Science.gov

Sample records for anticoagulation therapy mr-tomographische

  1. Pharmacologic Therapies in Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joana Lima; Wipf, Joyce E

    2016-07-01

    Anticoagulants are beneficial for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. The development of target-specific oral anticoagulants is changing the landscape of anticoagulation therapy and created growing interest on this subject. Understanding the pharmacology of different anticoagulants is the first step to adequately treat patients with best available therapy while avoiding serious bleeding complications. This article reviews the pharmacology of the main anticoagulant classes (vitamin K antagonists, direct oral anticoagulants, and heparins) and their clinical indications based on evidence-based data currently available in the literature. PMID:27235611

  2. Oral Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gallus, Alexander S.; Wittkowsky, Ann; Crowther, Mark; Hylek, Elaine M.; Palareti, Gualtiero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The objective of this article is to summarize the published literature concerning the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral anticoagulant drugs that are currently available for clinical use and other aspects related to their management. Methods: We carried out a standard review of published articles focusing on the laboratory and clinical characteristics of the vitamin K antagonists; the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate; and the direct factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban Results: The antithrombotic effect of each oral anticoagulant drug, the interactions, and the monitoring of anticoagulation intensity are described in detail and discussed without providing specific recommendations. Moreover, we describe and discuss the clinical applications and optimal dosages of oral anticoagulant therapies, practical issues related to their initiation and monitoring, adverse events such as bleeding and other potential side effects, and available strategies for reversal. Conclusions: There is a large amount of evidence on laboratory and clinical characteristics of vitamin K antagonists. A growing body of evidence is becoming available on the first new oral anticoagulant drugs available for clinical use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban. PMID:22315269

  3. Anticoagulation Drug Therapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Harter, Katherine; Levine, Michael; Henderson, Sean O.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, most patients who required parenteral anticoagulation received heparin, whereas those patients requiring oral anticoagulation received warfarin. Due to the narrow therapeutic index and need for frequent laboratory monitoring associated with warfarin, there has been a desire to develop newer, more effective anticoagulants. Consequently, in recent years many novel anticoagulants have been developed. The emergency physician may institute anticoagulation therapy in the short term (e.g. heparin) for a patient being admitted, or may start a novel anticoagulation for a patient being discharged. Similarly, a patient on a novel anticoagulant may present to the emergency department due to a hemorrhagic complication. Consequently, the emergency physician should be familiar with the newer and older anticoagulants. This review emphasizes the indication, mechanism of action, adverse effects, and potential reversal strategies for various anticoagulants that the emergency physician will likely encounter. PMID:25671002

  4. The evolution of anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Franchini, Massimo; Liumbruno, Giancarlo M.; Bonfanti, Carlo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Arterial and venous thromboembolism are leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world. For almost 70 years, heparins (unfractionated heparin and low molecular weight heparins) and vitamin K antagonists have been the leading therapeutic medical options for the treatment and prevention of thromboembolic disorders. Nevertheless, the many limitations of these traditional anticoagulants have fuelled the search for novel agents over the past 15 years, and a new class of oral anticoagulants that specifically target activated factor X and thrombin has been developed and is now commercially available. In this narrative review, the evolution of anticoagulant therapy is summarised, with a focus on newer oral anticoagulants. PMID:26710352

  5. Anticoagulant Therapy-Induced Gallbladder Hemorrhage after Cardiac Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seong Ho; Lee, Hae Young; Kim, Hyun Su

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is essential after cardiac valve surgery. However, spontaneous bleeding remains a major concern during anticoagulation therapy. Spontaneous gallbladder (GB) hemorrhage (hemobilia) is a rare occurrence during standard anticoagulation therapy. This report presents a case of GB hemorrhage that occurred shortly after initiating oral anticoagulant therapy in a patient who had undergone mitral valve replacement surgery. PMID:26665115

  6. Resuming anticoagulant therapy after intracerebral bleeding.

    PubMed

    Becattini, Cecilia; Sembolini, Agnese; Paciaroni, Maurizio

    2016-09-01

    The clinical benefit of resuming anticoagulant treatment after an anticoagulants-associated intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is debated. No randomized trial has been conducted on this particular clinical issue. The risk of ICH recurrence from resuming anticoagulant therapy is expected to be higher after index lobar than deep ICH and in patients with not amendable risk factors for ICH. Retrospective studies have recently shown improved survival with resumption of treatment after index anticoagulants-associated ICH. Based on these evidences and on the risk for thromboembolic events without anticoagulant treatment, resumption of anticoagulation should be considered in all patients with mechanical heart valve prosthesis and in those with amendable risk factors for anticoagulants-associated ICH. Resumption with direct oral anticoagulants appears a reasonable option for non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) patients at moderate to high thromboembolic risk after deep ICH and for selected NVAF patients at high thromboembolic risk after lobar ICH. For VTE patients at high risk for recurrence, resumption of anticoagulation or insertion of vena cava filter should be tailored on the estimated risk for ICH recurrence. PMID:27260938

  7. Evidence-Based Management of Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schulman, Sam; Witt, Daniel M.; Vandvik, Per Olav; Fish, Jason; Kovacs, Michael J.; Svensson, Peter J.; Veenstra, David L.; Crowther, Mark; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: High-quality anticoagulation management is required to keep these narrow therapeutic index medications as effective and safe as possible. This article focuses on the common important management questions for which, at a minimum, low-quality published evidence is available to guide best practices. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: Most practical clinical questions regarding the management of anticoagulation, both oral and parenteral, have not been adequately addressed by randomized trials. We found sufficient evidence for summaries of recommendations for 23 questions, of which only two are strong rather than weak recommendations. Strong recommendations include targeting an international normalized ratio of 2.0 to 3.0 for patients on vitamin K antagonist therapy (Grade 1B) and not routinely using pharmacogenetic testing for guiding doses of vitamin K antagonist (Grade 1B). Weak recommendations deal with such issues as loading doses, initiation overlap, monitoring frequency, vitamin K supplementation, patient self-management, weight and renal function adjustment of doses, dosing decision support, drug interactions to avoid, and prevention and management of bleeding complications. We also address anticoagulation management services and intensive patient education. Conclusions: We offer guidance for many common anticoagulation-related management problems. Most anticoagulation management questions have not been adequately studied. PMID:22315259

  8. [Cerebral vascular accidents in anticoagulant therapy].

    PubMed

    Woimant, F; Lecoz, P; Rajzbaum, G; Haguenau, M; Pépin, B

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-three patients hospitalized as they presented with cerebral vascular lesions during anticoagulant therapy (25 intracerebral hemorrhages, 7 subdural hematoma, and one ischemia lesion). Frequency of intra-cerebral hemorrhages along with anticoagulant therapy was about 11 p. 100, this of subdural hematoma ranged from 12 to 38 p. 100. Intra-cerebral hemorrhages failed to show any peculiar topography and volume was variable. A predisposing factor thus existed in about 50 p. 100 of cases: high blood pressure or arterial aneurysm. Previous cranial traumatism was only demonstrated in 48 p. 100 patients presenting with a subdural hematoma. Prognosis as for these intracranial hemorrhages might be compared to this of hemorrhagic lesions appearing under other etiologic conditions. Ischemia lesion was secondary to a severe thrombopenia to heparin. PMID:3813286

  9. Individualising Anticoagulant Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist (VKA) oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have emerged as alternatives to VKAs for the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Four NOACS: dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban and edoxaban, have received regulatory approval in Europe from the European Medicines Agency. Numerous factors can influence the decision to prescribe a NOAC, the most important of which are assessment of stroke and bleeding risks. Given the variation in design of the pivotal phase III clinical trials investigating the efficacy and safety of NOACs, and in the absence of head-to-head comparative data, it is impossible to recommend one NOAC over the other. However, NOACS offer the opportunity for individualised therapy based on factors such as renal function, age or patient/doctor preference for once- or twice-daily dosing regimens. Dose reduction of some NOACS should be considered in at-risk patient populations. PMID:27617088

  10. Contemporary anticoagulation therapy in patients undergoing percutaneous intervention.

    PubMed

    Bhatty, Shaun; Ali, Asghar; Shetty, Ranjith; Sumption, Kevin F; Topaz, On; Jovin, Ion S

    2014-04-01

    The proper use of anticoagulants is crucial for ensuring optimal patient outcomes post percutaneous interventions in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Anticoagulant agents such as unfractionated heparin, a thrombin inhibitor; low-molecular weight heparins, predominantly Factor Xa inhibitors; fondaparinux, a Factor Xa inhibitor and bivalirudin, a direct thrombin inhibitor have been developed to target various steps in the coagulation cascade to prevent formation of thrombin. Optimal anticoagulation achieves the correct balance between thrombosis and bleeding and is related to optimal outcomes with minimal complications. This review will discuss the mechanisms and appropriate use of current and emerging anticoagulant therapies used during percutaneous interventions. PMID:24506409

  11. [Duration of anticoagulant therapy in venous thromboembolic complications].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M R; Leontyev, S G; Neskhodimov, L A; Tolstikhin, V Yu; Khotinskiy, A A

    2016-01-01

    Adequate anticoagulant therapy is a general approach to treatment of deep vein thrombosis. However, the duration of anticoagulant therapy is not strictly specified in everyday clinical practice. The present article deals with various approaches to selecting the duration of therapy with anticoagulants based on the findings of studies, national and foreign clinical guidelines. The minimal duration of therapy for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism amounts to 3 months in accordance with the national and American recommendations. For some cohorts of patients, continuation of therapy above 3 months is considered: patients with idiopathic thrombosis (the recommended duration of therapy of not less than 6 months), patients having persisting risk factor for relapse of thrombosis on termination of the main therapeutic course, oncological patients (6 month therapy followed by assessing the risk and benefit of continuing therapy with anticoagulants). Prolonged therapy of venous thromboembolism using unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin followed by changing over to vitamin K antagonists is associated with decreased risk for thrombosis relapse approximately by 90%, however increasing the risk of haemorrhage. Currently, as an alternative, it is possible to consider administration of novel oral anticoagulants (rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban) which beside high efficacy are associated with less risk of bleeding. The route of administration, no necessity to control the INR, and the minimal number of drug and food interactions make administration of new oral anticoagulants an attractive alternative to therapy with heparins and vitamin K antagonists. PMID:27100556

  12. [Progress of anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Hernández Olmedo, Miguel; Suárez Fernández, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation is currently a very prevalent disease and it represents one of the most common causes of disabling stroke. Antithrombotic therapies have reduced the incidence of this complication although they pose many limitations and difficulties. As a result, a large number of high risk patients do not receive an appropriate treatment. In recent years, four new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) with relevant advantages in comparison to vitaminK antagonists have been released. Four large phaseiii clinical trials have demonstrated that NOAC are at least as safe and efficacious as warfarin in stroke prevention in non-valve atrial fibrillation patients with moderate-high thrombotic risk, being their main advantage the reduction in intracranial hemorrhage. The arrival of these drugs has caused great expectations in the management of these patients but also new doubts. Lacking data in some subgroups of frail patients, the absence of specific antidotes available and specially their high cost represent nowadays the main limitations for their generalization. PMID:25192579

  13. Anti-coagulant therapy with dabigatran for cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Manvi; Ren, Clement L

    2016-08-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism, especially in association with central venous catheter use. Coumarin drugs and low molecular weight heparin are frequently used for anti-coagulant therapy, but are more challenging to administer in CF patients. Dabigatran, an oral thrombin antagonist, is an alternative anti-coagulant medication, but its use in CF has not been reported. We describe our experience in successfully using dabigatran for long-term anti-coagulation therapy in two CF patients. Our experience suggests that dabigatran can serve as an option for anticoagulation therapy in CF. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:E29-E30. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27128852

  14. Antithrombotic and Anticoagulant Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Dzeshka, Mikhail S; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-04-01

    As atrial fibrillation (AF) substantially increases the risk of stroke and other thromboembolic events, most AF patients require appropriate antithrombotic prophylaxis. Oral anticoagulation (OAC) with either dose-adjusted vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) (eg, warfarin) or non-VKA oral anticoagulants (eg, dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban) can be used for this purpose unless contraindicated. Therefore, risk assessment of stroke and bleeding is an obligatory part of AF management, and risk has to be weighed individually. Antiplatelet drugs (eg, aspirin and clopidogrel) are inferior to OAC, both alone and in combination, with a comparable risk of bleeding events. PMID:26968670

  15. Personalized antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy: applications and significance of pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Beitelshees, Amber L; Voora, Deepak; Lewis, Joshua P

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, substantial effort has been made to better understand the influence of genetic factors on the efficacy and safety of numerous medications. These investigations suggest that the use of pharmacogenetic data to inform physician decision-making has great potential to enhance patient care by reducing on-treatment clinical events, adverse drug reactions, and health care-related costs. In fact, integration of such information into the clinical setting may be particularly applicable for antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapeutics, given the increasing body of evidence implicating genetic variation in variable drug response. In this review, we summarize currently available pharmacogenetic information for the most commonly used antiplatelet (ie, clopidogrel and aspirin) and anticoagulation (ie, warfarin) medications. Furthermore, we highlight the currently known role of genetic variability in response to next-generation antiplatelet (prasugrel and ticagrelor) and anticoagulant (dabigatran) agents. While compelling evidence suggests that genetic variants are important determinants of antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy response, significant barriers to clinical implementation of pharmacogenetic testing exist and are described herein. In addition, we briefly discuss development of new diagnostic targets and therapeutic strategies as well as implications for enhanced patient care. In conclusion, pharmacogenetic testing can provide important information to assist clinicians with prescribing the most personalized and effective antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy. However, several factors may limit its usefulness and should be considered. PMID:25897256

  16. Personalized antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy: applications and significance of pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Beitelshees, Amber L; Voora, Deepak; Lewis, Joshua P

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, substantial effort has been made to better understand the influence of genetic factors on the efficacy and safety of numerous medications. These investigations suggest that the use of pharmacogenetic data to inform physician decision-making has great potential to enhance patient care by reducing on-treatment clinical events, adverse drug reactions, and health care-related costs. In fact, integration of such information into the clinical setting may be particularly applicable for antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapeutics, given the increasing body of evidence implicating genetic variation in variable drug response. In this review, we summarize currently available pharmacogenetic information for the most commonly used antiplatelet (ie, clopidogrel and aspirin) and anticoagulation (ie, warfarin) medications. Furthermore, we highlight the currently known role of genetic variability in response to next-generation antiplatelet (prasugrel and ticagrelor) and anticoagulant (dabigatran) agents. While compelling evidence suggests that genetic variants are important determinants of antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy response, significant barriers to clinical implementation of pharmacogenetic testing exist and are described herein. In addition, we briefly discuss development of new diagnostic targets and therapeutic strategies as well as implications for enhanced patient care. In conclusion, pharmacogenetic testing can provide important information to assist clinicians with prescribing the most personalized and effective antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy. However, several factors may limit its usefulness and should be considered. PMID:25897256

  17. Antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in elective percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    ten Berg, Jurriën M; Plokker, HW Thijs; Verheugt, Freek WA

    2001-01-01

    Thrombosis plays a major role in acute vessel closure both after coronary balloon angioplasty and after stenting. This review will address the role of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy in preventing early thrombotic complications after percutaneous coronary intervention. The focus will be on agents that are routinely available and commonly used. PMID:11806786

  18. [Serious surgical complications associated with chronic anticoagulant therapy].

    PubMed

    Pitrák, V; Hadacová, I; Hochová, I; Hoch, J

    2001-06-01

    Chronic anticoagulant treatment is administered mostly for cardiological reasons. Cumarin derivatires are used in the majority of cases (Warfarin, Pelentan). It is necessary to monitor this treatment regularly and to control the dose according to the INR value. Different complications can occur; the haemorrhage represents a serious one. The authors discuss several aspects of anticoagulant therapy and possible prevention of the complications. The importance of the problems is demonstrated on the authors' clinical experience--two cases of haemorrhage after Warfarin administration simulating an acute surgical event. PMID:11482149

  19. Application of the theory of planned behavior to oral anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Burns, Sharita

    2009-03-01

    Anticoagulation control is imperative for individuals who are prescribed long-term oral anticoagulation therapy. Therapeutic international normalized ratios decrease the risk of the thromboembolic complications that are associated with oral anticoagulation therapy. Individuals on oral anticoagulation therapy are often asked to make lifestyle modifications that can become barriers to medication adherence. The application of the theory of planned behavior to oral anticoagulation therapy can be used to assist advanced practice nurses in assessing individuals for the perceived barriers or obstacles that might interfere with the behavioral changes necessary to successfully comply with the recommended treatment plan. PMID:19298315

  20. Emerging anticoagulant therapies for atrial fibrillation: new options, new challenges.

    PubMed

    Mangiafico, R A; Mangiafico, M

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common cardiac arrhythmia, is associated with an increased risk of stroke and systemic embolism. Oral anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), such as warfarin, has historically been the mainstay of long-term thromboprophylaxis in AF patients. However, although highly effective, VKAs have a number of limitations that make their use difficult and cumbersome in clinical practice. They have a slow onset and offset of action, narrow therapeutic window, marked dose-response variability, and multiple food and drug interactions, and require frequent coagulation monitoring and dose adjustments. To overcome VKA drawbacks, several new oral anticoagulants have been recently developed for use in AF, and three of them, the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran etexilate and the direct factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban and apixaban, have completed phase III trials. New agents have proven to be noninferior or superior to warfarin for AF-related stroke prevention, with similar or better safety profiles. These new drugs, with their predictable anticoagulant effect that allows for fixed dosing with no need for coagulation monitoring, have the potential to greatly simplify anticoagulation therapy for AF. Dabigatran etexilate and rivaroxaban are already approved in the United States and Europe for stroke prevention in nonvalvular AF, and dabigatran etexilate has entered current AF guidelines as an alternative to warfarin. However, some issues with new compounds are still unresolved, such as the lack of antidotes and standardized tests to measure drug activity. Active postmarketing monitoring surveillance of effectiveness and safety is required in the implementation of new anticoagulant therapies. PMID:22830344

  1. Worldwide management of oral anticoagulant therapy: the ISAM study.

    PubMed

    Pengo, Vittorio; Pegoraro, Cinzia; Cucchini, Umberto; Iliceto, Sabino

    2006-02-01

    A multicenter, observational, retrospective, cross-sectional study of patients, receiving oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) for stroke prophylaxis in chronic non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) was conducted in the US, Canada, France, Italy and Spain according to their predominant model of care [routine medical care (RMC) or Anticoagulation Clinic care (ACC)]. The study objectives were to assess anticoagulation control (time in target range), and to describe the features of the local model of care. Consecutive patients were recruited on the basis of a minimum of 60 days of oral anticoagulant treatment over a 12 month period, and clinic and physician details were captured by means of a structured face-to-face or telephone interview. Time in therapeutic range (TTR) was calculated by using linear interpolation between INR values. A total of 1511 patients were recruited, of whom 1445 were included in the analysis of TTR. TTR was higher in ACC (69.5% and 64.9% for Italy and Spain, respectively) with respect to RMC (58.1%, 62.8% and 59.3% for the US, Canada and France, respectively). Mean intervals between INR determinations were between 3 and 4 weeks. Dose changes in case of INR outside therapeutic range were more frequent in Spain and less frequent in France. Striking differences were observed in type of VKA used, specialists involved in patient management, and dosage instructions. Studying of anticoagulation management based on local models of care highlights important discrepancies among countries and suggests further standardization of the management of this important therapy is necessary. PMID:16475046

  2. The future prospects of pharmacogenetics in oral anticoagulation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Farhad; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2006-06-01

    Coumarins are the mainstay of oral anticoagulation for the treatment and prophylaxis of thromboembolic disorders. They have a narrow therapeutic index and regular monitoring is therefore required to avoid serious adverse effects. There is wide interindividual variability in dosage requirements, which makes anticoagulation response unpredictable. Current dosing titrations are haphazard and inconvenient and poor initial control leads to morbidity, and occasional mortality, because of bleeding and further thromboembolism. Recent discoveries have helped to characterize the factors that contribute to the interindividual variability in responses to coumarins. Patient and environmental factors that affect anticoagulation response to coumarins include age, body size, dietary vitamin K status, concurrent disease and drug interactions. More recently, single nucleotide polymorphisms in the 2C9 isoform of cytochrome P450 (CYP2C9) and vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) have been shown to make significant contributions to the variability in coumarin dosage requirements. Polymorphisms in other genes that mediate the actions of coumarins may also contribute to this variability. Racial and cultural differences influence dosage requirements, which can be explained, at least in part, by genetic and dietary factors. Incorporation of genetic and environmental factors could help in the prediction of more individualized loading and maintenance doses for safer anticoagulation therapy. PMID:16722840

  3. Safety of anticoagulation in the elderly: reasons for discontinuing therapy.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, P. A.; Crossley, D.; Taberner, D. A.; Fairweather, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have conducted a retrospective study on the reasons for discontinuing anticoagulants in 50 patients over the age of 75 years compared with 198 adults under 75 years to determine the safety of therapy in the elderly. Venous thromboembolism and arterial embolization were the most common indications for therapy in the elderly and the median duration of therapy in all patients was 7 months (9 days-22 years). There were no deaths attributable to anticoagulants. There was no significant difference in the proportion of elderly patients who stopped treatment because of bleeding compared with 198 patients under 75 years (5/50 (10%) vs 12/198 (6.1%), P = 0.26), nor in the rate of bleeding between the two groups (5/52.5 (9.5%) treatment-years vs 12/249 (4.8%) treatment-years, P = 0.15). This complication rate does not suggest that age per se is a risk factor in the use of oral anticoagulants. PMID:1461856

  4. Pharmacogenomics of Anti-platelet and Anti-coagulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fisch, Adam S.; Perry, Christina G.; Stephens, Sarah H.; Horenstein, Richard B.; Shuldiner, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Arterial thrombosis is a major component of vascular disease, especially myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. Current anti-thrombotic therapies such as warfarin and clopidogrel are effective in inhibiting cardiovascular events; however, there is great inter-individual variability in response to these medications. In recent years, it has been recognized that genetic factors play a significant role in drug response, and, subsequently, common variants in genes responsible for metabolism and drug action have been identified. These discoveries along with the new diagnostic targets and therapeutic strategies on the horizon hold promise for more effective individualized anti-coagulation and anti-platelet therapy. PMID:23797323

  5. Considerations for long-term anticoagulant therapy in patients with venous thromboembolism in the novel oral anticoagulant era

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Peter P

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients who have had a venous thromboembolic event are generally advised to receive anticoagulant treatment for 3 months or longer to prevent a recurrent episode. Current guidelines recommend initial heparin and an oral vitamin K antagonist (VKA) for long-term anticoagulation. However, because of the well-described disadvantages of VKAs, including extensive food and drug interactions and the need for regular anticoagulation monitoring, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have become an attractive option in recent years. These agents are given at fixed doses and do not require routine coagulation-time monitoring. The NOACs are discussed in this review with regard to the needs of patients on long-term anticoagulation. Methods Current guidelines from Europe and North America that refer to the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism are included, as well as published randomized Phase III clinical trials of NOACs. PubMed searches were used for sourcing case studies of long-term anticoagulant treatment, and results were filtered for human application and screened for relevance. Conclusion NOAC-based therapy showed a similar efficacy and safety profile to heparins/VKAs but without the need for regular anticoagulation monitoring or dietary adjustments, and can be taken as a fixed-dose regimen once or twice daily. This represents a significant step forward in facilitating the management of long-term anticoagulation therapy. Furthermore, in the EINSTEIN studies, improved patient satisfaction was documented with the NOAC rivaroxaban, which may result in better adherence to therapy and an overall reduction in the incidence of recurrent venous thromboembolism. PMID:26929637

  6. [Anticoagulant therapy in secondary prevention of coronary events].

    PubMed

    Bultas, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Secondary prevention of atherothrombotic events is the domain of antiplatelet therapy and according to present risk is used one drug strategy or combination of acetylsalicylic acid with ADP receptor blockers. The importance of the combination of dual antiplatelet therapy together with xabans or dabigatran was investigated in 6 clinical trials. Only one of them (ATLAS ACS 2-TIMI 51) indicated that treatment with small dose of rivaroxaban (2 × 2.5 mg) may be added to dual strategy of acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel. The risk of major bleeding event is increased and net clinical benefit is only about 0.5 % per year. Dual therapy with aspirin and prasugrel or tikagrelor is beneficial. In the second part of the review is discussed higher incidence of myocardial infarction in controlled group in the trial comparing treatment of dabigatran with warfarin. This relationship has not been resolved, however, in patients with higher risk of coronary events and indication of anticoagulant treatment with direct oral anticoagulants it is recommended to choose from xabans (apixaban and rivaroxaban). PMID:25692828

  7. Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Therapy in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mischke, Karl; Knackstedt, Christian; Marx, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Anticoagulation represents the mainstay of therapy for most patients with atrial fibrillation. Patients on oral anticoagulation often require concomitant antiplatelet therapy, mostly because of coronary artery disease. After coronary stent implantation, dual antiplatelet therapy is necessary. However, the combination of oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy increases the bleeding risk. Risk scores such as the CHA2DS2-Vasc score and the HAS-BLED score help to identify both bleeding and stroke risk in individual patients. The guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology provide a rather detailed recommendation for patients on oral anticoagulation after coronary stent implantation. However, robust evidence is lacking for some of the recommendations, and especially for new oral anticoagulants and new antiplatelets few or no data are available. This review addresses some of the critical points of the guidelines and discusses potential advantages of new anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation after stent implantation. PMID:22577538

  8. Sex Differences in Patients Receiving Anticoagulant Therapy for Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Molina, Angeles; Enea, Iolanda; Gadelha, Telma; Tufano, Antonella; Bura-Riviere, Alessandra; Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Bounameaux, Henri; González, José; Villalta, Jaume; Monreal, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE), the outcome during the course of anticoagulant therapy may differ according to the patient’s sex. We used the RIETE (Registro Informatizado Enfermedad TromboEmbólica) database to compare the rate of VTE recurrences, major bleeding, and mortality due to these events according to sex. As of August 2013, 47,499 patients were enrolled in RIETE, of whom 24,280 (51%) were women. Women were older, more likely presented with pulmonary embolism (PE), and were more likely to have recent immobilization but less likely to have cancer than men. During the course of anticoagulation (mean duration: 253 d), 659 patients developed recurrent deep vein thrombosis (DVT), 576 recurrent PE, 1368 bled, and 4506 died. Compared with men, women had a lower rate of DVT recurrences (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.67–0.91), a similar rate of PE recurrences (HR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.83–1.15), a higher rate of major bleeding (HR: 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09–1.35), and higher mortality due to PE (HR: 1.24; 95% CI: 1.04–1.47). On multivariable analysis, any influence of sex on the risk for recurrent DVT (HR: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.75–1.03), major bleeding (HR: 1.10; 95% CI: 0.98–1.24), or fatal PE (HR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.84–1.22) was no longer statistically significant. In conclusion, women had fewer DVT recurrences and more bleeds than men during the course of anticoagulation. These differences were not due to sex, but very likely to other patient characteristics more common in female patients and differences in treatment choice. PMID:25398066

  9. Role of Antiplatelet Therapy and Anticoagulation in Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Carazo, Matthew; Berger, Jeffrey S; Reyentovich, Alex; Katz, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the United States. The pathophysiology of heart failure involves the activation of complex neurohormonal pathways, many of which mediate not only hypertrophy and fibrosis within ventricular myocardium and interstitium, but also activation of platelets and alteration of vascular endothelium. Platelet activation and vascular endothelial dysfunction may contribute to the observed increased risk of thromboembolic events in patients with chronic heart failure. However, current data from clinical trials do not support the routine use of chronic antiplatelet or oral anticoagulation therapy for ambulatory heart failure patients without other indications (atrial fibrillation and/or coronary artery disease) as the risk of bleeding seems to outweigh the potential benefit related to reduction in thromboembolic events. In this review, we consider the potential clinical utility of targeting specific pathophysiological mechanisms of platelet and vascular endothelial activation to guide clinical decision making in heart failure patients. PMID:26501990

  10. [Gastrointestinal bleeding associated with NSAIDs, antiplatelet therapy and anticoagulant agent].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Angel

    2012-09-01

    Following the trends observed for the last 2-3 years, the most significant and recent advances in the area of gastrointestinal lesions associated with anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have focused on adverse effects in the distal intestine and on issues related to the toxicity associated with antiplatelet therapy. New data reinforce evidence that NSAIDs and antiplatelet therapy are associated with an increased risk of serious complications in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract, opening up several lines of research in prevention and therapy based on probiotics, antibiotics and mucosal protectants. The interaction between Helicobacter pylori infection and NSAIDs or aspirin remains controversial but a positive interaction between this bacterium and NSAIDs seems to be reinforced. Several systematic reviews confirm that the combination of gastrotoxic drugs significantly increases the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, which should reinforce existing prevention strategies, and that new anticoagulant agents do not appear to reduce the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Once gastrointestinal hemorrhage has occurred, several studies have indicated the need to implement simpler prognostic scales than those used today. Notable innovations are the development of a disposable endoscope for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding events and a promising new hemostatic technique, hemospray, applied locally over the bleeding lesion. PMID:23018006

  11. Anticoagulant therapy and its impact on dental patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Thean, D; Alberghini, M

    2016-06-01

    Several new oral anticoagulants have been studied in the past decade, and have now started to enter the market. These drugs are reported to be as effective as, or more effective than, warfarin. In Australia, the Therapeutic Goods Administration has approved dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. The use of these newer anticoagulants is likely to increase in time, and it is important for dentists to have a sound understanding of the mechanisms of action, reversal strategies, and management guidelines for patients taking oral anticoagulants. This article discusses the process of coagulation, available anticoagulants and their monitoring and reversal, and provides clinical advice on the management of patients on anticoagulants who require dental treatment. PMID:26042924

  12. Implant surgery and oral anticoagulant therapy: case report

    PubMed Central

    MIRANDA, M.; BOLLERO, P.; D’OVIDIO, N.; MARSANGO, V.; BARLATTANI, A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives. This work aims to assess the risks both thromboembolic that bleeding of a management protocol “non-conservative” in patients on oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) to be undergoing implant surgery. Materials and methods. We decided to take a surgical “non-conservative” protocol, to insert four implants in the aesthetic zone, without using flapless surgery and the surgical template. In accordance with the hematologist, the value of INR is lowered and warfarin was replaced with heparin low molecular weight, to have a better coagulation’s control. Results. The modern guidelines impose a protocol of conservative management in patients with OAT, with minimally invasive surgery, flapless, and use of surgical template to reduce the risk of uncontrolled bleeding. This, thanks to the team-work between dentist and hematologist, thanks to careful adjustment of INR and the use of local haemostatic agents, were not encountered any problems with bleeding or intra or postoperative. Conclusion. Surgical treatment of patients with OAT is a real problem for the oral surgeon, to treat every time in association with the hematologist. Applying this type of surgical procedure, different from today’s guidelines, in our experience there were no post-operative complications (bleeding or bleeding); osseointegration has not been compromised and the prosthetic rehabilitation was completed successfully. PMID:25694802

  13. Hemorrhagic complications of anticoagulant treatment: the Seventh ACCP Conference on Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Levine, Mark N; Raskob, Gary; Beyth, Rebecca J; Kearon, Clive; Schulman, Sam

    2004-09-01

    This chapter about hemorrhagic complications of anticoagulant treatment is part of the seventh ACCP Conference on Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy: Evidence Based Guidelines. Bleeding is the major complication of anticoagulant therapy. The criteria for defining the severity of bleeding varies considerably between studies, accounting in part for the variation in the rates of bleeding reported. The major determinants of vitamin K antagonist-induced bleeding are the intensity of the anticoagulant effect, underlying patient characteristics, and the length of therapy. There is good evidence that vitamin K antagonist therapy, targeted international normalized ratio (INR) of 2.5 (range, 2.0 to 3.0), is associated with a lower risk of bleeding than therapy targeted at an INR > 3.0. The risk of bleeding associated with IV unfractionated heparin (UFH) in patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) is < 3% in recent trials. This bleeding risk may increase with increasing heparin dosages and age (> 70 years). Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is associated with less major bleeding compared with UFH in acute VTE. UFH and LMWH are not associated with an increase in major bleeding in ischemic coronary syndromes, but are associated with an increase in major bleeding in ischemic stroke. Information on bleeding associated with the newer generation of antithrombotic agents has begun to emerge. In terms of treatment decision making for anticoagulant therapy, bleeding risk cannot be considered alone, ie, the potential decrease in thromboembolism must be balanced against the potential increased bleeding risk. PMID:15383476

  14. Practice points in gynecardiology: Abnormal uterine bleeding in premenopausal women taking oral anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Maas, Angela H E M; Euler, Mia von; Bongers, Marlies Y; Rolden, Herbert J A; Grutters, Janneke P C; Ulrich, Lian; Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin

    2015-12-01

    A growing number of premenopausal women are currently using antithrombotic and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy for various cardiovascular indications. These may induce or exacerbate abnormal uterine bleeding and more awareness and knowledge among prescribers is required. Heavy and irregular menstrual bleeding is common in women in their forties and may have a variety of underlying causes that require different treatment options. Thus using anticoagulants in premenopausal women demands specific expertise and close collaboration between cardiovascular physicians and gynecologists. In this article we summarize the scope of the problem and provide practical recommendations for the care for young women taking anticoagulants and/or (dual) antiplatelet therapy. We also recommend that more safety data on uterine bleeding with novel anticoagulants in premenopausal women should be obtained. PMID:26358933

  15. Hemorrhagic cholecystitis as a complication of anticoagulant therapy: role of CT in its diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Rajul; O'Malley, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Hemorrhage within the gallbladder lumen is a rare but potentially fatal complication of acute cholecystitis. Concomitant anticoagulant therapy increases the chances of hemorrhage. In this case report we describe one such case which showed active extravasation of the contrast into the lumen of the gallbladder. Early diagnosis of this potentially fatal condition is important to facilitate urgent surgical treatment. PMID:18629579

  16. How I treat patients with inherited bleeding disorders who need anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Martin, Karlyn; Key, Nigel S

    2016-07-14

    Situations that ordinarily necessitate consideration of anticoagulation, such as arterial and venous thrombotic events and prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation, become challenging in patients with inherited bleeding disorders such as hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and von Willebrand disease. There are no evidence-based guidelines to direct therapy in these patients, and management strategies that incorporate anticoagulation must weigh a treatment that carries a risk of hemorrhage in a patient who is already at heightened risk against the potential consequences of not treating the thrombotic event. In this paper, we review atherothrombotic disease, venous thrombotic disease, and atrial fibrillation in patients with inherited bleeding disorders, and discuss strategies for using anticoagulants in this population using cases to illustrate these considerations. PMID:27106121

  17. How I treat patients with inherited bleeding disorders who need anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Karlyn

    2016-01-01

    Situations that ordinarily necessitate consideration of anticoagulation, such as arterial and venous thrombotic events and prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation, become challenging in patients with inherited bleeding disorders such as hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and von Willebrand disease. There are no evidence-based guidelines to direct therapy in these patients, and management strategies that incorporate anticoagulation must weigh a treatment that carries a risk of hemorrhage in a patient who is already at heightened risk against the potential consequences of not treating the thrombotic event. In this paper, we review atherothrombotic disease, venous thrombotic disease, and atrial fibrillation in patients with inherited bleeding disorders, and discuss strategies for using anticoagulants in this population using cases to illustrate these considerations. PMID:27106121

  18. [Quality of life of patients with venous thromboses in different variants of anticoagulant therapy].

    PubMed

    Kalinin, R E; Suchkov, I A; Pshennikov, A S; Agapov, A B

    2016-01-01

    The CIVIQ questionnaire was used to evaluate quality of life of patients presenting with deep vein thrombosis of lower limbs in different variants of anticoagulant therapy. The study included a total of 170 patients who were depending on the variant of anticoagulant therapy subdivided into 3 groups: Group One (comprising 48 patients) taking rivaroxaban as monotherapy; Group Two (consisting of 73 subjects) receiving low molecular weight heparin (enoxaparin sodium) followed by adjusting the warfarin dose, and Group Three (including 49 patients) receiving low molecular weight heparin (enoxaparin sodium) followed by rivaroxaban. The total value of the level of quality of life in all groups showed a tendency towards restoration. However, patients taking warfarin during the follow-up period were found to have negative dynamics by the 6th month of treatment. It was revealed that quality of life on all parameters was higher in patients taking rivaroxaban and lower in those taking warfarin. The parameters of the physical component of health turned out to depend upon the degree of recanalization of the thrombus. After 6 months of anticoagulant therapy patients taking rivaroxaban (Groups One and Three) were found to have good recanalization in 87.5 and 87.7% of cases, respectively, while in Group Two being observed in 54.8% of patients only. Taking an anticoagulant at a fixed dose not requiring laboratory control (rivaroxaban) increases patient compliance, thus leading to improvement of both mental and social wellbeing. PMID:27336328

  19. Recurrent venous thromboembolism and abnormal uterine bleeding with anticoagulant and hormone therapy use.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Ida; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Middeldorp, Saskia; Levi, Marcel; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; van Bellen, Bonno; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A; Cohen, Alexander T; Trajanovic, Mila; Gebel, Martin; Lam, Phuong; Wells, Philip S; Prins, Martin H

    2016-03-17

    Women receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) require adequate contraception because of the potential for fetal complications. It is unknown whether the use of hormonal therapy, especially those containing estrogens, is associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) during anticoagulation. Despite the absence of data, World Health Organization guidelines state that use of estrogen-containing contraceptives confers an "unacceptable health risk" during established anticoagulation for VTE. We compared the incidences of recurrent VTE and abnormal uterine bleeding with and without concomitant hormonal therapy in women aged <60 years who were receiving anticoagulation with rivaroxaban or enoxaparin/VKA for confirmed VTE. Incidence densities in percentage per year were computed for the on and off estrogen-containing or progestin-only therapy periods. Cox regression models were fitted, with hormonal therapy (on vs off) as a time-dependent variable to derive the hazard ratio (HR) for the effects on recurrent VTE and abnormal uterine bleeding. In total, 1888 women were included. VTE incidence densities on and off hormonal therapy were 3.7%/year and 4.7%/year (adjusted HR, 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23-1.39), respectively, and were 3.7%/year and 3.8%/year, respectively, for estrogen-containing and progestin-only therapy. The adjusted HR for all abnormal uterine bleeding (on vs off hormonal therapy) was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.66-1.57). Abnormal uterine bleeding occurred more frequently with rivaroxaban than with enoxaparin/VKA (HR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.57-2.89). Hormonal therapy was not associated with an increased risk of recurrent VTE in women receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. The observed increased risk of abnormal uterine bleeding with rivaroxaban needs further exploration. PMID:26696010

  20. Recurrent venous thromboembolism and abnormal uterine bleeding with anticoagulant and hormone therapy use

    PubMed Central

    Lensing, Anthonie W. A.; Middeldorp, Saskia; Levi, Marcel; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; van Bellen, Bonno; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A.; Cohen, Alexander T.; Trajanovic, Mila; Gebel, Martin; Lam, Phuong; Wells, Philip S.; Prins, Martin H.

    2016-01-01

    Women receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) require adequate contraception because of the potential for fetal complications. It is unknown whether the use of hormonal therapy, especially those containing estrogens, is associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) during anticoagulation. Despite the absence of data, World Health Organization guidelines state that use of estrogen-containing contraceptives confers an “unacceptable health risk” during established anticoagulation for VTE. We compared the incidences of recurrent VTE and abnormal uterine bleeding with and without concomitant hormonal therapy in women aged <60 years who were receiving anticoagulation with rivaroxaban or enoxaparin/VKA for confirmed VTE. Incidence densities in percentage per year were computed for the on and off estrogen-containing or progestin-only therapy periods. Cox regression models were fitted, with hormonal therapy (on vs off) as a time-dependent variable to derive the hazard ratio (HR) for the effects on recurrent VTE and abnormal uterine bleeding. In total, 1888 women were included. VTE incidence densities on and off hormonal therapy were 3.7%/year and 4.7%/year (adjusted HR, 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23-1.39), respectively, and were 3.7%/year and 3.8%/year, respectively, for estrogen-containing and progestin-only therapy. The adjusted HR for all abnormal uterine bleeding (on vs off hormonal therapy) was 1.02 (95% CI, 0.66-1.57). Abnormal uterine bleeding occurred more frequently with rivaroxaban than with enoxaparin/VKA (HR, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.57-2.89). Hormonal therapy was not associated with an increased risk of recurrent VTE in women receiving therapeutic anticoagulation. The observed increased risk of abnormal uterine bleeding with rivaroxaban needs further exploration. PMID:26696010

  1. Andexanet: Effectively Reversing Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2016-06-01

    Despite direct oral anticoagulants becoming a mainstay of anticoagulant therapy, the effective, timely, and safe reversal of their anticoagulant effect remains challenging. Emerging evidence attests that andexanet, a recombinant and inactive variant of native factor X (FXa), competitively inhibits and counteracts the anticoagulant effect of many inhibitors of native activated FXa. PMID:27048885

  2. Intracerebral hemorrhage during treatment with oral anticoagulants. Risk factors, therapy and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ernestus, R I; Speder, B; Pakos, P; Hildebrandt, G; Klug, N

    1994-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) during oral anticoagulation is a serious complication, which is mostly fatal for the multimorbid patient. In the present retrospective study of 53 patients with ICH during treatment with a cumarin derivative (Phenoprocoumon, Marcumar), we investigated the relationship between therapy and preexisting parameters such as age, location, level of consciousness, additional bleeding risks, and the degree of anticoagulation, which were assumed to be of prognostic relevance. The therapeutic management of ICH during treatment with anticoagulants was determined predominantly by location of the hematoma, patient's age, and additional bleeding risks, but less by level of consciousness and initial thromboplastin time (Quick's test). As a consequence of the individual analysis of these 5 parameters, age over 60 years, location of hematoma in the midline or ventricles, coma, additional bleeding risks such as arterial hypertension and trauma, and Quick's test below 15% at the time of bleeding were supposed to be responsible for poor prognosis. Mortality increased with a rising number of poor prognostic factors, independently of surgical or conservative treatment. In consequence, prognosis of ICH during oral anticoagulation is predominantly influenced by the number of such disadvantageous indicators and only little by therapy. PMID:8053274

  3. Curative effect of mechanical heart valve replacement and anticoagulant therapy after surgery.

    PubMed

    Chuai, J B; Shi, L; Ma, X Y; Wu, D; Kang, K; Jiang, S L

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the curative effect of low-intensity anticoagulant therapy by observing the oral administration of warfarin (anticoagulant therapy) on patients who had undergone mechanical heart valve replacement (MHVR) surgery with subsequent anticoagulation complications. Fifty patients who underwent MHVR in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University and 52 patients in the Cardiovascular Surgery of Daqing Oilfield General Hospital between January 2013 and January 2016 were selected (63 males and 39 females, ages 26-77 years). They took warfarin after treatment and were followed-up by means of outpatient review and telephone after leaving the hospital. The effect of warfarin and the occurrence of anticoagulation complications were analyzed. The operations lasted 230±106 min, extracorporeal circulation for 110±50 min and aorta occlusion for 82±23 min. During post-operation 3 patients developed skin purpura and one patient died. During follow-up we found 3 cases of anemia caused by excessive menstruation, 4 cases of hematuresis, 3 cases of peated epistaxis, 1 case of gastrointestinal bleeding, 1 case of cerebral hemorrhage, 1 case of embolism in the lower limbs and 1 case of cerebral infarction, although they all improved or were totally cured. Therefore, the incidence of complications can be reduced significantly by the correct administration of warfarin as well as timely monitoring of interference factors after MHVR. PMID:27049085

  4. Fatal Events in Cancer Patients Receiving Anticoagulant Therapy for Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Farge, Dominique; Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Debourdeau, Philippe; Bura-Riviere, Alessandra; Rodriguez-Beltrán, Eva Maria; Nieto, Jose Antonio; Peris, Maria Luisa; Zeltser, David; Mazzolai, Lucia; Hij, Adrian; Monreal, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In cancer patients treated for venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), analyzing mortality associated with recurrent VTE or major bleeding is needed to determine the optimal duration of anticoagulation. This was a cohort study using the Registro Informatizado de Enfermedad TromboEmbólica (RIETE) Registry database to compare rates of fatal recurrent PE and fatal bleeding in cancer patients receiving anticoagulation for VTE. As of January 2013, 44,794 patients were enrolled in RIETE, of whom 7911 (18%) had active cancer. During the course of anticoagulant therapy (mean, 181 ± 210 days), 178 cancer patients (4.3%) developed recurrent PE (5.5 per 100 patient-years; 95% CI: 4.8–6.4), 194 (4.7%) had recurrent DVT (6.2 per 100 patient-years; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.3–7.1), and 367 (8.9%) bled (11.3 per 100 patient-years; 95% CI: 10.2–12.5). Of 4125 patients initially presenting with PE, 43 (1.0%) died of recurrent PE and 45 (1.1%) of bleeding; of 3786 patients with DVT, 19 (0.5%) died of PE, and 55 (1.3%) of bleeding. During the first 3 months of anticoagulation, there were 59 (1.4%) fatal PE recurrences and 77 (1.9%) fatal bleeds. Beyond the third month, there were 3 fatal PE recurrences and 23 fatal bleeds. In RIETE cancer patients, the rate of fatal recurrent PE or fatal bleeding was much higher within the first 3 months of anticoagulation therapy. PMID:26266353

  5. The New Oral Anticoagulants for the Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism: A New Paradigm Shift in Antithrombotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Galanis, Taki; Keiffer, Gina; Merli, Geno

    2014-01-01

    Background Several novel oral anticoagulants have been studied for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in different patient populations. Clinicians will increasingly encounter scenarios in which they must choose among these and conventional anticoagulants for the treatment of this potentially fatal condition. Objective To review the results of Phase III clinical trials that investigated the novel oral anticoagulants for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Potential advantages and disadvantages of these anticoagulant agents with respect to each other and conventional therapy will also be explored through a case-based approach. Methods A literature search in PubMed was conducted that identified Phase III clinical trials investigating the novel oral anticoagulant agents for the treatment of VTE. Results The new oral anticoagulant agents have been shown to be as safe and effective for the treatment of VTE as conventional therapies. Conclusions These novel, oral anticoagulant agents are legitimate options for the treatment of VTE. A careful assessment of a patient׳s comorbidities, medication use, and laboratory results should be undertaken before prescribing the new oral anticoagulant agents for patients with VTE. PMID:25352938

  6. Preferences for anticoagulation therapy in atrial fibrillation: the patients' view.

    PubMed

    Böttger, Björn; Thate-Waschke, Inga-Marion; Bauersachs, Rupert; Kohlmann, Thomas; Wilke, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Since the introduction of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs), besides vitamin-K antagonists, an additional option for stroke prevention of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is available. The objective of this study was to assess AF patients' preferences with regard to the attributes of these different treatment options. We conducted a multicenter study among randomly selected physicians. Preferences were assessed by computer-assisted telephone interviews. We used a discrete-choice-experiment (DCE) with four convenience-related treatment dependent attributes (need of bridging: yes/no, interactions with food/nutrition: yes/no, need of INR controls/dose adjustment: yes/no; frequency of intake: once/twice daily) and one comparator attribute (distance to practitioner: <1 km/>15 km). Preferences measured in the interviews were analyzed descriptively and based on a conditional logit regression model. A total of 486 AF patients (age: 73.9 ± 8.2 years; 43.2 % female; mean CHA2DS2-VASc: 3.7 ± 1.6; current medication: 48.1 % rivaroxaban, 51.9 % VKA) could be interviewed. Regardless of type of medication, patients significantly preferred the attribute levels (in order of patients' importance) "once daily intake" (Level: once = 1 vs. twice = 0; Coefficient = 0.615; p < 0.001), "bridging necessary" (yes = 1 vs. no = 0; -0.558; p < 0.001), "distance to practitioner of ≤1 km (>15 km = 0 vs. ≤1 km = 1; 0.494; p < 0.001), "interactions with food/nutrition" (yes = 1 vs. no = 0; -0.332; p < 0.001) and "need of INR controls/dose adjustment" (yes = 1 vs. no = 0; -0.127; p < 0.001). In our analyses, "once daily frequency of intake" was the most important OAC-attribute for patients' choice followed by "no bridging necessary" and "no interactions with food/nutrition". Thus, patients with AF seem to prefer treatment options which are easier to administer. PMID:26260625

  7. Quality of anticoagulation therapy in neurological patients in a tertiary care hospital in north India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhat; Kalita, J.; Misra, U.K.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: There is paucity of studies on the quality of anticoagulation in neurological patients from India. This study evaluates the quality of oral anticoagulation therapy in neurology patients. Methods: Consecutive patients attending a tertiary care neurology service in north India who were prescribed oral anticoagulant (OAC), were included. Their international normalized ratio (INR) values were prospectively monitored and the earlier INR values of the patients who were already on OAC were retrospectively analyzed. The patients with multi-organ dysfunction, pregnancy and those below 18 yr of age were excluded. The therapeutic INR range was defined as per standard recommendations. The level of anticoagulation, factors interfering with OAC and complications were noted. Results: The results were based on 77 patients with median age 40 yr. Fifty one patients received OAC for secondary stroke prevention, 23 for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) and three for deep vein thrombosis (DVT). A total 167.9 person-years of follow up was done with a median of 1.2 (0.3-9.3) years. Of the 1287 INR reports, 505 (39.3%) reports were in the therapeutic range, 496 (38.5%) were below and 282 (21.91%) were above the therapeutic level. Stable INR was obtained in 33 (42.86%) patients only. INR level was improved by dose adjustment in 20 (26%), drug modification in two (2.6%), and dietary adjustment in six (7.8%) patients. Three patients were sensitive and five were resistant to OAC. Complications were noted in 28 instances; thromboembolic in 16 and haemorrhagic stroke in 12. The overall complication rate was 16.7 per 100 person-years. Interpretation & conclusions: It may be concluded that stable therapeutic INR is difficult to maintain in neurological patients. Optimal modification of diet, drug and dose of oral anticoagulant may help in stabilization of INR. PMID:27377498

  8. Clinical effects of anticoagulant therapy in suspected acute myocardial infarction: systematic overview of randomised trials.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, R.; MacMahon, S.; Flather, M.; Baigent, C.; Remvig, L.; Mortensen, S.; Appleby, P.; Godwin, J.; Yusuf, S.; Peto, R.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Most randomised trials of anticoagulant therapy for suspected acute myocardial infarction have been small and, in some, aspirin and fibrinolytic therapy were not used routinely. A systematic overview (meta-analysis) of their results is needed, in particular to assess the clinical effects of adding heparin to aspirin. DESIGN: Computer aided searches, scrutiny of reference lists, and inquiry of investigators and companies were used to identify potentially eligible studies. On central review, 26 studies were found to involve unconfounded randomised comparisons of anticoagulant therapy versus control in suspected acute myocardial infarction. Additional information on study design and outcome was sought by correspondence with study investigators. SUBJECTS: Patients with suspected acute myocardial infarction. INTERVENTIONS: No routine aspirin was used among about 5000 patients in 21 trials (including half of one small trial) that assessed heparin alone or heparin plus oral anticoagulants, and aspirin was used routinely among 68,000 patients in six trials (including the other half of one small trial) that assessed the addition of intravenous or high dose subcutaneous heparin. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Death, reinfarction, stroke, pulmonary embolism, and major bleeds (average follow up of about 10 days). RESULTS: In the absence of aspirin, anticoagulant therapy reduced mortality by 25% (SD 8%; 95% confidence interval 10% to 38%; 2P = 0.002), representing 35 (11) fewer deaths per 1000. There were also 10 (4) fewer strokes per 1000 (2P = 0.01), 19 (5) fewer pulmonary emboli per 1000 (2P < 0.001), and non-significantly fewer reinfarctions, with about 13 (5) extra major bleeds per 1000 (2P = 0.01). Similar sized effects were seen with the different anticoagulant regimens studied. In the presence of aspirin, however, heparin reduced mortality by only 6% (SD 3%; 0% to 10%; 2P = 0.03), representing just 5 (2) fewer deaths per 1000. There were 3 (1.3) fewer

  9. Long-Term Anticoagulant Therapy of Patients with Venous Thromboembolism. What Are the Practices?

    PubMed

    Mahé, Isabelle; Sterpu, Raluca; Bertoletti, Laurent; López-Jiménez, Luciano; Mellado Joan, Meritxell; Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Ballaz, Aitor; Hernández Blasco, Luis Manuel; Marchena, Pablo Javier; Monreal, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines of antithrombotic therapy suggest early initiation of vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in non-cancer patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE), and long-term therapy with low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) for those with cancer. We used data from RIETE (international registry of patients with VTE) to report the use of long-term anticoagulant therapy over time and to identify predictors of anticoagulant choice (regarding international guidelines) in patients with- and without cancer. Among 35,280 patients without cancer, 82% received long-term VKA (but 17% started after the first week). Among 4,378 patients with cancer, 66% received long term LMWH as monotherapy. In patients without cancer, recent bleeding (odds ratio [OR] 2.70, 95% CI 2.26-3.23), age >70 years (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.06-1.24), immobility (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.93-2.19), renal insufficiency (OR 2.42, 95% CI 2.15-2.71) and anemia (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.65-1.87) predicted poor adherence to guidelines. In those with cancer, anemia (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.64-2.06), immobility (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.30-1.76) and metastases (OR 3.22, 95% CI 2.87-3.61) predicted long-term LMWH therapy. In conclusion, we report practices of VTE therapy in real life and found that a significant proportion of patients did not receive the recommended treatment. The perceived increased risk for bleeding has an impact on anticoagulant treatment decision. PMID:26076483

  10. Long-Term Anticoagulant Therapy of Patients with Venous Thromboembolism. What Are the Practices?

    PubMed Central

    Mahé, Isabelle; Sterpu, Raluca; Bertoletti, Laurent; López-Jiménez, Luciano; Mellado Joan, Meritxell; Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Ballaz, Aitor; Hernández Blasco, Luis Manuel; Marchena, Pablo Javier; Monreal, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines of antithrombotic therapy suggest early initiation of vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in non-cancer patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE), and long-term therapy with low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) for those with cancer. We used data from RIETE (international registry of patients with VTE) to report the use of long-term anticoagulant therapy over time and to identify predictors of anticoagulant choice (regarding international guidelines) in patients with- and without cancer. Among 35,280 patients without cancer, 82% received long-term VKA (but 17% started after the first week). Among 4,378 patients with cancer, 66% received long term LMWH as monotherapy. In patients without cancer, recent bleeding (odds ratio [OR] 2.70, 95% CI 2.26–3.23), age >70 years (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.06–1.24), immobility (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.93–2.19), renal insufficiency (OR 2.42, 95% CI 2.15–2.71) and anemia (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.65–1.87) predicted poor adherence to guidelines. In those with cancer, anemia (OR 1.83, 95% CI 1.64–2.06), immobility (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.30–1.76) and metastases (OR 3.22, 95% CI 2.87–3.61) predicted long-term LMWH therapy. In conclusion, we report practices of VTE therapy in real life and found that a significant proportion of patients did not receive the recommended treatment. The perceived increased risk for bleeding has an impact on anticoagulant treatment decision. PMID:26076483

  11. Clinical Outcomes of Anticoagulation Therapy in Patients With Symptomatic Spontaneous Isolated Dissection of the Superior Mesenteric Artery

    PubMed Central

    Han, Youngjin; Cho, Yong-Pil; Ko, Gi-Young; Seo, Dong Wan; Kim, Min-Ju; Kwon, Hyunwook; Kim, Hyangkyoung; Kwon, Tae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the clinical outcomes of long-term anticoagulation therapy in patients with symptomatic spontaneous isolated dissection of the superior mesenteric artery (SIDSMA) and to evaluate whether conservative treatment with anticoagulation therapy is a safe and effective treatment modality for these patients. In this single center, observational cohort study, data from a prospectively recruiting symptomatic SIDSMA registry, including demographics, risk factors of interest, clinical characteristics and outcomes, and initial and follow-up computed tomography angiography (CTA) findings, were analyzed retrospectively. During an 8-year period, a total of 52 consecutive patients who underwent conservative treatment with the use of long-term anticoagulation were included in this study. Clinical symptoms resolved within 11 days in all except 4 patients (7.7%); 3 received endovascular treatment for persistent symptoms and 1 received surgical repair. The mean duration of anticoagulation therapy was 9 (range: 3–60) months. A follow-up CTA showed complete remodeling in 20 (41.7%) patients, and the mean diameter and the incidence of false lumen thrombosis were also decreased significantly. There was no anticoagulation therapy-related mortality or morbidity except 2 (4.2%) minor bleeding complications, and no symptomatic recurrence or aggravation of the dissection occurred during the mean follow-up period of 47.5 (range: 10–97) months. The present study showed that long-term anticoagulation therapy could result in a high rate of complete remodeling during the natural course of symptomatic SIDSMA. Conservative treatment with long-term anticoagulation therapy could be an optimal treatment strategy for symptomatic SIDSMA. PMID:27100453

  12. Clinical Outcomes of Anticoagulation Therapy in Patients With Symptomatic Spontaneous Isolated Dissection of the Superior Mesenteric Artery.

    PubMed

    Han, Youngjin; Cho, Yong-Pil; Ko, Gi-Young; Seo, Dong Wan; Kim, Min-Ju; Kwon, Hyunwook; Kim, Hyangkyoung; Kwon, Tae-Won

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical outcomes of long-term anticoagulation therapy in patients with symptomatic spontaneous isolated dissection of the superior mesenteric artery (SIDSMA) and to evaluate whether conservative treatment with anticoagulation therapy is a safe and effective treatment modality for these patients.In this single center, observational cohort study, data from a prospectively recruiting symptomatic SIDSMA registry, including demographics, risk factors of interest, clinical characteristics and outcomes, and initial and follow-up computed tomography angiography (CTA) findings, were analyzed retrospectively.During an 8-year period, a total of 52 consecutive patients who underwent conservative treatment with the use of long-term anticoagulation were included in this study. Clinical symptoms resolved within 11 days in all except 4 patients (7.7%); 3 received endovascular treatment for persistent symptoms and 1 received surgical repair. The mean duration of anticoagulation therapy was 9 (range: 3-60) months. A follow-up CTA showed complete remodeling in 20 (41.7%) patients, and the mean diameter and the incidence of false lumen thrombosis were also decreased significantly. There was no anticoagulation therapy-related mortality or morbidity except 2 (4.2%) minor bleeding complications, and no symptomatic recurrence or aggravation of the dissection occurred during the mean follow-up period of 47.5 (range: 10-97) months.The present study showed that long-term anticoagulation therapy could result in a high rate of complete remodeling during the natural course of symptomatic SIDSMA. Conservative treatment with long-term anticoagulation therapy could be an optimal treatment strategy for symptomatic SIDSMA. PMID:27100453

  13. [Perioperative Management of Lung Cancer Patients with atrial fibrillation being treated by antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shinya; Kasai, Yoshitaka; Matsuura, Natsumi; Tarumi, Shintaro; Nakano, Jun; Okuda, Masaya; Goto, Masashi; Ryu, Dagu; Go, Tetsuhiko; Yokomise, Hiroyasu

    2015-04-01

    In an aging society, the high incidence of surgery for the patients with ischemic heart disease(IHD)or atrial fibrillation(Af) under antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy is a great problem. Interruption of antiplatelet or anticoagulant oral agents in the perioperative period may increase the risk of coronary or cerebral events. We retrospectively reviewed the surgical outcomes for lung cancer patients with IHD or Af. We reviewed 135 patients with lung cancer(41~88 years;97 men) who had preoperative oral administration of antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs for IHD or Af between 2005 and 2012 at 2 centers, and analyzed retrospectively the perioperative medications and complications. IHD, Af and vasospastic angina(VSA) were complicated in 94, 33 and 8 patients, respectively. Drugeluted and bare-metal stents had been placed in 18 and 19 patients. Oral agents were aspirin in 68 patients, ticlopidine in 10 patients, clopidogrel in 15 patients and warfarin in 25 patients. These agents were stopped 2 to 60 days before surgery. Perioperative heparinization was performed in 22 patients. Oral agents were restarted after confirmation of hemostasis and no need for further invasive treatment. The surgical procedures were lobectomy in 88 patients, segmentectomy in 19 and partial resection in 25. There were no hemorrhagic or thromboembolic complications in a perioperative period except 1 case of pulmonary hemorrhage and 1 case of cerebral infarction. No perioperative hospital death was documented. Short-term interruption of antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs before lung cancer surgery and heparinization was acceptable from the view of perioperative outcomes. PMID:25836998

  14. Safety assessment of anticoagulation therapy in patients with hemorrhagic cerebral venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Riasi, Hamid Reza; Noureddine, Ali; Masoudinezhad, Shahram; Yazdani, Siamak; Mirzae, Mohammad Mousavi; Razavi, Atena Sharifi; Ghandehari, Kosar

    2013-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation therapy is a routine treatment in patients with hemorrhagic cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). However, fear of hemorrhagic complications and deterioration course following anticoagulation often disturbs the responsible physician. Methods This was a Prospective observational study on consecutive CVT patients with hemorrhagic venous infarction or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) admitted in Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran, during 2006-2012. The diagnosis of CVT in suspected cases was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance venography (MRI/MRV), and computerized tomography (CT) angiography following established diagnostic criteria. Demographic data, clinical manifestations from onset to end of the observation period, location of thrombus, location and size of infarction and hemorrhage, and clinical course during treatment were recorded. Choice of the treatment was left to the opinion of the treating physician. Clinical course during 1 week of treatment was assessed based on the baseline modified National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. Three or more points decrease or increase of modified NIHSS after 1 week of treatment was considered as improvement or deterioration courses, respectively. Other clinical courses were categorized as stabilization course. Results 102 hemorrhagic CVT patients (80 females, 22 males) with mean age of 38.6 ± 8 years were prospectively investigated. Of the 102 hemorrhagic CVT patients in the acute phase, 52 patients (50.9%) were anticoagulated with adjusted dose intravenous heparin infusion and 50 cases (49.1%) received subcutaneous enoxaparin 1mg/Kg twice daily. Decreased consciousness had a significant effect on the clinical course of the patients (X2 = 9.493, df = 2, P = 0.009). Presence of SAH had no significant effect on the clinical course of our anticoagulated hemorrhagic CVT cases (X2 = 0.304, df = 2, P = 0.914). Extension of Infarction in more than two thirds of a hemisphere

  15. Characteristics of Symptomatic Intracranial Hemorrhage in Patients Receiving Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The first non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC) introduced to the market in Japan was dabigatran in March 2011, and three more NOACs, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, have since become available. Randomized controlled trials of NOACs have revealed that intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) occurs less frequently with NOACs compared with warfarin. However, the absolute incidence of ICH associated with NOACs has increased with greater use of these anticoagulants, and we wanted to explore the incidence, clinical characteristics, and treatment course of patients with NOACs-associated ICH. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the characteristics of symptomatic ICH patients receiving NOACs between March 2011 and September 2014. Results ICH occurred in 6 patients (5 men, 1 woman; mean ± SD age, 72.8 ± 3.2 years). Mean time to onset was 146.2 ± 111.5 days after starting NOACs. Five patients received rivaroxaban and 1 patient received apixaban. None received dabigatran or edoxaban. Notably, no hematoma expansion was observed within 24 h of onset in the absence of infusion of fresh frozen plasma, activated prothrombin complex concentrate, recombinant activated factor VIIa or hemodialysis. When NOAC therapy was initiated, mean HAS-BLED and PANWARDS scores were 1.5 ± 0.5 and 39.5 ± 7.7, respectively. Mean systolic blood pressure was 137.8 ± 15.9 mmHg within 1 month before spontaneous ICH onset. Conclusion Six symptomatic ICHs occurred early in NOAC therapy but hematoma volume was small and did not expand in the absence of infusion of reversal agents or hemodialysis. The occurrence of ICH during NOAC therapy is possible even when there is acceptable mean systolic blood pressure control (137.8 ± 15.9 mmHg) and HAS-BLED score ≤ 2. Even stricter blood pressure lowering and control within the acceptable range may be advisable to prevent ICH during NOAC therapy. PMID:26171862

  16. Discontinuation of Anticoagulant or Antiplatelet Therapy for Transrectal Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Biopsies: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Rowan G; Galvin, David J; Manecksha, Rustom P; Varadaraj, Haradikar; McDermott, TED; Grainger, Ronald; Lynch, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Historically, it was thought that hemorrhagic complications were increased with transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies (TRUS biopsy) of patients receiving anticoagulation/antiplatelet therapy. However, the current literature supports the continuation of anticoagulation/antiplatelet therapy without additional morbidity. We assessed our experience regarding the continuation of anticoagulation/antiplatelet therapy during TRUS biopsy. Materials and Methods A total of 91 and 98 patients were included in the anticoagulation/antiplatelet (group I) and control (group II) groups, respectively. Group I subgroups consisted of patients on monotherapy or dual therapy of aspirin, warfarin, clopidogrel, or low molecular weight heparin. The TRUS biopsy technique was standardized to 12 cores from the peripheral zones. Patients completed a questionnaire over the 7 days following TRUS biopsy. The questionnaire was designed to assess the presence of hematuria, rectal bleeding, and hematospermia. Development of rectal pain, fever, and emergency hospital admissions following TRUS biopsy were also recorded. Results The patients' mean age was 65 years (range, 52 to 74 years) and 63.5 years (range, 54 to 74 years) in groups I and II, respectively. The overall incidence of hematuria was 46% in group I compared with 63% in group II (p=0.018). The incidence of hematospermia was 6% and 10% in groups I and II, respectively. The incidence of rectal bleeding was similar in group I (40%) and group II (39%). Statistical analysis was conducted by using Fisher exact test. Conclusions There were fewer hematuria episodes in anticoagulation/antiplatelet patients. This study suggests that it is not necessary to discontinue anticoagulation/antiplatelet treatment before TRUS biopsy. PMID:22536465

  17. Safety of IVF under anticoagulant therapy in patients at risk for thrombo-embolic events.

    PubMed

    Yinon, Yoav; Pauzner, Rachel; Dulitzky, Mordechai; Elizur, Shai E; Dor, Jehoshua; Shulman, Adrian

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the safety of induction of ovulation and oocyte retrieval in patients at risk of thrombosis, necessitating treatment with anticoagulants. Twenty-four patients considered as high risk for a thromboembolic event underwent 73 IVF cycles and 68 oocyte retrieval procedures, and were treated concomitantly with anticoagulation therapy (low molecular weight heparin; LMWH). A subgroup of five patients considered at especially high risk for thrombosis was isolated. These patients were prepared for oocyte retrieval using a controlled spontaneous cycle. All these patients were programmed exclusively for surrogacy. Nineteen women underwent 49 cycles of ovulation induction with gonadotrophins. The average peak oestradiol concentration was 1791 +/- 1420 pg/ml with an average of 13.5 +/- 8.4 oocytes retrieved in each cycle. The five patients from the very high risk group underwent 24 cycles: the average peak oestradiol concentration was 163 +/- 98 pg/ml. In 18, an egg was retrieved and in 14, fertilization was achieved. No bleeding or thromboembolic complications were noted during treatment of both groups of patients. It is concluded that during induction of ovulation in patients at risk for thrombosis, the introduction of LMWH as a cycle protective treatment was not associated with any medical complication. The use of a controlled spontaneous cycle with LMWH is suggested in very high risk patients. PMID:16578908

  18. Enhancement of photodynamic therapy effect by temporally inhibiting infarction with anticoagulant heparin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liyong; Zhao, Hongyou

    2008-12-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is one of the tumor-targeting therapeutics, and has been an established medical practice in recent years. PDT mediates tumor destruction mainly by killing tumor cells directly and damaging the tumor-associated vasculature, also inducing an immune response against tumor cells. For the Photofrin-mediated PDT, Vascular system injury is the predominant destruction that results in vascular collapse and blood plasma leakage, then leading to tumor infarction. However, thrombus formation during PDT may influence the light transmission and oxygen supply. Also some tumor cells not killed by PDT may irritate angiogenesis, causing the tumor recurrence under the condition of hypoxia after PDT. In our work, to prolong coagulation and formation of thrombus, an anticoagulant heparin was employed before the Photofrin-mediated PDT. After being administrated both Photofrin and anticoagulant heparin, the BALB/c mice with the subcutaneous EMT6 mammary carcinomas model were exposed to laser (635nm). And then an enhanced effect was received. Our experiments indicated that its antitumor effect may be attributed to the improvement of the light delivery to the deep part of tumor and oxygen supply for PDT. The results suggested that heparin can be used to enhance the effect of PDT in a solid tumor treatment.

  19. Optimizing adjunctive antithrombotic and anticoagulant therapy in primary PCI for STEMI.

    PubMed

    Deharo, Pierre; Rahbi, Hazim; Cuisset, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The pharmacological management of patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) poses a significant challenge to the clinician. While mechanical reperfusion with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) has proved its superiority over fibrinolysis, the best antithrombotic strategy surrounding the procedure remains a matter of debate. Due to the high risk of bleeding induced by antithrombotic drugs, the pharmacological management of STEMI needs to focus on an optimal strategy that reduces the rate of coronary thrombotic events without leading to excess bleeding. Intravenous anticoagulants are recommended for all patients presenting with STEMI. Low molecular heparin may be preferred over unfractionated heparin in the setting of PPCI. Recent data suggest that anticoagulation with bivalirudin can be utilized as an alternative strategy to heparin and Gp2b3a but this should be limited to patients at high risk of bleeding. Dual antiplatelet therapy comprising aspirin and P2Y12 inhibitor represents the cornerstone treatment for STEMI. New P2Y12 inhibitors (prasugrel and ticagrelor) have restricted clopidogrel use to situations where these potent agents are contraindicated. Whilst all oral antiplatelet agents have been used with an initial loading dose in STEMI, the time of their administration remains a controversial issue. In everyday practice, intravenous antiplatelet agents appear less consensual. While Gp2b3a receptor inhibitors use has been restricted to bailout situations, the place of cangrelor is not yet defined in real life daily practice. PMID:26934662

  20. Monitoring anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Isert, Mecki; Miesbach, Wolfgang; Schüttfort, Gundolf; Weil, Yvonne; Tirneci, Vanessa; Kasper, Alexander; Weber, Adele; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard; Herrmann, Eva; Linnemann, Birgit

    2015-08-01

    Because of the possible interference of antiphospholipid antibodies (APL) with the phospholipid component of thromboplastin reagents, concerns have been raised about the validity of international normalized ratio (INR) testing to monitor anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). To investigate the reliability of the INR, we determined the INR using various prothrombin time (PT) assays and compared the results with those of a chromogenic factor X (CFX) assay. The study cohort consisted of 40 APS patients and 100 APL-negative patients who were on anticoagulant therapy for reasons other than APS. The agreement (i.e. the percentage of patients with a difference ≤0.5 INR units) between the PT-derived INR and CFX-derived INR equivalents was only moderate in both patient groups. The best agreement with CFX-derived INR equivalents was observed for the Thromborel S reagent in APS patients (69.1 %) and for Neoplastin Plus in APL-negative patients (72.0 %). Regarding the results for the point-of-care system CoaguChek XS, an agreement between the INR and the CFX-derived INR equivalent was less frequently observed in the APS patients (55.6 vs. 67.8 %; p = 0.050). When considering all 3058 pairs of INR tests within the international sensitivity index (ISI)-calibrated range of 1.5 to 4.5 s, we did not observe a higher variability of INR values in either the APS patient group or the subgroup of APS patients positive for lupus coagulants compared with the APL-negative controls. In conclusion, monitoring vitamin K antagonists (VKA) therapy with laboratory INR measurements seems to be suitable for the majority of APS patients. PMID:25859986

  1. Clinical Factors and Perioperative Strategies Associated with Outcome in Preinjury Antiplatelet and Anticoagulation Therapy for Patients with Traumatic Brain Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Chang Hwan; Lee, Soo Eon

    2015-01-01

    Objective Long-term oral anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy has been used with increasing frequency in the elderly. These patients are at increased risk of morbidity and mortality from expansion of intracranial hemorrhage. We conducted a single-center retrospective case control study to evaluate risk factors associated with outcomes and to identify the differences in outcome in traumatic brain injury between preinjury anticoagulation use and without anticoagulation. Methods A retrospective study of patients who underwent craniotomy or craniectomy for acute traumatic cerebral hemorrhage, between January 2005 and December 2014 was performed. Results A consecutive series of 50 patients were evaluated. The factors significantly differed between the two groups were initial Prothrombin Time-International Normalized Ratio, initial platelet count, initial Glasgow Coma Scale score, and postoperative intracranial bleeding. Mean Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were similar between the two groups. In the patient with low-energy trauma only, no significant differences in GOS score, postoperative bleeding and many other factors were observed. The contributing factors to postoperative bleeding was preinjury anticoagulation and its adjusted odds ratio was 12 [adjusted odds ratio (OR), 12.242; p=0.0070]. The contributing factors to low GOS scores, which mean unfavorable neurological outcomes, were age (adjusted OR, 1.073; p=0.039) and Rotterdam scale score for CT scans (adjusted OR, 3.123; p=0.0020). Conclusion Preinjury anticoagulation therapy contributed significantly to the occurrence of postoperative bleeding. However, preinjury anticoagulation therapy in the patients with low-energy trauma did not contribute to the poor clinical outcomes or total hospital stay. Careful attention should be given to older patients and severity of hemorrhage on initial brain CT. PMID:26539271

  2. Antiplatelet therapy strategies after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients needing oral anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Saint Etienne, Christophe; Angoulvant, Denis; Simeon, Edouard; Fauchier, Laurent

    2013-11-01

    Long-term oral anticoagulant (OAC) and dual-antiplatelet therapy are commonly needed in patients with atrial fibrillation and in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), respectively. The combination of atrial fibrillation and PCI is frequent, and leads to a dilemma for antithrombotic therapy, where risk of stroke or stent thrombosis must be balanced with bleeding risk. In the WOEST study, 573 patients on OAC undergoing PCI were randomly assigned to receive clopidogrel alone or clopidogrel plus aspirin. The primary end point was the occurrence of any bleeding episode during 1-year follow-up. Clopidogrel alone administered to patients taking OAC after PCI was associated with a significantly lower rate of bleeding complications than clopidogrel plus aspirin. Moreover, a composite secondary end point of death, myocardial infarction and stent thrombosis was significantly lower in the dual-therapy group compared with the triple-therapy group. In spite of its limitations, the WOEST study constitutes a major breakthrough, showing that long-term aspirin after PCI may be obsolete in certain circumstances. This needs to be confirmed in further studies. PMID:24180531

  3. Decision-making about the use of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulant therapies for patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Mark H

    2016-02-01

    Until recently, vitamin K antagonists, warfarin being the most commonly used agent in the United States, have been the only oral anticoagulant therapies available to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). In the last 5 years four new, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants, the so-called NOACs or novel oral anticoagulants, have come to market and been approved by the Federal Drug Administration. Despite comparable if not superior efficacy in preventing AF-related stroke, and generally lower risks of major hemorrhage, particularly intracranial bleeding, the uptake of these agents has been slow. A number of barriers stand in the way of the more widespread use of these novel agents. Chief among them is concern about the lack of antidotes or reversal agents. Other concerns include the need for strict medication adherence, since missing even a single dose can lead to a non-anticoagulated state; out-of-pocket costs for patients; the lack of easily available laboratory tests to quantitatively assess the level of anticoagulant activity when these agents are being used; contraindications to use in patients with severe chronic kidney disease; and black-box warnings about the increased risk of thromboembolic events if these agents are discontinued prematurely. Fortunately, a number of reversal agents are in the pipeline. Three reversal agents, idarucizumab, andexanet alfa, and aripazine, have already progressed to human studies and show great promise as either antidotes for specific drugs or as universal reversal agents. The availability of these reversal agents will likely increase the clinical use of the non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants. In light of the many complex and nuanced issues surrounding the choice of an optimal anticoagulant for any AF patient, a patient-centered/shared decision-making approach will be useful. PMID:26343041

  4. External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Patients on Anticoagulation Therapy: How Significant is the Bleeding Toxicity?

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Kevin S.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Liauw, Stanley L.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To characterize the bleeding toxicity associated with external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients receiving anticoagulation (AC) therapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 568 patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate who were treated with definitive external beam radiotherapy. Of these men, 79 were receiving AC therapy with either warfarin or clopidogrel. All patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Bleeding complications were recorded during treatment and subsequent follow-up visits. Results: With a median follow-up of 48 months, the 4-year actuarial risk of Grade 3 or worse bleeding toxicity was 15.5% for those receiving AC therapy compared with 3.6% among those not receiving AC (p < .0001). On multivariate analysis, AC therapy was the only significant factor associated with Grade 3 or worse bleeding (p < .0001). For patients taking AC therapy, the crude rate of bleeding was 39.2%. Multivariate analysis within the AC group demonstrated that a higher radiotherapy dose (p = .0408), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (p = 0.0136), and previous transurethral resection of the prostate (p = .0001) were associated with Grade 2 or worse bleeding toxicity. Androgen deprivation therapy was protective against bleeding, with borderline significance (p = 0.0599). Dose-volume histogram analysis revealed that Grade 3 or worse bleeding was minimized if the percentage of the rectum receiving >=70 Gy was <10% or the rectum receiving >=50 Gy was <50%. Conclusion: Patients taking AC therapy have a substantial risk of bleeding toxicity from external beam radiotherapy. In this setting, dose escalation or intensity-modulated radiotherapy should be used judiciously. With adherence to strict dose-volume histogram criteria and minimizing hotspots, the risk of severe bleeding might be reduced.

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Thrombolytic Therapy, Compared with Anticoagulants Therapy in the Treatment of Acute Myocardial Infarction in Albania

    PubMed Central

    Rama, Mirvete; Miraci, Mirela; Balla, Idriz; Petrela, Ela; Malaj, Ledjan; Koleci, Anjeza

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The study aim is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of thrombolytic treatment in acute MI comparing with anticoagulants therapy and between each other thrombolytic (SK, r-Pa). MATERIAL AND METHODS: We used a prospective registry of all patients admitted for acute myocardial infarction in intensive care units in Tirana. The average drugs cost was calculated for the hospitalization period in Albanian money (ALL). Survival and life quality were estimated by phone contact 1 year after acute MI. RESULTS: Anticoagulant group cost is 23865.3 ALL (170.5€), SK group cost is 54148.63 ALL (386.7€), r-Pa group has a cost of 92184.90 ALL (658.5€). In the group treated with SK the hospital survival is 100%, while in the control group 88.8%. Reteplase group has a lower period of stay in hospital than SK group 13.04 days vs. 17.97 days, mean age in group treated with r-Pa is 64.29 ± 10.03 approximate with anticoagulant group mean age 64.17 ± 11.08; differ significantly with SK group mean age 56.75 ± 10.04. Survival after 1 year was 96.4% for r-Pa and 96.9% SK. CONCLUSIONS: SK and r-Pa are successful thrombolytics with high effectiveness. It is gained a higher survival with the thrombolytic treatments. Reteplase is well tolerated in older patients than SK, is easier to apply than Streptokinase, but has higher cost. PMID:27275248

  6. A novel microfluidic anti-factor Xa assay device for monitoring anticoagulant therapy at the point-of-care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Leanne F.; Rainey, Paul; Castro-López, Vanessa; O'Donnell, James S.; Killard, Anthony J.

    2013-05-01

    Millions of patients worldwide are receiving anticoagulant therapy to treat hypercoagulable diseases. While standard testing is still performed in the central laboratory, point-of-care (POC) diagnostics are being developed due to the increasing number of patients requiring long-term anticoagulation and with a need for more personalized and targeted therapy. Many POC devices on the market focus on clot measurement, a technique which is limited in terms of variability, highlighting the need for more reliable assays of anticoagulant status. The anti-Xa assay, a factor specific optical assay, was developed to measure the extent to which exogenous factor Xa (FXa) is inhibited by heparinantithrombin complexes. We have developed a novel microfluidic device and assay for monitoring the effect of heparin anticoagulant therapy at the point-of-care. The assay which was also developed in our institute is based on the anti-Xa assay principle but uses fluorescence as the method of detection. Our device is a disposable laminate microfluidic strip, fabricated from the cyclic polyolefin (COP), Zeonor®, which is extremely suitable for application to fluorescent device platforms. We present data on the execution of the anti-Xa assay in this microfluidic format, demonstrating that the assay can be used to measure heparin in human plasma samples from 0 to 0.8 U/ml, with average assay reproducibility of 8% and a rapid result obtained within 60 seconds. Results indicate that with further development, the fluorogenic anti-Xa assay and device could become a successful method for monitoring anticoagulant therapy.

  7. Is Post-TIPS Anticoagulation Therapy Necessary in Patients with Cirrhosis and Portal Vein Thrombosis? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Jiang, Ming-Shan; Zhang, Hai-Long; Weng, Ning-Na; Luo, Xue-Feng; Li, Xiao; Yang, Li

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To determine whether posttransjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement anticoagulation therapy could benefit patients with cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis (PVT) from the perspective of a change in portal vein patency status and clinical outcomes. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from each patient. From October 2012 to February 2014, patients with cirrhosis and PVT who underwent TIPS placement were randomly assigned to the anticoagulation therapy or control group. All patients were followed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the TIPS procedure. Outcome measures were a change of portal vein patency status and clinical measures including gastrointestinal rebleeding, shunt dysfunction, hepatic encephalopathy, and survival. Student t test, χ(2) test, Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney U test, and logistical regression were applied where appropriate. Results A total of 64 patients were enrolled in the study, with 31 allocated to the anticoagulation group and 33 allocated to the control group. Overall, thrombi were improved in 61 patients (96.8%) after the procedure. PVT recanalization (ie, complete disappearance; reconstruction of cavernous transformation) was achieved in 26 patients (83.9%) in the anticoagulation therapy group and in 23 (71.8%) patients in tthe control group (P = .252). The presence of a superior mesenteric vein thrombus may help predict recanalization failure (unadjusted relative risk = 0.243; 95% confidence interval: 0.070, 0.843; P = .026). Clinical outcomes were also similar between the two groups. Conclusion Anticoagulation therapy may not be necessary in certain patients with PVT because TIPS placement alone can achieve a high persistent recanalization rate. (©) RSNA, 2015. PMID:26653681

  8. Intracerebral Hematoma Occurring During Warfarin Versus Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Haruhiko; Jimbo, Yasushi; Takano, Hiroki; Abe, Hiroshi; Sato, Masahito; Fujii, Yukihiko; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2016-07-15

    The neuroradiological findings and its outcomes of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) were compared between the non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC) therapy and warfarin therapy. In the latest 3 years, 13 cases of nonvalvular atrial fibrillation on NOAC therapy were admitted for ICH. For comparison, 65 age- and gender-comparable patients with ICH on warfarin therapy were recruited. Three NOACs had been prescribed: dabigatran (n = 4), rivaroxaban (n = 2), and apixaban (n = 7). The average ages were 76 ± 9 and 78 ± 8 years in the warfarin (n = 65) and NOAC groups (n = 13), respectively. There was no difference in the clinical features, including the CHADS2 score or HAS-BLED score: 2.62 ± 1.31 versus 2.62 ± 1.33, or 1.09 ± 0.43 versus 1.00 ± 0.41, for the warfarin and NOAC groups, respectively. The volume of ICH <30 ml was found in 84.6% of the patients on NOACs, but it was found in 53.8% of the patients on warfarin (p = 0.0106). The expansion of hematoma was limited to 7 patients (10.8%) of the warfarin group. A lower hospital mortality and better modified Rankin Scale were observed in the NOAC group than in the warfarin group: 1 (7.7%) versus 27 (41.5%; p = 0.0105) and 3.2 ± 1.4 versus 4.5 ± 1.6 (p = 0.0057), respectively. In conclusion, ICH on NOAC therapy had smaller volume of hematoma with reduced rate of expansion and decreased mortality compared with its occurrence on warfarin. PMID:27289294

  9. Profile and anticoagulation outcomes of patients on warfarin therapy in an urban hospital in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hellenberg, Derek A.; Cupido, Clint S.; Jaeger, Cilia

    2016-01-01

    Background Warfarin is the most frequently used oral anticoagulant worldwide and it is the oral anticoagulant of choice in South Africa for reducing thrombosis-related morbidity and mortality. However, the safety and efficacy of warfarin therapy depends mainly on careful monitoring and maintenance of the international normalised ratio (INR) within an optimal therapeutic range. Aim The aim of this study was to describe the profile and the anticoagulation outcomes of patients on warfarin therapy in a major warfarin clinic in the Western Cape Province of South Africa. Setting Victoria Hospital - a district hospital in Cape Town. Methods A cross sectional review of clinical records of patients on warfarin therapy who attended the INR clinic from 01 January 2014 to 30 June 2014 was done. Data analysis was done with STATA to generate appropriate descriptive data. Results Our study showed that atrial fibrillation (AF) was the commonest indication for warfarin use in this study and hypertension was the commonest comorbidity among these patients. Only 48.5% achieved target therapeutic range; 51.5% were out-of-range. There was a significant association between alcohol consumption and poor anticoagulation outcomes (p-value < 0.022). Anticoagulation outcomes were better among the older age groups, male patients and in those with AF. The prevalence of thrombotic events while on warfarin treatment was 2.2%, while prevalence of haemorrhagic events was 14%. Most of the patients with bleeding events were on concurrent use of warfarin and other medications with potential drug interactions. Conclusion In our study, patients who achieved target therapeutic control were less than the acceptable 60%. PMID:27247158

  10. Management of anticoagulant therapy during pregnancy in patients with prosthetic heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, B. Stephen; Braimbridge, Mark V.

    1971-01-01

    We describe two patients with Starr-Edwards mitral valve replacements who underwent pregnancy on oral anticoagulants and who were successfully delivered of live babies. The literature on pregnancy with prosthetic heart valves is reviewed. It is suggested that properly controlled oral anticoagulation should be continued until the onset of labour; the anticoagulant effect should then be reversed by an intravenous infusion of fresh-frozen plasma and the patient maintained on intravenous heparin injections six-hourly. Oral anticoagulants should be restarted immediately after delivery and the heparin withdrawn only when their effect has been re-established. PMID:5576538

  11. Use of Oral Anticoagulation Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation after Stroke: Results from a Nationwide Registry

    PubMed Central

    Jespersen, Stine Funder; Christensen, Louisa M.; Christensen, Anders; Christensen, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Background. The knowledge is still sparse about patient related factors, influencing oral anticoagulation therapy (OAC) rates, in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Aims. To assess the use of OAC in ischemic stroke patients diagnosed with AF and to identify patient related factors influencing the initiation of OAC. Methods. In the nationwide Danish Stroke Registry we identified 55,551 patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke from 2003 to 2011. Frequency analysis was used to assess the use of OAC in patients with AF, and logistic regression was used to determine independent predictors of OAC. Results. 17.1% (n = 9,482) of ischemic stroke patients had AF. OAC prescription rates were increasing, and in 2011 46.6% were prescribed OAC, 42.5% had a contraindication, and 3.7% were not prescribed OAC without a stated contraindication. Younger age, less severe stroke, and male gender were positive predictors of OAC, while excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, and institutionalization were negative predictors of OAC (P values < 0.05). Conclusions. Advanced age, severe stroke, female gender, institutionalization, smoking, and excessive alcohol consumption were associated with lower OAC rates. Contraindications were generally present in patients not in therapy, and the assumed underuse of OAC may be overestimated. PMID:24349774

  12. A Proposal for an Individualized Pharmacogenetic-Guided Warfarin Dosage Regimen for Puerto Rican Patients Commencing Anticoagulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Luis Ángel Bermúdez

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin is the current standard of care in oral anticoagulation therapy. It is commonly prescribed to treat venous thromboembolism, pulmonary embolism, acute myocardial infarction, and to decrease the risk of stroke in atrial fibrillation. Warfarin therapy is challenging because of marked and often unpredictable inter-individual dosing variations that effectively reach and maintain adequate anticoagulation. Several researchers have developed pharmacogenetic-guided maintenance dose algorithms that incorporate genetics and individual patient characteristics. However, there is limited information available concerning dosing during warfarin initiation. This is considered the most clinically challenging therapeutic phase. In such, the risk of recurrent thromboembolism and hemorrhage are elevated. The objective of this retrospective study is to predict the individual initial doses for Puerto Rican patients (n=175) commencing anticoagulation therapy at Veterans Affairs Caribbean Healthcare System (VACHS) using pharmacogenetic/pharmacokinetic-driven model. A pharmacogenetic driven model (R2=0.4809) was developed in Puerto Rican patients and combined with pharmacokinetic formulas that enabled us to predict the individual initial doses for patients (n=121) commencing anticoagulation therapy. WinNonlin® pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic simulations were carried out to determine the predictability of this model. This model demonstrated promising results with few (n=10) simulations outside of their respective therapy range. A customized pharmacogenetic-based warfarin maintenance dose algorithm (R2=0.7659) was developed in a derivation cohort of 131 patients. The predictability of this developed pharmacogenetic algorithm was compared with the International Warfarin Pharmacogenomics Consortium (IWPC) algorithm and it demonstrated superior predictability within our study population. PMID:25285240

  13. Oral Anticoagulant Therapy and Bleeding Events with Vitamin K Antagonists in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation in a Hungarian County Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Laszlo; Dani, Győző; Vendrey, Robert; Paragh, György; Katona, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitamin K antagonists, despite their tight therapeutic spectrum and the fear of bleeding complications, were long the most important drugs used in anticoagulant therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of anticoagulant therapy and its relation with bleedings in everyday clinical practice. Material/Methods We analyzed the data of 272 patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation treated in our county hospital using retrospective data collection of the last 1008±384 days. The INR (International Normalized Ratio) values and the time in therapeutic range (TTR) were analyzed. We asked patients about bleeding complications and searched the medical records. Results The TTR proved to be 64% and there was no statistically significant difference between that of 252 (92.7%) patients taking acenocoumarol and 20 (7.3%) on warfarin. Analyzing various factors leading to TTR under 70%, we found that none of them have a significant impact. Significantly more bleeding events occurred in the first 3 months after the initiation of anticoagulant therapy and in patients with TTR under 70%, but the latter was not significant after adjustment for factors influencing bleeding (OR 1.607, CI 0.571–4.522, p=0.392). Conclusions Although the present study’s TTR values were similar to those found in the warfarin branch of various large-scale international trials and in real-life settings, further improvement of vitamin K antagonist therapy are necessary. As the possibilities for this are limited, we believe that the new type anticoagulant agents have a place in everyday clinical practice. PMID:25686556

  14. Protein C deficiency related obscure gastrointestinal bleeding treated by enteroscopy and anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Fan; Tsang, Yuk-Ming; Teng, Chung-Jen; Chung, Chen-Shuan

    2015-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommonly encountered and difficult-to-treat clinical problem in gastroenterology, but advancements in endoscopic and radiologic imaging modalities allow for greater accuracy in diagnosing obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Ectopic varices account for less than 5% of all variceal bleeding cases, and jejunal variceal bleeding due to extrahepatic portal hypertension is rare. We present a 47-year-old man suffering from obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed multiple vascular tufts around the proximal jejunum but no evidence of cirrhosis, and a visible hypodense filling defect suggestive of thrombus was visible in the superior mesenteric vein. Enteroscopy revealed several serpiginous varices in the proximal jejunum. Serologic data disclosed protein C deficiency (33.6%). The patient was successfully treated by therapeutic balloon-assisted enteroscopy and long-term anticoagulant therapy, which is normally contraindicated in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Diagnostic modalities for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, such as capsule endoscopy, computed tomography enterography, magnetic resonance enterography, and enteroscopy, were also reviewed in this article. PMID:25624741

  15. Four Thrombotic Events Over 5 Years, Two Pulmonary Emboli and Two Deep Venous Thrombosis, When Testosterone-HCG Therapy Was Continued Despite Concurrent Anticoagulation in a 55-Year-Old Man With Lupus Anticoagulant

    PubMed Central

    Glueck, Charles J.; Lee, Kevin; Prince, Marloe; Jetty, Vybhav; Shah, Parth; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: When exogenous testosterone or treatments to elevate testosterone (human chorionic gonadotropin [HCG] or Clomid) are prescribed for men who have antecedent thrombophilia, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism often occur and may recur despite adequate anticoagulation if testosterone therapy is continued. Case Presentation: A 55-year-old white male was referred to us because of 4 thrombotic events, 3 despite adequate anticoagulation over a 5-year period. We assessed interactions between thrombophilia, exogenous testosterone therapy, and recurrent thrombosis. In 2009, despite low-normal serum testosterone 334 ng/dL (lower normal limit [LNL] 300 ng/dL), he was given testosterone (TT) cypionate (50 mg/week) and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG; 500 units/week) for presumed hypogonadism. Ten months later, with supranormal serum T (1385 ng/dL, upper normal limit [UNL] 827 ng/dL) and estradiol (E2) 45 pg/mL (UNL 41 pg/mL), he had a pulmonary embolus (PE) and was then anticoagulated for 2 years (enoxaparin, then warfarin). Four years later, on TT-HCG, he had his first deep venous thrombosis (DVT). TT was stopped and HCG continued; he was anticoagulated (enoxaparin, then warfarin, then apixaban, then fondaparinux). One year after his first DVT, on HCG, still on fondaparinux, he had a second DVT (5/315), was anticoagulated (enoxaparin + warfarin), with a Greenfield filter placed, but 8 days later had a second PE. Thrombophilia testing revealed the lupus anticoagulant. After stopping HCG, and maintained on warfarin, he has been free of further DVT-PE for 9 months. Conclusion: When DVT-PE occur on TT or HCG, in the presence of thrombophilia, TT-HCG should be stopped, lest DVT-PE reoccur despite concurrent anticoagulation. PMID:27536705

  16. Patients’ perspectives regarding long-term warfarin therapy and the potential transition to new oral anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gebler-Hughes, Elizabeth S.; Kemp, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To examine patients’ perspectives regarding long-term vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy and the potential transition to new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) such as dabigatran and rivaroxaban, and to determine if factors such as residential location affect these opinions. Design, setting and participants: Patients on VKA therapy for at least 12 weeks completed a questionnaire specifically designed for the study. They were recruited while attending point-of-care international normalized ratio (INR) testing at six South Australian general practice clinics during the period July–September 2013. Main outcome measures: Opinions of current VKA therapy, level of awareness of NOACs, and ratings of potential benefits and deterrents of transition to NOACs were sought. Results: Data from 290 participants were available for analysis (response rate 95.4%). The majority of the sample (79.5%, 229/288) were either satisfied or very satisfied with current VKA therapy. The mean score for the potential benefits of transition to NOACs was 7.6 (±4.2) out of a possible 20, which was significantly lower than the mean score 10.9 (±4.5) for the perceived deterrents to transition (p < 0.001). Rural patients (82.0%, 82/100) were significantly more likely (p = 0.001) to have not heard of NOACs than metropolitan patients (50.3%, 95/189) and also perceived significant less benefits in a transition to NOACs (p = 0.001). Conclusion: When considering potential transition from VKAs to NOACs it is important for prescribers to consider that some patients, in particular those from a rural location, may not perceive a significant benefit in transitioning or may have particular concerns in this area. PMID:25436104

  17. Whose preferences should be elicited for use in health-care decision-making? A case study using anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Mott, David John; Najafzadeh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The question of whose preferences to elicit in health-state valuation has been widely discussed in the literature. The importance of this debate lies in the fact that health-state utility values are used in health technology assessment (HTA); therefore, an individual's preferences can influence decision-making. If preferences differ across groups, making decisions based on one group's preferences may be suboptimal for the other. Preferences for benefits, risks, experiences and health states associated with anticoagulant therapies have been elicited by researchers due to the underutilization of warfarin and the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants. The majority of existing studies elicit preferences from patient populations as opposed to other stakeholders such as the general public. This paper extends the preference debate by using this clinical area as a case study, with a particular focus on HTA guidelines and the recent advocacy of the use of preference information in benefit-risk assessments. PMID:26560704

  18. Can the vicious cycle of obscure or intractable gastrointestinal bleeding be broken in patients with atrial fibrillation subject to anticoagulant therapy?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, Diego; Martín-Yuste, Victoria; Feu, Faust; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Freixa, Xavier; Regueiro, Ander; Sabaté, Manel

    2014-05-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding of obscure origin or with an intractable cause is particularly common in patients with atrial fibrillation subject to oral anticoagulant therapy. This condition is highly recurrent and therefore gives rise to high morbidity and mortality rates, thus entailing a vicious cycle that is difficult to solve.Percutaneous left atrial appendage closure has become a therapeutic alternative for patients with atrial fibrillation and a contraindication for oral anticoagulation. This technique would allow the discontinuation of oral anticoagulants, thus helping to reduce the risk for gastrointestinal bleeding, and would also be protective against embolic events in this group of patients, thereby eventually breaking this vicious cycle.We report our experience with percutaneous left atrial appendage closure in the management of patients with atrial fibrillation who are subject to oral anticoagulation therapy and suffer from obscure or intractable gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25287239

  19. Endoscopy in patients on antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, including direct oral anticoagulants: British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Veitch, Andrew M; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Gershlick, Anthony H; Boustiere, Christian; Baglin, Trevor P; Smith, Lesley-Ann; Radaelli, Franco; Knight, Evelyn; Gralnek, Ian M; Hassan, Cesare; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    The risk of endoscopy in patients on antithrombotics depends on the risks of procedural haemorrhage versus thrombosis due to discontinuation of therapy. P2Y12 receptor antagonists (clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor) For low-risk endoscopic procedures we recommend continuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists as single or dual antiplatelet therapy (low quality evidence, strong recommendation); For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at low thrombotic risk, we recommend discontinuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists five days before the procedure (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). In patients on dual antiplatelet therapy, we suggest continuing aspirin (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at high thrombotic risk, we recommend continuing aspirin and liaising with a cardiologist about the risk/benefit of discontinuation of P2Y12 receptor antagonists (high quality evidence, strong recommendation). Warfarin The advice for warfarin is fundamentally unchanged from British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) 2008 guidance. Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC) For low-risk endoscopic procedures we suggest omitting the morning dose of DOAC on the day of the procedure (very low quality evidence, weak recommendation); For high-risk endoscopic procedures, we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken ≥48 h before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). For patients on dabigatran with CrCl (or estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) of 30–50 mL/min we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken 72 h before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). In any patient with rapidly deteriorating renal function a haematologist should be consulted (low quality evidence, strong recommendation). PMID:26873868

  20. Endoscopy in patients on antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, including direct oral anticoagulants: British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Veitch, Andrew M; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Gershlick, Anthony H; Boustiere, Christian; Baglin, Trevor P; Smith, Lesley-Ann; Radaelli, Franco; Knight, Evelyn; Gralnek, Ian M; Hassan, Cesare; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-04-01

    The risk of endoscopy in patients on antithrombotics depends on the risks of procedural haemorrhage vs. thrombosis due to discontinuation of therapy. P2Y12 receptor antagonists (clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor): For low-risk endoscopic procedures we recommend continuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists as single or dual antiplatelet therapy (low quality evidence, strong recommendation);For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at low thrombotic risk, we recommend discontinuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists five days before the procedure (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). In patients on dual antiplatelet therapy, we suggest continuing aspirin (low quality evidence, weak recommendation).For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at high thrombotic risk, we recommend continuing aspirin and liaising with a cardiologist about the risk/benefit of discontinuation of P2Y12 receptor antagonists (high quality evidence, strong recommendation). Warfarin: The advice for warfarin is fundamentally unchanged from BSG 2008 guidance. Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC): For low-risk endoscopic procedures we suggest omitting the morning dose of DOAC on the day of the procedure (very low quality evidence, weak recommendation). For high-risk endoscopic procedures, we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken ≥ 48 hours before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). For patients on dabigatran with CrCl (or estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) of 30 - 50 mL/min we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken 72 hours before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). In any patient with rapidly deteriorating renal function a haematologist should be consulted (low quality evidence, strong recommendation). PMID:26890676

  1. Impact of renal function deterioration on adverse events during anticoagulation therapy using non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Koji; Aiba, Takeshi; Arihiro, Shoji; Watanabe, Makoto; Kokubo, Yoshihiro; Ishibashi, Kohei; Hirose, Sayako; Wada, Mitsuru; Nakajima, Ikutaro; Okamura, Hideo; Noda, Takashi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Kamakura, Shiro; Shimizu, Wataru; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Kazunori; Kusano, Kengo

    2016-08-01

    Renal function is crucial for patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) using non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOAC). The incidence of renal function deterioration during anticoagulation therapy and its impact of adverse events are unknown. In 807 consecutive NVAF patients treated with NOAC and with estimated creatinine clearance (eCCr) ≥ 50 ml/min (mean age 68 ± 11 years, mean CHADS2 score = 1.8 ± 1.4, CHA2DS2-VASc score = 2.8 ± 1.8, HAS-BLED score = 1.7 ± 1.1), we analyzed the time course of renal function and clinical outcomes, and compared these with the data of general Japanese inhabitants from the Suita Study (n = 2140). Of the 807 patients, 751 (93 %) maintained eCCr ≥ 50 ml/min (group A) whereas the remaining 56 (7 %) fell into the eCCr < 50 ml/min (group B) during the 382 ± 288 days of follow-up. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that advanced age, lower body weight, and congestive heart failure were independent predictors for renal function deterioration in patients with eCCr ≥ 50 ml/min at baseline. Major and/or minor bleedings were more commonly observed in group B than in group A (21 vs. 8 %; P = 0.0004). The CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, and HAS-BLED scores were also significant predictors of renal function deterioration (P < 0.0001). The incidences of renal function deterioration were 1.4, 3.4, 10.5 and 11.7 % in patients with CHADS2 score of 0, 1, 2 and ≥3, respectively. As to CHA2DS2-VASc score, renal function deterioration occurred in 0, 1.7, 9.8 and 15.0 % with a score of 0, 1-2, 3-4 and ≥5, respectively. In the Suita Study of the general population, on the other hand, 122 of 2140 participants with eCCr ≥ 50 ml/min at baseline (5.7 %) fell into the eCCr < 50 ml/min during about 2 years. The incidence of renal function deterioration increased with the CHADS2 score in the general population as well as in our patients. Renal function deterioration was

  2. Effects of Oral Anticoagulant Therapy in Medical Inpatients ≥65 Years With Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Bo, Mario; Sciarrillo, Irene; Li Puma, Federica; Badinella Martini, Marco; Falcone, Yolanda; Iacovino, Marina; Grisoglio, Enrica; Menditto, Elena; Fonte, Gianfranco; Brunetti, Enrico; Maggiani, Guido; Isaia, Giovanni Carlo; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2016-02-15

    In this retrospective cohort observational study, we investigated mortality, ischemic, and hemorrhagic events in patients ≥65 years with atrial fibrillation consecutively discharged from an Acute Geriatric Ward in the period 2010 to 2013. Stroke and bleeding risk were evaluated using CHA2DS2-VASC (congestive heart failure/left ventricular dysfunction, hypertension, aged ≥75 years, diabetes mellitus, stroke/transient ischemic attack/systemic embolism, vascular disease, aged 65 to 74 years, gender category) and HAS-BLED (hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function, stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile international normalized ratio, elderly, drugs/alcohol concomitantly) scores. Co-morbidity, cognitive status, and functional autonomy were evaluated using standardized scales. Independent associations among clinical variables, including use of vitamin K antagonist-based oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT), all-cause mortality, and fatal and nonfatal ischemic and hemorrhagic events, were evaluated. Further clinical outcomes comparison between patients treated with OAT and those untreated was performed after adjustment for significant differences in patient baseline characteristics with propensity score matching. Of 980 patients discharged (mean age 83 years, 60% women, roughly 30% cognitively impaired or functionally dependent, mean CHA2DS2-VASC and HAS-BLED scores 4.8 and 2.1, respectively), 505 (51.5%) died during a mean follow-up period of 571 days; ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke occurred in 82 (12.3%) and 13 patients (1.3%), respectively, and major bleedings in 43 patients (4.4%). Vitamin K antagonists' use was independently associated with reduced mortality (odds ratio 0.524) and with a nonsignificant reduction in incidence of ischemic stroke, without excess in bleeding risk. Similar findings were observed in the 2 propensity score-matched cohorts of patients. In conclusion, among vulnerable patients with atrial fibrillation ≥65 years with high

  3. Are there a guidelines for implantable spinal cord stimulator therapy in patients using chronic anticoagulation therapy? - A review of decision-making in the high-risk patient

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Ramsis F.; Lissounov, Alexei; Candido, Kenneth D.; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulators (SCSs) are gaining increasing indications and utility in an expanding variety of clinical conditions. Complications and initial expenses have historically prevented the early use of SCS therapy despite ongoing efforts to educate and promote its utilization. At present, there exists no literature evidence of SCS implantation in a chronically anticoagulated patient, and neuromodulation manufacturers are conspicuously silent in providing warnings or recommendations in the face of anticoagulant use chronically. It would appear as through these issues demand scrutiny and industry as well as neuromodulation society advocacy and support in terms of the provision of coherent guidelines on how to proceed. Case Description: A 79-year-old male returned to the neurosurgical clinic with persistent low back pain and leg heaviness due to adjacent level degenerative spondylosis and severe thoracic spinal stenosis. The patient had a notable history of multiple comorbidities along with atrial fibrillation requiring chronic anticoagulation. On initial presentation, he was educated with three choice of conservative medical therapy, intrathecal drug delivery system implantation, or additional lumbar decompression laminectomy with instrumented fusion of T10-L3 and a palliative surgical lead SCS implantation. Description: A 79-year-old male returned to the neurosurgical clinic with persistent low back pain and leg heaviness due to adjacent level degenerative spondylosis and severe thoracic spinal stenosis. The patient had a notable history of multiple comorbidities along with atrial fibrillation requiring chronic anticoagulation. On initial presentation, he was educated with three choice of conservative medical therapy, intrathecal drug delivery system implantation, or additional lumbar decompression laminectomy with instrumented fusion of T10-L3 and a palliative surgical lead SCS implantation. Conclusion: Our literature search did not reveal any

  4. Current Perioperative Management of Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Use in Neuroendovascular Therapy: Analysis of JR-NET1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    ENOMOTO, Yukiko; YOSHIMURA, Shinichi; SAKAI, Nobuyuki; EGASHIRA, Yusuke

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate current perioperative antithrombotic management in neuroendovascular therapy in Japan, we analyzed perioperative anticoagulant and antiplatelet use in various procedures and examined their relationships with periprocedural adverse events. Patient's data from nationwide surveys administered by the Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET) between January 2005 and December 2007 (JR-NET1) and January 2008 and December 2009 (JR-NET2) were retrospectively analyzed. Compared to JR-NET1, the frequency of perioperative antiplatelet therapy and dual or triple therapy were increased for either aneurysm coiling and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty or stenting in JR-NET2. Although ischemic complications were significantly decreased (4.2% vs. 2.1%, p < 0.001), hemorrhagic complications (2.1% vs. 5.3%, p < 0.001), severe adverse events (1.5% vs. 2.1%, p < 0.001), and total perioperative complications (8.3% vs. 10.3%, p < 0.001) were significantly increased in JR-NET2. The rate of hemorrhagic complications was significantly higher in patients with triple or more perioperative antiplatelet therapy (preoperative: 5.3% vs. 9.2%, p < 0.0001, postoperative: 5.7% vs. 12.7%, p < 0.0001). Perioperative antithrombotic therapy was performed more frequently and intensively in neuroendovascular therapy in Japan. While ischemic complications were decreased, hemorrhagic complications and severe adverse events were increased. These results suggest that intensive antithrombotic therapy has a potential risk of hemorrhagic complications for Japanese patients. PMID:24305029

  5. [Therapy education for patients receiving oral anti-coagulants vitamin K antagonists].

    PubMed

    Satger, Bernadette; Blaise, Sophie; Fontaine, Michèle; Yver, Jacqueline; Allenet, Benoît; Baudrant, Magali; Pernod, Gilles; Bosson, Jean-Luc

    2009-12-01

    The vitamin K antagonists (VKA) remain to this day the only oral form of therapeutic anticoagulation. Approximately 1% of the French population, mainly elderly, is treated with these anticoagulants. Oral anticoagulants have significant risks of iatrogenic complications; indeed they are the leading cause of such drug-induced complications, predominantly hemorrhages. AFSSAPS (French Drug and Medical Products Agency) clinical practice recommendations, repeatedly disseminated, emphasize the education of patients receiving VKAs. Managing oral anticoagulant treatment is challenging, with a significant risk of under- or overdosing and consequently, thrombosis or hemorrhage. The therapeutic window is narrow, multiple drug-interactions are possible, and the specific dose required for a particular individual to achieve appropriate International Normalized Ratio (INR) levels is unpredictable. The literature contains few randomized controlled trials about the efficacy of education for patients treated with oral anticoagulants. These education programs are not standardized and are therefore varied and difficult to compare. Nevertheless, studies demonstrate the importance of patient education programs in reducing the risk of hemorrhage and achieving better treatment stability. The Grenoble region hospital-community network for vascular diseases (GRANTED) has developed an education program for these patients, consisting of individual sessions for the patient and/or a friend or family member (either at a health care facility or at the patient's home), telephone support and group sessions, and using educational tools and supports. There is also a link with the general practitioner who receives a report. This approach makes it possible to adapt the educational message to individual patients and their daily lives, as well as directly involving them in the management of their treatment. PMID:19815369

  6. Incidence, clinical impact and risk of bleeding during oral anticoagulation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rubboli, Andrea; Becattini, Cecilia; Verheugt, Freek WA

    2011-01-01

    Bleeding is the most important complication of oral anticoagulation (OAC) with vitamin K-antagonists. Whilst bleeding is unavoidably related to OAC, it may have a great impact on the prognosis of treated subjects by leading to discontinuation of treatment, permanent disability or death. The yearly incidence of bleeding during OAC is 2%-5% for major bleeding, 0.5%-1% for fatal bleeding, and 0.2%-0.4% for intracranial bleeding. While OAC interruption and/or antagonism, as well as administration of coagulation factors, represent the necessary measures for the management of bleeding, proper stratification of the individual risk of bleeding prior to start OAC is of paramount importance. Several factors, including advanced age, female gender, poor control and higher intensity of OAC, associated diseases and medications, as well as genetic factors, have been proven to be associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Most of these factors have been included in the development of bleeding prediction scores, which should now be used by clinicians when prescribing and monitoring OAC. Owing to the many limitations of OAC, including a narrow therapeutic window, cumbersome management, and wide inter- and intra-individual variability, novel oral anticoagulants, such as factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors, have been recently developed. These agents can be given in fixed doses, have little interaction with foods and drugs, and do not require regular monitoring of anticoagulation. While the novel oral anticoagulants show promise for effective thromboprophylaxis in atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism, definitive data on their safety and efficacy are awaited. PMID:22125670

  7. Long Standing Eculizumab Treatment without Anticoagulant Therapy in High-Risk Thrombogenic Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jafar, Hassan A.; AlDallal, Salma M.; Askar, Haifa A.; Aljeraiwi, Ali M.; Al-Alansari, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an ultra-orphan disease affecting all hematopoietic cell types. The abnormality of red blood cells in this disease predisposes to intravascular complement-mediated hemolysis. Eculizumab is an orphan drug used to treat this rare disease. Thrombosis is the key cause of death in PNH patients in about 40% to 67% of cases. We report the case of a woman presenting with PNH complicated with serious Budd-Chiari syndrome thrombosis and with a stent inserted in the portal vein. She refused to take any anticoagulant treatment since she commenced eculizumab 4 years before. No thrombotic events happened since that time. This case could add an extra benefit for eculizumab, which could be used as an anti-thromboembolic prophylactic agent in PNH, especially in patients with thrombocytopenia, where the use of anticoagulant agents is extremely hazardous. More randomized studies might establish the use of eculizumab without anticoagulants to avoid serious bleeding that could happen in thrombocytopenic PNH patients. PMID:26487933

  8. Racial Differences in Quality of Anticoagulation Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation (from the TREAT-AF Study).

    PubMed

    Yong, Celina; Azarbal, Farnaz; Abnousi, Freddy; Heidenreich, Paul A; Schmitt, Susan; Fan, Jun; Than, Claire T; Ullal, Aditya J; Yang, Felix; Phibbs, Ciaran S; Frayne, Susan M; Ho, P Michael; Shore, Supriya; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Turakhia, Mintu P

    2016-01-01

    The influence of race on quality of anticoagulation control is not well described. We examined the association between race, international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring intensity, and INR control in warfarin-treated patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Using data from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), we performed a retrospective cohort study of 184,161 patients with a new diagnosis of AF/flutter from 2004 to 2012 who received any VHA prescription within 90 days of diagnosis. The primary predictor was race, ascertained from multiple VHA and linked Medicare demographic files. The primary outcome was first-year and long-term time in therapeutic range (TTR) of INR 2.0 to 3.0. Secondary outcomes were INR monitoring intensity and warfarin persistence. Of the 116,021 patients who received warfarin in the cohort, INR monitoring intensity was similar across racial groups. However, TTR was lowest in blacks and highest in whites (first year 0.49 ± 0.23 vs 0.57 ± 0.21, p <0.001; long term 0.52 ± 0.20 vs 0.59 ± 0.18, p <0.001); 64% of whites and 49% of blacks had long-term TTR >55% (p <0.001). After adjusting for site and patient-level covariates, black race was associated with lower first-year and long-term TTRs (4.2% and 4.1% below the conditional mean, relative to whites; p <0.0001 for both). One-year warfarin persistence was slightly lower in blacks compared to whites (58% vs 60%, p <0.0001). In conclusion, in patients with AF anticoagulated with warfarin, differences in INR control are most evident among blacks, underscoring the need to determine if other types of intensive management or warfarin alternatives may be necessary to improve anticoagulation among vulnerable AF populations. PMID:26552504

  9. [New anticoagulants].

    PubMed

    Bauersachs, R M

    2008-02-01

    This review updates the latest developments concerning new anticoagulants. It describes potential targets in the coagulation pathway: inhibition of the initiation of coagulation, factor Xa and thrombin inhibitors. The focus is laid on substances in late development that already passed the phase II trial for venous thromboembolism (VTE)-prevention as "proof of concept". In the group of factor Xa inhibitors, the indirect inhibitor Fondaparinux has got approval for the indications prevention and therapy of VTE and acute coronary syndromes (OASIS 5 and 6). Rivaroxaban is the first direct factor Xa inhibitor that was admitted for approval in the indication VTE-prevention. The first trial of the program RECORD 1-4 was finished, trials for the indications therapy of VTE (EINSTEIN) and stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (ROCKET AF) are in phase III. The use in acute coronary symptoms is - like apixaban - evaluated in phase II. The ADOPT trial with apixaban for VTE-prevention, as well as the BOTTICELLI trial for atrial fibrillation, have reached phase III. After the withdrawal of Ximelagatran, Dabigatran is the most developed direct thrombin inhibitor, being extensively studied in the comprehensive phase- III-program REVOLUTION and in approval for the indication VTE-prevention. PMID:18278158

  10. New oral anticoagulants in addition to single or dual antiplatelet therapy after an acute coronary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oldgren, Jonas; Wallentin, Lars; Alexander, John H.; James, Stefan; Jönelid, Birgitta; Steg, Gabriel; Sundström, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral anticoagulation in addition to antiplatelet treatment after an acute coronary syndrome might reduce ischaemic events but increase bleeding risk. We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adding direct thrombin or factor-Xa inhibition by any of the novel oral anticoagulants (apixaban, dabigatran, darexaban, rivaroxaban, and ximelagatran) to single (aspirin) or dual (aspirin and clopidogrel) antiplatelet therapy in this setting. Methods and results All seven published randomized, placebo-controlled phase II and III studies of novel oral anticoagulants in acute coronary syndromes were included. The database consisted of 30 866 patients, 4135 (13.4%) on single, and 26 731 (86.6%) on dual antiplatelet therapy, with a non-ST- or ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome within the last 7–14 days. We defined major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) as the composite of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, or stroke; and clinically significant bleeding as the composite of major and non-major bleeding requiring medical attention according to the study definitions. When compared with aspirin alone the combination of an oral anticoagulant and aspirin reduced the incidence of MACE [hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval 0.70; 0.59–0.84], but increased clinically significant bleeding (HR: 1.79; 1.54–2.09). Compared with dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel, adding an oral anticoagulant decreased the incidence of MACE modestly (HR: 0.87; 0.80–0.95), but more than doubled the bleeding (HR: 2.34; 2.06–2.66). Heterogeneity between studies was low, and results were similar when restricting the analysis to phase III studies. Conclusion In patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome, the addition of a new oral anticoagulant to antiplatelet therapy results in a modest reduction in cardiovascular events but a substantial increase in bleeding, most pronounced when new oral anticoagulants are combined with

  11. Detecting nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and anticoagulant therapy in cardioembolic ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Min, Jiangyong; Farooq, Muhammad Umar

    2016-08-01

    Nonvalvular Atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia associated with an increase in risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. Strokes related to AF are associated with higher mortality, greater disability, longer hospital stays, and lower chance of being discharged home. The present review will focus on the current status of detecting NVAF and stroke prevention when there is AF. The CHA2DS2-VASc risk stratification scheme is discussed for the identification of patients who are at risk for thromboembolic stroke related to NVAF. Patient with a CHA2DS2-VASc score of 2 or greater are candidates for warfarin or a novel oral anticoagulant, irrespective of whether the strategy is for rate or rhythm control. Finally, guidelines and landmark clinical trials in NVAF patients with primary or secondary stroke prevention are discussed. PMID:27263867

  12. Discrepancies between Patients’ Preferences and Educational Programs on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Survey in Community Pharmacies and Hospital Consultations

    PubMed Central

    Macquart de Terline, Diane; Hejblum, Gilles; Fernandez, Christine; Cohen, Ariel; Antignac, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral anticoagulation therapy is increasingly used for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic complications in various clinical situations. Nowadays, education programs for patients treated with anticoagulants constitute an integrated component of their management. However, such programs are usually based on the healthcare providers’ perceptions of what patients should know, rather than on patients’ preferences. Objective To investigate patients’ viewpoints on educational needs and preferred modalities of information delivery. Methods We conducted an observational study based on a self-administered questionnaire. To explore several profiles of patients, the study was designed for enrolling patients in two settings: during outpatient consultations in a cardiology department (Saint Antoine Hospital, Paris, France) and in community pharmacies throughout France. Results Of the 371 patients who completed the questionnaire, 187 (50.4%) were recruited during an outpatient consultation and 184 (49.6%) were recruited in community pharmacies. 84.1% of patients were receiving a vitamin K antagonist and 15.6% a direct oral anticoagulant. Patients ranked 16 of 21 (76.2%) questionnaire items on information about their treatment as important or essential; information on adverse effects of treatment was the highest ranked domain (mean score 2.38, 95% CI 2.30–2.46). Pharmacists (1.69, 1.58–1.80), nurses (1.05, 0.95–1.16), and patient associations (0.36, 0.29–0.44), along with group sessions (0.85, 0.75–0.95), the internet (0.77, 0.67–0.88), and delivery of material at the patient’s home (1.26, 1.14–1.38), were ranked poorly in terms of delivering educational material. Conclusion This study revealed substantial discrepancies between patient preferences and current educational programs. These findings should be useful for tailoring future educational programs that are better adapted to patients, with a potential associated enhancement of their

  13. Supporting patients to self-monitor their oral anticoagulation therapy: recommendations based on a qualitative study of patients’ experiences

    PubMed Central

    Tompson, Alice; Heneghan, Carl; Fitzmaurice, David; Sutton, Stephen; Harrison, Sian; Ward, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical trials suggest that oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT) self-monitoring is safe and effective, however little is known about the patient experience of this process. There is a lack of understanding about how best to train and support patients embarking on OAT self-monitoring. Aim To collect in-depth information about patients’ experiences of OAT self-monitoring outside of clinical trial conditions and to produce a set of recommendations on how best to support such patients. Design and setting Semi-structured qualitative interviews with patients who self-monitor and live in England. Method In total, 26 of the 267 (9.7%) who participated in the Cohort study of Anticoagulation Self-Monitoring (CASM) and were still self-monitoring after 12 months’ follow-up were interviewed. Topics discussed included experiences of OAT self-monitoring, healthcare support, training, and decision making. Framework analysis was used. Results Following initial problems using the monitoring device, interviewees described a mostly positive experience. Although less effort was expended attending monitoring appointments with health professionals, effort was required to conduct self-monitoring tests and to interpret and act on the results. Desire to self-manage was variable, especially when dosing advice systems worked promptly and reliably. Interviewees overcame patchy healthcare system knowledge and support of self-monitoring by educating themselves. Family and friends provided support with learning to use the monitor and managing OAT dosage adjustments. Conclusion Better, more-consistent training and health-service support would have alleviated a number of problems encountered by these patients who were self-monitoring. This training and support will become even more important if self-monitoring becomes more accessible to the general population of people on OAT. PMID:26077266

  14. Maternal malaria induces a procoagulant and antifibrinolytic state that is embryotoxic but responsive to anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Avery, John W; Smith, Geoffrey M; Owino, Simon O; Sarr, Demba; Nagy, Tamas; Mwalimu, Stephen; Matthias, James; Kelly, Lauren F; Poovassery, Jayakumar S; Middii, Joab D; Abramowsky, Carlos; Moore, Julie M

    2012-01-01

    Low birth weight and fetal loss are commonly attributed to malaria in endemic areas, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie these poor birth outcomes are incompletely understood. Increasing evidence suggests that dysregulated hemostasis is important in malaria pathogenesis, but its role in placental malaria (PM), characterized by intervillous sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum, proinflammatory responses, and excessive fibrin deposition is not known. To address this question, markers of coagulation and fibrinolysis were assessed in placentae from malaria-exposed primigravid women. PM was associated with significantly elevated placental monocyte and proinflammatory marker levels, enhanced perivillous fibrin deposition, and increased markers of activated coagulation and suppressed fibrinolysis in placental plasma. Submicroscopic PM was not proinflammatory but tended to be procoagulant and antifibrinolytic. Birth weight trended downward in association with placental parasitemia and high fibrin score. To directly assess the importance of coagulation in malaria-induced compromise of pregnancy, Plasmodium chabaudi AS-infected pregnant C57BL/6 mice were treated with the anticoagulant, low molecular weight heparin. Treatment rescued pregnancy at midgestation, with substantially decreased rates of active abortion and reduced placental and embryonic hemorrhage and necrosis relative to untreated animals. Together, the results suggest that dysregulated hemostasis may represent a novel therapeutic target in malaria-compromised pregnancies. PMID:22347435

  15. [GOOD PLANNING PRACTICE IN PRECLINICAL AND CLINICAL STUDIES OF UNFRACTIONATED AND FRACTIONATED HEPARINS IN RUSSIA AS THE BASIS OF SAFE AND EFFECTIVE ANTICOAGULATION THERAPY].

    PubMed

    Gavrishina, E V; Dobrovolskii, A V; Niyazov, R R; Romodanovskii, D P; Vasil'ev, A N

    2015-01-01

    General principles of appropriate strategies for preclinical and clinical development of unfractionated and low-molecular-weight heparins and demonstration of their biosimilarity to corresponding reference medicinal products are provided. Demonstration of the biosimilarity of heparin-containing medicinal products constitutes the basis for their efficacy and safety during anticoagulation therapy. The main quality, safety, and efficacy characteristics of heparin products are described and the extent of non-clinical and clinical investigations necessary prior to drug marketing authorization are considered. PMID:27017700

  16. Anticoagulant rodenticides.

    PubMed

    Watt, Barbara E; Proudfoot, Alex T; Bradberry, Sally M; Vale, J Allister

    2005-01-01

    Anticoagulant pesticides are used widely in agricultural and urban rodent control. The emergence of warfarin-resistant strains of rats led to the introduction of a new group of anticoagulant rodenticides variously referred to as 'superwarfarins', 'single dose' or 'long-acting'. This group includes the second generation 4-hydroxycoumarins brodifacoum, bromadiolone, difenacoum, flocoumafen and the indanedione derivatives chlorophacinone and diphacinone. Most cases of anticoagulant rodenticide exposure involve young children and, as a consequence, the amounts ingested are almost invariably small. In contrast, intentional ingestion of large quantities of long-acting anticoagulant rodenticides may cause anticoagulation for several weeks or months. Occupational exposure has also been reported. Anticoagulant rodenticides inhibit vitamin K(1)-2,3 epoxide reductase and thus the synthesis of vitamin K and subsequently clotting factors II, VII, IX and X. The greater potency and duration of action of long-acting anticoagulant rodenticides is attributed to their: (i) greater affinity for vitamin K(1)-2,3-epoxide reductase; (ii) ability to disrupt the vitamin K(1)-epoxide cycle at more than one point; (iii) hepatic accumulation; and (iv) unusually long biological half-lives due to high lipid solubility and enterohepatic circulation. Substantial ingestion produces epistaxis, gingival bleeding, widespread bruising, haematomas, haematuria with flank pain, menorrhagia, gastrointestinal bleeding, rectal bleeding and haemorrhage into any internal organ; anaemia may result. Spontaneous haemoperitoneum has been described. Severe blood loss may result in hypovolaemic shock, coma and death. The first clinical signs of bleeding may be delayed and patients may remain anticoagulated for several days (warfarin) or days, weeks or months (long-acting anticoagulants) after ingestion of large amounts. There are now sufficient data in young children exposed to anticoagulant rodenticides to

  17. Preference for oral anticoagulation therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation in Europe in different clinical situations: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association Survey.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Potpara, Tatjana; Dagres, Nikolaos; Proclemer, Alessandro; Sciarrafia, Elena; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association Survey was to assess the clinical practice in relation to the use of oral anticoagulation therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in Europe. Of special interest were patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), cardioversion procedures, catheter ablation, surgery, and those suffering from anticoagulation-related bleeding. Of 38 responding centres, non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) were used for stroke prophylaxis and were preferred (33.3%) or considered equal (48.5%) to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Only 3% did not use NOACs at all. There were some practice differences regarding the use of NOACs in combination with dual antiplatelet therapy in AF patients undergoing PCI, and only 12% preferred using NOACs in this setting. Bare metal stents were preferred rather than drug-eluting stents in AF patients at high bleeding risk. There were clear practice differences between centres regarding the use of triple therapy. Most of the major bleeding events would be handled using symptomatic and supportive measures (e.g. mechanical compression, fluid replacement, blood transfusion, prothrombin complex concentrate, or recombinant Factor VIIa). More than 80% of the centres offer either VKA or NOAC for at least 3 weeks before and after cardioversion and 70% offer either VKA or NOAC before and after AF catheter ablation. Patients treated with an NOAC were routinely re-assed in most centres. PMID:25926476

  18. Novel oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Reiffel, James A

    2014-04-01

    Warfarin has a proven record as an oral anticoagulant; almost every study, however, has found that it is not prescribed for 40-60% of patients who are eligible and should receive it, and of those who do receive it, serum warfarin levels only achieved a time in therapeutic range (TTR) equal to INR 2-3 about 55-60% of the time (online video available at: http://education.amjmed.com/video.php?event_id=445&stage_id=5&vcs=1). This means that only about 1 in 4 patients are adequately anticoagulated with warfarin, and thus there is a large unmet need for achieving better anticoagulation in these patients. Although physicians have sometimes tried to use antiplatelet therapy (aspirin, plus or minus clopidogrel) for anticoagulation, this may result in as much as a doubling of the risk of thromboembolic events. Recently 2 new classes of oral anticoagulant agents have appeared: direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs) and factor Xa inhibitors. This review sequentially examines the recent clinical trial evidence for the 3 approved NOACs in the 2 classes, highlighting that all 3 share a class effect of being noninferior to warfarin for reducing risk of stroke and systemic embolization and reducing risk of bleeding, with a relative risk of mortality consistently reduced by 10% per year. In addition, all of the NOACs have a significantly lower risk of intracranial/intracerebral bleeding than warfarin, an important clinical consideration, since that is the most feared bleeding risk and may be sufficient reason to consider switching patients from warfarin to a NOAC, even if they seem to be doing well on warfarin. Finally in addition to reviewing the overall benefits of these NOACs over traditional therapy, the clinical application differences between the classes and between the agents are reviewed. PMID:24655744

  19. [Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, M; Bode, Ch

    2008-10-01

    In this overview the actual guideline-recommendations for anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation and the problems of the currently available therapy are discussed. Furthermore an outlook over future developments in this field is given. Effective anticoagulation can prohibit thrombembolic events and is thus essential for the prognosis of patients suffering from atrial fibrillation. Until now vitamin-K-antagonists (VKAs) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) are available for oral anticoagulation in these patients. VKAs demonstrate a satisfying efficiency combined with rather high bleeding hazard. ASA on the other hand allows only moderate risk reduction with minimal side effects. Thus the guidelines recommend anticoagulation tailored to the individual risk, which can be evaluated by the CHADS2-Score. New therapeutic strategies, like the factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban or the factor II inhibitor dabigatran, are actually evaluated in phase III studies. These drugs bear the hope of higher efficiency combined with improved safety and much more comfortable use in the daily practice (e. g. no need for INR measurement, no dose adaptation). PMID:18836647

  20. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Piccini, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin’s shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment. PMID:24733535

  1. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Benjamin A; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin's shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment. PMID:24733535

  2. Outcomes and predictors of very stable INR control during chronic anticoagulation therapy.

    PubMed

    Witt, Daniel M; Delate, Thomas; Clark, Nathan P; Martell, Chad; Tran, Thu; Crowther, Mark A; Garcia, David A; Ageno, Walter; Hylek, Elaine M

    2009-07-30

    For patients on warfarin therapy, an international normalized ratio (INR) recall interval not exceeding 4 weeks has traditionally been recommended. Less frequent INR monitoring may be feasible in stable patients. We sought to identify patients with stable INRs (defined as having INR values exclusively within the INR range) and comparator patients (defined as at least one INR outside the INR range) in a retrospective, longitudinal cohort study. Occurrences of thromboembolism, bleeding, and death were compared between groups. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify independent predictors of stable INR control. There were 2504 stable and 3569 comparator patients. The combined rates of bleeding and thromboembolism were significantly lower in stable patients. Independent predictors of stable INR control were age older than 70 years and the absence of comorbid heart failure and diabetes. Stable patients were significantly less likely to have target INR of 3.0 or higher or chronic diseases. We hypothesize that many patients demonstrating stable INR control could be safely treated with INR recall intervals greater than the traditional 4 weeks. PMID:19439733

  3. Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants and Antiplatelet Therapy for Stroke Prevention in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shashi; Danik, Stephan B; Altman, Robert K; Barrett, Conor D; Lip, Gregory Y H; Chatterjee, Saurav; Roubin, Gary S; Natale, Andrea; Danik, Jacqueline S

    2016-01-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are frequently used to prevent stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. These patients are often also on aspirin or other antiplatelet agents. It is possible that treatment with both NOACs and aspirin or other antiplatelet drug may be effective in decreasing stroke, but data are sparse regarding the efficacy and safety of using both agents for stroke prevention. To address these issues, data were pooled from the 4 recent randomized, controlled trials of NOACs: apixaban, rivaroxaban, dabigatran, and edoxaban, which included 42,411 patients; 14,148 (33.4%) were also on aspirin or other antiplatelet drug. The number of thromboembolic events among participants on NOAC and aspirin/antiplatelet was compared with the number of events in patients on NOAC alone. Bleeding rates were also compared between those on NOAC + aspirin/antiplatelet and on NOAC alone. These results were compared with thromboembolic and bleeding events in the warfarin + aspirin/antiplatelet versus warfarin alone. No greater risk for thromboembolism was seen in patients on NOACs compared with patients on both NOACs and aspirin/antiplatelet drug. In this nonrandomized comparison, there was initially a signal toward higher thromboembolic rates among NOAC users also on aspirin/antiplatelet drugs (relative risk, 1.16; 95% confidence intervals, 1.05, 1.29) when compared with NOAC alone. This likely reflected the higher CHADS2 scores of those on aspirin/antiplatelet drugs. When the analysis was limited to studies that included aspirin rather than other antiplatelet drugs, no difference was seen for thromboembolic rates comparing dual therapy to NOAC alone (relative risk, 1.02; 95% confidence intervals, 0.90, 1.15). Higher rates of bleeding were seen with aspirin/antiplatelet drug in conjunction with NOAC. In this meta-analysis and nonrandomized comparison of aspirin/antiplatelet users and nonusers also on anticoagulation, there was no additional

  4. Use of Percutaneous Aspiration Thrombectomy vs. Anticoagulation Therapy to Treat Acute Iliofemoral Venous Thrombosis: 1-year Follow-up Results of a Randomised, Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Cakir, Volkan; Gulcu, Aytac; Akay, Emrah; Capar, Ahmet E.; Gencpinar, Tugra; Kucuk, Banu; Karabay, Ozalp; Goktay, A. Yigit

    2014-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy (PAT) followed by standard anticoagulant therapy, with anticoagulation therapy alone, for the treatment of acute proximal lower extremity deep vein thrombosis.MethodsIn this randomised, prospective study, 42 patients with acute proximal iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis documented via Doppler ultrasound examination, were separated into an interventional treatment group (16 males, 5 females, average age 51 years) and a medical treatment group (13 males, 8 females, average age 59 years). In the interventional group, PAT with large-lumen 9-F diameter catheterisation was applied, after initiation of standard anticoagulant therapy. Balloon angioplasty (n 19) and stent implementation (n: 14) were used to treat patients with residual stenosis (>50 %) after PAT. Prophylactic IVC filters were placed in two patients. The thrombus clearance status of the venous system was evaluated by venography. In both the medical and interventional groups, venous patency rates and clinical symptom scores were evaluated at months 1, 3, and 12 after treatment.ResultsDeep venous systems became totally cleared of thrombi in 12 patients treated with PAT. The venous patency rates in month 12 were 57.1 and 4.76 % in the interventional and medical treatment groups, respectively. A statistically significant improvement was observed in clinical symptom scores of the interventional group (PAT) with or without stenting (4.23 ± 0.51 before treatment; 0.81 ± 0.92 at month 12) compared with the medical treatment group (4.00 ± 0.63 before treatment; 2.43 ± 0.67 at month 12). During follow-up, four patients in the medical treatment and one in the interventional group developed pulmonary embolisms.ConclusionsFor treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis, PAT with or without stenting is superior to anticoagulant therapy alone in terms of both ensuring venous patency and improving clinical

  5. Oral anticoagulant therapy for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing ablation: results from the First European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA).

    PubMed

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Larsen, Torben B; Deharo, Jean Claude; Rossvoll, Ole; Dagres, Nikolaos; Todd, Derick; Pison, Laurent; Proclemer, Alessandro; Purefellner, Helmut; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-06-01

    The European Snapshot Survey on Procedural Routines in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation (ESS-PRAFA) is a prospective, multicentre snapshot survey of patients undergoing atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, conducted to collect patient-based data on current clinical practices in AF ablation in context of the latest AF Guidelines and contemporary oral anticoagulant therapies. The EP Research Network Centres were asked to prospectively enrol consecutive patients during a 6-week period (September/October 2014). Data were collected via the web-based case report form. We present the results pertinent to the use of antithrombotic therapies. Thirteen countries prospectively enrolled 455 eligible consecutive patients [mean age 59 ± 10.8 years, 131 (28.8%) females]. The mean CHA2DS2-VASc score was 1.12 ± 1.06 [137 patients (30.1%) had a score of ≥2]. Before ablation, 443 patients (97.4%) were on anticoagulant therapy [143 (31.4%) on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and 264 (58.0%) on vitamin K antagonists (VKAs)]. Of the latter, 79.7% underwent ablation without VKA interruption, whilst a variety of strategies were used in patients taking NOAC. After ablation, most patients (89.3%) continued the same anticoagulant as before, and 2 (0.4%) were not prescribed any anticoagulation. At discharge, 280 patients (62.2%) were advised oral anticoagulation for a limited period of mean 3.8 ± 2.2 months. On multivariate analysis, CHA2DS2-VASc, AF duration, prior VKA use, and estimated AF ablation success were significantly associated with the decision on short-term anticoagulation. Our results show the increasing use of NOAC in patients undergoing AF ablation and emphasize the need for more information to guide the periprocedural use of both NOACs and VKAs in real-world setting. PMID:26023177

  6. Attitudes and Preferences on the Use of Mobile Health Technology and Health Games for Self-Management: Interviews With Older Adults on Anticoagulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Annie Lu; Berg, Jill; Amin, Alpesh; Bachman, Mark; Guo, Yuqing; Evangelista, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Background Older adults are at substantial risk for cardiovascular disorders that may require anticoagulation therapy. Those on warfarin therapy report dissatisfaction and reduced quality of life (QOL) resulting from the treatment. Advances in the area of mobile health (mHealth) technology have resulted in the design and development of new patient-centric models for the provision of personalized health care services to improve care delivery. However, there is a paucity of research examining the effectiveness of mHealth tools on knowledge, attitudes, and patient satisfaction with treatment, as well as self-management, adherence to therapy, and QOL in older adults with chronic illness conditions requiring long-term warfarin therapy. Objective The objective of the study was to explore the attitudes and preferences of older adults on warfarin therapy regarding the use of mHealth technology and health games to gain skills for self-management. Methods We conducted group and individual interviews with patients (60 years or older) on warfarin therapy at two anticoagulation clinics affiliated with an academic medical center. We held 4 group and 2 individual interviews, resulting in 11 patient participants and 2 family caregiver participants. We used structured questions on three topic areas including medication self-management strategies, mHealth technology use, and health games for exercise. We demonstrated some commercial health apps related to medication management, vitamin K content of food, and a videogame for balance exercise. Discussions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Common themes were drawn using content analysis. Results The participants reported awareness of the importance of staying on schedule with warfarin therapy. They also acknowledged that negative experiences of friends or family members who were taking warfarin influenced their desire to keep on schedule with warfarin therapy. In addition, the participants expressed that the use of m

  7. Pharmacology of anticoagulants used in the treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Nutescu, Edith A; Burnett, Allison; Fanikos, John; Spinler, Sarah; Wittkowsky, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulant drugs are the foundation of therapy for patients with VTE. While effective therapeutic agents, anticoagulants can also result in hemorrhage and other side effects. Thus, anticoagulant therapy selection should be guided by the risks, benefits and pharmacologic characteristics of each agent for each patient. Safe use of anticoagulants requires not only an in-depth knowledge of their pharmacologic properties but also a comprehensive approach to patient management and education. This paper will summarize the key pharmacologic properties of the anticoagulant agents used in the treatment of patients with VTE. PMID:26780737

  8. New anticoagulants: focus on venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Outes, Antonio; Lecumberri, Ramón; Pozo, Carmen; Rocha, Eduardo

    2009-07-01

    Anticoagulation is recommended for prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) (deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) and/or arterial thromboembolism. The therapeutic arsenal of anticoagulants available to clinicians is mainly composed by unfractionated heparin (UFH), low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), fondaparinux and oral vitamin K antagonists (VKA) (i.e. warfarin and acenocumarol). These anticoagulants are effective, but they require parenteral administration (UFH, LMWH, fondaparinux) and/or frequent anticoagulant monitoring (intravenous UFH, oral VKA). Novel anticoagulants in clinical testing include orally active direct factor II inhibitors [dabigatran etexilate (BIBR 1048), AZD0837)], parenteral direct factor II inhibitors (flovagatran sodium), orally active direct factor X inhibitors [rivaroxaban (BAY 59-7939), apixaban, betrixaban, YM150, DU-176b, LY-517717, GW813893, TAK-442, PD 0348292] and new parenteral FXa inhibitors [idraparinux, idrabiotaparinux (biotinilated idraparinux; SSR 126517), ultra-low-molecular-weight heparins (ULMWH: AVE5026, RO-14)]. These new compounds have the potential to complement heparins and fondaparinux for short-term anticoagulation and/or to replace VKA for long-term anticoagulation in most patients. Dabigatran and rivaroxaban have been the firsts of the new oral anticoagulants to be licensed for the prevention of VTE after hip and knee replacement surgery. In the present review, we discuss the pharmacology of new anticoagulants, the key points necessary for interpreting the results of studies on VTE prophylaxis and treatment, the results of clinical trials testing these new compounds and their potential advantages and drawbacks over existing therapies. PMID:19601856

  9. XALIA: rationale and design of a non-interventional study of rivaroxaban compared with standard therapy for initial and long-term anticoagulation in deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), comprising deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism, poses a substantial clinical risk, and the incidence of these thrombotic-related diseases remains high. Anticoagulation aims to prevent thrombus extension and reduce the risk of recurrent events, particularly fatal pulmonary embolism. In EINSTEIN DVT, rivaroxaban was non-inferior to enoxaparin/vitamin K antagonists for the reduction of recurrent VTE, with a similar safety profile and a net clinical benefit. EINSTEIN EXT investigated patients receiving long-term treatment in whom there was no clear decision about continuing or stopping anticoagulation; rivaroxaban was superior to placebo in the reduction of recurrent VTE, showing an acceptable benefit–risk balance. Rivaroxaban has the potential to replace standard therapy, usually parenteral low molecular weight heparin overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist, for the treatment of acute symptomatic DVT and the secondary prevention of VTE. As the use of rivaroxaban for DVT treatment increases in clinical practice, a fundamental understanding of its clinical benefits in everyday patient care is essential. XALIA (XArelto for Long-term and Initial Anticoagulation in venous thromboembolism) is a multicentre, prospective, non-interventional, observational study investigating the effectiveness and safety of a single-drug approach with rivaroxaban compared with standard therapy in patients with DVT. The study cohort will include approximately 4800 patients (≥18 years old) with objectively confirmed acute DVT who will be treated for a period of ≥3 months. The primary outcomes will be the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (primarily major bleeding), symptomatic recurrent venous thromboembolic events and all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes include: major cardiovascular events; patient-reported treatment satisfaction and adherence; healthcare resource utilization; reasons for drug switching or

  10. [Anticoagulants after intracerebral haemorrhage in frail elderly].

    PubMed

    Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Claassen, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    Restarting anticoagulants in frail older patients who have had an intracerebral haemorrhage as an adverse reaction to anticoagulant therapy is a major dilemma, and one which is not specifically addressed in the state-of-the-art paper on restarting anticoagulants elsewhere in this issue. Frail older persons have the highest risk of recurrent bleeding, but, in theory, also have the most benefit from anticoagulants due to the high absolute risk for ischemic events in atrial fibrillation, which is the major indication. However, frail older persons are largely excluded from trials with anticoagulants, which makes it impossible to solve this dilemma in an evidence-based way. Therefore, we argue that sound decision making cannot only be based on neurological or cardiological expertise, as proposed by others, but should include an overall comprehensive geriatric assessment, and, most importantly, patients and caregivers should be included in shared goal setting and shared decision making. PMID:25873225

  11. Engaging with quality improvement in anticoagulation management.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Geoffrey D; Kline-Rogers, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Anticoagulants are highly effective at preventing thrombosis across a variety of clinical indications. However, their use can also lead to devastating effects, including major bleeding and death. Anticoagulation providers strive to balance the benefits of anticoagulant therapy with the risks of major bleeding. A measure of quality care can be used to assess the strengths and potential weaknesses in any system of coordinated care delivery. Quality measures in anticoagulation include patient-centered outcomes (e.g. major bleeding, time in the therapeutic range) and provider- or process-focused outcomes (e.g. compliance with guideline recommendations and response times to out-of-range laboratory values). Engaging in quality improvement activities allows anticoagulation providers to assess their own performance and identify areas for targeted interventions. This review summarizes the justification for engaging in quality improvement for anticoagulation management and describes a number of example programs. Interventions benefiting the management of both warfarin and the direct oral anticoagulants are included. The review also details potential quality measures and resources for any anticoagulation provider looking to begin a quality improvement process. PMID:25772116

  12. Anticoagulant modulation of inflammation in severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Karen S; Sawheny, Eva; Kinasewitz, Gary T

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and coagulation are so tightly linked that the cytokine storm which accompanies the development of sepsis initiates thrombin activation and the development of an intravascular coagulopathy. This review examines the interaction between the inflammatory and coagulation cascades, as well as the role of endogenous anticoagulants in regulating this interaction and dampening the activity of both pathways. Clinical trials attempting to improve outcomes in patients with severe sepsis by inhibiting thrombin generation with heparin and or endogenous anticoagulants are reviewed. In general, these trials have failed to demonstrate that anticoagulant therapy is associated with improvement in mortality or morbidity. While it is possible that selective patients who are severely ill with a high expected mortality may be shown to benefit from such therapy, at the present time none of these anticoagulants are neither approved nor can they be recommended for the treatment of sepsis. PMID:25938026

  13. Percutaneous tracheostomy in patients on anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Pasin, Laura; Frati, Elena; Cabrini, Luca; Giovanni, Landoni; Nardelli, Pasquale; Bove, Tiziana; Calabrò, Maria Grazia; Scandroglio, Anna Mara; Pappalardo, Federico; Zangrillo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To determine if percutaneous tracheostomy is safe in critically ill patients treated with anticoagulant therapies. Settings and Design: Single-center retrospective study including all the patients who underwent percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) placement over a 1-year period in a 14-bed, cardiothoracic and vascular Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Materials and Methods: Patients demographics and characteristics, anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapies, coagulation profile, performed technique and use of bronchoscopic guidance were retrieved. Results: Thirty-six patients (2.7% of the overall ICU population) underwent PDT over the study period. Twenty-six (72%) patients were on anticoagulation therapy, 1 patient was on antiplatelet therapy and 2 further patients received prophylactic doses of low molecular weight heparin. Only 4 patients had normal coagulation profile and were not receiving anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapies. Overall, bleeding of any severity complicated 19% of PDT. No procedure-related deaths occurred. Conclusions: PDT was proved to be safe even in critically ill-patients treated with anticoagulant therapies. Larger prospective studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:26139737

  14. Characteristics affecting oral anticoagulant therapy choice among patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation: a retrospective claims analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dabigatran is one of the three newer oral anticoagulants (OACs) recently approved in the United States for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) patients. The objective of this study was to identify patient, healthcare provider, and health plan factors associated with dabigatran versus warfarin use among NVAF patients. Methods Administrative claims data from patients with ≥2 NVAF medical claims in the HealthCore Integrated Research Database between 10/1/2009 and 10/31/2011 were analyzed. During the study intake period (10/1/2010 - 10/31/2011), dabigatran patients had ≥2 dabigatran prescriptions, warfarin patients had ≥2 warfarin and no dabigatran prescriptions, and the first oral anticoagulant (OAC) prescription date was the index date. Continuous enrollment for 12 months preceding (“pre-index”) and ≥ 6 months following the index date was required. Patients without pre-index warfarin use were assigned to the ‘OAC-naïve’ subgroup. Separate analyses were performed for ‘all-patient’ and ‘OAC-naïve’ cohorts. Multivariable logistic regression (LR) identified factors associated with dabigatran versus warfarin use. Results Of 20,320 patients (3,019 dabigatran and 17,301 warfarin) who met study criteria, 27% of dabigatran and 13% of warfarin patients were OAC-naïve. Among all-patients, dabigatran patients were younger (mean 67 versus 73 years, p < 0.001), predominantly male (71% versus 61%, p < 0.001), and more frequently had a cardiologist prescriber (51% versus 30%, p < 0.001) than warfarin patients. Warfarin patients had higher pre-index Elixhauser Comorbidity Index (mean: 4.3 versus 4.0, p < 0.001) and higher ATRIA bleeding risk score (mean: 3.0 versus 2.3, p < 0.001). LR results were generally consistent between all- and OAC-naïve patients. Among OAC-naïve patients, strongest factors associated with dabigatran use were prescriber specialty (OR = 3.59, 95% CI 2.68-4.81 for

  15. New anticoagulants for treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Gross, Peter L; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2008-03-01

    Anticoagulant therapy is the cornerstone of treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Such treatment is divided into 2 stages: Rapid initial anticoagulation is given to minimize the risk of thrombus extension and fatal pulmonary embolism, whereas extended anticoagulation is aimed at preventing recurrent VTE, thereby reducing the risk of postphlebitic syndrome. With currently available drugs, immediate anticoagulation can only be achieved with parenteral agents, such as heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, or fondaparinux. Extended treatment usually involves the administration of vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin. Emerging anticoagulants have the potential to streamline VTE treatment. These agents include idraparinux, a long-acting synthetic pentasaccharide that is given subcutaneously on a once-weekly basis, and new oral anticoagulants that target thrombin or factor Xa. This article (1) reviews the pharmacology of these agents, (2) outlines their potential strengths and weaknesses, (3) describes the results of clinical trials with these new drugs, and (4) identifies the evolving role of new anticoagulants in the management of VTE. PMID:18296593

  16. Novel oral anticoagulants in the management of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Sean R; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen; Schneider, David J

    2016-08-01

    Despite advances in interventional and pharmacologic therapy, survivors of myocardial infarction remain at an increased risk of subsequent cardiovascular events. Initial pharmacological management includes both platelet inhibition and parenteral anticoagulation, whereas long-term pharmacological therapy relies on antiplatelet therapy for prevention of thrombotic complications. Biomarkers showing ongoing thrombin generation after acute coronary syndromes suggest that anticoagulants may provide additional benefit in reducing cardiovascular events. We review the pharmacokinetics of novel anticoagulants, clinical trial results, the role of monitoring, and future directions for the use of novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of coronary artery disease. Clinical trials have shown that long-term use of oral anticoagulants decreases the risk of cardiovascular events, but they do so at a cost of an increased risk of bleeding. Future studies will need to identify optimal treatment combinations for selected patients and conditions that address both the appropriate combination of therapy and the appropriate dosage of each agent when used in combination. PMID:27228186

  17. Practicability of patient self-testing of oral anticoagulant therapy by the international normalized ratio (INR) using a portable whole blood monitor. A pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Hasenkam, J M; Knudsen, L; Kimose, H H; Grønnesby, H; Attermann, J; Andersen, N T; Pilegaard, H K

    1997-01-01

    The prophylactic efficacy of long-term oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT) has been demonstrated in a number of clinical conditions with increased tendency to thromboembolism, and the number of individuals subjected to OAT in the industrialised world has increased substantially in recent years. Since this therapy requires considerable resources from both the health care system and the patients, the feasibility of patients' self-monitoring and self-management of OAT has been investigated (1,2,3). The anticipated advantages of this approach include improved convenience and compliance for the patient, who may increase his apprehension for managing the treatment. In addition, self-testing allows for more frequent control compared to the conventional out-patient approach. Importantly, a prerequisite for conceiving a safe and operational concept for patient self-management (PSM) is the availability of a portable INR monitoring system with an accuracy, precision, reproducibility, and long-term reliability comparable to standard coagulometric equipment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of a commercially available INR-monitor. CoaguChek, for patient self-testing, through a step-wise investigation of the performance characteristics of the equipment in the laboratory, in command of the patient, and during self-testing and self-adjustment of treatment at home. Laboratory INR values were used as reference. PMID:8983128

  18. Optical profiling of anticoagulation status (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tshikudi, Diane M.; Tripathi, Markandey M.; Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2016-02-01

    Defective blood coagulation resulting from excessive procoagulant activity often leads to thrombotic disorders such as stroke and myocardial infarction. A variety of oral and injectable anticoagulant drugs are prescribed to prevent or treat life-threatening thrombosis. However, due to bleeding complications often associated with anticoagulant treatment, routine monitoring and accurate dosing of anticoagulant therapy is imperative. We have developed Optical thromboelastography (OTEG), a non-contact approach that utilizes a drop of whole blood to measure blood coagulation status in patients. Here, we demonstrate the capability of OTEG for rapidly monitoring anticoagulation in whole blood samples. OTEG monitors coagulation status by assessing changes in blood viscosity from temporal intensity fluctuations of laser speckle patterns during clotting. In OTEG a blood drop is illuminated with coherent light and the blood viscosity is measured from the speckle intensity autocorrelation curve, g2 (t). The metrics, clotting time (R+k), clot progression (angle) and maximum clot stiffness (MA) are then extracted. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the accuracy of OTEG in assessing anticoagulation status of common anticoagulants including heparin, argatroban and rivaroxaban status. A dose-dependent prolongation of R+k was observed in anticoagulated blood, which closely corresponded with standard-reference Thromboelastography (TEG) (r 0.87-0.99, P>0.01 for all cases). OTEG angle was unaltered by anticoagulation whereas TEG angle presented a dose-dependent diminution probably linked to clot rupture. In both OTEG and TEG, MA was unaffected by heparin, argatroban or rivaroxaban. We conclude that OTEG can accurately monitor anticoagulation status following treatment, potentially providing a powerful tool for routine monitoring of patients in the doctor's office or in the home setting.

  19. Anticoagulation in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Robert-Ebadi, Helia; Righini, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Management of anticoagulation in elderly patients represents a particularly challenging issue. Indeed, this patient population is at high thromboembolic risk, but also at high hemorrhagic risk. Assessment of the benefit-risk balance of anticoagulation is the key point when decisions are made about introducing and/or continuing such treatments in the individual elderly patient. In order to maximise the safety of anticoagulation in the elderly, some specific considerations need to be taken into account, including renal insufficiency, modified pharmacodynamics of anticoagulants, especially vitamin K antagonists, and the presence of multiple comorbidities and concomitant medications. New anticoagulants could greatly simplify and possibly increase the safety of anticoagulation in the elderly in the near future.

  20. Dietary Vitamin K intake and anticoagulation control during the initiation phase of warfarin therapy: A prospective cohort study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of varying levels of dietary vitamin K intake on therapeutic International Normalized Ratio (INR) values among patients starting warfarin therapy has not been well studied. We performed a prospective cohort study among 282 patients to explore the independent associations between usual in...

  1. New Oral Anticoagulants in the Treatment of Pulmonary Embolism: Efficacy, Bleeding Risk, and Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Kelly M.; Phillips, Elizabeth (Lisa) M.

    2013-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is mandatory in patients with pulmonary embolism to prevent significant morbidity and mortality. The mainstay of therapy has been vitamin-K antagonist therapy bridged with parenteral anticoagulants. The recent approval of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs: apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban) has generated significant interest in their role in managing venous thromboembolism, especially pulmonary embolism due to their improved pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles, predictable anticoagulant response, and lack of required efficacy monitoring. This paper addresses the available literature, on-going clinical trials, highlights critical points, and discusses potential advantages and disadvantages of the new oral anticoagulants in patients with pulmonary embolism. PMID:23691304

  2. Fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after taking anticoagulation medication

    PubMed Central

    Hammar, Samuel P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 64-year-old man with extensive diffuse acute lung hemorrhage, presumably as a result of anticoagulation therapy. We evaluated reports in the literature concerning acute exacerbation (acute lung injury of unknown cause) in UIP and other forms of fibrotic interstitial pneumonias. We also evaluated autopsy tissue in this case in order to determine the cause of death in this 64-year-old man, who was initially thought to have an asbestos-related disease. Based on the autopsy findings, this man died as a result of anticoagulation therapy; specifically, the use of Xarelto® (rivaroxaban). PMID:26236607

  3. Newer Oral Anticoagulants: Stroke Prevention and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anand; Goddeau Jr, Richard P.; Henninger, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Warfarin is very effective in preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, its use is limited due to fear of hemorrhagic complications, unpredictable anticoagulant effects related to multiple drug interactions and dietary restrictions, a narrow therapeutic window, frequent difficulty maintaining the anticoagulant effect within a narrow therapeutic window, and the need for inconvenient monitoring. Several newer oral anticoagulants have been approved for primary and secondary prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. These agents have several advantages relative to warfarin therapy. As a group, these direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC), which include the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran, and the factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban), are more effective than dose adjusted warfarin for prevention of all-cause stroke (including both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke), and have an overall more favorable safety profile. Nevertheless, an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (with the exception of apixaban), increased risk for thrombotic complication with sudden discontinuation, and inability to accurately assess and reverse anticoagulant effect require consideration prior to therapy initiation, and pose a challenge for decision making in acute stroke therapy. PMID:27347226

  4. [Extended options of anticoagulant treatment in thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Karetová, Debora; Bultas, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Thromboembolic disease (TD) is a relatively common disease with acute risk of death and potential long-term consequences in term of postthrombotic syndrome or chronic pulmonary hypertension. Anticoagulant therapy is the basic therapeutic procedure; thrombolytic therapy and the introduction cava filter are appropriately indicated for individual cases. In past few years, new direct oral anticoagulant drugs (NOAC) have occurred - Xa factor or thrombin inhibitors which have demonstrated the same efficacy and even higher safety in comparison to conventional treatment. In mid 2014, 3 drugs of this group are registered in Czech Republic - rivaroxaban (Xarelto®), dabigatran (Pradaxa®) and apixaban (Eliquis®). These drugs have comparable efficacy and safety but they differ in schedule of dose administration. Rivaroxaban and apixaban can be administered immediately after diagnosis of venous thrombosis or hemodynamically stable pulmonary embolism. LMWH application has to precede few days the administration of dabigatran. Limitation of new drugs is their price. Unavailability of antidotes is temporary because current researches continue to find one for dabigatran and another for both of xabans. Duration of anticoagulant treatment after acute phase depends on the presence of thrombosis risk factors and the individual bleeding risk. Minimal duration of anticoagulant therapy is 3 months, commonly 6-12 months and in high risk patients it is "long term" treatment. Good results of new anticoagulant drugs in trials in term of thromboembolism recurrence prevention may change established habits in TD patients with long term treatment. PMID:25600045

  5. Novel oral anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    How, Choon How

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is effective in preventing primary and secondary thromboembolic events due to atrial fibrillation. Warfarin, which was approved by the United States in 1954, was the only long-term oral anticoagulation therapy till the approval of dabigatran in 2010, and of rivaroxaban and other direct factor Xa inhibitors from 2011, forming a group known as novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC). NOAC have fewer food and drug interactions compared to warfarin; hence, the patient will require fewer clinic visits. However, the short half-life of NOAC means that twice-a-day dosing is needed and there is higher risk of a prothrombotic state when doses are missed. Other disadvantages are the lack of long-term data on NOAC, their high cost and the current lack of locally available antidotes. PMID:26702159

  6. [THE IMPORTANCE OF ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH ARTIAL FIBRILLATION IN STROKE PREVENTION--SUMMARY OF INTERNATIONAL DATA AND NOVEL THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES].

    PubMed

    Mirolovics, Ágnes; Papp, Csaba; Zsuga, Judit; Bereczki, Dániel

    2016-03-30

    The most common cardiogenic cause of ischaemic stroke is atrial fibrillation which increases the probability of stroke five-fold and doubles case fatality. Based on international data the incidence of atrial fibrillation is approx. 2% however this rapidly increases with age. The necessity of using oral anticoagulants in the prevention of non-valvular atrial fibrillation related stroke is decided based on estimated stroke risk. The CHADS2 and the more predictive CHA2DS2-VASc scales are used for this purpose while the bleeding risk of patients treated with anticoagulant may be estimated by the HAS-BLED scoring scale. For decades oral anticoagulation meant using vitamin-K antagonists. Based on international data we can see that rate of anticoagulation is unacceptably low, furthermore most of the anticoagulated patients aren't within the therapeutic range of INR (INR: 2-3). A lot of disadvantages of vitamin-K antagonists are known (e.g. food-drug interaction, need for regular coagulation monitoring, increased risk of bleeding), therefore compounds with new therapeutic target have been developed. The novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) can be divided in two major subgroups: direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran etexilate) and Xa-factor inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban). These products are administered in fix doses, they less frequently interact with other medications or food, and regular coagulation monitoring is not needed when using these drugs. Moreover several studies have shown that they are at least as effective in the prevention of ischaemic stroke than the vitamin-K antagonists, with no more haemorrhagic complications. PMID:27188000

  7. Incidence of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, CHA2DS2-VASc score of ≤1 and without anticoagulant therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yin-Jian; Yuan, Jin-Qing; Fan, Chao-Mei; Pu, Jie-Lin; Fang, Pi-Hua; Ma, Jian; Guo, Xi-Ying; Li, Yi-Shi

    2016-07-01

    Data on the risk of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism (iSSE) events in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), a CHA2DS2-VASc score of ≤1, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and without anticoagulant therapy are still lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of iSSE events in these patients. We consecutively screened medical records of patients with HCM and NVAF referred to Fuwai Hospital between January 1994 and March 2014. The primary end point was iSSE events, defined as a composite of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism. Follow-up was carried out to ascertain end point status. Medical records of 522 patients with NVAF and HCM were screened. A total of 108 patients (20.7 %) with a CHA2DS2-VASc score of ≤1 and without anticoagulant therapy were enrolled and constituted our study population. After a median follow-up of 2.4 years (range 0.6-14.1 years; 376.2 patient-years), ischemic stroke occurred in 2 patients, resulting in death of 1 patient in the first year and paralysis of the other patient in the fourth year. No other iSSE events occurred. The incidence of iSSE was 0.9 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.0-5.0 %] in the first year, and 0.5 % per 100 patient-years (95 % CI 0.1-1.9 %). The risk of iSSE events seems low in patients with NVAF, a CHA2DS2-VASc score of ≤1, HCM, and without anticoagulant therapy. Multicenter studies with sizeable study populations are needed to validate the risk of iSSE events in these patients. PMID:26231425

  8. To anticoagulate or not to anticoagulate patients with cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Graham, S P

    2001-11-01

    The current published literature does not indicate whether the long-term effect of anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy contributes to mortality reduction in patients with LV dysfunction. Evaluating patients for personal risk for emboli or for ischemic coronary artery events may influence the choice of therapies. As more is learned about the mechanisms of drug effects in different populations, physicians may be better able to direct appropriate therapies. Until that time, one must weigh the risks and benefits of each drug alone and in combination. In NYHA class IV patients, the risk for thrombosis owing to spontaneous clotting increases as does the adverse potential of warfarin and the adverse effects of inhibiting prostaglandin mediated vasodilation by aspirin. In NYHA class I and II patients, the quality of life and convenience of multidrug therapy is weighed against the devastating effect of a major stroke. In less symptomatic patients, the long-term risk for acute coronary events may be higher than previously identified. This would suggest that all patients with depressed LV function should be on some type of antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy. The current WATCH study will provide much needed information about the outcome differences between these agents. Conclusions based on available data include the following: Heart failure is increasing in incidence and prevalence. Atherosclerotic disease is an important causative factor for the development of heart failure or may be a comorbid condition in these patients. There is a measurable rate of stroke in patients with heart failure, although the cause of death in large studies is more often owing to sudden death or progressive heart failure. Sudden death may be from new ischemic events, asystole, or from ventricular tachyarrhythmias. In patients with heart failure, not all strokes are cardioembolic in origin. The benefits and risks of warfarin may be increased as the EF worsens or heart failure functional class

  9. Anticoagulant conversion in the elderly: pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Al-Nasser, Bassam

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of medical conditions representing a risk for thromboembolic complications and requiring antithrombotic therapy increases gradually with age. Two cases of fatal noncritical organ bleeding complication that occurred during the conversion period from initial fondaparinux to vitamin K antagonist are presented. An 81-year-old obese female patient (body mass index 43 kg/m(2)) with previous postoperative thrombosis underwent uneventful total knee replacement under spinal anesthesia. She presented with popliteal hematoma during conversion to oral anticoagulant. A 92-year-old female patient (body mass index 33 kg/m(2)) with left lower limb thrombosis was referred to our orthopedics department from her senior citizens' home for right lower limb hematoma and ischemia that occurred during conversion to oral anticoagulant. Thromboembolic and bleeding events in the elderly are real public health problems. Specific guidelines dedicated to this particular population are needed, which will improve the management of anticoagulation and decrease risk of complications. PMID:26547115

  10. New anticoagulants for the treatment of venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Caio Julio Cesar dos Santos; Júnior, José Leonidas Alves; Gavilanes, Francisca; Prada, Luis Felipe; Morinaga, Luciana Kato; Souza, Rogerio

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, venous thromboembolism (VTE) is among the leading causes of death from cardiovascular disease, surpassed only by acute myocardial infarction and stroke. The spectrum of VTE presentations ranges, by degree of severity, from deep vein thrombosis to acute pulmonary thromboembolism. Treatment is based on full anticoagulation of the patients. For many decades, it has been known that anticoagulation directly affects the mortality associated with VTE. Until the beginning of this century, anticoagulant therapy was based on the use of unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin and vitamin K antagonists, warfarin in particular. Over the past decades, new classes of anticoagulants have been developed, such as factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors, which significantly changed the therapeutic arsenal against VTE, due to their efficacy and safety when compared with the conventional treatment. The focus of this review was on evaluating the role of these new anticoagulants in this clinical context. PMID:27167437

  11. [New anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Bura-Rivière, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    Anticoagulant therapy is the cornerstone of treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The treatment needs rapid initial anticoagulaton to minimize the risk of thrombus extension and fata pulmonary embolism, followed by an extended anticoagulation, aimed at preventing recurrent VTE. Till very recently, immediate anticoagulation can only be achieved with parenteral agents, such as heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, or fondaparinux. Extended treatment usually involves the administration of vitamin K antagonists, such as warfarin. Emerging direct oral anticoagulants have the potential to streamline VTE treatment. These agents include oral anticoagulants that target thrombin or factor Xa. This article reviews the characteristics of these agents, describes the results of clinical trials in venous thromboembolic disease and outlines their strengths and weakness. PMID:24167902

  12. Pharmacogenetics of oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K; King, Barry P

    2003-05-01

    There is wide interindividual variation in oral anticoagulant dose requirement, which is partly genetically determined. Several cytochrome P450s contribute to oxidative metabolism of oral anticoagulants. The most important of these is CYP2C9, which hydroxylates the S-enantiomers of warfarin, acenocoumarol and phenprocoumon with high catalytic activity. In at least eight separate clinical studies, possession of the CYP2C9*2 or CYP2C9*3 variant alleles, which result in decreased enzyme activity, has been associated with a significant decrease in a mean warfarin dose requirement. Several studies also suggest that possession of a CYP2C9 variant allele is associated with an increased risk of adverse events, such as bleeding. Possession of the CYP2C9*3 variant also appears to be associated with a low acenocoumarol dose requirement. Other genetic factors, such as polymorphisms in the cytochromes P450 that metabolize the R-enantiomers of warfarin and acenocoumarol, may also be relevant to anticoagulant dose. The molecular basis of anticoagulant resistance where a higher than normal dose of anticoagulant is required remains unclear, but could be due to unusually high CYP2C9 activity (pharmacokinetic resistance) or to an abnormality in the target enzyme vitamin K epoxide reductase (pharmacodynamic resistance). PMID:12724615

  13. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000547.htm Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining ...

  14. The new oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Garcia, David; Libby, Edward; Crowther, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    Although their first application in clinical practice occurred in the 1940s, vitamin K antagonists remain the only form of oral anticoagulant medication approved for long-term use. Although the available vitamin K antagonists are highly effective for the prevention and/or treatment of most thrombotic disease, the significant interpatient and intrapatient variability in dose-response, the narrow therapeutic index, and the numerous drug and dietary interactions associated with these agents have led clinicians, patients, and investigators to search for alternative agents. Three new orally administered anticoagulants (apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban) are in the late stages of development and several others are just entering (or moving through) earlier phases of investigation. These novel anticoagulant medications are being studied for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism, the treatment of acute coronary syndromes and the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. This review summarizes published clinical trial data pertinent to apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban. PMID:19880491

  15. "Timing" of arrival and in-hospital mortality in a cohort of patients under anticoagulant therapy presenting to the emergency departments with cerebral hemorrhage: A multicenter chronobiological study in Italy.

    PubMed

    Fabbian, Fabio; Manfredini, Roberto; De Giorgi, Alfredo; Gallerani, Massimo; Cavazza, Mario; Grifoni, Stefano; Fabbri, Andrea; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Ferrari, Anna Maria; Imberti, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Therapy with oral anticoagulants (OACs) is a risk factor for cerebral hemorrhage (CH). Although different studies have been undertaken to investigate the timing of the onset of major cardiovascular events, no data exist on temporal patterns of the onset of CH in subjects treated with OACs. The aim of this study is to evaluate the timing of CH in patients treated with OACs. All patients who developed CH under OACs therapy and admitted to 28 Italian Emergency Departments (EDs) between September 2011 and July 2013 were enrolled. Age, sex, time and location of the hemorrhagic lesion, type of the bleeding events (idiopathic or post-traumatic), anticoagulant therapy (warfarin or new oral anticoagulants - NOAs) and time of ED admission (i.e., hour, day, month and season) were recorded. Five hundred and seventeen patients (63.2% male aged 80 ± 7.9 yrs) with CH were involved. Warfarin was taken by 494 patients (95.6%), and NOAs by 23 (4.4%). In-hospital mortality (IHM) was recorded in 208 cases (40.2%). Cosinor analysis showed a peak of CH arrival between 12:00 and 14:00 h both in the whole population (PR 73.9%, p = 0.002) and the male subgroup (PR 65.2%, p = 0.009), whereas females showed an anticipated morning peak between 08:00 and 10:00 h (PR 65.7%, p = 0.008). A further analysis between idiopathic and post-traumatic CH confirmed the presence of a 24 h pattern with a peak between 12:00 and 14:00 h (PR 58.5%, p = 0.019) and between 08:00 and 10:00 h (PR80.1%, p < 0.001) for idiopathic events and post-traumatic hemorrhages, respectively. Moreover, a seasonal winter peak was identified for idiopathic forms (PR 74%, p = 0.035), and a summer peak for post-traumatic forms (PR 77%, p = 0.025). The present study suggests the presence of a temporal pattern of ED arrivals in CH patients treated with OACs. PMID:26852790

  16. New oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Turpie, Alexander G G

    2008-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major risk factor for stroke. Currently, acetylsalicylic acid (a platelet inhibitor) and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; oral anticoagulants), including warfarin, are the only approved antithrombotic therapies for stroke prevention in patients with AF. Although effective, VKAs have unpredictable pharmacological effects, requiring regular coagulation monitoring and dose adjustment to maintain effects within the therapeutic range. The clinical development pathway for novel anticoagulants often involves evaluation of efficacy and safety in a short-term indication, such as the prevention of venous thrombo-embolism (VTE), followed by longer-term VTE treatment studies, and finally chronic indications, including stroke prevention studies in patients with AF. The coagulation pathway provides many targets for novel anticoagulants, including Factor Xa (FXa) and Factor IIa (thrombin). Numerous oral, direct FXa inhibitors are in various stages of clinical development, including rivaroxaban, LY517717, YM150, DU-176b, apixaban, and betrixaban, and are anticipated to overcome the limitations of VKAs. Dabigatran is the only oral direct thrombin inhibitor in late-stage development. Studies of these agents for stroke prevention in patients with AF are planned or ongoing. If approved, they may represent the next generation of anticoagulants, by providing new therapeutic options for stroke prevention in patients with AF. PMID:18096568

  17. Antiplatelet and Anticoagulant Drugs in Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Altenburg, Alexander; Haage, Patrick

    2012-02-15

    In treating peripheral arterial disease, a profound knowledge of antiplatelet and anticoagulative drug therapy is helpful to assure a positive clinical outcome and to anticipate and avoid complications. Side effects and drug interactions may have fatal consequences for the patient, so interventionalists should be aware of these risks and able to control them. Aspirin remains the first-line agent for antiplatelet monotherapy, with clopidogrel added where dual antiplatelet therapy is required. In case of suspected antiplatelet drug resistance, the dose of clopidogrel may be doubled; prasugrel or ticagrelor may be used alternatively. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (abciximab or eptifibatide) may help in cases of hypercoagulability or acute embolic complications. Desmopressin, tranexamic acid, or platelet infusions may be used to decrease antiplatelet drug effects in case of bleeding. Intraprocedurally, anticoagulant therapy treatment with unfractionated heparin (UFH) still is the means of choice, although low molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) are suitable, particularly for postinterventional treatment. Adaption of LMWH dose is often required in renal insufficiency, which is frequently found in elderly patients. Protamine sulphate is an effective antagonist for UFH; however, this effect is less for LMWH. Newer antithrombotic drugs, such as direct thrombin inhibitors or factor X inhibitors, have limited importance in periprocedural treatment, with the exception of treating patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). Nevertheless, knowing pharmacologic properties of the newer drugs facilitate correct bridging of patients treated with such drugs. This article provides a comprehensive overview of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs for use before, during, and after interventional radiological procedures.

  18. Newer anticoagulants in 2009.

    PubMed

    Samama, Meyer Michel; Gerotziafas, Grigoris T

    2010-01-01

    Several newer anticoagulants are under clinical development. Recently two of them, Dabigatran etexilate/Pradaxa. and Rivaroxaban/Xarelto obtained marketing authorization in Europe and Canada for the prevention of thromboembolic events following major orthopedic surgery such as total hip and knee replacement. The results of Phase III clinical studies in thromboprophylaxis in major orthopedic surgery are highlighted and discussed in detail. Ongoing Phase II and III clinical trials assess their efficacy in the secondary prevention and treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, and in the long-term prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and in combination with aspirin and clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Many other small antithrombotic molecules including a new generation of low molecular weight heparins, are currently in different stages of clinical development. In addition to being administered orally, the newer anticoagulant agents have a more balanced benefit/risk ratio and wider therapeutic window. They have a rapid onset of action, a predictable anticoagulant effect that does not require routine laboratory monitoring. They have minor food and drug interactions, including those with cytochrome P450 and P.gp. They are highly specific and targeted to a single coagulation factor, and could carry similar or less hemorrhagic risks compared to the older anticoagulant agents. Finally, they may be used in a broader variety of patients, especially the medically ill patients with advanced cancer, and the elderly without any dosage adjustment, regardless of the patient age, gender, body weight, or in patients with mild renal impairment. Their use in the general world will hopefully confirm the promising results of clinical trials. PMID:19838770

  19. Reimagining Anticoagulation Clinics in the Era of Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Geoffrey D; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K; Sales, Anne E; Froehlich, James B

    2016-03-01

    Anticoagulation clinics were initially developed to provide safe and effective care for warfarin-treated patients with atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, and mechanical valve replacement. Traditionally, these patients required ongoing laboratory monitoring and warfarin dose adjustment by expert providers. With the introduction of direct oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban), many have questioned the need for anticoagulation clinic. However, we think that the growing number of oral anticoagulant choices creates an urgent need for expanding the traditional role of the anticoagulation clinic. We outline 3 key purposes that a reimagined anticoagulation clinic would serve: (1) to assist patients and clinicians with selecting the most appropriate drug and dose from a growing list of anticoagulant options (including warfarin), (2) to help patients minimize the risk of serious bleeding complications with careful long-term monitoring and peri-procedural management, and (3) to encourage ongoing adherence to these life-saving medications. We also describe how repurposing anticoagulation clinics as broader medication safety clinics would promote safe and effective care across a range of cardiovascular conditions for high-risk medications (eg, spironolactone, amiodarone). Finally, we highlight a few existing health systems that are overcoming key challenges to implementing a reimagined anticoagulation or medication safety clinic structure. PMID:26933047

  20. Citrate anticoagulation in the ICU: the Leeds experience.

    PubMed

    Trumper, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is widely used in the management of critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. It requires effective anticoagulation of the extracorporeal blood circuit. Although heparin is the most commonly prescribed anticoagulant, there are issues associated with heparin, and there has been increasing interest in regional citrate anticoagulation as an alternative. In 2013, The Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust switched from heparin to citrate anticoagulant for CRRT in intensive care units (ICUs) across the Trust. This article examines the reasons for the switch, the implementation of citrate and the impact of this quality-improvement project in terms of patient outcome data and feedback from the ICU nursing team. PMID:27615524

  1. D-dimer and factor VIIa in atrial fibrillation - prognostic values for cardiovascular events and effects of anticoagulation therapy. A RE-LY substudy.

    PubMed

    Siegbahn, Agneta; Oldgren, Jonas; Andersson, Ulrika; Ezekowitz, Michael D; Reilly, Paul A; Connolly, Stuart J; Yusuf, Salim; Wallentin, Lars; Eikelboom, John W

    2016-05-01

    Coagulation markers may improve monitoring the risk of stroke and bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) during anticoagulant treatment. We examined baseline levels of D-dimer and their association with stroke, cardiovascular death and major bleeding in 6,202 AF patients randomised to dabigatran or warfarin in the RE-LY trial. The effects of treatment on serial levels of D-dimer and coagulation factor (F) VIIa in 2,567 patients were also analysed. Baseline D-dimer levels were related to the rate of stroke/systemic embolism (SEE) with 0.64 % in the lowest quartile (Q1, as reference) (D-dimer < 298 µg/l), 1.38 % Q2 (D-dimer 298-473 µg/l), 1.71 % Q3 (D-dimer 474-822 µg/l) and 2.00 % in Q4 (D-dimer > 822 µg/l) (p=0.0007). Similar associations were shown for cardiovascular death and major bleeding. Addition of baseline D-dimer to established clinical risk factors improved prediction of stroke/SEE, cardiovascular death and major bleeding (C-index increased from 0.66 to 0.68, 0.71 to 0.73 and 0.66 to 0.67, respectively). Dabigatran provided a greater reduction of D-dimer levels than warfarin regardless of baseline anticoagulant treatment. On-treatment levels of FVIIa were markedly reduced by warfarin (median 12.1-13.8 mU/ml) but significantly higher with dabigatran (median 39.4-49.0 mU/ml) at all-time points. Dabigatran is associated with greater reduction in D-dimer without the pronounced reduction of FVIIa seen with warfarin. These different effects on the coagulation system might explain the better efficacy and less intracranial bleeding observed with dabigatran compared with warfarin. PMID:26818781

  2. Parenteral anticoagulants: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Garcia, David A; Baglin, Trevor P; Weitz, Jeffrey I; Samama, Meyer Michel

    2012-02-01

    This article describes the pharmacology of approved parenteral anticoagulants. These include the indirect anticoagulants, unfractionated heparin (UFH), low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs), fondaparinux, and danaparoid, as well as the direct thrombin inhibitors hirudin, bivalirudin, and argatroban. UFH is a heterogeneous mixture of glycosaminoglycans that bind to antithrombin via a unique pentasaccharide sequence and catalyze the inactivation of thrombin, factor Xa, and other clotting enzymes. Heparin also binds to cells and plasma proteins other than antithrombin causing unpredictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties and triggering nonhemorrhagic side effects, such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) and osteoporosis. LMWHs have greater inhibitory activity against factor Xa than thrombin and exhibit less binding to cells and plasma proteins than heparin. Consequently, LMWH preparations have more predictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, have a longer half-life than heparin, and are associated with a lower risk of nonhemorrhagic side effects. LMWHs can be administered once daily or bid by subcutaneous injection, without coagulation monitoring. Based on their greater convenience, LMWHs have replaced UFH for many clinical indications. Fondaparinux, a synthetic pentasaccharide, catalyzes the inhibition of factor Xa, but not thrombin, in an antithrombin-dependent fashion. Fondaparinux binds only to antithrombin. Therefore, fondaparinux-associated HIT or osteoporosis is unlikely to occur. Fondaparinux exhibits complete bioavailability when administered subcutaneously, has a longer half-life than LMWHs, and is given once daily by subcutaneous injection in fixed doses, without coagulation monitoring. Three additional parenteral direct thrombin inhibitors and danaparoid are approved as alternatives to heparin in patients with HIT. PMID:22315264

  3. Simplified Citrate Anticoagulation for CRRT Without Calcium Replacement.

    PubMed

    Broman, Marcus; Klarin, Bengt; Sandin, Karin; Carlsson, Ola; Wieslander, Anders; Sternby, Jan; Godaly, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Since 2012, citrate anticoagulation is the recommended anticoagulation strategy for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). The main drawback using citrate as anticoagulant compared with heparin is the need for calcium replacement and the rigorous control of calcium levels. This study investigated the possibility to achieve anticoagulation while eliminating the need for calcium replacement. This was successfully achieved by including citrate and calcium in all CRRT solutions. Thereby the total calcium concentration was kept constant throughout the extracorporeal circuit, whereas the ionized calcium was kept at low levels enough to avoid clotting. Being a completely new concept, only five patients with acute renal failure were included in a short, prospective, intensely supervised nonrandomized pilot study. Systemic electrolyte levels and acid-base parameters were stable and remained within physiologic levels. Ionized calcium levels declined slightly initially but stabilized at 1.1 mmol/L. Plasma citrate concentrations stabilized at approximately 0.6 mmol/L. All postfilter ionized calcium levels were <0.5 mmol/L, that is, an anticoagulation effect was reached. All filter pressures were normal indicating no clotting problems, and no visible clotting was observed. No calcium replacement was needed. This pilot study suggests that it is possible to perform regional citrate anticoagulation without the need for separate calcium infusion during CRRT. PMID:25851312

  4. Underuse of anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Vallakati, Ajay; Lewis, William R

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. Guidelines recommend anticoagulation for patients with intermediate and high stroke risk (CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥ 2). Underuse of anticoagulants among eligible patients remains a persistent problem. Evidence demonstrates that the psychology of the fear of causing harm (omission bias) results in physicians' hesitancy to initiate anticoagulation and an inaccurate estimation of stroke risk. The American Heart Association (AHA) initiated the Get With The Guidelines-AFIB (GWTG-AFIB) module in June 2013 to enhance guideline adherence for treatment and management of AF. Better quality of care for AF patients can be provided by increasing adherence to anticoagulation guidelines and improving patient compliance with anticoagulation therapy through education and established protocols. Nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants may facilitate better patient adherence due to ease of administration and reduced monitoring burden. In this review, we discuss the reasons for underuse, omission bias contributing to underuse, and different strategies to address this issue. PMID:26666288

  5. New anticoagulants for the prevention of venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Becattini, Cecilia; Lignani, Alessandra; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2010-01-01

    Anticoagulant drugs have an essential role in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic diseases. Currently available anticoagulants substantially reduce the incidence of thromboembolic events in a number of clinical conditions. However, these agents have limitations that strengthen the case for the development of new anticoagulants. An ideal anticoagulant should be at least as effective as those currently in use, as well as safe, simple to use, and widely applicable. The majority of new anticoagulants currently under investigation are small molecules with a selective and direct anti-Xa or antithrombin action, allowing oral administration in fixed doses. These new agents are in different phases of clinical development. The anti-Xa agent rivaroxaban and the antithrombin agent dabigatran are already available for the prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in some countries. Apixaban is in an advanced phase of clinical development and several anti-Xa agents are currently approaching phase III clinical trials. Promising results in terms of efficacy and safety profiles have been obtained with these agents in different clinical conditions. Differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics could offer the potential for individualized anticoagulant therapies in the near future. PMID:20531960

  6. Anticoagulants versus cancer.

    PubMed

    Tieken, Chris; Versteeg, Henri H

    2016-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) and cancer are strongly associated, and present a major challenge in cancer patient treatment. Cancer patients have a higher risk of developing VTE, although the risk differs widely between tumour types. VTE prophylaxis is routinely given to cancer patients, in the form of vitamin K antagonists (VKA) or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). Several studies have reported that cancer patients receiving anticoagulants show prolonged survival and this effect was more pronounced in patients with a good prognosis, although the mechanism is poorly understood. Tissue Factor (TF) is the initiator of extrinsic coagulation, but its non-haemostatic signalling via protease-activated receptors (PARs) is a potent driver of tumour angiogenesis. Furthermore, coagulation activation is strongly implicated in tumour cell migration and metastasis. This review discusses the effects of anticoagulants on cancer progression in patients, tumour cell behaviour, angiogenesis, and metastasis in in vitro and in vivo models. Inhibition of TF signalling shows great promise in curbing angiogenesis and in vivo tumour growth, but whether this translates to patients is not yet known. Furthermore, non-haemostatic properties of coagulation factors in cancer progression are discussed, which provide exciting opportunities on limiting oncologic processes without affecting blood coagulation. PMID:27067969

  7. Factors affecting the quality of anticoagulation with warfarin: experience of one cardiac centre

    PubMed Central

    Ciurus, Tomasz; Cichocka-Radwan, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The risk of complications in anticoagulation therapy can be reduced by maximising the percentage of time spent by the patient in the optimal therapeutic range (TTR). However, little is known about the predictors of anticoagulation control. The aim of this paper was to assess the quality of anticoagulant therapy in patients on warfarin and to identify the factors affecting its deterioration. Material and methods We studied 149 patients who required anticoagulant therapy with warfarin due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation and/or venous thromboembolism. Each patient underwent proper training regarding the implemented treatment and remained under constant medical care. Results The mean age of the patients was 68.8 ± 12.6 years, and 59% were male. A total of 2460 international normalised ratio (INR) measurements were collected during the 18-month period. The mean TTR in the studied cohort was 76 ± 21%, and the median was 80%. The level at which high-quality anticoagulation was recorded for this study was based on TTR values above 80%. Seventy-five patients with TTR ≥ 80% were included in the stable anticoagulation group (TTR ≥ 80%); the remaining 74 patients constituted the unstable anticoagulation group (TTR < 80%). According to multivariate stepwise regression analysis, the independent variables increasing the risk of deterioration of anticoagulation quality were: arterial hypertension (OR 2.74 [CI 95%: 1.06-7.10]; p = 0.038), amiodarone therapy (OR 4.22 [CI 95%: 1.30-13.70]; p = 0.017), and obesity (OR 1.11 [CI 95%: 1.02-1.21]; p = 0.013). Conclusions The presence of obesity, hypertension, or amiodarone therapy decreases the quality of anticoagulation with warfarin. High quality of anticoagulation can be achieved through proper monitoring and education of patients. PMID:26855650

  8. Comparing new anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2012-12-01

    For years, the pharmaceutical industry has been trying to find a safe and effective drug to replace warfarin. Although warfarin is an effective anticoagulant, its pharmacology, adverse effects, and risk profiles dictate that patients taking this medication must be monitored judiciously. The US Food and Drug Administration has approved two drugs for commercial use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban, that will compete directly with warfarin for use in specific indications. Because of direct marketing to patients, physicians are being asked to comment on these new medications. This brief review illustrates the data available for the two new drugs when compared to warfarin for the specified indications. For some patients, these drugs may be highly beneficial and offer an excellent alternative to warfarin. For others, warfarin may still be the preferred drug. PMID:23211502

  9. Avulsion of the auricle in an anticoagulated patient: is leeching contraindicated? A review and a case.

    PubMed

    Mommsen, Jens; Rodríguez-Fernández, Javier; Mateos-Micas, Mario; Vázquez-Bouso, Olga; Gumbao-Grau, Victor; Forteza-Gonzalez, Gabriel

    2011-06-01

    Amputation of the auricle is a periodic occurrence leading to disfigurement if not treated properly. Venous stasis is a common complication in reattachments and requires decongestant and anticoagulant treatment. Today, leech therapy is the treatment of choice. Common problems are that it is not available everywhere and that it is usually contraindicated in anticoagulated patients. The peculiarities of leech therapy and the various aspects of surgical management are reviewed. A case of a partial amputation of the auricle in a patient under concomitant anticoagulation therapy with warfarin is presented. The amputated part was reattached in another hospital without microvascular anastomosis. The patient presented to our department with early signs of venous congestion. Leech therapy was started 35 hours after trauma, and the patient continued his anticoagulation therapy. With this treatment, 90% of the amputated part was rescued. The anticoagulation therapy of the patient may have played an important role in the first hours after reattachment, preventing capillary thrombosis and in consequence facilitating the minimal oxygenation necessary. The claim that anticoagulation therapy is a contraindication to leeching should be questioned in cases of reattachments in well-controllable locations without arterial anastomosis. PMID:22655116

  10. Avulsion of the Auricle in an Anticoagulated Patient: Is Leeching Contraindicated? A Review and a Case

    PubMed Central

    Mommsen, Jens; Rodríguez-Fernández, Javier; Mateos-Micas, Mario; Vázquez-Bouso, Olga; Gumbao-Grau, Victor; Forteza-Gonzalez, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    Amputation of the auricle is a periodic occurrence leading to disfigurement if not treated properly. Venous stasis is a common complication in reattachments and requires decongestant and anticoagulant treatment. Today, leech therapy is the treatment of choice. Common problems are that it is not available everywhere and that it is usually contraindicated in anticoagulated patients. The peculiarities of leech therapy and the various aspects of surgical management are reviewed. A case of a partial amputation of the auricle in a patient under concomitant anticoagulation therapy with warfarin is presented. The amputated part was reattached in another hospital without microvascular anastomosis. The patient presented to our department with early signs of venous congestion. Leech therapy was started 35 hours after trauma, and the patient continued his anticoagulation therapy. With this treatment, 90% of the amputated part was rescued. The anticoagulation therapy of the patient may have played an important role in the first hours after reattachment, preventing capillary thrombosis and in consequence facilitating the minimal oxygenation necessary. The claim that anticoagulation therapy is a contraindication to leeching should be questioned in cases of reattachments in well-controllable locations without arterial anastomosis. PMID:22655116

  11. Antithrombotic therapy use in patients with atrial fibrillation before the era of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants: the Global Registry on Long-Term Oral Antithrombotic Treatment in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation (GLORIA-AF) Phase I cohort

    PubMed Central

    Huisman, Menno V.; Ma, Chang Sheng; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Dubner, Sergio J.; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Rothman, Kenneth J.; Teutsch, Christine; Schoof, Nils; Kleine, Eva; Bartels, Dorothee B.; Lip, Gregory Y.H.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The introduction of non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which differ from the earlier vitamin K antagonist (VKA) treatments, has changed the approach to stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF). GLORIA-AF is a prospective, global registry programme describing the selection of antithrombotic treatment in newly diagnosed AF patients at risk of stroke. It comprises three phases: Phase I, before the introduction of NOACs; Phase II, during the time of the introduction of dabigatran, the first NOAC; and Phase III, once NOACs have been established in clinical practice. Methods and results In Phase I, 1063 patients were eligible from the 1100 enrolled (54.3% male; median age 70 years); patients were from China (67.1%), Europe (EU; 27.4%), and the Middle East (ME; 5.6%). The majority of patients using VKAs had high stroke risk (CHA2DS2-VASc ≥ 2; 86.5%); 13.5% had moderate risk (CHA2DS2-VASc = 1). Vitamin K antagonist use was higher for persistent/permanent AF (47.7%) than that for paroxysmal (23.9%). Most patients in China were treated with antiplatelet agents (53.7%) vs. 27.1% in EU and 28.8% in ME. In China, 25.9% of patients had no antithrombotic therapy, vs. 8.6% in EU and 8.5% in ME. Conclusion Phase I of GLORIA-AF shows that VKAs were mostly used in patients with persistent/permanent (vs. paroxysmal) AF and in those with high stroke risk. Furthermore, there were meaningful geographical differences in the use of VKA therapy in the era before the availability of NOACs, including a much lower use of VKAs in China, where most patients either received antiplatelet agents or no antithrombotic treatment. PMID:27335063

  12. The use of anticoagulation in pediatric cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Boris, JR; Harris, MA

    2003-01-01

    Palliation and repair of increasingly complex congenital heart defects as well as the emergence of novel contexts has led to multiple scenarios in which a real or potential risk of thromboembolism may exist. While various anticoagulation methodologies have been well defined for adults, there are few studies relating directly to pediatric patients. This article reviews a number of specific pediatric disease states, the representative pediatric literature, and, where appropriate, the corresponding adult literature. In so doing, the art and science of pediatric cardiac anticoagulation is defined with the hope to engender further thought regarding future directions of study and therapy. PMID:22368628

  13. A pharmacologic overview of current and emerging anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Nutescu, Edith A; Shapiro, Nancy L; Chevalier, Aimee; Amin, Alpesh N

    2005-04-01

    For over 50 years, anticoagulant options for the treatment and prevention of thrombosis have been limited mainly to traditional agents such as unfractionated heparin and oral vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin. These traditional agents are fraught with limitations that complicate their clinical use. A variety of novel anticoagulants with improved pharmacologic and clinical profiles have recently been introduced or are in development, offering benefits over traditional therapies. Specifically, progress has been made in the development of low-molecular-weight heparins, factor Xa inhibitors, and direct thrombin inhibitors. Because of their convenience and ease of use, some of these novel compounds are competing with the traditional anticoagulants and are needed additions to the antithrombotic arsenal. PMID:15853173

  14. Platelet aggregation in presence of anticoagulants dependent pseudothrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, G; Calvano, D; Mattaini, R; Cosini, I; Giardini, C

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of pseudothrombocytopenia anticoagulants dependence in a healthy woman. Platelet count was performed on the automated impedance haematological analyzer utilizing peripheral blood samples anticoagulated with ethylene diamine tetra-acetate, heparin and sodium citrate. We pointed out that the severe thrombocytopenia was principally time and ethylene diamine tetra-acetate dependent. As regard both the temperature (37 degrees C) and the other anticoagulants (heparin, sodium citrate), the phenomenon was variable. The phenomenon "in vitro" was confirmed by the normal aggregation, moreover we showed that the platelets of a normal subject aggregated with plasma and ethylene diamine tetra-acetate of pseudothrombocytopenic subject. We report this case because often, in a healthy subject, it is possible to make a mistake in diagnosis and to employ more sophisticated and expansive investigations. Moreover it is very important to point out the pseudothrombocytopenia in case of heparinic therapy because it is possible to have a dilated thrombocytopenia. PMID:8414132

  15. Management of hemorrhage with the target-specific oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Pluym, Mark; Howell, Gregory

    2014-08-01

    The target-specific oral anticoagulants have recently been introduced as alternatives to warfarin for both prophylactic and therapeutic indications. Although their efficacy and side-effect profiles have been favorable, there is significant concern about management of hemorrhage with these agents as there is no direct reversal agent available. It is important for clinicians to be aware of these agents and the issues that surround them. Most of the management of hemorrhage is based on expert opinion and case reviews. Given the potentially catastrophic consequences of acute hemorrhage while patients are on anticoagulation, specific treatments are needed. Some methods that have been described include activated charcoal, hemodialysis, prohemostatic agents, and transfusions. Target-specific therapies have been shown to be effective in early studies in animal models; however, the effects in humans are still under investigation. More investigation is needed on the management of bleeding complications from target-specific oral anticoagulants. PMID:25255409

  16. Laparoscopic resection of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the lower rectum in a patient with coronary artery disease following long-term neoadjuvant imatinib treatment and anticoagulation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Surgery is the mainstay of treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). However, complete resection of rectal GISTs is sometimes difficult because of bulkiness and/or anatomical reasons. Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy has gained attention as an alternative treatment to increase the chance of en bloc resection of rectal GISTs, although it usually takes several months. In this case report, we first demonstrated that neoadjuvant imatinib therapy can be performed safely not only to downsize tumors, but also to allow adequate time for the effective treatment of major comorbid illnesses. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with a 45 mm GIST of the lower rectum. He also had severe stenosis in the proximal segment of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Following the implantation of a drug-eluting stent, the patient received imatinib together with dual anti-platelet therapy for 12 months without obvious side effects. Follow-up image studies revealed tumor shrinkage as well as stent patency. En bloc resection of the GIST was performed laparoscopically, which preserved the anus. The patient is currently alive without any evidence of relapse for 12 months after surgery. PMID:25022862

  17. [The practice guideline 'Neuraxis blockade and anticoagulation'].

    PubMed

    De Lange, J J; Van Kleef, J W; Van Everdingen, J J E

    2004-07-31

    In a patient with a coagulation disorder, the administration of a local anaesthetic by means of a needle or via the insertion of a catheter into the epidural space or spinal cavity may lead to bleeding and haematoma formation, with a danger of pressure on the spinal cord or nerve roots. Employing the method of the Dutch Institute for Healthcare (CBO) for the development of practice guidelines, a working group of anaesthesiologists, a haematologist and a hospital chemist have drawn up recommendations for neuraxis blockade in combination with anticoagulant therapy. In patients with a clinically acquired tendency toward increased bleeding, the management is highly dependent on the cause of the bleeding tendency. If the patient uses acetylsalicylic acid or clopidogrel, the medication must be withdrawn at least 10 days before neuraxis blockade is started. Therapy with glycoprotein-IIb/IIIa-receptor antagonists is an absolute contra-indication for neuraxis blockade. In patients who are using coumarin derivatives, neuraxis blockade results in an increased risk of a neuraxial haematoma. The coumarin derivative should then be withdrawn and replaced by a different form of anticoagulation. The use of low-molecular-weight heparin at the usual prophylactic dosage is not a contra-indication for neuraxis blockade and the risk of a neuraxial haematoma following neuraxis blockade is also not increased significantly by the subcutaneous administration of unfractionated heparin. PMID:15366721

  18. Anticoagulation Considerations for Travel to High Altitude.

    PubMed

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2015-09-01

    DeLoughery, Thomas G. Anticoagulation considerations for travel to high altitude. High Alt Med Biol 16:181-185, 2015.-An increasing percentage of the population are on anticoagulation medicine for clinical reasons ranging from stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation to long term prevention of deep venous thrombosis. In recent years, several new direct oral anticoagulants have entered the market. The key questions that should be kept in mind when approaching a potential traveler on anticoagulation are: 1) why is the patient on anticoagulation? 2) do they need to stay on anticoagulation? 3) what are the choices for their anticoagulation? 4) will there be any drug interactions with medications needed for travel? and 5) how will they monitor their anticoagulation while traveling? Knowing the answers to these questions then can allow for proper counseling and planning for the anticoagulated traveler's trip. PMID:26186419

  19. Novel oral anticoagulants in acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costopoulos, Charis; Niespialowska-Steuden, Maria; Kukreja, Neville; Gorog, Diana A

    2013-09-10

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with a prevalence that has now reached pandemic levels as a consequence of the rapid modernization of the developing world. Its presentation as an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a frequent reason for hospital admission and of profound implications for personal, societal and global health. Despite improvements in the management of ACS with anti-platelet and anticoagulant therapy and revascularization techniques, many patients continue to suffer recurrent ischemic events. The need to reduce future cardiovascular events has led to the development of novel therapies to prevent coronary thrombosis, targeting thrombin-mediated pathways. These include direct Xa inhibitors (apixaban, rivaroxaban and darexaban), direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran) and PAR 1 antagonists (vorapaxar and atopaxar). This article critically reviews the comparative mechanisms of action, the risks and benefits, together with the clinical evidence base for the use of these novel oral agents in the management of ACS patients. PMID:22989603

  20. Reversing anticoagulant effects of novel oral anticoagulants: role of ciraparantag, andexanet alfa, and idarucizumab

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tiffany Y; Vaidya, Vaibhav R; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2016-01-01

    Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are increasingly used in clinical practice, but lack of commercially available reversal agents is a major barrier for mainstream use of these therapies. Specific antidotes to NOACs are under development. Idarucizumab (aDabi-Fab, BI 655075) is a novel humanized mouse monoclonal antibody that binds dabigatran and reverses its anticoagulant effect. In a recent Phase III study (Reversal Effects of Idarucizumab on Active Dabigatran), a 5 g intravenous infusion of idarucizumab resulted in the normalization of dilute thrombin time in 98% and 93% of the two groups studied, with normalization of ecarin-clotting time in 89% and 88% patients. Two other antidotes, andexanet alfa (PRT064445) and ciraparantag (PER977) are also under development for reversal of NOACs. In this review, we discuss commonly encountered management issues with NOACs such as periprocedural management, laboratory monitoring of anticoagulation, and management of bleeding. We review currently available data regarding specific antidotes to NOACs with respect to pharmacology and clinical trials. PMID:26937198

  1. Utility of a dedicated pediatric cardiac anticoagulation program: the Boston Children's Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jenna M; Hellinger, Amy; Dionne, Roger; Brown, Loren; Galvin, Rosemary; Griggs, Suzanne; Mittler, Karen; Harney, Kathy; Manzi, Shannon; VanderPluym, Christina; Baker, Annette; O'Brien, Patricia; O'Connell, Cheryl; Almond, Christopher S

    2015-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is the leading cause of stroke in children. Warfarin therapy can be difficult to manage safely in this population because of its narrow therapeutic index, multiple drug and dietary interactions, small patient size, high-risk cardiac indications, and lack of data to support anticoagulation recommendations. We sought to describe our institution's effort to develop a dedicated cardiac anticoagulation service to address the special needs of this population and to review the literature. In 2009, in response to Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goals for Anticoagulation, Boston Children's Hospital created a dedicated pediatric Cardiac Anticoagulation Monitoring Program (CAMP). The primary purpose was to provide centralized management of outpatient anticoagulation to cardiac patients, to serve as a disease-specific resource to families and providers, and to devise strategies to evolve clinical care with rapidly emerging trends in anticoagulation care. Over 5 years the CAMP Service, staffed by a primary pediatric cardiology attending, a full-time nurse practitioner, and administrative assistant with dedicated support from pharmacy and nutrition, has enrolled over 240 patients ranging in age from 5 months to 55 years. The most common indications include a prosthetic valve (34 %), Fontan prophylaxis (20 %), atrial arrhythmias (11 %), cardiomyopathy (10 %), Kawasaki disease (7 %), and a ventricular assist device (2 %). A patient-centered multi-disciplinary cardiac anticoagulation clinic was created in 2012. Overall program international normalized ratio (INR) time in therapeutic range (TTR) is favorable at 67 % (81 % with a 0.2 margin) and has improved steadily over 5 years. Pediatric-specific guidelines for VKOR1 and CYP2C9 pharmacogenomics testing, procedural bridging with enoxaparin, novel anticoagulant use, and quality metrics have been developed. Program satisfaction is rated highly among families and providers. A dedicated pediatric

  2. Impact of Global Geographic Region on Time in Therapeutic Range on Warfarin Anticoagulant Therapy: Data From the ROCKET AF Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Daniel E.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Pan, Guohua; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Becker, Richard C.; Breithardt, Günter; Hankey, Graeme J.; Hacke, Werner; Nessel, Christopher C.; Patel, Manesh R.; Califf, Robert M.; Fox, Keith A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy remains the most common method of stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Time in therapeutic range (TTR) is a widely cited measure of the quality of VKA therapy. We sought to identify factors associated with TTR in a large, international clinical trial. Methods and Results TTR (international normalized ratio [INR] 2.0 to 3.0) was determined using standard linear interpolation in patients randomized to warfarin in the ROCKET AF trial. Factors associated with TTR at the individual patient level (i‐TTR) were determined via multivariable linear regression. Among 6983 patients taking warfarin, recruited from 45 countries grouped into 7 regions, the mean i‐TTR was 55.2% (SD 21.3%) and the median i‐TTR was 57.9% (interquartile range 43.0% to 70.6%). The mean time with INR <2 was 29.1% and the mean time with an INR >3 was 15.7%. While multiple clinical features were associated with i‐TTR, dominant determinants were previous warfarin use (mean i‐TTR of 61.1% for warfarin‐experienced versus 47.4% in VKA‐naïve patients) and geographic region where patients were managed (mean i‐TTR varied from 64.1% to 35.9%). These effects persisted in multivariable analysis. Regions with the lowest i‐TTRs had INR distributions shifted toward lower INR values and had longer inter‐INR test intervals. Conclusions Independent of patient clinical features, the regional location of medical care is a dominant determinant of variation in i‐TTR in global studies of warfarin. Regional differences in mean i‐TTR are heavily influenced by subtherapeutic INR values and are associated with reduced frequency of INR testing. Clinical Trial Registration URL: ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00403767. PMID:23525418

  3. Direct Oral Anticoagulants for the Management of Thromboembolic Disorders: The Importance of Adherence and Persistence in Achieving Beneficial Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh; Marrs, Joel C

    2016-10-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is central to the management of thromboembolic disorders, and the use of direct oral anticoagulants offers several advantages over standard therapy with parenteral heparins and vitamin K antagonists. In phase III clinical trials, the direct oral anticoagulants (given once or twice daily) all demonstrated favorable benefit-risk profiles compared with conventional standard therapy for the treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism and for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. In clinical practice, many factors may influence overall clinical outcomes in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy, including adherence and persistence to the prescribed therapy, which becomes particularly important during long-term therapy. When choosing an anticoagulant for an individual patient, the pharmacological and clinical profile of the anticoagulant, its dosing regimen, and the patient's clinical characteristics (eg, renal function and comorbidities) and preferences should be considered. This review examines the rationale for and clinical evidence of the selected dosing regimens of the direct oral anticoagulants for the treatment of venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. The potential influence of dosing strategies (eg, once- or twice-daily dosing) and other factors on patient adherence and therapy persistence are also discussed. PMID:26316518

  4. Novel oral anticoagulants in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Pilar; Roldán, Vanessa; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2014-01-01

    Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF) confers an increased risk of thromboembolism, with a 5-fold higher risk of ischemic stroke. Oral anticoagulation (OAC) has shown to be highly effective in preventing stroke and mortality compared to placebo and is also used in patients without AF for both treatment and prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism. The OAC halts the coagulation by different mechanisms. Until recently, the only option was the vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), but their inherent limitations have promoted the development of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which may offer efficacious and safer alternatives. Patients should be carefully selected to receive the most suitable treatment for each one. As the VKA efficacy and safety largely rely on the time the patient remains within the therapeutic range, this could be a useful selection criterion. Bleeding remains the main complication of all OACs. Although clinical trials of stroke prevention in AF have shown a significant reduction in hemorrhagic stroke and intracranial bleeding with the NOACs, as prescriptions are increasing, clinicians need to be prepared to accurate management of bleeding complications. Withholding the drug is usually enough for most cases of mild bleeding, but in patients with major, life-threatening bleeding, other measures, such as fluid replacement and blood transfusion, might be necessary while waiting for specific reversal agents that may reach the market soon. In case of acute bleeding, the accurate estimation of anticoagulant effect could also be needed, but the currently available coagulation tests only offer a qualitative measure. While awaiting long-term safety data, the choice between all these available therapies should be based on patient preferences, compliance, and ease of administration as well as on local factors affecting cost-effectiveness. But the increasing variety of therapeutic options when chronic OAC is needed can only improve the provided health care. PMID

  5. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation. Is there a gap in care for ambulatory patients?

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Wayne; Nicol, Kelly; Anderson, David; Brownell, Brenda; Chiasson, Meredith; Burge, Frederick I.; Flowerdew, Gordon; Cox, Jafna

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Atrial fibrillation (AF) substantially increases risk of stroke. Evidence suggests that anticoagulation to reduce risk is underused (a "care gap"). Our objectives were to clarify measures of this gap in care by including data from family physicians and to determine why eligible patients were not receiving anticoagulation therapy. DESIGN: Telephone survey of family physicians regarding specific patients in their practices. SETTING: Nova Scotia. PARTICIPANTS: Ambulatory AF patients not taking warfarin who had risk factors that made anticoagulation appropriate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of patients removed from the care gap; reasons given for not giving the remainder anticoagulants. RESULTS: Half the patients thought to be in the care gap had previously unknown contraindications to anticoagulation, lacked a clear indication for anticoagulation, or were taking warfarin. Patients' refusal and anticipated problems with compliance and monitoring were among the reasons for not giving patients anticoagulants. CONCLUSION: Adding data from primary care physicians significantly narrowed the care gap. Attention should focus on the remaining reasons for not giving eligible patients anticoagulants. PMID:15508374

  6. Unfavourable effects of medically indicated oral anticoagulants on survival in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, Michael; Wijsenbeek, Marlies S; Vasakova, Martina; Spagnolo, Paolo; Kolb, Martin; Costabel, Ulrich; Weycker, Derek; Kirchgaessler, Klaus-Uwe; Maher, Toby M

    2016-06-01

    Procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity has been associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF); however, investigation of anticoagulant therapy in IPF has suggested deleterious effects. This post hoc analysis evaluated the effect of medically indicated anticoagulation on mortality and other clinical outcomes in IPF.Patients randomised to placebo (n=624) from three controlled trials in IPF were analysed by oral anticoagulant use. End-points included all-cause and IPF-related mortality, disease progression, hospitalisation, and adverse events, over 1 year.At baseline, 32 (5.1%) patients randomised to placebo were prescribed anticoagulants for non-IPF indications, 29 (90.6%) of whom received warfarin. Unadjusted analyses demonstrated significantly higher all-cause and IPF-related mortality at 1 year in baseline anticoagulant users versus nonusers (15.6% versus 6.3%, p=0.039 and 15.6% versus 3.9%, p=0.002, respectively). In multivariate analyses, baseline use of anticoagulants was an independent predictor of IPF-related mortality (hazard ratio 4.7, p=0.034), but not other end-points. Rates of bleeding and cardiac events did not differ significantly between groups. In an exploratory analysis, anticoagulant use at any time during the study was an independent predictor of all end-points.This post hoc analysis suggests that anticoagulants used for non-IPF indications may have unfavourable effects in IPF patients. Future studies are needed to explore this relationship further. PMID:27103382

  7. Novel oral anticoagulants and their role in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Wittkowsky, Ann K

    2011-12-01

    The complexities of oral anticoagulation with warfarin have led to the search for more practical alternative agents. Novel direct factor IIa inhibitors and direct factor Xa inhibitors currently in development can be administered at a fixed dose and do not require routine coagulation monitoring and ongoing dosage adjustment to ensure their effectiveness and safety. A number of phase III trials of these agents for the prevention of venous thromboembolism associated with orthopedic surgery and acute medical illness, for the treatment of venous thromboembolism, and for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation have been completed, with almost universally positive results. If these novel agents are approved for use in the United States, the future of oral anticoagulant therapy will allow a more nuanced approach to drug selection than has been available in the past. Attention to drug interactions and renal function will be required, as methods to measure the presence of these agents are not precise, cannot quantify the degree of anticoagulant present, and are influenced by the changes in serum drug concentrations during the dosing interval. In the future, patient preferences and the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of individual drugs will be able to be matched to optimize therapy. These new agents represent a new paradigm for anticoagulation that promises to improve patient care in the long term. PMID:22122180

  8. Anticoagulation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jeffrey C; Pugliese, Steven C; Fox, Daniel L; Badesch, David B

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by molecular and pathologic alteration to the pulmonary circulation, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular failure, and eventual death. Pharmacologic treatment of PAH consists of use of a multitude of pulmonary vasodilators, sometimes in combination. PAH has been associated with increased thrombosis and disrupted coagulation and fibrinolysis, making anticoagulation an attractive and frequently employed therapeutic modality. Observational studies have provided some insight into the therapeutic potential of anticoagulation in idiopathic PAH, but there is a distinct lack of well-controlled prospective trials. Due to the conflicting evidence, there is a large amount of heterogeneity in the application of therapeutic anticoagulation in PAH and further well-controlled prospective trials are needed to clarify its role in treating PAH. PMID:27137522

  9. The novel anticoagulants: entering a new era.

    PubMed

    Bounameaux, H

    2009-02-01

    During the past five decades, anticoagulant therapy has consisted of rapidly acting parenteral drugs (unfractionated heparin [UFH] low-molecular-weight heparins [LMWH]) for prevention of venous thromboembolism and initial treatment of arterial and venous thromboembolism, whereas vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are used for longer term oral treatment. These drugs act by indirectly inhibiting several activated plasma clotting factors (UFH, LMWH) or by blocking the synthesis of some of them (VKA). In recent years, compounds that specifically block activated coagulation factor X (FXa) or thrombin have been developed. Thus, fondaparinux, and its long-acting derivative idraparinux, are administered subcutaneously. These substances inhibit F Xa indirectly via antithrombin. Small molecules have also been developed that directly block FXa (rivaroxaban, apixaban) or thrombin (dabigatran etexilate) following oral administration. In the present review we discuss the currently available evidence supporting the use of these new anticoagulants, in particular rivaroxaban and dabigatran etexilate, in the setting of thromboprophylaxis following major orthopaedic surgery, and the broader perspectives that these new drugs may open up in the next few years. PMID:19204837

  10. Anticoagulation in Atrial Fibrillation – Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Gersh, Bernard J; Camm, A John

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the current status of the use of anticoagulation for the treatment of AF, particularly with the use of non-vitamin K-dependent anticoagulants. Comparisons between these agents and warfarin are made and methods for assessment of anticoagulant activity and reversal are discussed. PMID:26835109

  11. Anticoagulation and delayed bowel resection in the management of mesenteric venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Kee; Chun, Jae Min; Huh, Seung

    2013-01-01

    Acute mesenteric venous thrombosis is potentially lethal because it can result in mesenteric ischemia and, ultimately, bowel infarction requiring surgical intervention. Systemic anticoagulation for the prevention of thrombus propagation is a well-recognized treatment modality and the current mainstay therapy for patients with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis. However, the decision between prompt surgical exploration vs conservative treatment with anticoagulation is somewhat difficult in patients with suspected bowel ischemia. Here we describe a patient with acute mesenteric venous thrombosis who presented with bowel ischemia and was treated with anticoagulation and delayed short-segment bowel resection. PMID:23946612

  12. Anticoagulation in Older Adults with Multimorbidity.

    PubMed

    Parks, Anna L; Fang, Margaret C

    2016-05-01

    The number of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) who are of advanced age or have multiple comorbidities is expected to increase substantially. Older patients with AF generally gain a net benefit from anticoagulation. Guidelines typically recommend anticoagulation. There are multiple challenges in the safe use of anticoagulation in frail patients, including bleeding risk, monitoring and adherence, and polypharmacy. Although there are options for chronic oral anticoagulation, clinicians must understand the unique advantages and disadvantages of these medications when developing a management plan. This article reviews issues surrounding the appropriate use and selection of anticoagulants in complex older patients with AF. PMID:27113150

  13. Citrate Anticoagulation for CRRT in Children: Comparison with Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Sara Nicole; Santiago, Maria José; López-Herce, Jesús; García, Miriam; Del Castillo, Jimena; Alcaraz, Andrés José; Bellón, Jose María

    2014-01-01

    Regional anticoagulation with citrate is an alternative to heparin in continuous renal replacement therapies, which may prolong circuit lifetime and decrease hemorrhagic complications. A retrospective comparative cohort study based on a prospective observational registry was conducted including critically ill children undergoing CRRT. Efficacy, measured as circuit survival, and secondary effects of heparin and citrate were compared. 12 patients on CRRT with citrate anticoagulation and 24 patients with heparin anticoagulation were analyzed. Median citrate dose was 2.6 mmol/L. Median calcium dose was 0.16 mEq/kg/h. Median heparin dose was 15 UI/kg/h. Median circuit survival was 48 hours with citrate and 31 hours with heparin (P = 0.028). 66.6% of patients treated with citrate developed mild metabolic alkalosis, which was directly related to citrate dose. There were no cases of citrate intoxication: median total calcium/ionic calcium index (CaT/I) of 2.16 and a maximum CaT/I of 2.33, without metabolic acidosis. In the citrate group, 45.5% of patients developed hypochloremia and 27.3% hypomagnesemia. In the heparin group, 27.8% developed hypophosphatemia. Three patients were moved from heparin to citrate to control postoperatory bleeding. In conclusion citrate is a safe and effective anticoagulation method for CRRT in children and it achieves longer circuit survival than heparin. PMID:25157369

  14. Contact laser prostatectomy in a patient on chronic anticoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Edward J.

    1995-05-01

    The `gold standard' therapy for patients with symptomatic bladder outlet obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia has always been electrocautery TURP. However, in patients with medical problems requiring chronic anticoagulation, this procedure is contraindicated due to the extreme risk of hemorrhage, both during the procedure and the immediate post operative period. With the recent development of contact laser prostatectomy the patient on chronic anticoagulation can safely undergo the procedure. Herein, I present a case of a 60 year old with significant bladder outlet obstruction yielding an AUA symptom score of 18. The patient had a history of multiple episodes of deep venous thrombosis of the left leg with three prior pulmonary emboli. He was maintained on chronic anticoagulation with alternating days of 3.5 mg. and 5.0 mg. of warfarin sodium (coumadin). Preoperative cystoscopy showed a 4 cm prostatic fossa obstructed by tri-lobar hypertrophy, with large kissing lateral lobes and visual obstruction from the verumontanum. The patient underwent a contact laser prostatectomy with the SLT Nd:YAG laser at 50 watts. There was minimal bleeding both during the procedure and in the immediate postoperative period. At three months post-op the AUA symptom score had decreased to 2. This case demonstrated that contact laser prostatectomy can be safely and effectively performed in patients on chronic anticoagulation.

  15. Citrate anticoagulation for CRRT in children: comparison with heparin.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Sara Nicole; Santiago, Maria José; López-Herce, Jesús; García, Miriam; Del Castillo, Jimena; Alcaraz, Andrés José; Bellón, Jose María

    2014-01-01

    Regional anticoagulation with citrate is an alternative to heparin in continuous renal replacement therapies, which may prolong circuit lifetime and decrease hemorrhagic complications. A retrospective comparative cohort study based on a prospective observational registry was conducted including critically ill children undergoing CRRT. Efficacy, measured as circuit survival, and secondary effects of heparin and citrate were compared. 12 patients on CRRT with citrate anticoagulation and 24 patients with heparin anticoagulation were analyzed. Median citrate dose was 2.6 mmol/L. Median calcium dose was 0.16 mEq/kg/h. Median heparin dose was 15 UI/kg/h. Median circuit survival was 48 hours with citrate and 31 hours with heparin (P = 0.028). 66.6% of patients treated with citrate developed mild metabolic alkalosis, which was directly related to citrate dose. There were no cases of citrate intoxication: median total calcium/ionic calcium index (CaT/I) of 2.16 and a maximum CaT/I of 2.33, without metabolic acidosis. In the citrate group, 45.5% of patients developed hypochloremia and 27.3% hypomagnesemia. In the heparin group, 27.8% developed hypophosphatemia. Three patients were moved from heparin to citrate to control postoperatory bleeding. In conclusion citrate is a safe and effective anticoagulation method for CRRT in children and it achieves longer circuit survival than heparin. PMID:25157369

  16. Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism With New Anticoagulant Agents.

    PubMed

    Becattini, Cecilia; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2016-04-26

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common disease associated with high risk for recurrences, death, and late sequelae, accounting for substantial health care costs. Anticoagulant agents are the mainstay of treatment for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. The recent availability of oral anticoagulant agents that can be administered in fixed doses, without laboratory monitoring and dose adjustment, is a landmark change in the treatment of VTE. In Phase III trials, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban (antifactor Xa agents), and dabigatran (an antithrombin agent) were noninferior and probably safer than conventional anticoagulation therapy (low-molecular-weight heparin followed by vitamin K antagonists). These favorable results were confirmed in specific patient subgroups, such as the elderly and fragile. However, some patients, such as those with cancer or with intermediate- to high-risk pulmonary embolism, were underrepresented in the Phase III trials. Further clinical research is required before new oral anticoagulant agents can be considered standard of care for the full spectrum of patients with VTE. PMID:27102510

  17. 'Sailing in troubled waters': a review of the use of anticoagulation in adult cancer patients with thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Rami B; Skewes, Michelle D; Kuriakose, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Simply providing anticoagulation therapy is not as straightforward of a solution in cancer patients who have concurrent thrombocytopenia owing to the increased risk of bleeding complications. Currently, few guidelines are in place to assist clinicians in safely managing thrombocytopenic cancer patients on anticoagulation. The purpose of this review is to critically examine the available body of biomedical literature surrounding anticoagulant use against the backdrop of cancer-related thrombocytopenia in adult patients. Available evidence for the use of parenteral anticoagulants (low molecular weight heparins, unfractionated heparin, pentasaccharides, and direct thrombin inhibitors) and oral anticoagulants (vitamin K antagonists and novel oral anticoagulants) in thrombocytopenic cancer patients is described. The review revealed many inconsistencies between reports on this topic, which made it difficult to draw firm conclusions as to, for example, the ideal well tolerated anticoagulant dose in thrombocytopenic cancer patients? Intriguingly, critical clinical information including (but not limited) patient platelet nadirs, platelet counts during bleeding episodes, and platelet transfusion support was absent from a not-so-insignificant number of publications. Despite these shortcomings, the review sets out to formulate recommendations on the management of anticoagulation, at prophylactic or treatment doses, in adult cancer patients who also have concurrent thrombocytopenia. It also enlists a call for the medical community, by mapping select clinical guideposts, for further research in this setting. With the inclusion of these criteria in future studies, only then formal recommendations on the ideal safe dosage of anticoagulants in cancer patients, based on solid evidence, are conceived. PMID:26945262

  18. New oral anticoagulants: discussion on monitoring and adherence should start now!

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    New oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been introduced to improve anticoagulant therapy worldwide, but safe implementation may require additional measures. First, optimization of dose adjustment based on therapeutic levels of the drug may be more appropriate than fixed dose therapy. The development and implementation in quantitative laboratory assays will enable further dose optimization. Second, non-adherence to medication is a potential threat to the safe use of NOACs. Since cardiovascular medication may not be optimally used in about 50% of patients, procedures to improve adherence are imperative, also for NOAC therapy and in particular in elderly patients. PMID:23809888

  19. New anticoagulants - towards the development of an "ideal" anticoagulant.

    PubMed

    Haas, S

    2009-02-01

    Currently available anticoagulants, such as unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparins and vitamin K antagonists, have proved effective in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disorders. However, these drugs have some drawbacks, such as unpredictability (in the case of unfractionated heparin), non-specificity and parenteral mode of administration, which limit their use in the clinical setting. There is a need for new agents with efficacy similar to that of these classes of anticoagulants and none of their associated drawbacks. Advances are being made in the development of more convenient and more specific drugs, with the aim to improve substantially the prevention and management of thromboembolic disorders. This review will emphasize how the development of an ideal anticoagulant, with potential benefits including high efficacy, safety, low levels of bleeding, fixed dosing, rapid onset of action, ability to bind clot-bound coagulation factors and no requirement for therapeutic monitoring, is a considerable challenge. This review will present the most relevant preclinical data, as well as the clinical studies performed to date, for several drug classes. Direct thrombin inhibitors, such as dabigatran etexilate, will be reviewed, as well as indirect (fondaparinux and idraparinux) and direct (rivaroxaban, apixaban, among others) Factor Xa inhibitors, Factor IXa inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies against Factor IX/IXa. PMID:19229800

  20. Atrial sensor, remote monitoring and new anticoagulant drugs: Identification and treatment of a patient with unknown and asymptomatic atrial flutter

    PubMed Central

    Quartieri, Fabio; Giacopelli, Daniele; Iori, Matteo; Bottoni, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes how new tools and technologies can drive a different approach in the management of arrhythmic patients. An unknown and asymptomatic atrial flutter was detected by the atrial sensor mounted in a single lead implantable cardioverter defibrillator. Moreover daily remote monitoring of the device allowed early notification and prompt clinical reaction. Anticoagulant therapy onset, radiofrequency ablation and the following anticoagulant therapy removal were driven by the device data transmissions. PMID:26937114

  1. Reversal of novel oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Abo-Salem, Elsayed; Becker, Richard C

    2016-04-01

    The development of a new generation of non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants represents a potential breakthrough in the management of patients with thrombotic diseases, disorders and conditions. While a large and growing body of evidence from large-scale clinical trials and registries supports a favorable safety profile, having a means to rapidly reverse their anticoagulant effects represents an unmet need among practicing clinicians. Several targeted reversal agents are currently in development and the early results are promising. Idarucizumab is a monoclonal antibody that can immediately and specifically reverse dabigatran. Andexanet alfa is a recombinant modified factor Xa that can bind and reverse oral and parenteral factor Xa inhibitors, including rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, and low molecular weight heparin. Aripazine is a small molecule that can reverse the action of factor Xa inhibitors and possibly dabigatran as well through non-covalent binding and charge-charge interactions. PMID:26939028

  2. The challenges of lupus anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Chighizola, Cecilia Beatrice; Raschi, Elena; Banzato, Alessandra; Borghi, Maria Orietta; Pengo, Vittorio; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The term "lupus anticoagulant" (LA) refers to a heterogeneous group of immunoglobulins behaving as acquired in vitro inhibitors of coagulation. These antibodies, namely anti-β2GPI and anti-prothrombin antibodies, induce the in vitro elongation of clotting time interfering with phospholipid-dependent coagulation cofactors. Positive LA is associated with thrombosis and pregnancy complications, providing one of the three laboratory criteria for the classification of the anti-phospholipid syndrome. LA is the strongest predictor of clinical events, especially when associated with other anti-phospholipid antibodies. Much more controversial is the risk conveyed by isolated and weak LA. LA detection is technically laborious, envisaging screening, mixing and confirming tests. Hopefully critical issues in LA detection, such as the interference of anticoagulants, will be overcome, in the next future. PMID:26789237

  3. Assessing Anticoagulation Practice Patterns in Patients on Durable Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices: An International Survey.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Douglas L; Horn, Edward T; Lyster, Haifa; Panos, Anthony L; Teuteberg, Jeffrey J; Lehmkuhl, Hans B; Perez, Alexandra; Shullo, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulation in mechanical circulatory support (MCS) patients dictated by local practice, and therefore uniform standards for management are lacking. To characterize the worldwide variance in anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy in patients with MCS devices, a 42 item survey was created and distributed electronically in August 2014. The survey assessed the center-perceived thromboembolic risk (minimal, low, moderate, or high) and characterized the antiplatelet and anticoagulant strategies for the Thoratec HeartMate II (HMII) and HeartWare HVAD (HVAD). A total of 83/214 centers (39%) responded: North America (60/152), Europe (18/50), Australia (2/4), and Asia (3/8). Although the most common target international normalized ratio (INR) was 2-3 for both devices, significant variability exists. Anticoagulation intensity tended to be lower with the HMII, with more centers targeting INR values of less than 2.5. Aspirin monotherapy was the most common antiplatelet regimen; however, the HVAD patients were more likely to be on daily aspirin doses over 100 mg. In addition, parenteral bridging was more frequent with the HVAD device. While 43.8% of respondents indicated an increase in the perceived risk of HMII device thrombosis in 2014, intensification of anticoagulation (22%) or antiplatelet (11%) therapy was infrequent. Our findings verify the wide variety of anticoagulation practice patterns between MCS centers. PMID:26309097

  4. Oral anticoagulation with Factor Xa and thrombin inhibitors: Is there an alternative to warfarin?

    PubMed

    Zikria, Jennifer; Ansell, Jack

    2009-12-01

    Vitamin K antagonists (VKA), such as warfarin, have been the only available oral anticoagulants despite their many limitations. The greatest medical need is to find a replacement for warfarin for long-term therapy, particularly for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Emerging oral anticoagulants are free from many of warfarin's drawbacks and may offer a convenient alternative. Drugs in advanced development target factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban) or thrombin (dabigatran etexilate). Recently, the RE-LY phase III study found dabigatran etexilate was an effective and convenient alternative to warfarin in stroke prevention for AF patients. Within the next two years, similar studies comparing rivaroxaban and apixaban versus warfarin in AF patients will become available. This paper reviews warfarin's limitations, discusses the pharmacokinetics of emerging anticoagulants in advanced development, and summarizes trials with an emphasis on head-to-head studies comparing novel anticoagulants to warfarin. PMID:20040270

  5. Electrochemical assay of heparin to monitor anticoagulation action in cardiovascular patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Niyati

    2012-06-01

    Complications in anticoagulation therapy and long term consequences of the post thrombotic syndromes requires a fast and powerful therapy such as heparin therapy (anticoagulation) to minimize the thrombotic effects in patients. Thus, a simple approach via electrochemical method: Differential pulse polarography (DPP) has been developed for heparin analysis as a powerful clinical tool to monitor anticoagulation action in-patient undergoing heparin therapy. The method has been standardized for determination of heparin activity over the existing methods and a very well defined characteristic reduction peak at -1.25 V in 2 M NaOH was observed for heparin. A linear relation was observed with a regression equation as y = 0.3117x + 0.8069, for 0.1 to 2.0 units/ml heparin. The developed DPP method was observed with excellent precision, accuracy and recovery in human blood plasma samples and in pharmacological formulations. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) noticed to be 2.04 and 6.8 units/ml respectively. The DPP results compared with pharmacological screening through average thrombin time (TT) and applied to monitor invitro anticoagulation action of heparin in healthy human subjects. Statistical analysis done to validate developed DPP method for heparin analysis and its probable clinical use to monitor anticoagulation action to treat patients suffering from various cerebrovascular disorders (CVD) by proper dosing of heparin. PMID:23730016

  6. Coagulation assessment with the new generation of oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Charles V

    2016-01-01

    Long-term oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy is used for the treatment and prevention of thrombosis and thromboembolism. As OAC use is so widespread, emergency physicians are likely to encounter patients on anticoagulant therapy in the emergency department (ED) on a regular basis, either for the same reasons as the population in general or as a result of the increased bleeding risk that OAC use entails. The vitamin K antagonist warfarin has been the standard OAC for several decades, but recently, the newer agents dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban and apixaban (collectively, novel OACs, non-vitamin K OACs, or simply ‘NOACs’) have become available for long-term use. Protocols for assessing and managing warfarin-treated patients in the ED are well established and include international normalised ratio (INR) testing, which helps guide patient management. However, the INR does not give an accurate evaluation of coagulation status with NOACs, and alternative tests are therefore needed for use in emergency settings. This paper discusses what information the INR provides for a patient taking warfarin and which coagulation tests can guide the physician when treating patients on one of the NOACs, as well as other differences in emergency anticoagulation management. PMID:25987596

  7. Coagulation assessment with the new generation of oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Charles V

    2016-06-01

    Long-term oral anticoagulant (OAC) therapy is used for the treatment and prevention of thrombosis and thromboembolism. As OAC use is so widespread, emergency physicians are likely to encounter patients on anticoagulant therapy in the emergency department (ED) on a regular basis, either for the same reasons as the population in general or as a result of the increased bleeding risk that OAC use entails.The vitamin K antagonist warfarin has been the standard OAC for several decades, but recently, the newer agents dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban and apixaban (collectively, novel OACs, non-vitamin K OACs, or simply 'NOACs') have become available for long-term use. Protocols for assessing and managing warfarin-treated patients in the ED are well established and include international normalised ratio (INR) testing, which helps guide patient management. However, the INR does not give an accurate evaluation of coagulation status with NOACs, and alternative tests are therefore needed for use in emergency settings. This paper discusses what information the INR provides for a patient taking warfarin and which coagulation tests can guide the physician when treating patients on one of the NOACs, as well as other differences in emergency anticoagulation management. PMID:25987596

  8. A Comprehensive Overview of Direct Oral Anticoagulants for the Management of Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Comerota, Anthony J; Ramacciotti, Eduardo

    2016-07-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a prevalent, potentially fatal health problem. Although standard anticoagulant therapy is effective when compared with the newer direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), it has disadvantages. Heparin and its derivatives must be administered parenterally, whereas use of oral vitamin K antagonists is complicated by unpredictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, drug-food and drug-drug interactions and the requirement for frequent laboratory monitoring. Randomized phase 3 trials have demonstrated that patients receive similarly effective anticoagulation with the DOACs dabigatran, edoxaban, rivaroxaban and apixaban when compared with warfarin, with similar or reduced risk of bleeding. Extended therapy trials have consistently demonstrated superior effectiveness for DOAC treatment when compared with placebo in preventing VTE recurrence. This article presents a comprehensive review of the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and accumulated clinical trial evidence for each DOAC for short-term, long-term and extended VTE therapy, and it considers the potential implications these agents have for the clinical management of VTE. PMID:27432042

  9. Direct oral anticoagulants and venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2016-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), consisting of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major clinical concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of management of VTE is anticoagulation, and traditional anticoagulants include parenteral heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists. Recently, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed and licensed, including direct factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) and thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran etexilate). This narrative review focusses on the characteristics of these direct anticoagulants and the main results of published clinical studies on their use in the prevention and treatment of VTE. PMID:27581829

  10. Secondary poisoning of owls by anticoagulant rodenticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendenhall, V.M.; Pank, L.F.

    1980-01-01

    Anticoagulants-compounds that prevent clotting of the blood-are extensively used for control of small mammal pests. The potential secondary hazards of 6 anticoagulant rodenticides to birds of prey were examined in this study. Whole rats or mice were killed with each anticoagulant and were fed to 1-3 species of owls. Owls died of hemorrhaging after feeding on rats killed with bromadiolone, brodifacoum, or diphacinone; sublethal hemorrhaging occurred in owls fed rats killed with difenacoum. These results demonstrate potential secondary hazards of 4 anticoagulants to avian predators. No abnormalities were observed in owls fed rats killed with fumarin and chlorophacinone

  11. Novel Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation: Monitoring, Reversal and Perioperative Management

    PubMed Central

    Shamoun, Fadi; Obeid, Hiba; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation continues to be a significant source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Effective anticoagulation remains the cornerstone of outpatient and inpatient treatment. The use of the new generation of anticoagulants (NOACs) continues to grow. Recently published data indicate their cost-effectiveness and overall safety in stroke prevention; compared to vitamin K antagonists, they can be prescribed in fixed doses for long-term therapy without the need for coagulation monitoring. Both United States and European Guidelines recommend NOACs for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. This review discusses each of the NOACs, along with their efficacy and safety data. It explores the most recent guidelines regarding their perioperative use in atrial fibrillation patients. It also discusses bleeding complications, perioperative management, and reversal agents. PMID:26221593

  12. Delayed intra-abdominal bleeding following trans-vaginal ultrasonography guided oocyte retrieval for in vitro fertilization in patients at risk for thrombo-embolic events under anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Orvieto, Raoul

    2013-01-01

    We report herein, two cases of massive delayed (2 and 4 days) intra abdominal hemorrhage following ovum pick-up (OPU), in patients at risk for thrombo-embolic events, who concomitantly used therapeutic doses of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH). We discuss the possible mechanisms involved in causing the aforementioned delayed bleeding, and call for re-evaluation of the presently accepted anticoagulant co-treatment regimen. These case reports should direct physicians' attention and keep them alert, while conducting IVF treatment to this subgroup of high risk patients. PMID:24555090

  13. Differential In Vitro Inhibition of Thrombin Generation by Anticoagulant Drugs in Plasma from Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Potze, Wilma; Arshad, Freeha; Adelmeijer, Jelle; Blokzijl, Hans; van den Berg, Arie P.; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Porte, Robert J.; Lisman, Ton

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment and prevention of thrombotic complications is frequently required in patients with cirrhosis. However anticoagulant therapy is often withheld from these patients, because of the perceived bleeding diathesis. As a result of the limited clinical experience, the anticoagulant of choice for the various indications is still not known. Objectives We evaluated the in vitro effect of clinically approved anticoagulant drugs in plasma from patients with cirrhosis. Patients/Methods Thirty patients with cirrhosis and thirty healthy controls were studied. Thrombin generation assays were performed before and after addition of unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparin, fondaparinux, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban, to estimate anticoagulant potencies of these drugs. Results Addition of dabigatran led to a much more pronounced reduction in endogenous thrombin potential in patients compared to controls (72.6% reduction in patients vs. 12.8% reduction in controls, P<0.0001). The enhanced effect of dabigatran was proportional to the severity of disease. In contrast, only a slightly increased anticoagulant response to heparin and low molecular weight heparin and even a reduced response to fondaparinux and rivaroxaban was observed in plasma from cirrhotic patients as compared to control plasma. Conclusions The anticoagulant potency of clinically approved drugs differs substantially between patients with cirrhosis and healthy individuals. Whereas dabigatran and, to a lesser extent, heparin and low molecular weight heparin are more potent in plasma from patients with cirrhosis, fondaparinux and rivaroxaban showed a decreased anticoagulant effect. These results may imply that in addition to dose adjustments based on altered pharmacokinetics, drug-specific dose adjustments based on altered anticoagulant potency may be required in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:24505487

  14. Telephone-based anticoagulation management in the homebound setting: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Samer; Naboush, Ali; Radbel, Jared; Asaad, Razan; Alkaied, Homam; Demissie, Seleshi; Terjanian, Terenig

    2013-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation management is currently performed through anticoagulation clinics or self-managed with or without the help of medical services. Homebound patients are a unique population that cannot utilize anticoagulation clinics or self-testing. Telephone-based anticoagulation management could be an alternative to the traditional methods of monitoring warfarin in this subgroup. The objective of this retrospective, observational study is to investigate the feasibility of warfarin management in homebound patients. Methods This study was performed through the use of telephone-based adjustments of warfarin dose based on an international normalized ratio (INR) result. Four hundred forty-eight homebound patients referred to the anticoagulation clinic at Staten Island University Hospital were visited at home by a phlebotomist; a blood sample was drawn for initial laboratory testing. A nurse practitioner then called the patient or designated person to relay the INR result and to direct dosage adjustment. INR results and dosage changes were entered into an electronic medical record and analyzed statistically. Results The mean percentage of INR values in range was 58.39%. The mean time when the INR was in the therapeutic range was 62.75%. The percent of patients who were therapeutically controlled decreased as the number of medications increased. The complication rate was 4% per patient year, with an equal distribution between bleeding and clotting. These values compared favorably to other studies in which monitoring was performed through anticoagulation clinics or self-monitoring. The cost per visit at our anticoagulation clinic was found to be approximately $300 compared with $82 when utilizing our homebound service. Conclusion Telephone-based management of warfarin therapy in the homebound setting is feasible. It can lower the cost of health care expenditures compared to other modalities of anticoagulation management. PMID:24348065

  15. Pharmacogenetics of antiplatelets and anticoagulants: a report on clopidogrel, warfarin and dabigatran.

    PubMed

    Ross, Stephanie; Paré, Guillaume

    2013-10-01

    Genetic polymorphisms are thought to contribute to the wide intraindividual variability in antiplatelet and anticoagulant drug response. Pharmacogenetics is the study of how genetic variants influence drug response and how the adoption of a more personalized approach in antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy may help to minimize harmful drug effects and optimize care for individual patients. However, due to sometimes conflicting evidence, the uptake of pharmacogenetics in the clinical setting has been slow. In this article, we review the genetic mechanisms contributing to the variability in response to three commonly used and emerging antiplatelet and anticoagulant drug therapies, namely clopidogrel, warfarin and dabigatran. We will focus on common genetic variants that influence the absorption, metabolism and/or action of these agents, including CYP2C19 (*2, *3 and *17), CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, ABCB1, P2RY12, CYP2C9 (*2/*3), VKORC1 and CESI. PMID:24088127

  16. Use of novel oral anticoagulants for patients with atrial fibrillation: systematic review and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nancy M

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), a common arrhythmia, increases the risk of ischemic stroke. Stroke and bleeding scores for patients with AF can help to stratify risk and determine the need for antithrombotic therapy, for which warfarin has been the gold standard. Although highly effective, warfarin has several limitations that can lead to its underuse. Data from randomized, Phase III clinical trials of the novel oral anticoagulants, dabigatran, a direct thrombin inhibitor, and rivaroxaban and apixaban, both factor Xa inhibitors, indicate these drugs are at least noninferior to warfarin for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism. They are easier to administer, and have an equivalent or lower risk of bleeding versus warfarin. A better understanding of the risks and benefits of the novel oral anticoagulants, and their use in clinical practice, will prepare clinicians to anticipate and address educational and clinical needs of AF patients and their families, and promote evidence-based prescription of appropriate and safe anticoagulation therapy. PMID:24373340

  17. Should patients with systemic sclerosis-related pulmonary arterial hypertension be anticoagulated?

    PubMed

    Nikpour, M; Stevens, W; Proudman, S M; Buchbinder, R; Prior, D; Zochling, J; Williams, T; Gabbay, E; Nandurkar, H

    2013-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a major cause of mortality in scleroderma and despite 'advanced' therapies confers a median survival of less than 5 years. Anticoagulation in systemic sclerosis-related PAH (SSc-PAH) is currently one of the most contentious issues in the management of patients with connective tissue disease. While some studies have shown a survival benefit with warfarin therapy in this disease, others have not. Accordingly, a state of clinical equipoise exists in relation to anticoagulation in SSc-PAH. With an over fivefold reduction in mortality demonstrated in some observational studies, the issue of anticoagulation in SSc-PAH demands resolution through a well-designed randomised controlled trial. PMID:23668273

  18. Novel oral Anticoagulants in Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rose M.F.L.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent arrhythmia in clinical practice, reaching 2% of the people in the world and is associated with systemic embolism. Thus, the use of anticoagulants is indicated if CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2 or in patients with previous transient ischemic attack or stroke. For decades, warfarin, a vitamin K antagonist, was the only choice for chronic oral anticoagulation. Recently, novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been introduced, offering similar (or better) effectiveness, safety, and convenience to the vitamin K antagonists. Dabigatran was the first NOAC approved and is a direct thrombin inhibitor. Rivaroxaban and apixaban are factor Xa inhibitors. They display rapid onset of action, more predictable of pharmacological profile, less interactions with other drugs, lack of significant effects in the diet, and less risk of intracranial hemorrhage than warfarin. Despite that dose adjustment is necessary for patients with chronic kidney disease or according to body weight, these new drugs do not require regular monitoring. There are recommendations for the start and follow-up therapy with NOACs, planning for cardioversion, ablation and surgical interventions and the management of bleeding. This article is a review of the major studies of the NOACs. The clinical use of these drugs in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation is presented. PMID:25470147

  19. Safety of new oral anticoagulant drugs: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vílchez, Juan Antonio; Gallego, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) offers the possibility of efficacy, relative safety and convenience compared with warfarin. This could lead to greater patient compliance, with easier management and improved provision of thromboprophylaxis. Safety whilst using NOACs should be focused on bleeding cases, surgery or on the management of patients receiving anticoagulant therapy with concomitant impairment of renal function, especially since many NOACs are dependent on renal excretion. Thus, if the clearance creatinine indicates severe renal impairment, NOACS will be contraindicated or their dose needs to be changed. In patients who need surgery, there are published protocols of management, depending on the severity of the intervention and renal function. In the case of severe hemorrhage, requiring rapid reversal of the anticoagulant effect and in the absence of specific antidotes, alternatives such as one of the nonspecific haemostatic agents must be considered. Clinical evaluation in bleeding situations and a meticulous risk–benefit appraisal for NOACs is needed, and these procoagulant agents and patients must be monitored closely. This article provides an overview of the pharmacology and potential risks, as well as the efficacy and safety of NOACs. PMID:25083259

  20. Novel oral anticoagulants for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Skelley, Jessica W; Kyle, Jeffrey A; Roberts, Rachel A

    2016-08-01

    To review the use of the novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC) agents for the treatment of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) from relevant clinical trial data. A MEDLINE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Google-Scholar searches (1966-March 2016) were conducted using the keywords: thrombocytopenia, NOACs, dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban, edoxaban, Xa inhibitor, direct thrombin inhibitor. Articles evaluating the new oral anticoagulants for thrombocytopenia published in English and using human subjects were selected. Eight clinical trials were identified. References cited in identified articles were used for additional citations. Approximately 12 million hospitalized patients each year are exposed to heparin for thromboprophylaxis. HIT, an immune-mediated, prothrombotic adverse reaction is a potential complication of heparin therapy. As a result, heparin products must be immediately withdrawn and replaced by alternative anticoagulants to compensate for the thrombotic risk associated with HIT. Limitations exist with the only currently FDA approved heparin alternative, argatroban. NOACs have been considered as potential alternatives to traditional agents based on their pharmacologic activity. Case reports have indicated positive results in patients, with clinical outcomes and tolerability supporting the use of the NOACs as alternative agents in the treatment of HIT. Positive results have been reported for the use of NOACs in the treatment of HIT. Further robust studies are needed for definitive decision making by clinicians. PMID:27102287

  1. Anticoagulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... gums or nosebleeds. Oral Medications These mainly include aspirin or clopidogrel (Plavix) and warfarin (Coumadin). These medications ... will decide which one is right for you. Aspirin tends to cause fewer bleeding complications than clopidogrel ...

  2. Anticoagulants

    MedlinePlus

    ... or interactions with other medicines and vitamin or herbal supplements. This information should not be used as medical ... your doctor about every medicine and vitamin or herbal supplement that you are taking, so he or she ...

  3. Direct oral anticoagulants: key considerations for use to prevent stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ment, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia worldwide. Strokes that occur as a complication of AF are usually more severe and associated with a higher disability or morbidity and mortality rate compared with non-AF-related strokes. The risk of stroke in AF is dependent on several risk factors; AF itself acts as an independent risk factor for stroke. The combination of effective anticoagulation therapy, risk stratification (based on stroke risk scores, such as CHADS2 and CHA2DS2-VASc), and recommendations provided by guidelines is essential for decreasing the risk of stroke in patients with AF. Although effective in preventing the occurrence of stroke, vitamin K antagonists (VKAs; eg, warfarin) are associated with several limitations. Therefore, direct oral anticoagulants, such as apixaban, dabigatran etexilate, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban, have emerged as an alternative to the VKAs for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular AF. Compared with the VKAs, these agents have more favorable pharmacological characteristics and, unlike the VKAs, they are given at fixed doses without the need for routine coagulation monitoring. It remains important that physicians use these direct oral anticoagulants responsibly to ensure optimal safety and effectiveness. This article provides an overview of the existing data on the direct oral anticoagulants, focusing on management protocols for aiding physicians to optimize anticoagulant therapy in patients with nonvalvular AF, particularly in special patient populations (eg, those with renal impairment) and other specific clinical situations. PMID:26089678

  4. Use of the activated clotting time in anticoagulation monitoring of intravascular procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, J; Ferguson, J J

    1993-01-01

    The activated clotting time first came into clinical use in the mid-1970s to guide the administration and reversal of heparin during cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. The explosive growth of cardiopulmonary bypass led to the development of automated techniques for measuring activated clotting times. Recent advances in the field of interventional cardiology have emphasized the importance of the coagulation cascade and the need for the prevention of thrombosis with anticoagulant drugs. The activated clotting time has emerged as an important means of monitoring and guiding heparin therapy during invasive intravascular procedures. This review focuses on the following topics: 1) the development of anticoagulation monitoring techniques; 2) current alternatives in bedside anticoagulation monitoring; and 3) the clinical application of activated clotting times outside surgery. Until prospective studies can establish appropriate "target" activated-clotting-time values for interventional procedures, procedural anticoagulation must be guided empirically. Nevertheless, the activated clotting time is extremely useful in the catheterization laboratory, for monitoring heparin therapy and the adequacy of anticoagulation. PMID:8298321

  5. Development and implementation of a pharmacist-managed inpatient anticoagulation monitoring program.

    PubMed

    Wellman, Jessica C; Kraus, Peggy S; Burton, Bradley L; Ensor, Christopher R; Nesbit, Todd W; Ross, Patricia A; Thomas, Michelle L; Streiff, Michael B

    2011-05-15

    PURPOSE. A stepwise approach to development and implementation of a program to standardize and increase pharmacists' involvement in anticoagulation therapy at a large academic medical center is described. SUMMARY. In response to the Joint Commission's national goal of improved patient safety in anticoagulation therapy, a work group of pharmacy administrators, educators, clinical specialists, and decentralized pharmacists at the hospital developed the structure for a comprehensive inpatient anticoagulation program (IAP); the work group also developed a list of required competencies, educational materials, assessment methods, and mechanisms for eliciting feedback from IAP pharmacists and other patient care staff. After completion of training that included structured case-review sessions, a one-on-one shadowing experience, and competency assessment, IAP pharmacists began reviewing clinical and laboratory data on patients receiving warfarin and low-molecular-weight heparins and providing recommendations to physicians, nurse practitioners, and other health care team members. Feedback from other clinicians was generally positive, with a majority of those surveyed indicating that increased pharmacist involvement in anticoagulation monitoring and dosage adjustment resulted in improved patient care; about 80% indicated that they concurred with pharmacists' recommendations at least 75% of the time. Results of a survey of IAP pharmacists indicated increased satisfaction with their daily duties but also a need for improved pharmacist-to-pharmacist communication. CONCLUSION. Case-based advanced training and implementation of an IAP in a tertiary care hospital increased pharmacists' involvement in the management of inpatients receiving anticoagulants. PMID:21546645

  6. Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Anticoagulant or Antiplatelet Drugs: Systematic Search for Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Gutermann, Irit Kaye; Niggemeier, Verena; Zimmerli, Lukas U.; Holzer, Barbara M.; Battegay, Edouard; Scharl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a frequently encountered and very serious problem in emergency room patients who are currently being treated with anticoagulant or antiplatelet medications. There is, however, a lack of clinical practice guidelines about how to respond to these situations. The goal of this study was to find published articles that contain specific information about how to safely adjust anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy when GI bleeding occurs. The investigators initiated a global search on the PubMed and Google websites for published information about GI bleeding in the presence of anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy. After eliminating duplicate entries, the medical articles that remained were screened to narrow the sets of articles to those that met specific criteria. Articles that most closely matched study criteria were analyzed in detail and compared to determine how many actual guidelines exist and are useful. We could provide only minimal information about appropriate therapeutic strategies because no articles provided sufficient specific advice about how to respond to situations involving acute GI bleeding and concurrent use of anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs. Only 4 articles provided enough detail to be of any use in an emergency situation. Clinical practice guidelines and also clinical trials for GI hemorrhaging should be expanded to state in which situations the use of anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs should be suspended and the medications should later be resumed, and they should state the level of risk for any particular action. PMID:25569664

  7. Self-Titrating Anticoagulant Nanocomplexes That Restore Homeostatic Regulation of the Coagulation Cascade

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy is a critical portion of the treatment regime for a number of life-threatening conditions, including cardiovascular disease, stroke, and cancer; yet, proper clinical management of anticoagulation remains a challenge because existing agents increase the propensity for bleeding in patients. Here, we describe the development of a bioresponsive peptide–polysaccharide nanocomplex that utilizes a negative feedback mechanism to self-titrate the release of anticoagulant in response to varying levels of coagulation activity. This nanoscale self-titrating activatable therapeutic, or nanoSTAT, consists of a cationic thrombin-cleavable peptide and heparin, an anionic polysaccharide and widely used clinical anticoagulant. Under nonthrombotic conditions, nanoSTATs circulate inactively, neither releasing anticoagulant nor significantly prolonging bleeding time. However, in response to life-threatening pulmonary embolism, nanoSTATs locally release their drug payload and prevent thrombosis. This autonomous negative feedback regulator may improve antithrombotic therapy by increasing the therapeutic window and decreasing the bleeding risk of anticoagulants. PMID:25119520

  8. Effective reversal of warfarin-induced excessive anticoagulation with low dose vitamin K1.

    PubMed

    Shetty, H G; Backhouse, G; Bentley, D P; Routledge, P A

    1992-01-23

    Reversal of the anticoagulant effect of warfarin in patients with no active haemorrhage can be achieved by administration of intravenous vitamin K1. Currently recommended doses of intravenous vitamin K1, for this purpose often result in subsequent difficulties in anticoagulation. We observed the response to low dose intravenous vitamin K1 in patients requiring reversal of anticoagulant therapy. Ten consecutive patients received 1 mg and 21 further patients received 0.5 mg of intravenous vitamin K1. In 50% of the patients who received 1 mg of vitamin K1 the INR (International Normalised Ratio) fell below 2 at 24 h whereas in patients who received 0.5 mg the INR fell below 5.5 in all subjects after 24 h and in none did it fall below 2.0. No patient had any thrombotic or haemorrhagic complications and no difficulty was encountered in re-establishing anticoagulant control after 24 h. We recommend 0.5 mg of vitamin K1 as an effective and convenient method of predictable and fine control of oral anticoagulant therapy. PMID:1615468

  9. A Summary of the Literature Evaluating Adherence and Persistence with Oral Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Obamiro, Kehinde O; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R E

    2016-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a growing public health concern and remains an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Warfarin, a commonly used oral anticoagulant, is associated with a 60-70 % relative reduction in stroke risk and a reduction in mortality of 26 %. However, warfarin has several limitations, including a narrow therapeutic window, variable dose response, multiple interactions with other drugs and concurrent illnesses, and the need for frequent laboratory monitoring. In recent years, the direct acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs), including dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban, have been developed to overcome the limitations of warfarin therapy. These treatment strategies are either comparable or superior to warfarin in stroke prevention in AF. Despite the documented effectiveness of oral anticoagulants in AF, patients may not derive optimal benefit if they fail to adhere or fail to continue with their medication. This may lead to treatment failure, increased hospitalization and mortality. This review summarizes the literature regarding adherence and persistence (or discontinuation) rates with oral anticoagulants in the management of AF; the impact of non-adherence and non-persistence on treatment outcomes; and the effectiveness of strategies to improve adherence and persistence with oral anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27262433

  10. Adherence to long-term anticoagulation treatment, what is known and what the future might hold.

    PubMed

    Abdou, John K; Auyeung, Vivian; Patel, Jignesh P; Arya, Roopen

    2016-07-01

    Adherence to medication, commonly reported as being 50% in chronic diseases, is of great concern in healthcare. Medication non-adherence is particularly apparent in chronic diseases, where treatment is often preventative and may provide little or no symptomatic relief or feedback for the patient. A lot of research has been undertaken to describe the extent of non-adherence to long-term anticoagulation therapy, particularly with vitamin K antagonists and more recently with direct oral anticoagulants. However, the literature is scarce with respect to describing adherence to anticoagulation in terms of the behavioural aspects that influence medicine use. Utilizing the COM-B (capability, opportunity, motivation and behaviour) psychological model of non-adherence, we present the available evidence, not only in terms of describing the extent of the non-adherence problem, but also describing why patients do not adhere, offering theory-driven and evidence-based solutions to improve long-term adherence to chronic anticoagulation therapy. Lessons learned are not only applicable within the field of anticoagulation but throughout haematology. PMID:27173746

  11. [New oral anticoagulants (NOAC) in nephrology].

    PubMed

    Bellasi, Antonio; Di Lullo, Luca; Melfa, Gianvincenzo; Minoretti, Claudio; Ratti, Carlo; Campana, Carlo; Volpi, Maurizio; Mangano, Stefano; Di Iorio, Biagio; Cozzolino, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The new or direct oral anticoagulants [new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) or direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC)] were launched in the Italian market in 2013. Although these compounds share common pharmacological indications with vitamin K antagonists (warfarin or acenocumarol), they have different mechanisms of action, do not require a constant anticoagulant monitoring but are more efficacious and safer than vitamin K antagonists. The use of these molecules (Dabigatran, Apixaban, Rivaroxaban, Betrixaban, Edoxaban) is constantly rising in daily practice. However, while available data suggest that NOAC/DOAC use is safe, dosage should be adjusted based on renal or liver function. It should be acknowledged that commonly available blood tests [Prothrombin Time (PT) and partial thromboplastin time (PTT)] are not indicated to monitor the anticoagulant activity of these compounds. With the exception of dabigatran, we currently lack of an antidote to reverse the anticoagulant effect of NOAC/DOAC. We herein review available evidence on NOAC/DOAC pharmacokinetic, risk factors for bleeding, interventions to reverse the anticoagulant activity in case of hemorrhages or need of urgent surgery and/or NOAC/DOAC overdose or side effects. PMID:27545637

  12. Perioperative Bridging Anticoagulation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Douketis, James D.; Spyropoulos, Alex C.; Kaatz, Scott; Becker, Richard C.; Caprini, Joseph A.; Dunn, Andrew S.; Garcia, David A.; Jacobson, Alan; Jaffer, Amir K.; Kong, David F.; Schulman, Sam; Turpie, Alexander G.G.; Hasselblad, Vic; Ortel, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is uncertain whether bridging anticoagulation is necessary for patients with atrial fibrillation who need an interruption in warfarin treatment for an elective operation or other elective invasive procedure. We hypothesized that forgoing bridging anticoagulation would be noninferior to bridging with low-molecular-weight heparin for the prevention of perioperative arterial thromboembolism and would be superior to bridging with respect to major bleeding. METHODS We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in which, after perioperative interruption of warfarin therapy, patients were randomly assigned to receive bridging anticoagulation therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin (100 IU of dalteparin per kilogram of body weight) or matching placebo administered subcutaneously twice daily, from 3 days before the procedure until 24 hours before the procedure and then for 5 to 10 days after the procedure. Warfarin treatment was stopped 5 days before the procedure and was resumed within 24 hours after the procedure. Follow-up of patients continued for 30 days after the procedure. The primary outcomes were arterial thromboembolism (stroke, systemic embolism, or transient ischemic attack) and major bleeding. RESULTS In total, 1884 patients were enrolled, with 950 assigned to receive no bridging therapy and 934 assigned to receive bridging therapy. The incidence of arterial thromboembolism was 0.4% in the no-bridging group and 0.3% in the bridging group (risk difference, 0.1 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], −0.6 to 0.8; P = 0.01 for noninferiority). The incidence of major bleeding was 1.3% in the no-bridging group and 3.2% in the bridging group (relative risk, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.78; P = 0.005 for superiority). CONCLUSIONS In patients with atrial fibrillation who had warfarin treatment interrupted for an elective operation or other elective invasive procedure, forgoing bridging anticoagulation was noninferior to

  13. New anticoagulants for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Sobieraj-Teague, Magdalena; O'Donnell, Martin; Eikelboom, John

    2009-07-01

    Atrial fibrillation is already the most common clinically significant cardiac arrhythmia and a common cause of stroke. Vitamin K antagonists are very effective for the prevention of cardioembolic stroke but have numerous limitations that limit their uptake in eligible patients with AF and reduce their effectiveness in treated patients. Multiple new anticoagulants are under development as potential replacements for vitamin K antagonists. Most are small synthetic molecules that target factor IIa (e.g., dabigatran etexilate, AZD-0837) or factor Xa (e.g., rivaroxaban, apixaban, betrixaban, DU176b, idrabiotaparinux). These drugs have predictable pharmacokinetics that allow fixed dosing without laboratory monitoring, and are being compared with vitamin K antagonists or aspirin in phase III clinical trials [corrected]. A new vitamin K antagonist (ATI-5923) with improved pharmacological properties compared with warfarin is also being evaluated in a phase III trial. None of the new agents have as yet been approved for clinical use. PMID:19739042

  14. [Direct oral anticoagulant associated bleeding].

    PubMed

    Godier, A; Martin, A-C; Rosencher, N; Susen, S

    2016-07-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are recommended for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. However, they are associated with hemorrhagic complications. Management of DOAC-induced bleeding remains challenging. Activated or non-activated prothrombin concentrates are proposed, although their efficacy to reverse DOAC is uncertain. Therapeutic options also include antidotes: idarucizumab, antidote for dabigatran, has been approved for use whereas andexanet alpha, antidote for anti-Xa agents, and aripazine, antidote for all DOAC, are under development. Other options include hemodialysis for the treatment of dabigatran-associated bleeding and administration of oral charcoal if recent DOAC ingestion. DOAC plasma concentration measurement is necessary to guide DOAC reversal. We propose an update on DOAC-associated bleeding, integrating the availability of dabigatran antidote and the critical place of DOAC concentration measurements. PMID:27297642

  15. [Prophylaxis of thromboembolism in atrial fibrillation: new oral anticoagulants and left atrial appendage closure].

    PubMed

    Zeus, Tobias; Kelm, Malte; Bode, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Thrombo-embolic prophylaxis is a key element within the therapy of atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter. Besides new oral anticoagulants the concept of left atrial appendage occlusion has approved to be a good alternative option, especially in patients with increased risk of bleeding. PMID:26261929

  16. Laboratory assessment of the anticoagulant effects of the next generation of oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Garcia, D; Barrett, Y C; Ramacciotti, E; Weitz, J I

    2013-02-01

    In contrast to vitamin K antagonists, which reduce the functional levels of several coagulation factors, the new oral anticoagulants specifically target either thrombin or factor Xa. These new agents have such predictable pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics that routine coagulation monitoring is unnecessary. However, there are still some situations in which measurement of anticoagulant effect may be required. The coagulation assays that are used to monitor heparin derivatives or vitamin K antagonists may not always accurately reflect the anticoagulant activity of the new oral anticoagulants, and specialized assays may be needed. In this article, we: (i) identify situations in which assessment of anticoagulant effect may aid treatment decisions; (ii) describe the effects of the new oral anticoagulants on the various coagulation tests; (iii) review the specialized coagulation assays that have been developed to measure the anticoagulant effects of the new oral anticoagulants; and (iv) provide a clinical perspective on the role of coagulation testing in the clinical management of patients treated with the new oral anticoagulants. PMID:23216682

  17. What Are Anticoagulants and Antiplatelet Agents?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents are medicines that reduce blood clotting in an artery, a vein or the heart. ... are drugs that are given to prevent your blood from clotting or prevent existing clots from getting larger. They ...

  18. Lemierre Syndrome—Should We Anticoagulate? A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Phua, C.K.; Chadachan, V.M.; Acharya, R.

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre syndrome is an uncommon condition classically described in acute oropharyngeal infection with septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and metastatic septic embolism particularly to the lungs. It is commonly described in young healthy adults with isolation of Fusobacterium necrophorum. We describe a case of Lemierre syndrome in a 50-year-old man with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus presenting with a neck abscess secondary to Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our patient made good recovery to appropriate antimicrobial therapy, prompt surgical drainage, and anticoagulation. Anticoagulation remains controversial and we review the literature for its role in Lemierre syndrome. PMID:24436600

  19. New antiplatelet drugs and new oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Koenig-Oberhuber, V; Filipovic, M

    2016-09-01

    In our daily anaesthetic practice, we are confronted with an increasing number of patients treated with either antiplatelet or anticoagulant agents. During the last decade, changes have occurred that make the handling of antithrombotic medication a challenging part of anaesthetic perioperative management. In this review, the authors discuss the most important antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, the perioperative management, the handling of bleeding complications, and the interpretation of some laboratory analyses related to these agents. PMID:27566810

  20. Potential role of new anticoagulants for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Outes, Antonio; Suárez-Gea, M Luisa; Lecumberri, Ramón; Terleira-Fernández, Ana Isabel; Vargas-Castrillón, Emilio; Rocha, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), encompassing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. Low molecular weight heparins are the preferred option for anticoagulation in cancer patients according to current clinical practice guidelines. Fondaparinux may also have a place in prevention of VTE in hospitalized cancer patients with additional risk factors and for initial treatment of VTE. Although low molecular weight heparins and fondaparinux are effective and safe, they require daily subcutaneous administration, which may be problematic for many patients, particularly if long-term treatment is needed. Studying anticoagulant therapy in oncology patients is challenging because this patient group has an increased risk of VTE and bleeding during anticoagulant therapy compared with the population without cancer. Risk factors for increased VTE and bleeding risk in these patients include concomitant treatments (surgery, chemotherapy, placement of central venous catheters, radiotherapy, hormonal therapy, angiogenesis inhibitors, antiplatelet drugs), supportive therapies (ie, steroids, blood transfusion, white blood cell growth factors, and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents), and tumor-related factors (local vessel damage and invasion, abnormalities in platelet function, and number). New anticoagulants in development for prophylaxis and treatment of VTE include parenteral compounds for once-daily administration (ie, semuloparin) or once-weekly dosing (ie, idraparinux and idrabiotaparinux), as well as orally active compounds (ie, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban, betrixaban). In the present review, we discuss the pharmacology of the new anticoagulants, the results of clinical trials testing these new compounds in VTE, with special emphasis on studies that included cancer patients, and their potential advantages and drawbacks compared with existing therapies. PMID:23674896

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of secondary anticoagulant rodenticide toxicosis in a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Murray, Maureen; Tseng, Florina

    2008-03-01

    Anticoagulant rodenticides inhibit the activation of vitamin K-ependent clotting factors, resulting in fatal hemorrhage. Nontarget species are exposed to these rodenticides primarily by direct consumption of baits or secondarily by consumption of poisoned prey. The diagnosis of anticoagulant rodenticide toxicosis is more challenging in birds than in mammals because of the limited availability of laboratory tests to evaluate avian coagulation. In addition, the presenting signs in birds may differ from those commonly seen in mammals. Treatment for acute blood loss and therapy with vitamin K1 can result in a favorable outcome in birds. This report describes the presenting signs, diagnosis, and successful treatment of a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) with secondary anticoagulant rodenticide toxicosis. PMID:18543601

  2. A case of warfarin skin necrosis despite enoxaparin anticoagulation in a patient with protein S deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chau Y; Ierardi, Ralph; Alexander, James B

    2004-03-01

    Warfarin-induced skin necrosis is a rare complication associated with the use of oral anticoagulants. Most patients develop this at the initiation of therapy, often while still receiving intravenous unfractionated heparin (UFH). Recently, low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) have gained wider use, providing an option for outpatient treatment of deep-vein thrombosis. The treatment protocols are similar to UFH, including the early initiation of oral anticoagulation with warfarin. A Medline search failed to reveal any cases of warfarin-induced skin necrosis while using a LMWH. We present a patient with protein S deficiency who developed warfarin skin necrosis despite appropriate anticoagulation with enoxaparin, and review the chemical and clinical difference between UFH and LMWH. PMID:15253263

  3. Evolving Treatments for Arterial and Venous Thrombosis: Role of the Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Chan, Noel C; Eikelboom, John W; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2016-04-29

    The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) represent a major advance in oral anticoagulant therapy and have replaced the vitamin K antagonists as the preferred treatment for many indications. By simplifying long-term anticoagulant therapy and improving its safety, the DOACs have the potential to reduce the global burden of thrombosis. Postmarketing studies suggest that the favorable results achieved with DOACs in the randomized controlled trials can be readily translated into practice, but highlight the need for appropriate patient, drug and dose selection, and careful follow-up. Leveraging on their success to date, ongoing studies are assessing the utility of DOACs for the prevention of thrombosis in patients with embolic stroke of unknown source, heart failure, coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, antiphospholipid syndrome, and cancer. The purpose of this article is to (1) review the pharmacology of the DOACs, (2) describe the advantages of the DOACs over vitamin K antagonists, (3) summarize the experience with the DOACs in established indications, (4) highlight current challenges and limitations, (5) highlight potential new indications; and (6) identify future directions for anticoagulant therapy. PMID:27126650

  4. Is long-term anticoagulation after acute thromboembolic limb ischemia always necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Thomas L.; DeRose, Guy; Harris, Kenneth A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective After thromboembolectomy, patients with acute limb ischemia often receive anticoagulant therapy to prevent recurrent events. Patients with atrial fibrillation or cardiac thrombus have a higher risk of recurrent emboli than those without these risk factors. This study examines the importance of long-term anticoagulation in these 2 groups. Design A review of patients presenting with acute limb ischemia over a 5-year period (1994–1999). Setting A university-affiliated medical centre. Patients Fifty patients divided into 2 groups: 19 (38%) patients with atrial fibrillation (group 1) and 31 (62%) patients with no atrial fibrillation or cardiac thrombus (group 2) as confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. Intervention All patients underwent surgical thromboembolectomy and received postoperative anticoagulant therapy. Outcome measures Mortality, limb loss, further thromboembolic events and bleeding complications as determined by telephone survey. Results There was a significant difference in 5-year survival (group 1, 84%; group 2, 64%) and early limb loss (group 1, 0%; group 2, 13%). Further thromboembolic events and bleeding complications were rare but were more common in group 1. In group 2 there were no instances of recurrent thromboemboli and no bleeding complications although only 39% of patients in this group were taking angicoagulants at the end of the study period. Conclusions Patients with extremity thromboemboli without atrial fibrillation or cardiac thrombus may not be at the same risk for recurrent events as those with these risk factors, and long-term anticoagulant therapy may not be as necessary in this group. PMID:12387535

  5. Polysulfated Trehalose as a Novel Anticoagulant Agent with Dual Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Qudsia; Abid, Mohammad; Gupta, Neha; Tyagi, Tarun; Ashraf, Mohammad Z.; Jairajpuri, Mohamad Aman

    2015-01-01

    Physiological hemostatic balance is a coordinated outcome of counteracting coagulation and fibrinolytic systems. An imbalance of procoagulant and anticoagulant factors may result in life threatening thromboembolism. Presently, anticoagulant administration is the first line of therapy for the treatment of these conditions and several anticoagulants have been approved, including various forms of heparin. However, the polyanionic nature and multispecificity of heparin pose several complications. Generally, the polysulfated compounds with antithrombotic potential are thought to have feasible synthetic procedures with much less bleeding, thus having favourable safety profiles. Here we report the synthesis of a novel compound, trehalose octasulfate and the assessment of its anticoagulation potential. Molecular docking of trehalose and trehalose octasulfate with antithrombin showed a specificity switch in binding affinity on sulfation, where trehalose octasulfate interacts with critical residues of AT that are either directly involved in heparin binding or in the conformational rearrangement of AT on heparin binding. An in vitro analysis of trehalose octasulfate demonstrated prolonged clotting time. Lead compound when intravenously injected in occlusion induced thrombotic rats showed remarkable reduction in the size and weight of the clot at a low dose. Delay in coagulation time was observed by analysing blood plasma isolated from rats preinjected with trehalose octasulfate. A decrease in Adenosine 5′-Diphosphate (ADP) induced platelet aggregation indicated a probable dual anticoagulant and antiplatelet mechanism of action. To summarize, this study presents trehalose octasulfate as a novel, effective, dual acting antithrombotic agent. PMID:25866798

  6. Anticoagulation, ferrotoxicity and the future of translational lung cancer research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that elements of coagulation reactions mediate tumor cell proliferation, motility (invasiveness), tissue remodeling and metastasis. Coagulation activation is virtually a universal feature of human malignancy that differs from the clotting response to injury in that it is self-perpetuating rather than self-attenuating. Coagulation activation participates in tumor matrix deposition and local inflammation, and predicts subsequent cancer risk and adverse cancer outcomes. Several clinical trials of anticoagulants have shown improved outcomes in small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCCL) that have been correlated with assembly on the tumor cells of an intact coagulation pathway. However, variable efficacy of anticoagulant therapy has raised doubts about the coagulation hypothesis. Recently, initiators of coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways have been identified that mediate tumor inception and progression. Notable among these is oxidative stress driven by iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species that may be the basis for local coagulation activation, tumor matrix deposition, inflammation and aberrant properties characteristic of the malignant phenotype. Recognition of important biological characteristics of individual tumor types, disease stage, choice of standard therapy including chemotherapy and the iron status of the host may clarify mechanisms. All of these are subject to modification based on controlled clinical trial design. Further tests of the coagulation hypothesis may lead to novel, low cost and relatively non-toxic approaches to treatment of malignancy including lung cancer that contrast with certain current cancer treatment paradigms. PMID:27413710

  7. Anticoagulation, ferrotoxicity and the future of translational lung cancer research.

    PubMed

    Zacharski, Leo R

    2016-06-01

    Numerous studies have shown that elements of coagulation reactions mediate tumor cell proliferation, motility (invasiveness), tissue remodeling and metastasis. Coagulation activation is virtually a universal feature of human malignancy that differs from the clotting response to injury in that it is self-perpetuating rather than self-attenuating. Coagulation activation participates in tumor matrix deposition and local inflammation, and predicts subsequent cancer risk and adverse cancer outcomes. Several clinical trials of anticoagulants have shown improved outcomes in small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCCL) that have been correlated with assembly on the tumor cells of an intact coagulation pathway. However, variable efficacy of anticoagulant therapy has raised doubts about the coagulation hypothesis. Recently, initiators of coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways have been identified that mediate tumor inception and progression. Notable among these is oxidative stress driven by iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen species that may be the basis for local coagulation activation, tumor matrix deposition, inflammation and aberrant properties characteristic of the malignant phenotype. Recognition of important biological characteristics of individual tumor types, disease stage, choice of standard therapy including chemotherapy and the iron status of the host may clarify mechanisms. All of these are subject to modification based on controlled clinical trial design. Further tests of the coagulation hypothesis may lead to novel, low cost and relatively non-toxic approaches to treatment of malignancy including lung cancer that contrast with certain current cancer treatment paradigms. PMID:27413710

  8. Cystamine Preparations Exhibit Anticoagulant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Maria M.; Holle, Lori A.; Stember, Katherine G.; Devette, Christa I.; Monroe, Dougald M.; Wolberg, Alisa S.

    2015-01-01

    Transglutaminases are a superfamily of isoenzymes found in cells and plasma. These enzymes catalyze the formation of ε-N-(γ-glutamyl)-lysyl crosslinks between proteins. Cystamine blocks transglutaminase activity and is used in vitro in human samples and in vivo in mice and rats in studies of coagulation, immune dysfunction, and inflammatory disease. These studies have suggested cystamine blocks fibrin crosslinking and has anti-inflammatory effects, implicating transglutaminase activity in the pathogenesis of several diseases. We measured the effects of cystamine on fibrin crosslinking, tissue factor-triggered plasma clot formation and thrombin generation, and coagulation factor enzymatic activity. At concentrations that blocked fibrin crosslinking, cystamine also inhibited plasma clot formation and reduced thrombin generation. Cystamine inhibited the amidolytic activity of coagulation factor XI and thrombin towards chromogenic substrates. These findings demonstrate that cystamine exhibits anticoagulant activity during coagulation. Given the close relationship between coagulation and inflammation, these findings suggest prior studies that used cystamine to implicate transglutaminase activity in disease pathogenesis warrant re-examination. PMID:25915545

  9. New issues in oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Francis, Charles W

    2008-01-01

    Polymorphisms in CYP2C9, a critical cytochrome P-450 enzyme in the metabolism of warfarin, alters its clearance and affects dosing. CYP*1 has higher activity than either the *2 or *3 variants, and patients with the *2 or *3 variants require a lower dose. VKORC1 is the enzyme inhibited by warfarin, and its levels are affected by several polymorphisms that can be divided into high or low level haplotypes, and patients with high level haplotypes require higher warfarin doses. The use of algorithms for dosing that incorporate pharmacogenomic information perform better than those using clinical data alone. Considerable effort is ongoing to develop new oral anticoagulants as alternatives to warfarin, and three agents are in advanced development. Dabigatran is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor that has been compared with enoxaparin for prevention of VTE following hip or knee replacement. Based on non-inferiority results in European trials, it has now been approved for marketing in Europe. Phase III trials with a new oral Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban, have been completed in hip or knee replacement, and rivaroxaban was superior to enoxaparin in prevention of VTE with no increase in bleeding complications. Phase III studies with apixaban, another oral Xa inhibitor, are in progress. These agents are also being evaluated in large studies for prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation and for VTE treatment. PMID:19074093

  10. Cystamine preparations exhibit anticoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Maria M; Holle, Lori A; Stember, Katherine G; Devette, Christa I; Monroe, Dougald M; Wolberg, Alisa S

    2015-01-01

    Transglutaminases are a superfamily of isoenzymes found in cells and plasma. These enzymes catalyze the formation of ε-N-(γ-glutamyl)-lysyl crosslinks between proteins. Cystamine blocks transglutaminase activity and is used in vitro in human samples and in vivo in mice and rats in studies of coagulation, immune dysfunction, and inflammatory disease. These studies have suggested cystamine blocks fibrin crosslinking and has anti-inflammatory effects, implicating transglutaminase activity in the pathogenesis of several diseases. We measured the effects of cystamine on fibrin crosslinking, tissue factor-triggered plasma clot formation and thrombin generation, and coagulation factor enzymatic activity. At concentrations that blocked fibrin crosslinking, cystamine also inhibited plasma clot formation and reduced thrombin generation. Cystamine inhibited the amidolytic activity of coagulation factor XI and thrombin towards chromogenic substrates. These findings demonstrate that cystamine exhibits anticoagulant activity during coagulation. Given the close relationship between coagulation and inflammation, these findings suggest prior studies that used cystamine to implicate transglutaminase activity in disease pathogenesis warrant re-examination. PMID:25915545

  11. Efficacy of long-term anticoagulant treatment in subgroups of patients after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, P. F.; Deckers, J. W.; Jonker, J. J.; van Domburg, R. T.; Azar, A. J.; Hofman, A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the efficacy of long term oral anticoagulant treatment in subgroups of patients after myocardial infarction. DESIGN--Analysis of the effect of anticoagulant treatment in subgroups of hospital survivors of myocardial infarction based upon age, gender, history of hypertension, previous myocardial infarction, smoking habits, diabetes mellitus, Killip class, anterior location of infarction, thrombolytic therapy, and use of beta blockers. SUBJECTS--Participants of a multicentre, randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial that assessed the effect of oral anticoagulant treatment on mortality as well as cerebrovascular and cardiovascular morbidity in 3404 hospital survivors of acute myocardial infarction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--The effect of anticoagulant treatment on recurrent myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular events, and vascular events (the composite endpoint of reinfarction, cerebrovascular event, and vascular death). RESULTS--Long term anticoagulant treatment was associated with a reduction in mortality of 10% (95% confidence interval -11% to 27%), recurrent myocardial infarction of 53% (41% to 62%), cerebrovascular events of 40% (10% to 60%) and vascular events of 35% (24% to 45%). Treatment effect with respect to recurrent myocardial infarction was comparable among all subgroups of patients. Although treatment effect appeared to be somewhat smaller in females than in males (-11% v -45%), and in patients with diabetes compared to those without (-14% v -42%) with respect to vascular events, none of these differences reached statistical significance. In multivariate analysis, more advanced age, previous myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, and heart failure during admission were independently associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular complications. CONCLUSIONS--The relative benefit of long term anticoagulant therapy in survivors of myocardial infarction is not modified by known prognostic factors for

  12. Periprocedural anticoagulation of patients undergoing pericardiocentesis for cardiac tamponade complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Bai, Rong; Chen, Ying-wei; Yu, Rong-hui; Tang, Ri-bo; Sang, Cai-hua; Li, Song-nan; Ma, Chang-sheng; Dong, Jian-zeng

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation of patients with cardiac tamponade (CT) complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is an ongoing problem. The aim of this study was to survey the clinical practice of periprocedural anticoagulation in such patients. This study analyzed the periprocedural anticoagulation of 17 patients with CT complicating AF ablation. Emergent pericardiocentesis was performed once CT was confirmed. The mean drained volume was 410.0 ± 194.1 mL. Protamine sulfate was administered to neutralize heparin (1 mg neutralizes 100 units heparin) in 11 patients with persistent pericardial bleeding and vitamin K1 (10 mg) was given to reverse warfarin in 3 patients with supratherapeutic INR (INR > 2.1). Drainage catheters were removed 12 hours after echocardiography confirmed absence of intrapericardial bleeding and anticoagulation therapy was restored 12 hours after removing the catheter. Fifteen patients took oral warfarin and 10 of them were given subcutaneous injection of LMWH (1 mg/kg, twice daily) as a bridge to resumption of systemic anticoagulation with warfarin. Two patients with a small amount of persistent pericardial effusion were given LMWH on days 5 and 13, and warfarin on days 6 and 24. The dosage of warfarin was adjusted to keep the INR within 2-3 in all patients. After 12 months of follow-up, all patients had no neurological events and no occurrence of delayed CT. The results showed that it was effective and safe to resume anticoagulation therapy 12 hours after removal of the drainage catheter. This may help to prevent thromboembolic events following catheter ablation of AF. PMID:25503659

  13. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly challenging when given in an ambulatory setting. Current treatment pathways for most patients with deep-vein thrombosis typically involve initial hospital or community-based ambulatory care with subsequent follow-up in a secondary care setting. With the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) into routine clinical practice, it is now possible for the initial acute management of patients with deep-vein thrombosis to be undertaken by primary care. As hospital admissions associated with VTE become shorter, primary care will play an increasingly important role in the long-term management of these patients. Although the NOACs can potentially simplify patient management and improve clinical outcomes, primary care physicians may be less familiar with these new treatments compared with traditional therapy. To assist primary care physicians in further understanding the role of the NOACs, this article outlines the main differences between NOACs and traditional anticoagulation therapy and discusses the benefit–risk profile of the different NOACs in the treatment and secondary prevention of recurrent VTE. Key considerations for the use of NOACs in the primary care setting are highlighted, including dose transition, risk assessment and follow-up, duration of anticoagulant therapy, how to minimize bleeding risks, and the importance of patient education and counseling. PMID:27217793

  14. Changing practice of anticoagulation: will target-specific anticoagulants replace warfarin?

    PubMed

    Arepally, Gowthami M; Ortel, Thomas L

    2015-01-01

    The target-specific oral anticoagulants are a class of agents that inhibit factor Xa or thrombin. They are effective and safe compared to warfarin for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism, and they are comparable to low-molecular-weight heparin for thromboprophylaxis after hip or knee arthroplasty. For other indications, however, such as the prevention of stroke in patients with mechanical heart valves, initial studies have been unfavorable for the newer agents, leaving warfarin the anticoagulant of choice. Further studies are needed before the target-specific anticoagulants can be recommended for patients with cancer-associated thrombosis or heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. Concerns also persist about difficulties with the laboratory assessment of anticoagulant effect and the lack of a specific reversal agent. For these reasons, we anticipate that the vitamin K antagonists will continue to be important anticoagulants for years to come. PMID:25587651

  15. Race against the clock: overcoming challenges in the management of anticoagulant-associated intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter; Pollack, Charles V; Milan, Melissa; Schaefer, Alisa

    2014-08-01

    Patients receiving anticoagulation therapy who present with any type of intracranial hemorrhage--including subdural hematoma, epidural hematoma, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)--require urgent correction of their coagulopathy to prevent hemorrhage expansion, limit tissue damage, and facilitate surgical intervention as necessary. The focus of this review is acute ICH, but the principles of management for anticoagulation-associated ICH (AAICH) apply to patients with all types of intracranial hemorrhage, whether acute or chronic. A number of therapies--including fresh frozen plasma (FFP), intravenous vitamin K, activated and inactivated prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs), and recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa)--have been used alone or in combination to treat AAICH to reverse anticoagulation, help achieve hemodynamic stability, limit hematoma expansion, and prepare the patient for possible surgical intervention. However, there is a paucity of high-quality data to direct such therapy. The use of 3-factor PCC (activated and inactivated) and rFVIIa to treat AAICH constitutes off-label use of these therapies in the United States. However, in April 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Kcentra (a 4-factor PCC) for the urgent reversal of vitamin K antagonist (VKA) anticoagulation in adults with acute major bleeding. Plasma is the only other product approved for this use in the United States. (1) Inconsistent recommendations, significant barriers (e.g., clinician-, therapy-, or logistics-based barriers), and a lack of approved treatment pathways in some institutions can be potential impediments to timely and evidence-based management of AAICH with available therapies. Patient assessment, therapy selection, whether to use a reversal or factor repletion agent alone or in combination with other agents, determination of site-of-care management, eligibility for neurosurgery, and potential hematoma evacuation are the

  16. Use and Outcomes Associated With Bridging During Anticoagulation Interruptions in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Eric D.; Kim, Sunghee; Thomas, Laine; Gersh, Bernard J.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Kowey, Peter R.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Sherwood, Matthew W.; Chang, Paul; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Ansell, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Background— Temporary interruption of oral anticoagulation for procedures is often required, and some propose using bridging anticoagulation. However, the use and outcomes of bridging during oral anticoagulation interruptions in clinical practice are unknown. Methods and Results— The Outcomes Registry for Better Informed Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation (ORBIT-AF) registry is a prospective, observational registry study of US outpatients with atrial fibrillation. We recorded incident temporary interruptions of oral anticoagulation for a procedure, including the use and type of bridging therapy. Outcomes included multivariable-adjusted rates of myocardial infarction, stroke or systemic embolism, major bleeding, cause-specific hospitalization, and death within 30 days. Of 7372 patients treated with oral anticoagulation, 2803 overall interruption events occurred in 2200 patients (30%) at a median follow-up of 2 years. Bridging anticoagulants were used in 24% (n=665), predominantly low-molecular-weight heparin (73%, n=487) and unfractionated heparin (15%, n=97). Bridged patients were more likely to have had prior cerebrovascular events (22% versus 15%; P=0.0003) and mechanical valve replacements (9.6% versus 2.4%; P<0.0001); however, there was no difference in CHA2DS2-VASc scores (scores ≥2 in 94% versus 95%; P=0.5). Bleeding events were more common in bridged than nonbridged patients (5.0% versus 1.3%; adjusted odds ratio, 3.84; P<0.0001). The incidence of myocardial infarction, stroke or systemic embolism, major bleeding, hospitalization, or death within 30 days was also significantly higher in patients receiving bridging (13% versus 6.3%; adjusted odds ratio, 1.94; P=0.0001). Conclusions— Bridging anticoagulation is used in one quarter of anticoagulation interruptions and is associated with higher risk for bleeding and adverse events. These data do not support the use of routine bridging, and additional data are needed to identify best practices concerning

  17. The new oral anticoagulants: a challenge for hospital formularies.

    PubMed

    Merli, Geno J

    2012-08-01

    Introduction Over the past 60 years, clinicians have used vitamin K antagonists, primarily warfarin, as the sole oral anticoagulants for managing a variety of thrombotic disorders. Warfarin, which requires frequent monitoring, has a variable dose response, a narrow therapeutic index, and numerous drug and dietary interactions. However, intravenous and subcutaneous agents, such as unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, direct thrombin inhibitors, and pentasaccharide, have been introduced over the past 30 years for managing thromboembolic disorders. Recently, 5 new oral anticoagulants, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, endoxaban, and betrixaban, have been introduced into clinical trials. Apixaban, rivaroxaban, endoxaban, and betrixaban are specific direct inhibitors of factor Xa, while dabigatran inhibits factor IIa. These drugs have a pharmacological profile that does not require monitoring in order to adjust therapy, which is the mainstay of warfarin management. In addition, these new medications have not shown any major issues regarding food interactions; rather, they demonstrate the potential for limited drug-drug interactions due to their limited metabolism through the cytochrome P450 system. This unique pharmacokinetic profile may provide clinicians with a new era of managing thromboembolic disorders. Two of these agents, dabigatran and rivaroxaban, have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF); in addition, rivaroxaban can be used in the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in total hip and knee arthroplasty during the acute and extended periods of risk. However, the challenge for hospital formularies will be the appropriate use and management of these new medications as they become integrated into outpatient care. In order to better understand the issues that pharmacy and therapeutics committees will encounter, a review of the 2 FDA

  18. Lupus-anticoagulant testing at NOAC trough levels.

    PubMed

    Ratzinger, Franz; Lang, Mona; Belik, Sabine; Jilma-Stohlawetz, Petra; Schmetterer, Klaus G; Haslacher, Helmuth; Perkmann, Thomas; Quehenberger, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOAC), including rivaroxaban, apixaban or dabigatran, regularly show relevant effects on coagulation tests, making the interpretation of results difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible interferences of NOACs in trough level concentrations in lupus anticoagulant (LA) testing. Citrate plasma specimens of 30 healthy volunteers were spiked with rivaroxaban, apixaban or dabigatran in four plasma concentration levels at or below trough NOAC levels. The NOAC concentration was measured using dedicated surrogate concentration tests and a stepwise diagnostic procedure for LA-testing was applied using screening, mixing and confirmatory testing. Results were compared to NOAC-free specimens. Starting with a plasma concentration of 12.5 ng/ml, dabigatran-spiked specimens showed significant prolongations in the lupus anticoagulant-sensitive activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT-LA) as well as in the Dilute Russell viper venom time (dRVVT), leading to 43.3 % false positives in confirmatory testing in the dRVVT. In contrast, rivaroxaban, beginning with 7.5 ng/ml, exclusively affected dRVVT-based tests. In confirmatory tests, 30.0 % of rivaroxaban-spiked specimens showed false positive results. Starting with 18.75 ng/ml apixaban, a significant prolongation of the dRVVT and up to 20.7 % false positives in confirmatory tests were found. In contrast to other NOACs tested, apixaban did not present with a dose-dependent increase of the dRVVT ratio. In conclusion, the rate of false positive results in LA-testing is unacceptably high at expected trough levels of NOACs. Even at plasma concentrations below the LLOQ of commercially available surrogate tests, LA testing is best avoided in patients with NOAC therapy. PMID:27075441

  19. Atrial Fibrillation Ablation without Interruption of Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Santangeli, Pasquale; Di Biase, Luigi; Sanchez, Javier E; Horton, Rodney; Natale, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) can be cured by pulmonary vein antrum isolation (PVAI) in a substantial proportion of patients. The high efficacy of PVAI is partially undermined by a small but concrete periprocedural risk of complications, such as thromboembolic events and bleeding. A correct management of anticoagulation is essential to prevent such complications. Performing PVAI without interruption of oral anticoagulation has been demonstrated feasible by our group in previous studies. Recently, we reported that continuation of therapeutic warfarin during radiofrequency catheter ablation consistently reduces the risk of periprocedural stroke/transient ischemic attack without increasing the risk of hemorrhagic events. Of note, interrupting warfarin anticoagulation may actually increase the risk of stroke even when bridged with heparin. The latter strategy is also associated with an increased risk of minor bleeding. With regard to major bleeding, we found no significant difference between patients with a therapeutic INR and those who were bridged with heparin. Therefore, continuation of therapeutic warfarin during ablation of AF appears to be the best anticoagulation strategy. In this paper we summarize our experience with AF ablation without interruption of anticoagulation. PMID:21577267

  20. [Treatment standards of the oral anticoagulant in patients with idiopathic pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Zbigniew; Kowalski, Piotr; Grzegorek, Damian

    2016-07-01

    The optimal and the most effective treatment of pulmonary embolism is still a matter of concern and each day sees a new set of challenges for the world of medicine. The progress, has been made in recent years, improved quality of life and caused much better treatment results. This is difficult issue in patients, receiving anticoagulant therapy, because they require an individual approach and adjustability to the therapeutic possibilities. The benefits of long-term anticoagulant therapy, which decreases relapses of idiopathic venous thromboembolism and diminishes risk of thromboembolic complications, should be taking under consideration. It is still a matter of dispute the time of carrying out of treatment, especially after the first life idiopathic episode of pulmonary embolism. The purpose of this paper is an overview and a summary of the foregoing achievements concerned the standards of idiopathic pulmonary embolism treatment, expecting benefits flowing with using new oral anticoagulants, as an alternative to known for decades Vitamin K antagonist drugs. A lot of information about new oral anticoagulants speaks in favor of their use, but unknown safety of the drugs caused searching the best strategy of pulmonary embolism treatment all the time. PMID:27590653

  1. Current practice of antiplatelet and anticoagulation management in post-cardiac surgery patients: a national audit.

    PubMed

    Hosmane, Sharath; Birla, Rashmi; Marchbank, Adrian

    2012-04-01

    The Audit and Guidelines Committee of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery recently published a guideline on antiplatelet and anticoagulation management in cardiac surgery. We aimed to assess the awareness of the current guideline and adherence to it in the National Health Service through this National Audit. We designed a questionnaire consisting of nine questions covering various aspects of antiplatelet and anticoagulation management in post-cardiac surgery patients. A telephonic survey of the on-call cardiothoracic registrars in all the cardiothoracic centres across the UK was performed. All 37 National Health Service hospitals in the UK with 242 consultants providing adult cardiac surgical service were contacted. Twenty (54%) hospitals had a unit protocol for antiplatelet and anticoagulation management in post-cardiac surgery. Only 23 (62.2%) registrars were aware of current European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery guidelines. Antiplatelet therapy is variable in the cardiac surgical units across the country. Low-dose aspirin is commonly used despite the recommendation of 150-300 mg. The loading dose of aspirin within 24 h as recommended by the guideline is followed only by 60.7% of surgeons. There was not much deviation from the guideline with respect to the anticoagulation therapy. PMID:22235003

  2. [Treatment standards of the oral anticoagulant in patients with idiopathic pulmonary embolism].

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Zbigniew; Kowalski, Piotr; Grzegorek, Damian

    2016-08-01

    The optimal and the most effective treatment of pulmonary embolism is still a matter of concern and each day sees a new set of challenges for the world of medicine. The progress, has been made in recent years, improved quality of life and caused much better treatment results. This is difficult issue in patients, receiving anticoagulant therapy, because they require an individual approach and adjustability to the therapeutic possibilities. The benefits of long-term anticoagulant therapy, which decreases relapses of idiopathic venous thromboembolism and diminishes risk of thromboembolic complications, should be taking under consideration. It is still a matter of dispute the time of carrying out of treatment, especially after the first life idiopathic episode of pulmonary embolism. The purpose of this paper is an overview and a summary of the foregoing achievements concerned the standards of idiopathic pulmonary embolism treatment, expecting benefits flowing with using new oral anticoagulants, as an alternative to known for decades Vitamin K antagonist drugs. A lot of information about new oral anticoagulants speaks in favor of their use, but unknown safety of the drugs caused searching the best strategy of pulmonary embolism treatment all the time. PMID:27591448

  3. Antithrombotic therapies in patients with prosthetic heart valves: guidelines translated for the clinician

    PubMed Central

    Leiria, Tiago L. L.; Lopes, Renato D.; Williams, Judson B.; Katz, Jason N.; Kalil, Renato A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with prosthetic heart valves require chronic oral anticoagulation. In this clinical scenario, physicians must be mindful of the thromboembolic and bleeding risks related to chronic anticoagulant therapy. Currently, only vitamin K antagonists are approved for this indication. This paper reviews the main heart valve guidelines focusing on the use of oral anticoagulation in these patients. PMID:21327503

  4. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: established oral anticoagulants versus novel anticoagulants-translating clinical trial data into practice.

    PubMed

    Ezekowitz, Michael D; Spahr, Judy; Ghosh, Pradeepto; Corelli, Kathryn

    2014-09-01

    Anticoagulation for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) is effective. Pivotal trials RE-LY, ROCKET AF, ARISTOTLE, and ENGAGE-AF TIMI 48 tested novel agents against warfarin (W). In RE-LY, an open-label trial, dabigatran 150 mg BID (D150) was superior (35%) and 110 mg BID (D110) was noninferior to W. D150 reduced ischemic strokes by 25% and intracerebral bleeds by 74%, but increased major GI bleeds by 0.5 % per year. In ROCKET AF, a double-blind study, rivaroxaban 20 mg daily, downtitrated to 15 mg daily (if CrCl was <49) was noninferior for efficacy and safety, with an increase in GI bleeds. In ARISTOTLE, a double-blind study, apixaban 5 mg BID (downtitrated to 2.5 mg BID if two of the following were present: age, >80; weight, <60 kg; or serum creatinine, >1.5 mg) was superior for safety (31%), efficacy (21%), and all-cause mortality (11%). In ENGAGE-AF TIMI 48, edoxaban 60 mg once daily (30 mg once daily if CrCl 30-50 ml/min, weight <60 kg, or concomitant verapamil or quinidine) was noninferior to W for efficacy, but reduced major bleeding (20%). To translate clinical trials to practice, understanding the disease and each anticoagulant is essential. For all novel agents, rapid anticoagulation, absence of monitoring, and a short half-life differentiate them from W. Bleed rates were either noninferior or lower than for W, without an antidote. Patient compliance is critical. Knowledge of renal function is essential and maintaining patients on therapy is key. PMID:24880227

  5. [New oral anticoagulants in perioperative medicine].

    PubMed

    Giebl, A; Gürtler, K

    2014-04-01

    New oral anticoagulants (NOAC) inhibit factor Xa (Stuart-Prower factor) or factor IIa (thrombin) and are alternatives to vitamin K antagonists. Perioperative indications are deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis for prosthetic hip and knee replacement, therapeutic anticoagulation for deep vein thrombosis as well as the prophylaxis of stroke for patients with atrial fibrillation. Patients on NOACs pose multiple perioperative challenges for all medical disciplines involved. For non-emergency surgery, patients should be evaluated by an anesthesiolgist as early as possible to assess an optimal appointment for surgery and bridging strategy. Management of emergency procedures for patients on NOACs requires an interdisciplinary approach. The individual risk for uncontrolled bleeding versus the urgency for surgery needs to be evaluated on an individual basis. The determination of drug serum levels enables a rough estimation of anticoagulant activity. Emergency procedures in coagulopathy due to active bleeding are treated with the unspecific administration of blood products and coagulation factor concentrates. PMID:24696299

  6. Assessing patients’ anticoagulation preferences for the treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis using conjoint methodology

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Simon; Matzdorff, Axel; Maraveyas, Anthony; Holm, Majbrit V.; Pisa, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Low molecular weight heparins have demonstrated superiority over coumarins in the extended treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis and are recommended as first-line therapy in clinical guidelines. Non-vitamin K oral antagonists are yet to be evaluated against low molecular weight heparin for this indication. Nevertheless, a perception that patients favor oral anticoagulants over injections may lead to an increased prescribing of warfarin or non-vitamin K oral antagonists despite the evidence gap. There has been no evaluation of cancer patient preferences for anticoagulants and whether such an evidence gap is an acceptable trade-off for patients prescribed orals. We conducted a study to assess what features are most important to CAT patients regarding their choice of anticoagulant. Two modules were applied: Initial in-depth interviews with 9 patients diagnosed with cancer-associated thrombosis, and thereafter quantitative research, where a further 100 patients completed a choice-based-conjoint exercise, where 15 different scenarios were presented to identify the most important attributes of an anticoagulant. Seventy percent of the patients were treated with injected medication (low molecular weight heparin) and 30% with oral medications. Patients most valued an anticoagulant with minimal interference with their cancer treatment (39%), low thrombosis recurrence rate (24%), and low risk of major bleed (19%). Preference for oral administration over injection had moderate importance (13%). The results show that patients prefer an anticoagulant that does not interfere with their cancer treatment, suggesting the primacy of the cancer disease over venous thromboembolism in these patients. Patients also favor efficacy and safety over convenience of route of administration. PMID:26294737

  7. Possible unaware intoxication by anticoagulant rodenticide

    PubMed Central

    Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin; Ghaffari, Saba; Nassiri-Toossi, Mohsen; Amini, Mohsen; Edalatifard, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Superwarfarin toxicity may be a serious problem. It needs high clinical suspicious in patients with bleeding diathesis without hematologic or liver diseases even in patients with apparent negative history of warfarin or other anticoagulant accessibility. Here we reported a patient with a negative history of any medical diseases or drug administration who was referred with generalized ecchymosis. Increased international normalized ratio and decreased vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors were detected in this patient. His hematologic and liver evaluations were normal. Clinical pharmacist emphasis in taking history revealed using anticoagulant rodenticide all over the farm the patient lived in that might result in unaware intoxication in this patient who suffered dementia. PMID:25535623

  8. Laboratory monitoring of anticoagulation: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Tripodi, Armando; van den Besselaar, Antonius

    2009-02-01

    The treatment of choice for acute venous thromboembolism is anticoagulant therapy with fast-acting drugs (unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin or fondaparinux) aimed at preventing thrombus extension, followed by extended prophylaxis with vitamin K antagonists aimed at preventing recurrence. Experience accumulated over the years has demonstrated that strict laboratory monitoring is required for unfractionated heparin and vitamin K antagonists, making use of these drugs problematic for patients and physicians and prompting researchers to develop new anticoagulants equally effective but without the requirement for laboratory monitoring. The results of clinical trials to date, albeit limited, suggest that these new drugs will probably keep their promise. However, the definitive answer will come subsequent to these clinical trials, when clinicians will start to use these drugs to treat patients in the real world. It is likely that some sort of laboratory monitoring will be required at least for selected categories of patients. Accordingly, clinical laboratories should still be prepared to monitor patients, although the numbers may hopefully decrease sharply in the next decade or so. PMID:19308891

  9. [Anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning in dogs in The Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Robben, J H; Mout, H C; Kuijpers, E A

    1997-09-01

    The occurrence, the diagnosis, and the treatment of anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning in dogs in the Netherlands was evaluated by a survey among Dutch veterinarians carried out by the National Poisons Control Center (NPCC). The survey included information on 54 dogs, 32 being treated by veterinarians who consulted the NPCC and 22 that were admitted to the Utrecht University Clinic for Companion Animals (UUCCA). The poisons that were suspected were brodifacoum (n = 19), bromadiolone (n = 14), difenacoum (n = 8), difethialone (n = 6) and chlorophacinone (n = 1). In 6 dogs the identity of the poison was unknown. Of 31 dogs with hemorrhages, 2 died shortly after presentation to practitioners and 2 died shortly after admission to the UUCCA. Signs of bleeding occurred especially in poisoning by brodifacoum (n = 16). In all but one of the dogs without hemorrhages, the intake of poison had taken place within 24 hours before presentation. The method of treatment varied, with the induction of vomiting and the use of vitamin K mentioned most. The choice of therapy was determined by the length of time after intake of the poison, the clinical signs and whether or not an anticoagulant toxicosis was suspected at the time of the initial examination. These findings provide the basis for discussion of several aspects of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:9534772

  10. Anticoagulative strategies in reconstructive surgery – clinical significance and applicability

    PubMed Central

    Jokuszies, Andreas; Herold, Christian; Niederbichler, Andreas D.; Vogt, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced strategies in reconstructive microsurgery and especially free tissue transfer with advanced microvascular techniques have been routinely applied and continously refined for more than three decades in day-to-day clinical work. Bearing in mind the success rates of more than 95%, the value of these techniques in patient care and comfort (one-step reconstruction of even the most complex tissue defects) cannot be underestimated. However, anticoagulative protocols and practices are far from general acceptance and – most importantly – lack the benchmark of evidence basis while the reconstructive and microsurgical methods are mostly standardized. Therefore, the aim of our work was to review the actual literature and synoptically lay out the mechanisms of action of the plethora of anticoagulative substances. The pharmacologic prevention and the surgical intervention of thrombembolic events represent an established and essential part of microsurgery. The high success rates of microvascular free tissue transfer as of today are due to treatment of patients in reconstructive centers where proper patient selection, excellent microsurgical technique, tissue transfer to adequate recipient vessels, and early anastomotic revision in case of thrombosis is provided. Whether the choice of antithrombotic agents is a factor of success remains still unclear. Undoubtedly however the lack of microsurgical experience and bad technique can never be compensated by any regimen of antithrombotic therapy. All the more, the development of consistent standards and algorithms in reconstructive microsurgery is absolutely essential to optimize clinical outcomes and increase multicentric and international comparability of postoperative results and complications. PMID:22294976