models (in combination with molecular dynamics simulations that reveal structural information not provided by crystallographic data and methods for modeling hard-to-predict flexible loop regions) have improved the quality of GPCR homology models. This, in turn, has improved the success rates of virtual ligand screens that use homology models to identify potential receptor binding compounds. Experimental testing of the predicted hits and validation using traditional GPCR pharmacological approaches can be used to drive ligand-based efforts to probe orphan receptor biology as well as to define the chemotypes and chemical scaffolds important for binding. As a result of these advances, orphan GPCRs are emerging from relative obscurity as a new class of drug targets. PMID

  16. Diabetic Kidney Disease: Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Toth-Manikowski, Stephanie; Atta, Mohamed G.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic that has led to a rise in diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Over the past two decades, there has been significant clarification of the various pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of DKD. Nonetheless, very little has changed in the way clinicians manage patients with this disorder. Indeed, treatment is primarily centered on controlling hyperglycemia and hypertension and inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system. The purpose of this review is to describe the current understanding of how the hemodynamic, metabolic, inflammatory, and alternative pathways are all entangled in pathogenesis of DKD and detail the various therapeutic targets that may one day play a role in quelling this epidemic. PMID:26064987

  17. ADAM10 as a target for anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Moss, Marcia L; Stoeck, Alexander; Yan, Wenbo; Dempsey, Peter J

    2008-02-01

    There is a great unmet medical need in the area of cancer treatment. A potential therapeutic target for intervention in cancer is ADAM10. ADAM10 is a disintegrin-metalloproteinase that processes membrane bound proteins from the cell surface to yield soluble forms. Pharmaceutical companies are actively seeking out inhibitors of ADAM10 for treatments in cancer as the enzyme is known to release the ErbB receptor, HER2/ErbB2 from the cell membrane, an event that is necessary for HER2 positive tumor cells to proliferate. ADAM10 is also capable of processing betacellulin indicating that an inhibitor could be used against EGFR/ErbB1 and/or HER4/ErbB4 receptor positive tumor cells that are betacellulin-dependent. ADAM10 is the principle sheddase for several other molecules associated with cancer proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration such as Notch, E-cadherin, CD44 and L1 adhesion molecule indicating that targeting ADAM10 with specific inhibitors could be beneficial. PMID:18289051

  18. Design of a novel microtubule targeted peptide vesicle for delivering different anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Adak, Anindyasundar; Mohapatra, Saswat; Mondal, Prasenjit; Jana, Batakrishna; Ghosh, Surajit

    2016-06-18

    A microtubule targeted peptide-based delivery vehicle has been designed using two oppositely charged peptides, which targets tubulin/microtubules, delivers both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs into their target site through lysosome at acidic pH. Drug loaded vesicles show a significant anticancer effect compared to control drugs in a 2D monolayer and a 3D spheroid cell. PMID:27153208

  19. Interleukin-6 as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Jean-François; Lu, Zhao-Yang; Jourdan, Michel; Klein, Bernard

    2015-03-15

    Human IL6 is a cytokine produced by many cell types that has pleiotropic effects. In agreement, anti-IL6 therapy reduces inflammation, hepatic acute phase proteins, and anemia and has antiangiogenic effects. Blocking IL6 has demonstrated therapeutic efficacy with drug registration in Castleman disease and inflammatory diseases (rheumatoid arthritis) without major toxicity. Interestingly, the inhibition of C-reactive protein (CRP) production is a trustworthy surrogate marker of anti-IL6 therapy efficacy. Clinically registered IL6 inhibitors include siltuximab, an anti-IL6 mAb, and tocilizumab, an anti-IL6R mAb. In various cancers, in particular plasma cell cancers, large randomized trials showed no efficacy of IL6 inhibitors, despite a full inhibition of CRP production in treated patients in vivo, the numerous data showing an involvement of IL6 in these diseases, and initial short-term treatments demonstrating a dramatic inhibition of cancer cell proliferation in vivo. A likely explanation is the plasticity of cancer cells, with the presence of various subclones, making the outgrowth of cancer subclones possible using growth factors other than IL6. In addition, current therapeutic strategies used in these cancers already target IL6 activity. Thus, anti-IL6 therapeutics are able to neutralize IL6 production in vivo and are safe and useful in inflammatory diseases and Castleman disease. PMID:25589616

  20. Mitochondrial specific therapeutic targets following brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yonutas, H M; Vekaria, H J; Sullivan, P G

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a complicated disease to treat due to the complex multi-factorial secondary injury cascade that is initiated following the initial impact. This secondary injury cascade causes nonmechanical tissue damage, which is where therapeutic interventions may be efficacious for intervention. One therapeutic target that has shown much promise following brain injury are mitochondria. Mitochondria are complex organelles found within the cell. At a superficial level, mitochondria are known to produce the energy substrate used within the cell called ATP. However, their importance to overall cellular homeostasis is even larger than their production of ATP. These organelles are necessary for calcium cycling, ROS production and play a role in the initiation of cell death pathways. When mitochondria become dysfunctional, they can become dysregulated leading to a loss of cellular homeostasis and eventual cell death. Within this review there will be a deep discussion into mitochondrial bioenergetics followed by a brief discussion into traumatic brain injury and how mitochondria play an integral role in the neuropathological sequelae following an injury. The review will conclude with a discussion pertaining to the therapeutic approaches currently being studied to ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction following brain injury. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery. PMID:26872596

  1. Therapeutic Targeting of Mitochondrial Superoxide in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dikalova, Anna E.; Bikineyeva, Alfiya T.; Budzyn, Klaudia; Nazarewicz, Rafal R.; McCann, Louise; Lewis, William; Harrison, David G.; Dikalov, Sergey I.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Superoxide (O2∸) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many human diseases including hypertension, however commonly employed antioxidants have proven ineffective in clinical trials. It is possible that these agents are not adequately delivered to the subcellular sites of superoxide production. Objective: Because the mitochondria are important sources of reactive oxygen species, we postulated that mitochondrial targeting of superoxide scavenging would have therapeutic benefit. Methods and Results: In this study, we found that the hormone angiotensin II increased endothelial mitochondrial superoxide production. Treatment with the mitochondrial targeted antioxidant mitoTEMPO decreased mitochondrial O2∸, inhibited the total cellular O2∸, reduced cellular NADPH oxidase activity and restored the level of bioavailable NO. These effects were mimicked by overexpressing the mitochondrial MnSOD (SOD2), while SOD2 depletion with siRNA increased both basal and angiotensin II-stimulated cellular O2∸. Treatment of mice in vivo with mitoTEMPO attenuated hypertension when given at the onset of angiotensin II infusion and decreased blood pressure by 30 mm Hg following establishment of both angiotensin II-induced and DOCA-salt hypertension, while a similar dose of non-targeted TEMPOL was not effective. In vivo, mitoTEMPO decreased vascular O2∸, increased vascular NO• production and improved endothelial-dependent relaxation. Interestingly, transgenic mice overexpressing mitochondrial SOD2 demonstrated attenuated angiotensin II-induced hypertension and vascular oxidative stress similar to mice treated with mitoTEMPO. Conclusions: These studies show that mitochondrial O2∸ is important for the development of hypertension and that antioxidant strategies specifically targeting this organelle could have therapeutic benefit in this and possibly other diseases. PMID:20448215

  2. Ligand substitutions between ruthenium–cymene compounds can control protein versus DNA targeting and anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Adhireksan, Zenita; Davey, Gabriela E.; Campomanes, Pablo; Groessl, Michael; Clavel, Catherine M.; Yu, Haojie; Nazarov, Alexey A.; Yeo, Charmian Hui Fang; Ang, Wee Han; Dröge, Peter; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Dyson, Paul J.; Davey, Curt A.

    2014-01-01

    Ruthenium compounds have become promising alternatives to platinum drugs by displaying specific activities against different cancers and favourable toxicity and clearance properties. Nonetheless, their molecular targeting and mechanism of action are poorly understood. Here we study two prototypical ruthenium-arene agents—the cytotoxic antiprimary tumour compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(ethylene-diamine)Cl]PF6 and the relatively non-cytotoxic antimetastasis compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane)Cl2]—and discover that the former targets the DNA of chromatin, while the latter preferentially forms adducts on the histone proteins. Using a novel ‘atom-to-cell’ approach, we establish the basis for the surprisingly site-selective adduct formation behaviour and distinct cellular impact of these two chemically similar anticancer agents, which suggests that the cytotoxic effects arise largely from DNA lesions, whereas the protein adducts may be linked to the other therapeutic activities. Our study shows promise for developing new ruthenium drugs, via ligand-based modulation of DNA versus protein binding and thus cytotoxic potential, to target distinguishing epigenetic features of cancer cells. PMID:24637564

  3. Multifunctional Nanoprobes for Cancer Cell Targeting, Imaging and Anticancer Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkov, Pavel; Laronze-Cochard, Marie; Sapi, Janos; Sidorov, Lev N.; Nabiev, Igor

    The diagnosis and treatment of cancer have been greatly improved with recent developments in bio-nanotechnology, including engineering of multifunctional probes. One of the promising nanoscale tools for cancer imaging is fluorescent quantum dots (QDs), whose small size and unique optical properties allow them to penetrate into cells and ensure highly sensitive optical diagnosis of cancer at the cellular level. Furthermore, novel multi-functional probes have been developed in which QDs are conjugated with one or several functional molecules, including targeting moieties and therapeutic agents. Here, the strategy for engineering novel nanocarriers for controlled nucleus-targeted antitumor drug delivery and real-time imaging by single- or two-photon microscopy is described. A triple multifunctional nanoprobe is being developed that consists of a nitrogen-based heterocyclic derivative, an anticancer agent interacting with a DNA in living cells; a recognized molecule serving as a vector responsible for targeted delivery of the probe into cancer cells; and photoluminescent QDs providing the imaging capability of the probe. Subsequent optimization of the multifunctional nanoprobe will offer new possibilities for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Polymeric micelles loaded with platinum anticancer drugs target preangiogenic micrometastatic niches associated with inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hailiang; Cabral, Horacio; Toh, Kazuko; Mi, Peng; Chen, Yi-Chun; Matsumoto, Yu; Yamada, Naoki; Liu, Xueying; Kinoh, Hiroaki; Miura, Yutaka; Kano, Mitsunobu R; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-09-10

    Nanocarriers have been used for specific delivery of therapeutic agents to solid tumors based on the enhanced permeability and retention in cancerous tissues. Despite metastasis is the main reason of cancer-related death and a priority for nanocarrier-based therapies, the targeting ability of nanocarriers to the metastatic disease is poorly understood, especially for preangiogenic micrometastases as nanocarriers usually use the malignant neovasculature for enhancing their accumulation. Thus, herein, we studied the ability of micellar nanocarriers incorporating (1,2-diaminocyclohexane)platinum(II) (DACHPt) for treating liver metastases of bioluminescent murine colon adenocarcinoma C-26, during overt and preangiogenic metastatic stages. After intravenous injection, DACHPt-loaded micelles (DACHPt/m) effectively inhibited the tumor growth in both metastatic tumor models. While the anticancer activity of the micelles against overt metastases was associated with their selective accumulation in cancerous tissues having neovasculature, the ability of DACHPt/m to target preangiogenic metastases was correlated with the inflammatory microenvironment of the niche. This targeting capability of polymeric micelles to preangiogenic metastasis may provide a novel approach for early diagnosis and treatment of metastases. PMID:24956488

  5. Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Characterization of Covalent Adducts of DNA with Anti-cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Silvestri, Catherine; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic activities of many anticancer and antibacterial drugs arise from their interactions with nucleic acid substrates. Some of these ligands interact with DNA in a way that causes conformational changes or damage to the nucleic acid targets, ultimately altering recognition by key DNA-specific enzymes, interfering with DNA transcription or prohibiting replication, and terminating cell growth and proliferation. The design and synthesis of ligands that bind to nucleic acids remains a dynamic field in medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical research. The quest for more selective and efficacious DNA-interactive anti-cancer chemotherapeutics has likewise catalyzed the need for sensitive analytical methods that can provide structural information about the nature of the resulting DNA adducts and provide insight into the mechanistic pathways of the DNA/drug interactions and the impact on the cellular processes in biological systems. This review focuses on the array of tandem mass spectrometric strategies developed and applied for characterization of covalent adducts formed between DNA and anti-cancer ligands. PMID:23150278

  6. Metal complexes of curcumin for cellular imaging, targeting, and photoinduced anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samya; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2015-07-21

    Curcumin is a polyphenolic species. As an active ingredient of turmeric, it is well-known for its traditional medicinal properties. The therapeutic values include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and anticancer activity with the last being primarily due to inhibition of the transcription factor NF-κB besides affecting several biological pathways to arrest tumor growth and its progression. Curcumin with all these positive qualities has only remained a potential candidate for cancer treatment over the years without seeing any proper usage because of its hydrolytic instability involving the diketo moiety in a cellular medium and its poor bioavailability. The situation has changed considerably in recent years with the observation that curcumin in monoanionic form could be stabilized on binding to a metal ion. The reports from our group and other groups have shown that curcumin in the metal-bound form retains its therapeutic potential. This has opened up new avenues to develop curcumin-based metal complexes as anticancer agents. Zinc(II) complexes of curcumin are shown to be stable in a cellular medium. They display moderate cytotoxicity against prostate cancer and neuroblastoma cell lines. A similar stabilization and cytotoxic effect is reported for (arene)ruthenium(II) complexes of curcumin against a variety of cell lines. The half-sandwich 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphatricyclo-[3.3.1.1]decane (RAPTA)-type ruthenium(II) complexes of curcumin are shown to be promising cytotoxic agents with low micromolar concentrations for a series of cancer cell lines. In a different approach, cobalt(III) complexes of curcumin are used for its cellular delivery in hypoxic tumor cells using intracellular agents that reduce the metal and release curcumin as a cytotoxin. Utilizing the photophysical and photochemical properties of the curcumin dye, we have designed and synthesized photoactive curcumin metal complexes that are used for cellular imaging by fluorescence microscopy and

  7. Nanomicellar carriers for targeted delivery of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Huang, Yixian; Li, Song

    2014-01-01

    Clinical application of anticancer drugs is limited by problems such as low water solubility, lack of tissue-specificity and toxicity. Formulation development represents an important approach to these problems. Among the many delivery systems studied, polymeric micelles have gained considerable attention owing to ease in preparation, small sizes (10–100 nm), and ability to solubilize water-insoluble anticancer drugs and accumulate specifically at the tumors. This article provides a brief review of several promising micellar systems and their applications in tumor therapy. The emphasis is placed on the discussion of the authors’ recent work on several nanomicellar systems that have both a delivery function and antitumor activity, named dual-function drug carriers. PMID:24341817

  8. Nano-Fenton Reactors as a New Class of Oxidative Stress Amplifying Anticancer Therapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Byeongsu; Han, Eunji; Yang, Wonseok; Cho, Wooram; Yoo, Wooyoung; Hwang, Junyeon; Kwon, Byoung-Mog; Lee, Dongwon

    2016-03-01

    Cancer cells, compared to normal cells, are under oxidative stress associated with an elevated level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and are more vulnerable to oxidative stress induced by ROS generating agents. Thus, manipulation of the ROS level provides a logical approach to kill cancer cells preferentially, without significant toxicity to normal cells, and great efforts have been dedicated to the development of strategies to induce cytotoxic oxidative stress for cancer treatment. Fenton reaction is an important biological reaction in which irons convert hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to highly toxic hydroxyl radicals that escalate ROS stress. Here, we report Fenton reaction-performing polymer (PolyCAFe) micelles as a new class of ROS-manipulating anticancer therapeutic agents. Amphiphilic PolyCAFe incorporates H2O2-generating benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde and iron-containing compounds in its backbone and self-assembles to form micelles that serve as Nano-Fenton reactors to generate cytotoxic hydroxyl radicals, killing cancer cells preferentially. When intravenously injected, PolyCAFe micelles could accumulate in tumors preferentially to remarkably suppress tumor growth, without toxicity to normal tissues. This study demonstrates the tremendous translatable potential of Nano-Fenton reactors as a new class of anticancer drugs. PMID:26888039

  9. Synthetic lethality-based targets for discovery of new cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Weidle, Ulrich H; Maisel, Daniela; Eick, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic lethality is based on the incompatibility of cell survival with the loss of function of two or more genes, not with loss of function of a single gene. If targets of synthetic lethality are deregulated or mutated in cancer cells, the strategy of synthetic lethality can result in significant increase of therapeutic efficacy and a favourable therapeutic window. In this review, we discuss synthetic lethality based on deficient DNA repair mechanisms, activating mutations of RAS, loss of function mutations of the tumor suppressor genes p53, Rb and von Hippel-Lindau, and disruption of interactive protein kinase networks in the context of development of new anticancer agents. PMID:21737609

  10. New therapeutic targets for cancer bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Krzeszinski, Jing Y.; Wan, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastases are dejected consequences of many types of tumors including breast, prostate, lung, kidney and thyroid cancers. This complicated process begins with the successful tumor cell epithelial–mesenchymal transition, escape from the original site, and penetration into circulation. The homing of tumor cells to the bone depends on both tumor-intrinsic traits and various molecules supplied by the bone metastatic niche. The colonization and growth of cancer cells in the osseous environment, which awaken their dormancy to form micro- and macro-metastasis, involve an intricate interaction between the circulating tumor cells and local bone cells including osteoclasts, osteoblasts, adipocytes and macrophages. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances in the identification of new molecules and novel mechanisms during each step of bone metastasis that may serve as promising therapeutic targets. PMID:25962679

  11. Quadruplex Nucleic Acids as Novel Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Neidle, Stephen

    2016-07-14

    Quadruplex-forming sequences are widely prevalent in human and other genomes, including bacterial ones. These sequences are over-represented in eukaryotic telomeres, promoters, and 5' untranslated regions. They can form quadruplex structures, which may be transient in many situations in normal cells since they can be effectively resolved by helicase action. Mutated helicases in cancer cells are unable to unwind quadruplexes, which are impediments to transcription, translation, or replication, depending on their location within a particular gene. Small molecules that can stabilize quadruplex structures augment these effects and produce cell and proliferation growth inhibition. This article surveys the chemical biology of quadruplexes. It critically examines the major classes of quadruplex-binding small molecules that have been developed to date and the various approaches to discovering selective agents. The challenges of requiring (and achieving) small-molecule targeted selectivity for a particular quadruplex are discussed in relation to the potential of these small molecules as clinically useful therapeutic agents. PMID:26840940

  12. Epigenetics and therapeutic targets mediating neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2015-12-01

    The rapidly evolving science of epigenetics is transforming our understanding of the nervous system in health and disease and holds great promise for the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches targeting neurological diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic factors and mechanisms serve as important mediators of the pathogenic processes that lead to irrevocable neural injury and of countervailing homeostatic and regenerative responses. Epigenetics is, therefore, of considerable translational significance to the field of neuroprotection. In this brief review, we provide an overview of epigenetic mechanisms and highlight the emerging roles played by epigenetic processes in neural cell dysfunction and death and in resultant neuroprotective responses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. PMID:26236020

  13. Development of novel activin-targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Justin L; Walton, Kelly L; Al-Musawi, Sara L; Kelly, Emily K; Qian, Hongwei; La, Mylinh; Lu, Louis; Lovrecz, George; Ziemann, Mark; Lazarus, Ross; El-Osta, Assam; Gregorevic, Paul; Harrison, Craig A

    2015-03-01

    Soluble activin type II receptors (ActRIIA/ActRIIB), via binding to diverse TGF-β proteins, can increase muscle and bone mass, correct anemia or protect against diet-induced obesity. While exciting, these multiple actions of soluble ActRIIA/IIB limit their therapeutic potential and highlight the need for new reagents that target specific ActRIIA/IIB ligands. Here, we modified the activin A and activin B prodomains, regions required for mature growth factor synthesis, to generate specific activin antagonists. Initially, the prodomains were fused to the Fc region of mouse IgG2A antibody and, subsequently, "fastener" residues (Lys(45), Tyr(96), His(97), and Ala(98); activin A numbering) that confer latency to other TGF-β proteins were incorporated. For the activin A prodomain, these modifications generated a reagent that potently (IC(50) 5 nmol/l) and specifically inhibited activin A signaling in vitro, and activin A-induced muscle wasting in vivo. Interestingly, the modified activin B prodomain inhibited both activin A and B signaling in vitro (IC(50) ~2 nmol/l) and in vivo, suggesting it could serve as a general activin antagonist. Importantly, unlike soluble ActRIIA/IIB, the modified prodomains did not inhibit myostatin or GDF-11 activity. To underscore the therapeutic utility of specifically antagonising activin signaling, we demonstrate that the modified activin prodomains promote significant increases in muscle mass. PMID:25399825

  14. Orthogonally functionalized nanoscale micelles for active targeted codelivery of methotrexate and mitomycin C with synergistic anticancer effect.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Lin, Jinyan; Wu, Hongjie; Chang, Ying; Yuan, Conghui; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Shuang; Hou, Zhenqing; Dai, Lizong

    2015-03-01

    The design of nanoscale drug delivery systems for the targeted codelivery of multiple therapeutic drugs still remains a formidable challenge (ACS Nano, 2013, 7, 9558-9570; ACS Nano, 2013, 7, 9518-9525). In this article, both mitomycin C (MMC) and methotrexate (MTX) loaded DSPE-PEG micelles (MTX-M-MMC) were prepared by self-assembly using the dialysis technique, in which MMC-soybean phosphatidylcholine complex (drug-phospholipid complex) was encapsulated within MTX-functionalized DSPE-PEG micelles. MTX-M-MMC could coordinate an early phase active targeting effect with a late-phase synergistic anticancer effect and enable a multiple-responsive controlled release of both drugs (MMC was released in a pH-dependent pattern, while MTX was released in a protease-dependent pattern). Furthermore, MTX-M-MMC could codeliver both drugs to significantly enhance the cellular uptake, intracellular delivery, cytotoxicity, and apoptosis in vitro and improve the tumor accumulation and penetration and anticancer effect in vivo compared with either both free drugs treatment or individual free drug treatment. To our knowledge, this work provided the first example of the systemically administrated, orthogonally functionalized, and self-assisted nanoscale micelles for targeted combination cancer chemotherapy. The highly convergent therapeutic strategy opened the door to more simplified, efficient, and flexible nanoscale drug delivery systems. PMID:25625539

  15. Update on Aurora Kinase Targeted Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Green, Myke R.; Woolery, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Mammalian cells contain three distinct serine/threonine protein kinases with highly conserved catalytic domains, including aurora A and B kinases that are essential regulators of mitotic entry and progression. Overexpression of aurora A and/or B kinase is associated with high proliferation rates and poor prognosis, making them ideal targets for anti-cancer therapy. Disruption of mitotic machinery is a proven anti-cancer strategy employed by multiple chemotherapeutic agents. Numerous small molecule inhibitors of the aurora kinases have been discovered and tested in vivo and in vitro, with a few currently in phase II testing. Areas covered This review provides the reader with updated results from both preclinical and human studies for each of the aurora kinase inhibitors (AKI) that are currently being investigated. The paper also covers in detail the late breaking and phase I data presented for AKIs thereby allowing the reader to compare and contrast individual and classrelated effects of AKIs. Expert opinion While the successful development and approval of an AKI for anti-cancer therapy remains unresolved, pre-clinical identification of resistant mechanisms would help design better early phase clinical trials where relevant combinations may be evaluated prior to phase II testing. The authors believe that aurora kinases are important anti-cancer targets that operate in collaboration with other oncogenes intimately involved in uncontrolled tumor proliferation and by providing a unique, targeted and complimentary anti-cancer mechanism, expand the available armamentarium against cancer. PMID:21556291

  16. Update on Aurora Kinase Targeted Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Green, Myke R.; Woolery, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Mammalian cells contain three distinct serine/threonine protein kinases with highly conserved catalytic domains, including aurora A and B kinases that are essential regulators of mitotic entry and progression. Overexpression of aurora A and/or B kinase is associated with high proliferation rates and poor prognosis, making them ideal targets for anti-cancer therapy. Disruption of mitotic machinery is a proven anti-cancer strategy employed by multiple chemotherapeutic agents. Numerous small molecule inhibitors of the aurora kinases have been discovered and tested in vivo and in vitro, with a few currently in phase II testing. Areas covered This review provides the reader with updated results from both preclinical and human studies for each of the aurora kinase inhibitors (AKI) that are currently being investigated. The paper also covers in detail the late breaking and phase I data presented for AKIs thereby allowing the reader to compare and contrast individual and class-related effects of AKIs. Expert opinion While the successful development and approval of an AKI for anti-cancer therapy remains unresolved, pre-clinical identification of resistant mechanisms would help design better early phase clinical trials where relevant combinations may be evaluated prior to phase II testing. The authors believe that aurora kinases are important anti-cancer targets that operate in collaboration with other oncogenes intimately involved in uncontrolled tumor proliferation and by providing a unique, targeted and complimentary anti-cancer mechanism, expand the available armamentarium against cancer. PMID:18991785

  17. The molecular basis of targeting protein kinases in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we provide an overview of targeted anticancer therapies with small molecule kinase inhibitors. First, we discuss why a single constitutively active kinase emanating from a variety of aberrant genetic alterations is capable of transforming a normal cell, leading it to acquire the hallmarks of a cancer cell. To draw attention to the fact that kinase inhibition in targeted cancer therapeutics differs from conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, we exploit a conceptual framework explaining why suppressed kinase activity will selectively kill only the so-called oncogene 'addicted' cancer cell, while sparing the healthy cell. Second, we introduce the protein kinase superfamily in light of its common active conformation with precisely positioned structural elements, and the diversified auto-inhibitory conformations among the kinase families. Understanding the detailed activation mechanism of individual kinases is essential to relate the observed oncogenic alterations to the elevated constitutively active state, to identify the mechanism of consequent drug resistance, and to guide the development of the next-generation inhibitors. To clarify the vital importance of structural guidelines in studies of oncogenesis, we explain how somatic mutations in EGFR result in kinase constitutive activation. Third, in addition to the common theme of secondary (acquired) mutations that prevent drug binding from blocking a signaling pathway which is hijacked by the aberrant activated kinase, we discuss scenarios of drug resistance and relapse by compensating lesions that bypass the inactivated pathway in a vertical or horizontal fashion. Collectively, these suggest that the future challenge of cancer therapy with small molecule kinase inhibitors will rely on the discovery of distinct combinations of optimized drugs to target individual subtypes of different cancers. PMID:23651790

  18. Importins and exportins as therapeutic targets in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mahipal, Amit; Malafa, Mokenge

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear transport proteins, importins and exportins (karyopherin-β proteins), may play an important role in cancer by transporting key mediators of oncogenesis across the nuclear membrane in cancer cells. During nucleocytoplasmic transport of tumor suppressor proteins and cell cycle regulators during the processing of these proteins, aberrant cellular growth signaling and inactivation of apoptosis can occur, both critical to growth and development of tumors. Karyopherin-β proteins bind to these cargo proteins and RanGTP for active transport across the nuclear membrane through the nuclear pore complex. Importins and exportins are overexpressed in multiple tumors including melanoma, pancreatic, breast, colon, gastric, prostate, esophageal, lung cancer, and lymphomas. Furthermore, some of the karyopherin-β proteins such as exportin-1 have been implicated in drug resistance in cancer. Importin and exportin inhibitors are being considered as therapeutic targets against cancer and have shown preclinical anticancer activity. Moreover, synergistic activity has been observed with various chemotherapeutic and targeted agents. However, clinical development of the exportin-1 inhibitor leptomycin B was stopped due to adverse events, including vomiting, anorexia, and dehydration. Selinexor, a selective nuclear export inhibitor, is being tested in multiple clinical trials both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy. Selinexor has demonstrated clinical activity in multiple cancers, especially acute myelogenous leukemia and multiple myeloma. The roles of other importin and exportin inhibitors still need to be investigated clinically. Targeting the key mediators of nucleocytoplasmic transport in cancer cells represents a novel strategy in cancer intervention with the potential to significantly affect outcomes. PMID:27113410

  19. Coumarin-appended phosphorescent cyclometalated iridium(iii) complexes as mitochondria-targeted theranostic anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rui-Rong; Tan, Cai-Ping; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-08-16

    Theranostic anticancer agents incorporating anticancer properties with capabilities for real-time treatment assessment are appealing candidates for chemotherapy. The design of mitochondria-targeted cytotoxic drugs represents a promising approach to target tumors selectively and overcome resistance to current anticancer therapies. In this work, three coumarin-appended phosphorescent cyclometalated iridium(iii) complexes 1-3 have been explored as mitochondria-targeted theranostic anticancer agents. These complexes display rich photophysical properties, which facilitate the study of their intracellular fate. All three complexes can specifically target mitochondria and show much higher antiproliferative activities than cisplatin against various cancer cells including cisplatin-resistant cells. 1-3 can penetrate into human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells quickly and efficiently, and they can carry out theranostic functions by simultaneously inducing and monitoring the morphological changes in mitochondria. Mechanism studies show that 1-3 exert their anticancer efficacy by initiating a cascade of events related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Genome-wide transcriptional and Connectivity Map analyses reveal that the cytotoxicity of complex 3 is associated with pathways involved in mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. PMID:27139504

  20. Therapeutic targets for treating fibrotic kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So-Young; Kim, Sung Il; Choi, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is the hallmark of virtually all progressive kidney diseases and strongly correlates with the deterioration of kidney function. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade is central to the current treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) for the renoprotective effects aimed to prevent or slow progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, the incidence of CKD is still increasing, and there is a critical need for new therapeutics. Here, we review novel strategies targeting various components implicated in the fibrogenic pathway to inhibit or retard the loss of kidney function. We focus, in particular, on anti-fibrotic approaches that target transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, a key mediator of kidney fibrosis, and exciting new data on the role of autophagy. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-7 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) are highlighted as modulators of pro-fibrotic TGF-β activity. BMP-7 has a protective role against TGF-β1 in kidney fibrosis, whereas CTGF enhances TGF-β-mediated fibrosis. We also discuss recent advances in the development of additional strategies for anti-fibrotic therapy. These include strategies targeting chemokine pathways via CC chemokine receptor 1 and 2 to modulate the inflammatory response, inhibition of phosphodiesterase to restore nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic 3′,5′ guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) function, inhibition of NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) and 4 (Nox4) to suppress reactive oxygen species production, as well as inhibition of endothelin-1 or tumor necrosis factor-α to ameliorate progressive renal fibrosis. Furthermore, a brief overview of some of the biomarkers of kidney fibrosis currently being explored that may improve the ability to monitor anti-fibrotic therapies. It is hoped that evidence based on the preclinical and clinical data discussed in this review leads to novel anti-fibrotic therapies effective in patients with CKD to prevent or delay progression to ESRD. PMID

  1. A novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent with high selectivity for cancer cells.

    PubMed

    He, Huan; Li, Dong-Wei; Yang, Li-Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Xun-Jin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have recently emerged as novel targets for cancer therapy due to its important roles in fundamental cellular function. Discovery of new chemotherapeutic agents that allow for simultaneous treatment and visualization of cancer is urgent. Herein, we demonstrate a novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent (FPB), exhibiting both imaging capability and anticancer activity. It can selectively accumulate in mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis. Notably, it results in much higher toxicity toward cancer cells owing to much higher uptake by cancer cells. These features make it highly attractive in cancer imaging and treatment. PMID:26337336

  2. A novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent with high selectivity for cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Huan; Li, Dong-Wei; Yang, Li-Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Xun-Jin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have recently emerged as novel targets for cancer therapy due to its important roles in fundamental cellular function. Discovery of new chemotherapeutic agents that allow for simultaneous treatment and visualization of cancer is urgent. Herein, we demonstrate a novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent (FPB), exhibiting both imaging capability and anticancer activity. It can selectively accumulate in mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis. Notably, it results in much higher toxicity toward cancer cells owing to much higher uptake by cancer cells. These features make it highly attractive in cancer imaging and treatment. PMID:26337336

  3. Liquid biopsy and therapeutic response: Circulating tumor cell cultures for evaluation of anticancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Bee Luan; Grenci, Gianluca; Jing, Tengyang; Lim, Ying Bena; Lee, Soo Chin; Thiery, Jean Paul; Han, Jongyoon; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-01-01

    The lack of a robust anticancer drug screening system to monitor patients during treatment delays realization of personalized treatment. We demonstrate an efficient approach to evaluate drug response using patient-derived circulating tumor cell (CTC) cultures obtained from liquid biopsy. Custom microfabricated tapered microwells were integrated with microfluidics to allow robust formation of CTC clusters without pre-enrichment and subsequent drug screening in situ. Rapid feedback after 2 weeks promotes immediate intervention upon detection of drug resistance or tolerance. The procedure was clinically validated with blood samples (n = 73) from 55 patients with early-stage, newly diagnosed, locally advanced, or refractory metastatic breast cancer. Twenty-four of these samples were used for drug evaluation. Cluster formation potential correlated inversely with increased drug concentration and therapeutic treatment. This new and robust liquid biopsy technique can potentially evaluate patient prognosis with CTC clusters during treatment and provide a noninvasive and inexpensive assessment that can guide drug discovery development or therapeutic choices for personalized treatment. PMID:27453941

  4. Ascaris lumbricoides: an overview of therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Hagel, Isabel; Giusti, Tatiana

    2010-10-01

    A. lumbricoides is the largest of the common nematode parasites of man and has been associated with intestinal pathology, respiratory symptoms and malnutrition in children from endemic areas. Current anthelmintic treatments have proven to be safe. However, a reduced efficacy of single dose drugs has been reported. In veterinary practice, anthelmintic drug resistance is an irreversible problem. Thus, research and development of sensitive tools for early detection of drug resistance as well as new anthelmintic approaches are urgently needed. In this review, we summarized data providing information about current drug therapy against A. lumbricoides and other intestinal helminths, new drugs in experimental trials, future drugs perspectives and the identification of immunogenic parasite molecules that may be suitable vaccine targets. In addition to the WHO recommended drugs (albendazole, mebendazole, levamisole, and pyrantel pamoate), new anthelmintic alternatives such as tribendimidine and Nitazoxanide have proved to be safe and effective against A. lumbricoides and other soil-transmitted helminthiases in human trials. Also, some new drugs for veterinary use, monepantel and cyclooctadepsipeptides (e.g., PF1022A), will probably expand future drug spectrum for human treatments. The development of genomic technology has provided a great amount of available nematode DNA sequences, coupled with new gene function data that may lead to the identification of new drug targets through efficient mining of nematode genomic databases. On the other hand, the identification of nematode antigens involved in different parasite vital functions as well as immunomodulatory molecules in animals and humans may contribute to future studies of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:20701574

  5. Migraine: current therapeutic targets and future avenues.

    PubMed

    Arulmozhi, D K; Veeranjaneyulu, A; Bodhankar, S L

    2006-04-01

    Migraine is characterized by attacks of intense pulsatile and throbbing headache, typically unilateral in nature with or without aura. Migraine affects a substantial fraction (10-20 %) of the world population (more women than men). With regard to the pathophysiology of migraine, several theories have been proposed; the major three are vascular (due to cerebral vasodilatation), neurological (abnormal neurological firing) and neurogenic dural inflammation (release of inflammatory neuropeptides). The drugs used to treat migraine can be divided into two groups: agents that abolish the acute migraine headache and agents aimed at prevention. The acutely acting antimigraine agents (5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonists) stimulated research interest in the field of migraine. Currently prophylactic treatments for migraine include calcium channel blockers, 5-HT(2) receptor antagonists, beta-adrenoceptor blockers and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) agonists. Unfortunately, many of these treatments are non-specific and not always effective. Despite progress, the complex etiology of migraine requires further research, the condition often remains undiagnosed and available therapies are underused. In this review, the evidence that linked the different theories of migraine with its pathophysiology is considered. Furthermore, the present therapeutic targets and future approaches for the acute and prophylactic treatment of migraine are critically evaluated. PMID:16611154

  6. ASICs as therapeutic targets for migraine.

    PubMed

    Dussor, Greg

    2015-07-01

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder and one of the most common chronic pain conditions. Despite its prevalence, the pathophysiology leading to migraine is poorly understood and the identification of new therapeutic targets has been slow. Several processes are currently thought to contribute to migraine including altered activity in the hypothalamus, cortical-spreading depression (CSD), and afferent sensory input from the cranial meninges. Decreased extracellular pH and subsequent activation of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) may contribute to each of these processes and may thus play a role in migraine pathophysiology. Although few studies have directly examined a role of ASICs in migraine, studies directly examining a connection have generated promising results including efficacy of ASIC blockers in both preclinical migraine models and in human migraine patients. The purpose of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology thought to contribute to migraine and findings that implicate decreased pH and/or ASICs in these events, as well as propose issues to be resolved in future studies of ASICs and migraine. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'. PMID:25582295

  7. Therapeutic targeting of autophagy in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Schiattarella, Gabriele G; Hill, Joseph A

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient process of intracellular catabolism necessary to preserve cellular homeostasis in response to a wide variety of stresses. In the case of post-mitotic cells, where cell replacement is not an option, finely tuned quality control of cytoplasmic constituents and organelles is especially critical. And due to the ubiquitous and critical role of autophagic flux in the maintenance of cell health, it comes as little surprise that perturbation of the autophagic process is observed in multiple disease processes. A large body of preclinical evidence suggests that autophagy is a double-edged sword in cardiovascular disease, acting in either beneficial or maladaptive ways, depending on the context. In light of this, the autophagic machinery in cardiomyocytes and other cardiovascular cell types has been proposed as a potential therapeutic target. Here, we summarize current knowledge regarding the dual functions of autophagy in cardiovascular disease. We go on to analyze recent evidence suggesting that titration of autophagic flux holds potential as a novel treatment strategy. PMID:26602750

  8. Deubiquitinases: Novel Therapeutic Targets in Immune Surveillance?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a protective response of the organism to tissue injury or infection. It occurs when the immune system recognizes Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs) or Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern (DAMPs) through the activation of Pattern Recognition Receptors. This initiates a variety of signalling events that conclude in the upregulation of proinflammatory molecules, which initiate an appropriate immune response. This response is tightly regulated since any aberrant activation of immune responses would have severe pathological consequences such as sepsis or chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Accumulative evidence shows that the ubiquitin system, and in particular ubiquitin-specific isopeptidases also known as deubiquitinases (DUBs), plays crucial roles in the control of these immune pathways. In this review we will give an up-to-date overview on the role of DUBs in the NF-κB pathway and inflammasome activation, two intrinsically related events triggered by activation of the membrane TLRs as well as the cytosolic NOD and NLR receptors. Modulation of DUB activity by small molecules has been proposed as a way to control dysregulation or overactivation of these key players of the inflammatory response. We will also discuss the advances and challenges of a potential use of DUBs as therapeutic targets in inflammatory pathologies. PMID:27597804

  9. ASICs as therapeutic targets for migraine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is the most common neurological disorder and one of the most common chronic pain conditions. Despite its prevalence, the pathophysiology leading to migraine is poorly understood and the identification of new therapeutic targets has been slow. Several processes are currently thought to contribute to migraine including altered activity in the hypothalamus, cortical-spreading depression (CSD), and afferent sensory input from the cranial meninges. Decreased extracellular pH and subsequent activation of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) may contribute to each of these processes and may thus play a role in migraine pathophysiology. Although few studies have directly examined a role of ASICs in migraine, studies directly examining a connection have generated promising results including efficacy of ASIC blockers in both preclinical migraine models and in human migraine patients. The purpose of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology thought to contribute to migraine and findings that implicate decreased pH and/or ASICs in these events, as well as propose issues to be resolved in future studies of ASICs and migraine. PMID:25582295

  10. Targeting α-synuclein: Therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Dehay, Benjamin; Decressac, Mickael; Bourdenx, Mathieu; Guadagnino, Irene; Fernagut, Pierre-Olivier; Tamburrino, Anna; Bassil, Fares; Meissner, Wassilios G; Bezard, Erwan

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of the central role of α-synuclein (αSyn) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has powered, in the last decade, the emergence of novel relevant models of this condition based on viral vector-mediated expression of the disease-causing protein or inoculation of toxic species of αSyn. Although the development of these powerful tools and models has provided considerable insights into the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in PD, it has also been translated into the expansion of the landscape of preclinical therapeutic strategies. Much attention is now brought to the proteotoxic mechanisms induced by αSyn and how to block them using strategies inspired by intrinsic cellular pathways such as the enhancement of cellular clearance by the lysosomal-autophagic system, through proteasome-mediated degradation or through immunization. The important effort undertaken by several laboratories and consortia to tackle these issues and identify novel targets warrants great promise for the discovery not only of neuroprotective approaches but also of restorative strategies for PD and other synucleinopathies. In this viewpoint, we summarize the latest advances in this new area of PD research and will discuss promising approaches and ongoing challenges. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26926119

  11. Mitochondrial DNA is a direct target of anti-cancer anthracycline drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Neil Poulton, Joanna

    2009-01-16

    The anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin (DXR), are potent anti-cancer drugs but they are limited by their clinical toxicity. The mechanisms involved remain poorly understood partly because of the difficulty in determining sub-cellular drug localisation. Using a novel method utilising the fluorescent DNA dye PicoGreen, we found that anthracyclines intercalated not only into nuclear DNA but also mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Intercalation of mtDNA by anthracyclines may thus contribute to the marked mitochondrial toxicity associated with these drugs. By contrast, ethidium bromide intercalated exclusively into mtDNA, without interacting with nuclear DNA, thereby explaining why mtDNA is the main target for ethidium. By exploiting PicoGreen quenching we also developed a novel assay for quantification of mtDNA levels by flow-cytometry, an approach which should be useful for studies of mitochondrial dysfunction. In summary our PicoGreen assay should be useful to study drug/DNA interactions within live cells, and facilitate therapeutic drug monitoring and kinetic studies in cancer patients.

  12. Use of the Rad51 promoter for targeted anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hine, Christopher M; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2008-12-30

    Rad51 protein, involved in homologous recombination, is overexpressed in a variety of tumors, and its expression is correlated with a poor prognosis. Here we propose to exploit the overexpression of Rad51 in cancer cells to design a Rad51 promoter-based anticancer therapy. On average, Rad51 mRNA and protein levels are increased in cancer cells four- and sixfold, respectively. Serendipitously, we discovered that when the Rad51 ORF is replaced with another ORF, the difference in promoter activity between normal and cancer cells increases to an average of 840-fold with a maximum difference of 12,500-fold. This dramatic difference in activity has high therapeutic potential. We demonstrate that the fusion of Rad51 promoter to diphtheria toxin A (DTA) gene kills a variety of cancer cell types, including breast cancer, fibrosarcoma, and cervical cancer cells, with minimal effect on normal breast epithelial cells and normal fibroblasts. Our results suggest that therapies based on the Rad51 promoter will be highly tumor specific and open new avenues for targeting a broad range of cancers. PMID:19106292

  13. Phytochemical-mediated Protein Expression Profiling and the Potential Applications in Therapeutic Drug Target Identifications.

    PubMed

    Wong, Fai-Chu; Tan, Siok-Thing; Chai, Tsun-Thai

    2016-07-29

    Many phytochemicals derived from edible medicinal plants have been investigated intensively for their various bioactivities. However, the detailed mechanism and their corresponding molecular targets frequently remain elusive. In this review, we present a summary of the research works done on phytochemical-mediated molecular targets, identified via proteomic approach. Concurrently, we also highlighted some pharmaceutical drugs which could be traced back to their origins in phytochemicals. For ease of presentation, these identified protein targets were categorized into two important healthcare-related fields, namely anti-bacterial and anti-cancer research. Through this review, we hope to highlight the usefulness of comparative proteomic as a powerful tool in phytochemical-mediated protein target identifications. Likewise, we wish to inspire further investigations on some of these protein targets identified over the last few years. With contributions from all researchers, the accumulative efforts could eventually lead to the discovery of some target-specific, low-toxicity therapeutic agents. PMID:26193174

  14. Mitosis as an anti-cancer drug target.

    PubMed

    Salmela, Anna-Leena; Kallio, Marko J

    2013-10-01

    Suppression of cell proliferation by targeting mitosis is one potential cancer intervention. A number of existing chemotherapy drugs disrupt mitosis by targeting microtubule dynamics. While efficacious, these drugs have limitations, i.e. neuropathy, unpredictability and development of resistance. In order to overcome these issues, a great deal of effort has been spent exploring novel mitotic targets including Polo-like kinase 1, Aurora kinases, Mps1, Cenp-E and KSP/Eg5. Here we summarize the latest developments in the discovery and clinical evaluation of new mitotic drug targets. PMID:23775312

  15. Potential of apoptotic pathway-targeted cancer therapeutic research: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Baig, S; Seevasant, I; Mohamad, J; Mukheem, A; Huri, H Z; Kamarul, T

    2016-01-01

    Underneath the intricacy of every cancer lies mysterious events that impel the tumour cell and its posterity into abnormal growth and tissue invasion. Oncogenic mutations disturb the regulatory circuits responsible for the governance of versatile cellular functions, permitting tumour cells to endure deregulated proliferation, resist to proapoptotic insults, invade and erode normal tissues and above all escape apoptosis. This disruption of apoptosis has been highly implicated in various malignancies and has been exploited as an anticancer strategy. Owing to the fact that apoptosis causes minimal inflammation and damage to the tissue, apoptotic cell death-based therapy has been the centre of attraction for the development of anticancer drugs. Increased understanding of the molecular pathways underlying apoptosis has enabled scientists to establish unique approaches targeting apoptosis pathways in cancer therapeutics. In this review, we reconnoitre the two major pathways (intrinsic and extrinsic) targeted cancer therapeutics, steering toward chief modulators of these pathways, such as B-cell lymphoma 2 protein family members (pro- and antiapoptotic), inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, and the foremost thespian of extrinsic pathway regulator, tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing agent. Together, we also will have a look from clinical perspective to address the agents (drugs) and therapeutic strategies adopted to target these specific proteins/pathways that have entered clinical trials. PMID:26775709

  16. Death receptors as targets for anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Papenfuss, Kerstin; Cordier, Stefanie M; Walczak, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Human tumour cells are characterized by their ability to avoid the normal regulatory mechanisms of cell growth, division and death. The classical chemotherapy aims to kill tumour cells by causing DNA damage-induced apoptosis. However, as many tumour cells posses mutations in intracellular apoptosis-sensing molecules like p53, they are not capable of inducing apoptosis on their own and are therefore resistant to chemotherapy. With the discovery of the death receptors the opportunity arose to directly trigger apoptosis from the outside of tumour cells, thereby circumventing chemotherapeutic resistance. Death receptors belong to the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily, with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-1, CD95 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-R1 and -R2 being the most prominent members. This review covers the current knowledge about these four death receptors, summarizes pre-clinical approaches engaging these death receptors in anti-cancer therapy and also gives an overview about their application in clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:19210756

  17. Molecular Targets Underlying the Anticancer Effects of Quercetin: An Update.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Maqbool, Faheem; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nagulapalli Venkata, Kalyan C; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bishayee, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a medicinally important member of the flavonoid family, is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. It is present in a variety of foods-including fruits, vegetables, tea, wine, as well as other dietary supplements-and is responsible for various health benefits. Numerous pharmacological effects of quercetin include protection against diseases, such as osteoporosis, certain forms of malignant tumors, and pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders. Quercetin has the special ability of scavenging highly reactive species, such as hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radicals. These oxygen radicals are called reactive oxygen species, which can cause oxidative damage to cellular components, such as proteins, lipids, and deoxyribonucleic acid. Various oxygen radicals play important roles in pathophysiological and degenerative processes, such as aging. Subsequently, several studies have been performed to evaluate possible advantageous health effects of quercetin and to collect scientific evidence for these beneficial health claims. These studies also gather data in order to evaluate the exact mechanism(s) of action and toxicological effects of quercetin. The purpose of this review is to present and critically analyze molecular pathways underlying the anticancer effects of quercetin. Current limitations and future directions of research on this bioactive dietary polyphenol are also critically discussed. PMID:27589790

  18. Probing the Small-Molecule Inhibition of an Anticancer Therapeutic Protein-Protein Interaction Using a Solid-State Nanopore.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Dong-Kyu; Chae, Hongsik; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Ha, Ji-Hyang; Goyal, Gaurav; Kim, Min Jun; Kim, Ki-Bum; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2016-05-01

    Nanopore sensing is an emerging technology for the single-molecule-based detection of various biomolecules. In this study, we probed the anticancer therapeutic p53 transactivation domain (p53TAD)/MDM2 interaction and its inhibition with a small-molecule MDM2 antagonist, Nutlin-3, using low-noise solid-state nanopores. Although the translocation of positively charged MDM2 through a nanopore was detected at the applied negative voltage, this MDM2 translocation was almost completely blocked upon formation of the MDM2/GST-p53TAD complex owing to charge conversion. In combination with NMR data, the nanopore measurements showed that the addition of Nutlin-3 rescued MDM2 translocation, indicating that Nutlin-3 disrupted the MDM2/GST-p53TAD complex, thereby releasing MDM2. Taken together, our results reveal that solid-state nanopores can be a valuable platform for the ultrasensitive, picomole-scale screening of small-molecule drugs against protein-protein interaction (PPI) targets. PMID:27038437

  19. In vitro discovery of promising anti-cancer drug combinations using iterative maximisation of a therapeutic index

    PubMed Central

    Kashif, M.; Andersson, C.; Hassan, S.; Karlsson, H.; Senkowski, W.; Fryknäs, M.; Nygren, P.; Larsson, R.; Gustafsson, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro-based search for promising anti-cancer drug combinations may provide important leads to improved cancer therapies. Currently there are no integrated computational-experimental methods specifically designed to search for combinations, maximizing a predefined therapeutic index (TI) defined in terms of appropriate model systems. Here, such a pipeline is presented allowing the search for optimal combinations among an arbitrary number of drugs while also taking experimental variability into account. The TI optimized is the cytotoxicity difference (in vitro) between a target model and an adverse side effect model. Focusing on colorectal carcinoma (CRC), the pipeline provided several combinations that are effective in six different CRC models with limited cytotoxicity in normal cell models. Herein we describe the identification of the combination (Trichostatin A, Afungin, 17-AAG) and present results from subsequent characterisations, including efficacy in primary cultures of tumour cells from CRC patients. We hypothesize that its effect derives from potentiation of the proteotoxic action of 17-AAG by Trichostatin A and Afungin. The discovered drug combinations against CRC are significant findings themselves and also indicate that the proposed strategy has great potential for suggesting drug combination treatments suitable for other cancer types as well as for other complex diseases. PMID:26392291

  20. 3-Hydrazinoindolin-2-one derivatives: Chemical classification and investigation of their targets as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hany S; Abou-Seri, Sahar M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A

    2016-10-21

    Isatin is a well acknowledged pharmacophore in many clinically approved drugs used for treatment of cancer. 3-Hydrazinoindolin-2-one, as a derivative of isatin, represents a pharmacophore of an important class of biologically active pharmaceutical agents by virtue of their diverse biological activities. In this review, anticancer activity will be on focus for compounds derived from 3-hydrazinoindolin-2-one. They are classified according to their chemical structure into nine different classes. In each class, different compounds were browsed, showing their anticancer activity and their potential targets. Moreover, crystallographic data or docking studies were highlighted for some compounds, when available, to provide a deep understanding of their mechanisms of action. PMID:27391135

  1. Emergence of zebrafish models in oncology for validating novel anticancer drug targets and nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K.

    2013-01-01

    The in vivo zebrafish models have recently attracted great attention in molecular oncology to investigate multiple genetic alterations associated with the development of human cancers and validate novel anticancer drug targets. Particularly, the transparent zebrafish models can be used as a xenotransplantation system to rapidly assess the tumorigenicity and metastatic behavior of cancer stem and/or progenitor cells and their progenies. Moreover, the zebrafish models have emerged as powerful tools for an in vivo testing of novel anticancer agents and nanomaterials for counteracting tumor formation and metastases and improving the efficacy of current radiation and chemotherapeutic treatments against aggressive, metastatic and lethal cancers. PMID:22903142

  2. Honokiol analogs: a novel class of anticancer agents targeting cell signaling pathways and other bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ankit; Kumar Singh, Umesh; Chaudhary, Anurag

    2013-05-01

    Honokiol (3,5-di-(2-propenyl)-1,1-biphenyl-2,2-diol) is a natural bioactive neolignan isolated from the genus Magnolia. In recent studies, honokiol has been observed to have anti-angiogenic, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and GABA-modulating properties in vitro and in preclinical models. Honokiol and its analogs target multiple signaling pathways including NF-κB, STAT3, EGFR, mTOR and caspase-mediated common pathway, which regulate cancer initiation and progression. Honokiol and its targets of action may be helpful in the development of effective analogs and targeted cancer therapy. In this review, recent data describing the molecular targets of honokiol and its analogs with anticancer and some other bioactivities are discussed. PMID:23651094

  3. Rituximab's new therapeutic target: the podocyte actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Chan, Andrew C

    2011-06-01

    Therapeutic off-target activities are well recognized for small-molecule drugs. In contrast, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) traditionally are believed to act specifically and lack off-target therapeutic effects. In this issue of Science Translational Medicine, Fornoni et al. show therapeutic benefit, through an off-target-mediated mechanism, of the mAb drug rituximab in recurrent focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) after kidney transplantation. These data shed new light on FSGS pathogenesis and suggest new therapeutic interventions for proteinuric diseases. PMID:21632983

  4. REOVIRUS: A TARGETED THERAPEUTIC – PROGRESS AND POTENTIAL

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Radhashree; Ghalib, Mohammad H.; Goel, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Medical therapy of patients with malignancy requires a paradigm shift through development of new drugs with a good safety record and novel mechanisms of activity. While there is no dearth of such molecules, one particular agent, “reovirus” is promising by its ability to target cancer cells with aberrant signaling pathways. This double stranded RNA virus has been therapeutically formulated and has rapidly progressed from pre-clinical validation of anti cancer activity to a phase III registration study in platinum refractory metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. During this process, reovirus has demonstrated safety both as a single agent when administered intratumorally and intravenously, as well as in combination therapy, with multiple chemotherapeutics such as gemcitabine, carboplatin/paclitaxel, and docetaxel; and similarly with radiation. The scientific rationale for its development as an anticancer agent stems from the fact that it preferentially replicates in and induces lyses of cells with an activated Kras pathway. As documented in many previous studies, the initial observation of greater tropism in Kras compromised situation might certainly not be the sole and possibly not even the predominant reason for enhanced virulence. All the same, scientists have emphasized on Kras optimistically due to its high prevalence in various types of cancers. Incidence of Kras mutation has been found to be highest in pancreatic cancer (85–90%) followed by colorectal (35–45%) and lung (25–30%). Reovirus, in fact has the potential not only as a therapy but also as a tool to unravel the aberrant cellular pathway leading to carcinogenicity. PMID:23038811

  5. HER2-mediated anticancer drug delivery: strategies to prepare targeting ligands highly specific for the receptor.

    PubMed

    Calce, Enrica; Monfregola, Luca; Saviano, Michele; De Luca, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    HER2 receptor, for its involvement in tumorigenesis, has been largely studied as topic in cancer research. In particular, the employment of trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized anti-HER2 antibody, showed several clinical benefits in the therapy against the breast cancer. Moreover, for its accessible extracellular domain, this receptor is considered an ideal target to deliver anticancer drugs for the receptormediated anticancer therapy. By now, monoclonal antibody and its fragments, affibody, and some peptides have been employed as targeting agents in order to deliver various drugs to HER2 positive tumor cells. In particular, the ability to perform a fast and reliable screening of a large number of peptide molecules would make possible the selection of highly specific compounds to the receptor target. In this regard, the availability of preparing a simplified synthetic model which is a good mimetic of the receptor target and can be used in a reliable screening method of ligands would be of a strategic importance for the development of selective HER2-targeting peptide molecules. Herein, we illustrate the importance of HER2-targeted anticancer therapies. We also report on a synthetic and effective mimetic of the receptor, which revealed to be a useful tool for the selection of specific HER2 ligands. PMID:25994863

  6. Targeted alpha anticancer therapies: update and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Barry J; Huang, Chen-Yu; Clarke, Raymond A

    2014-01-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) is an emerging option for local and systemic cancer treatment. Preclinical research and clinical trials show that alpha-emitting radionuclides can kill targeted cancer cells while sparing normal cells, thus reducing toxicity. 223RaCl2 (Xofigo®) is the first alpha emitting radioisotope to gain registration in the US for palliative therapy of prostate cancer bone metastases by indirect physiological targeting. The alpha emitting radioisotopes 211At, 213Bi, 225Ac and 227Th are being used to label targeting vectors such as monoclonal antibodies for specific cancer therapy indications. In this review, safety and tolerance aspects are considered with respect to microdosimetry, specific energy, Monte Carlo model calculations, biodosimetry, equivalent dose and mutagenesis. The clinical efficacy of TAT for solid tumors may also be enhanced by its capacity for tumor anti-vascular (TAVAT) effects. This review emphasizes key aspects of TAT research with respect to the PAI2-uPAR complex and the monoclonal antibodies bevacizumab, C595 and J591. Clinical trial outcomes are reviewed for neuroendocrine tumors, leukemia, glioma, melanoma, non-Hodgkins lymphoma, and prostate bone metastases. Recommendations and future directions are proposed. PMID:25422581

  7. Transferrin receptors and the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Tracy R.; Bernabeu, Ezequiel; Rodríguez, José A.; Patel, Shabnum; Kozman, Maggie; Chiappetta, Diego A.; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Helguera, Gustavo; Penichet, Manuel L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional cancer therapy can be successful in destroying tumors, but can also cause dangerous side effects. Therefore, many targeted therapies are in development. The transferrin receptor (TfR) functions in cellular iron uptake through its interaction with transferrin. This receptor is an attractive molecule for the targeted therapy of cancer since it is upregulated on the surface of many cancer types and is efficiently internalized. This receptor can be targeted in two ways: 1) for the delivery of therapeutic molecules into malignant cells or 2) to block the natural function of the receptor leading directly to cancer cell death. Scope of review In the present article we discuss the strategies used to target the TfR for the delivery of therapeutic agents into cancer cells. We provide a summary of the vast types of anti-cancer drugs that have been delivered into cancer cells employing a variety of receptor binding molecules including Tf, anti-TfR antibodies, or TfR-binding peptides alone or in combination with carrier molecules including nanoparticles and viruses. Major conclusions Targeting the TfR has been shown to be effective in delivering many different therapeutic agents and causing cytotoxic effects in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. General significance The extensive use of TfR for targeted therapy attests to the versatility of targeting this receptor for therapeutic purposes against malignant cells. More advances in this area are expected to further improve the therapeutic potential of targeting the TfR for cancer therapy leading to an increase in the number of clinical trials of molecules targeting this receptor. PMID:21851850

  8. Targeted Delivery System of Nanobiomaterials in Anticancer Therapy: From Cells to Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Su-Eon; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Targeted delivery systems of nanobiomaterials are necessary to be developed for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Nanobiomaterials can be engineered to recognize cancer-specific receptors at the cellular levels and to deliver anticancer drugs into the diseased sites. In particular, nanobiomaterial-based nanocarriers, so-called nanoplatforms, are the design of the targeted delivery systems such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles/micelles, nanoconjugates, norganic materials, carbon-based nanobiomaterials, and bioinspired phage system, which are based on the nanosize of 1–100 nm in diameter. In this review, the design and the application of these nanoplatforms are discussed at the cellular levels as well as in the clinics. We believe that this review can offer recent advances in the targeted delivery systems of nanobiomaterials regarding in vitro and in vivo applications and the translation of nanobiomaterials to nanomedicine in anticancer therapy. PMID:24672796

  9. Destabilisation of dimeric 14-3-3 proteins as a novel approach to anti-cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, Joanna M; Coolen, Carl; Goodwin, Katy L; Baek, Dong Jae; Bittman, Robert; Samuel, Michael S; Pitson, Stuart M; Lopez, Angel F

    2015-06-10

    14-3-3 proteins play a pivotal role in controlling cell proliferation and survival, two commonly dysregulated hallmarks of cancers. 14-3-3 protein expression is enhanced in many human cancers and correlates with more aggressive tumors and poor prognosis, suggesting a role for 14-3-3 proteins in tumorigenesis and/or progression. We showed previously that the dimeric state of 14-3-3 proteins is regulated by the lipid sphingosine, a physiological inducer of apoptosis. As the functions of 14-3-3 proteins are dependent on their dimeric state, this sphingosine-mediated 14-3-3 regulation provides a possible means to target dimeric 14-3-3 for therapeutic effect. However, sphingosine mimics are needed that are not susceptible to sphingolipid metabolism. We show here the identification and optimization of sphingosine mimetics that render dimeric 14-3-3 susceptible to phosphorylation at a site buried in the dimer interface and induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Two such compounds, RB-011 and RB-012, disrupt 14-3-3 dimers at low micromolar concentrations and induce rapid down-regulation of Raf-MAPK and PI3K-Akt signaling in Jurkat cells. Importantly, both RB-011 and RB-012 induce apoptosis of human A549 lung cancer cells and RB-012, through disruption of MAPK signaling, reduces xenograft growth in mice. Thus, these compounds provide proof-of-principle for this novel 14-3-3-targeting approach for anti-cancer drug discovery. PMID:25971334

  10. Exploiting developments in nanotechnology for the preferential delivery of platinum-based anti-cancer agents to tumours: targeting some of the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Parker, James P; Ude, Ziga; Marmion, Celine J

    2016-01-01

    Platinum drugs as anti-cancer therapeutics are held in extremely high regard. Despite their success, there are drawbacks associated with their use; their dose-limiting toxicity, their limited activity against an array of common cancers and patient resistance to Pt-based therapeutic regimes. Current investigations in medicinal inorganic chemistry strive to offset these shortcomings through selective targeting of Pt drugs and/or the development of Pt drugs with new or multiple modes of action. A comprehensive overview showcasing how liposomes, nanocapsules, polymers, dendrimers, nanoparticles and nanotubes may be employed as vehicles to selectively deliver cytotoxic Pt payloads to tumour cells is provided. PMID:26567482

  11. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function. PMID:27288727

  12. Targeting tumor perfusion and oxygenation to improve the outcome of anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bénédicte F; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are widespread clinical modalities for cancer treatment. Among other biological influences, hypoxia is a main factor limiting the efficacy of radiotherapy, primarily because oxygen is involved in the stabilization of the DNA damage caused by ionizing radiations. Radiobiological hypoxia is found in regions of rodent and human tumors with a tissue oxygenation level below 10 mmHg at which tumor cells become increasingly resistant to radiation damage. Since hypoxic tumor cells remain clonogenic, their resistance to the treatment strongly influences the therapeutic outcome of radiotherapy. There is therefore an urgent need to identify adjuvant treatment modalities aimed to increase tumor pO(2) at the time of radiotherapy. Since tumor hypoxia fundamentally results from an imbalance between oxygen delivery by poorly efficient blood vessels and oxygen consumption by tumor cells with high metabolic activities, two promising approaches are those targeting vascular reactivity and tumor cell respiration. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the development and use of tumor-selective vasodilators, inhibitors of tumor cell respiration, and drugs and treatments combining both activities in the context of tumor sensitization to X-ray radiotherapy. Tumor-selective vasodilation may also be used to improve the delivery of circulating anticancer agents to tumors. Imaging tumor perfusion and oxygenation is of importance not only for the development and validation of such combination treatments, but also to determine which patients could benefit from the therapy. Numerous techniques have been developed in the preclinical setting. Hence, this review also briefly describes both magnetic resonance and non-magnetic resonance in vivo methods and compares them in terms of sensitivity, quantitative or semi-quantitative properties, temporal, and spatial resolutions, as well as translational aspects. PMID:22661950

  13. Targeting Tumor Perfusion and Oxygenation to Improve the Outcome of Anticancer Therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Bénédicte F.; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are widespread clinical modalities for cancer treatment. Among other biological influences, hypoxia is a main factor limiting the efficacy of radiotherapy, primarily because oxygen is involved in the stabilization of the DNA damage caused by ionizing radiations. Radiobiological hypoxia is found in regions of rodent and human tumors with a tissue oxygenation level below 10 mmHg at which tumor cells become increasingly resistant to radiation damage. Since hypoxic tumor cells remain clonogenic, their resistance to the treatment strongly influences the therapeutic outcome of radiotherapy. There is therefore an urgent need to identify adjuvant treatment modalities aimed to increase tumor pO2 at the time of radiotherapy. Since tumor hypoxia fundamentally results from an imbalance between oxygen delivery by poorly efficient blood vessels and oxygen consumption by tumor cells with high metabolic activities, two promising approaches are those targeting vascular reactivity and tumor cell respiration. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the development and use of tumor-selective vasodilators, inhibitors of tumor cell respiration, and drugs and treatments combining both activities in the context of tumor sensitization to X-ray radiotherapy. Tumor-selective vasodilation may also be used to improve the delivery of circulating anticancer agents to tumors. Imaging tumor perfusion and oxygenation is of importance not only for the development and validation of such combination treatments, but also to determine which patients could benefit from the therapy. Numerous techniques have been developed in the preclinical setting. Hence, this review also briefly describes both magnetic resonance and non-magnetic resonance in vivo methods and compares them in terms of sensitivity, quantitative or semi-quantitative properties, temporal, and spatial resolutions, as well as translational aspects. PMID:22661950

  14. Tumor interstitial fluid pressure as an early-response marker for anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Stephane; Allegrini, Peter R; Becquet, Mike M; McSheehy, Paul Mj

    2009-09-01

    Solid tumors have a raised interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) due to high vessel permeability, low lymphatic drainage, poor perfusion, and high cell density around the blood vessels. To investigate tumor IFP as an early-response biomarker, we have tested the effect of seven anticancer chemotherapeutics including cytotoxics and targeted cytostatics in 13 experimental tumor models. IFP was recorded with the wick-in-needle method. Models were either ectopic or orthotopic and included mouse and rat syngeneic as well as human xenografts in nude mice. The mean basal IFP was between 4.4 and 15.2mm Hg; IFP was lowest in human tumor xenografts and highest in rat syngeneic models. Where measured, basal IFP correlated positively with relative tumor blood volume (rTBV) determined by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Most chemotherapeutics sooner (2 or 3 days) or later (6 or 7 days) lowered tumor IFP significantly, and the cytotoxic patupilone caused the greatest decrease in IFP. In rat mammary orthotopic BN472 tumors, significant drug-induced decreases in IFP and rTBV correlated positively with each other for both patupilone and the cytostatic vatalanib. In the two orthotopic models studied, early decreases in IFP were significantly (P < or = .005) correlated with late changes in tumor volume. Thus, drug-induced decreases in tumor IFP are an early marker of response to therapy, which could aid clinical development. PMID:19724681

  15. Dermatologic adverse events in pediatric patients receiving targeted anticancer therapies: a pooled analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pratilas, Christine A.; Sibaud, Vincent; Boralevi, Franck; Lacouture, Mario E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The dermatologic adverse events (AEs) of various molecularly targeted therapies are well-described in adult cancer patients. Little has been reported on the incidence and clinical presentation of such AEs in pediatric patients with cancer. To address this gap, we analyzed the dermatologic AEs reported across clinical trials of targeted anticancer therapies in pediatric patients. METHODS We conducted an electronic literature search (PubMed, American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meetings’ abstracts, ClinicalTrials.gov, NCI’s Pediatric Oncology Branch webpage) to identify clinical trials involving targeted anticancer therapies that reported dermatologic AEs in their safety data. Studies were limited to the pediatric population, monotherapy trials (oncology), and English language publications. RESULTS Pooled data from 19 clinical studies investigating 11 targeted anticancer agents (alemtuzumab, rituximab, imatinib, dasatinib, erlotinib, vandetanib, sorafenib, cabozantinib, pazopanib, everolimus, and temsirolimus) were analyzed. The most frequently encountered dermatologic AEs were rash (127/660; 19%), xerosis (18/100; 18%), mucositis (68/402; 17%) and pruritus (12/169; 7%). Other AEs included pigmentary abnormalities of the skin/hair (13%), hair disorders (trichomegaly, hypertrichosis, alopecia and madarosis; 14%), urticaria (7%), palmoplantar erythrodysesthesia (7%), erythema, acne, purpura, skin fissures, other ‘unknown skin changes’, exanthem, infection, flushing, telangiectasia, and photosensitivity. CONCLUSION This study describes the dermatologic manifestations of targeted anticancer therapy-related AEs in the pediatric population. Since these AEs are often associated with significant morbidity, it is imperative that pediatric oncologists be familiar with their recognition and management, to avoid unnecessary dose modifications and/or termination, and to prevent impairments in patients’ quality of life. PMID:25683226

  16. A human leucyl-tRNA synthetase as an anticancer target

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guangwei; Yao, Ying; Li, Kun; Mashausi, Dhahiri Saidi; Li, Dongsheng; Negi, Hema; Kamle, Suchitra; Chen, Hao; Wu, Zhenghua; Zhou, Huchen; Li, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Several aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases have been reported to be overexpressed for charging essential aminoacyl-tRNAs in many cancer types. In this study, we aimed to explore the potential role of leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LARS) as an anticancer target. MTT assay was performed to screen inhibitors to human LARS (hsLARS) from compounds AN2690 and its derivatives, compounds 1–6, in U2OS and SKOV3 cells. The compound with the strongest inhibitory ability was further investigated for its inhibitory effect in cancer cell lines and in an animal tumor model. Additionally, a LARS-rescue experiment was performed to explore the potential target in U2OS using Western blot and flow cytometry. Luciferase reporter assay was designed to analyze the effect of of hsLARS inhibitor on p21 activation. We identified an hsLARS inhibitor (compound 2) that suppressed the proliferation of U2OS and SKOV3 cells in vitro. A LARS-rescue experiment demonstrated that the proliferation inhibition was induced by targeting intracellular LARS. In addition, the hsLARS inhibition was shown to activate the p21 early transcription and promote cell apoptosis, as well as reduce implanted EMT6 tumor progression in mice. Our results suggest that LARS might serve as a potential anticancer target through the p21 signaling pathway and that the nutritional signaling pathway may provide a valuable anticancer strategy for further investigation. PMID:26508878

  17. Synergistic Induction of Apoptosis in Brain Cancer Cells by Targeted Co delivery of siRNA and Anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Cheoljin; Shah, Birju P.; Subramaniam, Prasad; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2011-01-01

    Multiple dysregulated pathways in tumors necessitate targeting multiple oncogenic elements by combining orthogonal therapeutic moieties like short-interfering RNAs (siRNA) and drug molecules in order to achieve a synergistic therapeutic effect. In this manuscript, we describe the synthesis of cyclodextrin-modified dendritic polyamines (DexAMs) and their application as a multicomponent delivery vehicle for translocating siRNA and anticancer drugs. The presence of β-cyclodextrins in our DexAMs facilitated complexation and intracellular uptake of hydrophobic anticancer drugs-Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and Erlotinib, whereas the cationic polyamine backbone allowed for electrostatic interaction with the negatively charged siRNA. The DexAMs complexes were found to have minimal cytotoxicity over a wide range of concentrations and were found to efficiently deliver siRNA, thereby silencing the expression of targeted genes. As a proof-of concept, we demonstrated that upon appropriate modification with targeting ligands, we were able to simultaneously deliver multiple payloads -siRNA against oncogenic receptor, EGFRvIII and anti-cancer drugs (SAHA or erlotinib) efficiently and selectively to glioblastoma cells. Co-delivery of siRNA-EGFRvIII and SAHA/Erlotinib in glioblastoma cells was found to significantly inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, as compared to the individual treatments. PMID:21793576

  18. Safe and targeted anticancer therapy for ovarian cancer using a novel class of curcumin analogs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A diagnosis of advanced ovarian cancer is the beginning of a long and arduous journey for a patient. Worldwide, approximately half of the individuals undergoing therapy for advanced cancer will succumb to the disease, or consequences of treatment. Well-known and widely-used chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin, paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin are toxic to both cancer and non-cancerous cells, and have debilitating side effects Therefore, development of new targeted anticancer therapies that can selectively kill cancer cells while sparing the surrounding healthy tissues is essential to develop more effective therapies. We have developed a new class of synthetic curcumin analogs, diarylidenyl-piperidones (DAPs), which have higher anticancer activity and enhanced bio-absorption than curcumin. The DAP backbone structure exhibits cytotoxic (anticancer) activity, whereas the N-hydroxypyrroline (-NOH) moiety found on some variants functions as a cellular- or tissue-specific modulator (antioxidant) of cytotoxicity. The anticancer activity of the DAPs has been evaluated using a number of ovarian cancer cell lines, and the safety has been evaluated in a number of non-cancerous cell lines. Both variations of the DAP compounds showed similar levels of cell death in ovarian cancer cells, however the compounds with the -NOH modification were less toxic to non-cancerous cells. The selective cytotoxicity of the DAP–NOH compounds suggests that they will be useful as safe and effective anticancer agents. This article reviews some of the key findings of our work with the DAP compounds, and compares this to some of the targeted therapies currently used in ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:23663277

  19. The Potential of Minipigs in the Development of Anticancer Therapeutics: Species Comparison and Examples of Special Applications.

    PubMed

    Mahl, Andreas; Dincer, Zuhal; Heining, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Minipigs are increasingly being used as an alternative to dog or monkey in nonclinical safety testing of pharmaceuticals since they share similar anatomical and physiological characteristics to humans. Integrative assessment of pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic data sets of drug candidates fromin silico,in vitro, andin vivoinvestigations form the basis for selecting the most relevant nonrodent species for toxicology studies. Developing anticancer therapeutics represents a special challenge for species selection due to their effects on multiple organ systems. The toxicological profile of anticancer drugs can be associated with steep dose-response curves, especially due to dose-limiting toxicity on the alimentary, hematopoietic, and immune systems. Selection of an appropriate species for toxicology studies is of importance to avoid an inappropriately low (without benefit for the late-stage cancer patient) or high clinical starting dose (with a risk of unexpected adverse reactions). Although the minipig has been the preferred species to develop drugs applied topically, it is only rarely used in anticancer drug development compared to dog and monkey. In this context, we discuss the potential of minipigs in anticancer drug development with examples of programs for oral and dermal administration, intravascular application in drug-eluting stents, and local chemotherapy (chemoembolization). PMID:26698323

  20. Interest of Tumor-Specific CD4 T Helper 1 Cells for Therapeutic Anticancer Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Galaine, Jeanne; Borg, Christophe; Godet, Yann; Adotévi, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, immunotherapy represents one promising approach for cancer treatment. Recently, spectacular results of cancer immunotherapy clinical trials have confirmed the crucial role of immune system in cancer regression. Therapeutic cancer vaccine represents one widely used immunotherapy strategy to stimulate tumor specific T cell responses but clinical impact remains disappointing in targeting CD8 T cells. Although CD8 T cells have been initially considered to be the main protagonists, it is now clear that CD4 T cells also play a critical role in antitumor response. In this article, we discuss the role of tumor antigen-specific CD4 T cell responses and how we can target these cells to improve cancer vaccines. PMID:26350591

  1. OLIGODEOXYNUCLEOTIDES AS ANTI-CANCER THERAPEUTICS AND DIAGNOSTICS | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute Laboratory of Experimental Immunology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize anti-cancer oligodeoxynucleotides.  

  2. sGC-cGMP signaling: target for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Bian, Ka; Murad, Ferid

    2014-01-01

    The biologic endogenous production of cGMP was reported in the 1960s and followed by the demonstration of guanylyl cyclase activity and the isoforms of soluble and membrane-bound guanylyl cyclases. During the same period, cGMP specific phosphodiesterases also was discovered. Murad's lab established link between the endothelium derived relaxation factor (EDRF) and elevated cGMP concentration in the vascular system. October 12, 1998, the Nobel Assembly awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology to scientists Robert Furchgott, Louis Ignarro, and Ferid Murad for their discoveries concerning nitric oxide (NO) as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. In contrast with the short research history of the enzymatic synthesis of NO, the introduction of nitrate-containing compounds for medicinal purposes marked its 150th anniversary in 1997. Glyceryl trinitrate (nitroglycerin; GTN) is the first compound of this category. Alfred Nobel (the founder of the Nobel Prize) himself had suffered from angina pectoris and was prescribed nitroglycerin for his chest pain while he refused to take due to the induction of headaches. Almost a century after its first chemical use, research in the nitric oxide and 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) pathway has dramatically expanded and the role of NO/cGMP in physiology and pathology has been extensively studied. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is the receptor for NO. The α1β1 heterodimer is the predominant isoform of sGC that is obligatory for catalytic activity. NO binds to the ferrous (Fe(2+)) heme at histidine 105 of the β1 subunit and leads to an increase in sGC activity and cGMP production of at least 200-fold. In this chapter, we reviewed the studies of sGC-cGMP signaling in cell proliferation; introduced our work of targeting sGC-cGMP signaling for cancer therapy; and explored the role of sGC-cGMP signaling in the chromatin-microenvironment. PMID:25015797

  3. NKG2D ligands as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Paul; Wu, Ming-Ru; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Sentman, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) receptor plays an important role in protecting the host from infections and cancer. By recognizing ligands induced on infected or tumor cells, NKG2D modulates lymphocyte activation and promotes immunity to eliminate ligand-expressing cells. Because these ligands are not widely expressed on healthy adult tissue, NKG2D ligands may present a useful target for immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer. Novel therapies targeting NKG2D ligands for the treatment of cancer have shown preclinical success and are poised to enter into clinical trials. In this review, the NKG2D receptor and its ligands are discussed in the context of cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. In addition, therapies targeting NKG2D ligands in cancer are also reviewed. PMID:23833565

  4. Therapeutic targeting of splicing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stanley Chun-Wei; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have highlighted that splicing patterns are frequently altered in cancer and that mutations in genes encoding spliceosomal proteins, as well as mutations affecting the splicing of key cancer-associated genes, are enriched in cancer. In parallel, there is also accumulating evidence that several molecular subtypes of cancer are highly dependent on splicing function for cell survival. These findings have resulted in a growing interest in targeting splicing catalysis, splicing regulatory proteins, and/or specific key altered splicing events in the treatment of cancer. Here we present strategies that exist and that are in development to target altered dependency on the spliceosome, as well as aberrant splicing, in cancer. These include drugs to target global splicing in cancer subtypes that are preferentially dependent on wild-type splicing for survival, methods to alter post-translational modifications of splicing-regulating proteins, and strategies to modulate pathologic splicing events and protein-RNA interactions in cancer. PMID:27603132

  5. Antibody therapeutics targeting ion channels: are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Han; Li, Min

    2013-01-01

    The combination of technological advances, genomic sequences and market success is catalyzing rapid development of antibody-based therapeutics. Cell surface receptors and ion channel proteins are well known drug targets, but the latter has seen less success. The availability of crystal structures, better understanding of gating biophysics and validation of physiological roles now form an excellent foundation to pursue antibody-based therapeutics targeting ion channels to treat a variety of diseases. PMID:23381110

  6. Therapeutic Strategies for Targeting Ras Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gysin, Stephan; Salt, Megan; Young, Amy; McCormick, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Ras genes are frequently activated in cancer. Attempts to develop drugs that target mutant Ras proteins have, so far, been unsuccessful. Tumors bearing these mutations, therefore, remain among the most difficult to treat. Most efforts to block activated Ras have focused on pathways downstream. Drugs that inhibit Raf kinase have shown clinical benefit in the treatment of malignant melanoma. However, these drugs have failed to show clinical benefit in Ras mutant tumors. It remains unclear to what extent Ras depends on Raf kinase for transforming activity, even though Raf proteins bind directly to Ras and are certainly major effectors of Ras action in normal cells and in development. Furthermore, Raf kinase inhibitors can lead to paradoxical activation of the MAPK pathway. MEK inhibitors block the Ras-MAPK pathway, but often activate the PI3’-kinase, and have shown little clinical benefit as single agents. This activation is mediated by EGF-R and other receptor tyrosine kinases through relief of a negative feedback loop from ERK. Drug combinations that target multiple points within the Ras signaling network are likely to be necessary to achieve substantial clinical benefit. Other effectors may also contribute to Ras signaling and provide a source of targets. In addition, unbiased screens for genes necessary for Ras transformation have revealed new potential targets and have added to our understanding of Ras cancer biology. PMID:21779505

  7. Therapeutic approaches to drug targets in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jamkhande, Prasad G; Chandak, Prakash G; Dhawale, Shashikant C; Barde, Sonal R; Tidke, Priti S; Sakhare, Ram S

    2014-07-01

    Non-communicable diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis and diabetes are responsible for major social and health burden as millions of people are dying every year. Out of which, atherosclerosis is the leading cause of deaths worldwide. The lipid abnormality is one of the major modifiable risk factors for atherosclerosis. Both genetic and environmental components are associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Immune and inflammatory mediators have a complex role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Understanding of all these processes will help to invent a range of new biomarkers and novel treatment modalities targeting various cellular events in acute and chronic inflammation that are accountable for atherosclerosis. Several biochemical pathways, receptors and enzymes are involved in the development of atherosclerosis that would be possible targets for improving strategies for disease diagnosis and management. Earlier anti-inflammatory or lipid-lowering treatments could be useful for alleviating morbidity and mortality of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. However, novel drug targets like endoglin receptor, PPARα, squalene synthase, thyroid hormone analogues, scavenger receptor and thyroid hormone analogues are more powerful to control the process of atherosclerosis. Therefore, the review briefly focuses on different novel targets that act at the starting stage of the plaque form to the thrombus formation in the atherosclerosis. PMID:25061401

  8. Therapeutic and predictive targets of AKI

    PubMed Central

    Yalavarthy, R.; Edelstein, C.L.

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a very common condition encountered in a hospital setting. AKI is an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality. In this review, we discuss in detail about the tubular, inflammatory and vascular molecular targets of AKI which may result in therapies to improve mortality and biomarkers for earlier diagnosis of AKI. PMID:19049701

  9. Alzheimer's disease: molecular concepts and therapeutic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassbender, K.; Masters, C.; Beyreuther, K.

    2001-06-01

    The beta amyloid peptide is the major component of the neuritic plaques, the characteristic lesions in Alzheimer's disease. Mutations in three genes (APP, PS-1, and PS-2) cause familial Alzheimer's disease by alteration of the rate of generation of amyloid peptide or the length of this peptide. However, in the 90% non-familial cases, other factors play a major pathogenetic role. These include the apolipoprotein E genotype, the "plaque-associated" proteins promoting the formation of toxic fibrillar aggregates or the chronic inflammatory responses. The aim of this review is to explain the steps in the complex cascade leading to Alzheimer's disease and, based on this, to report the current efforts to intervene in these different pathophysiological events in order to prevent progression of Alzheimer's disease. Whereas acetylcholine substitution is currently used in clinical practice, future therapeutical strategies to combat Alzheimer's disease may include anti-inflammatory treatments, vaccination against beta amyloid peptide, or treatment with cholesterol-lowering drugs.

  10. Dendritic cells as therapeutic targets in neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Lüssi, Felix; Zipp, Frauke; Witsch, Esther

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system characterized by infiltration of immune cells and progressive damage to myelin sheaths and neurons. There is still no cure for the disease, but drug regimens can reduce the frequency of relapses and slightly delay progression. Myeloid cells or antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as dendritic cells (DC), macrophages, and resident microglia, are key players in both mediating immune responses and inducing immune tolerance. Mounting evidence indicates a contribution of these myeloid cells to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and to the effects of treatment, the understanding of which might provide strategies for more potent novel therapeutic interventions. Here, we review recent insights into the role of APCs, with specific focus on DCs in the modulation of neuroinflammation in MS. PMID:26970979

  11. Mitochondrial ion channels as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Pablo M.; Ryu, Shin-Young; Kinnally, Kathleen W.

    2010-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial ion channels changed our perception of these double-wrapped organelles from being just the power house of a cell to the guardian of a cell's fate. Mitochondria communicate with the cell through these special channels. Most of the time, the message is encoded by ion flow across the mitochondrial outer and inner membranes. Potassium, sodium, calcium, protons, nucleotides, and proteins traverse the mitochondrial membranes in an exquisitely regulated manner to control a myriad of processes, from respiration and mitochondrial morphology to cell proliferation and cell death. This review is an update on both well established and putative mitochondrial channels regarding their composition, function, regulation, and therapeutic potential. PMID:20178788

  12. Autophagy: An Exposing Therapeutic Target in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yun; Lu, Shan; Zhou, Ping; Ai, Qi-Di; Sun, Gui-Bo; Sun, Xiao-Bo

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process whereby the cytoplasmic contents of a cell are sequestered within autophagosomes through a lysosome-dependent pathway. Increasing evidence shows that this process is of great importance in a wide range of diseases, including atherosclerosis (AS). Autophagy can be modulated in advanced AS plaques by cytokines, reactive lipids, lipopolysaccharides, advanced glycation end products, and microRNAs. Autophagy exerts both protective and detrimental functions in vascular disorders. However, despite an increasing interest in autophagy, it remains an underestimated and overlooked phenomenon in AS. Therefore, the precise role of autophagy and its relationship with apoptosis need to be described. This review highlights recent findings on the autophagy activities and signaling pathways in endothelial cells, macrophages, and smooth muscle cells that are accompanied by apoptosis in AS. We conclude with recent studies on autophagy modulation as a new therapeutic approach to treat AS. PMID:26580134

  13. Targeting PCSK9 for therapeutic gains.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Michael D; Fazio, Sergio; Tavori, Hagai

    2015-04-01

    Even though it is only a little over a decade from the discovery of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) as a plasma protein that associates with both hypercholesterolemia and low cholesterol syndromes, a rich literature has developed describing its unique physiology and the impact of antagonism of this molecule on cholesterol metabolism for therapeutic purposes. Indeed, the PCSK9 story is unfolding rapidly, with many answers and more questions. This review summarizes the most recent data from phase II/III clinical trials of PCSK9 inhibition with the three leading antibodies, highlights the clinical significance of the ongoing studies, and suggests future areas of investigation based on recent basic science discoveries on the physiology of PCSK9. PMID:25712137

  14. Novel therapeutic targets for erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Williams, Steve K; Melman, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a neurovascular phenomenon modulated by hormonal, local biochemical, and biomechanical/structural factors of the penis. The success of the orally active phosphodiesterase inhibitors for the treatment of ED has boosted research activities into the physiology of the erectile mechanism. Peripheral intracellular signal transduction in the penis as well as central brain and spinal cord pathways controlling penile erection have been investigated and are now better understood. The results of this ongoing research have provided the basis for the development and introduction of several novel therapeutic modalities into the management of ED. Many novel pharmacotherapeutic approaches under development including the use of melanocortins and Rho-kinase inhibitors as well as the introduction of gene therapy and tissue engineering have demonstrated efficacy in animal as well as early human trials. This review describes the major new and evolving pharmacological advances in the field of oral pharmacotherapy for the treatment of male ED. PMID:22154078

  15. The prince and the pauper. A tale of anticancer targeted agents

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas-González, Alfonso; García-López, Patricia; Herrera, Luis Alonso; Medina-Franco, Jose Luis; González-Fierro, Aurora; Candelaria, Myrna

    2008-01-01

    Cancer rates are set to increase at an alarming rate, from 10 million new cases globally in 2000 to 15 million in 2020. Regarding the pharmacological treatment of cancer, we currently are in the interphase of two treatment eras. The so-called pregenomic therapy which names the traditional cancer drugs, mainly cytotoxic drug types, and post-genomic era-type drugs referring to rationally-based designed. Although there are successful examples of this newer drug discovery approach, most target-specific agents only provide small gains in symptom control and/or survival, whereas others have consistently failed in the clinical testing. There is however, a characteristic shared by these agents: -their high cost-. This is expected as drug discovery and development is generally carried out within the commercial rather than the academic realm. Given the extraordinarily high therapeutic drug discovery-associated costs and risks, it is highly unlikely that any single public-sector research group will see a novel chemical "probe" become a "drug". An alternative drug development strategy is the exploitation of established drugs that have already been approved for treatment of non-cancerous diseases and whose cancer target has already been discovered. This strategy is also denominated drug repositioning, drug repurposing, or indication switch. Although traditionally development of these drugs was unlikely to be pursued by Big Pharma due to their limited commercial value, biopharmaceutical companies attempting to increase productivity at present are pursuing drug repositioning. More and more companies are scanning the existing pharmacopoeia for repositioning candidates, and the number of repositioning success stories is increasing. Here we provide noteworthy examples of known drugs whose potential anticancer activities have been highlighted, to encourage further research on these known drugs as a means to foster their translation into clinical trials utilizing the more limited

  16. The prince and the pauper. A tale of anticancer targeted agents.

    PubMed

    Dueñas-González, Alfonso; García-López, Patricia; Herrera, Luis Alonso; Medina-Franco, Jose Luis; González-Fierro, Aurora; Candelaria, Myrna

    2008-01-01

    Cancer rates are set to increase at an alarming rate, from 10 million new cases globally in 2000 to 15 million in 2020. Regarding the pharmacological treatment of cancer, we currently are in the interphase of two treatment eras. The so-called pregenomic therapy which names the traditional cancer drugs, mainly cytotoxic drug types, and post-genomic era-type drugs referring to rationally-based designed. Although there are successful examples of this newer drug discovery approach, most target-specific agents only provide small gains in symptom control and/or survival, whereas others have consistently failed in the clinical testing. There is however, a characteristic shared by these agents: -their high cost-. This is expected as drug discovery and development is generally carried out within the commercial rather than the academic realm. Given the extraordinarily high therapeutic drug discovery-associated costs and risks, it is highly unlikely that any single public-sector research group will see a novel chemical "probe" become a "drug". An alternative drug development strategy is the exploitation of established drugs that have already been approved for treatment of non-cancerous diseases and whose cancer target has already been discovered. This strategy is also denominated drug repositioning, drug repurposing, or indication switch. Although traditionally development of these drugs was unlikely to be pursued by Big Pharma due to their limited commercial value, biopharmaceutical companies attempting to increase productivity at present are pursuing drug repositioning. More and more companies are scanning the existing pharmacopoeia for repositioning candidates, and the number of repositioning success stories is increasing. Here we provide noteworthy examples of known drugs whose potential anticancer activities have been highlighted, to encourage further research on these known drugs as a means to foster their translation into clinical trials utilizing the more limited

  17. Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential for Targeting Human Brain Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etame, Arnold B.

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) remains a major challenge to the advancement and application of systemic anti-cancer therapeutics into the central nervous system. The structural and physiological delivery constraints of the BBB significantly limit the effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, thereby making systemic administration a non-viable option for the vast majority of chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, the lack of specificity of conventional systemic chemotherapy when applied towards malignant brain tumors remains a major shortcoming. Hence novel therapeutic strategies that focus both on targeted and enhanced delivery across the BBB are warranted. In recent years nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as attractive vehicles for efficient delivery of targeted anti-cancer therapeutics. In particular, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained prominence in several targeting applications involving systemic cancers. Their enhanced permeation and retention within permissive tumor microvasculature provide a selective advantage for targeting. Malignant brain tumors also exhibit transport-permissive microvasculature secondary to blood brain barrier disruption. Hence AuNPs may have potential relevance for brain tumor targeting. However, the permeation of AuNPs across the BBB has not been well characterized, and hence is a potential limitation for successful application of AuNP-based therapeutics within the central nervous system (CNS). In this dissertation, we designed and characterized AuNPs and assessed the role of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the physical and biological properties of AuNPs. We established a size-dependent permeation profile with respect to core size as well as PEG length when AuNPs were assessed through a transport-permissive in-vitro BBB. This study was the first of its kind to systematically examine the influence of design on permeation of AuNPs through transport-permissive BBB. Given the significant delivery limitations through the non

  18. Pathways and therapeutic targets in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Shtivelman, Emma; Davies, Michael Q A; Hwu, Patrick; Yang, James; Lotem, Michal; Oren, Moshe; Flaherty, Keith T; Fisher, David E

    2014-04-15

    This review aims to summarize the current knowledge of molecular pathways and their clinical relevance in melanoma. Metastatic melanoma was a grim diagnosis, but in recent years tremendous advances have been made in treatments. Chemotherapy provided little benefit in these patients, but development of targeted and new immune approaches made radical changes in prognosis. This would not have happened without remarkable advances in understanding the biology of disease and tremendous progress in the genomic (and other "omics") scale analyses of tumors. The big problems facing the field are no longer focused exclusively on the development of new treatment modalities, though this is a very busy area of clinical research. The focus shifted now to understanding and overcoming resistance to targeted therapies, and understanding the underlying causes of the heterogeneous responses to immune therapy. PMID:24743024

  19. Pathways and therapeutic targets in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Shtivelman, Emma; Davies, Michael A.; Hwu, Patrick; Yang, James; Lotem, Michal; Oren, Moshe; Flaherty, Keith T.; Fisher, David E.

    2014-01-01

    This review aims to summarize the current knowledge of molecular pathways and their clinical relevance in melanoma. Metastatic melanoma was a grim diagnosis, but in recent years tremendous advances have been made in treatments. Chemotherapy provided little benefit in these patients, but development of targeted and new immune approaches made radical changes in prognosis. This would not have happened without remarkable advances in understanding the biology of disease and tremendous progress in the genomic (and other “omics”) scale analyses of tumors. The big problems facing the field are no longer focused exclusively on the development of new treatment modalities, though this is a very busy area of clinical research. The focus shifted now to understanding and overcoming resistance to targeted therapies, and understanding the underlying causes of the heterogeneous responses to immune therapy. PMID:24743024

  20. Potential new therapeutic targets for pathological pruritus.

    PubMed

    Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Very few approved medications are indicated for the treatment of pruritus, and drug development for pruritic diseases is awaited. During the past two decades, progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of the physiology and pathophysiology of pruritus. Newly identified potential targets for pathological pruritus include receptors (histamine H4 receptor, leukotriene B4 receptors, interleukin-31 receptor A, bombesin BB2 receptor, toll-like receptor 3, α-adrenoceptor, and opioid μ- and κ-receptors), channels (transient receptor potential (TRP) V3 and TRPA1 channels), and enzymes (histidine decarboxylase, sphingomyelin glucosylceramide deacylase, 5-lipoxygenase, leukotriene A4 hydrolase, and autotaxin). The development of specific, effective blockers and agonists/antagonists of these targets is awaited. PMID:23902965

  1. [Dermatologic adverse events of the new targeted anticancer therapies used in oncodermatology].

    PubMed

    Sibaud, V; Delord, J-P; Chevreau, C; Gangloff, D; Garrido-Stowhas, I

    2012-04-01

    The management of oncology patients has been deeply modified over recent years by the development of new targeted anticancer therapies. Though these new therapies generally have a good safety profile, the skin is probably the organ most affected by their toxicity, in terms of frequency and symptom diversity. This review describes the most frequent cutaneous side effects induced by the new targeted therapies used in oncodermatology, whether they are well-established drugs such as EGF receptor inhibitors (cetuximab, erlotinib) or imatinib, or new treatments for metastatic melanoma such as selective BRAF (vemurafenib) or MEK inhibitors (selumetinib) and CTLA-4 monoclonal antibodies (ipilimumab). PMID:22425393

  2. Human Isoprenoid Synthase Enzymes as Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios; Berghuis, Albert; Tsantrizos, Youla

    2014-07-01

    The complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids in the human body, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently, pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies.

  3. Human isoprenoid synthase enzymes as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios N.; Berghuis, Albert M.; Tsantrizos, Youla S.

    2014-01-01

    In the human body, the complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins, and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP, and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies. PMID:25101260

  4. Targeting TRP Channels For Novel Migraine Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is increasingly understood to be a disorder of the brain. In susceptible individuals, a variety of “triggers” may influence altered central excitability, resulting in the activation and sensitization of trigeminal nociceptive afferents surrounding blood vessels (i.e., the trigeminovascular system), leading to migraine pain. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are expressed in a subset of dural afferents, including those containing calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). Activation of TRP channels promotes excitation of nociceptive afferent fibers and potentially lead to pain. In addition to pain, allodynia to mechanical and cold stimuli can result from sensitization of both peripheral afferents and of central pain pathways. TRP channels respond to a variety of endogenous conditions including chemical mediators and low pH. These channels can be activated by exogenous stimuli including a wide range of chemical and environmental irritants, some of which have been demonstrated to trigger migraine in humans. Activation of TRP channels can elicit CGRP release, and blocking the effects of CGRP through receptor antagonism or antibody strategies has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of migraine. Identification of approaches that can prevent activation of TRP channels provides an additional novel strategy for discovery of migraine therapeutics. PMID:25138211

  5. Enhancing cancer targeting and anticancer activity by a stimulus-sensitive multifunctional polymer-drug conjugate.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ying; Zhu, Lin

    2015-08-28

    Undesirable physicochemical properties, low tumor targeting, insufficient cell internalization, acquired drug resistance, and severe side effects significantly limit the applications of anticancer drugs. In this study, to improve the tumor targeting and drug efficacy of the poorly water-soluble drug, doxorubicin (DOX), a novel drug delivery platform (PEG-ppTAT-DOX) was developed, which contained a polyethylene glycol (PEG), a matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2)-sensitive peptide linker (pp), a cell penetrating peptide (TAT), and a model drug (doxorubicin). The prepared drug platform possessed several key features, including: (i) the nanoparticle formation via the self-assembly; (ii) prevention of the non-specific interaction via the PEGylation; (iii) tumor targeting via the MMP2-mediated PEG deshielding and exposure of the TAT; (iv) the TAT-mediated cell internalization; (v) the TAT-induced endosomal escape; (vi) the inhibition of P-glycoprotein mediated drug efflux; and (vii) the TAT-medicated nuclear translocation. These cooperative functions ensured the improved tumor targetability, enhanced tumor cell internalization, improved intracellular distribution, and potentiated anticancer activity. Compared to the multi-component nanocarriers, the proposed simple but multifunctional polymer-drug conjugate might have greater potential for tumor-targeted drug delivery and enhanced chemotherapy. PMID:26113423

  6. Advances in rheumatology: new targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tak, Paul P; Kalden, Joachim R

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of inflammatory arthritides - including rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis - has seen much progress in recent years, partially due to increased understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases at the cellular and molecular levels. These conditions share some common mechanisms. Biologic therapies have provided a clear advance in the treatment of rheumatological conditions. Currently available TNF-targeting biologic agents that are licensed for at east one of the above-named diseases are etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, and certolizumab. Biologic agents with a different mechanism of action have also been approved in rheumatoid arthritis (rituximab, abatacept, and tocilizumab). Although these biologic agents are highly effective, there is a need for improved management strategies. There is also a need for education of family physicians and other healthcare professionals in the identification of early symptoms of inflammatory arthritides and the importance of early referral to rheumatologists for diagnosis and treatment. Also, researchers are developing molecules - for example, the Janus kinase inhibitor CP-690550 (tofacitinib) and the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor R788 (fostamatinib) - to target other aspects of the inflammatory cascade. Initial trial results with new agents are promising, and, in time, head-to-head trials will establish the best treatment options for patients. The key challenge is identifying how best to integrate these new, advanced therapies into daily practice. PMID:21624184

  7. Mitochondrial Quality Control as a Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Suliman, Hagir B; Piantadosi, Claude A

    2016-01-01

    In addition to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), mitochondria perform other functions such as heme biosynthesis and oxygen sensing and mediate calcium homeostasis, cell growth, and cell death. They participate in cell communication and regulation of inflammation and are important considerations in aging, drug toxicity, and pathogenesis. The cell's capacity to maintain its mitochondria involves intramitochondrial processes, such as heme and protein turnover, and those involving entire organelles, such as fusion, fission, selective mitochondrial macroautophagy (mitophagy), and mitochondrial biogenesis. The integration of these processes exemplifies mitochondrial quality control (QC), which is also important in cellular disorders ranging from primary mitochondrial genetic diseases to those that involve mitochondria secondarily, such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, inflammatory, and metabolic syndromes. Consequently, mitochondrial biology represents a potentially useful, but relatively unexploited area of therapeutic innovation. In patients with genetic OXPHOS disorders, the largest group of inborn errors of metabolism, effective therapies, apart from symptomatic and nutritional measures, are largely lacking. Moreover, the genetic and biochemical heterogeneity of these states is remarkably similar to those of certain acquired diseases characterized by metabolic and oxidative stress and displaying wide variability. This biologic variability reflects cell-specific and repair processes that complicate rational pharmacological approaches to both primary and secondary mitochondrial disorders. However, emerging concepts of mitochondrial turnover and dynamics along with new mitochondrial disease models are providing opportunities to develop and evaluate mitochondrial QC-based therapies. The goals of such therapies extend beyond amelioration of energy insufficiency and tissue loss and entail cell repair, cell replacement, and the prevention of fibrosis. This review

  8. Transmembrane mucins as novel therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Constantinou, Pamela E; Danysh, Brian P; Dharmaraj, Neeraja; Carson, Daniel D

    2011-01-01

    Membrane-tethered mucin glycoproteins are abundantly expressed at the apical surfaces of simple epithelia, where they play important roles in lubricating and protecting tissues from pathogens and enzymatic attack. Notable examples of these mucins are MUC1, MUC4 and MUC16 (also known as cancer antigen 125). In adenocarcinomas, apical mucin restriction is lost and overall expression is often highly increased. High-level mucin expression protects tumors from killing by the host immune system, as well as by chemotherapeutic agents, and affords protection from apoptosis. Mucin expression can increase as the result of gene duplication and/or in response to hormones, cytokines and growth factors prevalent in the tumor milieu. Rises in the normally low levels of mucin fragments in serum have been used as markers of disease, such as tumor burden, for many years. Currently, several approaches are being examined that target mucins for immunization or nanomedicine using mucin-specific antibodies. PMID:22201009

  9. Potential therapeutic targets in obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Saboisky, Julian P; Chamberlin, Nancy L; Malhotra, Atul

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a disease of ever-increasing importance due to its association with multiple impairments and rising prevalence in an increasingly susceptible demographic. The syndrome is linked with loud snoring, disrupted sleep and observed apnoeas. Serious co-morbidities associated with OSA appear to be reversed by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment; however, CPAP is variably tolerated leaving many patients untreated and emphasising the need for alternative treatments. Virtually all OSA patients have airways that are anatomically vulnerable to collapse, but numerous pathophysiological factors underlie when and how OSA is manifested. This review describes how the complexity of OSA requires multiple treatment approaches that are individually targeted. This approach may take the form of more specific diagnoses in terms of the mechanisms underlying OSA as well as rational pharmacological treatment directed toward such disparate ends as arousal threshold and ventilatory control/chemosensitivity, and mechanical treatment in the form of surgery and augmentation of lung volumes. PMID:19530985

  10. Novel therapeutic targets in myeloma bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Webb, S L; Edwards, C M

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a neoplastic disorder of plasma cells characterized by clonal proliferation within the bone marrow. One of the major clinical features of multiple myeloma is the destructive osteolytic bone disease that occurs in the majority of patients. Myeloma bone disease is associated with increased osteoclast activity and suppression of osteoblastogenesis. Bisphosphonates have been the mainstay of treatment for many years; however, their use is limited by their inability to repair existing bone loss. Therefore, research into novel approaches for the treatment of myeloma bone disease is of the utmost importance. This review will discuss the current advances in our understanding of osteoclast stimulation and osteoblast suppression mechanisms in myeloma bone disease and the treatments that are under development to target this destructive and debilitating feature of myeloma. PMID:24750110

  11. Discoidin Domains as Emerging Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Villoutreix, Bruno O; Miteva, Maria A

    2016-08-01

    Discoidin (DS) domains are found in eukaryotic and prokaryotic extracellular and transmembrane multidomain proteins. These small domains play different functional roles and can interact with phospholipids, glycans, and proteins, including collagens. DS domain-containing proteins are often involved in cellular adhesion, migration, proliferation, and matrix-remodeling events, while some play a major role in blood coagulation. Mutations in DS domains have been associated with various disease conditions. This review provides an update on the structure, function, and modulation of the DS domains, with a special emphasis on two circulating blood coagulation cofactors, factor V and factor VIII, and the transmembrane neuropilin receptors that have been targeted for inhibition by biologics and small chemical compounds. PMID:27372370

  12. Targeting and Therapeutic Peptides in Nanomedicine for Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun Ji

    2016-01-01

    Peptides in atherosclerosis nanomedicine provide structural, targeting, and therapeutic functionality, and can assist in overcoming delivery barriers of traditional pharmaceuticals. Moreover, their inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability make them especially attractive as materials intended for use in vivo. In this review, an overview of nanoparticle-associated targeting and therapeutic peptides for atherosclerosis are provided, including peptides designed for cellular targets such as endothelial cells, monocytes, and macrophages as well as for plaque components such as collagen and fibrin. An emphasis is placed on recent advances in multimodal strategies and a discussion on current challenges and barriers for clinical applicability is presented. PMID:27022138

  13. Native functionality and therapeutic targeting of arenaviral glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Crispin, Max; Zeltina, Antra; Zitzmann, Nicole; Bowden, Thomas A

    2016-06-01

    Surface glycoproteins direct cellular targeting, attachment, and membrane fusion of arenaviruses and are the primary target for neutralizing antibodies. Despite significant conservation of the glycoprotein architecture across the arenavirus family, there is considerable variation in the molecular recognition mechanisms used during host cell entry. We review recent progress in dissecting these infection events and describe how arenaviral glycoproteins can be targeted by small-molecule antivirals, the natural immune response, and immunoglobulin-based therapeutics. Arenaviral glycoprotein-mediated assembly and infection pathways present numerous opportunities and challenges for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27104809

  14. Molecular pathways: novel approaches for improved therapeutic targeting of Hedgehog signaling in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Justilien, Verline; Fields, Alan P

    2015-02-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is critical for embryonic development. In adult tissues, Hh signaling is relatively quiescent with the exception of roles in tissue maintenance and repair. Aberrant activation of Hh signaling is implicated in multiple aspects of transformation, including the maintenance of the cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotype. Preclinical studies indicate that CSCs from many tumor types are sensitive to Hh pathway inhibition and that Hh-targeted therapeutics block many aspects of transformation attributed to CSCs, including drug resistance, relapse, and metastasis. However, to date, Hh inhibitors, specifically those targeting Smoothened [such as vismodegib, BMS-833923, saridegib (IPI-926), sonidegib/erismodegib (LDE225), PF-04449913, LY2940680, LEQ 506, and TAK-441], have demonstrated good efficacy as monotherapy in patients with basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma, but have shown limited activity in other tumor types. This lack of success is likely due to many factors, including a lack of patient stratification in early trials, cross-talk between Hh and other oncogenic signaling pathways that can modulate therapeutic response, and a limited knowledge of Hh pathway activation mechanisms in CSCs from most tumor types. Here, we discuss Hh signaling mechanisms in the context of human cancer, particularly in the maintenance of the CSC phenotype, and consider new therapeutic strategies that hold the potential to expand considerably the scope and therapeutic efficacy of Hh-directed anticancer therapy. PMID:25646180

  15. Reformulating Tylocrebrine in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeted Polymeric Nanoparticles Improves Its Therapeutic Index

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Several promising anticancer drug candidates have been sidelined owing to their poor physicochemical properties or unfavorable pharmacokinetics, resulting in high overall cost of drug discovery and development. Use of alternative formulation strategies that alleviate these issues can help advance new molecules to the clinic at a significantly lower cost. Tylocrebrine is a natural product with potent anticancer activity. Its clinical trial was discontinued following the discovery of severe central nervous system toxicities. To improve the safety and potency of tylocrebrine, we formulated the drug in polymeric nanoparticles targeted to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressed on several types of tumors. Through in vitro studies in different cancer cell lines, we found that EGFR targeted nanoparticles were significantly more effective in killing tumor cells than the free drug. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that encapsulation in nanoparticles resulted in lower brain penetration and enhanced tumor accumulation of the drug. Further, targeted nanoparticles were characterized by significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibitory activity in a mouse xenograft model of epidermoid cancer. These results suggest that the therapeutic index of drugs that were previously considered unusable could be significantly improved by reformulation. Application of novel formulation strategies to previously abandoned drugs provides an opportunity to advance new molecules to the clinic at a lower cost. This can significantly increase the repertoire of treatment options available to cancer patients. PMID:26065924

  16. Some Perspectives on Network Modeling in Therapeutic Target Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Reka; DasGupta, Bhaskar; Mobasheri, Nasim

    2013-01-01

    Drug target identification is of significant commercial interest to pharmaceutical companies, and there is a vast amount of research done related to the topic of therapeutic target identification. Interdisciplinary research in this area involves both the biological network community and the graph algorithms community. Key steps of a typical therapeutic target identification problem include synthesizing or inferring the complex network of interactions relevant to the disease, connecting this network to the disease-specific behavior, and predicting which components are key mediators of the behavior. All of these steps involve graph theoretical or graph algorithmic aspects. In this perspective, we provide modelling and algorithmic perspectives for therapeutic target identification and highlight a number of algorithmic advances, which have gotten relatively little attention so far, with the hope of strengthening the ties between these two research communities. PMID:25288898

  17. Is Estrogen a Therapeutic Target for Glaucoma?

    PubMed

    Dewundara, Samantha S; Wiggs, Janey L; Sullivan, David A; Pasquale, Louis R

    2016-01-01

    endothelial nitric oxide synthase, a gene receptive to estrogen regulation, are associated with glaucoma. The study concluded that increasing evidence suggests that lifetime exposure to estrogen may alter the pathogenesis of glaucoma. Estrogen exposure may have a neuroprotective effect on the progression of POAG but further studies need to confirm this finding. The role of sex-specific preventive and therapeutic treatment may be on the horizon. PMID:26959139

  18. Factor XI as a Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Gailani, David; Gruber, Andras

    2016-07-01

    Factor XIa is a plasma serine protease that contributes to thrombin generation primarily through proteolytic activation of factor IX. Traditionally considered part of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation, several lines of evidence now suggest that factor XIa serves as an interface between the vitamin-K-dependent thrombin generation mechanism and the proinflammatory kallikrein-kinin system, allowing the 2 systems to influence each other. Work with animal models and results from epidemiological surveys of human populations support a role for factor XIa in thromboembolic disease. These data and the clinical observation that deficiency of factor XI, the zymogen of factor XIa, produces a relatively mild bleeding disorder suggest that drugs targeting factor XI or XIa could produce an antithrombotic effect while leaving hemostasis largely intact. Results of a recent trial comparing antisense-induced factor XI reduction to standard-dose low molecular-weight heparin as prophylaxis for venous thrombosis during knee replacement are encouraging in this regard. Here, we discuss recent findings on the biochemistry, physiology, and pathology of factor XI as they relate to thromboembolic disease. PMID:27174099

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm: potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Garima; Rao, Saloni; Bansal, Ankiti; Dang, Shweta; Gupta, Sanjay; Gabrani, Reema

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative pathogen that has become an important cause of infection, especially in patients with compromised host defense mechanisms. It is frequently related to nosocomial infections such as pneumonia, urinary tract infections (UTIs) and bacteremia. The biofilm formed by the bacteria allows it to adhere to any surface, living or non-living and thus Pseudomonal infections can involve any part of the body. Further, the adaptive and genetic changes of the micro-organisms within the biofilm make them resistant to all known antimicrobial agents making the Pseudomonal infections complicated and life threatening. Pel, Psl and Alg operons present in P. aeruginosa are responsible for the biosynthesis of extracellular polysaccharide which plays an important role in cell-cell and cell-surface interactions during biofilm formation. Understanding the bacterial virulence which depends on a large number of cell-associated and extracellular factors is essential to know the potential drug targets for future studies. Current novel methods like small molecule based inhibitors, phytochemicals, bacteriophage therapy, photodynamic therapy, antimicrobial peptides, monoclonal antibodies and nanoparticles to curtail the biofilm formed by P. aeruginosa are being discussed in this review. PMID:24309094

  20. Phosphodiesterases as Therapeutic Targets for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among the elderly. In AD patients, memory loss is accompanied by the formation of beta-amyloid plaques and the appearance of tau in a pathological form. Given the lack of effective treatments for AD, the development of new management strategies for these patients is critical. The continued failure to find effective therapies using molecules aimed at addressing the anti-beta amyloid pathology has led researchers to focus on other non-amyloid-based approaches to restore memory function. Promising non-amyloid related candidate targets include phosphosdiesterases (PDEs), and indeed, Rolipram, a specific PDE4 inhibitor, was the first compound found to effectively restore cognitive deficits in animal models of AD. More recently, PDE5 inhibitors have also been shown to effectively restore memory function. Accordingly, inhibitors of other members of the PDE family may also improve memory performance in AD and non-AD animal models. Hence, in this review, we will summarize the data supporting the use of PDE inhibitors as cognitive enhancers and we will discuss the possible mechanisms of action underlying these effects. We shall also adopt a medicinal chemistry perspective that leads us to propose the most promising PDE candidates on the basis of inhibitor selectivity, brain distribution, and mechanism of action. PMID:23173065

  1. RANK as a therapeutic target in cancer.

    PubMed

    González-Suárez, Eva; Sanz-Moreno, Adrián

    2016-06-01

    The RANK signaling pathway has emerged as a new target in breast cancer as receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) and its receptor RANK mediate the pro-tumorigenic role of progesterone in the mammary gland. Thousands of cancer patients worldwide are already taking RANKL inhibitors for the management of bone metastasis, given the relevance of this pathway in osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. RANK signaling also has multiple divergent effects in immunity and inflammation, both in the generation of active immune responses and in the induction of tolerance: it is required for lymph node organogenesis, thymic medullary epithelial development and self-tolerance, and regulates activation of several immune cells and inflammatory processes. The RANK pathway interferes with mammary epithelial differentiation and mediates the major proliferative response of mammary epithelium to progesterone and progesterone-driven expansion of mammary stem cells; it also controls hair follicle and epidermal stem cell homeostasis, pointing to RANK as a key regulator of epithelial stemness. Here we revisit the main functions of RANK signaling in bone remodeling, immune cells and epithelial differentiation. We also discuss the mechanistic evidence that supports its pleiotropic effects on cancer: from bone metastasis to immune and cancer-cell-dependent effects. PMID:26749530

  2. Anticancer efficacy of the metabolic blocker 3-bromopyruvate: specific molecular targeting.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram; Kunjithapatham, Rani; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    The anticancer efficacy of the pyruvate analog 3-bromopyruvate has been demonstrated in multiple tumor models. The chief principle underlying the antitumor effects of 3-bromopyruvate is its ability to effectively target the energy metabolism of cancer cells. Biochemically, the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) has been identified as the primary target of 3-bromopyruvate. Its inhibition results in the depletion of intracellular ATP, causing cell death. Several reports have also demonstrated that in addition to GAPDH inhibition, the induction of cellular stress also contributes to 3-bromopyruvate treatment-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, recent evidence shows that 3-bromopyruvate is taken up selectively by tumor cells via the monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) that are frequently overexpressed in cancer cells (for the export of lactate produced during aerobic glycolysis). The preferential uptake of 3-bromopyruvate via MCTs facilitates selective targeting of tumor cells while leaving healthy and non-malignant tissue untouched. Taken together, the specificity of molecular (GAPDH) targeting and selective uptake by tumor cells, underscore the potential of 3-bromopyruvate as a potent and promising anticancer agent. In this review, we highlight the mechanistic characteristics of 3-bromopyruvate and discuss its potential for translation into the clinic. PMID:23267123

  3. Non-Coding RNAs as Therapeutic Targets in Hepatocellular Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Braconi, Chiara; Patel, Tushar

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignancy that affects a large number of patients worldwide, with an increasing incidence in the United States and Europe. The therapies that are currently available for patients with inoperable HCC have limited benefits. Although molecular targeted therapies against selected cell signaling pathways have shown some promising results, their impact has been minimal. There is a need to identify and explore other targets for the development of novel therapeutics. Several non-protein coding RNAs (ncRNA) have recently been implicated in hepatocarcinogenesis and tumor progression. These ncRNA genes represent promising targets for cancer. However, therapeutic targeting of ncRNA genes has not been employed for HCC. The use of antisense oligonucleotides and viral vector delivery approaches has been shown to be feasible approaches to modulate ncRNA expression. HCC is an optimal cancer to evaluate novel RNA based therapeutic approaches because of the potential of effective delivery and uptake of therapeutic agents to the liver. In this review, we discuss selected ncRNA that could function as potential targets in HCC treatment and outline approaches to target ncRNA expression. Future challenges include the need to achieve site-specific targeting with acceptable safety and efficacy. PMID:22873215

  4. Non-coding RNAs as therapeutic targets in hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Braconi, Chiara; Patel, Tushar

    2012-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignancy that affects a large number of patients worldwide, with an increasing incidence in the United States and Europe. The therapies that are currently available for patients with inoperable HCC have limited benefits. Although molecular targeted therapies against selected cell signaling pathways have shown some promising results, their impact has been minimal. There is a need to identify and explore other targets for the development of novel therapeutics. Several non-protein coding RNAs (ncRNA) have recently been implicated in hepatocarcinogenesis and tumor progression. These ncRNA genes represent promising targets for cancer. However, therapeutic targeting of ncRNA genes has not been employed for HCC. The use of antisense oligonucleotides and viral vector delivery approaches have been shown to be feasible approaches to modulate ncRNA expression. HCC is an optimal cancer to evaluate novel RNA based therapeutic approaches because of the potential of effective delivery and uptake of therapeutic agents to the liver. In this review, we discuss selected ncRNA that could function as potential targets in HCC treatment and outline approaches to target ncRNA expression. Future challenges include the need to achieve site-specific targeting with acceptable safety and efficacy. PMID:22873215

  5. Cholera: pathophysiology and emerging therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2013-05-01

    Cholera is a diarrheal disease that remains an important global health problem with several hundreds of thousands of reported cases each year. This disease is caused by intestinal infection with Vibrio cholerae, which is a highly motile gram-negative bacterium with a single-sheathed flagellum. In the course of cholera pathogenesis, V. cholerae expresses a transcriptional activator ToxT, which subsequently transactivates expressions of two crucial virulence factors: toxin-coregulated pilus and cholera toxin (CT). These factors are responsible for intestinal colonization of V. cholerae and induction of fluid secretion, respectively. In intestinal epithelial cells, CT binds to GM1 ganglioside receptors on the apical membrane and undergoes retrograde vesicular trafficking to endoplasmic reticulum, where it exploits endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation systems to release a catalytic A1 subunit of CT (CT A1) into cytoplasm. CT A1, in turn, catalyzes ADP ribosylation of α subunits of stimulatory G proteins, leading to a persistent activation of adenylate cyclase and an elevation of intracellular cAMP. Increased intracellular cAMP in human intestinal epithelial cells accounts for pathogenesis of profuse diarrhea and severe fluid loss in cholera. This review provides an overview of the pathophysiology of cholera diarrhea and discusses emerging drug targets for cholera, which include V. cholerae virulence factors, V. cholerae motility, CT binding to GM1 receptor, CT internalization and intoxication, as well as cAMP metabolism and transport proteins involved in cAMP-activated Cl(-) secretion. Future directions and perspectives of research on drug discovery and development for cholera are discussed. PMID:23651092

  6. RNA therapeutics targeting osteoclast-mediated excessive bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuwei; Grainger, David W

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific post-transcriptional gene silencing technique developed with dramatically increasing utility for both scientific and therapeutic purposes. Short interfering RNA (siRNA) is currently exploited to regulate protein expression relevant to many therapeutic applications, and commonly used as a tool for elucidating disease-associated genes. Osteoporosis and their associated osteoporotic fragility fractures in both men and women are rapidly becoming a global healthcare crisis as average life expectancy increases worldwide. New therapeutics are needed for this increasing patient population. This review describes the diversity of molecular targets suitable for RNAi-based gene knock-down in osteoclasts to control osteoclast-mediated excessive bone resorption. We identify strategies for developing targeted siRNA delivery and efficient gene silencing, and describe opportunities and challenges of introducing siRNA as a therapeutic approach to hard and connective tissue disorders. PMID:21945356

  7. Targeting Notch degradation system provides promise for breast cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Shen, Jia-Xin; Wen, Xiao-Fen; Guo, Yu-Xian; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Notch receptor signaling pathways play an important role, not only in normal breast development but also in breast cancer development and progression. As a group of ligand-induced proteins, different subtypes of mammalian Notch (Notch1-4) are sensitive to subtle changes in protein levels. Thus, a clear understanding of mechanisms of Notch protein turnover is essential for understanding normal and pathological mechanisms of Notch functions. It has been suggested that there is a close relationship between the carcinogenesis and the dysregulation of Notch degradation. However, this relationship remains mostly undefined in the context of breast cancer, as protein degradation is mediated by numerous signaling pathways as well as certain molecule modulators (activators/inhibitors). In this review, we summarize the published data regarding the regulation of Notch family member degradation in breast cancer, while emphasizing areas that are likely to provide new therapeutic modalities for mechanism-based anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27263934

  8. Autoimmune therapies targeting costimulation and emerging trends in multivalent therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chittasupho, Chuda; Siahaan, Teruna J; Vines, Charlotte M; Berkland, Cory

    2011-01-01

    Proteins participating in immunological signaling have emerged as important targets for controlling the immune response. A multitude of receptor–ligand pairs that regulate signaling pathways of the immune response have been identified. In the complex milieu of immune signaling, therapeutic agents targeting mediators of cellular signaling often either activate an inflammatory immune response or induce tolerance. This review is primarily focused on therapeutics that inhibit the inflammatory immune response by targeting membrane-bound proteins regulating costimulation or mediating immune-cell adhesion. Many of these signals participate in larger, organized structures such as the immunological synapse. Receptor clustering and arrangement into organized structures is also reviewed and emerging trends implicating a potential role for multivalent therapeutics is posited. PMID:21984960

  9. Advances in sarcoma genomics and new therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Barry S.; Barretina, Jordi; Maki, Robert G.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Singer, Samuel; Ladanyi, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Preface Increasingly, human mesenchymal malignancies are classified by the abnormalities that drive their pathogenesis. While many of these aberrations are highly prevalent within particular sarcoma subtypes, few are currently targeted therapeutically. Indeed, most subtypes of sarcoma are still treated with traditional therapeutic modalities and in many cases are resistant to adjuvant therapies. In this Review, we discuss the core molecular determinants of sarcomagenesis and emphasize the emerging genomic and functional genetic approaches that, coupled to novel therapeutic strategies, have the potential to transform the care of patients with sarcoma. PMID:21753790

  10. Tracking of Multimodal Therapeutic Nanocomplexes Targeting Breast Cancer in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Rizia; Chen, Wenxue; Bartels, Marc; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Botero, Maria F.; McAninch, Robin Ward; Contreras, Alejandro; Schiff, Rachel; Pautler, Robia G.; Halas, Naomi J.; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutics with local delivery and external electromagnetic field modulation holds extraordinary promise for soft-tissue cancers such as breast cancer; however, knowledge of the distribution and fate of nanoparticles in vivo is crucial for clinical translation. Here we demonstrate that multiple diagnostic capabilities can be introduced in photothermal therapeutic nanocomplexes by simultaneously enhancing both near-infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We track nanocomplexes in vivo, examining the influence of HER2 antibody targeting on nanocomplex distribution over 72 h. This approach provides valuable, detailed information regarding the distribution and fate of complex nanoparticles designed for specific diagnostic and therapeutic functions. PMID:21090693

  11. Synthesis, anti-cancer evaluation of benzenesulfonamide derivatives as potent tubulin-targeting agents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Yang, Simin; Zhou, Shanshan; Lu, Dongbo; Ji, Liyan; Li, Zhongjun; Yu, Siwang; Meng, Xiangbao

    2016-10-21

    A series of benzenesulfonamide derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their anti-proliferative activity and interaction with tubulin. These new derivatives showed significant activities against cellular proliferative and tubulin polymerization. Compound BA-3b proved to be the most potent compound with IC50 value ranging from 0.007 to 0.036 μM against seven cancer cell lines, and three drug-resistant cancer cell lines, which indicated a promising anti-cancer agent. The target tubulin was also verified by dynamic tubulin polymerization assay and tubulin intensity assay. PMID:27423028

  12. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore as a selective target for anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Dong H.; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Hee S.; Chung, Hyun H.; Song, Yong S.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) is the ultimate step in dozens of lethal apoptotic signal transduction pathways which converge on mitochondria. One of the representative systems proposed to be responsible for the MOMP is the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). Although the molecular composition of the MPTP is not clearly understood, the MPTP attracts much interest as a promising target for resolving two conundrums regarding cancer treatment: tumor selectivity and resistance to treatment. The regulation of the MPTP is closely related to metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells including mitochondrial alterations. Restoration of deregulated apoptotic machinery in cancer cells by tumor-specific modulation of the MPTP could therefore be a promising anti-cancer strategy. Currently, a number of MPTP-targeting agents are under pre-clinical and clinical studies. Here, we reviewed the structure and regulation of the MPTP as well as the current status of the development of promising MPTP-targeting drugs. PMID:23483560

  13. Lipid A as a Drug Target and Therapeutic Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Sang Hoon

    2015-01-01

    In this review, lipid A, from its discovery to recent findings, is presented as a drug target and therapeutic molecule. First, the biosynthetic pathway for lipid A, the Raetz pathway, serves as a good drug target for antibiotic development. Several assay methods used to screen for inhibitors of lipid A synthesis will be presented, and some of the promising lead compounds will be described. Second, utilization of lipid A biosynthetic pathways by various bacterial species can generate modified lipid A molecules with therapeutic value. PMID:26535075

  14. Network Pharmacology Strategies Toward Multi-Target Anticancer Therapies: From Computational Models to Experimental Design Principles

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Aittokallio, Tero

    2014-01-01

    Polypharmacology has emerged as novel means in drug discovery for improving treatment response in clinical use. However, to really capitalize on the polypharmacological effects of drugs, there is a critical need to better model and understand how the complex interactions between drugs and their cellular targets contribute to drug efficacy and possible side effects. Network graphs provide a convenient modeling framework for dealing with the fact that most drugs act on cellular systems through targeting multiple proteins both through on-target and off-target binding. Network pharmacology models aim at addressing questions such as how and where in the disease network should one target to inhibit disease phenotypes, such as cancer growth, ideally leading to therapies that are less vulnerable to drug resistance and side effects by means of attacking the disease network at the systems level through synergistic and synthetic lethal interactions. Since the exponentially increasing number of potential drug target combinations makes pure experimental approach quickly unfeasible, this review depicts a number of computational models and algorithms that can effectively reduce the search space for determining the most promising combinations for experimental evaluation. Such computational-experimental strategies are geared toward realizing the full potential of multi-target treatments in different disease phenotypes. Our specific focus is on system-level network approaches to polypharmacology designs in anticancer drug discovery, where we give representative examples of how network-centric modeling may offer systematic strategies toward better understanding and even predicting the phenotypic responses to multi-target therapies.

  15. Classical and Targeted Anticancer Drugs: An Appraisal of Mechanisms of Multidrug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Baguley, Bruce C

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which tumor cells resist the action of multiple anticancer drugs, often with widely different chemical structures, have been pursued for more than 30 years. The identification of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a drug efflux transporter protein with affinity for multiple therapeutic drugs, provided an important potential mechanism and further work, which identified other members of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family that act as drug transporters. Several observations, including results of clinical trials with pharmacological inhibitors of P-gp, have suggested that mechanisms other than efflux transporters should be considered as contributors to resistance, and in this review mechanisms of anticancer drug resistance are considered more broadly. Cells in human tumors exist is a state of continuous turnover, allowing ongoing selection and "survival of the fittest." Tumor cells die not only as a consequence of drug therapy but also by apoptosis induced by their microenvironment. Cell death can be mediated by host immune mechanisms and by nonimmune cells acting on so-called death receptors. The tumor cell proliferation rate is also important because it controls tumor regeneration. Resistance to therapy might therefore be considered to arise from a reduction of several distinct cell death mechanisms, as well as from an increased ability to regenerate. This review provides a perspective on these mechanisms, together with brief descriptions of some of the methods that can be used to investigate them in a clinical situation. PMID:26910066

  16. The disulfide compound α-lipoic acid and its derivatives: A novel class of anticancer agents targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Dörsam, Bastian; Fahrer, Jörg

    2016-02-01

    The endogenous disulfide α-lipoic acid (LA) is an essential mitochondrial co-factor. In addition, LA and its reduced counterpart dihydro lipoic acid form a potent redox couple with antioxidative functions, for which it is used as dietary supplement and therapeutic. Recently, it has gained attention due to its cytotoxic effects in cancer cells, which is the key aspect of this review. We initially recapitulate the dietary occurrence, gastrointestinal absorption and pharmacokinetics of LA, illustrating its diverse antioxidative mechanisms. We then focus on its mode of action in cancer cells, in which it triggers primarily the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, whereas non-transformed primary cells are hardly affected. Furthermore, LA impairs oncogenic signaling and displays anti-metastatic potential. Novel LA derivatives such as CPI-613, which target mitochondrial energy metabolism, are described and recent pre-clinical studies are presented, which demonstrate that LA and its derivatives exert antitumor activity in vivo. Finally, we highlight clinical studies currently performed with the LA analog CPI-613. In summary, LA and its derivatives are promising candidates to complement the arsenal of established anticancer drugs due to their mitochondria-targeted mode of action and non-genotoxic properties. PMID:26604131

  17. New therapeutic targets in rare genetic skeletal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Michael D; Bell, Peter A; Wright, Michael J; Pirog, Katarzyna A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Genetic skeletal diseases (GSDs) are a diverse and complex group of rare genetic conditions that affect the development and homeostasis of the skeleton. Although individually rare, as a group of related diseases, GSDs have an overall prevalence of at least 1 per 4,000 children. There are currently very few specific therapeutic interventions to prevent, halt or modify skeletal disease progression and therefore the generation of new and effective treatments requires novel and innovative research that can identify tractable therapeutic targets and biomarkers of these diseases. Areas covered: Remarkable progress has been made in identifying the genetic basis of the majority of GSDs and in developing relevant model systems that have delivered new knowledge on disease mechanisms and are now starting to identify novel therapeutic targets. This review will provide an overview of disease mechanisms that are shared amongst groups of different GSDs and describe potential therapeutic approaches that are under investigation. Expert opinion: The extensive clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity of GSDs renders this broad group of rare diseases a bench to bedside challenge. However, the evolving hypothesis that clinically different diseases might share common disease mechanisms is a powerful concept that will generate critical mass for the identification and validation of novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers. PMID:26635999

  18. Advances in the molecular design of potential anticancer agents via targeting of human telomeric DNA.

    PubMed

    Maji, Basudeb; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-06-21

    Telomerases are an attractive drug target to develop new generation drugs against cancer. A telomere appears from the chromosomal termini and protects it from double-stranded DNA degradation. A short telomere promotes genomic instability, like end-to-end fusion and regulates the over-expression of the telomere repairing enzyme, telomerase. The telomerase maintains the telomere length, which may lead to genetically abnormal situations, leading to cancer. Thus, the design and synthesis of an efficient telomerase inhibitor is a viable strategy toward anticancer drugs development. Accordingly, small molecule induced stabilization of the G-quadruplex structure, formed by the human telomeric DNA, is an area of contemporary scientific art. Several such compounds efficiently stabilize the G-quadruplex forms of nucleic acids, which often leads to telomerase inhibition. This Feature article presents the discovery and development of the telomere structure, function and evolution in telomere targeted anticancer drug design and incorporates the recent advances in this area, in addition to discussing the advantages and disadvantages in the methods, and prospects for the future. PMID:24695755

  19. Dysregulation of protein methyltransferases in human cancer: An emerging target class for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Ryuji; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2016-04-01

    Protein methylation is one of the important post-translational modifications. Although its biological and physiological functions were unknown for a long time, we and others have characterized a number of protein methyltransferases, which have unveiled the critical functions of protein methylation in various cellular processes, in particular, in epigenetic regulation. In addition, it had been believed that protein methylation is an irreversible phenomenon, but through identification of a variety of protein demethylases, protein methylation is now considered to be dynamically regulated similar to protein phosphorylation. A large amount of evidence indicated that protein methylation has a pivotal role in post-translational modification of histone proteins as well as non-histone proteins and is involved in various processes of cancer development and progression. As dysregulation of this modification has been observed frequently in various types of cancer, small-molecule inhibitors targeting protein methyltransferases and demethylases have been actively developed as anticancer drugs; clinical trials for some of these drugs have already begun. In this review, we discuss the biological and physiological importance of protein methylation in human cancer, especially focusing on the significance of protein methyltransferases as emerging targets for anticancer therapy. PMID:26751963

  20. Elements toward novel therapeutic targeting of the adrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Ghanemi, Abdelaziz; Hu, Xintian

    2015-02-01

    Adrenergic receptors belong to the family of the G protein coupled receptors that represent important targets in the modern pharmacotherapies. Studies on different physiological and pathophysiological properties of the adrenergic system have led to novel evidences and theories that suggest novel possible targeting of such system in a variety of pathologies and disorders, even beyond the classical known therapeutic possibilities. Herein, those advances have been illustrated with selected concepts and different examples. Furthermore, we illustrated the applications and the therapeutic implications that such findings and advances might have in the contexts of experimental pharmacology, therapeutics and clinic. We hope that the content of this work will guide researches devoted to the adrenergic aspects that combine neurosciences with pharmacology. PMID:25481798

  1. Current progress on aptamer-targeted oligonucleotide therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Dassie, Justin P; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2014-01-01

    Exploiting the power of the RNAi pathway through the use of therapeutic siRNA drugs has remarkable potential for treating a vast array of human disease conditions. However, difficulties in delivery of these and similar nucleic acid-based pharmacological agents to appropriate organs or tissues, remains a major impediment to their broad clinical application. Synthetic nucleic acid ligands (aptamers) have emerged as effective delivery vehicles for therapeutic oligonucleotides, including siRNAs. In this review, we summarize recent attractive developments in creatively employing cell-internalizing aptamers to deliver therapeutic oligonucleotides (e.g., siRNAs, miRNAs, anti-miRs and antisense oligos) to target cells. We also discuss advancements in aptamer-siRNA chimera technology, as well as, aptamer-functionalized nanoparticles for siRNA delivery. In addition, the challenges and future prospects of aptamer-targeted oligonucleotide drugs for clinical translation are further highlighted. PMID:24304250

  2. Chromatin-modifying enzymes as therapeutic targets – Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Keppler, Brian R; Archer, Trevor K

    2009-01-01

    Background Part 1 of this review described the importance of histone acetylases, deacetylases, methylases and demethylases in transcriptional control and their potential as therapeutic targets. However, precise gene regulation requires the involvement of more than just the addition or removal of acetyl and methyl groups on histones. Histone phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, SUMOylation and poly-ADP-ribosylation, as well as ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling complexes, play equally pivotal roles in the maintenance of transcriptional fidelity. Accordingly, the enzymes responsible for these modifications are also misregulated in various disease states. Objective To review the complex roles of chromatin-modifying enzymes in gene regulation and to highlight their potential as therapeutic targets. Methods This review is based on recent published literature and online resources. Results/conclusion In this second and final part of the review, we discuss the importance of these other histone and nucleosome modifying enzymes in gene transcription as well as their therapeutic potential. PMID:18851700

  3. Dual targeting of heat shock proteins 90 and 70 promotes cell death and enhances the anticancer effect of chemotherapeutic agents in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Sato, Fuminori; Sato, Ryuta; Matsubara, Takanori; Hirai, Kenichi; Yamasaki, Mutsushi; Shin, Toshitaka; Shimada, Tatsuo; Nomura, Takeo; Mori, Kenichi; Sumino, Yasuhiro; Mimata, Hiromitsu

    2014-06-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are molecular chaperones that stabilize numerous vital proteins, may be attractive targets for cancer therapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible anticancer effect of single or dual targeting of HSP90 and HSP70 and the combination treatment with HSP inhibitors and chemotherapeutic agents in bladder cancer cells. The expression of HSP90 and the anticancer effect of the HSP90 inhibitor 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) coupled with cisplatin, docetaxel, or gemcitabine were examined using immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, cell growth, flow cytometry, immunoblots and caspase-3/7 assays. The expression of HSP70 under HSP90 inhibition and the additive effect of HSP70 inhibitor pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ) were examined by the same assays and transmission electron microscopy. HSP90 was highly expressed in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. 17-AAG enhanced the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of each chemotherapeutic agent. 17-AAG also suppressed Akt activity but induced the upregulation of HSP70. PFT-μ enhanced the effect of 17-AAG or chemotherapeutic agents; the triple combination of 17-AAG, PFT-μ and a chemotherapeutic agent showed the most significant anticancer effect on the T24 cell line. The combination of 17-AAG and PFT-μ markedly suppressed Akt and Bad activities. With HSP90 suppression, HSP70 overexpression possibly contributes to the avoidance of cell death and HSP70 may be a key molecule for overcoming resistance to the HSP90 inhibitor. The dual targeting of these two chaperones and the combination with conventional anticancer drugs could be a promising therapeutic option for patients with advanced bladder cancer. PMID:24718854

  4. Dual targeting of heat shock proteins 90 and 70 promotes cell death and enhances the anticancer effect of chemotherapeutic agents in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    MA, LIANG; SATO, FUMINORI; SATO, RYUTA; MATSUBARA, TAKANORI; HIRAI, KENICHI; YAMASAKI, MUTSUSHI; SHIN, TOSHITAKA; SHIMADA, TATSUO; NOMURA, TAKEO; MORI, KENICHI; SUMINO, YASUHIRO; MIMATA, HIROMITSU

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are molecular chaperones that stabilize numerous vital proteins, may be attractive targets for cancer therapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible anticancer effect of single or dual targeting of HSP90 and HSP70 and the combination treatment with HSP inhibitors and chemotherapeutic agents in bladder cancer cells. The expression of HSP90 and the anticancer effect of the HSP90 inhibitor 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) coupled with cisplatin, docetaxel, or gemcitabine were examined using immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, cell growth, flow cytometry, immunoblots and caspase-3/7 assays. The expression of HSP70 under HSP90 inhibition and the additive effect of HSP70 inhibitor pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ) were examined by the same assays and transmission electron microscopy. HSP90 was highly expressed in bladder cancer tissues and cell lines. 17-AAG enhanced the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of each chemotherapeutic agent. 17-AAG also suppressed Akt activity but induced the upregulation of HSP70. PFT-μ enhanced the effect of 17-AAG or chemotherapeutic agents; the triple combination of 17-AAG, PFT-μ and a chemotherapeutic agent showed the most significant anticancer effect on the T24 cell line. The combination of 17-AAG and PFT-μ markedly suppressed Akt and Bad activities. With HSP90 suppression, HSP70 overexpression possibly contributes to the avoidance of cell death and HSP70 may be a key molecule for overcoming resistance to the HSP90 inhibitor. The dual targeting of these two chaperones and the combination with conventional anticancer drugs could be a promising therapeutic option for patients with advanced bladder cancer. PMID:24718854

  5. gp130 receptor ligands as potential therapeutic targets for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Febbraio, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Obesity and its related cluster of pathophysiologic conditions including insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension are recognized as growing threats to world health. It is now estimated that 10% of the world’s population is overweight or obese. As a result, new therapeutic options for the treatment of obesity are clearly warranted. Recent research has focused on the role that gp130 receptor ligands may play as potential therapeutic targets in obesity. One cytokine in particular, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), acts both centrally and peripherally and mimics the biologic actions of the appetite control hormone leptin, but unlike leptin, CNTF appears to be effective in obesity and as such may have therapeutic potential. In addition, CNTF suppresses inflammatory signaling cascades associated with lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle. This review examines the potential role of gp130 receptor ligands as part of a therapeutic strategy to treat obesity. PMID:17404609

  6. AMPA Receptors as Therapeutic Targets for Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin; Goodman, Lucy; Fourie, Chantelle; Schenk, Susan; Leitch, Beulah; Montgomery, Johanna M

    2016-01-01

    Almost every neurological disease directly or indirectly affects synapse function in the brain. However, these diseases alter synapses through different mechanisms, ultimately resulting in altered synaptic transmission and/or plasticity. Glutamate is the major neurotransmitter that mediates excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain through activation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptors. These receptors have therefore been identified as a target for the development of therapeutic treatments for neurological disorders including epilepsy, neurodegenerative diseases, autism, and drug addiction. The fact that AMPA receptors play a dominant role throughout the brain raises the significant challenge of selectively targeting only those regions affected by disease, and clinical trials have raised doubt regarding the feasibility of specifically targeting AMPA receptors for new therapeutic options. Benzamide compounds that act as positive allosteric AMPA receptor modulators, known as AMPAkines, can act on specific brain regions and were initially proposed to revolutionize the treatment of cognitive deficits associated with neurological disorders. Their therapeutic potential has since declined due to inconsistent results in clinical trials. However, recent advances in basic biomedical research are significantly increasing our knowledge of AMPA receptor structure, binding sites, and interactions with auxiliary proteins. In particular, the large complex of postsynaptic proteins that interact with AMPA receptor subunits have been shown to control AMPA receptor insertion, location, pharmacology, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. These proteins are now being considered as alternative therapeutic target sites for modulating AMPA receptors in neurological disorders. PMID:26920691

  7. Special issue: Proteoglycans: signaling, targeting and therapeutics: introduction.

    PubMed

    Karamanos, Nikos K; Linhardt, Robert J

    2013-05-01

    This special issue of FEBS Journal contains 31 review and primary research articles reflecting the advancements covered at the 2012 Proteoglycans Gordon Research Conference and novel aspects from experts in the field. It is mainly focused on current status of the extracellular and cell surface proteoglycans' regulatory roles in cell signaling, molecular targeting, engineering attempts and potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:23530537

  8. Formulation and dosage of therapeutic nanosuspension for active targeting of docetaxel (WO 2014210485A1).

    PubMed

    Pooja, Deep; Kulhari, Hitesh; Adams, David J; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2016-07-01

    Non-specificity and drug resistance are two major limitations of all chemotherapeutic agents. Ligand-conjugated nanomedicine is the most versatile approach for targeted cancer therapy. Attaching a targeting ligand to the nanoparticle surface increases drug concentration at the desired sites, decreases the dose needed and lessens side effects. The subject of this patent evaluation describes the preparation of a therapeutic nanosuspension of an anticancer drug, docetaxel (DTX). The nanoparticle matrix comprised a polylactic acid-polyethylene glycol block copolymer (PLA-PEG). The nanoparticles were actively directed towards prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) over-expressing cancer cells using a targeting ligand S,S-2-{3-[1-carboxy-5-amino-pentyl-]ureido}-pantanedioic acid (GL2). The dose-limiting toxicity and maximum tolerated dose were determined for GL2-conjugated and DTX-loaded polymeric nanosuspensions. The efficacy of nanosuspensions was evaluated in people with various cancer types. The investigators claim the method of preparation of therapeutic nanosuspension, optimized composition of the formulation and dosage regimen for the clinical studies to effectively treat gastroesophageal and breast cancers. PMID:27088623

  9. Activation of sphingosine kinase-1 in cancer: implications for therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier; Ader, Isabelle; Bouquerel, Pierre; Brizuela, Leyre; Malavaud, Bernard; Mazerolles, Catherine; Rischmann, Pascal

    2010-06-01

    Sphingolipid metabolites are critical to the regulation of a number of fundamental biological processes including cancer. Whereas ceramide and sphingosine mediate and trigger apoptosis or cell growth arrest, sphingosine 1-phosphate promotes proliferation, cell survival and angiogenesis. The delicate equilibrium between the intracellular levels of each of these sphingolipids is controlled by the enzymes that either produce or degrade these metabolites. Sphingosine kinase-1 is a crucial regulator of this two-pan balance, because its produces the pro-survival and pro-angiogenic sphingosine 1-phosphate and decreases the amount of both ceramide and sphingosine, the pro-apoptotic sphingolipids. Moreover, its gene is oncogenic, its mRNA is overproduced in several solid tumors, its overexpression protects cells from apoptosis, and its activity is down-regulated by anti-cancer treatments. Therefore, the sphingosine kinase-1/sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling pathway appears to be a target of interest for therapeutic manipulation. PMID:20302564

  10. Drug Normalization for Cancer Therapeutic and Druggable Genome Target Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guoqian; Sohn, Sunghwan; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Wang, Chen; Liu, Hongfang; Chute, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous drug data representation among different druggable genome knowledge resources and datasets delays effective cancer therapeutic target discovery within the broad scientific community. The objective of the present paper is to describe the challenges and lessons learned from our efforts in developing and evaluating a standards-based drug normalization framework targeting cancer druggable genome datasets. Our findings suggested that mechanisms need to be established to deal with spelling errors and irregularities in normalizing clinical drug data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), whereas the annotations from NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) and PubChem are two layers of normalization that potentially bridge between the clinical phenotypes and the druggable genome knowledge for effective cancer therapeutic target discovery. PMID:26306243

  11. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key molecules of signaling pathways can control growth of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). • Development of BCSCs also involves miRNA interactions. • Therapeutic achievement can be done by targeting identified targets in the BCSC pathways. - Abstract: A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo “epithelial to mesenchymal transition” (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements.

  12. Therapeutic Targeting of Autophagy in Disease: Biology and Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yan; Ren, Xingcong; Hait, William N.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy, a process of self-digestion of the cytoplasm and organelles through which cellular components are recycled for reuse or energy production, is an evolutionarily conserved response to metabolic stress found in eukaryotes from yeast to mammals. It is noteworthy that autophagy is also associated with various pathophysiologic conditions in which this cellular process plays either a cytoprotective or cytopathic role in response to a variety of stresses such as metabolic, inflammatory, neurodegenerative, and therapeutic stress. It is now generally believed that modulating the activity of autophagy through targeting specific regulatory molecules in the autophagy machinery may impact disease processes, thus autophagy may represent a new pharmacologic target for drug development and therapeutic intervention of various human disorders. Induction or inhibition of autophagy using small molecule compounds has shown promise in the treatment of diseases such as cancer. Depending on context, induction or suppression of autophagy may exert therapeutic effects via promoting either cell survival or death, two major events targeted by therapies for various disorders. A better understanding of the biology of autophagy and the pharmacology of autophagy modulators has the potential for facilitating the development of autophagy-based therapeutic interventions for several human diseases. PMID:23943849

  13. New oleyl glycoside as anti-cancer agent that targets on neutral sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Romero-Ramírez, Lorenzo; García-Álvarez, Isabel; Casas, Josefina; Barreda-Manso, M Asunción; Yanguas-Casás, Natalia; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Fernández-Mayoralas, Alfonso

    2015-09-15

    We designed and synthesized two anomeric oleyl glucosaminides as anti-cancer agents where the presence of a trifluoroacetyl group close to the anomeric center makes them resistant to hydrolysis by hexosaminidases. The oleyl glycosides share key structural features with synthetic and natural oleyl derivatives that have been reported to exhibit anti-cancer properties. While both glycosides showed antiproliferative activity on cancer cell lines, only the α-anomer caused endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and cell death on C6 glioma cells. Analysis of sphingolipids and glycosphingolipds in cells treated with the glycosides showed that the α-anomer caused a drastic accumulation of ceramide and glucosylceramide and reduction of lactosylceramide and GM3 ganglioside at concentrations above a threshold of 20 μM. In order to understand how ceramide levels increase in response to α-glycoside treatment, further investigations were done using specific inhibitors of sphingolipid metabolic pathways. The pretreatment with 3-O-methylsphingomyelin (a neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitor) restored sphingomyelin levels together with the lactosylceramide and GM3 ganglioside levels and prevented the ER stress and cell death caused by the α-glycoside. The results indicated that the activation of neutral sphingomyelinase is the main cause of the alterations in sphingolipids that eventually lead to cell death. The new oleyl glycoside targets a key enzyme in sphingolipid metabolism with potential applications in cancer therapy. PMID:26206186

  14. Cyclodextrin conjugated magnetic colloidal nanoparticles as a nanocarrier for targeted anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S.; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2008-07-01

    A novel magnetic nanocarrier (CD-GAMNPs) was fabricated for targeted anticancer drug delivery by grafting cyclodextrin (CD) onto gum arabic modified magnetic nanoparticles (GAMNPs) using hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) as a linker. Analyses by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the product had a mean diameter of 17.1 nm and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 44.1 nm. The CD grafting was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that the amount of CD grafted on the GAMNPs was 16.8 mg g-1. The study on the loading of anticancer drug all-trans-retinoic acid (retinoic acid) revealed that the newly fabricated magnetic nanocarrier possessed a considerably higher adsorption capability as compared to GAMNPs due to the special hydrophobic cavity structure of CD, which could act as a host-guest complex with retinoic acid. Furthermore, it was found that the complexation of CD-GAMNPs with retinoic acid was exothermic and the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) led to the decrease in the inclusion of retinoic acid because the linear structure of sodium dodecyl sulfate made it easier to enter the cavity of CD as compared to less linear retinoic acid. In addition, the in vitro release profile of retinoic acid from CD-GAMNPs was characterized by an initial fast release followed by a delayed release phase.

  15. Endothelins and their Receptors in Cancer: Identification of Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong; Dashwood, Roderick H.

    2011-01-01

    Endothelins and their receptors are important in normal physiology, but have been implicated in various pathophysiological conditions. Members of the so-called “endothelin axis” are dysregulated in a wide range of human cancers, opening the door for novel anticancer therapies. Established cancer chemotherapeutic agents and drugs that target specific components of the endothelin axis have been combined with promising results, but more work is needed in this area. The endothelin axis affects numerous signaling pathways, including Ras, mitogen activated protein kinases, β-catenin/T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor, nuclear factor-κB (NFκB), SNAIL, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). There is much still to learn about optimizing drug specificity in this area, while minimizing off-target effects. Selective agonists and antagonists of endothelins, their receptors, and upstream processing enzymes, as well as knockdown strategies in vitro, are providing valuable leads for testing in the clinical setting. The endothelin axis continues to be an attractive avenue of scientific endeavor, both in the cancer arena and for other important health-related disciplines. PMID:21251982

  16. Anticancer treatment and fertility: Effect of therapeutic modalities on reproductive system and functions.

    PubMed

    Vassilakopoulou, Maria; Boostandoost, Erfaneh; Papaxoinis, George; de La Motte Rouge, Thibault; Khayat, David; Psyrri, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The significant improvement of cancer treatments entailed a longer life in cancer survivors and raised expectations for higher quality of life with minimized long-term toxicity. Infertility and gonadal dysfunction are adverse effects of anticancer therapy or may be related to specific tumors. In female cancer survivors, premature ovarian failure is common after antineoplastic treatments resulting in infertility and other morbidities related to oestrogen deficiency such as osteoporosis. In male cancer survivors, infertility and persistent a zoospermia is a more common long-term adverse effect than hypogonadism because germ cells are more sensitive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy than leydig cells. Gonadal toxicity and compromise of reproductive functions will be more efficiently prevented and treated if addressed before treatment initiation. This review focuses on these issues in young cancer survivors of childbearing age, where methods of protecting or restoring endocrine function and fertility need to be considered. PMID:26481950

  17. Therapeutic target database update 2012: a resource for facilitating target-oriented drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Feng; Shi, Zhe; Qin, Chu; Tao, Lin; Liu, Xin; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Li; Song, Yang; Liu, Xianghui; Zhang, Jingxian; Han, Bucong; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yuzong

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge and investigation of therapeutic targets (responsible for drug efficacy) and the targeted drugs facilitate target and drug discovery and validation. Therapeutic Target Database (TTD, http://bidd.nus.edu.sg/group/ttd/ttd.asp) has been developed to provide comprehensive information about efficacy targets and the corresponding approved, clinical trial and investigative drugs. Since its last update, major improvements and updates have been made to TTD. In addition to the significant increase of data content (from 1894 targets and 5028 drugs to 2025 targets and 17 816 drugs), we added target validation information (drug potency against target, effect against disease models and effect of target knockout, knockdown or genetic variations) for 932 targets, and 841 quantitative structure activity relationship models for active compounds of 228 chemical types against 121 targets. Moreover, we added the data from our previous drug studies including 3681 multi-target agents against 108 target pairs, 116 drug combinations with their synergistic, additive, antagonistic, potentiative or reductive mechanisms, 1427 natural product-derived approved, clinical trial and pre-clinical drugs and cross-links to the clinical trial information page in the ClinicalTrials.gov database for 770 clinical trial drugs. These updates are useful for facilitating target discovery and validation, drug lead discovery and optimization, and the development of multi-target drugs and drug combinations. PMID:21948793

  18. Network modelling reveals the mechanism underlying colitis-associated colon cancer and identifies novel combinatorial anti-cancer targets.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junyan; Zeng, Hanlin; Liang, Zhongjie; Chen, Limin; Zhang, Liyi; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Bairong; Huang, Ming; Geng, Meiyu; Spiegel, Sarah; Luo, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The connection between inflammation and tumourigenesis has been well established. However, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying inflammation-associated tumourigenesis remains unknown because this process involves a complex interplay between immune microenvironments and epithelial cells. To obtain a more systematic understanding of inflammation-associated tumourigenesis as well as to identify novel therapeutic approaches, we constructed a knowledge-based network describing the development of colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) by integrating the extracellular microenvironment and intracellular signalling pathways. Dynamic simulations of the CAC network revealed a core network module, including P53, MDM2, and AKT, that may govern the malignant transformation of colon epithelial cells in a pro-tumor inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, in silico mutation studies and experimental validations led to a novel finding that concurrently targeting ceramide and PI3K/AKT pathway by chemical probes or marketed drugs achieves synergistic anti-cancer effects. Overall, our network model can guide further mechanistic studies on CAC and provide new insights into the design of combinatorial cancer therapies in a rational manner. PMID:26446703

  19. Network modelling reveals the mechanism underlying colitis-associated colon cancer and identifies novel combinatorial anti-cancer targets

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Junyan; Zeng, Hanlin; Liang, Zhongjie; Chen, Limin; Zhang, Liyi; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Bairong; Huang, Ming; Geng, Meiyu; Spiegel, Sarah; Luo, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The connection between inflammation and tumourigenesis has been well established. However, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying inflammation-associated tumourigenesis remains unknown because this process involves a complex interplay between immune microenvironments and epithelial cells. To obtain a more systematic understanding of inflammation-associated tumourigenesis as well as to identify novel therapeutic approaches, we constructed a knowledge-based network describing the development of colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) by integrating the extracellular microenvironment and intracellular signalling pathways. Dynamic simulations of the CAC network revealed a core network module, including P53, MDM2, and AKT, that may govern the malignant transformation of colon epithelial cells in a pro-tumor inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, in silico mutation studies and experimental validations led to a novel finding that concurrently targeting ceramide and PI3K/AKT pathway by chemical probes or marketed drugs achieves synergistic anti-cancer effects. Overall, our network model can guide further mechanistic studies on CAC and provide new insights into the design of combinatorial cancer therapies in a rational manner. PMID:26446703

  20. Treatment Strategies that Enhance the Efficacy and Selectivity of Mitochondria-Targeted Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Modica-Napolitano, Josephine S.; Weissig, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Nearly a century has passed since Otto Warburg first observed high rates of aerobic glycolysis in a variety of tumor cell types and suggested that this phenomenon might be due to an impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity in these cells. Subsequently, much has been written about the role of mitochondria in the initiation and/or progression of various forms of cancer, and the possibility of exploiting differences in mitochondrial structure and function between normal and malignant cells as targets for cancer chemotherapy. A number of mitochondria-targeted compounds have shown efficacy in selective cancer cell killing in pre-clinical and early clinical testing, including those that induce mitochondria permeability transition and apoptosis, metabolic inhibitors, and ROS regulators. To date, however, none has exhibited the standards for high selectivity and efficacy and low toxicity necessary to progress beyond phase III clinical trials and be used as a viable, single modality treatment option for human cancers. This review explores alternative treatment strategies that have been shown to enhance the efficacy and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents in vitro and in vivo, and may yet fulfill the clinical promise of exploiting the mitochondrion as a target for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26230693

  1. Treatment Strategies that Enhance the Efficacy and Selectivity of Mitochondria-Targeted Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Modica-Napolitano, Josephine S; Weissig, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Nearly a century has passed since Otto Warburg first observed high rates of aerobic glycolysis in a variety of tumor cell types and suggested that this phenomenon might be due to an impaired mitochondrial respiratory capacity in these cells. Subsequently, much has been written about the role of mitochondria in the initiation and/or progression of various forms of cancer, and the possibility of exploiting differences in mitochondrial structure and function between normal and malignant cells as targets for cancer chemotherapy. A number of mitochondria-targeted compounds have shown efficacy in selective cancer cell killing in pre-clinical and early clinical testing, including those that induce mitochondria permeability transition and apoptosis, metabolic inhibitors, and ROS regulators. To date, however, none has exhibited the standards for high selectivity and efficacy and low toxicity necessary to progress beyond phase III clinical trials and be used as a viable, single modality treatment option for human cancers. This review explores alternative treatment strategies that have been shown to enhance the efficacy and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents in vitro and in vivo, and may yet fulfill the clinical promise of exploiting the mitochondrion as a target for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26230693

  2. Targeted search for anticancer drugs--CNIO cancer conference. 16-18 March, Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Lacal, Juan-Carlos; Carnero, Amancio

    2003-05-01

    The Spanish National Cancer Center has launched a new series of cancer conferences devoted to timely themes in oncology. These meetings aim to bring together a maximum of 50 participants, including 20 to 25 speakers along with 25 to 30 participants for in-depth discussion of new results and ideas in frontline cancer research. There is no registration fee to attend, but participants must organize their own travel and accommodation expenses; free communications are presented as posters, but a few may be selected for short (15 min) oral presentations. This particular meeting was organized by Amancio Carnero and David H Beach, and was mostly devoted to state of the art methodologies for the identification of new targets for anticancer drug design, although the development of novel drugs was also discussed. PMID:12841206

  3. Nuclear receptor coregulators as a new paradigm for therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Elaine Y.; Goodson, Michael L.; Zou, June X.; Privalsky, Martin L.; Chen, Hong-Wu

    2012-01-01

    The complex function and regulation of nuclear receptors cannot be fully understood without a thorough knowledge of the receptor-associated coregulators that either enhance (coactivators) or inhibit (corepressors) transcription. While nuclear receptors themselves have garnered much attention as therapeutic targets, the clinical and etiological relevance of the coregulators to human diseases is increasingly recognized. Aberrant expression or function of coactivators and corepressors has been associated with malignant and metabolic disease development. Many of them are key epigenetic regulators and utilize enzymatic activities to modify chromatin through histone acetylation/deacetylation, histone methylation/demethylation or chromatin remodeling. In this review, we showcase and evaluate coregulators with the most promising therapeutic potential based on their physiological roles and involvement in various diseases that are revealed thus far. We also describe the structural features of the coactivator and corepressor functional domains and highlight areas that can be further explored for molecular targeting. PMID:20933027

  4. Mitochondria: a therapeutic target in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Yu; Inagi, Reiko

    2016-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common clinical entity that is associated with high mortality and morbidity. It is a risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease. Presently, no effective treatment for AKI is available, and novel therapeutic approaches are desperately needed. Accumulating evidence highlights mitochondrial dysfunction as an important factor in the pathogenesis of AKI. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecules involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, fusion/fission, mitophagy and their pathophysiological roles will lead to the development of drugs that target mitochondria for the treatment of various diseases, including AKI. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the contribution of mitochondria-related pathophysiology in AKI and the prospective benefits of mitochondria-targeting therapeutic approaches against AKI. PMID:26333547

  5. Therapeutic Targets of Triglyceride Metabolism as Informed by Human Genetics.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Robert C; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Hand, Nicholas J; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-04-01

    Human genetics has contributed to the development of multiple drugs to treat hyperlipidemia and coronary artery disease (CAD), most recently including antibodies targeting PCSK9 to reduce LDL cholesterol. Despite these successes, a large burden of CAD remains. Genetic and epidemiological studies have suggested that circulating triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) are a causal risk factor for CAD, presenting an opportunity for novel therapeutic strategies. We discuss recent unbiased human genetics testing, including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and whole-genome or -exome sequencing, that have identified the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipogenesis pathways as important mechanisms in the regulation of circulating TRLs. Further strengthening the causal relationship between TRLs and CAD, findings such as these may provide novel targets for much-needed potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:26988439

  6. Therapeutic Targets for the Treatment of Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Scott P.; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the most common causes of acute viral hepatitis in the world with an estimated 20 million infections per year. Although the mortality rate is less than 1% among the general population, pregnant women can have a fatality rate of up to 30%. Additionally, chronic hepatitis E has increasingly become a significant clinical problem in immunocompromised individuals. Effective antivirals against HEV are needed. Areas covered This review article addresses the current state of knowledge of HEV infections with regard to animal and cell culture model systems that are important for antiviral discovery and testing, our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of virus replication, our understanding of how each viral protein functions, and areas that can potentially be exploited as therapeutic targets. Expert opinion Lack of an efficient cell culture system for HEV propagation, the limited knowledge of HEV lifecycle, and the inherent self-limiting infection within the normal populace make the development of new therapeutic agents against HEV challenging. There are many promising therapeutic targets, and the tools for identifying and testing potential antivirals are rapidly evolving. The development of effective therapeutics against HEV in immunocompromised and pregnant patient populations is warranted. PMID:26073772

  7. Emerging therapeutics and relevant targets for chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Song, Il Han

    2016-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global health problem for the pursuit of complete virus eradication and immunity acquisition to prevent liver disease progression. Currently, interferon-alpha, with the underlying mechanism of host immunomodulation, and nucleos(t)ide analogs, with the underlying mechanism of inhibition of viral replication, are used for the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis B. Despite remarkable improvement in the virological, serological, biochemical, and histological response to current therapeutics, we are still far from meeting the therapeutic goals, e.g., clearance of HBV DNA/covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) in the serum/liver tissue and seroconversion of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) to anti-HBs in the present antiviral era. Recently, HBV replication cycle-related, viral RNA interference-based, and host immune-mediated therapeutic targets and relevant anti-HBV agents have been newly introduced and investigated in the preclinical and clinical fields. This review discusses emerging therapeutics and relevant targets in the management of chronic hepatitis B. PMID:27210776

  8. Actively targeted delivery of anticancer drug to tumor cells by redox-responsive star-shaped micelles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chunli; Guo, Xing; Qu, Qianqian; Tang, Zhaomin; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Shaobing

    2014-10-01

    In cancer therapy nanocargos based on star-shaped polymer exhibit unique features such as better stability, smaller size distribution and higher drug capacity in comparison to linear polymeric micelles. In this study, we developed a multifunctional star-shaped micellar system by combination of active targeting ability and redox-responsive behavior. The star-shaped micelles with good stability were self-assembled from four-arm poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer. The redox-responsive behaviors of these micelles triggered by glutathione were evaluated from the changes of micellar size, morphology and molecular weight. In vitro drug release profiles exhibited that in a stimulated normal physiological environment, the redox-responsive star-shaped micelles could maintain good stability, whereas in a reducing and acid environment similar with that of tumor cells, the encapsulated agent was promptly released. In vitro cellular uptake and subcellular localization of these micelles were further studied with confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa. In vivo and ex vivo DOX fluorescence imaging displayed that these FA-functionalized star-shaped micelles possessed much better specificity to target solid tumor. Both the qualitative and quantitative results of the antitumor effect in 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice demonstrated that these redox-responsive star-shaped micelles have a high therapeutic efficiency to artificial solid tumor. Therefore, the multifunctional star-shaped micelles are a potential platform for targeted anticancer drug delivery. PMID:25002267

  9. MicroRNAs as novel predictive biomarkers and therapeutic targets in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stiegelbauer, Verena; Perakis, Samantha; Deutsch, Alexander; Ling, Hui; Gerger, Armin; Pichler, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in western countries. Despite significant improvement in available treatment options, CRC still remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Traditionally, 5-fluorouracil has been used as the main chemotherapy drug for treatment of metastatic CRC (mCRC). However, during the last two decades more effective chemotherapeutic agents such as oxaliplatin, irinotecan and the monoclonal antibodies cetuximab, panitumumab and bevacizumab have been used in clinical practice. More recently, the therapeutic armamentarium has been supplemented by the monoclonal antibodies bevacizumab, cetuximab and panitumumab as well as the protein-trap aflibercept and the small molecule multi-kinase inhibitor regorafenib. One of the major problems for the management of CRC is the inherent or acquired resistance to therapeutic approaches. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small, endogenous, non-coding, single-stranded RNAs that play a role as post-transcriptional regulators, has added new dimensions to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Because miRNAs are important regulators of carcinogenesis, progression, invasion, angiogenesis and metastases in CRC, they might serve as potential predictive and prognostic factors and even as therapeutic targets themselves. Several miRNAs are already known to be dysregulated in CRCs and have been linked to biological processes involved in tumor progression and response to anti-cancer therapies. This review summarizes current therapeutic approaches for treating CRC and highlights the role of miRNAs as novel predictive biomarkers and potential drug targets in CRC patients. PMID:25206276

  10. A Quantitative Chemical Proteomics Approach to Profile the Specific Cellular Targets of Andrographolide, a Promising Anticancer Agent That Suppresses Tumor Metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jigang; Tan, Xing Fei; Nguyen, Van Sang; Yang, Peng; Zhou, Jing; Gao, Mingming; Li, Zhengjun; Lim, Teck Kwang; He, Yingke; Ong, Chye Sun; Lay, Yifei; Zhang, Jianbin; Zhu, Guili; Lai, Siew-Li; Ghosh, Dipanjana; Mok, Yu Keung; Shen, Han-Ming; Lin, Qingsong

    2014-01-01

    Drug target identification is a critical step toward understanding the mechanism of action of a drug, which can help one improve the drug's current therapeutic regime and expand the drug's therapeutic potential. However, current in vitro affinity-chromatography-based and in vivo activity-based protein profiling approaches generally face difficulties in discriminating specific drug targets from nonspecific ones. Here we describe a novel approach combining isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation with clickable activity-based protein profiling to specifically and comprehensively identify the protein targets of andrographolide (Andro), a natural product with known anti-inflammation and anti-cancer effects, in live cancer cells. We identified a spectrum of specific targets of Andro, which furthered our understanding of the mechanism of action of the drug. Our findings, validated through cell migration and invasion assays, showed that Andro has a potential novel application as a tumor metastasis inhibitor. Moreover, we have unveiled the target binding mechanism of Andro with a combination of drug analog synthesis, protein engineering, and mass-spectrometry-based approaches and determined the drug-binding sites of two protein targets, NF-κB and actin. PMID:24445406

  11. Aquaporin 1, a potential therapeutic target for migraine with aura

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The pathophysiology of migraine remains largely unknown. However, evidence regarding the molecules participating in the pathophysiology of migraine has been accumulating. Water channel proteins, known as aquaporins (AQPs), notably AQP-1 and AQP-4, appears to be involved in the pathophysiology of several neurological diseases. This review outlines newly emerging evidence indicating that AQP-1 plays an important role in pain signal transduction and migraine and could therefore serve as a potential therapeutic target for these diseases. PMID:20969805

  12. Reprogrammed viruses as cancer therapeutics: targeted, armed and shielded

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Roberto; Miest, Tanner; Shashkova, Elena V.; Barry, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Virotherapy is currently undergoing a renaissance, based on our improved understanding of virus biology and genetics and our better knowledge of many different types of cancer. Viruses can be reprogrammed into oncolytic vectors by combining three types of modification: targeting, arming and shielding. Targeting introduces multiple layers of cancer specificity and improves safety and efficacy; arming occurs through the expression of prodrug convertases and cytokines; and coating with polymers and the sequential usage of different envelopes or capsids provides shielding from the host immune response. Virus-based therapeutics are beginning to find their place in cancer clinical practice, in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. PMID:18552863

  13. From Toxins Targeting Ligand Gated Ion Channels to Therapeutic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nasiripourdori, Adak; Taly, Valérie; Grutter, Thomas; Taly, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGIC) play a central role in inter-cellular communication. This key function has two consequences: (i) these receptor channels are major targets for drug discovery because of their potential involvement in numerous human brain diseases; (ii) they are often found to be the target of plant and animal toxins. Together this makes toxin/receptor interactions important to drug discovery projects. Therefore, toxins acting on LGIC are presented and their current/potential therapeutic uses highlighted. PMID:22069709

  14. Pancreatic cancer: molecular pathogenesis and new therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Han H.; Lemoine, Nicholas R.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic cancer normally present with advanced disease that is lethal and notoriously difficult to treat. Survival has not improved dramatically, despite routine use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy; this situation signifies an urgent need for novel therapeutic approaches. Over the past decade, a large number of studies that aimed to target the molecular abnormalities implicated in pancreatic tumor growth, invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis and resistance to apoptosis have been published. This research is of particular importance, as recent data suggest that a large number of genetic alterations affect only a few major signaling pathways and processes involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Although laboratory results of targeted therapies have been impressive, until now only erlotinib, an epidermal growth-factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has demonstrated modest survival benefit in combination with gemcitabine in a phase III clinical trial. Whilst the failures of targeted therapies in the clinical setting are discouraging, lessons have been learnt and new therapeutic targets that hold promise for the future management of the disease are continuously emerging. This Review describes some of the important developments and targeted agents for pancreatic cancer that have been tested in clinical trials. PMID:19506583

  15. Progress in Small Molecule and Biologic Therapeutics Targeting Ghrelin Signaling.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Kayleigh R; Darling, Joseph E; Hougland, James L

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is a circulating peptide hormone involved in regulation of a wide array of physiological processes. As an endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a), ghrelin is responsible for signaling involved in energy homeostasis, including appetite stimulation, glucose metabolism, insulin signaling, and adiposity. Ghrelin has also been implicated in modulation of several neurological processes. Dysregulation of ghrelin signaling is implicated in diseases related to these pathways, including obesity, type II diabetes, and regulation of appetite and body weight in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome. Multiple steps in the ghrelin signaling pathway are available for targeting in the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Agonists and antagonists of GHS-R1a have been widely studied and have shown varying levels of effectiveness within ghrelin-related physiological pathways. Agents targeting ghrelin directly, either through depletion of ghrelin levels in circulation or inhibitors of ghrelin O-acyltransferase whose action is required for ghrelin to become biologically active, are receiving increasing attention as potential therapeutic options. We discuss the approaches utilized to target ghrelin signaling and highlight the current challenges toward developing small-molecule agents as potential therapeutics for ghrelin-related diseases. PMID:26202202

  16. Magnetic antibody-linked nanomatchmakers for therapeutic cell targeting

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ke; Shen, Deliang; Hensley, M. Taylor; Middleton, Ryan; Sun, Baiming; Liu, Weixin; De Couto, Geoffrey; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a promising strategy for therapeutic cardiac regeneration, but current therapies are limited by inefficient interaction between potentially beneficial cells (either exogenously transplanted or endogenously recruited) and the injured tissue. Here we apply targeted nanomedicine to achieve in vivo cell-mediated tissue repair, imaging and localized enrichment without cellular transplantation. Iron nanoparticles are conjugated with two types of antibodies (one against antigens on therapeutic cells and the other directed at injured cells) to produce magnetic bifunctional cell engager (MagBICE). The antibodies link the therapeutic cells to the injured cells, whereas the iron core of MagBICE enables physical enrichment and imaging. We treat acute myocardial infarction by targeting exogenous bone marrow-derived stem cells (expressing CD45) or endogenous CD34-positive cells to injured cardiomyocytes (expressing myosin light chain. Targeting can be further enhanced by magnetic attraction, leading to augmented functional benefits. MagBICE represents a generalizable platform technology for regenerative medicine. PMID:25205020

  17. Pleiotropic effects of statins: new therapeutic targets in drug design.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Onkar; Dhawan, Veena; Sharma, P L; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-07-01

    The HMG Co-enzyme inhibitors and new lipid-modifying agents expand their new therapeutic target options in the field of medical profession. Statins have been described as the most effective class of drugs to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Since the discovery of the first statin nearly 30 years ago, these drugs have become the main therapeutic approach to lower cholesterol levels. The present scientific research demonstrates numerous non-lipid modifiable effects of statins termed as pleiotropic effects of statins, which could be beneficial for the treatment of various devastating disorders. The most important positive effects of statins are anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, anti-diabetes, and antithrombotic, improving endothelial dysfunction and attenuating vascular remodeling besides many others which are discussed under the scope of this review. In particular, inhibition of Rho and its downstream target, Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK), and their agonistic action on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) can be viewed as the principle mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic effects of statins. With gradually increasing knowledge of new therapeutic targets of statins, their use has also been advocated in chronic inflammatory disorders for example rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the scope of review, we highlight statins and their pleiotropic effects with reference to their harmful and beneficial effects as a novel approach for their use in the treatment of devastating disorders. Graphical abstract Pleiotropic effect of statins. PMID:27146293

  18. NG2 proteoglycan as a pericyte target for anticancer therapy by tumor vessel infarction with retargeted tissue factor

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Caroline; Schliemann, Christoph; Ring, Janine; Kessler, Torsten; Bäumer, Sebastian; Angenendt, Linus; Mantke, Verena; Ross, Rebecca; Hintelmann, Heike; Spieker, Tilmann; Wardelmann, Eva; Mesters, Rolf M.; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Schwöppe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    tTF-TAA and tTF-LTL are fusion proteins consisting of the extracellular domain of tissue factor (TF) and the peptides TAASGVRSMH and LTLRWVGLMS, respectively. These peptides represent ligands of NG2, a surface proteoglycan expressed on angiogenic pericytes and some tumor cells. Here we have expressed the model compound tTF-NGR, tTF-TAA, and tTF-LTL with different lengths in the TF domain in E. coli and used these fusion proteins for functional studies in anticancer therapy. We aimed to retarget TF to tumor vessels leading to tumor vessel infarction with two barriers of selectivity, a) the leaky endothelial lining in tumor vessels with the target NG2 being expressed on pericytes on the abluminal side of the endothelial cell barrier and b) the preferential expression of NG2 on angiogenic vessels such as in tumors. Chromatography-purified tTF-TAA showed identical Factor X (FX)-activating procoagulatory activity as the model compound tTF-NGR with Km values of approx. 0.15 nM in Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The procoagulatory activity of tTF-LTL varied with the chosen length of the TF part of the fusion protein. Flow cytometry revealed specific binding of tTF-TAA to NG2-expressing pericytes and tumor cells with low affinity and dissociation KD in the high nM range. In vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging of tumor xenograft-carrying animals and of the explanted tumors showed reduction of tumor blood flow upon tTF-TAA application. Therapeutic experiments showed a reproducible antitumor activity of tTF-TAA against NG2-expressing A549-tumor xenografts, however, with a rather small therapeutic window (active/toxic dose in mg/kg body weight). PMID:26735180

  19. NG2 proteoglycan as a pericyte target for anticancer therapy by tumor vessel infarction with retargeted tissue factor.

    PubMed

    Brand, Caroline; Schliemann, Christoph; Ring, Janine; Kessler, Torsten; Bäumer, Sebastian; Angenendt, Linus; Mantke, Verena; Ross, Rebecca; Hintelmann, Heike; Spieker, Tilmann; Wardelmann, Eva; Mesters, Rolf M; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Schwöppe, Christian

    2016-02-01

    tTF-TAA and tTF-LTL are fusion proteins consisting of the extracellular domain of tissue factor (TF) and the peptides TAASGVRSMH and LTLRWVGLMS, respectively. These peptides represent ligands of NG2, a surface proteoglycan expressed on angiogenic pericytes and some tumor cells. Here we have expressed the model compound tTF-NGR, tTF-TAA, and tTF-LTL with different lengths in the TF domain in E. coli and used these fusion proteins for functional studies in anticancer therapy. We aimed to retarget TF to tumor vessels leading to tumor vessel infarction with two barriers of selectivity, a) the leaky endothelial lining in tumor vessels with the target NG2 being expressed on pericytes on the abluminal side of the endothelial cell barrier and b) the preferential expression of NG2 on angiogenic vessels such as in tumors. Chromatography-purified tTF-TAA showed identical Factor X (FX)-activating procoagulatory activity as the model compound tTF-NGR with Km values of approx. 0.15 nM in Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The procoagulatory activity of tTF-LTL varied with the chosen length of the TF part of the fusion protein. Flow cytometry revealed specific binding of tTF-TAA to NG2-expressing pericytes and tumor cells with low affinity and dissociation KD in the high nM range. In vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging of tumor xenograft-carrying animals and of the explanted tumors showed reduction of tumor blood flow upon tTF-TAA application. Therapeutic experiments showed a reproducible antitumor activity of tTF-TAA against NG2-expressing A549-tumor xenografts, however, with a rather small therapeutic window (active/toxic dose in mg/kg body weight). PMID:26735180

  20. Integrin-targeted pH-responsive micelles for enhanced efficiency of anticancer treatment in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinjian; Deng, Hongzhang; Liu, Qiang; Chu, Liping; Zhang, Yumin; Yang, Cuihong; Zhao, Xuefei; Huang, Pingsheng; Deng, Liandong; Dong, Anjie; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-02-01

    The key to developing more nanocarriers for the delivery of drugs in clinical applications is to consider the route of the carrier from the administration site to the target tissue and to look for a simple design to complete this whole journey. We synthesized the amphiphilic copolymer cRGDfK-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(2,4,6-trimethoxybenzylidene-1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethyl) ethane methacrylate) (cRGD-PETM) to construct multifunctional micelles. These micelles combined enhanced drug-loading efficiency with tumor-targeting properties, visual detection and controllable intracellular drug release, resulting in an improved chemotherapeutic effect in vivo. Doxorubicin (DOX) was encapsulated within the cRGD-PETM micelles as a model drug (termed as cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms). The size and morphology of the micelles were characterized systematically. As a result of the hydrophobic interaction and the π-π conjugation between the DOX molecules and the PTTMA copolymers, the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms showed an excellent drug-loading capacity. The results of in vitro drug-release studies indicated that the cumulative release of DOX from cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms at pH 5.0 was twice that at pH 7.4. The results of fluorescent microscopic analysis showed that the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms could be internalized by 4T1 and HepG2 cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis with rapid intracellular drug release, which resulted in increased cytotoxicity compared with free DOX. Ex vivo imaging studies showed that the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms improved the accumulation and retention of the drug in tumor tissues. Studies of the in vivo anticancer effects showed that the cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms had a significantly higher therapeutic efficacy with lower side-effects than free DOX and PETM/DOX Ms. These results show that the multifunctional cRGD-PETM/DOX Ms have great potential as vehicles for the delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs.

  1. Critical questions in development of targeted nanoparticle therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Korsmeyer, Richard

    2016-06-01

    One of the fourteen Grand Challenges for Engineering articulated by the US National Academy of Engineering is 'Engineer Better Medicines'. Although there are many ways that better medicines could be engineered, one of the most promising ideas is to improve our ability to deliver the therapeutic molecule more precisely to the desired target. Most conventional drug delivery methods (oral absorption, intravenous infusion etc.) result in systemic exposure to the therapeutic molecule, which places severe constraints on the types of molecules that can be used. A molecule administered by systemic delivery must be effective at low concentrations in the target tissue, yet safe everywhere else in the body. If drug carriers could be developed to deliver therapeutic molecules selectively to the desired target, it should be possible to greatly improve safety and efficacy of therapy. Nanoparticles (and related nanostructures, such as liposomes, nanoemulsions, micelles and dendrimers) are an attractive drug carrier concept because they can be made from a variety of materials engineered to have properties that allow loading and precise delivery of bound therapeutic molecules. The field of targeted nanoparticles has been extraordinarily active in the academic realm, with thousands of articles published over the last few years. Many of these publications seem to demonstrate very promising results in in vitro studies and even in animal models. In addition, a handful of human clinical trials are in progress. Yet, the biopharmaceutical industry has been relatively slow to make major investments in targeted nanoparticle development programs, despite a clear desire to introduce innovative new therapies to the market. What is the reason for such caution? Some degree of caution is no doubt due to the use of novel materials and the unproven nature of targeted nanoparticle technology, but many other unproven technologies have generated intense interest at various times. We believe that the

  2. Critical questions in development of targeted nanoparticle therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Korsmeyer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    One of the fourteen Grand Challenges for Engineering articulated by the US National Academy of Engineering is ‘Engineer Better Medicines’. Although there are many ways that better medicines could be engineered, one of the most promising ideas is to improve our ability to deliver the therapeutic molecule more precisely to the desired target. Most conventional drug delivery methods (oral absorption, intravenous infusion etc.) result in systemic exposure to the therapeutic molecule, which places severe constraints on the types of molecules that can be used. A molecule administered by systemic delivery must be effective at low concentrations in the target tissue, yet safe everywhere else in the body. If drug carriers could be developed to deliver therapeutic molecules selectively to the desired target, it should be possible to greatly improve safety and efficacy of therapy. Nanoparticles (and related nanostructures, such as liposomes, nanoemulsions, micelles and dendrimers) are an attractive drug carrier concept because they can be made from a variety of materials engineered to have properties that allow loading and precise delivery of bound therapeutic molecules. The field of targeted nanoparticles has been extraordinarily active in the academic realm, with thousands of articles published over the last few years. Many of these publications seem to demonstrate very promising results in in vitro studies and even in animal models. In addition, a handful of human clinical trials are in progress. Yet, the biopharmaceutical industry has been relatively slow to make major investments in targeted nanoparticle development programs, despite a clear desire to introduce innovative new therapies to the market. What is the reason for such caution? Some degree of caution is no doubt due to the use of novel materials and the unproven nature of targeted nanoparticle technology, but many other unproven technologies have generated intense interest at various times. We believe that

  3. Cardio-protective and anti-cancer therapeutic potential of Nigella sativa.

    PubMed

    Shafiq, Hammad; Ahmad, Asif; Masud, Tariq; Kaleem, Muhammad

    2014-12-01

    Nigella sativa is the miraculous plant having a lot of nutritional and medicinal benefits, and attracts large number of nutrition and pharmacological researchers. N. sativa seed composition shows that it is the blessing of nature and it contains and many bioactive compounds like thymoquinone, α-hederin, alkaloids, flavonoids, antioxidants, fatty acids many other compounds that have positive effects on curing of different diseases. Several medicinal properties of N. sativa like its anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, antioxidant activities and many others are well acknowledged. However, this article focuses on activity of N. sativa against cardiovascular diseases and cancer. For gathering required data the authors went through vast number of articles using search engines like Science direct, ELSEVIER, Pub Med, Willey on Line Library and Google scholar and the findings were classified on the basis of relevance of the topic and were reviewed in the article. N. sativa is rich source of different biologically active compounds and is found effective in controlling number of cardiovascular diseases and various cancers both in vivo and in vitro studies. PMID:25859300

  4. Cardio-protective and anti-cancer therapeutic potential of Nigella sativa

    PubMed Central

    Shafiq, Hammad; Ahmad, Asif; Masud, Tariq; Kaleem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Nigella sativa is the miraculous plant having a lot of nutritional and medicinal benefits, and attracts large number of nutrition and pharmacological researchers. N. sativa seed composition shows that it is the blessing of nature and it contains and many bioactive compounds like thymoquinone, α-hederin, alkaloids, flavonoids, antioxidants, fatty acids many other compounds that have positive effects on curing of different diseases. Several medicinal properties of N. sativa like its anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, antioxidant activities and many others are well acknowledged. However, this article focuses on activity of N. sativa against cardiovascular diseases and cancer. For gathering required data the authors went through vast number of articles using search engines like Science direct, ELSEVIER, Pub Med, Willey on Line Library and Google scholar and the findings were classified on the basis of relevance of the topic and were reviewed in the article. N. sativa is rich source of different biologically active compounds and is found effective in controlling number of cardiovascular diseases and various cancers both in vivo and in vitro studies. PMID:25859300

  5. In Vivo Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Imaging for Targeted Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Kevin; Gaind, Vaibhav; Tsai, Hsiaorho; Bentz, Brian; Chelvam, Venkatesh; Low, Philip

    2012-02-01

    We describe an approach for the evaluation of targeted anti-cancer drug delivery in vivo. The method emulates the drug release and activation process through acceptor release from a targeted donor-acceptor pair that exhibits fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In this case, folate targeting of the cancer cells is used - 40 % of all human cancers, including ovarian, lung, breast, kidney, brain and colon cancer, over-express folate receptors. We demonstrate the reconstruction of the spatially-dependent FRET parameters in a mouse model and in tissue phantoms. The FRET parameterization is incorporated into a source for a diffusion equation model for photon transport in tissue, in a variant of optical diffusion tomography (ODT) called FRET-ODT. In addition to the spatially-dependent tissue parameters in the diffusion model (absorption and diffusion coefficients), the FRET parameters (donor-acceptor distance and yield) are imaged as a function of position. Modulated light measurements are made with various laser excitation positions and a gated camera. More generally, our method provides a new vehicle for studying disease at the molecular level by imaging FRET parameters in deep tissue, and allows the nanometer FRET ruler to be utilized in deep tissue.

  6. Mitochondria Death/Survival Signaling Pathways in Cardiotoxicity Induced by Anthracyclines and Anticancer-Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Montaigne, David; Hurt, Christopher; Neviere, Remi

    2012-01-01

    Anthracyclines remain the cornerstone of treatment in many malignancies but these agents have a cumulative dose relationship with cardiotoxicity. Development of cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure induced by anthracyclines are typically dose-dependent, irreversible, and cumulative. Although past studies of cardiotoxicity have focused on anthracyclines, more recently interest has turned to anticancer drugs that target many proteins kinases, such as tyrosine kinases. An attractive model to explain the mechanism of this cardiotoxicity could be myocyte loss through cell death pathways. Inhibition of mitochondrial transition permeability is a valuable tool to prevent doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. In response to anthracycline treatment, activation of several protein kinases, neuregulin/ErbB2 signaling, and transcriptional factors modify mitochondrial functions that determine cell death or survival through the modulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability. Cellular response to anthracyclines is also modulated by a myriad of transcriptional factors that influence cell fate. Several novel targeted chemotherapeutic agents have been associated with a small but worrying risk of left ventricular dysfunction. Agents such as trastuzumab and tyrosine kinase inhibitors can lead to cardiotoxicity that is fundamentally different from that caused by anthracyclines, whereas biological effects converge to the mitochondria as a critical target. PMID:22482055

  7. Peptide deformylase: a new target in antibacterial, antimalarial and anticancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Sangshetti, Jaiprakash N; Khan, Firoz A Kalam; Shinde, Devanand B

    2015-01-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is a class of metalloenzyme responsible for catalyzing the removal of the N-formyl group from N-terminal methionine following translation. PDF inhibitors are moving into new phase of drug development. Initially, PDF was considered as an important target in antibacterial drug discovery; however genome database searches have revealed PDF-like sequences in parasites (P. falciparum) and human, widening the utility of this target in antimalarial and anticancer drug discovery along with antibacterial. Using structural and mechanistic information together with high throughput screening, several types of chemical classes of PDF inhibitors with improved efficacy and specificity have been identified. Various drugs like, GSK-1322322 (Phase II), BB-83698 (Phase I), and LBM-415 (Phase I) have entered into clinical developments. Developments in the field have prompted us to review the current aspects of PDFs, especially their structures, different classes of PDF inhibitors, and molecular modeling studies. In nut shell, this review enlightens PDF as a versatile target along with its inhibitors and future perspectives of different PDF inhibitors. PMID:25174923

  8. Dual CD44 and folate receptor-targeted nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Young; Termsarasab, Ubonvan; Park, Ju-Hwan; Lee, Song Yi; Ko, Seung-Hak; Shim, Jae-Seong; Chung, Suk-Jae; Cho, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2016-08-28

    Dual CD44 and folate receptor targetable nanoparticles (NPs) based on hyaluronic acid-ceramide-folic acid (HACE-FA) were fabricated for improving tumor targetability. HACE-FA was synthesized via esterification between the carboxylic group of FA and hydroxyl group of HA. Doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded HACE-FA NPs, with a mean diameter of 120-130nm, narrow size distribution, and negative zeta potential, were prepared. The drug release from HACE-FA NPs were significantly increased in acidic pH (pH5.5) compared with physiological pH (7.4) (p<0.05). The cellular accumulation of the drug in HACE-FA NPs group was higher than that of HACE NPs group in SKOV-3 cells (human ovarian cancer cells; CD44 and folate receptor (FR)-positive cells). Dual targetability of HACE-FA NPs, compared to HACE NPs, was also verified in the SKOV-3 tumor-xenografted mouse model by near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging. Twenty-four hours after injection, HACE-FA NPs were accumulated mainly in tumor regions and their fluorescence intensity was 4.82-fold higher than that of HACE NPs (p<0.05). These findings suggest successful application of HACE-FA NPs for the accurate delivery of anticancer drugs to ovarian cancer. PMID:27320169

  9. Chemical proteomics identifies heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 as the molecular target of quercetin in its anti-cancer effects in PC-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chia-Chen; Chen, Yun-Ju; Chen, Chih-Ta; Liu, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Fong-Chi; Hsu, Kai-Chao; Chow, Lu-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid abundantly present in plants, is widely used as a phytotherapy in prostatitis and prostate cancer. Although quercetin has been reported to have a number of therapeutic effects, the cellular target(s) responsible for its anti-cancer action has not yet been clearly elucidated. Here, employing affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNPA1) as a direct target of quercetin. A specific interaction between quercetin and hnRNPA1 was validated by immunoblotting and in vitro binding experiments. We found that quercetin bound the C-terminal region of hnRNPA1, impairing the ability of hnRNPA1 to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm and ultimately resulting in its cytoplasmic retention. In addition, hnRNPA1 was recruited to stress granules after treatment of cells with quercetin for up to 48 h, and the levels of cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis), an internal ribosome entry site translation-dependent protein, were reduced by hnRNPA1 regulation. This is the first report that anti-cancer effects of quercetin are mediated, in part, by impairing functions of hnRNPA1, insights that were obtained using a chemical proteomics strategy. PMID:24962584

  10. Identification of potential glucocorticoid receptor therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alexandra L.; Coarfa, Cristian; Qian, Jun; Wilkerson, Joseph J.; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Krett, Nancy L.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Rosen, Steven T.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are a cornerstone of combination therapies for multiple myeloma. However, patients ultimately develop resistance to GCs frequently based on decreased glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. An understanding of the direct targets of GC actions, which induce cell death, is expected to culminate in potential therapeutic strategies for inducing cell death by regulating downstream targets in the absence of a functional GR. The specific goal of our research is to identify primary GR targets that contribute to GC-induced cell death, with the ultimate goal of developing novel therapeutics around these targets that can be used to overcome resistance to GCs in the absence of GR. Using the MM.1S glucocorticoid-sensitive human myeloma cell line, we began with the broad platform of gene expression profiling to identify glucocorticoid-regulated genes further refined by combination treatment with phosphatidylinositol-3’-kinase inhibition (PI3Ki). To further refine the search to distinguish direct and indirect targets of GR that respond to the combination GC and PI3Ki treatment of MM.1S cells, we integrated 1) gene expression profiles of combination GC treatment with PI3Ki, which induces synergistic cell death; 2) negative correlation between genes inhibited by combination treatment in MM.1S cells and genes over-expressed in myeloma patients to establish clinical relevance and 3) GR chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-Seq) in myeloma cells to identify global chromatin binding for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Using established bioinformatics platforms, we have integrated these data sets to identify a subset of candidate genes that may form the basis for a comprehensive picture of glucocorticoid actions in multiple myeloma. As a proof of principle, we have verified two targets, namely RRM2 and BCL2L1, as primary functional targets of GR involved in GC-induced cell death. PMID:26715915

  11. The Pyk2 FERM domain: a Novel Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Christopher A.; Loftus, Joseph C.

    2009-01-01

    Importance of the field The focal adhesion tyrosine kinases FAK and Pyk2 are uniquely situated to act as critical mediators for the activation of signaling pathways that regulate cell migration, proliferation, and survival. By coordinating adhesion and cytoskeletal dynamics with survival and growth signaling, FAK and Pyk2 represent molecular therapeutic targets in cancer as malignant cells often exhibit defects in these processes. Areas covered in this review This review examines the structure and function of the focal adhesion kinase Pyk2 and intends to provide a rationale for the employ of modulating strategies that include both catalytic and extra-catalytic approaches that have been developed in the last 3–5 years. What the reader will gain Targeting tyrosine kinases in oncology has focused on the ATP binding pocket as means to inhibit catalytic activity and down-regulate pathways involved in tumor invasion. This review will discuss the available catalytic inhibitors and compare them to the alternative approach of targeting protein-protein interactions that regulate kinase activity Take home message Development of specific catalytic inhibitors of the focal adhesion kinases has improved but significant challenges remain. Thus, approaches that inhibit the effector function of Pyk2 by targeting regulatory modules can increase specificity and will be a welcome asset to the therapeutic arena. PMID:20001213

  12. Virus Maturation as a Novel HIV-1 Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Catherine S.; Salzwedel, Karl; Freed, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    Development of novel therapeutic targets against HIV-1 is a high research priority due to the serious clinical consequences associated with acquisition of resistance to current antiretroviral drugs. The HIV-1 structural protein Gag represents a potential novel therapeutic target as it plays a central role in virus particle production, yet is not targeted by any of the currently approved antiretroviral drugs. The Gag polyprotein precursor multimerizes to form immature particles that bud from the infected cell. Concomitant with virus release, the Gag precursor undergoes proteolytic processing by the viral protease to generate the mature Gag proteins, which include capsid (CA). Once liberated from the Gag polyprotein precursor, CA molecules interact to reassemble into a condensed conical core, which organizes the viral RNA genome and several viral proteins to facilitate virus replication in the next round of infection. Correct Gag proteolytic processing and core assembly are therefore essential for virus infectivity. In this review, we discuss novel strategies to inhibit maturation by targeting proteolytic cleavage sites in Gag or CA-CA interactions required for core formation. The identification and development of lead maturation inhibitors are highlighted. PMID:19534569

  13. Exploiting the Fanconi Anemia Pathway for Targeted Anti-Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Ukhyun; Kim, Hyungjin

    2015-01-01

    Genome instability, primarily caused by faulty DNA repair mechanisms, drives tumorigenesis. Therapeutic interventions that exploit deregulated DNA repair in cancer have made considerable progress by targeting tumor-specific alterations of DNA repair factors, which either induces synthetic lethality or augments the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The study of Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare inherited blood disorder and cancer predisposition syndrome, has been instrumental in understanding the extent to which DNA repair defects contribute to tumorigenesis. The FA pathway functions to resolve blocked replication forks in response to DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs), and accumulating knowledge of its activation by the ubiquitin-mediated signaling pathway has provided promising therapeutic opportunities for cancer treatment. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of FA pathway regulation and its potential application for designing tailored therapeutics that take advantage of deregulated DNA ICL repair in cancer. PMID:26194820

  14. Bioreductive prodrugs as cancer therapeutics: targeting tumor hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Guise, Christopher P.; Mowday, Alexandra M.; Ashoorzadeh, Amir; Yuan, Ran; Lin, Wan-Hua; Wu, Dong-Hai; Smaill, Jeff B.; Patterson, Adam V.; Ding, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia, a state of low oxygen, is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with disease progression as well as resistance to radiotherapy and certain chemotherapeutic drugs. Hypoxic regions in tumors, therefore, represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. To date, five distinct classes of bioreactive prodrugs have been developed to target hypoxic cells in solid tumors. These hypoxia-activated prodrugs, including nitro compounds, N-oxides, quinones, and metal complexes, generally share a common mechanism of activation whereby they are reduced by intracellular oxidoreductases in an oxygen-sensitive manner to form cytotoxins. Several examples including PR-104, TH-302, and EO9 are currently undergoing phase II and phase III clinical evaluation. In this review, we discuss the nature of tumor hypoxia as a therapeutic target, focusing on the development of bioreductive prodrugs. We also describe the current knowledge of how each prodrug class is activated and detail the clinical progress of leading examples. PMID:23845143

  15. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 108 particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer.

  16. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 10(8) particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer. PMID:27004512

  17. Long-acting antituberculous therapeutic nanoparticles target macrophage endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Edagwa, Benson J.; Guo, Dongwei; Puligujja, Pavan; Chen, Han; McMillan, JoEllyn; Liu, Xinming; Gendelman, Howard E.; Narayanasamy, Prabagaran

    2014-01-01

    Eradication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection requires daily administration of combinations of rifampin (RIF), isoniazid [isonicotinylhydrazine (INH)], pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, among other drug therapies. To facilitate and optimize MTB therapeutic selections, a mononuclear phagocyte (MP; monocyte, macrophage, and dendritic cell)-targeted drug delivery strategy was developed. Long-acting nanoformulations of RIF and an INH derivative, pentenyl-INH (INHP), were prepared, and their physicochemical properties were evaluated. This included the evaluation of MP particle uptake and retention, cell viability, and antimicrobial efficacy. Drug levels reached 6 μg/106 cells in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) for nanoparticle treatments compared with 0.1 μg/106 cells for native drugs. High RIF and INHP levels were retained in MDM for >15 d following nanoparticle loading. Rapid loss of native drugs was observed in cells and culture fluids within 24 h. Antimicrobial activities were determined against Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis). Coadministration of nanoformulated RIF and INHP provided a 6-fold increase in therapeutic efficacy compared with equivalent concentrations of native drugs. Notably, nanoformulated RIF and INHP were found to be localized in recycling and late MDM endosomal compartments. These were the same compartments that contained the pathogen. Our results demonstrate the potential of antimicrobial nanomedicines to simplify MTB drug regimens.—Edagwa, B. J., Guo, D., Puligujja, P., Chen, H., McMillan, J., Liu, X., Gendelman, H. E., Narayanasamy, P. Long-acting antituberculous therapeutic nanoparticles target macrophage endosomes. PMID:25122556

  18. Interferon-γ: Promising therapeutic target in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Joe WE; Ramji, Dipak P

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the vasculature and is the primary cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD is currently the world’s leading cause of death and the numbers are predicted to rise further because of a global increase in risk factors such as diabetes and obesity. Current therapies such as statins have had a major impact in reducing mortality from CVD. However, there is a marked residual CVD risk in patients on statin therapy. It is therefore important to understand the molecular basis of this disease in detail and to develop alternative novel therapeutics. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is often regarded as a master regulator of atherosclerosis development. IFN-γ is able to influence several key steps during atherosclerosis development, including pro-inflammatory gene expression, the recruitment of monocytes from the blood to the activated arterial endothelium and plaque stability. This central role of IFN-γ makes it a promising therapeutic target. The purpose of this editorial is to describe the key role IFN-γ plays during atherosclerosis development, as well as discuss potential strategies to target it therapeutically. PMID:26309816

  19. MicroRNAs and other non-coding RNAs as targets for anticancer drug development

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hui; Fabbri, Muller; Calin, George A.

    2015-01-01

    With the first cancer-targeted microRNA drug, MRX34, a liposome-based miR-34 mimic, entering phase I clinical trial in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma in April 2013, miRNA therapeutics are attracting special attention from both academia and biotechnology companies. Although to date the most studied non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are miRNAs, the importance of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is increasingly being recognized. Here we summarize the roles of miRNAs and lncRNAs in cancer, with a focus on the recently identified novel mechanisms of action, and discuss the current strategies in designing ncRNA-targeting therapeutics, as well as the associated challenges. PMID:24172333

  20. Synthesis and anti-cancer activity of covalent conjugates of artemisinin and a transferrin-receptor targeting peptide.

    PubMed

    Oh, Steve; Kim, Byung Ju; Singh, Narendra P; Lai, Henry; Sasaki, Tomikazu

    2009-02-01

    Artemisinin, a natural product isolated from Artemisia annua L., shows a unique anti-cancer activity by an iron dependent mechanism. Artemisinin was covalently conjugated to a transferrin-receptor targeting peptide, HAIYPRH that binds to a cavity on the surface of transferrin receptor. This enables artemisinin to be co-internalized with receptor-bound transferrin. The iron released from transferrin can activate artemisinin to generate toxic radical species to kill cells. The artemisinin-peptide conjugates showed potent anti-cancer activity against Molt-4 leukemia cells with a significantly improved cancer/normal cells selectivity. PMID:18838215

  1. The SIX1-EYA transcriptional complex as a therapeutic target in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, Melanie A; Towers, Christina Garlington; Patrick, Aaron N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The SIX homeodomain proteins and the EYA family of co-activators form a bipartite transcription factor complex that promotes the proliferation and survival of progenitor cells during organogenesis and is down-regulated in most adult tissues. Abnormal over-expression of SIX1 and EYA in adult tissue is associated with the initiation and progression of diverse tumor types. Importantly, SIX1 and EYA are often co-overexpressed in tumors, and the SIX1-EYA2 interaction has been shown to be critical for metastasis in a breast cancer model. The EYA proteins also contain protein tyrosine phosphatase activity, which plays an important role in breast cancer growth and metastasis as well as directing cells to the repair pathway upon DNA damage. Areas covered This review provides a summary of the SIX1/EYA complex as it relates to development and disease and the current efforts to therapeutically target this complex. Expert opinion Recently, there have been an increasing number of studies suggesting that targeting the SIX1/EYA transcriptional complex will potently inhibit tumor progression. Although current attempts to develop inhibitors targeting this complex are still in the early stages, continued efforts towards developing better compounds may ultimately result in effective anti-cancer therapies. PMID:25555392

  2. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-01

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:26819503

  3. Human neutrophil elastase: mediator and therapeutic target in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Peter A; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2008-01-01

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is present within atherosclerotic plaques where it contributes to matrix degradation and weakening of the vessel wall associated with the complications of aneurysm formation and plaque rupture. It is joined by other extracellular proteases in these actions but the broad range of substrates and potency of HNE coupled with the potential for rapid increases in HNE activity associated with neutrophil degranulation in acute coronary syndromes single this disruptive protease out as therapeutic target in atherosclerotic disease. This review summarises the role of HNE in neutrophil-mediated endothelial injury and the evidence for HNE as a mediator of atherosclerotic plaque development. The therapeutic potential of HNE neutralising antiproteases, alpha-1-antitrypsin and elafin, in atherosclerosis, is discussed. PMID:18289916

  4. Clinical development of cancer therapeutics that target metabolism.

    PubMed

    Clem, B F; O'Neal, J; Klarer, A C; Telang, S; Chesney, J

    2016-06-01

    Glucose and glutamine metabolism in cancer cells are markedly elevated relative to non-transformed normal cells. This metabolic reprogramming enables the production of adenosine triphosphate and the anabolic precursors needed for survival, growth and motility. The recent observations that mutant oncogenic proteins and the loss of tumor suppressors activate key metabolic enzymes suggest that selective inhibition of these enzymes may yield effective cancer therapeutics with acceptable toxicities. In support of this concept, pre-clinical studies of small molecule antagonists of several metabolic enzymes in tumor-bearing mice have demonstrated reasonable therapeutic indices. We will review the rationale for targeting metabolic enzymes as a strategy to treat cancer and will detail the results of several recent clinical trials of metabolic inhibitors in advanced cancer patients. PMID:26428335

  5. Targeting ischemic penumbra: part I - from pathophysiology to therapeutic strategy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shimin; Levine, Steven R.; Winn, H. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Penumbra is the viable tissue around the irreversibly damaged ischemic core. The purpose of acute stroke treatment is to salvage penumbral tissue and to improve brain function. However, the majority of acute stroke patients who have treatable penumbra are left untreated. Therefore, developing an effective non-recanalizational therapeutics, such as neuroprotective agents, has significant clinical applications. Part I of this serial review on “targeting penumbra” puts special emphases on penumbral pathophysiology and the development of therapeutic strategies. Bioenergetic intervention by massive metabolic suppression and direct energy delivery would be a promising future direction. An effective drug delivery system for this purpose should be able to penetrate BBB and achieve high local tissue drug levels while non-ischemic region being largely unaffected. Selective drug delivery to ischemic stroke penumbra is feasible and deserves intensive research. PMID:20607107

  6. Engineering therapeutic antibodies targeting G-protein–coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Migyeong; Jung, Sang Taek

    2016-01-01

    G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the most attractive therapeutic target classes because of their critical roles in intracellular signaling and their clinical relevance to a variety of diseases, including cancer, infection and inflammation. However, high conformational variability, the small exposed area of extracellular epitopes and difficulty in the preparation of GPCR antigens have delayed both the isolation of therapeutic anti-GPCR antibodies as well as studies on the structure, function and biochemical mechanisms of GPCRs. To overcome the challenges in generating highly specific anti-GPCR antibodies with enhanced efficacy and safety, various forms of antigens have been successfully designed and employed for screening with newly emerged systems based on laboratory animal immunization and high-throughput-directed evolution. PMID:26846450

  7. Vitamin A-aldehyde adducts: AMD risk and targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Janet R

    2016-04-26

    Although currently available treatment options for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are limited, particularly for atrophic AMD, the identification of predisposing genetic variations has informed clinical studies addressing therapeutic options such as complement inhibitors and anti-inflammatory agents. To lower risk of early AMD, recommended lifestyle interventions such as the avoidance of smoking and the intake of low glycemic antioxidant-rich diets have largely followed from the identification of nongenetic modifiable factors. On the other hand, the challenge of understanding the complex relationship between aging and cumulative damage leading to AMD has fueled investigations of the visual cycle adducts that accumulate in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and are a hallmark of aging retina. These studies have revealed properties of these compounds that provide insights into processes that may compromise RPE and could contribute to disease mechanisms in AMD. This work has also led to the design of targeted therapeutics that are currently under investigation. PMID:27071115

  8. Human mitochondrial peptide deformylase, a new anticancer target of actinonin-based antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mona D; She, Yuhong; Soskis, Michael J; Borella, Christopher P; Gardner, Jeffrey R; Hayes, Paula A; Dy, Benzon M; Heaney, Mark L; Philips, Mark R; Bornmann, William G; Sirotnak, Francis M; Scheinberg, David A

    2004-10-01

    Peptide deformylase activity was thought to be limited to ribosomal protein synthesis in prokaryotes, where new peptides are initiated with an N-formylated methionine. We describe here a new human peptide deformylase (Homo sapiens PDF, or HsPDF) that is localized to the mitochondria. HsPDF is capable of removing formyl groups from N-terminal methionines of newly synthesized mitochondrial proteins, an activity previously not thought to be necessary in mammalian cells. We show that actinonin, a peptidomimetic antibiotic that inhibits HsPDF, also inhibits the proliferation of 16 human cancer cell lines. We designed and synthesized 33 chemical analogs of actinonin; all of the molecules with potent activity against HsPDF also inhibited tumor cell growth, and vice versa, confirming target specificity. Small interfering RNA inhibition of HsPDF protein expression was also antiproliferative. Actinonin treatment of cells led to a tumor-specific mitochondrial membrane depolarization and ATP depletion in a time- and dose-dependent manner; removal of actinonin led to a recovery of the membrane potential consistent with indirect effects on the electron transport chain. In animal models, oral or parenteral actinonin was well tolerated and inhibited human prostate cancer and lung cancer growth. We conclude that HsPDF is a new human mitochondrial enzyme that may provide a novel selective target for anticancer therapy by use of actinonin-based antibiotics. PMID:15489958

  9. Human mitochondrial peptide deformylase, a new anticancer target of actinonin-based antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mona D.; She, Yuhong; Soskis, Michael J.; Borella, Christopher P.; Gardner, Jeffrey R.; Hayes, Paula A.; Dy, Benzon M.; Heaney, Mark L.; Philips, Mark R.; Bornmann, William G.; Sirotnak, Francis M.; Scheinberg, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Peptide deformylase activity was thought to be limited to ribosomal protein synthesis in prokaryotes, where new peptides are initiated with an N-formylated methionine. We describe here a new human peptide deformylase (Homo sapiens PDF, or HsPDF) that is localized to the mitochondria. HsPDF is capable of removing formyl groups from N-terminal methionines of newly synthesized mitochondrial proteins, an activity previously not thought to be necessary in mammalian cells. We show that actinonin, a peptidomimetic antibiotic that inhibits HsPDF, also inhibits the proliferation of 16 human cancer cell lines. We designed and synthesized 33 chemical analogs of actinonin; all of the molecules with potent activity against HsPDF also inhibited tumor cell growth, and vice versa, confirming target specificity. Small interfering RNA inhibition of HsPDF protein expression was also antiproliferative. Actinonin treatment of cells led to a tumor-specific mitochondrial membrane depolarization and ATP depletion in a time- and dose-dependent manner; removal of actinonin led to a recovery of the membrane potential consistent with indirect effects on the electron transport chain. In animal models, oral or parenteral actinonin was well tolerated and inhibited human prostate cancer and lung cancer growth. We conclude that HsPDF is a new human mitochondrial enzyme that may provide a novel selective target for anticancer therapy by use of actinonin-based antibiotics. PMID:15489958

  10. Targeting Cytochrome P450 Enzymes: A New Approach in Anti-cancer Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Robert D.; Njar, Vincent C.O.

    2007-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) represent a large class of heme-containing enzymes that catalyze the metabolism of multitudes of substrates both endogenous and exogenous. Until recently, however, CYPs have been largely overlooked in cancer drug development, acknowledged only for their role in Phase I metabolism of chemotherapeutics. The first successful strategy targeting CYP enzymes in cancer therapy was the development of potent inhibitors of CYP19 (aromatase) for the treatment of breast cancer. Aromatase inhibitors ushered in a new era in hormone ablation therapy for estrogen dependent cancers, and have paved the way for similar strategies (i.e. inhibition of CYP17) that combat androgen dependent prostate cancer. Identification of CYPs involved in the inactivation of anti-cancer metabolites of Vitamin D3 and Vitamin A has triggered development of agents that target these enzymes as well. The discovery of the over-expression of exogenous metabolizing CYPs, such as CYP1B1, in cancer cells has roused interest in the development of inhibitors for chemoprevention and of prodrugs designed to be activated by CYPs only in cancer cells. Finally, the expression of CYPs within tumors has been utilized in the development of bioreductive molecules that are activated by CYPs only under hypoxic conditions. This review offers the first comprehensive analysis of strategies in drug development that either inhibit or exploit CYP enzymes for the treatment of cancer. PMID:17544277

  11. Folate mediated self-assembled phytosterol-alginate nanoparticles for targeted intracellular anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianting; Wang, Ming; Zheng, Mingming; Guo, Qiong; Wang, Yafan; Wang, Heqing; Xie, Xiangrong; Huang, Fenghong; Gong, Renmin

    2015-05-01

    Self-assembled core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized from water-soluble alginate substituted by hydrophobic phytosterols. Folate, a cancer-cell-specific ligand, was conjugated to the phytosterol-alginate (PA) NPs for targeting folate-receptor-overexpressing cancer cells. The physicochemical properties of folate-phytosterol-alginate (FPA) NPs were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic light scattering, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Doxorubicin (DOX), an anticancer drug, was entrapped inside prepared NPs by dialysis method. The identification of prepared FPA NPs to folate-receptor-overexpressing cancer cells (KB cells) was confirmed by cytotoxicity and folate competition assays. Compared to the pure DOX and DOX/PA NPs, the DOX/FPA NPs had lower IC50 value to KB cells because of folate-receptor-mediated endocytosis process and the cytotoxicity of DOX/FPA NPs to KB cells could be competitively inhibited by free folate. The cellular uptake and internalization of pure DOX and DOX/FPA NPs was confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy image and the higher intracellular uptake of drug for DOX/FPA NPs over pure DOX was observed. The FPA NPs had the potential as a promising carrier to target drugs to cancer cells overexpressing folate receptors and avoid cytotoxicity to normal tissues. PMID:25829128

  12. Lactobionic acid and carboxymethyl chitosan functionalized graphene oxide nanocomposites as targeted anticancer drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qixia; Lv, Yao; Williams, Gareth R; Tao, Lei; Yang, Huihui; Li, Heyu; Zhu, Limin

    2016-10-20

    In this work, we report a targeted drug delivery system built by functionalizing graphene oxide (GO) with carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC), fluorescein isothiocyanate and lactobionic acid (LA). Analogous systems without LA were prepared as controls. Doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto the composites through adsorption. The release behavior from both the LA-functionalized and the LA-free material is markedly pH sensitive. The modified GOs have high biocompatibility with the liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721, but can induce cell death after 24h incubation if loaded with DOX. Tests with shorter (2h) incubation times were undertaken to investigate the selectivity of the GO composites: under these conditions, neither DOX-loaded system was found to be toxic to the non-cancerous L929 cell line, but the LA-containing composite showed the ability to selectively induce cell death in cancerous (SMMC-7721) cells while the LA-free analogue was inactive here also. These findings show that the modified GO materials are strong potential candidates for targeted anticancer drug delivery systems. PMID:27474628

  13. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Alex

    2015-01-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery & development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. The conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. The importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. The most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. The factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery & development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials. PMID:26779369

  14. Exosomal miRNAs as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Thind, Arron; Wilson, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Intercommunication between cancer cells and with their surrounding and distant environments is key to the survival, progression and metastasis of the tumour. Exosomes play a role in this communication process. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently dysregulated in tumour cells and can be reflected by distinct exosomal miRNA (ex-miRNA) profiles isolated from the bodily fluids of cancer patients. Here, the potential of ex-miRNA as a cancer biomarker and therapeutic target is critically analysed. Exosomes are a stable source of miRNA in bodily fluids but, despite a number of methods for exosome extraction and miRNA quantification, their suitability for diagnostics in a clinical setting is questionable. Furthermore, exosomally transferred miRNAs can alter the behaviour of recipient tumour and stromal cells to promote oncogenesis, highlighting a role in cell communication in cancer. However, our incomplete understanding of exosome biogenesis and miRNA loading mechanisms means that strategies to target exosomes or their transferred miRNAs are limited and not specific to tumour cells. Therefore, if ex-miRNA is to be employed in novel non-invasive diagnostic approaches and as a therapeutic target in cancer, two further advances are necessary: in methods to isolate and detect ex-miRNA, and a better understanding of their biogenesis and functions in tumour-cell communication. PMID:27440105

  15. Therapeutically targeting mitochondrial redox signalling alleviates endothelial dysfunction in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cathal; Kenny, Louise C

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant placentation generating placental oxidative stress is proposed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Unfortunately, therapeutic trials of antioxidants have been uniformly disappointing. There is provisional evidence implicating mitochondrial dysfunction as a source of oxidative stress in preeclampsia. Here we provide evidence that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediates endothelial dysfunction and establish that directly targeting mitochondrial scavenging may provide a protective role. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to 3% plasma from women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia resulted in a significant decrease in mitochondrial function with a subsequent significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation compared to cells exposed to plasma from women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Real-time PCR analysis showed increased expression of inflammatory markers TNF-α, TLR-9 and ICAM-1 respectively in endothelial cells treated with preeclampsia plasma. MitoTempo is a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, pre-treatment of cells with MitoTempo protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Furthermore MitoTempo significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide production in cells exposed to preeclampsia plasma by normalising mitochondrial metabolism. MitoTempo significantly altered the inflammatory profile of plasma treated cells. These novel data support a functional role for mitochondrial redox signaling in modulating the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and identifies mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants as potential therapeutic candidates. PMID:27604418

  16. Exosomal miRNAs as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Thind, Arron; Wilson, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Intercommunication between cancer cells and with their surrounding and distant environments is key to the survival, progression and metastasis of the tumour. Exosomes play a role in this communication process. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently dysregulated in tumour cells and can be reflected by distinct exosomal miRNA (ex-miRNA) profiles isolated from the bodily fluids of cancer patients. Here, the potential of ex-miRNA as a cancer biomarker and therapeutic target is critically analysed. Exosomes are a stable source of miRNA in bodily fluids but, despite a number of methods for exosome extraction and miRNA quantification, their suitability for diagnostics in a clinical setting is questionable. Furthermore, exosomally transferred miRNAs can alter the behaviour of recipient tumour and stromal cells to promote oncogenesis, highlighting a role in cell communication in cancer. However, our incomplete understanding of exosome biogenesis and miRNA loading mechanisms means that strategies to target exosomes or their transferred miRNAs are limited and not specific to tumour cells. Therefore, if ex-miRNA is to be employed in novel non-invasive diagnostic approaches and as a therapeutic target in cancer, two further advances are necessary: in methods to isolate and detect ex-miRNA, and a better understanding of their biogenesis and functions in tumour-cell communication. PMID:27440105

  17. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27574550

  18. Therapeutically targeting mitochondrial redox signalling alleviates endothelial dysfunction in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Cathal; Kenny, Louise C.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant placentation generating placental oxidative stress is proposed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Unfortunately, therapeutic trials of antioxidants have been uniformly disappointing. There is provisional evidence implicating mitochondrial dysfunction as a source of oxidative stress in preeclampsia. Here we provide evidence that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediates endothelial dysfunction and establish that directly targeting mitochondrial scavenging may provide a protective role. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to 3% plasma from women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia resulted in a significant decrease in mitochondrial function with a subsequent significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation compared to cells exposed to plasma from women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Real-time PCR analysis showed increased expression of inflammatory markers TNF-α, TLR-9 and ICAM-1 respectively in endothelial cells treated with preeclampsia plasma. MitoTempo is a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, pre-treatment of cells with MitoTempo protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Furthermore MitoTempo significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide production in cells exposed to preeclampsia plasma by normalising mitochondrial metabolism. MitoTempo significantly altered the inflammatory profile of plasma treated cells. These novel data support a functional role for mitochondrial redox signaling in modulating the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and identifies mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants as potential therapeutic candidates. PMID:27604418

  19. Therapeutics targeting persistent inflammation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Machowska, Anna; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a condition intrinsically linked to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its other typical sequelae, such as acquired immune dysfunction, protein-energy wasting (PEW), and accelerated vascular aging that promote premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) and infections, the two leading causes of death in CKD patients. Inflammation is a major contributor to complications in CKD, and inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, correlate with underlying causes and consequences of the inflamed uremic phenotype, such as oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, CVD, PEW, and infections, and are sensitive and independent predictors of outcome in CKD. Therefore, inflammation appears to be a logical target for potential preventive and therapeutic interventions in patients with CKD. Putative anti-inflammatory therapy strategies aiming at preventing complications and improving outcomes in CKD span over several areas: (1) dealing with the source of inflammation (such as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal or periodontal disease and depression); (2) providing nonspecific immune modulatory effects by promoting healthy dietary habits and other lifestyle changes; (3) promoting increased use of recognized pharmacologic interventions that have pleiotropic effects; and, (4) introducing novel targeted anticytokine interventions. This review provides a brief update on inflammatory biomarkers and possible therapeutic approaches targeting inflammation and the uremic inflammatory milieu in patients with CKD. PMID:26173187

  20. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Abraha, Aman M; Ketema, Ezra B

    2016-08-15

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:27574550

  1. Novel therapeutic targets on the horizon for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wan-Ling; Jain, Amit; Takano, Angela; Newell, Evan W; Iyer, N Gopalakrishna; Lim, Wan-Teck; Tan, Eng-Huat; Zhai, Weiwei; Hillmer, Axel M; Tam, Wai-Leong; Tan, Daniel S W

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, and is classically divided into two major histological subtypes: non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Although NSCLC and SCLC are considered distinct entities with different genomic landscapes, emerging evidence highlights a convergence in therapeutically relevant targets for both histologies. In adenocarcinomas with defined alterations such as EGFR mutations and ALK translocations, targeted therapies are now first-line standard of care. By contrast, many experimental and targeted agents remain largely unsuccessful for SCLC. Intense preclinical research and clinical trials are underway to exploit unique traits of lung cancer, such as oncogene dependency, DNA damage response, angiogenesis, and cellular plasticity arising from presence of cancer stem cell lineages. In addition, the promising clinical activity observed in NSCLC in response to immune checkpoint blockade has spurred great interest in the field of immunooncology, with the scope to develop a diverse repertoire of synergistic and personalised immunotherapeutics. In this Review, we discuss novel therapeutic agents for lung cancer that are in early-stage development, and how prospective clinical trials and drug development may be shaped by a deeper understanding of this heterogeneous disease. PMID:27511159

  2. Breast cancer stem cells, EMT and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Kotiyal, Srishti; Bhattacharya, Susinjan

    2014-10-10

    A small heterogeneous population of breast cancer cells acts as seeds to induce new tumor growth. These seeds or breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) exhibit great phenotypical plasticity which allows them to undergo "epithelial to mesenchymal transition" (EMT) at the site of primary tumor and a future reverse transition. Apart from metastasis they are also responsible for maintaining the tumor and conferring it with drug and radiation resistance and a tendency for post-treatment relapse. Many of the signaling pathways involved in induction of EMT are involved in CSC generation and regulation. Here we are briefly reviewing the mechanism of TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, TNF-α, NF-κB, RTK signalling pathways which are involved in EMT as well as BCSCs maintenance. Therapeutic targeting or inhibition of the key/accessory players of these pathways could control growth of BCSCs and hence malignant cancer. Additionally several miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer stem cells indicating their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. This review also lists the miRNA interactions identified in BCSCs and discusses on some newly identified targets in the BCSC regulatory pathways like SHIP2, nicastrin, Pin 1, IGF-1R, pro-inflammatory cytokines and syndecan which can be targeted for therapeutic achievements. PMID:25261721

  3. Neuroimmunotherapies Targeting T Cells: From Pathophysiology to Therapeutic Applications.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Stefan; Wiendl, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis (MS) have significantly increased over the last few years. T lymphocytes are considered to play a central role in initiating and perpetuating the pathological immune response. Currently approved therapies for MS target T lymphocytes, either in an unspecific manner or directly by interference with specific T-cell pathways. While the concept of "T-cell-specific therapy" implies specificity and selectivity, currently approved approaches come from a general shaping of the immune system towards anti-inflammatory immune responses by non-T-cell-selective immune suppression or immune modulation (e.g., interferons-immune modulation approach) to a depletion of immune cell populations involving T cells (e.g., anti-CD52, alemtuzumab-immune selective depletion approach), or a selective inhibition of distinct molecular pathways in order to sequester leucocytes (e.g., natalizumab-leukocyte sequestration approach). This review will highlight the rationale and results of different T-cell-directed therapeutic approaches coming from basic animal experiments to clinical trials. We will first discuss the pathophysiological rationale for targeting T lymphocytes in MS leading to currently approved treatments acting on T lymphocytes. Furthermore, we will disuss previous promising concepts that have failed to show efficacy in clinical trials or were halted as a result of unexpected adverse events. Learning from the discrepancies between expectations and failures in practical outcomes helps to optimize future research approaches and clinical study designs. As our current view of MS pathogenesis and patient needs is rapidly evolving, novel therapeutic approaches targeting T lymphocytes will also be discussed, including specific molecular interventions such as cytokine-directed treatments or strategies enhancing immunoregulatory mechanisms. Based on clinical experience and novel pathophysiological approaches, T-cell-based strategies will remain a

  4. Targeted polymeric therapeutic nanoparticles: design, development and clinical translation†

    PubMed Central

    Kamaly, Nazila; Xiao, Zeyu; Valencia, Pedro M.; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F.; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2013-01-01

    Polymeric materials have been used in a range of pharmaceutical and biotechnology products for more than 40 years. These materials have evolved from their earlier use as biodegradable products such as resorbable sutures, orthopaedic implants, macroscale and microscale drug delivery systems such as microparticles and wafers used as controlled drug release depots, to multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) capable of targeting, and controlled release of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. These newer generations of targeted and controlled release polymeric NPs are now engineered to navigate the complex in vivo environment, and incorporate functionalities for achieving target specificity, control of drug concentration and exposure kinetics at the tissue, cell, and subcellular levels. Indeed this optimization of drug pharmacology as aided by careful design of multifunctional NPs can lead to improved drug safety and efficacy, and may be complimentary to drug enhancements that are traditionally achieved by medicinal chemistry. In this regard, polymeric NPs have the potential to result in a highly differentiated new class of therapeutics, distinct from the original active drugs used in their composition, and distinct from first generation NPs that largely facilitated drug formulation. A greater flexibility in the design of drug molecules themselves may also be facilitated following their incorporation into NPs, as drug properties (solubility, metabolism, plasma binding, biodistribution, target tissue accumulation) will no longer be constrained to the same extent by drug chemical composition, but also become in-part the function of the physicochemical properties of the NP. The combination of optimally designed drugs with optimally engineered polymeric NPs opens up the possibility of improved clinical outcomes that may not be achievable with the administration of drugs in their conventional form. In this critical review, we aim to provide insights into the design and development

  5. Targeted polymeric therapeutic nanoparticles: design, development and clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Kamaly, Nazila; Xiao, Zeyu; Valencia, Pedro M; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F; Farokhzad, Omid C

    2012-04-01

    Polymeric materials have been used in a range of pharmaceutical and biotechnology products for more than 40 years. These materials have evolved from their earlier use as biodegradable products such as resorbable sutures, orthopaedic implants, macroscale and microscale drug delivery systems such as microparticles and wafers used as controlled drug release depots, to multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) capable of targeting, and controlled release of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. These newer generations of targeted and controlled release polymeric NPs are now engineered to navigate the complex in vivo environment, and incorporate functionalities for achieving target specificity, control of drug concentration and exposure kinetics at the tissue, cell, and subcellular levels. Indeed this optimization of drug pharmacology as aided by careful design of multifunctional NPs can lead to improved drug safety and efficacy, and may be complimentary to drug enhancements that are traditionally achieved by medicinal chemistry. In this regard, polymeric NPs have the potential to result in a highly differentiated new class of therapeutics, distinct from the original active drugs used in their composition, and distinct from first generation NPs that largely facilitated drug formulation. A greater flexibility in the design of drug molecules themselves may also be facilitated following their incorporation into NPs, as drug properties (solubility, metabolism, plasma binding, biodistribution, target tissue accumulation) will no longer be constrained to the same extent by drug chemical composition, but also become in-part the function of the physicochemical properties of the NP. The combination of optimally designed drugs with optimally engineered polymeric NPs opens up the possibility of improved clinical outcomes that may not be achievable with the administration of drugs in their conventional form. In this critical review, we aim to provide insights into the design and development

  6. Systems approaches to design of targeted therapeutic delivery.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Jacob W; Brenner, Jacob S; Greineder, Colin F; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery aims to improve therapeutic effects and enable mechanisms that are not feasible for untargeted agents (e.g., due to impermeable biological barriers). To achieve targeting, a drug or its carrier should possess properties providing specific accumulation from circulation at the desired site. There are several examples of systems-inspired approaches that have been applied to achieve this goal. First, proteomics analysis of plasma membrane fraction of the vascular endothelium has identified a series of target molecules and their ligands (e.g., antibodies) that deliver conjugated cargoes to well-defined vascular cells and subcellular compartments. Second, selection of ligands binding to cells of interest using phage display libraries in vitro and in vivo has provided peptides and polypeptides that bind to normal and pathologically altered cells. Finally, large-scale high-throughput combinatorial synthesis and selection of lipid- and polymer-based nanocarriers varying their chemical components has yielded a series of carriers accumulating in diverse organs and delivering RNA interference agents to diverse cells. Together, these approaches offer a basis for systems-based design and selection of targets, targeting molecules, and targeting vehicles. Current studies focus on expanding the arsenal of these and alternative targeting strategies, devising drug delivery systems capitalizing on these strategies and evaluation of their benefit/risk ratio in adequate animal models of human diseases. These efforts, combined with better understanding of mechanisms and unintended consequences of these targeted interventions, need to be ultimately translated into industrial development and the clinical domain. PMID:25946066

  7. Systems approaches to design of targeted therapeutic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Myerson, Jacob W.; Brenner, Jacob S.; Greineder, Colin F.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery aims to improve therapeutic effects and enable mechanisms that are not feasible for untargeted agents (e.g., due to impermeable biological barriers). To achieve targeting, a drug or its carrier should possess properties providing specific accumulation from circulation at the desired site. There are several examples of systems-inspired approaches that have been applied to achieve this goal. First, proteomics analysis of plasma membrane fraction of the vascular endothelium has identified a series of target molecules and their ligands (e.g., antibodies) that deliver conjugated cargoes to well-defined vascular cells and subcellular compartments. Second, selection of ligands binding to cells of interest using phage display libraries in vitro and in vivo has provided peptides and polypeptides that bind to normal and pathologically altered cells. Finally, large-scale high-throughput combinatorial synthesis and selection of lipid- and polymer-based nanocarriers varying their chemical components has yielded a series of carriers accumulating in diverse organs and delivering RNA interference agents to diverse cells. Together, these approaches offer a basis for systems-based design and selection of targets, targeting molecules, and targeting vehicles. Current studies focus on expanding the arsenal of these and alternative targeting strategies, devising drug delivery systems capitalizing on these strategies and evaluation of their benefit/risk ratio in adequate animal models of human diseases. These efforts, combined with better understanding of mechanisms and unintended consequences of these targeted interventions, need to be ultimately translated into industrial development and the clinical domain. PMID:25946066

  8. Therapeutic targeting of liver inflammation and fibrosis by nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Bartneck, Matthias; Warzecha, Klaudia Theresa; Tacke, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Nanomedicine constitutes the emerging field of medical applications for nanotechnology such as nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems. This technology may hold exceptional potential for novel therapeutic approaches to liver diseases. The specific and unspecific targeting of macrophages, hepatic stellate cells (HSC), hepatocytes, and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) using nanomedicine has been developed and tested in preclinical settings. These four major cell types in the liver are crucially involved in the complex sequence of events that occurs during the initiation and maintenance of liver inflammation and fibrosis. Targeting different cell types can be based on their capacity to ingest surrounding material, endocytosis, and specificity for a single cell type can be achieved by targeting characteristic structures such as receptors, sugar moieties or peptide sequences. Macrophages and especially the liver-resident Kupffer cells are in the focus of nanomedicine due to their highly efficient and unspecific uptake of most nanomaterials as well as due to their critical pathogenic functions during inflammation and fibrogenesis. The mannose receptor enables targeting macrophages in liver disease, but macrophages can also become activated by certain nanomaterials, such as peptide-modified gold nanorods (AuNRs) that render them proinflammatory. HSC, the main collagen-producing cells during fibrosis, are currently targeted using nanoconstructs that recognize the mannose 6-phosphate and insulin-like growth factor II, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor 1, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor β, or integrins. Targeting of the major liver parenchymal cell, the hepatocyte, has only recently been achieved with high specificity by mimicking apolipoproteins, naturally occurring nanoparticles of the body. LSEC were found to be targeted most efficiently using carboxy-modified micelles and their integrin receptors. This review will summarize important

  9. Therapeutic targeting of liver inflammation and fibrosis by nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Warzecha, Klaudia Theresa; Tacke, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Nanomedicine constitutes the emerging field of medical applications for nanotechnology such as nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems. This technology may hold exceptional potential for novel therapeutic approaches to liver diseases. The specific and unspecific targeting of macrophages, hepatic stellate cells (HSC), hepatocytes, and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) using nanomedicine has been developed and tested in preclinical settings. These four major cell types in the liver are crucially involved in the complex sequence of events that occurs during the initiation and maintenance of liver inflammation and fibrosis. Targeting different cell types can be based on their capacity to ingest surrounding material, endocytosis, and specificity for a single cell type can be achieved by targeting characteristic structures such as receptors, sugar moieties or peptide sequences. Macrophages and especially the liver-resident Kupffer cells are in the focus of nanomedicine due to their highly efficient and unspecific uptake of most nanomaterials as well as due to their critical pathogenic functions during inflammation and fibrogenesis. The mannose receptor enables targeting macrophages in liver disease, but macrophages can also become activated by certain nanomaterials, such as peptide-modified gold nanorods (AuNRs) that render them proinflammatory. HSC, the main collagen-producing cells during fibrosis, are currently targeted using nanoconstructs that recognize the mannose 6-phosphate and insulin-like growth factor II, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor 1, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor β, or integrins. Targeting of the major liver parenchymal cell, the hepatocyte, has only recently been achieved with high specificity by mimicking apolipoproteins, naturally occurring nanoparticles of the body. LSEC were found to be targeted most efficiently using carboxy-modified micelles and their integrin receptors. This review will summarize important

  10. Brain Arteriovenous Malformation Modeling, Pathogenesis and Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqiu; Choi, Eun-Jung; McDougall, Cameron M.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Patients harboring brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) are at life-threatening risk of rupture and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The pathogenesis of bAVM has not been completely understood. Current treatment options are invasive and ≈ 20% of patients are not offered interventional therapy because of excessive treatment risk. There are no specific medical therapies to treat bAVMs. The lack of validated animal models has been an obstacle for testing hypotheses of bAVM pathogenesis and testing new therapies. In this review, we summarize bAVM model development; and bAVM pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets that have been identified during model development. PMID:24723256

  11. Oxidative Stress in Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Sources, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Tao, Chuanyuan; Gan, Qi; Zheng, Jun; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with the highest mortality and morbidity despite only constituting approximately 10–15% of all strokes. Complex underlying mechanisms consisting of cytotoxic, excitotoxic, and inflammatory effects of intraparenchymal blood are responsible for its highly damaging effects. Oxidative stress (OS) also plays an important role in brain injury after ICH but attracts less attention than other factors. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that the metabolite axis of hemoglobin-heme-iron is the key contributor to oxidative brain damage after ICH, although other factors, such as neuroinflammation and prooxidases, are involved. This review will discuss the sources, possible molecular mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets of OS in ICH. PMID:26843907

  12. The emerging molecular machinery and therapeutic targets of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yutong; Ma, Li

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is a 100-year-old research topic. Technological advancements during the past few decades have led to significant progress in our understanding of metastatic disease. However, metastasis remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortalities. The lack of appropriate clinical trials for metastasis preventive drugs and incomplete understanding of the molecular machinery are major obstacles in metastasis prevention and treatment. A number of processes, factors, and signaling pathways are involved in regulating metastasis. Here, we discuss recent progress in metastasis research, including epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity, cancer stem cells, emerging molecular determinants and therapeutic targets, and the link between metastasis and therapy resistance. PMID:25939811

  13. T cells as a therapeutic target in SLE

    PubMed Central

    Comte, Denis; Karampetsou, Maria P.; Tsokos, George C.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by a loss of tolerance to multiple endogenous antigens. SLE etiology remains largely unknown, despite recent insight into the immunopathogenesis of the disease. T cells are important in the development of the disease by amplifying the immune response and contributing to organ damage. Aberrant signaling, cytokine secretion and tissue homing displayed by SLE T cells have been extensively studied and the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms are starting to be elucidated. T-cell targeted treatments are being explored in SLE patients. This review is an update on the T-cell abnormalities and related therapeutic options in SLE. PMID:25801878

  14. Cholesterol catabolism as a therapeutic target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Hugues; Johnston, Jonathan B.; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is an intracellular pathogen that infects 10 million worldwide and kills 2 million people every year. The uptake and utilization of nutrients by Mtb within the host cell is still poorly understood, although lipids play an important role in Mtb persistence. The recent identification of a large regulon of cholesterol catabolic genes suggests that Mtb can use host sterol for infection and persistence. In this review, we report on recent progress in elucidation of the Mtb cholesterol catabolic reactions and their potential utility as targets for tuberculosis therapeutic agents. PMID:21924910

  15. MicroRNAs as potential therapeutic targets in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Ivan G; Grafals, Monica; Portilla, Didier; Duffield, Jeremy S

    2014-01-01

    One cornerstone of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is fibrosis, as kidneys are susceptible due to their high vascularity and predisposition to ischemia. Presently, only therapies targeting the angiotensin receptor are used in clinical practice to retard the progression of CKD. Thus, there is a pressing need for new therapies designed to treat the damaged kidney. Several independent laboratories have identified a number of microRNAs that are dysregulated in human and animal models of CKD. We will explore the evidence suggesting that by blocking the activity of such dysregulated microRNAs, new therapeutics could be developed to treat the progression of CKD. PMID:23660218

  16. Large-scale automatic extraction of side effects associated with targeted anticancer drugs from full-text oncological articles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Wang, QuanQiu

    2015-06-01

    Targeted anticancer drugs such as imatinib, trastuzumab and erlotinib dramatically improved treatment outcomes in cancer patients, however, these innovative agents are often associated with unexpected side effects. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these side effects are not well understood. The availability of a comprehensive knowledge base of side effects associated with targeted anticancer drugs has the potential to illuminate complex pathways underlying toxicities induced by these innovative drugs. While side effect association knowledge for targeted drugs exists in multiple heterogeneous data sources, published full-text oncological articles represent an important source of pivotal, investigational, and even failed trials in a variety of patient populations. In this study, we present an automatic process to extract targeted anticancer drug-associated side effects (drug-SE pairs) from a large number of high profile full-text oncological articles. We downloaded 13,855 full-text articles from the Journal of Oncology (JCO) published between 1983 and 2013. We developed text classification, relationship extraction, signaling filtering, and signal prioritization algorithms to extract drug-SE pairs from downloaded articles. We extracted a total of 26,264 drug-SE pairs with an average precision of 0.405, a recall of 0.899, and an F1 score of 0.465. We show that side effect knowledge from JCO articles is largely complementary to that from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) drug labels. Through integrative correlation analysis, we show that targeted drug-associated side effects positively correlate with their gene targets and disease indications. In conclusion, this unique database that we built from a large number of high-profile oncological articles could facilitate the development of computational models to understand toxic effects associated with targeted anticancer drugs. PMID:25817969

  17. A comparative study of folate receptor-targeted doxorubicin delivery systems: dosing regimens and therapeutic index.

    PubMed

    Scomparin, Anna; Salmaso, Stefano; Eldar-Boock, Anat; Ben-Shushan, Dikla; Ferber, Shiran; Tiram, Galia; Shmeeda, Hilary; Landa-Rouben, Natalie; Leor, Jonathan; Caliceti, Paolo; Gabizon, Alberto; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit

    2015-06-28

    Ligand-receptor mediated targeting may affect differently the performance of supramolecular drug carriers depending on the nature of the nanocarrier. In this study, we compare the selectivity, safety and activity of doxorubicin (Dox) entrapped in liposomes versus Dox conjugated to polymeric nanocarriers in the presence or absence of a folic acid (FA)-targeting ligand to cancer cells that overexpress the folate receptor (FR). Two pullulan (Pull)-based conjugates of Dox were synthesized, (FA-PEG)-Pull-(Cyst-Dox) and (NH2-PEG)-Pull-(Cyst-Dox). The other delivery systems are Dox loaded PEGylated liposomes (PLD, Doxil®) and the FR-targeted version (PLD-FA) obtained by ligand post-insertion into the commercial formulation. Both receptor-targeted drug delivery systems (DDS) were shown to interact in vitro specifically with cells via the folate ligand. Treatment of FR-overexpressing human cervical carcinoma KB tumor-bearing mice with three-weekly injections resulted in slightly enhanced anticancer activity of PLD-FA compared to PLD and no activity for both pullulan-based conjugates. When the DDS were administered intravenously every other day, the folated-Pull conjugate and the non-folated-Pull conjugate displayed similar and low antitumor activity as free Dox. At this dosing regimen, the liposome-based formulations displayed enhanced antitumor activity with an advantage to the non-folated liposome. However, both liposomal formulations suffered from toxicity that was reversible following treatment discontinuation. Using a daily dosing schedule, with higher cumulative dose, the folated-Pull conjugate strongly inhibited tumor growth while free Dox was toxic at this regimen. For polymeric constructs, increasing dose intensity and cumulative dose strongly affects the therapeutic index and reveals a major therapeutic advantage for the FR-targeted formulation. All DDS were able to abrogate doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. This study constitutes the first side

  18. Prospects in the development of natural radioprotective therapeutics with anti-cancer properties from the plants of Uttarakhand region of India.

    PubMed

    Painuli, Sakshi; Kumar, Navin

    2016-03-01

    Radioprotective agents are substances those reduce the effects of radiation in healthy tissues while maintaining the sensitivity to radiation damage in tumor cells. Due to increased awareness about radioactive substances and their fatal effects on human health, radioprotective agents are now the topic of vivid research. Scavenging of free radicals is the most common mechanism in oncogenesis that plays an important role in protecting tissues from lethal effect of radiation exposure therefore radioprotectors are also good anti-cancer agents. There are numerous studies indicating plant-based therapeutics against cancer and radioprotection. Such plants could be further explored for developing them as promising natural radioprotectors with anti-cancer properties. This review systematically presents information on plants having radioprotective and anti-cancer properties. PMID:27240731

  19. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vacchelli, Erika; Bravo-San Pedro, José-Manuel; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V; Eggermont, Alexander M; Fearon, Douglas T; Fridman, Wolf H; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E; Pienta, Kenneth J; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J; Speiser, Daniel E; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K; Talmadge, James E; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S; Whiteside, Theresa L; Wolchok, Jedd D; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-12-30

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into "passive" and "active" based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches. PMID:25537519

  20. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Pedro, José-Manuel Bravo-San; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N.; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P.; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Eggermont, Alexander M.; Fearon, Douglas T.; Fridman, Wolf H.; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M.; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E.; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Talmadge, James E.; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J.; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into “passive” and “active” based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches. PMID:25537519

  1. Delivery of Therapeutic RNAs Into Target Cells IN VIVO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Mei Ying; Hagen, Thilo

    2014-02-01

    RNA-based therapy is one of the most promising approaches to treat human diseases. Specifically, the use of short interfering RNA (siRNA) siRNA and microRNA (miRNA) mimics for in vivo RNA interference has immense potential as it directly lowers the expression of the therapeutic target protein. However, there are a number of major roadblocks to the successful implementation of siRNA and other RNA based therapies in the clinic. These include the instability of RNAs in vivo and the difficulty to efficiently deliver the RNA into the target cells. Hence, various innovative approaches have been taken over the years to develop effective RNA delivery methods. These methods include liposome-, polymeric nanoparticle- and peptide-mediated cellular delivery. In a recent innovative study, bioengineered bacterial outer membrane vesicles were used as vehicles for effective delivery of siRNA into cells in vivo.

  2. In Search of New Therapeutic Targets in Obesity Treatment: Sirtuins.

    PubMed

    Kurylowicz, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Most of the available non-invasive medical therapies for obesity are non-efficient in a long-term evaluation; therefore there is a constant need for new methods of treatment. Research on calorie restriction has led to the discovery of sirtuins (silent information regulators, SIRTs), enzymes regulating different cellular pathways that may constitute potential targets in the treatment of obesity. This review paper presents the role of SIRTs in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism as well as in the differentiation of adipocytes. How disturbances of SIRTs' expression and activity may lead to the development of obesity and related complications is discussed. A special emphasis is placed on polymorphisms in genes encoding SIRTs and their possible association with susceptibility to obesity and metabolic complications, as well as on data regarding altered expression of SIRTs in human obesity. Finally, the therapeutic potential of SIRTs-targeted strategies in the treatment of obesity and related disorders is discussed. PMID:27104517

  3. Therapeutic Implications of Targeting Energy Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sakharkar, Meena K.; Shashni, Babita; Sharma, Karun; Dhillon, Sarinder K.; Ranjekar, Prabhakar R.; Sakharkar, Kishore R.

    2013-01-01

    PPARs are ligand activated transcription factors. PPARγ agonists have been reported as a new and potentially efficacious treatment of inflammation, diabetes, obesity, cancer, AD, and schizophrenia. Since cancer cells show dysregulation of glycolysis they are potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. Interestingly, several of the genes involved in maintaining the metabolic environment and the central energy generation pathway are regulated or predicted to be regulated by PPARγ. The use of synthetic PPARγ ligands as drugs and their recent withdrawal/restricted usage highlight the lack of understanding of the molecular basis of these drugs, their off-target effects, and their network. These data further underscores the complexity of nuclear receptor signalling mechanisms. This paper will discuss the function and role of PPARγ in energy metabolism and cancer biology in general and its emergence as a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:23431283

  4. Cancer stem cells: biological functions and therapeutically targeting.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, Marius Eugen; Georgescu, Ada Maria; Purcaru, Stefana Oana; Artene, Stefan-Alexandru; Emami, Ghazaleh Hooshyar; Boldeanu, Mihai Virgil; Tache, Daniela Elise; Dricu, Anica

    2014-01-01

    Almost all tumors are composed of a heterogeneous cell population, making them difficult to treat. A small cancer stem cell population with a low proliferation rate and a high tumorigenic potential is thought to be responsible for cancer development, metastasis and resistance to therapy. Stem cells were reported to be involved in both normal development and carcinogenesis, some molecular mechanisms being common in both processes. No less controversial, stem cells are considered to be important in treatment of malignant diseases both as targets and drug carriers. The efforts to understand the role of different signalling in cancer stem cells requires in depth knowledge about the mechanisms that control their self-renewal, differentiation and malignant potential. The aim of this paper is to discuss insights into cancer stem cells historical background and to provide a brief review of the new therapeutic strategies for targeting cancer stem cells. PMID:24821540

  5. In Search of New Therapeutic Targets in Obesity Treatment: Sirtuins

    PubMed Central

    Kurylowicz, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Most of the available non-invasive medical therapies for obesity are non-efficient in a long-term evaluation; therefore there is a constant need for new methods of treatment. Research on calorie restriction has led to the discovery of sirtuins (silent information regulators, SIRTs), enzymes regulating different cellular pathways that may constitute potential targets in the treatment of obesity. This review paper presents the role of SIRTs in the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism as well as in the differentiation of adipocytes. How disturbances of SIRTs’ expression and activity may lead to the development of obesity and related complications is discussed. A special emphasis is placed on polymorphisms in genes encoding SIRTs and their possible association with susceptibility to obesity and metabolic complications, as well as on data regarding altered expression of SIRTs in human obesity. Finally, the therapeutic potential of SIRTs-targeted strategies in the treatment of obesity and related disorders is discussed. PMID:27104517

  6. The human microbiome is a source of therapeutic drug targets.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Bret D; Redinbo, Matthew R

    2013-06-01

    It was appreciated early in drug discovery that the microbiota play an important role in the efficacy of therapeutic compounds. Indeed, the first antibiotic sulfa drugs were shown in the 1940s to be transformed by the bacteria that encode what we now call the intestinal microbiome. Here we briefly review the roles symbiotic bacteria play in the chemistry of human health, and we focus on the emerging appreciation that specific enzyme targets expressed by microbial symbiotes can be selectively disrupted to achieve clinical outcomes. We conclude that components of the microbiome should be considered 'druggable targets,' and we suggest that our rapidly evolving understanding of the chemical biology of mammalian-microbial symbiosis will translate into improved human health. PMID:23680493

  7. The GABAA Receptor as a Therapeutic Target for Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    PubMed

    Braat, Sien; Kooy, R Frank

    2015-06-01

    Intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder, and epilepsy are prime examples of neurodevelopmental disorders that collectively affect a significant percentage of the world population. Recent technological breakthroughs allowed the elucidation of the genetic causes of many of these disorders. As neurodevelopmental disorders are genetically heterogeneous, the development of rational therapy is extremely challenging. Fortunately, many causative genes are interconnected and cluster in specific cellular pathways. Targeting a common node in such a network would allow us to interfere with a series of related neurodevelopmental disorders at once. Here, we argue that the GABAergic system is disturbed in many neurodevelopmental disorders, including fragile X syndrome, Rett syndrome, and Dravet syndrome, and is a key candidate target for therapeutic intervention. Many drugs that modulate the GABAergic system have already been tested in animal models with encouraging outcomes and are readily available for clinical trials. PMID:26050032

  8. The Human Microbiome is a Source of Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bret D.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    It was appreciated early in drug discovery that the microbiota play an important role in the efficacy of therapeutic compounds. Indeed, the first antibiotic sulfa drugs were shown in the 1940s to be transformed by the bacteria that encode what we now call the intestinal microbiome. Here we briefly review the roles symbiotic bacteria play in the chemistry of human health, and we focus on the emerging appreciation that specific enzyme targets expressed by microbial symbiotes can be selectively disrupted to achieve clinical outcomes. We conclude that components of the microbiome should be considered “druggable targets,” and we suggest that our rapidly evolving understanding of the chemical biology of mammalian-microbial symbiosis will translate into improved human health. PMID:23680493

  9. Neuronal and Cardiovascular Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Edward S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium (K+) channels, with their diversity, often tissue-defined distribution, and critical role in controlling cellular excitability, have long held promise of being important drug targets for the treatment of dysrhythmias in the heart and abnormal neuronal activity within the brain. With the exception of drugs that target one particular class, ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels, very few selective K+ channel activators or inhibitors are currently licensed for clinical use in cardiovascular and neurological disease. Here we review what a range of human genetic disorders have told us about the role of specific K+ channel subunits, explore the potential of activators and inhibitors of specific channel populations as a therapeutic strategy, and discuss possible reasons for the difficulty in designing clinically relevant K+ channel modulators. PMID:26303307

  10. Hsp90 as a Potential Therapeutic Target in Retinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Aguilà, Mònica; Cheetham, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a pivotal cellular regulator involved in the folding, activation and assembly of a wide range of proteins. Hsp90 has multiple roles in the retina and the use of different Hsp90 inhibitors has been shown to prevent retinal degeneration in models of retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. Hsp90 is also a potential target in uveal melanoma. Mechanistically, Hsp90 inhibition can evoke a dual response in the retina; stimulating a stress response with molecular chaperone expression. Thereby leading to an improvement in visual function and photoreceptor survival; however, prolonged inhibition can also stimulate the degradation of Hsp90 client proteins potentially deleteriously affect vision. Here, we review the multiple roles of Hsp90 in the retina and the therapeutic potential of Hsp90 as a target. PMID:26427407

  11. Dual-targeting organometallic ruthenium(II) anticancer complexes bearing EGFR-inhibiting 4-anilinoquinazoline ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Qun; Zhao, Yao; Zhang, Erlong; Liu, Suyan; Wang, Fuyi

    2015-08-01

    We have recently demonstrated that complexation with (η(6)-arene)Ru(II) fragments confers 4-anilinoquinazoline pharmacophores a higher potential for inducing cellular apoptosis while preserving the highly inhibitory activity of 4-anilinoquinazolines against EGFR and the reactivity of the ruthenium centre to 9-ethylguanine (Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 10224-10226). Reported herein are the synthesis, characterisation and evaluation of the biological activity of a new series of ruthenium(ii) complexes of the type [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-L)Cl]PF6 (arene = p-cymene, benzene, 2-phenylethanol or indane, L = 4-anilinoquinazolines). These organometallic ruthenium complexes undergo fast hydrolysis in aqueous solution. Intriguingly, the ligation of (arene)Ru(II) fragments with 4-anilinoquinazolines not only makes the target complexes excellent EGFR inhibitors, but also confers the complexes high affinity to bind to DNA minor grooves while maintaining their reactivity towards DNA bases, characterising them with dual-targeting properties. Molecular modelling studies reveal that the hydrolysis of these complexes is a favourable process which increases the affinity of the target complexes to bind to EGFR and DNA. In vitro biological activity assays show that most of this group of ruthenium complexes are selectively active inhibiting the EGF-stimulated growth of the HeLa cervical cancer cell line, and the most active complex [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-L13)Cl]PF6 (, IC50 = 1.36 μM, = 4-(3'-chloro-4'-fluoroanilino)-6-(2-(2-aminoethyl)aminoethoxy)-7-methoxyquinazoline) is 29-fold more active than its analogue, [(η(6)-arene)Ru(N,N-ethylenediamine)Cl]PF6, and 21-fold more active than gefitinib, a well-known EGFR inhibitor in use clinically. These results highlight the strong promise to develop highly active ruthenium anticancer complexes by ligation of cytotoxic ruthenium pharmacophores with bioactive organic molecules. PMID:26106875

  12. Nucleo-cytoplasmic transport as a therapeutic target of cancer.

    PubMed

    Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Senapedis, William; McCauley, Dilara; Baloglu, Erkan; Shacham, Sharon; Festuccia, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Shuttling of specific proteins out of the nucleus is essential for the regulation of the cell cycle and proliferation of both normal and malignant tissues. Dysregulation of this fundamental process may affect many other important cellular processes such as tumor growth, inflammatory response, cell cycle, and apoptosis. It is known that XPO1 (Exportin-1/Chromosome Region Maintenance 1/CRM1) is the main mediator of nuclear export in many cell types. Nuclear proteins exported to the cytoplasm by XPO1 include the drug targets topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα) and BCR-ABL and tumor suppressor proteins such as Rb, APC, p53, p21, and p27. XPO1 can mediate cell proliferation through several pathways: (i) the sub-cellular localization of NES-containing oncogenes and tumor suppressor proteins, (ii) the control of the mitotic apparatus and chromosome segregation, and (iii) the maintenance of nuclear and chromosomal structures. The XPO1 protein is elevated in ovarian carcinoma, glioma, osteosarcoma, pancreatic and cervical cancer. There is a growing body of research indicating that XPO1 may have an important role as a prognostic marker in solid tumors. Because of this, nuclear export inhibition through XPO1 is a potential target for therapeutic intervention in many cancers. The best understood XPO1 inhibitors are the small molecule nuclear export inhibitors (NEIs; Leptomycin B and derivatives, ratjadones, PKF050-638, valtrate, ACA, CBS9106, selinexor/KPT-330, and verdinexor/KPT-335). Selinexor and verdinexor are orally bioavailable, highly potent, small molecules that are classified as Selective Inhibitors of Nuclear Export (SINE). KPT-330 is the only NEI currently in Phase I/II human clinical trials in hematological and solid cancers. Of all the potential targets in nuclear cytoplasmic transport, the nuclear export receptor XPO1 remains the best understood and most advanced therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25476752

  13. Polysaccharide-Gold Nanocluster Supramolecular Conjugates as a Versatile Platform for the Targeted Delivery of Anticancer Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Yang, Yang; Su, Yue; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2014-02-01

    Through the high affinity of the β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) cavity for adamantane moieties, novel polysaccharide-gold nanocluster supramolecular conjugates (HACD-AuNPs) were successfully constructed from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) bearing adamantane moieties and cyclodextrin-grafted hyaluronic acid (HACD). Due to their porous structure, the supramolecular conjugates could serve as a versatile and biocompatible platform for the loading and delivery of various anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), paclitaxel (PTX), camptothecin (CPT), irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11), and topotecan hydrochloride (TPT), by taking advantage of the controlled association/dissociation of drug molecules from the cavities formed by the HACD skeletons and AuNPs cores as well as by harnessing the efficient targeting of cancer cells by hyaluronic acid. Significantly, the release of anticancer drugs from the drug@HACD-AuNPs system was pH-responsive, with more efficient release occurring under a mildly acidic environment, such as that in a cancer cell. Taking the anticancer drug DOX as an example, cell viability experiments revealed that the DOX@HACD-AuNPs system exhibited similar tumor cell inhibition abilities but lower toxicity than free DOX due to the hyaluronic acid reporter-mediated endocytosis. Therefore, the HACD-AuNPs supramolecular conjugates may possess great potential for the targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

  14. Endocannabinoid System: A Multi-Facet Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Rimplejeet; Ambwani, Sneha R; Singh, Surjit

    2016-01-01

    the therapeutic targets for both cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists. One challenge is to develop drugs that target only cannabinoid receptors in a particular tissue and another is to invent drugs that act selectively on cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood brain barrier. Besides this, development of the suitable dosage forms with maximum efficacy and minimum adverse effects is also warranted. Another angle to be introspected for therapeutic abilities of this group of drugs is non-CB1 and non-CB2 receptor targets for cannabinoids. In order to successfully exploit the therapeutic potential of endocannabinoid system, it is imperative to further characterize the endocannabinoid system in terms of identification of the exact cellular location of cannabinoid receptors and their role as "protective" and "disease inducing substance", time-dependent changes in the expression of cannabinoid receptors. PMID:27086601

  15. Functional differentiation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and targeted cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Gian C; Barle, Ester Lovsin; Galati, Giuseppe; Kluwe, William M

    2014-10-01

    There is no nationally or internationally binding definition of the term "cytotoxic drug" although this term is used in a variety of regulations for pharmaceutical development and manufacturing of drugs as well as in regulations for protecting medical personnel from occupational exposure in pharmacy, hospital, and other healthcare settings. The term "cytotoxic drug" is frequently used as a synonym for any and all oncology or antineoplastic drugs. Pharmaceutical companies generate and receive requests for assessments of the potential hazards of drugs regularly - including cytotoxicity. This publication is intended to provide functional definitions that help to differentiate between generically-cytotoxic cancer drugs of significant risk to normal human tissues, and targeted cancer therapeutics that pose much lesser risks. Together with specific assessments, it provides comprehensible guidance on how to assess the relevant properties of cancer drugs, and how targeted therapeutics discriminate between cancer and normal cells. The position of several regulatory agencies in the long-term is clearly to regulate all drugs regardless of classification, according to scientific risk based data. Despite ongoing discussions on how to replace the term "cytotoxic drugs" in current regulations, it is expected that its use will continue for the near future. PMID:24956585

  16. MERTK receptor tyrosine kinase is a therapeutic target in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, Jennifer; Sambade, Maria J.; Sather, Susan; Moschos, Stergios J.; Tan, Aik-Choon; Winges, Amanda; DeRyckere, Deborah; Carson, Craig C.; Trembath, Dimitri G.; Tentler, John J.; Eckhardt, S. Gail; Kuan, Pei-Fen; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Duncan, Lyn M.; Miller, C. Ryan; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Midkiff, Bentley R.; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Weihe; Yang, Chao; Wang, Xiaodong; Frye, Stephen V.; Earp, H. Shelton; Shields, Janiel M.; Graham, Douglas K.

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cutaneous cancers. Although recent therapeutic advances have prolonged patient survival, the prognosis remains dismal. C-MER proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (MERTK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase with oncogenic properties that is often overexpressed or activated in various malignancies. Using both protein immunohistochemistry and microarray analyses, we demonstrate that MERTK expression correlates with disease progression. MERTK expression was highest in metastatic melanomas, followed by primary melanomas, while the lowest expression was observed in nevi. Additionally, over half of melanoma cell lines overexpressed MERTK compared with normal human melanocytes; however, overexpression did not correlate with mutations in BRAF or RAS. Stimulation of melanoma cells with the MERTK ligand GAS6 resulted in the activation of several downstream signaling pathways including MAPK/ERK, PI3K/AKT, and JAK/STAT. MERTK inhibition via shRNA reduced MERTK-mediated downstream signaling, reduced colony formation by up to 59%, and diminished tumor volume by 60% in a human melanoma murine xenograft model. Treatment of melanoma cells with UNC1062, a novel MERTK-selective small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, reduced activation of MERTK-mediated downstream signaling, induced apoptosis in culture, reduced colony formation in soft agar, and inhibited invasion of melanoma cells. This work establishes MERTK as a therapeutic target in melanoma and provides a rationale for the continued development of MERTK-targeted therapies. PMID:23585477

  17. Genetic determinants and potential therapeutic targets for pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Robert; Hendifar, Andrew E.; Tuli, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women in the United States, carrying a 5-year survival rate of approximately 5%, which is the poorest prognosis of any solid tumor type. Given the dismal prognosis associated with PDAC, a more thorough understanding of risk factors and genetic predisposition has important implications not only for cancer prevention, but also for screening techniques and the development of personalized therapies. While screening of the general population is not recommended or practicable with current diagnostic methods, studies are ongoing to evaluate its usefulness in people with at least 5- to 10-fold increased risk of PDAC. In order to help identify high-risk populations who would be most likely to benefit from early detection screening tests for pancreatic cancer, discovery of additional pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes is crucial. Thus, specific gene-based, gene-product, and marker-based testing for the early detection of pancreatic cancer are currently being developed, with the potential for these to be useful as potential therapeutic targets as well. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the genetic basis for PDAC with a focus on germline and familial determinants. A discussion of potential therapeutic targets and future directions in screening and treatment is also provided. PMID:24624093

  18. Matrix metalloproteinases as breast cancer drivers and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Radisky, Evette S.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family have been identified as poor prognosis markers for breast cancer patients and as drivers of many facets of the tumor phenotype in experimental models. Early enthusiasm for MMPs as therapeutic targets was tempered following disappointing clinical trials that utilized broad spectrum, small molecule catalytic site inhibitors. However, subsequent research has continued to define key roles for MMPs as breast cancer promoters, to elucidate the complex roles that that these proteins play in breast cancer development and progression, and to identify how these roles are linked to specific and unique biochemical features of individual members of the MMP family. Here, we provide an overview of the structural features of the MMPs, then discuss clinical studies identifying which MMP family members are linked with breast cancer development and new experimental studies that reveal how these specific MMPs may play unique roles in the breast cancer microenvironment. We conclude with a discussion of the most promising avenues for development of therapeutic agents capable of targeting the tumor-promoting properties of MMPs. PMID:25961550

  19. Potential anticancer application of polyamine oxidation products formed by amine oxidase: a new therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Agostinelli, E; Tempera, G; Viceconte, N; Saccoccio, S; Battaglia, V; Grancara, S; Toninello, A; Stevanato, R

    2010-02-01

    The polyamines spermine, spermidine and putrescine are ubiquitous cell components. These molecules are substrates of a class of enzymes that includes monoamine oxidases, diamine oxidases, polyamine oxidases and copper-containing amine oxidases. Amine oxidases are important because they contribute to regulate levels of mono- and polyamines. In tumors, polyamines and amine oxidases are increased as compared to normal tissues. Cytotoxicity induced by bovine serum amine oxidase (BSAO) and spermine is attributed to H(2)O(2) and aldehydes produced by the reaction. This study demonstrated that multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells (colon adenocarcinoma and melanoma) are significantly more sensitive than the corresponding wild-type (WT) ones to H(2)O(2) and aldehydes, the products of BSAO-catalyzed oxidation of spermine. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations showed major ultrastructural alterations of the mitochondria. These were more pronounced in MDR than in WT cells. Increasing the incubation temperature from 37 to 42 degrees Celsius enhances cytotoxicity in cells exposed to spermine metabolites. The combination BSAO/spermine prevents tumor growth, particularly well if the enzyme has been conjugated to a biocompatible hydrogel polymers. Since both wild-type and MDR cancer cells after pre-treatment with MDL 72527, a lysosomotropic compound, are sensitized to subsequent exposure to BSAO/spermine, it is conceivable that combined treatment with a lysosomotropic compound and BSAO/spermine would be effective against tumor cells. It is of interest to search for such novel compounds, which might be promising for application in a therapeutic setting. PMID:20012114

  20. Alveolar bone loss: mechanisms, potential therapeutic targets, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Intini, G; Katsuragi, Y; Kirkwood, K L; Yang, S

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews recent research into mechanisms underlying bone resorption and highlights avenues of investigation that may generate new therapies to combat alveolar bone loss in periodontitis. Several proteins, signaling pathways, stem cells, and dietary supplements are discussed as they relate to periodontal bone loss and regeneration. RGS12 is a crucial protein that mediates osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction, and a potential therapeutic target. RGS12 likely regulates osteoclast differentiation through regulating calcium influx to control the calcium oscillation-NFATc1 pathway. A working model for RGS10 and RGS12 in the regulation of Ca(2+) oscillations during osteoclast differentiation is proposed. Initiation of inflammation depends on host cell-microbe interactions, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oral p38 inhibitors reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone destruction in a rat periodontitis model but showed unsatisfactory safety profiles. The p38 substrate MK2 is a more specific therapeutic target with potentially superior tolerability. Furthermore, MKP-1 shows anti-inflammatory activity, reducing inflammatory cytokine biosynthesis and bone resorption. Multipotent skeletal stem cell (SSC) populations exist within the bone marrow and periosteum of long bones. These bone-marrow-derived SSCs and periosteum-derived SSCs have shown therapeutic potential in several applications, including bone and periodontal regeneration. The existence of craniofacial bone-specific SSCs is suggested based on existing studies. The effects of calcium, vitamin D, and soy isoflavone supplementation on alveolar and skeletal bone loss in post-menopausal women were investigated. Supplementation resulted in stabilization of forearm bone mass density and a reduced rate of alveolar bone loss over 1 yr, compared with placebo. Periodontal attachment levels were also well-maintained and alveolar bone loss suppressed during 24 wk of

  1. Targeting the Central Pocket in Human Transcription Factor TEAD as a Potential Cancer Therapeutic Strategy.

    PubMed

    Pobbati, Ajaybabu V; Han, Xiao; Hung, Alvin W; Weiguang, Seetoh; Huda, Nur; Chen, Guo-Ying; Kang, CongBao; Chia, Cheng San Brian; Luo, Xuelian; Hong, Wanjin; Poulsen, Anders

    2015-11-01

    The human TEAD family of transcription factors (TEAD1-4) is required for YAP-mediated transcription in the Hippo pathway. Hyperactivation of TEAD's co-activator YAP contributes to tissue overgrowth and human cancers, suggesting that pharmacological interference of TEAD-YAP activity may be an effective strategy for anticancer therapy. Here we report the discovery of a central pocket in the YAP-binding domain (YBD) of TEAD that is targetable by small-molecule inhibitors. Our X-ray crystallography studies reveal that flufenamic acid, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), binds to the central pocket of TEAD2 YBD. Our biochemical and functional analyses further demonstrate that binding of NSAIDs to TEAD inhibits TEAD-YAP-dependent transcription, cell migration, and proliferation, indicating that the central pocket is important for TEAD function. Therefore, our studies discover a novel way of targeting TEAD transcription factors and set the stage for therapeutic development of specific TEAD-YAP inhibitors against human cancers. PMID:26592798

  2. Current and novel therapeutic molecules and targets in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwini; Nisha, Chaluveelaveedu Murleedharan; Silakari, Chitrangda; Sharma, Isha; Anusha, Kanukanti; Gupta, Nityasha; Nair, Prateek; Tripathi, Timir; Kumar, Awanish

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which the death of brain cells causes memory loss and cognitive decline, i.e., dementia. The disease starts with mild symptoms and gradually becomes severe. AD is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Several different hallmarks of the disease have been reported such as deposits of β-amyloid around neurons, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, oxidative stress, dyshomeostasis of bio-metals, low levels of acetylcholine, etc. AD is not simple to diagnose since there is no single diagnostic test for it. Pharmacotherapy for AD currently provides only symptomatic relief and mostly targets cognitive revival. Computational biology approaches have proved to be reliable tools for the selection of novel targets and therapeutic ligands. Molecular docking is a key tool in computer-assisted drug design and development. Docking has been utilized to perform virtual screening on large libraries of compounds, and propose structural hypotheses of how the ligands bind with the target with lead optimization. Another potential application of docking is optimization stages of the drug-discovery cycle. This review summarizes the known drug targets of AD, in vivo active agents against AD, state-of-the-art docking studies done in AD, and future prospects of the docking with particular emphasis on AD. PMID:26220908

  3. Are Doses and Schedules of Small-Molecule Targeted Anticancer Drugs Recommended by Phase I Studies Realistic?

    PubMed

    Roda, Desamparados; Jimenez, Begoña; Banerji, Udai

    2016-05-01

    Tolerability of molecularly targeted agents (MTA) used in cancer therapeutics is determined in phase I trials. We reviewed the reported incidence of toxicity in phase III trials at doses and schedules recommended by phase I trials to evaluate whether these recommendations are realistic when drugs are used in larger populations of patients. We systematically reviewed a safety profile of small molecule (SM-MTA) and mAb MTA (MA-MTA) approved by the FDA in the last 12 years. There was a significantly increased percentage of grade 3 or 4 adverse events reported with SM-MTA compared with MA-MTA [40% vs. 27%; RR 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10-2.25, P = 0.038] in phase III studies. Importantly, a substantial proportion of patients (45%) treated with SM-MTA required dose modifications due to drug-related toxicity in phase III trials. However, this toxicity was associated to a definitive study drug discontinuation in only 9%. Overall, 25% of SM-MTA declared recommended phase II doses below MTD based on pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data and these trials were associated with a significantly reduced number of dose modifications in registration trials (32% vs. 50%; RR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.43-0.88, P = 0.01). Tolerability is going to come into further focus due to the need for combinations of SM-MTA and other anticancer agents. There was a higher incidence of grade 3-4 toxicity in phase III trials in combinations versus single-agent SM-MTAs (64% vs. 37%; RR 1.73; 95% CI, 1.3-2.3, P = 0.001). These results indicate that phase I studies underestimate toxicity while recommending doses of SM-MTA. Clin Cancer Res; 22(9); 2127-32. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26581244

  4. Identification and characterization of anticancer compounds targeting apoptosis and autophagy from Chinese native Garcinia species.

    PubMed

    Xu, Danqing; Lao, Yuanzhi; Xu, Naihan; Hu, Hui; Fu, Wenwei; Tan, Hongsheng; Gu, Yunzhi; Song, Zhijun; Cao, Peng; Xu, Hongxi

    2015-01-01

    Natural compounds from medicinal plants are important resources for drug development. Active compounds targeting apoptosis and autophagy are candidates for anti-cancer drugs. In this study, we collected Garcinia species from China and extracted them into water or ethanol fractions. Then, we performed a functional screen in search of novel apoptosis and autophagy regulators. We first characterized the anti-proliferation activity of the crude extracts on multiple cell lines. HeLa cells expressing GFP-LC3 were used to examine the effects of the crude extracts on autophagy. Their activities were confirmed by Western blots of A549 and HeLa cells. By using bioassay guided fractionation, we found that two caged prenylxanthones from Garcinia bracteata, neobractatin and isobractatin, can significantly induce apoptosis and inhibit autophagy. Our results suggest that different Garcinia species displayed various degrees of toxicity on different cancer cell lines. Furthermore, the use of a high content screening assay to screen natural products was an essential method to identify novel autophagy regulators. PMID:25478784

  5. Garden of therapeutic delights: new targets in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Waldburger, Jean M; Firestein, Gary S

    2009-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms in rheumatic disease fostered the advent of the targeted therapeutics era. Intense research activity continues to increase the number of potential targets at an accelerated pace. In this review, examples of promising targets and agents that are at various stages of clinical development are described. Cytokine inhibition remains at the forefront with the success of tumor necrosis factor blockers, and biologics that block interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-17, IL-12, and IL-23 and other cytokines are on the horizon. After the success of rituximab and abatacept, other cell-targeted approaches that inhibit or deplete lymphocytes have moved forward, such as blocking BAFF/BLyS (B-cell activation factor of the tumor necrosis factor family/B-lymphocyte stimulator) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand) or suppressing T-cell activation with costimulation molecule blockers. Small-molecule inhibitors might eventually challenge the dominance of biologics in the future. In addition to plasma membrane G protein-coupled chemokine receptors, small molecules can be designed to block intracellular enzymes that control signaling pathways. Inhibitors of tyrosine kinases expressed in lymphocytes, such as spleen tyrosine kinase and Janus kinase, are being tested in autoimmune diseases. Inactivation of the more broadly expressed mitogen-activated protein kinases could suppress inflammation driven by macrophages and mesenchymal cells. Targeting tyrosine kinases downstream of growth factor receptors might also reduce fibrosis in conditions like systemic sclerosis. The abundance of potential targets suggests that new and creative ways of evaluating safety and efficacy are needed. PMID:19232066

  6. Therapeutic anticancer efficacy of a synthetic diazonamide analog in the absence of overt toxicity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Noelle S; Burgett, Anthony W G; Atkins, Ashley S; Wang, Xiaodong; Harran, Patrick G; McKnight, Steven L

    2007-02-13

    Blocking cell division through the inhibition of mitosis is one of the most successful clinical strategies for the treatment of cancer. Taxanes and vinca alkaloids are in widespread use and have demonstrated substantive therapeutic efficacy. Both classes of compounds bind directly to tubulin, a structural component of the mitotic spindle. The ubiquitous utilization of tubulin in cell division in both cancerous and normal cells, however, tempers the broad spectrum of activity of currently used antimitotics by significant toxicities in normal dividing tissue. Moreover, peripheral nerve cells that rely on microtubules to shuttle cargo along axonal processes are also damaged by tubulin-binding drugs. Thus, neutropenia and peripheral neuropathy are the most frequently cited dose-limiting toxicities of this class of chemotherapeutics. Here we report the preclinical assessment of AB-5, a structural and functional analog of the natural product diazonamide A. AB-5, like taxanes and vinca alkaloids, blocks cell division during mitosis. However, AB-5 works not by binding tubulin but rather through inhibition of a newly discovered role for ornithine-delta-aminotransferase in mitosis. We hereby report that, unlike other antimitotics, AB-5 is extremely well tolerated by mice when administered under conditions where the drug cures xenografted tumors as effectively as taxanes and vinca alkaloids. AB-5-treated mice show no weight loss, no change in overall physical appearance, and no evidence of neutropenia. These observations raise the possibility that AB-5 may have clinical utility for cancer therapy under conditions largely devoid of chemotherapeutic toxicity and suggest that further preclinical evaluation of AB-5 is warranted. PMID:17287337

  7. Therapeutic anticancer efficacy of a synthetic diazonamide analog in the absence of overt toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Noelle S.; Burgett, Anthony W. G.; Atkins, Ashley S.; Wang, Xiaodong; Harran, Patrick G.; McKnight, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    Blocking cell division through the inhibition of mitosis is one of the most successful clinical strategies for the treatment of cancer. Taxanes and vinca alkaloids are in widespread use and have demonstrated substantive therapeutic efficacy. Both classes of compounds bind directly to tubulin, a structural component of the mitotic spindle. The ubiquitous utilization of tubulin in cell division in both cancerous and normal cells, however, tempers the broad spectrum of activity of currently used antimitotics by significant toxicities in normal dividing tissue. Moreover, peripheral nerve cells that rely on microtubules to shuttle cargo along axonal processes are also damaged by tubulin-binding drugs. Thus, neutropenia and peripheral neuropathy are the most frequently cited dose-limiting toxicities of this class of chemotherapeutics. Here we report the preclinical assessment of AB-5, a structural and functional analog of the natural product diazonamide A. AB-5, like taxanes and vinca alkaloids, blocks cell division during mitosis. However, AB-5 works not by binding tubulin but rather through inhibition of a newly discovered role for ornithine-δ-aminotransferase in mitosis. We hereby report that, unlike other antimitotics, AB-5 is extremely well tolerated by mice when administered under conditions where the drug cures xenografted tumors as effectively as taxanes and vinca alkaloids. AB-5-treated mice show no weight loss, no change in overall physical appearance, and no evidence of neutropenia. These observations raise the possibility that AB-5 may have clinical utility for cancer therapy under conditions largely devoid of chemotherapeutic toxicity and suggest that further preclinical evaluation of AB-5 is warranted. PMID:17287337

  8. Assessing the therapeutic efficacy of VEGFR-1-targeted polymer drug conjugates in mouse tumor models.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Golan, Moran; Tyomkin, Dalia; David, Ayelet

    2016-05-10

    Polymer-drug conjugates that can actively target the tumor vasculature have emerged as an attractive technology for improving the therapeutic efficacy of cytotoxic drugs. We have recently provided, for the first time, in vivo evidence showing the significant advantage of the E-selectin-targeted N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer-doxorubicin conjugate, P-(Esbp)-DOX, in inhibiting primary tumor growth and preventing the formation and development of cancer metastases. Here, we describe the design of a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1-targeted HPMA copolymer-DOX conjugate (P-(F56)-DOX) that can actively and simultaneously target different cell types in the tumor microenvironment, such as endothelial cells (ECs), bone marrow-derived cells and many human cancer cells of diverse tumor origin. The VEGFR-1-targeted copolymer was tested for its binding, internalization and in vitro cytotoxicity in ECs (bEnd.3 and cEND cells) and cancer cells (B16-F10, 3LL and HT29). The in vivo anti-cancer activity of P-(F56)-DOX was then tested in two tumor-bearing mice (TBM) models (i.e., primary Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) tumors and B16-F10 melanoma pulmonary metastases), relative to that of the E-selectin-targeted system (P-(Esbp)-DOX) that solely targets ECs. Our results indicate that the binding and internalization profiles of the VEGFR-1-targeted copolymer were superior towards ECs as compared to cancer cells and correlated well to the level of VEGFR-1 expression in cells. Accordingly, the VEGFR-1-targeted copolymer (P-(F56)-DOX) was more toxic towards bEnd.3 cells than to cancer cells, and exhibited significantly higher cytotoxicity than did the non-targeted control copolymer. P-(F56)-DOX inhibited 3LL tumor growth and significantly prolonged the survival of mice with B16-F10 pulmonary metastases. When compared to a system that actively targets only tumor vascular ECs, P-(F56)-DOX and P-(Esbp)-DOX exhibited comparable efficacy in slowing the

  9. Therapeutic targeting of B cells for rheumatic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Engel, Pablo; Gómez-Puerta, José A; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Lozano, Francisco; Bosch, Xavier

    2011-03-01

    Autoreactive B cells are characterized by their ability to secrete autoantibodies directed against self-peptides. During the last decade, it has become increasingly apparent that B lymphocytes not only produce autoantibodies but also exert important regulatory roles independent of their function as antibody-producing cells. This is especially relevant in the context of autoimmunity, because autoreactive B cells have been shown to possess the ability to activate pathogenic T cells, to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, and to promote the formation of tertiary lymphoid tissue in target organs. The production of monoclonal antibodies against B-cell-surface molecules has facilitated the characterization of several distinct B lymphocyte subsets. These cell-surface molecules have not only served as useful cell differentiation markers but have also helped to unravel the important biological functions of these cells. Some of these molecules, all of which are expressed on the cell surface, have proven to be effective therapeutic targets. In both animal models and in clinical assays, the efficient elimination of B lymphocytes has been shown to be useful in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. The treatment of most rheumatic autoimmune diseases relies mainly on the use of cytotoxic immunosuppressants and corticosteroids. Although this has resulted in improved disease survival, patients may nonetheless suffer severe adverse events and, in some cases, their relapse rate remains high. The increasing need for safer and more effective drugs along with burgeoning new insights into the pathogenesis of these disorders has fueled interest in biological agents; clinical trials involving the B-cell depletion agent rituximab have been especially promising. This article reviews the current knowledge of B-cell biology and pathogenesis as well as the modern therapeutic approaches for rheumatic autoimmune diseases focusing in particular on the targeting of B

  10. Neuroendothelial NMDA receptors as therapeutic targets in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Macrez, Richard; Ortega, Maria C; Bardou, Isabelle; Mehra, Anupriya; Fournier, Antoine; Van der Pol, Susanne M A; Haelewyn, Benoit; Maubert, Eric; Lesept, Flavie; Chevilley, Arnaud; de Castro, Fernando; De Vries, Helga E; Vivien, Denis; Clemente, Diego; Docagne, Fabian

    2016-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis is among the most common causes of neurological disability in young adults. Here we provide the preclinical proof of concept of the benefit of a novel strategy of treatment for multiple sclerosis targeting neuroendothelial N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors. We designed a monoclonal antibody against N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, which targets a regulatory site of the GluN1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor sensitive to the protease tissue plasminogen activator. This antibody reverted the effect of tissue plasminogen activator on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function without affecting basal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activity (n = 21, P < 0.01). This antibody bound N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors on the luminal surface of neurovascular endothelium in human tissues and in mouse, at the vicinity of tight junctions of the blood-spinal cord barrier. Noteworthy, it reduced human leucocyte transmigration in an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier (n = 12, P < 0.05). When injected during the effector phase of MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (n = 24), it blocked the progression of neurological impairments, reducing cumulative clinical score (P < 0.001) and mean peak score (P < 0.001). This effect was observed in wild-type animals but not in tissue plasminogen activator knock-out animals (n = 10). This therapeutic effect was associated to a preservation of the blood-spinal cord barrier (n = 6, P < 0.001), leading to reduced leucocyte infiltration (n = 6, P < 0.001). Overall, this study unveils a critical function of endothelial N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in multiple sclerosis, and highlights the therapeutic potential of strategies targeting the protease-regulated site of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. PMID:27435092

  11. Novel Opportunities for Thymidylate Metabolism as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Peter M.; Fazzone, William; LaBonte, Melissa J.; Deng, Jinxia; Neamati, Nouri; Ladner, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    For over 40 years, the fluoropyrimidine 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has remained the central agent in therapeutic regimens employed in the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) and is frequently combined with the DNA-damaging agent's oxaliplatin and irinotecan increasing response rates and improving overall survival. However, many patients will derive little or no benefit from treatment, highlighting the need to identify novel therapeutic targets to improve the efficacy of current 5-FU-based chemotherapeutic strategies. Deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) catalyzes the hydrolysis of dUTP to dUMP and PPi providing substrate for thymidylate synthase (TS) and DNA synthesis and repair. Although dUTP is a normal intermediate in DNA synthesis, its accumulation and misincorporation into DNA as uracil is lethal. Importantly, uracil misincorporation represents an important mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by the TS-targeted class of chemotherapeutic agents including 5-FU. A growing body of evidence suggests that dUTPase is an important mediator of response to TS-targeted agents. In this manuscript we present further evidence demonstrating that elevated expression of dUTPase can protect breast cancer cells from the expansion of the intracellular uracil pool, translating to reduced growth inhibition following treatment with 5-FU. We therefore report the implementation of in silico drug development techniques to identify and develop small molecule inhibitors of dUTPase. As 5-FU and the oral 5-FU pro-drug capecitabine remain central agents in the treatment of a variety of malignancies, the clinical utility of a small molecule inhibitor to dUTPase represents a viable strategy to improve the clinical efficacy of these mainstay chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:18790783

  12. Epigenetic regulators as promising therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gallipoli, Paolo; Giotopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most prevalent acute leukemia in adults, is an aggressive hematological malignancy arising in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. With the exception of a few specific AML subtypes, the mainstays of treatment have not significantly changed over the last 20 years, and are still based on standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. As a result, clinical outcome remains poor for the majority of patients, with overall long-term survival in the region of 20–30%. Recent successes in characterizing the genetic landscape of AML have highlighted that, despite its heterogeneity, many cases of AML carry recurrent mutations in genes encoding epigenetic regulators. Transcriptional dysregulation and altered epigenetic function have therefore emerged as exciting areas in AML research and it is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic dysfunction is central to leukemogenesis in AML. This has subsequently paved the way for the development of epigenetically targeted therapies. In this review, we will discuss the most recent advances in our understanding of the role of epigenetic dysregulation in AML pathobiology. We will particularly focus on those altered epigenetic programs that have been shown to be central to the development and maintenance of AML in preclinical models. We will discuss the recent development of therapeutics specifically targeting these key epigenetic programs in AML, describe their mechanism of action and present their current clinical development. Finally, we will discuss the opportunities presented by epigenetically targeted therapy in AML and will highlight future challenges ahead for the AML community, to ensure that these novel therapeutics are optimally translated into clinical practice and result in clinical improvement for AML patients. PMID:26137202

  13. DNA G-quadruplex and its potential as anticancer drug target

    PubMed Central

    Buket, ONEL; Clement, LIN; DanZhou, YANG

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplex secondary structures are four-stranded globular nucleic acid structures form in the specific DNA and RNA G-rich sequences with biological significance such as human telomeres, oncogene-promoter regions, replication initiation sites, and 5′ and 3′-untranslated (UTR) regions. The non-canonical G-quadruplex secondary structures can readily form under physiologically relevant ionic conditions and are considered to be new molecular target for cancer therapeutics. This review discusses the essential progress in our lab related to the structures and functions of biologically relevant DNA G-quadruplexes in human gene promoters and telomeres, and the opportunities presented for the development of G-quadruplex-targeted small- molecule drugs. PMID:27182219

  14. Chlorotoxin-conjugated graphene oxide for targeted delivery of an anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Gu, Wei; Xiao, Ning; Ye, Ling; Xu, Qunyuan

    2014-01-01

    Current chemotherapy for glioma is rarely satisfactory due to low therapeutic efficiency and systemic side effects. We have developed a glioma-targeted drug delivery system based on graphene oxide. Targeted peptide chlorotoxin-conjugated graphene oxide (CTX-GO) sheets were successfully synthesized and characterized. Doxorubicin was loaded onto CTX-GO (CTX-GO/DOX) with high efficiency (570 mg doxorubicin per gram CTX-GO) via noncovalent interactions. Doxorubicin release was pH-dependent and showed sustained-release properties. Cytotoxicity experiments demonstrated that CTX-GO/DOX mediated the highest rate of death of glioma cells compared with free doxorubicin or graphene oxide loaded with doxorubicin only. Further, conjugation with chlorotoxin enhanced accumulation of doxorubicin within glioma cells. These findings indicate that CTX-GO is a promising platform for drug delivery and provide a rationale for developing a glioma-specific drug delivery system. PMID:24672236

  15. Anti-Alzheimer Therapeutic Drugs Targeting γ-Secretase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Wong, Steven G; Hua, Qian

    2016-01-01

    γ-secretase is a membrane-embedded aspartyl protease carrying out cleavage of more than 100 single transmembrane-spanning proteins, including APP, Notch, N-cadherin, etc. Its subunit, presenilin (PS) is the catalytic component, of which mutations are a major cause of early onset familial Alzheimer disease (FAD). These mutations lead to an increase in the production of the highly amyloidogenic Aβ42 isoform. Drugs aimed at γ-secretase are now considered to be promising therapeutic targets for AD. γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) were first introduced into clinical trials due to their efficacy in lowering Aβ production, but later were found to cause severe adverse events due to their blockage of the Notch signaling process. γ-secretase modulators (GSMs) were developed to modulate γ-secretase activity by selectively targeting Aβ42 reduction over the Notch pathway, which have been shown to have less side effects. Although clinical studies show that none of the GSIs or GSMs have been proven to be fully effective, they shed light on the physiological role of γ-secretase and PS in AD development. At the same time, natural products, due to their structural diversity and pleiotropic profile, can modulate γ-secretase activity in a dose-dependent manner, broadening our vision of drug development. With the structural information of γ-secretase released recently, we speculate there will be an explosion of γ-secretase modulators targeting not only the proteolysic center but also the interaction of its different components. PMID:26268329

  16. G-quadruplex nucleic acids as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Shankar; Neidle, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Nucleic acid sequences containing several short runs of guanine nucleotides can form complex higher order structures, termed quadruplexes. Their occurrence has been most extensively characterised at the telomeric ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, whose DNA comprises such sequences, and where the extreme 3′ ends are single-stranded. This enables relatively facile formation of quadruplex arrangements under the influence of a quadruplex-selective small molecule to compete effectively with telomeric protein-DNA interactions. Occurrences of quadruplexes within the human and other genomes have been mapped by bioinformatics surveys, which have revealed over-representations in promoter regions, especially of genes involved in replication, such as oncogenes, as well as in 5′UTR regions. The highly distinctive nature of quadruplex topologies suggests that they can act as novel therapeutic targets, for example in the selective inhibition of transcription of a given oncogene, using designed small molecules to stabilise a particular quadruplex. This offers the prospect of an alternative to, for example, direct kinase targeting with small molecules, without the attendant issues of active-site resistance. We survey here the basis of these approaches, together with current progress, and discuss the mechanistic issues posed by quadruplex targeting. PMID:19515602

  17. Therapeutic Targeting of Eosinophil Adhesion and Accumulation in Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Baiula, Monica; Bedini, Andrea; Carbonari, Gioia; Dattoli, Samantha Deianira; Spampinato, Santi

    2012-01-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that eosinophils are important effectors of ocular allergy. Increased worldwide prevalence of allergic eye pathologies has stimulated the identification of novel drug targets, including eosinophils and adhesion molecules. Accumulation of eosinophils in the eye is a key event in the onset and maintenance of allergic inflammation and is mediated by different adhesion molecules. Antihistamines with multiple mechanisms of action can be effective during the early and late phases of allergic conjunctivitis by blocking the interaction between β1 integrins and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1. Small molecule antagonists that target key elements in the process of eosinophil recruitment have been identified and reinforce the validity of α4β1 integrin as a therapeutic target. Glucocorticoids are among the most effective drugs for ocular allergy, but their use is limited by adverse effects. Novel dissociated glucocorticoids can prevent eosinophil accumulation and induce apoptosis of eosinophils, making them promising candidates for ophthalmic drugs. This article reviews recent understanding of the role of adhesion molecules in eosinophil recruitment in the inflamed conjunctiva along with effective treatments for allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:23271999

  18. Targeting NF-κB in glioblastoma: A therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann-Morvinski, Dinorah; Narasimamurthy, Rajesh; Xia, Yifeng; Myskiw, Chad; Soda, Yasushi; Verma, Inder M.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal form of intracranial tumor. We have established a lentivirus-induced mouse model of malignant gliomas, which faithfully captures the pathophysiology and molecular signature of mesenchymal human GBM. RNA-Seq analysis of these tumors revealed high nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation showing enrichment of known NF-κB target genes. Inhibition of NF-κB by either depletion of IκB kinase 2 (IKK2), expression of a IκBαM super repressor, or using a NEMO (NF-κB essential modifier)–binding domain (NBD) peptide in tumor-derived cell lines attenuated tumor proliferation and prolonged mouse survival. Timp1, one of the NF-κB target genes significantly up-regulated in GBM, was identified to play a role in tumor proliferation and growth. Inhibition of NF-κB activity or silencing of Timp1 resulted in slower tumor growth in both mouse and human GBM models. Our results suggest that inhibition of NF-κB activity or targeting of inducible NF-κB genes is an attractive therapeutic approach for GBM. PMID:26824076

  19. Complement involvement in kidney diseases: From physiopathology to therapeutical targeting

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Rosso, Giuseppina; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Complement cascade is involved in several renal diseases and in renal transplantation. The different components of the complement cascade might represent an optimal target for innovative therapies. In the first section of the paper the authors review the physiopathology of complement involvement in renal diseases and transplantation. In some cases this led to a reclassification of renal diseases moving from a histopathological to a physiopathological classification. The principal issues afforded are: renal diseases with complement over activation, renal diseases with complement dysregulation, progression of renal diseases and renal transplantation. In the second section the authors discuss the several complement components that could represent a therapeutic target. Even if only the anti C5 monoclonal antibody is on the market, many targets as C1, C3, C5a and C5aR are the object of national or international trials. In addition, many molecules proved to be effective in vitro or in preclinical trials and are waiting to move to human trials in the future. PMID:25949931

  20. TRPV4 as a Therapeutic Target for Joint Diseases

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Amy L.; Leddy, Holly A.; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical factors play a critical role in regulating the physiology as well as the pathology of multiple joint tissues, and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. Therefore, the mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to mechanical signals may provide novel targets for the development of disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs (DMOADs). Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is a Ca2+-permeable cation channel that serves as a sensor of mechanical or osmotic signals in several musculoskeletal tissues, including cartilage, bone, and synovium. The importance of TRPV4 in joint homeostasis is apparent in patients harboring TRPV4 mutations, which result in the development of a spectrum of skeletal dysplasias and arthropathies. In addition, the genetic knockout of Trpv4 results in the development of osteoarthritis and decreased osteoclast function. In engineered cartilage replacements, chemical activation of TRPV4 can reproduce many of the anabolic effects of mechanical loading to accelerate tissue growth and regeneration. Overall, TRPV4 plays a key role in transducing mechanical, pain, and inflammatory signals within joint tissues, and thus is an attractive therapeutic target to modulate the effects of joint diseases. In pathological conditions in the joint, when the delicate balance of TRPV4 activity is altered, a variety of different tools could be utilized to directly or indirectly target TRPV4 activity. PMID:25519495

  1. Targeting NF-κB in glioblastoma: A therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Friedmann-Morvinski, Dinorah; Narasimamurthy, Rajesh; Xia, Yifeng; Myskiw, Chad; Soda, Yasushi; Verma, Inder M

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal form of intracranial tumor. We have established a lentivirus-induced mouse model of malignant gliomas, which faithfully captures the pathophysiology and molecular signature of mesenchymal human GBM. RNA-Seq analysis of these tumors revealed high nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation showing enrichment of known NF-κB target genes. Inhibition of NF-κB by either depletion of IκB kinase 2 (IKK2), expression of a IκBαM super repressor, or using a NEMO (NF-κB essential modifier)-binding domain (NBD) peptide in tumor-derived cell lines attenuated tumor proliferation and prolonged mouse survival. Timp1, one of the NF-κB target genes significantly up-regulated in GBM, was identified to play a role in tumor proliferation and growth. Inhibition of NF-κB activity or silencing of Timp1 resulted in slower tumor growth in both mouse and human GBM models. Our results suggest that inhibition of NF-κB activity or targeting of inducible NF-κB genes is an attractive therapeutic approach for GBM. PMID:26824076

  2. Mast cells: new therapeutic target in helminth immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Vukman, K V; Lalor, R; Aldridge, A; O'Neill, S M

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infection and their secreted antigens have a protective role in many immune-mediated inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, studies have focused primarily on identifying immune protective mechanisms of helminth infection and their secreted molecules on dendritic cells and macrophages. Given that mast cells have been shown to be implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of many inflammatory disorders, their role should also be examined and considered as cellular target for helminth-based therapies. As there is a dearth of studies examining the interaction of helminth-derived antigens and mast cells, this review will focus on the role of mast cells during helminth infection and examine our current understanding of the involvement of mast cells in TH 1/TH 17-mediated immune disorders. In this context, potential mechanisms by which helminths could target the TH 1/TH 17 promoting properties of mast cells can be identified to unveil novel therapeutic mast cell driven targets in combating these inflammatory disorders. PMID:26577605

  3. Self-Targeted, Shape-Assisted, and Controlled-Release Self-Delivery Nanodrug for Synergistic Targeting/Anticancer Effect of Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Lin, Jinyan; Huang, Yu; Li, Yanxiu; Yang, Xiangrui; Wu, Hongjie; Wu, Shichao; Xie, Liya; Dai, Lizong; Hou, Zhenqing

    2015-11-25

    We constructed 10-hydroxycamptothecin (CPT) "nanodrugs" with functionalization of lipid-PEG-methotrexate (MTX) to prepare high-drug-loaded, and sustained/controlled-release MTX-PEG-CPT nanorods (NRs), in which MTX drug itself can serve as a specific "targeting ligand". The self-targeted nanodrug can codeliver both CPT and MTX drugs with distinct anticancer mechanisms. Furthermore, MTX-PEG-CPT NRs significantly reduced burst release, improved blood circulation and tumor accumulation, enhanced cellular uptake, and synergistically increased anticancer effect against tumor cells compared with MTX-PEG-CPT nanospheres (NSs) and either both free drugs or individual free drug. Therefore, the synergistic targeting/therapeuticy nano-multi-drug codelivery assisted by shape design may advantageously offer a promising new strategy for nanomedicine. PMID:26529185

  4. Tumour suppressor HLJ1: A potential diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Meng-Feng; Wang, Chi-Chung; Chen, Jeremy JW

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality throughout the world. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for 85% of all diagnosed lung cancers. Despite considerable progress in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease, the overall 5-year survival rate of NSCLC patients remains lower than 15%. The most common causes of death in lung cancer patients are treatment failure and metastasis. Therefore, developing novel strategies that target both tumour growth and metastasis is an important and urgent mission for the next generation of anticancer therapy research. Heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are involved in the fundamental defence mechanism for maintaining cellular viability, are markedly activated during environmental or pathogenic stress. HSPs facilitate rapid cell division, metastasis, and the evasion of apoptosis in cancer development. These proteins are essential players in the development of cancer and are prime therapeutic targets. In this review, we focus on the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for HLJ1’s role in lung cancer carcinogenesis and progression. HLJ1, a member of the human HSP 40 family, has been characterised as a tumour suppressor. Research studies have also reported that HLJ1 shows promising dual anticancer effects, inhibiting both tumour growth and metastasis in NSCLC. The accumulated evidence suggests that HLJ1 is a potential biomarker and treatment target for NSCLC. PMID:25493224

  5. Novel Microtubule-Targeting 7-Deazahypoxanthines Derived from Marine Alkaloid Rigidins with Potent in Vitro and in Vivo Anticancer Activities.

    PubMed

    Medellin, Derek C; Zhou, Qiong; Scott, Robert; Hill, R Matthew; Frail, Sarah K; Dasari, Ramesh; Ontiveros, Steven J; Pelly, Stephen C; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Betancourt, Tania; Shuster, Charles B; Hamel, Ernest; Bai, Ruoli; LaBarbera, Daniel V; Rogelj, Snezna; Frolova, Liliya V; Kornienko, Alexander

    2016-01-14

    Docking studies of tubulin-targeting C2-substituted 7-deazahypoxanthine analogues of marine alkaloid rigidins led to the design and synthesis of compounds containing linear C2-substituents. The C2-alkynyl analogue was found to have double- to single-digit nanomolar antiproliferative IC50 values and showed statistically significant tumor size reduction in a colon cancer mouse model at nontoxic concentrations. These results provide impetus and further guidance for the development of these rigidin analogues as anticancer agents. PMID:26641132

  6. Autophagy as a Therapeutic Target in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nemchenko, Andriy; Chiong, Mario; Turer, Aslan; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    The epidemic of heart failure continues apace, and development of novel therapies with clinical efficacy has lagged. Now, important insights into the molecular circuitry of cardiovascular autophagy have raised the prospect that this cellular pathway of protein quality control may be a target of clinical relevance. Whereas basal levels of autophagy are required for cell survival, excessive levels – or perhaps distinct forms of autophagic flux – contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our challenge will be to distinguish mechanisms that drive adaptive versus maladaptive autophagy and to manipulate those pathways for therapeutic gain. Recent evidence suggests this may be possible. Here, we review the fundamental biology of autophagy and its role in a variety of forms of cardiovascular disease. We discuss ways in which this evolutionarily conserved catabolic mechanism can be manipulated, discuss studies presently underway in heart disease, and provide our perspective on where this exciting field may lead in the future. PMID:21723289

  7. Salivary epithelial cells: an unassuming target site for gene therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Paola; Rowzee, Anne M.; Zheng, Changyu; Adriaansen, Janik; Baum, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    Salivary glands are classical exocrine glands whose external secretions result in the production of saliva. However, in addition to the secretion of exocrine proteins, salivary epithelial cells are also capable of secreting proteins internally, into the bloodstream. This brief review examines the potential for using salivary epithelial cells as a target site for in situ gene transfer, with an ultimate goal of producing therapeutic proteins for treating both systemic and upper gastrointestinal tract disorders. The review discusses the protein secretory pathways reported to be present in salivary epithelial cells, the viral gene transfer vectors shown useful for transducing these cells, model transgenic secretory proteins examined, and some clinical conditions that might benefit from such salivary gland gene transfer. PMID:20219693

  8. [Mitochondrial dynamics: a potential new therapeutic target for heart failure].

    PubMed

    Kuzmicic, Jovan; Del Campo, Andrea; López-Crisosto, Camila; Morales, Pablo E; Pennanen, Christian; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Hechenleitner, Jonathan; Zepeda, Ramiro; Castro, Pablo F; Verdejo, Hugo E; Parra, Valentina; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles able to vary their morphology between elongated interconnected mitochondrial networks and fragmented disconnected arrays, through events of mitochondrial fusion and fission, respectively. These events allow the transmission of signaling messengers and exchange of metabolites within the cell. They have also been implicated in a variety of biological processes including embryonic development, metabolism, apoptosis, and autophagy. Although the majority of these studies have been confined to noncardiac cells, emerging evidence suggests that changes in mitochondrial morphology could participate in cardiac development, the response to ischemia-reperfusion injury, heart failure, and diabetes mellitus. In this article, we review how the mitochondrial dynamics are altered in different cardiac pathologies, with special emphasis on heart failure, and how this knowledge may provide new therapeutic targets for treating cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21820793

  9. PTP1B: a new therapeutic target for Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tautz, Lutz

    2015-08-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by successive loss of acquired cognitive, social, and motor skills and development of autistic behavior. RTT affects approximately 1 in 10,000 live female births and is the second most common cause of severe mental retardation in females, after Down syndrome. Currently, there is no cure or effective therapy for RTT. Approved treatment regimens are presently limited to supportive management of specific physical and mental disabilities. In this issue, Krishnan and colleagues reveal that the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is upregulated in patients with RTT and in murine models and provide strong evidence that targeting PTP1B has potential as a viable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of RTT. PMID:26214520

  10. Oncogenic and Therapeutic Targeting of PTEN Loss in Bone Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yongming; Chen, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Being a tumor suppressor, PTEN functions as a dual-specificity protein and phospholipid phosphatase and regulates a variety of cellular processes and signal transduction pathways. Loss of PTEN function has been detected frequently in different forms of cancers, such as breast, prostate and lung cancer, gastric and colon cancer, skin cancer, as well as endometrial carcinoma. In this review, we provide a summary of PTEN and its role in bone malignancies including bone metastases, multiple myeloma, and osteosarcoma, etc. We highlight the importance of PTEN loss leading to activation of the oncogenic PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in tumorigenesis and progression, which can be attributed to both genetic and non-genetic alterations involving gene mutation, loss of heterozygosity, promoter hypermethylation, and microRNA mediated negative regulation. We also discuss the emerging therapeutic applications targeting PTEN loss for the treatment of these bone malignant diseases. PMID:25773992

  11. Tetraspanins as therapeutic targets in hematological malignancy: a concise review

    PubMed Central

    Beckwith, Kyle A.; Byrd, John C.; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins belong to a family of transmembrane proteins which play a major role in the organization of the plasma membrane. While all immune cells express tetraspanins, most of these are present in a variety of other cell types. There are a select few, such as CD37 and CD53, which are restricted to hematopoietic lineages. Tetraspanins associate with numerous partners involved in a diverse set of biological processes, including cell activation, survival, proliferation, adhesion, and migration. The historical view has assigned them a scaffolding role, but recent discoveries suggest some tetraspanins can directly participate in signaling through interactions with cytoplasmic proteins. Given their potential roles in supporting tumor survival and immune evasion, an improved understanding of tetraspanin activity could prove clinically valuable. This review will focus on emerging data in the study of tetraspanins, advances in the clinical development of anti-CD37 therapeutics, and the future prospects of targeting tetraspanins in hematological malignancy. PMID:25852576

  12. EZH2 in Bladder Cancer, a Promising Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; Rubio, Carolina; Segovia, Cristina; López-Calderón, Fernando F.; Dueñas, Marta; Paramio, Jesús M.

    2015-01-01

    Bladder Cancer (BC) represents a current clinical and social challenge. The recent studies aimed to describe the genomic landscape of BC have underscored the relevance of epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of these tumors. Among the epigenetic alterations, histone modifications occupied a central role not only in cancer, but also in normal organism homeostasis and development. EZH2 (Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2) belongs to the Polycomb repressive complex 2 as its catalytic subunit, which through the trimethylation of H3 (Histone 3) on K27 (Lysine 27), produces gene silencing. EZH2 is frequently overexpressed in multiple tumor types, including BC, and plays multiple roles besides the well-recognized histone mark generation. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge on the oncogenic roles of EZH2 and its potential use as a therapeutic target, with special emphasis on BC pathogenesis and management. PMID:26580594

  13. Hepatic macrophages in liver fibrosis: pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; You, Hong; Fan, Xu; Jia, Jidong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic macrophages account for the largest non-parenchymal cell population in the liver. Recent studies have found that hepatic macrophages have different functions in different stages of experimental liver fibrosis. Some studies found that there are different types of hepatic macrophages in the liver, although others have suggested that hepatic macrophages could switch to different phenotypes in different environments. Many studies demonstrated that while hepatic macrophages promoted fibrosis through the recruitment of proinflammatory immune cells, and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the early stages, these also promoted the resolution of hepatic fibrosis through the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases in the late stages. This article will review the current role played by hepatic macrophages in liver fibrosis and the potential therapeutic targets that modulate hepatic macrophages. PMID:27252881

  14. Novel therapeutic approaches targeting matrix metalloproteinases in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Briasoulis, Alexandros; Tousoulis, Dimitris; Papageorgiou, Nikolaos; Kampoli, Anna-Maria; Androulakis, Emmanuel; Antoniades, Charalambos; Tsiamis, Eleftherios; Latsios, George; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), are proteinases that participate in extracellular matrix remodelling and degradation. Under normal physiological conditions, the activities of MMPs are regulated at the level of transcription, of activation of the pro-MMP precursor zymogens and of inhibition by endogenous inhibitors (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases; TIMPs). Alteration in the regulation of MMP activity is implicated in atherosclerotic plaque development, coronary artery disease and heart failure. The pathological effects of MMPs and TIMPs in cardiovascular diseases involve vascular remodelling, atherosclerotic plaque instability and left ventricular remodelling after myocardial infarction. Since excessive tissue remodelling and increased matrix metalloproteinase activity have been demonstrated during atherosclerotic lesion progression, MMPs represent a potential target for therapeutic intervention aimed at modification of vascular pathology by restoring the physiological balance between MMPs and TIMPs. This review discusses pharmacological approaches to MMP inhibition. PMID:22519451

  15. Therapeutic targets of triple-negative breast cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Jamdade, Vinayak S; Sethi, Nikunj; Mundhe, Nitin A; Kumar, Parveen; Lahkar, Mangala; Sinha, Neeraj

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the second most common cause of cancer deaths. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) does not show immunohistochemical expression of oestrogen receptors, progesterone receptors or HER2. At present, no suitable treatment option is available for patients with TNBC. This dearth of effective conventional therapies for the treatment of advanced stage breast cancer has provoked the development of novel strategies for the management of patients with TNBC. This review presents recent information associated with different therapeutic options for the treatment of TNBC focusing on promising targets such as the Notch signalling, Wnt/β-catenin and Hedgehog pathways, in addition to EGFR, PARP1, mTOR, TGF-β and angiogenesis inhibitors. PMID:26040571

  16. Inflammation as a Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Ang, Lynn; Holmes, Crystal; Gallagher, Katherine; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic neuropathies (DNs) are one of the most prevalent chronic complications of diabetes and a major cause of disability, high mortality, and poor quality of life. Given the complex anatomy of the peripheral nervous system and types of fiber dysfunction, DNs have a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. The treatment of DNs continues to be challenging, likely due to the complex pathogenesis that involves an array of systemic and cellular imbalances in glucose and lipids metabolism. These lead to the activation of various biochemical pathways, including increased oxidative/nitrosative stress, activation of the polyol and protein kinase C pathways, activation of polyADP ribosylation, and activation of genes involved in neuronal damage, cyclooxygenase-2 activation, endothelial dysfunction, altered Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump function, impaired C-peptide-related signaling pathways, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and low-grade inflammation. This review summarizes current evidence regarding the role of low-grade inflammation as a potential therapeutic target for DNs. PMID:26897744

  17. Functions of astrocytes and their potential as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kimelberg, Harold K.; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2010-01-01

    Astrocytes are often referred to, and historically have been regarded as, support cells of the mammalian CNS. Work over the last decade suggests otherwise, that astrocytes may in fact play a more active role in higher neural processing than previously recognized. Because astrocytes can potentially serve as novel therapeutic targets, it is critical to understand how astrocytes execute their diverse supportive tasks while maintaining neuronal health. To that end, this review will focus on the supportive roles of astrocytes, a line of study relevant to essentially all acute and chronic neurological diseases. Furthermore, this review will critically re-evaluate our concepts of the functional properties of astrocytes and relate these tasks to their intricate morphology. PMID:20880499

  18. Reactive oxygen species-targeted therapeutic interventions for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sovari, Ali A.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia that requires medical attention, and its incidence is increasing. Current ion channel blockade therapies and catheter ablation have significant limitations in treatment of AF, mainly because they do not address the underlying pathophysiology of the disease. Oxidative stress has been implicated as a major underlying pathology that promotes AF; however, conventional antioxidants have not shown impressive therapeutic effects. A more careful design of antioxidant therapies and better selection of patients likely are required to treat effectively AF with antioxidant agents. Current evidence suggest inhibition of prominent cardiac sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and targeting subcellular compartments with the highest levels of ROS may prove to be effective therapies for AF. Increased serum markers of oxidative stress may be an important guide in selecting the AF patients who will most likely respond to antioxidant therapy. PMID:22934062

  19. Hippocampal Area CA2: An Overlooked but Promising Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Chevaleyre, Vivien; Piskorowski, Rebecca A

    2016-08-01

    While the hippocampus has long been recognized as a brain structure specialized in mapping 'space' in rodents, human studies and now recent data from rodents have shown that its function extends well beyond spatial coding. Recently, an overlooked area of the hippocampus, CA2, has emerged as a critical region for social memory. This area is also uniquely altered during several pathologies such as schizophrenia and age-related dementia. Because of its singular connectivity, we propose that area CA2 resides at the interface between emotional brain activity and higher cognitive function. Furthermore, because of the unique expression of multiple neuromodulator receptors in area CA2, we posit that this region may represent a fruitful therapeutic target for diseases where social dysfunction occurs. PMID:27372610

  20. Macrophages associated with tumors as potential targets and therapeutic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Serguei; Warren, Galya; Wei, Xin

    2014-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form approximately 50% of tumor mass. TAMs were shown to promote tumor growth by suppressing immunocompetent cells, inducing neovascularization and supporting cancer stem cells. TAMs retain mobility in tumor mass, which can potentially be employed for better intratumoral biodistribution of nanocarriers and effective tumor growth inhibition. Due to the importance of TAMs, they are increasingly becoming principal targets of novel therapeutic approaches. In this review, we compare features of macrophages and TAMs that are essential for TAM-directed therapies, and illustrate the advantages of nanomedicine that are related to the preferential capture of nanocarriers by Mϕ in the process of drug delivery. We discuss recent efforts in reprogramming or inhibiting tumor-protecting properties of TAMs, and potential strategies to increase efficacy of conventional chemotherapy by combining with macrophage-associated delivery of nanodrugs. PMID:24827844

  1. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRasG12D mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  2. Cell migration in paediatric glioma; characterisation and potential therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Cockle, J V; Picton, S; Levesley, J; Ilett, E; Carcaboso, A M; Short, S; Steel, L P; Melcher, A; Lawler, S E; Brüning-Richardson, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric high grade glioma (pHGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) are highly aggressive brain tumours. Their invasive phenotype contributes to their limited therapeutic response, and novel treatments that block brain tumour invasion are needed. Methods: Here, we examine the migratory characteristics and treatment effect of small molecule glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl) and the indirubin derivative 6-bromoindirubin-oxime (BIO), previously shown to inhibit the migration of adult glioma cells, on two pHGG cell lines (SF188 and KNS42) and one patient-derived DIPG line (HSJD-DIPG-007) using 2D (transwell membrane, immunofluorescence, live cell imaging) and 3D (migration on nanofibre plates and spheroid invasion in collagen) assays. Results: All lines were migratory, but there were differences in morphology and migration rates. Both LiCl and BIO reduced migration and instigated cytoskeletal rearrangement of stress fibres and focal adhesions when viewed by immunofluorescence. In the presence of drugs, loss of polarity and differences in cellular movement were observed by live cell imaging. Conclusions: Ours is the first study to demonstrate that it is possible to pharmacologically target migration of paediatric glioma in vitro using LiCl and BIO, and we conclude that these agents and their derivatives warrant further preclinical investigation as potential anti-migratory therapeutics for these devastating tumours. PMID:25628092

  3. Autobiographical Memory Disturbances in Depression: A Novel Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed

    Köhler, Cristiano A; Carvalho, André F; Alves, Gilberto S; McIntyre, Roger S; Hyphantis, Thomas N; Cammarota, Martín

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by a dysfunctional processing of autobiographical memories. We review the following core domains of deficit: systematic biases favoring materials of negative emotional valence; diminished access and response to positive memories; a recollection of overgeneral memories in detriment of specific autobiographical memories; and the role of ruminative processes and avoidance when dealing with autobiographical memories. Furthermore, we review evidence from functional neuroimaging studies of neural circuits activated by the recollection of autobiographical memories in both healthy and depressive individuals. Disruptions in autobiographical memories predispose and portend onset and maintenance of depression. Thus, we discuss emerging therapeutics that target memory difficulties in those with depression. We review strategies for this clinical domain, including memory specificity training, method-of-loci, memory rescripting, and real-time fMRI neurofeedback training of amygdala activity in depression. We propose that the manipulation of the reconsolidation of autobiographical memories in depression might represent a novel yet largely unexplored, domain-specific, therapeutic opportunity for depression treatment. PMID:26380121

  4. Stem cells as a therapeutic target for diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Paras Kumar; Singh, Shree Ram; Joshua, Irving G.; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2010-01-01

    The rapidly increasing number of diabetes patients across the world poses a great challenge to the current therapeutic approach. The traditional method of exogenous supply of insulin is not sufficient and often causes lethal hypoglycemia that demands to develop a novel strategy. Recent investigations on regeneration of insulin producing cells (IPCs) revealed that in addition to primary source i.e., pancreatic beta cells, IPCs can be derived from several alternative sources including embryonic, adult, mesenchymal, and hematopoietic stem cells via the process of proliferation, dedifferentiation, neogenesis, nuclear reprogramming and trans-differentiation. There is considerable success in insulin independency of diabetes patient after transplantation of whole pancreas and/or the islets cell. However, the major challenge for regenerative therapy is to obtain a large source of islet/beta cells donor. Recent advances in the directed differentiation of stem cells generated a promising hope for a better and permanent insulin independency for diabetes patients. In this review we discussed stem cells as a potential future therapeutic target for the treatment of diabetes and associated diseases. PMID:20036830

  5. Targeting Cell Death Pathways for Therapeutic Intervention in Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Garg, Jay P; Vucic, Domagoj

    2016-05-01

    Precise regulation of cell death and survival is essential for proper maintenance of organismal homeostasis, development, and the immune system. Deregulated cell death can lead to developmental defects, neuropathies, infections, and cancer. Kidney diseases, especially acute pathologies linked to ischemia-reperfusion injury, are among illnesses that profoundly are affected by improper regulation or execution of cell death pathways. Attempts to develop medicines for kidney diseases have been impacted by the complexity of these pathologies given the heterogeneous patient population and diverse etiologies. By analyzing cell death pathways activated in kidney diseases, we attempt to differentiate their importance for these pathologies with a goal of identifying those that have more profound impact and the best therapeutic potential. Although classic apoptosis still might be important, regulated necrosis pathways including necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-associated cell death play a significantly role in kidney diseases, especially in acute kidney pathologies. Although targeting receptor-interacting protein 1 kinase appears to be the best therapeutic strategy, combination with inhibitors of other cell death pathways is likely to bring superior benefit and possible cure to patients suffering from kidney diseases. PMID:27339381

  6. Leptin, ghrelin, and endocannabinoids: potential therapeutic targets in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Støving, René Klinkby; Andries, Alin; Brixen, Kim; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Hørder, Kirsten; Frystyk, Jan

    2009-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) has the highest mortality rate between psychiatric disorders, and evidence for managing it is still very limited. So far, pharmacological treatment has focused on a narrow range of drugs and only a few controlled studies have been performed. Furthermore, the studies have been of short duration and included a limited number of subjects, often heterogenic with regard to stage and acute nutritive status. Thus, novel approaches are urgently needed. Body weight homeostasis is tightly regulated throughout life. With the discovery of orexigenic and anorectic signals, an array of new molecular targets to control eating behavior has emerged. This review focuses on recent advances in three important signal systems: leptin, ghrelin, and endocannabinoids toward the identification of potential therapeutical breakthroughs in AN. Our review of the current literature shows that leptin may have therapeutic potentials in promoting restoration of menstrual cycles in weight restored patients, reducing motor restlessness in severely hyperactive patients, and preventing osteoporosis in chronic patients. Ghrelin and endocannabinoids exert orexigenic effects which may facilitate nutritional restoration. Leptin and endocannabinoids may exert antidepressive and anxiolytic effects. Finally, monitoring serum concentration of leptin may be useful in order to prevent refeeding syndrome. PMID:18926548

  7. Glutamatergic dysfunctioning in Alzheimer's disease and related therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Zádori, Dénes; Veres, Gábor; Szalárdy, Levente; Klivényi, Péter; Toldi, József; Vécsei, László

    2014-01-01

    The impairment of glutamatergic neurotransmission plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The pathological process, which involves the production of amyloid-β peptides and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins, spreads over well-delineated neuroanatomical circuits. The gradual deterioration of proper synaptic functioning (via GluN2A-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, NMDARs) and the development of excitotoxicity (via GluN2B-containing NMDARs) in these structures both accompany the disease pathogenesis. Although one of the most important therapeutic targets would be glutamate excitotoxicity, the application of conventional anti-glutamatergic agents could result in further deterioration of synaptic transmission and intolerable side-effects. With regard to NMDAR antagonists with tolerable side-effects, ion channel blockers with low affinity, glycine site agents, and specific antagonists of polyamine site and GluN2B subunit may come into play. However, in the mirror of experimental data, only the application of ion channel blockers with pronounced voltage dependency, low affinity, and rapid unblocking kinetics (e.g., memantine) and specific antagonists of the GluN2B subunit (e.g., ifenprodil and certain kynurenic acid amides) resulted in desirable symptom amelioration. Therefore we propose that these kinds of chemical agents may have therapeutic potential for present and future drug development. PMID:24670398

  8. The Serotonin-6 Receptor as a Novel Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyung-Mun

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter that is found in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. 5-HT mediates its diverse physiological responses through 7 different 5-HT receptor families: 5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors. Among them, the 5-HT6 receptor (5-HT6R) is the most recently cloned serotonin receptor and plays important roles in the central nervous system (CNS) and in the etiology of neurological diseases. Compared to other 5-HT receptors, the 5-HT6R has been considered as an attractive CNS therapeutic target because it is expressed exclusively in the CNS and has no known isoforms. This review evaluates in detail the role of the 5-HT6R in the physiology and pathophysiology of the CNS and the potential usefulness of 5-HT6R ligands in the development of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of CNS disorders. Preclinical studies provide support for the use of 5-HT6R ligands as promising medications to treat the cognitive dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease, obesity, depression, and anxiety. PMID:22355260

  9. Therapeutic potential of targeting acinar cell reprogramming in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Hin; Li, You-Jia; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-08-21

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a common pancreatic cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Treating this life-threatening disease remains challenging due to the lack of effective prognosis, diagnosis and therapy. Apart from pancreatic duct cells, acinar cells may also be the origin of PDAC. During pancreatitis or combined with activating KRas(G12D) mutation, acinar cells lose their cellular identity and undergo a transdifferentiation process called acinar-to-ductal-metaplasia (ADM), forming duct cells which may then transform into pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and eventually PDAC. During ADM, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, Wnt, Notch and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Akt signaling inhibits the transcription of acinar-specific genes, including Mist and amylase, but promotes the expression of ductal genes, such as cytokeratin-19. Inhibition of this transdifferentiation process hinders the development of PanIN and PDAC. In addition, the transdifferentiated cells regain acinar identity, indicating ADM may be a reversible process. This provides a new therapeutic direction in treating PDAC through cancer reprogramming. Many studies have already demonstrated the success of switching PanIN/PDAC back to normal cells through the use of PD325901, the expression of E47, and the knockdown of Dickkopf-3. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways involved in ADM and the therapeutic potential of targeting reprogramming in order to treat PDAC. PMID:27610015

  10. ENaCs and ASICs as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Qadri, Yawar J.; Rooj, Arun K.

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) and acid-sensitive ion channel (ASIC) branches of the ENaC/degenerin superfamily of cation channels have drawn increasing attention as potential therapeutic targets in a variety of diseases and conditions. Originally thought to be solely expressed in fluid absorptive epithelia and in neurons, it has become apparent that members of this family exhibit nearly ubiquitous expression. Therapeutic opportunities range from hypertension, due to the role of ENaC in maintaining whole body salt and water homeostasis, to anxiety disorders and pain associated with ASIC activity. As a physiologist intrigued by the fundamental mechanics of salt and water transport, it was natural that Dale Benos, to whom this series of reviews is dedicated, should have been at the forefront of research into the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel. The cloning of ENaC and subsequently the ASIC channels has revealed a far wider role for this channel family than was previously imagined. In this review, we will discuss the known and potential roles of ENaC and ASIC subunits in the wide variety of pathologies in which these channels have been implicated. Some of these, such as the role of ENaC in Liddle's syndrome are well established, others less so; however, all are related in that the fundamental defect is due to inappropriate channel activity. PMID:22277752

  11. Anticancer activity of Panax notoginseng extract 20(S)-25-OCH3-PPD: Targetting beta-catenin signalling.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiuli; Zhao, Yuqing; Fang, Wenfeng; Yang, Wancai

    2009-11-01

    1. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway plays a critical role in carcinogenesis and so agents that target Wnt/beta-catenin may have potential in cancer prevention and therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anticancer activity of the novel natural product dammarane-type triterpene sapogenin (20(S)-25-OCH3-PPD; PPD25) isolated from the leaves of Panax notoginseng. 2. The anticancer activity of PPD25 was evaluated in three colon cancer cell lines and in one lung cancer cell line. The effects of PPD25 to inhibit proliferation and to induce apoptosis were evaluated. In addition, the potential mechanisms underlying the effects of PPD25 were investigated. 3. It was found that the addition of 5 or 25 micromol/L PPD25 to the culture medium significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in all four cancer cell lines. Mechanistic studies revealed that PPD25 significantly reduced the expression of beta-catenin, a key mediator in the Wnt pathway, as well as transcriptional targets of beta-catenin, namely c-myc, cyclin D1, cdk4 and T cell factor (TCF)-4. In addition, beta-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity was significantly suppressed by PPD25. 4. The data demonstrate that the PPD25 exerts its anticancer effect by targetting beta-catenin signalling, suggesting that PPD25 may have potential as a chemotherapeutic and/or chemopreventive agent for colon and lung cancer. PMID:19413587

  12. Targeting macrophage necroptosis for therapeutic and diagnostic interventions in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Denuja; Geoffrion, Michele; Wei, Lihui; Gan, Wei; Richards, Laura; Shangari, Prakriti; DeKemp, Ella M.; Beanlands, Rachelle A.; Perisic, Ljubica; Maegdefessel, Lars; Hedin, Ulf; Sad, Subash; Guo, Liang; Kolodgie, Frank D.; Virmani, Renu; Ruddy, Terrence; Rayner, Katey J.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis results from maladaptive inflammation driven primarily by macrophages, whose recruitment and proliferation drive plaque progression. In advanced plaques, macrophage death contributes centrally to the formation of plaque necrosis, which underlies the instability that promotes plaque rupture and myocardial infarction. Hence, targeting macrophage cell death pathways may offer promise for the stabilization of vulnerable plaques. Necroptosis is a recently discovered pathway of programmed cell necrosis regulated by RIP3 and MLKL kinases that, in contrast to apoptosis, induces a proinflammatory state. We show herein that necroptotic cell death is activated in human advanced atherosclerotic plaques and can be targeted in experimental atherosclerosis for both therapeutic and diagnostic interventions. In humans with unstable carotid atherosclerosis, expression of RIP3 and MLKL is increased, and MLKL phosphorylation, a key step in the commitment to necroptosis, is detected in advanced atheromas. Investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying necroptosis showed that atherogenic forms of low-density lipoprotein increase RIP3 and MLKL transcription and phosphorylation—two critical steps in the execution of necroptosis. Using a radiotracer developed with the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), we show that 123I-Nec-1 localizes specifically to atherosclerotic plaques in Apoe−/− mice, and its uptake is tightly correlated to lesion areas by ex vivo nuclear imaging. Furthermore, treatment of Apoe−/− mice with established atherosclerosis with Nec-1 reduced lesion size and markers of plaque instability, including necrotic core formation. Collectively, our findings offer molecular insight into the mechanisms of macrophage cell death that drive necrotic core formation in atherosclerosis and suggest that this pathway can be used as both a diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the treatment of unstable atherosclerosis. PMID:27532042

  13. Hypoxia inducible factor in hepatocellular carcinoma: A therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Daniel; Wu, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed and deadly cancers worldwide; its incidence has been rising in the United States due to the increase in hepatitis C associated cirrhosis and the growing epidemic of obesity. There have been no effective therapeutic options in the advanced disease setting beyond sorafenib, a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor that showed significant survival benefit. Because of this, there is an urgent need to search for novel pathways in sorafenib experienced patients. This review will focus on the role of hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α) in cancer development, specifically in HCC. We will discuss the biology of HIF-1α, the pathways with which it interacts, and the function of HIF-1α in HCC. Furthermore, we will review studies highlighting the relevance of HIF-1α in the clinical setting, as well as the pre-clinical data supporting its further investigation. Finally, we will conclude with a discussion of the potential role of a HIF-1α mRNA antagonist for the treatment of HCC, and hypothesize the ways in which such an inhibitor may be best utilized in the management of advanced HCC. Hypoxia plays a significant role in the development of HCC. HIF-1α is a key transcription factor involved in the hypoxic response of cancer cells. It activates transcription of genes responsible for angiogenesis, glucose metabolism, proliferation, invasion and metastasis in HCC. Its involvement in multiple, essential tumor pathways makes it an attractive potential therapeutic target in HCC. PMID:26576101

  14. Modeling of hyaluronic acid containing anti-cancer drugs-loaded polylactic-co-glycolic acid bioconjugates for targeted delivery to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul-e-Saba, Adulphakdee, A.; Madthing, A.; Zafar, M. N.; Abdullah, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular modeling of hyaluronan (HA), polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), polyethylene glycol-bis-amine (PEG-bis-amine), Curcumin, Cisplatin and the conjugate HA-PEG-PLGA containing Curcumin/Cisplatin were performed using Discovery Studio 2.5 to better understand issues and constraints related to targeted delivery of potent anticancer drugs to cancer cells. HA, a versatile biopolymer is a ligand of cancer cell receptor, CD44 that can be particularly useful in a receptor-mediated cellular uptake of drug-incorporated nanoparticles. Biocompatible and biodegradable polymers, PLGA and PEG, serve as polymeric micelles for controlled-release of drug. Curcumin as a natural anticancer agent has poor solubility that limits its use in drug therapeutics, while platinum-based Cisplatin exhibits systemic cytotoxicity. These can be overcome via drug delivery in polymeric biocompatible vehicles. The PLGA-PEG-HA conjugate shows the total measurement of 105 bond length with average bond length of 1.274163 Å. The conjugation between PEG and HA occurs at C8-O1 atoms and can be manipulated to improve properties.

  15. Pathogenic Inflammation and Its Therapeutic Targeting in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Timothy A.; Tsantikos, Evelyn; Hibbs, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, lupus) is a highly complex and heterogeneous autoimmune disease that most often afflicts women in their child-bearing years. It is characterized by circulating self-reactive antibodies that deposit in tissues, including skin, kidneys, and brain, and the ensuing inflammatory response can lead to irreparable tissue damage. Over many years, clinical trials in SLE have focused on agents that control B- and T-lymphocyte activation, and, with the single exception of an agent known as belimumab which targets the B-cell survival factor BAFF, they have been disappointing. At present, standard therapy for SLE with mild disease is the agent hydroxychloroquine. During disease flares, steroids are often used, while the more severe manifestations with major organ involvement warrant potent, broad-spectrum immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate. Current treatments have severe and dose-limiting toxicities and thus a more specific therapy targeting a causative factor or signaling pathway would be greatly beneficial in SLE treatment. Moreover, the ability to control inflammation alongside B-cell activation may be a superior approach for disease control. There has been a recent focus on the innate immune system and associated inflammation, which has uncovered key players in driving the pathogenesis of SLE. Delineating some of these intricate inflammatory mechanisms has been possible with studies using spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice. These strains, to varying degrees, exhibit hallmarks of the human disease and therefore have been utilized to model human SLE and to test new drugs. Developing a better understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of disease in SLE may uncover suitable novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we discuss the involvement of inflammation in SLE disease pathogenesis, with a focus on several key proinflammatory cytokines and myeloid growth factors, and review the known

  16. SynLethDB: synthetic lethality database toward discovery of selective and sensitive anticancer drug targets.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a type of genetic interaction between two genes such that simultaneous perturbations of the two genes result in cell death or a dramatic decrease of cell viability, while a perturbation of either gene alone is not lethal. SL reflects the biologically endogenous difference between cancer cells and normal cells, and thus the inhibition of SL partners of genes with cancer-specific mutations could selectively kill cancer cells but spare normal cells. Therefore, SL is emerging as a promising anticancer strategy that could potentially overcome the drawbacks of traditional chemotherapies by reducing severe side effects. Researchers have developed experimental technologies and computational prediction methods to identify SL gene pairs on human and a few model species. However, there has not been a comprehensive database dedicated to collecting SL pairs and related knowledge. In this paper, we propose a comprehensive database, SynLethDB (http://histone.sce.ntu.edu.sg/SynLethDB/), which contains SL pairs collected from biochemical assays, other related databases, computational predictions and text mining results on human and four model species, i.e. mouse, fruit fly, worm and yeast. For each SL pair, a confidence score was calculated by integrating individual scores derived from different evidence sources. We also developed a statistical analysis module to estimate the druggability and sensitivity of cancer cells upon drug treatments targeting human SL partners, based on large-scale genomic data, gene expression profiles and drug sensitivity profiles on more than 1000 cancer cell lines. To help users access and mine the wealth of the data, we developed other practical functionalities, such as search and filtering, orthology search, gene set enrichment analysis. Furthermore, a user-friendly web interface has been implemented to facilitate data analysis and interpretation. With the integrated data sets and analytics functionalities, SynLethDB would

  17. Mitochondrial-Targeted Curcuminoids: A Strategy to Enhance Bioavailability and Anticancer Efficacy of Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Cheruku Apoorva; Somepalli, Venkateswarlu; Golakoti, Trimurtulu; Kanugula, Anantha KoteswaraRao; Karnewar, Santosh; Rajendiran, Karthikraj; Vasagiri, Nagarjuna; Prabhakar, Sripadi; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Although the anti-cancer effects of curcumin has been shown in various cancer cell types, in vitro, pre-clinical and clinical studies showed only a limited efficacy, even at high doses. This is presumably due to low bioavailability in both plasma and tissues, particularly due to poor intracellular accumulation. A variety of methods have been developed to achieve the selective targeting of drugs to cells and mitochondrion. We used a novel approach by conjugation of curcumin to lipophilic triphenylphosphonium (TPP) cation to facilitate delivery of curcumin to mitochondria. TPP is selectively taken up by mitochondria driven by the membrane potential by several hundred folds. In this study, three mitocurcuminoids (mitocurcuminoids-1, 2, and 3) were successfully synthesized by tagging TPP to curcumin at different positions. ESI-MS analysis showed significantly higher uptake of the mitocurcuminoids in mitochondria as compared to curcumin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. All three mitocurcuminoids exhibited significant cytotoxicity to MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, SKNSH, DU-145, and HeLa cancer cells with minimal effect on normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A). The IC50 was much lower for mitocurcuminoids when compared to curcumin. The mitocurcuminoids induced significant ROS generation, a drop in ΔØm, cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. They inhibited Akt and STAT3 phosphorylation and increased ERK phosphorylation. Mitocurcuminoids also showed upregulation of pro-apoptotic BNIP3 expression. In conclusion, the results of this study indicated that mitocurcuminoids show substantial promise for further development as a potential agent for the treatment of various cancers. PMID:24622734

  18. Mitochondrial-targeted curcuminoids: a strategy to enhance bioavailability and anticancer efficacy of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Cheruku Apoorva; Somepalli, Venkateswarlu; Golakoti, Trimurtulu; Kanugula, Anantha KoteswaraRao; Karnewar, Santosh; Rajendiran, Karthikraj; Vasagiri, Nagarjuna; Prabhakar, Sripadi; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Although the anti-cancer effects of curcumin has been shown in various cancer cell types, in vitro, pre-clinical and clinical studies showed only a limited efficacy, even at high doses. This is presumably due to low bioavailability in both plasma and tissues, particularly due to poor intracellular accumulation. A variety of methods have been developed to achieve the selective targeting of drugs to cells and mitochondrion. We used a novel approach by conjugation of curcumin to lipophilic triphenylphosphonium (TPP) cation to facilitate delivery of curcumin to mitochondria. TPP is selectively taken up by mitochondria driven by the membrane potential by several hundred folds. In this study, three mitocurcuminoids (mitocurcuminoids-1, 2, and 3) were successfully synthesized by tagging TPP to curcumin at different positions. ESI-MS analysis showed significantly higher uptake of the mitocurcuminoids in mitochondria as compared to curcumin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. All three mitocurcuminoids exhibited significant cytotoxicity to MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, SKNSH, DU-145, and HeLa cancer cells with minimal effect on normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A). The IC50 was much lower for mitocurcuminoids when compared to curcumin. The mitocurcuminoids induced significant ROS generation, a drop in ΔØm, cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. They inhibited Akt and STAT3 phosphorylation and increased ERK phosphorylation. Mitocurcuminoids also showed upregulation of pro-apoptotic BNIP3 expression. In conclusion, the results of this study indicated that mitocurcuminoids show substantial promise for further development as a potential agent for the treatment of various cancers. PMID:24622734

  19. Aptamers as targeting delivery devices or anti-cancer drugs for fighting tumors.

    PubMed

    Scaggiante, Bruna; Dapas, Barbara; Farra, Rossella; Grassi, Mario; Pozzato, Gabriele; Giansante, Carlo; Fiotti, Nicola; Tamai, Elisa; Tonon, Federica; Grassi, Gabriele

    2013-06-01

    Aptamer researches applied to the treatment of human cancers have increased since their discovery in 1990. This is due to different factors including: 1) the technical possibility to select, by SELEX-based procedures, specific aptamers targeting virtually any given molecule, 2) the aptamer favorable bio-activity in vivo, 3) the low production costs and 4) the ease synthesis and storage for the marketing. In the field of cancer treatments, aptamers have been studied as tumor-specific agents driving drugs into cancer cells; additionally they have been used as anti-neoplastic agents, able to inhibit tumor cell growth and dissemination when administered alone or in combination with conventional anti-neoplastic drugs. Aptamers are gaining an increased interest for pharmaceutical companies and some of them are under clinical evaluation trials. In this review we update the findings about the use of aptamers as "escort" molecules able to drive drugs into the cells and as antineoplastic drugs. Current anti-neoplastic treatments suffer from the intrinsic toxicity related to the un-specific targeting of both normal and tumorigenic proliferating cells. The aptamers could be useful to improve: 1) the selective targeting of molecules essential for the viability and expansion of tumor cells and/or the selective driving of chemotherapies into tumor cells, thus resulting in higher effectiveness and lower systemic side-effects compared to conventional anti-neoplastic drugs alone and 2) to improve the therapeutic index of currently used chemotherapies. Even if some problems related to the in vivo stability and pharmacokinetic/dynamics of aptamers remain to be improved, their potential use in the treatment of different human cancers is getting closer and closer to a practical therapeutic use. PMID:23687927

  20. Exploring Internal Ribosome Entry Sites as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Komar, Anton A.; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Initiation of eukaryotic mRNA translation may proceed via several different routes, each requiring a different subset of factors and relying on different and specific interactions between the mRNA and the ribosome. Two modes predominate: (i) so-called cap-dependent initiation, which requires all canonical initiation factors and is responsible for about 95–97% of all initiation events in eukaryotic cells; and (ii) cap-independent internal initiation, which requires a reduced subset of initiation factors and accounts for up to 5% of the remaining initiation events. Internal initiation relies on the presence of so-called internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements in the 5′ UTRs of some viral and cellular mRNAs. These elements (often possessing complex secondary and tertiary structures) promote efficient interaction of the mRNA with the 40S ribosome and allow for internal ribosome entry. Internal initiation of translation of specific mRNAs may contribute to development of severe disease and pathological states, such as hepatitis C and cancer. Therefore, this cellular mechanism represents an attractive target for pharmacological modulation. The purpose of this review is to provide insight into current strategies used to target viral and cellular IRESs and discuss the physiological consequences (and potential therapeutic implications) of abrogation/modulation of IRES-mediated translation. PMID:26539410

  1. Estrogen receptor beta is a novel therapeutic target for photoaging.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ken C N; Wang, Yihe; Oh, Inn Gyung; Jenkins, Susan; Freedman, Leonard P; Thompson, Catherine C; Chung, Jin Ho; Nagpal, Sunil

    2010-05-01

    One of the many harmful factors faced by the skin is solar UV radiation, which damages skin by inducing chronic low-grade inflammation through increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines, metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Estrogen receptors (ERs) alpha and beta are ligand-dependent transcription factors that are expressed in skin, and an ERbeta agonist has previously shown efficacy in vivo in models of pain and inflammation. Because ERbeta does not carry the breast and uterine proliferation liabilities of ERalpha, we decided to explore the possibility of using ERbeta as a target for photoaging. We show that ERbeta-selective compounds suppressed the expression of cytokines and MMPs in activated keratinocytes and fibroblast-based in vitro models of photoaging. Furthermore, in activated dermal fibroblasts, ERbeta-selective compounds also inhibited COX-2. These activities of ERbeta ligands in skin cells correlated with the expression levels of ERbeta and showed reversal by treatment with a potent synthetic ER antagonist. Furthermore, the pharmacology of ERbeta-selective compound was observed in wild-type but not in skin cells obtained from ERbeta knockout mice. Finally, we demonstrate that a synthetic ERbeta agonist inhibited UV-induced photodamage and skin wrinkle formation in a murine model of photoaging. Therefore, the potential of an ERbeta ligand to regulate multiple pathways underlying the cause of photoaging suggests ERbeta to be a novel therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of photoaging. PMID:20110405

  2. Autophagy: A Novel Therapeutic Target for Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end stage renal disease and its occurance is increasing worldwide. The most effective treatment strategy for the condition is intensive treatment to strictly control glycemia and blood pressure using renin-angiotensin system inhibitors. However, a fraction of patients still go on to reach end stage renal disease even under such intensive care. New therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy are, therefore, urgently needed. Autophagy is a major catabolic pathway by which mammalian cells degrade macromolecules and organelles to maintain intracellular homeostasis. The accumulation of damaged proteins and organelles is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Autophagy in the kidney is activated under some stress conditions, such as oxidative stress and hypoxia in proximal tubular cells, and occurs even under normal conditions in podocytes. These and other accumulating findings have led to a hypothesis that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Here, we review recent findings underpinning this hypothesis and discuss the advantages of targeting autophagy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26706914

  3. Molecular Strategies for Targeting Antioxidants to Mitochondria: Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial function and specifically its implication in cellular redox/oxidative balance is fundamental in controlling the life and death of cells, and has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies. In this context, mitochondrial therapeutics, particularly those involving mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, have attracted increasing interest as potentially effective therapies for several human diseases. For the past 10 years, great progress has been made in the development and functional testing of molecules that specifically target mitochondria, and there has been special focus on compounds with antioxidant properties. In this review, we will discuss several such strategies, including molecules conjugated with lipophilic cations (e.g., triphenylphosphonium) or rhodamine, conjugates of plant alkaloids, amino-acid- and peptide-based compounds, and liposomes. This area has several major challenges that need to be confronted. Apart from antioxidants and other redox active molecules, current research aims at developing compounds that are capable of modulating other mitochondria-controlled processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Multiple chemically different molecular strategies have been developed as delivery tools that offer broad opportunities for mitochondrial manipulation. Additional studies, and particularly in vivo approaches under physiologically relevant conditions, are necessary to confirm the clinical usefulness of these molecules. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 686–729. PMID:25546574

  4. AMPK activation: a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Kimberly A; Valentine, Rudy J; Ruderman, Neil B; Saha, Asish K

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disease characterized by insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, and elevated hepatic glucose output. Over 350 million people worldwide have T2D, and the International Diabetes Federation projects that this number will increase to nearly 600 million by 2035. There is a great need for more effective treatments for maintaining glucose homeostasis and improving insulin sensitivity. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase whose activation elicits insulin-sensitizing effects, making it an ideal therapeutic target for T2D. AMPK is an energy-sensing enzyme that is activated when cellular energy levels are low, and it signals to stimulate glucose uptake in skeletal muscles, fatty acid oxidation in adipose (and other) tissues, and reduces hepatic glucose production. There is substantial evidence suggesting that AMPK is dysregulated in animals and humans with metabolic syndrome or T2D, and that AMPK activation (physiological or pharmacological) can improve insulin sensitivity and metabolic health. Numerous pharmacological agents, natural compounds, and hormones are known to activate AMPK, either directly or indirectly – some of which (for example, metformin and thiazolidinediones) are currently used to treat T2D. This paper will review the regulation of the AMPK pathway and its role in T2D, some of the known AMPK activators and their mechanisms of action, and the potential for future improvements in targeting AMPK for the treatment of T2D. PMID:25018645

  5. CRADA Final Report: ErbB2 Targeted Cancer Therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Lupu, Ruth

    2002-08-27

    The aim of the study was to design novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of carcinomas which overexpress the erbB-2 oncogene product and/or the activator (HRG). erbB-2 is a tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor, that overexpression of which in invasive breast, prostate, ovarian and lung carcinomas correlates with poor prognosis and poor overall survival. In breast carcinomas, erbB-2 is overexpressed in 25%-30% of the invasive phenotype and in 70% of ductal carcinomas in situ. On the other hand, the erbB-2 activator, heregulin (HRG) is expressed in about 30% of invasive breast carcinomas and it is highly expressed in other carcinoIl1as including, ovarian, lung, and prostate. Interestingly, only 6% of invasive breast carcinomas co-express both HRG and erbB-2. It is known today that tumors that overexpress erbB-2 are a leading cause of death, making erbB-2 and its activator HRG critical targets for therapy. Targeting both the receptors and the activator would be beneficial for a significant number of cancer patients. At the final stages of the project we had obtained significant improvements over the peptide quality but not significant improvements were made towards the generation of humanized monoclonal antibodies.

  6. Therapeutic Targeting of Casein Kinase 1δ in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Laura H.; Lafite, Marie; Quereda, Victor; Grant, Wayne; Chen, Weimin; Bibian, Mathieu; Noguchi, Yoshihiko; Fallahi, Mohammad; Yang, Chunying; Chang, Jenny C.; Roush, William R.; Cleveland, John L.; Duckett, Derek R.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of specific drivers of human cancer is required to instruct the development of targeted therapeutics. Here we demonstrate that CSNK1D is amplified and/or overexpressed in human breast tumors and that CK1δ is a vulnerability of human breast cancer subtypes overexpressing this kinase. Specifically, selective knockdown of CK1δ, or treatment with a highly selective and potent CK1δ inhibitor, triggers apoptosis of CK1δ-expressing breast tumor cells ex vivo, tumor regression in orthotopic models of triple negative breast cancer, including patient-derived xenografts, and tumor growth inhibition in HER2+ breast cancer models. We also show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a hallmark of human tumors overexpressing CK1δ, that disabling CK1δ blocks nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and T cell factor transcriptional activity, and that constitutively active β-catenin overrides the effects of inhibition or silencing of CK1δ. Thus, CK1δ inhibition represents a promising strategy for targeted treatment in human breast cancer with Wnt/β-catenin involvement. PMID:26676609

  7. Hereditary cancer syndromes: utilizing DNA repair deficiency as therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Gaurav; Fan, Tiffany; Silberstein, Peter Todd

    2016-07-01

    Human cells have numerous repair mechanisms to counteract various insults incurred on the DNA. Any mutation in these repair mechanisms can lead to accumulation of DNA errors and carcinogenesis. This review aims to discuss the therapeutic options in the two most common DNA repair deficient cancer syndromes, namely Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer) and breast cancer susceptibility gene (BRCA) associated ovarian and breast cancer. Deficiency in DNA repair mechanisms renders these tumors with increased sensitivity to platinum agents. There has been increasing amount of information on the utility of the defects in DNA repair as targets for cancer therapy in these syndromes. Novel therapies like poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors are one of such example where the induction of double stranded breaks in DNA leads to tumoricidal effect in patients with homologous DNA repair deficiency. Interestingly, patients with DNA repair deficiencies tend to have a more favorable prognosis than sporadic malignancies. In microsatellite high colorectal cancer patients, this has been attributed to increased recruitment of CD8+ T lymphocytes in tumor microenvironment. However, these tumors are able to limit the host immune response by activation of immune checkpoints that seem like attractive targets of therapy in the future. PMID:26873719

  8. Henipavirus mediated membrane fusion, virus entry and targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Deborah L; Xu, Kai; Nikolov, Dimitar B; Broder, Christopher C

    2012-02-01

    The Paramyxoviridae genus Henipavirus is presently represented by the type species Hendra and Nipah viruses which are both recently emerged zoonotic viral pathogens responsible for repeated outbreaks associated with high morbidity and mortality in Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Bangladesh. These enveloped viruses bind and enter host target cells through the coordinated activities of their attachment (G) and class I fusion (F) envelope glycoproteins. The henipavirus G glycoprotein interacts with host cellular B class ephrins, triggering conformational alterations in G that lead to the activation of the F glycoprotein, which facilitates the membrane fusion process. Using the recently published structures of HeV-G and NiV-G and other paramyxovirus glycoproteins, we review the features of the henipavirus envelope glycoproteins that appear essential for mediating the viral fusion process, including receptor binding, G-F interaction, F activation, with an emphasis on G and the mutations that disrupt viral infectivity. Finally, recent candidate therapeutics for henipavirus-mediated disease are summarized in light of their ability to inhibit HeV and NiV entry by targeting their G and F glycoproteins. PMID:22470837

  9. SALL4 is a novel therapeutic target in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gang; Zhu, Lei; Huang, Feizhou; Nie, Wanpin; Huang, Wei; Xu, Hongbo; Zheng, Shaopeng; Yi, Zhongjie; Wan, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is the most common and deadly disease of the biliary tree due to its poor prognosis. Sal-like protein 4 (SALL4), a stem cell marker, has been identified as a potential target for aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In our study, 175 ICC cases with an average age of 55 years were included, and 53% (93/175) were male. And 28 adjacent non-tumor tissues were also collected. The SALL4-positive immunoreactivity was detected in a total of 102 ICC cases (58%), whereas all 28 adjacent tissues showed negative staining. Univariate analysis, showed that the SALL4-positive ICC cases had significantly more frequent lymph nodal metastasis (P = 0.0460), vascular invasion (P < 0.0001), and nerve invasion (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, the strong SALL4-positive cases (n = 7, 5 months) had shorter overall survival, when compared to moderate SALL4-positive (n = 46, 9 months) or SALL4-negative cases (n = 73, 7 months), respectively. Our data also suggest that SALL4 may be involved in the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in ICC. Those results for the first time indicate an oncogenic role of SALL4 in ICC. Therefore, SALL4 may serve as a promising therapeutic target for ICC. PMID:26317546

  10. Henipavirus Mediated Membrane Fusion, Virus Entry and Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Deborah L.; Xu, Kai; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Broder, Christopher C.

    2012-01-01

    The Paramyxoviridae genus Henipavirus is presently represented by the type species Hendra and Nipah viruses which are both recently emerged zoonotic viral pathogens responsible for repeated outbreaks associated with high morbidity and mortality in Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Bangladesh. These enveloped viruses bind and enter host target cells through the coordinated activities of their attachment (G) and class I fusion (F) envelope glycoproteins. The henipavirus G glycoprotein interacts with host cellular B class ephrins, triggering conformational alterations in G that lead to the activation of the F glycoprotein, which facilitates the membrane fusion process. Using the recently published structures of HeV-G and NiV-G and other paramyxovirus glycoproteins, we review the features of the henipavirus envelope glycoproteins that appear essential for mediating the viral fusion process, including receptor binding, G-F interaction, F activation, with an emphasis on G and the mutations that disrupt viral infectivity. Finally, recent candidate therapeutics for henipavirus-mediated disease are summarized in light of their ability to inhibit HeV and NiV entry by targeting their G and F glycoproteins. PMID:22470837

  11. Histone Deacetylase-3/CAGE Axis Targets EGFR Signaling and Regulates the Response to Anti-Cancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyuna; Kim, Youngmi; Goh, Hyeonjung; Jeoung, Dooil

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported the role of miR-326-HDAC3 loop in anti-cancer drug-resistance. CAGE, a cancer/testis antigen, regulates the response to anti-cancer drug-resistance by forming a negative feedback loop with miR-200b. Studies investigating the relationship between CAGE and HDAC3 revealed that HDAC3 negatively regulated the expression of CAGE. ChIP assays demonstrated the binding of HDAC3 to the promoter sequences of CAGE. However, CAGE did not affect the expression of HDAC3. We also found that EGFR signaling regulated the expressions of HDAC3 and CAGE. Anti-cancer drug-resistant cancer cell lines show an increased expression of pEGFRY845. HDAC3 was found to negatively regulate the expression of pEGFRY845. CAGE showed an interaction and co-localization with EGFR. It was seen that miR-326, a negative regulator of HDAC3, regulated the expression of CAGE, pEGFRY845, and the interaction between CAGE and EGFR. miR-326 inhibitor induced the binding of HDAC3 to the promoter sequences in anti-cancer drug-resistant Malme3MR cells, decreasing the tumorigenic potential of Malme3MR cells in a manner associated with its effect on the expression of HDAC3, CAGE and pEGFRY845. The down-regulation of HDAC3 enhanced the tumorigenic, angiogenic and invasion potential of the anti-cancer drug-sensitive Malme3M cells in CAGE-dependent manner. Studies revealed that PKCδ was responsible for the increased expression of pEGFRY845 and CAGE in Malme3MR cells. CAGE showed an interaction with PKCδ in Malme3MR cells. Our results show that HDAC3-CAGE axis can be employed as a target for overcoming resistance to EGFR inhibitors. PMID:26883907

  12. Histone Deacetylase-3/CAGE Axis Targets EGFR Signaling and Regulates the Response to Anti-Cancer Drugs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyuna; Kim, Youngmi; Goh, Hyeonjung; Jeoung, Dooil

    2016-03-31

    We have previously reported the role of miR-326-HDAC3 loop in anti-cancer drug-resistance. CAGE, a cancer/testis antigen, regulates the response to anti-cancer drug-resistance by forming a negative feedback loop with miR-200b. Studies investigating the relationship between CAGE and HDAC3 revealed that HDAC3 negatively regulated the expression of CAGE. ChIP assays demonstrated the binding of HDAC3 to the promoter sequences of CAGE. However, CAGE did not affect the expression of HDAC3. We also found that EGFR signaling regulated the expressions of HDAC3 and CAGE. Anti-cancer drug-resistant cancer cell lines show an increased expression of pEGFR(Y845). HDAC3 was found to negatively regulate the expression of pEGFR(Y845). CAGE showed an interaction and co-localization with EGFR. It was seen that miR-326, a negative regulator of HDAC3, regulated the expression of CAGE, pEGFR(Y845), and the interaction between CAGE and EGFR. miR-326 inhibitor induced the binding of HDAC3 to the promoter sequences in anti-cancer drug-resistant Malme3M(R) cells, decreasing the tumorigenic potential of Malme3M(R) cells in a manner associated with its effect on the expression of HDAC3, CAGE and pEGFR(Y845). The down-regulation of HDAC3 enhanced the tumorigenic, angiogenic and invasion potential of the anti-cancer drug-sensitive Malme3M cells in CAGE-dependent manner. Studies revealed that PKCδ was responsible for the increased expression of pEGFR(Y845) and CAGE in Malme3M(R) cells. CAGE showed an interaction with PKCδ in Malme3M(R) cells. Our results show that HDAC3-CAGE axis can be employed as a target for overcoming resistance to EGFR inhibitors. PMID:26883907

  13. Characterizing and optimizing human anticancer drug targets based on topological properties in the context of biological pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Yan; Shang, Desi; Yu, Fulong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Feng, Chenchen; Wang, Qiuyu; Xu, Yanjun; Liu, Yuejuan; Bai, Xuefeng; Li, Xuecang; Li, Chunquan

    2015-04-01

    One of the challenging problems in drug discovery is to identify the novel targets for drugs. Most of the traditional methods for drug targets optimization focused on identifying the particular families of "druggable targets", but ignored their topological properties based on the biological pathways. In this study, we characterized the topological properties of human anticancer drug targets (ADTs) in the context of biological pathways. We found that the ADTs tended to present the following seven topological properties: influence the number of the pathways related to cancer, be localized at the start or end of the pathways, interact with cancer related genes, exhibit higher connectivity, vulnerability, betweenness, and closeness than other genes. We first ranked ADTs based on their topological property values respectively, then fused them into one global-rank using the joint cumulative distribution of an N-dimensional order statistic to optimize human ADTs. We applied the optimization method to 13 anticancer drugs, respectively. Results demonstrated that over 70% of known ADTs were ranked in the top 20%. Furthermore, the performance for mercaptopurine was significant: 6 known targets (ADSL, GMPR2, GMPR, HPRT1, AMPD3, AMPD2) were ranked in the top 15 and other four out of the top 15 (MAT2A, CDKN1A, AREG, JUN) have the potentialities to become new targets for cancer therapy. PMID:25724580

  14. Anticancer Properties of Capsaicin Against Human Cancer.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ruth; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    There is persuasive epidemiological and experimental evidence that dietary phytochemicals have anticancer activity. Capsaicin is a bioactive phytochemical abundant in red and chili peppers. While the preponderance of the data strongly indicates significant anticancer benefits of capsaicin, more information to highlight molecular mechanisms of its action is required to improve our knowledge to be able to propose a potential therapeutic strategy for use of capsaicin against cancer. Capsaicin has been shown to alter the expression of several genes involved in cancer cell survival, growth arrest, angiogenesis and metastasis. Recently, many research groups, including ours, found that capsaicin targets multiple signaling pathways, oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes in various types of cancer models. In this review article, we highlight multiple molecular targets responsible for the anticancer mechanism of capsaicin. In addition, we deal with the benefits of combinational use of capsaicin with other dietary or chemotherapeutic compounds, focusing on synergistic anticancer activities. PMID:26976969

  15. pH-Sensitive stimulus-responsive nanocarriers for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mahdi; Eslami, Masoud; Sahandi-Zangabad, Parham; Mirab, Fereshteh; Farajisafiloo, Negar; Shafaei, Zahra; Ghosh, Deepanjan; Bozorgomid, Mahnaz; Dashkhaneh, Fariba; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    In recent years miscellaneous smart micro/nanosystems that respond to various exogenous/endogenous stimuli including temperature, magnetic/electric field, mechanical force, ultrasound/light irradiation, redox potentials, and biomolecule concentration have been developed for targeted delivery and release of encapsulated therapeutic agents such as drugs, genes, proteins, and metal ions specifically at their required site of action. Owing to physiological differences between malignant and normal cells, or between tumors and normal tissues, pH-sensitive nanosystems represent promising smart delivery vehicles for transport and delivery of anticancer agents. Furthermore, pH-sensitive systems possess applications in delivery of metal ions and biomolecules such as proteins, insulin, etc., as well as co-delivery of cargos, dual pH-sensitive nanocarriers, dual/multi stimuli-responsive nanosystems, and even in the search for new solutions for therapy of diseases such as Alzheimer's. In order to design an optimized system, it is necessary to understand the various pH-responsive micro/nanoparticles and the different mechanisms of pH-sensitive drug release. This should be accompanied by an assessment of the theoretical and practical challenges in the design and use of these carriers. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:696-716. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1389 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26762467

  16. 2D-DIGE proteomic analysis identifies new potential therapeutic targets for adrenocortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Armignacco, Roberta; Ercolino, Tonino; Canu, Letizia; Baroni, Gianna; Nesi, Gabriella; Galli, Andrea; Mannelli, Massimo; Luconi, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare aggressive tumor with poor prognosis when metastatic at diagnosis. The tumor biology is still mostly unclear, justifying the limited specificity and efficacy of the anti-cancer drugs currently available. This study reports the first proteomic analysis of ACC by using two-dimensional-differential-in-gel-electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) to evaluate a differential protein expression profile between adrenocortical carcinoma and normal adrenal. Mass spectrometry, associated with 2D-DIGE analysis of carcinomas and normal adrenals, identified 22 proteins in 27 differentially expressed 2D spots, mostly overexpressed in ACC. Gene ontology analysis revealed that most of the proteins concurs towards a metabolic shift, called the Warburg effect, in adrenocortical cancer. The differential expression was validated by Western blot for Aldehyde-dehydrogenase-6-A1,Transferrin, Fascin-1,Lamin A/C,Adenylate-cyclase-associated-protein-1 and Ferredoxin-reductase. Moreover, immunohistochemistry performed on paraffin-embedded ACC and normal adrenal specimens confirmed marked positive staining for all 6 proteins diffusely expressed by neoplastic cells, compared with normal adrenal cortex. In conclusion, our preliminary findings reveal a different proteomic profile in adrenocortical carcinoma compared with normal adrenal cortex characterized by overexpression of mainly metabolic enzymes, thus suggesting the Warburg effect also occurs in ACC. These proteins may represent promising novel ACC biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets if validated in larger cohorts of patients. PMID:25691058

  17. Targeting EZH2 and PRC2 dependence as novel anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bowen; Konze, Kyle D.; Jin, Jian; Wang, Gang Greg

    2016-01-01

    Distinctive patterns of chromatin modification control gene expression and define cellular identity during development and cell differentiation. Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), the sole mammalian enzymatic complex capable of establishing gene-repressive high-degree methylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27), plays crucial roles in regulation of normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Recently, increasing evidence has indicated that recurrent gain-of-function mutation and overexpression of EZH2, the catalytic subunit of PRC2, drive and promote malignant transformation such as B-cell lymphomagenesis, providing a rationale for PRC2 inhibition as a novel anticancer strategy. Here, we summarize the recently developed strategies for inhibition of PRC2, which include a series of highly specific, highly potent, small-molecule inhibitors of EZH2 and EZH1, an EZH2-related methyltransferase. PRC2 establishes functional crosstalk with numerous epigenetic machineries during dynamic regulation of gene transcription. Perturbation of such functional crosstalk caused by genetic events observed in various hematologic cancers, such as inactivation of SNF5 and somatic mutation of UTX, confers PRC2 dependence, thus rendering an increased sensitivity to PRC2 inhibition. We discuss our current understanding of EZH2 somatic mutations frequently found in B-cell lymphomas and recurrent mutations in various other epigenetic regulators as novel molecular predictors and determinants of PRC2 sensitivity. As recent advances have indicated a critical developmental or tumor-suppressive role for PRC2 and EZH2 in various tissue types, we discuss concerns over potentially toxic or even adverse effects associated with EZH2/1 inhibition in certain biological contexts or on cancer genetic background. Collectively, inhibition of PRC2 catalytic activity has emerged as a promising therapeutic intervention for the precise treatment of a range of genetically defined hematologic malignancies and can be

  18. Toward intracellular targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics: progress and clinical outlook for brain tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Hetal; Debinski, Waldemar

    2012-08-01

    A number of anti-cancer drugs have their targets localized to particular intracellular compartments. These drugs reach the targets mainly through diffusion, dependent on biophysical and biochemical forces that allow cell penetration. This means that both cancer cells and normal cells will be subjected to such diffusion; hence many of these drugs, like chemotherapeutics, are potentially toxic and the concentration achieved at the site of their action is often suboptimal. The same relates to radiation that indiscriminately affects normal and diseased cells. However, nature-designed systems enable compounds present in the extracellular environment to end up inside the cell and even travel to more specific intracellular compartments. For example, viruses and bacterial toxins can more or less specifically recognize eukaryotic cells, enter these cells, and direct some protein portions to designated intracellular areas. These phenomena have led to creative thinking, such as employing viruses or bacterial toxins for cargo delivery to cells and, more specifically, to cancer cells. Proteins can be genetically engineered in order to not only mimic what viruses and bacterial toxins can do, but also to add new functions, extending or changing the intracellular routes. It is possible to make conjugates or, more preferably, single-chain proteins that recognize cancer cells and deliver cargo inside the cells, even to the desired subcellular compartment. These findings offer new opportunities to deliver drugs/labels only to cancer cells and only to their site of action within the cells. The development of such dual-specificity vectors for targeting cancer cells is an attractive and potentially safer and more efficacious way of delivering drugs. We provide examples of this approach for delivering brain cancer therapeutics, using a specific biomarker on glioblastoma tumor cells. PMID:22671766

  19. Activin signaling as an emerging target for therapeutic interventions

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Nakatani, Masashi; Hitachi, Keisuke; Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Sunada, Yoshihide; Ageta, Hiroshi; Inokuchi, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    After the initial discovery of activins as important regulators of reproduction, novel and diverse roles have been unraveled for them. Activins are expressed in various tissues and have a broad range of activities including the regulation of gonadal function, hormonal homeostasis, growth and differentiation of musculoskeletal tissues, regulation of growth and metastasis of cancer cells, proliferation and differentiation of embryonic stem cells, and even higher brain functions. Activins signal through a combination of type I and II transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptors. Activin receptors are shared by multiple transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) ligands such as myostatin, growth and differentiation factor-11 and nodal. Thus, although the activity of each ligand is distinct, they are also redundant, both physiologically and pathologically in vivo. Activin receptors activated by ligands phosphorylate the receptor-regulated Smads for TGF-β, Smad2 and 3. The Smad proteins then undergo multimerization with the co-mediator Smad4, and translocate into the nucleus to regulate the transcription of target genes in cooperation with nuclear cofactors. Signaling through receptors and Smads is controlled by multiple mechanisms including phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications such as sumoylation, which affect potein localization, stability and transcriptional activity. Non-Smad signaling also plays an important role in activin signaling. Extracellularly, follistatin and related proteins bind to activins and related TGF-β ligands, and control the signaling and availability of ligands. The functions of activins through activin receptors are pleiotrophic, cell type-specific and contextual, and they are involved in the etiology and pathogenesis of a variety of diseases. Accordingly, activin signaling may be a target for therapeutic interventions. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on activin signaling and discuss the potential roles of

  20. Fluorine-Containing Taxoid Anticancer Agents and Their Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Joshua; Vineberg, Jacob G; Zuniga, Edison S; Ojima, Iwao

    2013-08-01

    A long-standing problem of conventional chemotherapy is the lack of tumor-specific treatments. Traditional chemotherapy relies on the premise that rapidly proliferating cancer cells are more likely to be killed by a cytotoxic agent. In reality, however, cytotoxic agents have very little or no specificity, which leads to systemic toxicity, causing undesirable severe side effects. Consequently, various "molecularly targeted cancer therapies" have been developed for use in specific cancers, including tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. In general, such a drug delivery system consists of a tumor recognition moiety and a cytotoxic "warhead" connected through a "smart" linker to form a conjugate. When a multi-functionalized nanomaterial is used as the vehicle, a "Trojan Horse" approach can be used for mass delivery of cytotoxic "warheads" to maximize the efficacy. Exploitation of the special properties of fluorine has proven successful in the development of new and effective biochemical tools as well as therapeutic agents. Fluorinated congeners can also serve as excellent probes for the investigation of biochemical mechanisms. (19)F-NMR can provide unique and powerful tools for mechanistic investigations in chemical biology. This account presents our recent progress, in perspective, on the molecular approaches to the design and development of novel tumor-targeted drug delivery systems for new generation chemotherapy by exploiting the unique nature of fluorine. PMID:23935213

  1. Molecular targets in cerebral ischemia for developing novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Suresh L; Manhas, Namratta; Raghubir, Ram

    2007-04-01

    apoptosis proteins (IAPs), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), receptor interacting protein (RIP), etc., besides targeting directly the genes itself. However, selecting promising targets from various signalling cascades, for drug discovery and development is very challenging, nevertheless such novel approaches may lead to the emergence of new avenues for therapeutic intervention in cerebral ischemia. PMID:17222914

  2. Towards targeting anticancer drugs: ruthenium(ii)-arene complexes with biologically active naphthoquinone-derived ligand systems.

    PubMed

    Kubanik, Mario; Kandioller, Wolfgang; Kim, Kunwoo; Anderson, Robert F; Klapproth, Erik; Jakupec, Michael A; Roller, Alexander; Söhnel, Tilo; Keppler, Bernhard K; Hartinger, Christian G

    2016-08-16

    Anticancer active metal complexes with biologically active ligands have the potential to interact with more than one biological target, which could help to overcome acquired and/or intrinsic resistance of tumors to small molecule drugs. In this paper we present the preparation of 2-hydroxy-[1,4]-naphthoquinone-derived ligands and their coordination to a Ru(II)(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl moiety. The synthesis of oxime derivatives resulted in the surprising formation of nitroso-naphthalene complexes, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The compounds were shown to be stable in aqueous solution but reacted with glutathione and ascorbic acid rather than undergoing reduction. One-electron reduction with pulse radiolysis revealed different behavior for the naphthoquinone and nitroso-naphthalene complexes, which was also observed in in vitro anticancer assays. PMID:27214822

  3. RGD Peptide Cell-Surface Display Enhances the Targeting and Therapeutic Efficacy of Attenuated Salmonella-mediated Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung-Hwan; Zheng, Jin Hai; Nguyen, Vu Hong; Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Kim, Dong-Yeon; Szardenings, Michael; Min, Jung Hyun; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E.; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria-based anticancer therapies aim to overcome the limitations of current cancer therapy by actively targeting and efficiently removing cancer. To achieve this goal, new approaches that target and maintain bacterial drugs at sufficient concentrations during the therapeutic window are essential. Here, we examined the tumor tropism of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium displaying the RGD peptide sequence (ACDCRGDCFCG) on the external loop of outer membrane protein A (OmpA). RGD-displaying Salmonella strongly bound to cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3, but weakly bound to αvβ3-negative cancer cells, suggesting the feasibility of displaying a preferential homing peptide on the bacterial surface. In vivo studies revealed that RGD-displaying Salmonellae showed strong targeting efficiency, resulting in the regression in αvβ3-overexpressing cancer xenografts, and prolonged survival of mouse models of human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) and human melanoma (MDA-MB-435). Thus, surface engineering of Salmonellae to display RGD peptides increases both their targeting efficiency and therapeutic effect. PMID:27446500

  4. RGD Peptide Cell-Surface Display Enhances the Targeting and Therapeutic Efficacy of Attenuated Salmonella-mediated Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Hwan; Zheng, Jin Hai; Nguyen, Vu Hong; Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Kim, Dong-Yeon; Szardenings, Michael; Min, Jung Hyun; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria-based anticancer therapies aim to overcome the limitations of current cancer therapy by actively targeting and efficiently removing cancer. To achieve this goal, new approaches that target and maintain bacterial drugs at sufficient concentrations during the therapeutic window are essential. Here, we examined the tumor tropism of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium displaying the RGD peptide sequence (ACDCRGDCFCG) on the external loop of outer membrane protein A (OmpA). RGD-displaying Salmonella strongly bound to cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3, but weakly bound to αvβ3-negative cancer cells, suggesting the feasibility of displaying a preferential homing peptide on the bacterial surface. In vivo studies revealed that RGD-displaying Salmonellae showed strong targeting efficiency, resulting in the regression in αvβ3-overexpressing cancer xenografts, and prolonged survival of mouse models of human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) and human melanoma (MDA-MB-435). Thus, surface engineering of Salmonellae to display RGD peptides increases both their targeting efficiency and therapeutic effect. PMID:27446500

  5. A Targeting Modality for Destruction of RNA Polymerase I that Possesses Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Peltonen, Karita; Colis, Laureen; Liu, Hester; Trivedi, Rishi; Moubarek, Michael S.; Moore, Henna M.; Bai, Bayoan; Rudek, Michelle A.; Bieberich, Charles J.; Laiho, Marikki

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY We define here the activity and mechanisms of action of a small molecule lead compound for cancer targeting. We show that the compound, BMH-21, has wide and potent antitumorigenic activity across NCI60 cancer cell lines and represses tumor growth in vivo. BMH-21 binds GC-rich sequences, which is present at high frequency in ribosomal DNA genes, and potently and rapidly represses RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription. Strikingly, we find that BMH-21 causes proteasome-dependent destruction of RPA194, the large catalytic subunit protein of Pol I holocomplex, and this correlates with cancer cell killing. Our results show that Pol I activity is under proteasome-mediated control, which reveals an unexpected therapeutic opportunity. PMID:24434211

  6. HDAC8, A Potential Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors (MPNST)

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Gonzalo; Bill, Kate Lynn J.; Bid, Hemant Kumar; Braggio, Danielle; Constantino, Dylan; Prudner, Bethany; Zewdu, Abeba; Batte, Kara; Lev, Dina; Pollock, Raphael E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HDAC isoform-specific inhibitors may improve the therapeutic window while limiting toxicities. Developing inhibitors against class I isoforms poses difficulties as they share high homology among their catalytic sites; however, HDAC8 is structurally unique compared to other class I isoforms. HDAC8 inhibitors are novel compounds and have affinity for class I HDAC isoforms demonstrating anti-cancer effects; little is known about their activity in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). Recently, we demonstrated anti-MPNST efficacy of HDAC8i in human and murine-derived MPNST pre-clinical models; we now seek to consider the potential therapeutic inhibition of HDAC8 in MPNST. Methods Four Human MPNST cell lines, a murine-derived MPNST cell line, and two HDAC8 inhibitors (PCI-34051, PCI-48012; Pharmacyclics, Inc. Sunnyvale, CA) were studied. Proliferation was determined using MTS and clonogenic assays. Effects on cell cycle were determined via PI FACS analysis; effects on apoptosis were determined using Annexin V-PI FACS analysis and cleaved caspase 3 expression. In vivo growth effects of HDAC8i were evaluated using MPNST xenograft models. 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify potential HDAC8 deacetylation substrates. Results HDAC8i induced cell growth inhibition and marked S-phase cell cycle arrest in human and murine-derived MPNST cells. Relative to control, HDAC8i induced apoptosis in both human and murine-derived MPNST cells. HDAC8i exhibited significant effects on MPNST xenograft growth (p=0.001) and tumor weight (p=0.02). Four potential HDAC8 substrate targets were identified using a proteomic approach: PARK7, HMGB1, PGAM1, PRDX6. Conclusions MPNST is an aggressive sarcoma that is notoriously therapy-resistant, hence the urgent need for improved anti-MPNST therapies. HDAC8 inhibition may be useful for MPNST by improving efficacy while limiting toxicities as compared to pan-HDACis. PMID:26200462

  7. Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles for Targeted Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk, Brian Tsengchi

    interactions between membranes and synthetic nanoparticles, and how the membrane coating technique faithfully translates the complexities of natural cellular membranes to the nanoscale. The following three sections explore potential therapeutic applications of membrane-coated nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery, biodetoxification, and immunomodulation. Ultimately, cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticles have the potential to significantly change the landscape of nanomedicine. The novel applications presented in this thesis are just a few of many examples currently being researched, with countless more avenues waiting to be explored.

  8. Specific Targeting of Caspase-9/PP2A Interaction as Potential New Anti-Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Arrouss, Issam; Nemati, Fariba; Roncal, Fernando; Wislez, Marie; Dorgham, Karim; Vallerand, David; Rabbe, Nathalie; Karboul, Narjesse; Carlotti, Françoise; Bravo, Jeronimo; Mazier, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Purpose PP2A is a serine/threonine phosphatase critical to physiological processes, including apoptosis. Cell penetrating peptides are molecules that can translocate into cells without causing membrane damage. Our goal was to develop cell-penetrating fusion peptides specifically designed to disrupt the caspase-9/PP2A interaction and evaluate their therapeutic potential in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design We generated a peptide containing a penetrating sequence associated to the interaction motif between human caspase-9 and PP2A (DPT-C9h), in order to target their association. Using tumour cell lines, primary human cells and primary human breast cancer (BC) xenografts, we investigated the capacity of DPT-C9h to provoke apoptosis in vitro and inhibition of tumour growth (TGI) in vivo. DPT-C9h was intraperitonealy administered at doses from 1 to 25 mg/kg/day for 5 weeks. Relative Tumour Volume (RTV) was calculated. Results We demonstrated that DPT-C9h specifically target caspase-9/PP2A interaction in vitro and in vivo and induced caspase-9-dependent apoptosis in cancer cell lines. DPT-C9h also induced significant TGI in BC xenografts models. The mouse-specific peptide DPT-C9 also induced TGI in lung (K-Ras model) and breast cancer (PyMT) models. DPT-C9h has a specific effect on transformed B cells isolated from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients without any effect on primary healthy cells. Finally, neither toxicity nor immunogenic responses were observed. Conclusion Using the cell-penetrating peptides blocking caspase-9/PP2A interactions, we have demonstrated that DPT-C9h had a strong therapeutic effect in vitro and in vivo in mouse models of tumour progression. PMID:23637769

  9. Anticancer Effects of Mesothelin-Targeted Immunotoxin Therapy Are Regulated by Tyrosine Kinase DDR1.

    PubMed

    Ali-Rahmani, Fatima; FitzGerald, David J; Martin, Scott; Patel, Paresma; Prunotto, Marco; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Thomas, Craig; Pastan, Ira

    2016-03-15

    Recombinant immunotoxins (RIT) have been highly successful in cancer therapy due, in part, to the high cancer-specific expression of cell surface antigens such as mesothelin, which is overexpressed in mesothelioma, ovarian, lung, breast, and pancreatic cancers, but is limited in normal cells. RG7787 is a clinically optimized RIT consisting of a humanized anti-mesothelin Fab fused to domain III of Pseudomonas exotoxin A, in which immunogenic B-cell epitopes are silenced. To enhance the therapeutic efficacy of RITs, we conducted a kinome RNAi sensitization screen, which identified discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen-activated tyrosine kinase, as a potential target. The collagen/DDR1 axis is implicated in tumor-stromal interactions and potentially affects tumor response to therapy. Therefore, we investigated the effects of DDR1 on RIT. Knockdown of DDR1 by siRNA or treatment with inhibitor, 7rh, greatly enhanced the cytotoxic activity of RG7787 in several cancer cell lines. Investigation into the mechanism of action showed DDR1 silencing was associated with decreased expression of several ribosomal proteins and enhanced inhibition of protein synthesis. Conversely, induction of DDR1 expression or collagen-stimulated DDR1 activity protected cancer cells from RG7787 killing. Moreover, the combination of RG7787 and DDR1 inhibitor caused greater shrinkage of tumor xenografts than either agent alone. These data demonstrate that DDR1 is a key modulator of RIT activity and represents a novel therapeutic strategy to improve targeting of mesothelin-expressing cancers. PMID:26719540

  10. Accumulation, internalization and therapeutic efficacy of neuropilin-1-targeted liposomes.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Eric E; Ingham, Elizabeth S; Zhang, Hua; Mahakian, Lisa M; Fite, Brett Z; Gagnon, M Karen; Tam, Sarah; Kheirolomoom, Azadeh; Cardiff, Robert D; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2014-03-28

    Advancements in liposomal drug delivery have produced long circulating and very stable drug formulations. These formulations minimize systemic exposure; however, unfortunately, therapeutic efficacy has remained limited due to the slow diffusion of liposomal particles within the tumor and limited release or uptake of the encapsulated drug. Here, the carboxyl-terminated CRPPR peptide, with affinity for the receptor neuropilin-1 (NRP), which is expressed on both endothelial and cancer cells, was conjugated to liposomes to enhance the tumor accumulation. Using a pH sensitive probe, liposomes were optimized for specific NRP binding and subsequent cellular internalization using in vitro cellular assays. Liposomes conjugated with the carboxyl-terminated CRPPR peptide (termed C-LPP liposomes) bound to the NRP-positive primary prostatic carcinoma cell line (PPC-1) but did not bind to the NRP-negative PC-3 cell line, and binding was observed with liposomal peptide concentrations as low as 0.16mol%. Binding of the C-LPP liposomes was receptor-limited, with saturation observed at high liposome concentrations. The identical peptide sequence bearing an amide terminus did not bind specifically, accumulating only with a high (2.5mol%) peptide concentration and adhering equally to NRP positive and negative cell lines. The binding of C-LPP liposomes conjugated with 0.63mol% of the peptide was 83-fold greater than liposomes conjugated with the amide version of the peptide. Cellular internalization was also enhanced with C-LPP liposomes, with 80% internalized following 3h incubation. Additionally, fluorescence in the blood pool (~40% of the injected dose) was similar for liposomes conjugated with 0.63mol% of carboxyl-terminated peptide and non-targeted liposomes at 24h after injection, indicating stable circulation. Prior to doxorubicin treatment, in vivo tumor accumulation and vascular targeting were increased for peptide-conjugated liposomes compared to non-targeted liposomes based

  11. Molecular and Pharmacologic Properties of the Anticancer Quinolone Derivative Vosaroxin: A New Therapeutic Agent for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Gene C; Fox, Judith A; Poi, Ming; Strickland, Stephen A

    2016-09-01

    Vosaroxin is a first-in-class anticancer quinolone derivative that targets topoisomerase II and induces site-selective double-strand breaks in DNA, leading to tumor cell apoptosis. Vosaroxin has chemical and pharmacologic characteristics distinct from other topoisomerase II inhibitors due to its quinolone scaffold. The efficacy and safety of vosaroxin in combination with cytarabine were evaluated in patients with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a phase III, randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (VALOR). In this study, the addition of vosaroxin produced a 1.4-month improvement in median overall survival (OS; 7.5 months with vosaroxin/cytarabine vs. 6.1 months with placebo/cytarabine; hazard ratio [HR] 0.87, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.73-1.02; unstratified log-rank p [Formula: see text] 0.061; stratified log-rank p [Formula: see text]0.024), with the greatest OS benefit observed in patients ≥60 years of age (7.1 vs. 5.0 months; HR 0.75, 95 % CI 0.62-0.92; p [Formula: see text]0.003) and patients with early relapse (6.7 vs. 5.2 months; HR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.59-1.00; p [Formula: see text] 0.039), two AML patient groups that typically have poor prognosis. Here we review the chemical and pharmacologic properties of vosaroxin, how these properties are distinct from those of currently available topoisomerase II inhibitors, how they may contribute to the efficacy and safety profile observed in the VALOR trial, and the status of clinical development of vosaroxin for treatment of AML. PMID:27484675

  12. TDO as a therapeutic target in brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cheng-Peng; Pan, Ze-Zheng; Luo, Da-Ya

    2016-08-01

    Tryptophan-2, 3-dioxygenase (TDO) is a heme-containing protein catalyzing the first reaction in the kynurenine pathway, which incorporates oxygen into the indole moiety of tryptophan and catalyzes it into kynurenine (KYN). The activation of TDO results in the depletion of tryptophan and the accumulation of kynurenine and its metabolites. These metabolites can affect the function of neurons and inhibit the proliferation of T cells. Increasing evidence demonstrates that TDO is a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of brain diseases as well as in the antitumor and transplant fields. Despite its growing popularity, there are few reviews only focusing on TDO. Hence, we herein review TDO by providing a comprehensive overview of TDO, including its biological functions as well as the evolution, structure and catalytic process of TDO. Additionally, this review will focus on the role of TDO in the pathology of three groups of brain diseases: Schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Glioma. Finally, we will also provide an opinion regarding the future developmental directions of TDO in brain diseases, especially whether TDO has a potential role in other brain diseases as well as the development and applications of TDO inhibitors as treatments. PMID:27072164

  13. Cancer-Associated Myeloproliferation: Old Association, New Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    The association between malignancy and development of a paraneoplastic leukocytosis, the so-called leukemoid reaction, has long been appreciated. Although a leukemoid reaction has conventionally been defined as a peripheral blood leukocytosis composed of both mature and immature granulocytes that exceeds 50,000/μL, a less profound leukocytosis may be appreciated in many patients harboring a malignant disease. More recent insights have shed new light on this long-recognized association, because research performed in both murine models and cancer patients has uncovered multiple mechanisms by which tumors both drive myelopoiesis, sometimes leading to a clinically apparent leukocytosis, and inhibit the differentiation of myeloid cells, resulting in a qualitative change in myelopoiesis. This qualitative change leads to the accumulation of immature myeloid cells, which due to their immune suppressive effects have been collectively called myeloid-derived suppressor cells. More recently, myeloid cells have been shown to promote tumor angiogenesis. Cancer-associated myeloproliferation is not merely a paraneoplastic phenomenon of questionable importance but leads to the suppression of host immunity and promotion of tumor angiogenesis, both of which play an integral part in tumorigenesis and metastasis. Therefore, cancer-associated myeloproliferation represents a novel therapeutic target in cancer that, decades after its recognition, is only now being translated into clinical practice. PMID:20592171

  14. Inflammation and cardiovascular disease: from pathogenesis to therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Golia, Enrica; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Natale, Francesco; Fimiani, Fabio; Maddaloni, Valeria; Pariggiano, Ivana; Bianchi, Renatomaria; Crisci, Mario; D'Acierno, Ludovica; Giordano, Roberto; Di Palma, Gaetano; Conte, Marianna; Golino, Paolo; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Calabrò, Raffaele; Calabrò, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Atherosclerosis represents the most common pathological substrate of coronary heart disease (CHD), and the characterization of the disease as a chronic low-grade inflammatory condition is now largely accepted. A number of mediators of inflammation have been widely studied, both as surrogate biomarkers and as causal agents, in the pathophysiological network of atherogenesis and plaque vulnerability. The epidemiological observation that biomarkers of inflammation are associated with clinical cardiovascular risk supports the theory that targeted anti-inflammatory treatment appears to be a promising strategy in reducing residual cardiovascular risk on the background of traditional medical therapy. A large number of randomized controlled trials have shown that drugs commonly used in cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as statins, may be effective in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events through an anti-inflammatory effect. Moreover, several anti-inflammatory drugs are being tested for their potential to reduce residual cardiovascular risk on the background of validated medical therapy for atherosclerotic disease. In this paper, we review relevant evidence with regard to the relationship between inflammation and CVD, from pathogenesis to therapeutic strategies. PMID:25037581

  15. Innate inflammatory responses in stroke: mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Youl; Kawabori, Masahito; Yenari, Midori A.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a frequent cause of long-term disability and death worldwide. Ischemic stroke is more commonly encountered compared to hemorrhagic stroke, and leads to tissue death by ischemia due to occlusion of a cerebral artery. Inflammation is known to result as a result of ischemic injury, long thought to be involved in initiating the recovery and repair process. However, work over the past few decades indicates that aspects of this inflammatory response may in fact be detrimental to stroke outcome. Acutely, inflammation appears to have a detrimental effect, and anti-inflammatory treatments have been been studied as a potential therapeutic target. Chronically, reports suggest that post-ischemic inflammation is also essential for the tissue repairing and remodeling. The majority of the work in this area has centered around innate immune mechanisms, which will be the focus of this review. This review describes the different key players in neuroinflammation and their possible detrimental and protective effects in stroke. A better understanding of the roles of the different immune cells and their temporal profile of damage versus repair will help to clarify more effective modulation of inflammation post stroke. Introduction Stroke refers to conditions caused by occlusion and/or rupture of blood vessels in the brain, and is a leading cause of death and disability in the industrialized world. PMID:24372209

  16. BRD4 is a novel therapeutic target for liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ning; Hah, Nasun; Yu, Ruth T.; Sherman, Mara H.; Benner, Chris; Leblanc, Mathias; He, Mingxiao; Liddle, Christopher; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is characterized by the persistent deposition of extracellular matrix components by hepatic stellate cell (HSC)-derived myofibroblasts. It is the histological manifestation of progressive, but reversible wound-healing processes. An unabated fibrotic response results in chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, a pathological precursor of hepatocellular carcinoma. We report here that JQ1, a small molecule inhibitor of bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4), a member of bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins, abrogate cytokine-induced activation of HSCs. Cistromic analyses reveal that BRD4 is highly enriched at enhancers associated with genes involved in multiple profibrotic pathways, where BRD4 is colocalized with profibrotic transcription factors. Furthermore, we show that JQ1 is not only protective, but can reverse the fibrotic response in carbon tetrachloride-induced fibrosis in mouse models. Our results implicate that BRD4 can act as a global genomic regulator to direct the fibrotic response through its coordinated regulation of myofibroblast transcription. This suggests BRD4 as a potential therapeutic target for patients with fibrotic complications. PMID:26644586

  17. MPHOSPH1: a potential therapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinran; Zhou, Yafan; Liu, Xinyuan; Peng, Anlin; Gong, Hao; Huang, Lizi; Ji, Kaige; Petersen, Robert B; Zheng, Ling; Huang, Kun

    2014-11-15

    MPHOSPH1 is a critical kinesin protein that functions in cytokinesis. Here, we show that MPHOSPH1 is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, where it is essential for proliferation. Attenuating MPHOSPH1 expression with a tumor-selective shRNA-expressing adenovirus (Ad-shMPP1) was sufficient to arrest HCC cell proliferation in a manner associated with an accumulation of multinucleated polyploid cells, induction of postmitotic apoptosis, and increased sensitivity to taxol cytotoxicity. Mechanistic investigations showed that attenuation of MPHOSPH1 stabilized p53, blocked STAT3 phosphorylation, and prolonged mitotic arrest. In a mouse subcutaneous xenograft model of HCC, tumoral injection of Ad-shMPP1 inhibited MPHOSPH1 expression and tumor growth in a manner correlated with induction of apoptosis. Combining Ad-shMPP1 injection with taxol administration enhanced antitumor efficacy relative to taxol alone. Furthermore, Ad-shMPP1 tail vein injection suppressed formation of orthotopic liver nodules and prevented hepatic dysfunction. Taken together, our results identify MPHOSPH1 as an oncogenic driver and candidate therapeutic target in HCC. PMID:25269478

  18. Succinate metabolism: a new therapeutic target for myocardial reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Pell, Victoria R; Chouchani, Edward T; Frezza, Christian; Murphy, Michael P; Krieg, Thomas

    2016-07-15

    Myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion (IR) injury is a major cause of death worldwide and remains a disease for which current clinical therapies are strikingly deficient. While the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a critical driver of tissue damage upon reperfusion, the precise mechanisms underlying ROS production have remained elusive. More recently, it has been demonstrated that a specific metabolic mechanism occurs during ischaemia that underlies elevated ROS at reperfusion, suggesting a unifying model as to why so many different compounds have been found to be cardioprotective against IR injury. This review will discuss the role of the citric acid cycle intermediate succinate in IR pathology focusing on the mechanism by which this metabolite accumulates during ischaemia and how it can drive ROS production at Complex I via reverse electron transport. We will then examine the potential for manipulating succinate accumulation and metabolism during IR injury in order to protect the heart against IR damage and discuss targets for novel therapeutics designed to reduce reperfusion injury in patients. PMID:27194563

  19. Purinergic receptors as potential therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Woods, Lucas T; Ajit, Deepa; Camden, Jean M; Erb, Laurie; Weisman, Gary A

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of memory and cognitive ability and is a serious cause of mortality. Many of the pathological characteristics associated with AD are revealed post-mortem, including amyloid-β plaque deposition, neurofibrillary tangles containing hyperphosphorylated tau proteins and neuronal loss in the hippocampus and cortex. Although several genetic mutations and risk factors have been associated with the disease, the causes remain poorly understood. Study of disease-initiating mechanisms and AD progression in humans is inherently difficult as most available tissue specimens are from late-stages of disease. Therefore, AD researchers rely on in vitro studies and the use of AD animal models where neuroinflammation has been shown to be a major characteristic of AD. Purinergic receptors are a diverse family of proteins consisting of P1 adenosine receptors and P2 nucleotide receptors for ATP, UTP and their metabolites. This family of receptors has been shown to regulate a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, including neuroinflammation, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis and AD. Experimental evidence from human AD tissue has suggested that purinergic receptors may play a role in AD progression and studies using selective purinergic receptor agonists and antagonists in vitro and in AD animal models have demonstrated that purinergic receptors represent novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of AD. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26519903

  20. Targeting CBLB as a potential therapeutic approach for disseminated candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yun; Tang, Juan; Guo, Hui; Zhao, Yixia; Tang, Rong; Ouyang, Song; Zeng, Qiuming; Rappleye, Chad A; Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Schlesinger, Larry S; Tao, Lijian; Brown, Gordon D; Langdon, Wallace Y; Li, Belinda T; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Disseminated candidiasis has become one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired blood stream infections with high mobility and mortality. However, the molecular basis of host defense against disseminated candidiasis remains elusive, and treatment options are limited. Here we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase CBLB directs polyubiquitination of dectin-1 and dectin-2, two key pattern-recognition receptors for sensing Candida albicans, and their downstream kinase SYK, thus inhibiting dectin-1- and dectin-2-mediated innate immune responses. CBLB deficiency or inactivation protects mice from systemic infection with a lethal dose of C. albicans, and deficiency of dectin-1, dectin-2, or both in Cblb(-/-) mice abrogates this protection. Notably, silencing the Cblb gene in vivo protects mice from lethal systemic C. albicans infection. Our data reveal that CBLB is crucial for homeostatic control of innate immune responses mediated by dectin-1 and dectin-2. Our data also indicate that CBLB represents a potential therapeutic target for protection from disseminated candidiasis. PMID:27428899

  1. MicroRNAs as therapeutic targets in chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, Michela; Croce, Carlo M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite substantial progress in understanding the cancer signaling network, effective therapies remain scarce due to insufficient disruption of oncogenic pathways, drug resistance and drug-induced toxicity. New and more creative approaches are therefore required for the treatment of cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by sequence-selective targeting of mRNAs, leading to a translational repression or mRNA degradation. Experimental evidence demonstrates that dysregulation of specific miRNAs leads to drug resistance in different cancers and correction of these miRNAs using miRNA mimics or antagomiRs can normalize the gene regulatory network and signaling pathways and sensitize cancerous cells to chemotherapy. Therefore, miRNA-based gene therapy provides an attractive anti-tumor approach for integrated cancer therapy. Here, we will discuss the involvement of microRNAs in chemotherapy resistance and focus on recent advancements in the development and delivery of miRNA-based cancer therapeutics. PMID:23757365

  2. SOCS3: A novel therapeutic target for cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Hideo; Nagata, Takanobu; Oba, Toyoharu; Imaizumi, Tsutomu

    2012-10-01

    The suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family of proteins are cytokine-inducible inhibitors of Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of the transcription (STAT) signaling pathways. Among the family, SOCS1 and SOCS3 potently suppress cytokine actions by inhibiting JAK kinase activities. The generation of mice lacking individual SOCS genes has been instrumental in defining the role of individual SOCS proteins in specific cytokine pathways in vivo; SOCS1 is an essential negative regulator of interferon-γ (IFNγ) and SOCS3 is an essential negative regulator of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). JAK-STAT3 activating cytokines have exhibited cardioprotective roles in the heart. The cardiac-specific deletion of SOCS3 enhances the activation of cardioprotective signaling pathways, inhibits myocardial apoptosis and fibrosis and results in the inhibition of left ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). We propose that myocardial SOCS3 is a key determinant of left ventricular remodeling after MI, and SOCS3 may serve as a novel therapeutic target to prevent left ventricular remodeling after MI. In this review, we discuss the signaling pathways mediated by JAK-STAT and SOCS proteins and their roles in the development of myocardial injury under stress (e.g., pressure overload, viral infection and ischemia). PMID:24058778

  3. GEMINs: potential therapeutic targets for spinal muscular atrophy?

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Rebecca; Cauchi, Ruben J.

    2014-01-01

    The motor neuron degenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) remains one of the most frequently inherited causes of infant mortality. Afflicted patients loose the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene but retain one or more copies of SMN2, a homolog that is incorrectly spliced. Primary treatment strategies for SMA aim at boosting SMN protein levels, which are insufficient in patients. SMN is known to partner with a set of diverse proteins collectively known as GEMINs to form a macromolecular complex. The SMN-GEMINs complex is indispensible for chaperoning the assembly of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs), which are key for pre-mRNA splicing. Pharmaceutics that alleviate the neuromuscular phenotype by restoring the fundamental function of SMN without augmenting its levels are also crucial in the development of an effective treatment. Their use as an adjunct therapy is predicted to enhance benefit to patients. Inspired by the surprising discovery revealing a premier role for GEMINs in snRNP biogenesis together with in vivo studies documenting their requirement for the correct function of the motor system, this review speculates on whether GEMINs constitute valid targets for SMA therapeutic development. PMID:25360080

  4. [50 years of hepatology - from therapeutic nihilism to targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Manns, Michael P

    2013-04-01

    Over the past 50 years significant progress has been made in the whole field of hepatology. Part of this is translation of basic research (biochemistry, immunology, virology, molecular biology and others) into clinical hepatology. This enabled us to understand more about the pathogenesis of liver diseases and led to the discovery of the five major hepatotropic viruses, the identification of hepatocellular autoantigens, and to the development of specific therapies for chronic hepatitis B, C and D. In addition, the molecular basis of most genetic liver diseases has been identified. Significant progress was made in the development of medical therapies for various liver diseases with different underlying etiologies. Surgery significantly contributed to the progress in the management of liver diseases; examples are laparoscopic cholecystectomy and the development of liver transplantation. A multimodal therapeutic algorithm has been established for the therapy of hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC); with Sorafenib "targeted therapy" has entered the area of HCC. The progress made over the last 50 years not only led to an aetiological differentiation of acute and chronic liver diseases but also to specific therapies based on the identification and understanding of the underlying etiology. PMID:23585265

  5. Risk Factors and Therapeutic Targets in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wörmann, Sonja Maria; Algül, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most challenging tumor entities worldwide, characterized as a highly aggressive disease with dismal overall prognosis and an incidence rate equalling mortality rate. Over the last decade, substantial progress has been made to define the morphological changes and key genetic events in pancreatic carcinogenesis. And yet, it is still unclear what factors trigger PC. Some risk factors appear to be associated with sex, age, race/ethnicity, or other rare genetic conditions. Additionally, modifying factors such as smoking, obesity, diabetes, occupational risk factors, etc., increase the potential for acquiring genetic mutations that may result in PC. Another hallmark of PC is its poor response to radio- and chemo-therapy. Current chemotherapeutic regimens could not provide substantial survival benefit with a clear increase in overall survival. Recently, several new approaches to significantly improve the clinical outcome of PC have been described involving downstream signaling cascades desmoplasia and stromal response as well as tumor microenvironment, immune response, vasculature, and angiogenesis. This review summarizes major risk factors for PC and tries to illuminate relevant targets considerable for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:24303367

  6. ASK1: a new therapeutic target for kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Greg H; Ma, Frank Y; Nikolic-Paterson, David J

    2016-08-01

    Stress-induced activation of p38 MAPK and JNK signaling is a feature of both acute and chronic kidney disease and is associated with disease progression. Inhibitors of p38 MAPK or JNK activation provide protection against inflammation and fibrosis in animal models of kidney disease; however, clinical trials of p38 MAPK and JNK inhibitors in other diseases (rheumatoid arthritis and pulmonary fibrosis) have been disappointing. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) acts as an upstream regulator for the activation of p38 MAPK and JNK in kidney disease. Mice lacking the Ask1 gene are healthy with normal homeostatic functions and are protected from acute kidney injury induced by ischemia-reperfusion and from renal interstitial fibrosis induced by ureteric obstruction. Recent studies have shown that a selective ASK1 inhibitor substantially reduced renal p38 MAPK activation and halted the progression of nephropathy in diabetic mice, and this has led to a current clinical trial of an ASK1 inhibitor in patients with stage 3 or 4 diabetic kidney disease. This review explores the rationale for targeting ASK1 in kidney disease and the therapeutic potential of ASK1 inhibitors based on current experimental evidence. PMID:27226108

  7. Epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylase: therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ian F; Dexter, David T

    2013-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder affecting more than 4million people worldwide. The primary motor symptoms of the disease are due to degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons. Dopamine replacement therapies have therefore revolutionised disease management by partially controlling these symptoms. However these drugs can produce debilitating side effects when used long term and do not protect degenerating neurons against death. Recent evidence has highlighted a pathological imbalance in PD between the acetylation and deacetylation of the histone proteins around which deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is coiled, in favour of excessive histone deacetylation. This mechanism of adding/removing acetyl groups to histone lysine residues is one of many epigenetic regulatory processes which control the expression of genes, many of which will be essential for neuronal survival. Hence, such epigenetic modifications may have a pathogenic role in PD. It has therefore been hypothesised that if this pathological imbalance can be corrected with the use of histone deacetylase inhibiting agents then neurodegeneration observed in PD can be ameliorated. This article will review the current literature with regard to epigenetic changes in PD and the use of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) in PD: examining the evidence of the neuroprotective effects of numerous HDACIs in cellular and animal models of Parkinsonian cell death. Ultimately answering the question: does epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylases hold therapeutic potential in PD? PMID:23711791

  8. Mitochondria: A Therapeutic Target for Parkinson’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yu; Hoffer, Alan; Hoffer, Barry; Qi, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. The exact causes of neuronal damage are unknown, but mounting evidence indicates that mitochondrial-mediated pathways contribute to the underlying mechanisms of dopaminergic neuronal cell death both in PD patients and in PD animal models. Mitochondria are organized in a highly dynamic tubular network that is continuously reshaped by opposing processes of fusion and fission. Defects in either fusion or fission, leading to mitochondrial fragmentation, limit mitochondrial motility, decrease energy production and increase oxidative stress, thereby promoting cell dysfunction and death. Thus, the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics processes, such as fusion, fission and mitophagy, represents important mechanisms controlling neuronal cell fate. In this review, we summarize some of the recent evidence supporting that impairment of mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy and mitochondrial import occurs in cellular and animal PD models and disruption of these processes is a contributing mechanism to cell death in dopaminergic neurons. We also summarize mitochondria-targeting therapeutics in models of PD, proposing that modulation of mitochondrial impairment might be beneficial for drug development toward treatment of PD. PMID:26340618

  9. General Reagent Free Route to pH Responsive Polyacryloyl Hydrazide Capped Metal Nanogels for Synergistic Anticancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ujjwal, Rewati Raman; Purohit, Mahaveer Prasad; Patnaik, Satyakam; Ojha, Umaprasana

    2015-06-01

    Herewith, we report a facile synthesis of pH responsive polyacryloyl hydrazide (PAH) capped silver (Ag) or gold (Au) nanogels for anticancer therapeutic applications. A cost-effective instant synthesis of PAH-Ag or PAH-Au nanoparticles (NPs) possessing controllable particle diameter and narrow size distribution was accomplished by adding AgNO3 or AuCl to the aqueous solution of PAH under ambient conditions without using any additional reagent. PAH possessing carbonyl hydrazide pendant functionality served as both reducing and capping agent to produce and stabilize the NPs. The stability analysis by UV-vis, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy techniques suggested that these NPs may be stored in a refrigerator for at least up to 2 weeks with negligible change in conformation. The average hydrodynamic size of PAH-Ag NPs synthesized using 0.2 mmol/L AgNO3 changed from 122 to 226 nm on changing the pH of the medium from 5.4 to 7.4, which is a characteristic property of pH responsive nanogel. Camptothecin (CPT) with adequate loading efficiency (6.3%) was encapsulated in the PAH-Ag nanogels. Under pH 5.4 conditions, these nanogels released 78% of the originally loaded CPT over a period of 70 h. The antiproliferative potential of PAH-Ag-CPT nanogels (at [CPT]=0.6 μg/mL) against MCF-7 breast adeno-carcinoma cells were ∼350% higher compared to that of the free CPT as evidenced by high cellular internalization of these nanogels. Induction of apoptosis in MCF-7 breast adeno-carcinoma cells by PAH-Ag-CPT nanogels was evidenced by accumulation of late apoptotic cell population. Drug along with the PAH-Ag NPs were also encapsulated in a pH responsive hydrogel through in situ gelation at room temperature using acrylic acid as the cross-linker. The resulting hydrogel released quantitative amounts of both drug and PAH-Ag NPs over a period of 16 h. The simplicity of synthesis and ease of drug loading with efficient release render these NPs a viable

  10. Preliminary anti-cancer photodynamic therapeutic in vitro studies with mixed-metal binuclear ruthenium(II)-vanadium(IV) complexes.

    PubMed

    Holder, Alvin A; Taylor, Patrick; Magnusen, Anthony R; Moffett, Erick T; Meyer, Kyle; Hong, Yiling; Ramsdale, Stuart E; Gordon, Michelle; Stubbs, Javelyn; Seymour, Luke A; Acharya, Dhiraj; Weber, Ralph T; Smith, Paul F; Dismukes, G Charles; Ji, Ping; Menocal, Laura; Bai, Fengwei; Williams, Jennie L; Cropek, Donald M; Jarrett, William L

    2013-09-01

    We report the synthesis and characterisation of mixed-metal binuclear ruthenium(II)-vanadium(IV) complexes, which were used as potential photodynamic therapeutic agents for melanoma cell growth inhibition. The novel complexes, [Ru(pbt)2(phen2DTT)](PF6)2·1.5H2O 1 (where phen2DTT = 1,4-bis(1,10-phenanthrolin-5-ylsulfanyl)butane-2,3-diol and pbt = 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzothiazole) and [Ru(pbt)2(tpphz)](PF6)2·3H2O 2 (where tpphz = tetrapyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c:3'',2''-h:2''',3'''-j]phenazine) were synthesised and characterised. Compound 1 was reacted with [VO(sal-L-tryp)(H2O)] (where sal-L-tryp = N-salicylidene-L-tryptophanate) to produce [Ru(pbt)2(phen2DTT)VO(sal-L-tryp)](PF6)2·5H2O 4; while [VO(sal-L-tryp)(H2O)] was reacted with compound 2 to produce [Ru(pbt)2(tpphz)VO(sal-L-tryp)](PF6)2·6H2O 3. All complexes were characterised by elemental analysis, HRMS, ESI MS, UV-visible absorption, ESR spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry, where appropriate. In vitro cell toxicity studies (with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay) via dark and light reaction conditions were carried out with sodium diaqua-4,4',4'',4''' tetrasulfophthalocyaninecobaltate(II) (Na4[Co(tspc)(H2O)2]), [VO(sal-L-tryp)(phen)]·H2O, and the chloride salts of complexes 3 and 4. Such studies involved A431, human epidermoid carcinoma cells; human amelanotic malignant melanoma cells; and HFF, non-cancerous human skin fibroblast cells. Both chloride salts of complexes 3 and 4 were found to be more toxic to melanoma cells than to non-cancerous fibroblast cells, and preferentially led to apoptosis of the melanoma cells over non-cancerous skin cells. The anti-cancer property of the chloride salts of complexes 3 and 4 was further enhanced when treated cells were exposed to light, while no such effect was observed on non-cancerous skin fibroblast cells. ESR and (51)V NMR spectroscopic studies were also used to assess the stability of the chloride salts of complexes 3

  11. Cdc7 is a potent anti-cancer target in pancreatic cancer due to abrogation of the DNA origin activation checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Huggett, Matthew T.; Tudzarova, Slavica; Proctor, Ian; Loddo, Marco; Keane, Margaret G.; Stoeber, Kai; Williams, Gareth H.; Pereira, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cdc7 is a serine/threonine kinase which is responsible for the ‘firing’ of replication origins leading to initiation of DNA replication. Inhibition or depletion of Cdc7 in normal cells triggers a DNA origin activation checkpoint causing a reversible G1 arrest. Here we investigate Cdc7 as a novel therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. Experimental design Cdc7 target validation was performed by immunoexpression profiling in a cohort of 73 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma including 24 controls. Secondly Cdc7 kinase was targeted in Capan-1 and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cell line models using either an siRNA against Cdc7 or alternatively a small molecule inhibitor (SMI) of Cdc7 (PHA-767491). Results Cdc7 was significantly overexpressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared to benign pancreatic tissue (median LI 34.3% vs. 1.3%; P<0.0001). Cdc7 knockdown using siRNA in Capan-1 and PANC-1 cells resulted in marked apoptotic cell death when compared with control cells. A prominent sub-G1 peak was seen on flow cytometry (sub-G1 51% vs. 3% and 45% vs. 0.7% in Capan-1 and PANC-1 cells, respectively). Annexin V labelling confirmed apoptosis in 64% vs. 11% and 75% vs. 8%, respectively. Western blotting showed cleavage of PARP-1 and caspase-3 and presence of γH2A.X. TUNEL assay showed strong staining in treated cells. These results were mirrored following Cdc7 kinase inhibition with PHA-767491. Conclusions Our findings show that Cdc7 is a potent anti-cancer target in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and that Cdc7 immunoexpression levels might be used as a companion diagnostic to predict response to therapeutic siRNAs or SMIs directed against this kinase. PMID:26921250

  12. Therapeutic target database update 2016: enriched resource for bench to clinical drug target and targeted pathway information.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Qin, Chu; Li, Ying Hong; Tao, Lin; Zhou, Jin; Yu, Chun Yan; Xu, Feng; Chen, Zhe; Zhu, Feng; Chen, Yu Zong

    2016-01-01

    Extensive drug discovery efforts have yielded many approved and candidate drugs targeting various targets in different biological pathways. Several freely accessible databases provide the drug, target and drug-targeted pathway information for facilitating drug discovery efforts, but there is an insufficient coverage of the clinical trial drugs and the drug-targeted pathways. Here, we describe an update of the Therapeutic Target Database (TTD) previously featured in NAR. The updated contents include: (i) significantly increased coverage of the clinical trial targets and drugs (1.6 and 2.3 times of the previous release, respectively), (ii) cross-links of most TTD target and drug entries to the corresponding pathway entries of KEGG, MetaCyc/BioCyc, NetPath, PANTHER pathway, Pathway Interaction Database (PID), PathWhiz, Reactome and WikiPathways, (iii) the convenient access of the multiple targets and drugs cross-linked to each of these pathway entries and (iv) the recently emerged approved and investigative drugs. This update makes TTD a more useful resource to complement other databases for facilitating the drug discovery efforts. TTD is accessible at http://bidd.nus.edu.sg/group/ttd/ttd.asp. PMID:26578601

  13. Synthesis of Rapamycin Derivatives Containing the Triazole Moiety Used as Potential mTOR-Targeted Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lijun; Huang, Jie; Chen, Xiaoming; Yu, Hui; Li, Kualiang; Yang, Dan; Chen, Xiaqin; Ying, Jiayin; Pan, Fusheng; Lv, Youbing; Cheng, Yuanrong

    2016-06-01

    Rapamycin, a potent antifungal antibiotic, was approved as immunosuppressant, and lately its derivatives have been developed into mTOR targeting anticancer drugs. Structure modification was performed at the C-42 position of rapamycin, and a novel series of rapamycin triazole hybrids (4a-d, 5a-e, 8a-e, and 9a-e) was facilely synthesized via Huisgen's reaction. The anticancer activity of these compounds was evaluated against the Caski, H1299, MGC-803, and H460 human cancer cell lines. Some of the derivatives (8a-e, 9a-e) appeared to have stronger activity than that of rapamycin; however, 4a-d and 5a-e failed to show potential anticancer activity. Compound 9e with a (2,4-dichlorophenylamino)methyl moiety on the triazole ring was the most active anticancer compound, which showed IC50 values of 6.05 (Caski), 7.89 (H1299), 25.88 (MGC-803), and 8.60 μM (H460). In addition, research on the mechanism showed that 9e was able to cause cell morphological changes and to induce apoptosis in the Caski cell line. Most importantly, 9e can decrease the phosphorylation of mTOR and of its downstream key proteins, S6 and P70S6K1, indicating that 9e can effectively inhibit the mTOR signaling pathway. Thus, it may have the potential to become a new mTOR inhibitor against various cancers. PMID:27150260

  14. COGNITION AS A THERAPEUTIC TARGET IN LATE-LIFE DEPRESSION: POTENTIAL FOR NICOTINIC THERAPEUTICS

    PubMed Central

    Zurkovsky, Lilia; Taylor, Warren D.; Newhouse, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Depression is associated with impairments to cognition and brain function at any age, but such impairments in the elderly are particularly problematic because of the additional burden of normal cognitive aging and in some cases, structural brain pathology. Individuals with late-life depression exhibit impairments in cognition and brain structural integrity, alongside mood dysfunction. Antidepressant treatment improves symptoms in some but not all patients, and those who benefit may not return to the cognitive and functional level of nondepressed elderly. Thus, for comprehensive treatment of late-life depression, it may be necessary to address both the affective and cognitive deficits. In this review, we propose a model for the treatment of late-life depression in which nicotinic stimulation is used to improve cognitive performance and improve the efficacy of an antidepressant treatment of the syndrome of late-life depression. The cholinergic system is well-established as important to cognition. Although muscarinic stimulation may exacerbate depressive symptoms, nicotinic stimulation may improve cognition and neural functioning without a detriment to mood. While some studies of nicotinic subtype specific receptor agonists have shown promise in improving cognitive performance, less is known regarding how nicotinic receptor stimulation affects cognition in depressed elderly patients. Late-life depression thus represents a new therapeutic target for the development of nicotinic agonist drugs and parallel treatment of cognitive dysfunction along with medical and psychological approaches to treating mood dysfunction may be necessary to ensure full resolution of depressive illness in aging. PMID:23933385

  15. LGR5 expressing cells of hair follicle as potential targets for antibody mediated anti-cancer laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris V.

    2013-02-01

    Near infrared laser immunotherapy becomes now a new promising research field to cure the patients with cancers. One of the critical limitation in medical application of this treatment is availability of the specific markers for delivery of laser-sensitive nanoparticles. When coupled to antibodies to the cancer stem cells markers these nanoparticles may be delivered to the cancer tissue and mediate the laser induced thermolysis of the cancer stem cells that initiate and drive growth of cancer. This paper addresses the Lgr5 cell surface marker mediating the Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction as a potential target for anti-cancer laser immunotherapy of skin cancers.

  16. Novel p53-dependent anticancer strategy by targeting iron signaling and BNIP3L-induced mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Wilfinger, Nastasia; Austin, Shane; Scheiber-Mojdehkar, Barbara; Berger, Walter; Reipert, Siegfried; Praschberger, Monika; Paur, Jakob; Trondl, Robert; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Zielinski, Christoph C.; Nowikovsky, Karin

    2016-01-01

    This study identifies BNIP3L as the key regulator of p53-dependent cell death mechanism in colon cancer cells targeted by the novel gallium based anticancer drug, KP46. KP46 specifically accumulated into mitochondria where it caused p53-dependent morphological and functional damage impairing mitochondrial dynamics and bioenergetics. Furthermore, competing with iron for cellular uptake, KP46 lowered the intracellular labile iron pools and intracellular heme. Accordingly, p53 accumulated in the nucleus where it activated its transcriptional target BNIP3L, a BH3 only domain protein with functions in apoptosis and mitophagy. Upregulated BNIP3L sensitized the mitochondrial permeability transition and strongly induced PARKIN-mediated mitochondrial clearance and cellular vacuolization. Downregulation of BNIP3L entirely rescued cell viability caused by exposure of KP46 for 24 hours, confirming that early induced cell death was regulated by BNIP3L. Altogether, targeting BNIP3L in wild-type p53 colon cancer cells is a novel anticancer strategy activating iron depletion signaling and the mitophagy-related cell death pathway. PMID:26517689

  17. Adrenomedullin: A potential therapeutic target for retinochoroidal disease.

    PubMed

    Iesato, Yasuhiro; Yuda, Kentaro; Chong, Kelvin Teo Yi; Tan, Xue; Murata, Toshinori; Shindo, Takayuki; Yanagi, Yasuo

    2016-05-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a 52-amino acid peptide with anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and anti-oxidative properties discovered in a human pheochromocytoma. It is a member of the calcitonin peptide superfamily, and its signal is mediated by calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR). CLR interacts with receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs), among which RAMP-2 and RAMP-3 carry CLR from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cellular membrane to confer high affinity for AM. In addition to being implicated in a variety of systemic diseases, AM is a critical contributor to the pathogenesis of retinochoroidal disease. It is robustly upregulated in retinochoroidal disease models of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) and laser-induced choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) as well as in human patients with retinochoroidal diseases. In this review, we discuss the most salient recent findings that strongly illustrate the role of AM in retinochoroidal disease. In the OIR model, AM was identified as a key angiogenic mediator of retinal vascularisation, and AM inhibition suppressed only pathological angiogenesis, not physiological angiogenesis. On the contrary, lesion size was larger in AM(+/-) CNV model mice, presumably due to the anti-inflammatory function of AM. Despite the success of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents for the treatment of retinochoroidal disease, therapeutic shortcomings remain. Finding ways to modulate AM activity will provide new treatment avenues. Potential treatment strategies modulating the action of AM and its signaling pathway have been studied extensively. AM and its signaling molecules are intriguing future treatment targets for retinochoroidal disease. PMID:26791747

  18. Pharmacology of nociceptin and its receptor: a novel therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Calo', Girolamo; Guerrini, Remo; Rizzi, Anna; Salvadori, Severo; Regoli, Domenico

    2000-01-01

    Nociceptin (NC), alias Orphanin FQ, has been recently identified as the endogenous ligand of the opioid receptor-like 1 receptor (OP4). This new NC/OP4 receptor system belongs to the opioid family and has been characterized pharmacologically with functional and binding assays on native (mouse, rat, guinea-pig) and recombinant (human) receptors, by using specific and selective agonists (NC, NC(1–13)NH2) and a pure and competitive antagonist, [Nphe1]NC(1–13)NH2. The similar order of potency of agonists and affinity values of the antagonist indicate that the same receptor is present in the four species. OP4 is expressed in neurons, where it reduces activation of adenylyl cyclase and Ca2+ channels while activating K+ channels in a manner similar to opioids. In this way, OP4 mediates inhibitory effects in the autonomic nervous system, but its activities in the central nervous system can be either similar or opposite to those of opioids. In vivo experiments have demonstrated that NC modulates a variety of biological functions ranging from nociception to food intake, from memory processes to cardiovascular and renal functions, from spontaneous locomotor activity to gastrointestinal motility, from anxiety to the control of neurotransmitter release at peripheral and central sites. These actions have been demonstrated using NC and various pharmacological tools, as antisense oligonucleotides targeting OP4 or the peptide precursor genes, antibodies against NC, an OP4 receptor selective antagonist and with data obtained from animals in which the receptor or the peptide precursor genes were knocked out. These new advances have contributed to better understanding of the pathophysiological role of the NC/OP4 system, and ultimately will help to identify the therapeutic potential of new OP4 receptor ligands. PMID:10742280

  19. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Mechanisms, Redox Considerations, and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Biasi, Fiorella; Leonarduzzi, Gabriella; Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Oxidative stress is thought to play a key role in the development of intestinal damage in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), because of its primary involvement in intestinal cells' aberrant immune and inflammatory responses to dietary antigens and to the commensal bacteria. During the active disease phase, activated leukocytes generate not only a wide spectrum of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but also excess oxidative reactions, which markedly alter the redox equilibrium within the gut mucosa, and maintain inflammation by inducing redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Moreover, several inflammatory molecules generate further oxidation products, leading to a self-sustaining and auto-amplifying vicious circle, which eventually impairs the gut barrier. The current treatment of IBD consists of long-term conventional anti-inflammatory therapy and often leads to drug refractoriness or intolerance, limiting patients' quality of life. Immune modulators or anti-tumor necrosis factor α antibodies have recently been used, but all carry the risk of significant side effects and a poor treatment response. Recent developments in molecular medicine point to the possibility of treating the oxidative stress associated with IBD, by designing a proper supplementation of specific lipids to induce local production of anti-inflammatory derivatives, as well as by developing biological therapies that target selective molecules (i.e., nuclear factor-κB, NADPH oxidase, prohibitins, or inflammasomes) involved in redox signaling. The clinical significance of oxidative stress in IBD is now becoming clear, and may soon lead to important new therapeutic options to lessen intestinal damage in this disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1711–1747. PMID:23305298

  20. "Siglec"ting the allergic response for therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Bochner, Bruce S

    2016-06-01

    As a physician-scientist, I have pursued research related to translational immunology with the goal of improving our ability to diagnose and treat allergic, immunologic and other diseases involving eosinophils, basophils and mast cells. We have tried to delineate novel mechanisms of human disease, working whenever possible with primary human cells and tissues, attempting to identify targets that might be amenable to the development of new therapies. As a general strategy, we have compared eosinophils, basophils, mast cells and neutrophils to look for pathways in inflammation that were unique to distinct subsets of these cells. In doing so, the concepts of glycobiology did not enter my mind until we began noticing some intriguing functional differences involving selectins and their ligands among these cell types. One simple observation, that neutrophils were coated with a glycan that allowed them to interact with an endothelial adhesion molecule while eosinophils lacked this structure, pried open the glyco-door for me. Fruitful collaborations with card-carrying glycobiologists soon followed that have forever positively influenced our science, and have enhanced our hypotheses, experimental design, research opportunities and discoveries. Within a few years, we helped to discover Siglec-8, an I-type lectin expressed only on human eosinophils, basophils, mast cells. This receptor, together with its closest mouse counterpart Siglec-F, has been the primary focus of our work now for over a decade. If not for those in the fields of glycobiology and glycoimmunology, my lab would not have made much progress toward the goal of leveraging Siglec-8 for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26911285

  1. GABAergic Signaling as Therapeutic Target for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cellot, Giada; Cherubini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, early in postnatal life exerts a depolarizing and excitatory action. This depends on accumulation of chloride inside the cell via the cation–chloride importer NKCC1, being the expression of the chloride exporter KCC2 very low at birth. The developmentally regulated expression of KCC2 results in extrusion of chloride with age and a shift of GABA from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction. The depolarizing action of GABA leads to intracellular calcium rise through voltage-dependent calcium channels and/or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. GABA-mediated calcium signals regulate a variety of developmental processes from cell proliferation migration, differentiation, synapse maturation, and neuronal wiring. Therefore, it is not surprising that some forms of neuro-developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are associated with alterations of GABAergic signaling and impairment of the excitatory/inhibitory balance in selective neuronal circuits. In this review, we will discuss how changes of GABAA-mediated neurotransmission affect several forms of ASDs including the Fragile X, the Angelman, and Rett syndromes. Then, we will describe various animal models of ASDs with GABAergic dysfunctions, highlighting their behavioral deficits and the possibility to rescue them by targeting selective components of the GABAergic synapse. In particular, we will discuss how in some cases, reverting the polarity of GABA responses from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction with the diuretic bumetanide, a selective blocker of NKCC1, may have beneficial effects on ASDs, thus opening new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of these devastating disorders. PMID:25072038

  2. Could B7-H4 serve as a target to activate anti-cancer immunity?

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Heng, Xueyuan; Lu, Yong; Cai, Zhen; Yi, Qing; Che, Fengyuan

    2016-09-01

    It has been over 13years since the identification of B7-H4, the co-stimulatory molecule of B7 family members. While B7-H4 mRNA is widely distributed protein expression seems to be limited on tissues. Various cytokines and inflammatory mediators induce the expression of B7-H4. However, the specific regulatory mechanisms of B7-H4 remain to be defined. Recently, it has been shown that B7-H4 executes an inhibitory function in the T-cell response via reduced expansion, cell cycle arrest, decreased cytokine secretion and induced apoptosis of activated T-cells. Furthermore, B7-H4 suppresses the function of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and promotes the proliferation and development of regulatory T-cells (Treg). Moreover, a growing body of literature demonstrates that various cancers express B7-H4 and that the expression levels of B7-H4 correlate with cancer size, histological type, pathologic stage, grade, infiltration, lymph node metastasis, cancer progression, recurrence and death. The over-expression of B7-H4 in cancer may be related to an increased resistance to immune responses. The aim of this review is to supply an overview of the advances in the regulation and function of B7-H4. Additionally, many studies have suggested that B7-H4 is a molecular target for therapeutic intervention in cancer and that targeting B7-H4 may have promising potential for improving the efficacy of immunotherapy for cancer patients. PMID:27258187

  3. Small Molecule Sequential Dual-Targeting Theragnostic Strategy (SMSDTTS): from Preclinical Experiments towards Possible Clinical Anticancer Applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junjie; Oyen, Raymond; Verbruggen, Alfons; Ni, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    Hitting the evasive tumor cells proves challenging in targeted cancer therapies. A general and unconventional anticancer approach namely small molecule sequential dual-targeting theragnostic strategy (SMSDTTS) has recently been introduced with the aims to target and debulk the tumor mass, wipe out the residual tumor cells, and meanwhile enable cancer detectability. This dual targeting approach works in two steps for systemic delivery of two naturally derived drugs. First, an anti-tubulin vascular disrupting agent, e.g., combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P), is injected to selectively cut off tumor blood supply and to cause massive necrosis, which nevertheless always leaves peripheral tumor residues. Secondly, a necrosis-avid radiopharmaceutical, namely 131I-hypericin (131I-Hyp), is administered the next day, which accumulates in intratumoral necrosis and irradiates the residual cancer cells with beta particles. Theoretically, this complementary targeted approach may biologically and radioactively ablate solid tumors and reduce the risk of local recurrence, remote metastases, and thus cancer mortality. Meanwhile, the emitted gamma rays facilitate radio-scintigraphy to detect tumors and follow up the therapy, hence a simultaneous theragnostic approach. SMSDTTS has now shown promise from multicenter animal experiments and may demonstrate unique anticancer efficacy in upcoming preliminary clinical trials. In this short review article, information about the two involved agents, the rationale of SMSDTTS, its preclinical antitumor efficacy, multifocal targetability, simultaneous theragnostic property, and toxicities of the dose regimens are summarized. Meanwhile, possible drawbacks, practical challenges and future improvement with SMSDTTS are discussed, which hopefully may help to push forward this strategy from preclinical experiments towards possible clinical applications. PMID:23412554

  4. Structure and Potential Cellular Targets of HAMLET-like Anti-Cancer Compounds made from Milk Components.

    PubMed

    Rath, Emma M; Duff, Anthony P; Håkansson, Anders P; Vacher, Catherine S; Liu, Guo Jun; Knott, Robert B; Church, William Bret

    2015-01-01

    The HAMLET family of compounds (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made Lethal to Tumours) was discovered during studies on the properties of human milk, and is a class of protein-lipid complexes having broad spectrum anti-cancer, and some specific anti-bacterial properties. The structure of HAMLET-like compounds consists of an aggregation of partially unfolded protein making up the majority of the compound's mass, with fatty acid molecules bound in the hydrophobic core. This is a novel protein-lipid structure and has only recently been derived by small-angle X-ray scattering analysis. The structure is the basis of a novel cytotoxicity mechanism responsible for anti-cancer activity to all of the around 50 different cancer cell types for which the HAMLET family has been trialled. Multiple cytotoxic mechanisms have been hypothesised for the HAMLET-like compounds, but it is not yet clear which of those are the initiating cytotoxic mechanism(s) and which are subsequent activities triggered by the initiating mechanism(s). In addition to the studies into the structure of these compounds, this review presents the state of knowledge of the anti-cancer aspects of HAMLET-like compounds, the HAMLET-induced cytotoxic activities to cancer and non-cancer cells, and the several prospective cell membrane and intracellular targets of the HAMLET family. The emerging picture is that HAMLET-like compounds initiate their cytotoxic effects on what may be a cancer-specific target in the cell membrane that has yet to be identified. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page. PMID:26626257

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of a series of resveratrol analogues as potent anti-cancer agents that target tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Madadi, Nikhil R.; Zong, Hongliang; Ketkar, Amit; Zheng, Chen; Penthala, Narsimha R.; Janganati, Venumadhav; Bommagani, Shobanbabu; Eoff, Robert L.; Guzman, Monica L.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel diarylacrylonitrile and trans-stilbene analogues of resveratrol has been synthesized and evaluated for their anticancer activities against a panel of 60 human cancer cell lines. The diarylacrylonitrile analogues 3b and 4a exhibited the most potent anticancer activity of all the analogues synthesized in this study, with GI50 values of < 10 nM against almost all the cell lines in the human cancer cell panel. Compounds 3b and 4a were also screened against the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell line, MV4-11, and were found to have potent cytotoxic properties that are likely mediated through inhibition of tubulin polymerization. Results from molecular docking studies indicate a common binding site for 4a and 3b on the 3,3-tubulin heterodimer, with a slightly more favorable binding for 3b compared to 4a; this is consistent with the results from the microtubule assays, which demonstrate that 4a is more potent than 3b in inhibiting tubulin polymerization in MV4-11 cells. Taken together, these data suggest that diarylacrylonitriles 3b and 4a may have potential as antitubulin therapeutics for treatment of both solid and hematological tumors. PMID:26257861

  6. Improved drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy of PEgylated liposomal doxorubicin by targeting anti-HER2 peptide in murine breast tumor model.

    PubMed

    Zahmatkeshan, Masoumeh; Gheybi, Fatemeh; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2016-04-30

    Targeted cancer therapy is a powerful therapeutic strategy to management of cancer. HER2 as an anticancer target has long been studied. Its overexpression plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progressiveness of breast and other cancers. To establish efficient and reliable drug delivery to HER2-overexpressing cells, the authors of this study have developed anti-HER2 (ErbB2) peptide-liposomal formulations of doxorubicin (DOX) by an engineered breast tumor-targeting peptide ligand, AHNP, Anti-HER2/neu peptide, (FCDGFYACYADV) with three glycine amino acids as spacer before its original sequencing. Towards this goal, PEGylated liposome doxorubicin (PLD) bearing different ligand densities of AHNP was prepared and characterized for their size, zeta potential and peptide conjugation. The AHNP functionalization and density effects on breast tumor cell uptake, selective cytotoxicity, prevention of tumor growth and the tissue biodistribution of encapsulated DOX were studied in mice bearing TUBO breast cancer tumor model. The findings demonstrated that increasing the ligand density of AHNP increases cytotoxicity and cell-uptake in SKBR3 and TUBO cells which overexpress HER2 but not in MDA-MB-231with low HER2 expression profile. The anticancer activity was also superior for targeted liposomal DOX with more AHNP densities. Overall, the results showed that optimum AHNP density functionalization of PLD can significantly improve selectivity and the therapeutic index of liposomal DOX in the treatment of HER2 positive breast cancer and merits further investigation. PMID:26972276

  7. THE TRPV1 RECEPTOR: TARGET OF TOXICANTS AND THERAPEUTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the structural and functional complexities of the TRPV1 is essential to the therapeutic modulation of inflammation and pain. Because of its central role in initiating inflammatory processes and integrating painful stimuli, there is an understandable interest...

  8. Anti-cancer drug loaded iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles (Fe@Au) for magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Kayal, Sibnath; Ramanujan, Raju Vijayaraghavan

    2010-09-01

    Magnetic drug targeting, using core-shell magnetic carrier particles loaded with anti-cancer drugs, is an emerging and significant method of cancer treatment. Gold shell-iron core nanoparticles (Fe@Au) were synthesized by the reverse micelle method with aqueous reactants, surfactant, co-surfactant and oil phase. XRD, XPS, TEM and magnetic property measurements were utilized to characterize these core-shell nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements showed that the particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that the saturation magnetization decreased with increasing gold concentration. The anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto these Fe@Au nanoparticle carriers and the drug release profiles showed that upto 25% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h. It was found that the amine (-NH2) group of DOX binds to the gold shell. An in vitro apparatus simulating the human circulatory system was used to determine the retention of these nanoparticle carriers when exposed to an external magnetic field. A high percentage of magnetic carriers could be retained for physiologically relevant flow speeds of fluid. The present findings show that DOX loaded gold coated iron nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery. PMID:21133071

  9. Therapeutic Targets in the ARF Tumor Suppressor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Saporita, Anthony J.; Maggi, Leonard B.; Apicelli, Anthony J.; Weber, Jason D.

    2008-01-01

    suppressors act coordinately to prevent unwarranted cell growth and proliferation. The aim of this review is to characterize the current knowledge in the field about both p53-dependent and independent functions of ARF as well as to summarize the present models for how ARF might control rates of cell proliferation and/or macromolecular synthesis. We will discuss potential therapeutic targets in the ARF pathway, and some preliminary attempts at enhancing or restoring the activity of this important tumor suppressor. PMID:17627519

  10. Functionally-defined Therapeutic Targets in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Catherine S.; Tang, Yujie; Truffaux, Nathalene; Berlow, Noah E.; Liu, Lining; Debily, Marie-Anne; Quist, Michael J.; Davis, Lara E.; Huang, Elaine C.; Woo, Pamelyn J; Ponnuswami, Anitha; Chen, Spenser; Johung, Tessa B.; Sun, Wenchao; Kogiso, Mari; Du, Yuchen; Lin, Qi; Huang, Yulun; Hütt-Cabezas, Marianne; Warren, Katherine E.; Dret, Ludivine Le; Meltzer, Paul S.; Mao, Hua; Quezado, Martha; van Vuurden, Dannis G.; Abraham, Jinu; Fouladi, Maryam; Svalina, Matthew N.; Wang, Nicholas; Hawkins, Cynthia; Nazarian, Javad; Alonso, Marta M.; Raabe, Eric; Hulleman, Esther; Spellman, Paul T.; Li, Xiao-Nan; Keller, Charles; Pal, Ranadip; Grill, Jacques; Monje, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG) is a fatal childhood cancer. We performed a chemical sc