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Sample records for antifungals myclobutanil propiconazole

  1. COMPARATIVE LIVER P450 ENZYME ACTIVITY AND HISTOPATHOLOGY IN MICE TREATED WITH THE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES: MYCLOBUTANIL, PROPICONAZOLE AND TRIADIMETON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles used in agriculture and pharmaceutical products comprise a class of chemicals which inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis to act as fungicides. Both propiconazole and triadimefon are hepatotoxic and hepatotumorigenic in mice, while myclobutanil is not a mouse liver tumorigen....

  2. Behavior of myclobutanil, propiconazole, and nuarimol residues during lager beer brewing.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Simón; Pérez, Gabriel; Vela, Nuria; Mena, Luis; Navarro, Ginés

    2005-11-01

    Over a 4 month brewing process, the fate of three fungicides, myclobutanil, propiconazole, and nuarimol, was studied in the spent grain, brewer wort, and final beer product. Only the residual level of myclobutanil after the mashing step was higher than its maximum residue limit (MRL) on barley. A substantial fraction was removed with the spent grain in all cases (26-42%). The half-life times obtained for the fungicides during storage of the spent grains ranged from 82 to 187 days. No significant influence of the boiling stage on the decrease of the fungicide residues was demonstrated. During fermentation, the content reduction varied from 20 to 47%. After the lagering and filtration steps, no significant decrease (<10%) was observed in any of the residues. Finally, during storage of the beer (3 months), the amounts of fungicides fell by 25-50% of their respective concentrations in the finished beer. PMID:16248555

  3. TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILES IN LIVER FROM RATS TREATED WITH TUMORIGENIC AND NON-TUMORIGENIC TRIAZOLE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES: PROPICONAZOLE, TRIADIMEFON, AND MYCLOBUTANIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are a class of fungicides used as pharmaceutical and agricultural agents. In chronic bioassays in rats, triadimefon was hepatotoxic and induced follicular cell adenomas in the thyroid gland, whereas, propiconazole and myclobutanil were hepatotoxic but had no effect on t...

  4. Inhibition of Rat and Human Steroidogenesis by Triazole Antifungals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental chemicals that alter steroid production could interfere with male reproductive development and function. Three agricultural antifungal triazoles (myclobutanil, propiconazole and triadimefon) that are known to modulate expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes and e...

  5. TOXICITY PROFILES IN RATS TREATED WITH TUMORIGENIC AND NONTUMORIGENIC TRIAZOLE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES: PROPICONAZOLE, TRIADIMEFON, AND MYCLOBUTANIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are a class of azole based fungicides used in agriculture and as pharmaceutical products. They have a common mode of antifungal action through inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis. Some members of this class have been shown to be hepatotoxic and will induce mouse hepa...

  6. Toxicogenomic Effects Common to Triazole Antifungals and Conserved Between Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    The triazole antifungals myclobutanil, propiconazole and triadimefon cause varying degrees of hepatic toxicity and disrupt steroid hormone homeostasis in rodent in vivo models. To identify biological pathways consistently modulated across multiple time-points and various study d...

  7. Propiconazole

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Propiconazole ; CASRN 60207 - 90 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  8. TOXICITY PROFILES IN MICE TREATED WITH HEPATOTUMORIGENIC AND NON-HEPATOTUMORIGENIC TRIAZOLE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES: PROPICONAZOLE, TRIADIMEFON, AND MYCLOBUTANIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles comprise a class of fungicides used in agriculture and as pharmaceutical products. The fungicidal properties of conazoles are due to their inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis. Certain conazoles are tumorigenic in rodents; both propiconazole and triadimefon are hepatot...

  9. Development of a difenoconazole/propiconazole microemulsion and its antifungal activities against Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IA.

    PubMed

    Leng, Pengfei; Zhang, Zhiming; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yunsong; Zhao, Maojun; Pan, Guangtang

    2012-06-01

    According to its physical and chemical properties, the composition of difenoconazole/propiconazole microemulsion was as follows: xylene as solvent, emulsifier HSH as surfactant and methanol as cosurfactant. The optimal formulation of difenoconazole/propiconazole microemulsion was oil/SAA/water = 1/2/5 (w/w), in which the SAA consisted of emulsifier HSH and methanol with ratio of 3/2 (w/w). The cloud point of difenoconazole/propiconazole microemulsion was 70 degrees C and its effective ingredient content was 2.5% measured by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Its heat storage stability was studied according to the standards. The decomposition rates of the difenoconazole/propiconazole microemulsion were merely 2.45%, 2.63% respectively and met the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) standards of pesticide microemulsion. Investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) the particle size of difenoconazole/propiconazole microemulsion was 90-140 nm and its antifungal activities against Rhizoctonia solani AG1-IA were tested and compared with that of Meiyu. We found that the inhibition rates in the difenoconazole/propiconazole microemulsion treatment group were significantly higher than that of the emulsion group with the same content of effective ingredients and the study also revealed that its inhibiting ability on the formation and germination of sclerotia was significant. PMID:22822543

  10. METABOLISM OF MYCLOBUTANIL AND TRIADIMEFON BY HUMAN AND RAT CYTOCHROME P450 ENZYMES AND LIVER MICROSOMES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolism of two triazole-containing antifungal azoles was studied using expressed human and rat cytochrome P450s (CYP) and liver microsomes. Substrate depletion methods were used due to the complex array of metabolites produced from myclobutanil and triadimefon. Myclobutanil wa...

  11. CAR and PXR-dependent transcriptional changes in the mouse liver after exposure to propiconazole

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to the conazoles propiconazole and triadimefon but not myclobutanilled to tumors in mice after 2 years. Transcript profiling studies in the livers ofwild-type mice after short-term exposure to the conazoles revealed signatures indicating the involvement ofthe nuclear rec...

  12. INDUCTION OF CYTOCHROME P450 ISOFORMS IN RAT LIVER BY TWO CONAZOLES, TRIADIMEFON AND MYCLOBUTANIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. This study was undertaken to examine the inductive effects of two triazole antifungal agents, myclobutanil and triadimefon on the expression of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes and on the activities of CYP enzymes in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were dosed by gavage for 1...

  13. 78 FR 23497 - Propiconazole; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ...This regulation amends existing tolerances for residues of propiconazole in or on multiple commodities which are identified and discussed later in this document. Syngenta Crop Protection, LLC requested these tolerances under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act...

  14. TOXICOGENOMIC STUDY OF TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES AND PERFLUOROALKYL ACIDS IN RAT LIVERS ACCURATELY CATEGORIZES CHEMICALS AND IDENTIFIES MECHANISMS OF TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicogenomic analysis of five environmental chemicals was performed to investigate the ability of genomics to predict toxicity, categorize chemicals, and elucidate mechanisms of toxicity. Three triazole antifungals (myclobutanil, propiconazole, and triadimefon) and two perfluori...

  15. TOXICOGENOMIC STUDY OF TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES AND PERFLUOROALKYL ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicogenomic analysis of five environmental contaminants was performed to investigate the ability of genomics to categorize chemicals and elucidate mechanisms of toxicity. Three triazole antifungals (myclobutanil, propiconazole and triadimefon) and two perfluorinated compounds (...

  16. Propiconazole induces alterations in the hepatic metabolome of mice: relevance to propiconazole-induced hepatocarcinogenesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide and has been the subject of recent mechanistic investigations on its carcinogenic mechanism of action. The goals of this study were: 1. To identify metabolomic changes induced in the liver by increasing doses of propiconazole i...

  17. Propiconazole induces alterations in the hepatic metabolome of mice: relevance to propiconazole-induced hepatocarcinogenesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide and has been the subject of recent investigations into its carcinogenic mechanism of action. The goals of this study were: 1. To identify metabolomic changes induced in the liver by increasing doses of propiconazole in mice; 2...

  18. TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILES IN LIVER FROM MICE TREATED WITH HEPATOTUMORIGENIC AND NON-HEPATOTUMORIGENIC TRIAZOLE CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES: PROPICONAZOLE, TRIADIMEFON, AND MYCLOBUTANIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are environmental and pharmaceutical fungicides. The present study relates the toxicological effects of conazoles to alterations of gene and pathway transcription and identifies potential modes of tumorigenic action. In a companion study (Allen et al. 2006) under...

  19. Toxicogenomic effects common to triazole antifungals and conserved between rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Amber K; Dix, David J

    2009-07-01

    The triazole antifungals myclobutanil, propiconazole and triadimefon cause varying degrees of hepatic toxicity and disrupt steroid hormone homeostasis in rodent in vivo models. To identify biological pathways consistently modulated across multiple timepoints and various study designs, gene expression profiling was conducted on rat livers from three separate studies with triazole treatment groups ranging from 6 h after a single oral gavage exposure, to prenatal to adult exposures via feed. To explore conservation of responses across species, gene expression from the rat liver studies were compared to in vitro data from rat and human primary hepatocytes exposed to the triazoles. Toxicogenomic data on triazoles from 33 different treatment groups and 135 samples (microarrays) identified thousands of probe sets and dozens of pathways differentially expressed across time, dose, and species--many of these were common to all three triazoles, or conserved between rodents and humans. Common and conserved pathways included androgen and estrogen metabolism, xenobiotic metabolism signaling through CAR and PXR, and CYP mediated metabolism. Differentially expressed genes included the Phase I xenobiotic, fatty acid, sterol and steroid metabolism genes Cyp2b2 and CYP2B6, Cyp3a1 and CYP3A4, and Cyp4a22 and CYP4A11; Phase II conjugation enzyme genes Ugt1a1 and UGT1A1; and Phase III ABC transporter genes Abcb1 and ABCB1. Gene expression changes caused by all three triazoles in liver and hepatocytes were concentrated in biological pathways regulating lipid, sterol and steroid homeostasis, identifying a potential common mode of action conserved between rodents and humans. Modulation of hepatic sterol and steroid metabolism is a plausible mode of action for changes in serum testosterone and adverse reproductive outcomes observed in rat studies, and may be relevant to human risk assessment. PMID:19409404

  20. Toxicogenomic effects common to triazole antifungals and conserved between rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, Amber K.; Dix, David J.

    2009-07-01

    The triazole antifungals myclobutanil, propiconazole and triadimefon cause varying degrees of hepatic toxicity and disrupt steroid hormone homeostasis in rodent in vivo models. To identify biological pathways consistently modulated across multiple timepoints and various study designs, gene expression profiling was conducted on rat livers from three separate studies with triazole treatment groups ranging from 6 h after a single oral gavage exposure, to prenatal to adult exposures via feed. To explore conservation of responses across species, gene expression from the rat liver studies were compared to in vitro data from rat and human primary hepatocytes exposed to the triazoles. Toxicogenomic data on triazoles from 33 different treatment groups and 135 samples (microarrays) identified thousands of probe sets and dozens of pathways differentially expressed across time, dose, and species - many of these were common to all three triazoles, or conserved between rodents and humans. Common and conserved pathways included androgen and estrogen metabolism, xenobiotic metabolism signaling through CAR and PXR, and CYP mediated metabolism. Differentially expressed genes included the Phase I xenobiotic, fatty acid, sterol and steroid metabolism genes Cyp2b2 and CYP2B6, Cyp3a1 and CYP3A4, and Cyp4a22 and CYP4A11; Phase II conjugation enzyme genes Ugt1a1 and UGT1A1; and Phase III ABC transporter genes Abcb1 and ABCB1. Gene expression changes caused by all three triazoles in liver and hepatocytes were concentrated in biological pathways regulating lipid, sterol and steroid homeostasis, identifying a potential common mode of action conserved between rodents and humans. Modulation of hepatic sterol and steroid metabolism is a plausible mode of action for changes in serum testosterone and adverse reproductive outcomes observed in rat studies, and may be relevant to human risk assessment.

  1. Enantioselectivity in tebuconazole and myclobutanil non-target toxicity and degradation in soils.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanbo; Dong, Fengshou; Liu, Xingang; Xu, Jun; Han, Yongtao; Zheng, Yongquan

    2015-03-01

    Tebuconazole and myclobutanil are two widely used triazole fungicides, both comprising two enantiomers with different fungicidal activity. However, their non-target toxicity and environmental behavior with respect to enantioselectivity have received limited attention. In the present study, tebuconazole and myclobutanil enantiomers were isolated and used to evaluate the occurrence of enantioselectivity in their acute toxicity to three non-target organisms (Scenedesmus obliquus, Daphnia magna, and Danio rerio). Significant differences were found: R-(-)-tebuconazole was about 1.4-5.9 times more toxic than S-(+)-tebuconazole; rac-myclobutanil was about 1.3-6.1 and 1.4-7.3 more toxic than (-)-myclobutanil and (+)-myclobutanil, respectively. Enantioselectivity was further investigated in terms of fungicide degradation in seven soil samples, which were selected to cover a broad range of soil properties. In aerobic or anaerobic soils, the S-(+)-tebuconazole degraded faster than R-(-)-tebuconazole, and the enantioselectivity showed a correlation with soil organic carbon content. (+)-Myclobutanil was preferentially degraded than (-)-myclobutanil in aerobic soils, whereas both enantiomers degraded at similar rates in anaerobic soils. Apparent correlations of enantioselectivity with soil pH and soil texture were observed for myclobutanil under aerobic conditions. In addition, both fungicides were configurationally stable in soils, i.e., no enantiomerization was found. Enantioselectivity may be a common phenomenon in both aquatic toxicity and biodegradation of chiral triazole fungicides, and this should be considered when assessing ecotoxicological risks of these compounds in the environment. PMID:25475972

  2. PROPICONAZOLE-INDUCED CARCINOGENESIS: ROLE OF OXIDATIVE STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is a systemic foliar fungicide with a broad range of activity. Rodents fed with propiconazole at high dose resulted in diminished body weight, increased liver weight of adults and pups, and eventually liver carcinogenesis. In order to unravel the toxic processes inv...

  3. Interaction of propiconazole in the peanut leafspot disease complex

    SciTech Connect

    Hancock, H.G.

    1985-01-01

    (/sup 14/C)-Propiconazole exhibited characteristics of an apoplastic xenobiotic being acropetally translocated via the transpiration stream to the foliage following root exposure in peanut (Arachis hypogeaea). When applied to leaves, radioactivity was detected distal to the point of application and accumulated along the margins of treated leaves. Redistribution to untreated plant parts was not observed. (/sup 14/C)-propiconazole rapidly penetrated the cuticle of leaves. However, leaves treated with a mixture of (/sup 14/C)-propiconazole and Penetrator 3 exhibited significantly greater foliar uptake of radioactivity than leaves treated with (/sup 14/C)-propiconazole alone. In replicated experiments, leafspot infection (caused by Cercospora arachidicola or Cercosporidium personatum) decreased quadratically with increasing application rate of Tilt 3.6EC (propiconazole) or Vangard 1.0EC (etaconazole). Combinations of fungicide and penetrator 3 gave slightly greater reductions of infection relative to fungicide alone but had no effect on yield. Propiconazole had no effect on the uptake or incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-acetate into the total lipid (TL) of peanut leaf tissue. (/sup 14/C) in the total fatty acids and non-saponifiable lipids was 10 to 20% greater, respectively, in treated tissue relative to the untreated control. Radioactivity of 4-demethyl sterols was up to 57% lower in treated leaves but no differences in radioactivity were detected in 4-methyl and 4,14-dimethyl sterols.

  4. Effects of myclobutanil on soil microbial biomass, respiration, and soil nitrogen transformations.

    PubMed

    Ju, Chao; Xu, Jun; Wu, Xiaohu; Dong, Fengshou; Liu, Xingang; Zheng, Yongquan

    2016-01-01

    A 3-month-long experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of different concentrations of myclobutanil (0.4 mg kg(-1) soil [T1]; 1.2 mg kg(-1) soil [T3]; and 4 mg kg(-1) soil [T10]) on soil microbial biomass, respiration, and soil nitrogen transformations using two typical agricultural soils (Henan fluvo-aquic soil and Shanxi cinnamon soil). Soil was sampled after 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days of incubation to determine myclobutanil concentration and microbial parameters: soil basal respiration (RB), microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and nitrogen (MBN), NO(-)3-N and NH(+)4-N concentrations, and gene abundance of total bacteria, N2-fixing bacteria, fungi, ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The half-lives of the different doses of myclobutanil varied from 20.3 to 69.3 d in the Henan soil and from 99 to 138.6 d in the Shanxi soil. In the Henan soil, the three treatments caused different degrees of short-term inhibition of RB and MBC, NH(+)4-N, and gene abundance of total bacteria, fungi, N2-fixing bacteria, AOA, and AOB, with the exception of a brief increase in NO(-)3-N content during the T10 treatment. The MBN (immobilized nitrogen) was not affected. In the Shanxi soil, MBC, the populations of total bacteria, fungi, and N2-fixing bacteria, and NH(+)4-N concentration were not significantly affected by myclobutanil. The RB and MBN were decreased transitorily in the T10 treatment. The NO(-)3-N concentrations and the abundance of both AOA and AOB were erratically stimulated by myclobutanil. Regardless of whether stimulation or suppression occurred, the effects of myclobutanil on the two soil types were short term. In summary, myclobutanil had no long-term negative effects on the soil microbial biomass, respiration, and soil nitrogen transformations in the two types of soil, even at 10-fold the recommended dosage. PMID:26590854

  5. Protein Carbonyl Formation in Response to Propiconazole-Induced Oxidative Stress.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole, a widely used fungicide, is hepatotoxic and hepatotumorigenic in mice. Previous genomic analysis of liver tissues from propiconazole-treated mice identified genes and pathways involved in oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress may play a role in propico...

  6. Acute toxicity, bioactivity, and enantioselective behavior with tissue distribution in rabbits of myclobutanil enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingjing; Liu, Donghui; Qiu, Xinxu; Zhou, Qian; Shen, Zhigang; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2014-12-01

    The enantioselective bioactivity against pathogens (Cercospora arachidicola, Fulvia fulva, and Phytophthora infestans) and acute toxicity to Daphnia magna of the fungicide myclobutanil enantiomers were studied. The (+)-enantiomer in an antimicrobial activity test was about 1.79-1.96 times more active than the (-)-enantiomer. In the toxicity assay, the calculated 24-h LC50 values of the (-)-form, rac-form and (+)-form were 16.88, 13.17, and 11.91 mg/L, and the 48-h LC50 values were 10.15, 9.24, and 5.48 mg/L, respectively, showing that (+)-myclobutanil was more toxic. Meanwhile, the enantioselective metabolism of myclobutanil enantiomers following a single intravenous (i.v.) administration was investigated in rabbits. Total plasma clearance value (CL) of the (+)-enantiomer was 1.68-fold higher than its antipode. Significant differences in pharmacokinetics parameters between the two enantiomers indicated that the high bioactive (+)-enantiomer was preferentially metabolized and eliminated in plasma. Consistent consequences were found in the tissues (liver, brain, heart, kidney, fat, and muscle), resulting in a relative enrichment of the low-activity (-)-myclobutanil. These systemic assessments of the stereoisomers of myclobutanil cannot be used only to investigate environmental and biological behavior, but also have human health implications because of the long persistence of triazole fungicide and enantiomeric enrichment in mammals and humans. PMID:25043148

  7. Occurrence of azoxystrobin, propiconazole, and selected other fungicides in US streams, 2005-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, William A.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Fungicides are used to prevent foliar diseases on a wide range of vegetable, field, fruit, and ornamental crops. They are generally more effective as protective rather than curative treatments, and hence tend to be applied before infections take place. Less than 1% of US soybeans were treated with a fungicide in 2002 but by 2006, 4% were treated. Like other pesticides, fungicides can move-off of fields after application and subsequently contaminate surface water, groundwater, and associated sediments. Due to the constant pressure from fungal diseases such as the recent Asian soybean rust outbreak, and the always-present desire to increase crop yields, there is the potential for a significant increase in the amount of fungicides used on US farms. Increased fungicide use could lead to increased environmental concentrations of these compounds. This study documents the occurrence of fungicides in select US streams soon after the first documentation of soybean rust in the US and prior to the corresponding increase in fungicide use to treat this problem. Water samples were collected from 29 streams in 13 states in 2005 and/or 2006, and analyzed for 12 target fungicides. Nine of the 12 fungicides were detected in at least one stream sample and at least one fungicide was detected in 20 of 29 streams. At least one fungicide was detected in 56% of the 103 samples, as many as five fungicides were detected in an individual sample, and mixtures of fungicides were common. Azoxystrobin was detected most frequently (45% of 103 samples) followed by metalaxyl (27%), propiconazole (17%), myclobutanil (9%), and tebuconazole (6%). Fungicide detections ranged from 0.002 to 1.15 μ/L. There was indication of a seasonal pattern to fungicide occurrence, with detections more common and concentrations higher in late summer and early fall than in spring. At a few sites, fungicides were detected in all samples collected suggesting the potential for season-long occurrence in some streams

  8. Residue analysis and degradation studies of fenbuconazole and myclobutanil in strawberry by chiral high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hu; Wang, Xinquan; Qian, Mingrong; Wang, Xiangyun; Xu, Hao; Xu, Mingfei; Wang, Qiang

    2011-11-23

    A simple and sensitive enantioselective method for the determination of fenbuconazole and myclobutanil in strawberry was developed by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Fenbuconazole and myclobutanil residues in strawberry were extracted with acetonitrile containing 1% acetic acid, and an aliquot was cleaned up with PSA (primary and secondary amine) and C(18) sorbent. The direct resolution of fenbuconazole and myclobutanil enantiomers was performed on a cellulose tris (3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) column using acetonitrile-0.1% formic acid solution (60:40, v/v) as the mobile phase. Quantification was achieved using matrix-matched standard calibration curves, and the limits of quantification for fenbuconazole and myclobutanil enantiomers in strawberry were both 2 μg/kg. The method was successfully utilized to investigate the probable enantioselective degradation of fenbuconazole and myclobutanil in strawberry. The results showed that the degradation of the fenbuconazole and myclobutanil enantiomers in strawberry followed pseudofirst-order kinetics (R(2) > 0.97). The results from this study revealed that the degradation of fenbuconazole in strawberry was not enantioselective, while the degradation of myclobutanil was enantioselective, and the (+)-myclobutanil showed a faster degradation than (-)-myclobutanil in strawberry, resulting in the relative enrichment of (-)-myclobutanil in residue. The results could provide a reference to fully evaluate the risks of these two fungicides. PMID:21967215

  9. Antifungal polypeptides

    DOEpatents

    Altier, Daniel J.; Ellanskaya, Irina; Ellanskaya, legal representative, Natalia; Gilliam, Jacob T.; Hunter-Cevera, Jennie; Presnail, James K.; Schepers, Eric; Simmons, Carl R.; Torok, Tamas; Yalpani, Nasser

    2009-09-15

    The invention relates to antifungal compositions and methods for protecting a plant from a fungal pathogen. Compositions including antifungal polypeptides isolated from a fungal fermentation broth are provided.

  10. Cytotoxic effects of propiconazole and its metabolites in mouse and human hepatoma cells and primary mouse hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Propiconazole is a triazole-containing fungicide that is used agriculturally on grasses, fruits, grains, seeds, hardwoods, and conifers. Propiconazole is a mouse liver hepatotoxicant and a hepatocarcinogen and has adverse reproductive and developmental toxicities in exp...

  11. Altered microRNA expression induced by tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants ...

  12. A potential microRNA signature for tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants of conazole tumor...

  13. A microRNA signature for tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants o...

  14. In vivo mutagenicity of conazole fungicides correlates with tumorigenicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. All three conazoles are generally inactive in short-term genotoxicity te...

  15. IN VIVO MUTAGENICITY OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES CORRELATES WITH TUMORIGENICITY-JOURNAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. All three conazoles are generally inactive in short-term genotoxicity t...

  16. Inclusion complex of a new propiconazole derivative with β-cyclodextrin: NMR, ESI–MS and preliminary pharmacological studies

    PubMed Central

    Marangoci, Narcisa; Mares, Mihai; Silion, Mihaela; Fifere, Adrian; Varganici, Cristian; Nicolescu, Alina; Deleanu, Calin; Coroaba, Adina; Pinteala, Mariana; Simionescu, Bogdan C.

    2011-01-01

    A novel inclusion complex of the propiconazole nitrate (NO3PCZ) with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was prepared by treatment of propiconazole (PCZ) with an acidic nitrating agent. The formation of NO3PCZ and its inclusion complex with β-CD has been studied by NMR, ESI–MS, TGA, DSC methods. Using the undecoupled signal in the HMBC correlation spectra, almost identical coupling constants of CH from trizolic ring of PCZ and NO3PCZ compounds (1J(HC)3=207 Hz, 1J(CH)5=214 Hz, for PCZ; 1J(HC)3=208 Hz and 1J(CH)5=215 Hz, for NO3PCZ) were determined, confirming that the geometry of the heterocyclic skeleton is identical in both the forms. The 1:1 stoichiometry of the complex was determined by ESI–MS and was confirmed using Scott's equation in DMSO and Higuchi and Connors equation in water. The solubility curve obtained for NO3PCZ in presence of β-CD in distilled water was constructed, resulting in a solubility diagram of AL type. Solubility of NO3PCZ in water was determined by DLS studies. The results showed that NO3PCZ was encapsulated within the β-CD cavity with a binding constant of 330 M-1 in DMSO and 975 M-1 in water. Preliminary pharmacological studies showed higher antifungal activities for NO3PCZ and its inclusion complex, compared with its PCZ analog. The acute toxicity of the complex is smaller than the pure or modified drug, recommending the inclusion complex as future promising therapeutic agents. PMID:25755979

  17. The fungicide propiconazole interferes with embryonic development of the crustacean Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Kast-Hutcheson, K; Rider, C V; LeBlanc, G A

    2001-03-01

    Propiconazole is a fungicide used in a variety of agricultural applications. Preliminary studies had suggested that embryos of the crustacean Daphnia magna are particularly susceptible to the toxicity of this chemical. The goals of the present study were to define endpoints of daphnid embryonic development that could be routinely used to assess the embryo toxicity of chemicals and to characterize definitively the embryo toxicity of propiconazole to daphnids. Daphnid embryonic development was characterized into six readily distinguishable stages based on the degree of tissue differentiation. Embryonic development could be monitored either in the brood chamber of the maternal organism or using embryos removed from the brood chamber and incubated ex vivo. Standard toxicity assessment revealed that propiconazole elicited no significant adverse effects on daphnid survival or fecundity during a 21-d exposure to concentrations as high as 0.25 mg/L. Exposure to 0.25 mg/L propiconazole, however, caused a significant incidence of developmental abnormalities and embryonic death. Abnormalities were consistent with developmental arrest at later stages of embryonic maturation. Propiconazole elicited a steep concentration-response curve with respect to embryo toxicity, with a 10% and a 90% incidence of embryo toxicity measured at 0.50 and 0.82 mg/L, respectively. Direct exposure of embryos to propiconazole resulted in toxicity, though the incidence and characteristics of developmental abnormalities were not consistent with that observed during chronic exposures. However, maternal exposure to propiconazole followed by transfer of early embryos to propiconazole-free media resulted in embryo toxicity consistent with that observed during chronic exposure. These results indicate that propiconazole interferes with the later stages of daphnid embryonic development, and that this toxicity is manifested largely via maternal exposure to the fungicide. PMID:11349850

  18. Propiconazole inhibits steroidogenesis and reproduction in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study assessed effects of the conazole-fungicide propiconazole on endocrine function and reproductive success of the fathead minnow, using an experimental approach based on previously defined adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that inhibit steroidogenesis in fish...

  19. Propiconazole increases reactive oxygen species levels in mouse hepatic cells in culture and in mouse liver by a cytochrome P450 enzyme mediated process

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole induces hepatocarcinomas and hepatoadenomas in mice and is a rat liver tumor promoter. Transcriptional, proteomic, metabolomic and biochemical studies of hepatic tissues from mice treated with propiconazole under the conditions of the chronic bioassay indicate that ...

  20. [Determination of myclobutanil 25% WG degradation dynamics in ginseng root, stem, leaf and soil by HPLC-MS/MS].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Chun-Wei; Gao, Jie; Cui, Li-Li; Xu, Yun-Cheng

    2014-07-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for determining degradation dynamics and final residues of myclobutanil 25% WG in ginseng root, stem, leaf and soil. The samples were extracted with acetonitrile, cleaned-up with primary secondary amine (PSA) solid phase extraction cartridge, separated by Kromasil Eternity-5-C18 (2.1 mm x 150 mm, 5 microm) column with a gradient of acetonitrile and 0.1% formate in water as mobile phases, and analyzed with the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in positive ion mode by employing the external standard method. The average recoveries and the relative standard derivations (RSDs) of myclobutanil at the spiked level of 0.01-0.20 mg x kg(-1) were 80.9%-90.7% and 5.54%-9.29%, respectively, and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.005 mg x kg(-1). The method with good reproducible, high precision and low detection limit could meet the requirements of residual analysis on ginseng production. The half-lives of myclobutanil were from 6.25 days to 9.94 days in ginseng root, stem, leaf and soil at spraying dosage of 1 152 g x hm(-2) The final residues were below 0.060 1 mg x kg(-1) in root, below 0.081 7 mg x kg(-1) in stem, 0.006 0-0.102 2 mg x kg(-1) in leaf and below 0.037 6 mg x kg(-1) in soil at spraying dosage range from 576 to 1 152 g x hm(-2). It is recommended that the MRLs of myclobutanil in dried ginseng may be suggested to be 0.10 mg x kg(-1) temporarily, and the preharvest interval was set at 35 days. PMID:25276964

  1. In vitro and in vivo evidence for the inhibition of brassinosteroid synthesis by propiconazole through interference with side chain hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Keimei; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Hoshi, Tomoki; Yoshizawa, Yuko

    2016-05-01

    We carried out the biochemical evaluation of the target site of propiconazole in BR biosynthesis. Applying BR biosynthesis intermediates to Arabidopsis seedlings grown in the presence of propiconazole under dark condition, we found that the target site of propiconazole in BR biosynthesis can be identified among the C22 and C23 side chain hydroxylation steps from campestanol to teasterone. Using differential spectra techniques to determine the binding affinity of propiconazole to CYP90D1, which is responsible for C23 hydroxylation of BR, we found that propiconazole induced typical type II binding spectra in response to purified recombinant CYP90D1 and the Kd value was found approximately 0.76 μM. PMID:26987039

  2. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Hung; Chou, Pei-Hsin; Chen, Pei-Jen

    2014-07-30

    Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish populations in the aquatic environment. PMID:24962053

  3. Propiconazole inhibits steroidogenesis and reproduction in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Skolness, Sarah Y; Blanksma, Chad A; Cavallin, Jenna E; Churchill, Jessica J; Durhan, Elizabeth J; Jensen, Kathleen M; Johnson, Rodney D; Kahl, Michael D; Makynen, Elizabeth A; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Ankley, Gerald T

    2013-04-01

    Conazoles are designed to inhibit cytochrome P450 (CYP) 14α-demethylase, an enzyme key to fungal cell wall formation. In vertebrates, conazoles may inhibit other CYPs, potentially disrupting processes like sex steroid synthesis. Propiconazole is a current-use pesticide that is among the first chemicals being tested in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency endocrine disruptor screening program. Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to 0, 5, 50, 500, or 1000 µg propiconazole/l in a 21-day study that evaluated apical reproductive endpoints (fecundity, fertility, hatch); measures of endocrine function and steroid synthesis, such as cholesterol, vitellogenin (VTG), and sex steroid (testosterone [T], 17β-estradiol [E2]) concentrations in the plasma; and changes in gonadal expression of steroidogenic genes. Plasma E2 and VTG concentrations in females were reduced by exposure to propiconazole, and egg production was decreased in the 500 and 1000 µg/l treatment groups. These in vivo effects coincided with inhibition of E2 synthesis by ovary explants exposed to propiconazole in vitro. We also observed a compensatory response in females exposed to propiconazole, manifested as increased gonad weight and upregulation of genes coding for key steriodogenic proteins, including CYP19 (aromatase), CYP17 (hydroxylase/lyase), CYP11A (cholesterol side-chain-cleavage), and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. Other than an increase in relative testis weight, effects on endocrine function in males were less pronounced than in females. This study provides important data relative to the potential endocrine activity of propiconazole in fish and, more generally, to the further delineation of pathways for the reproductive effects of steroid synthesis inhibitors in fish. PMID:23339182

  4. Antifungal hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Zumbuehl, Andreas; Ferreira, Lino; Kuhn, Duncan; Astashkina, Anna; Long, Lisa; Yeo, Yoon; Iaconis, Tiffany; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Fink, Gerald R.; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2007-01-01

    Fungi are increasingly identified as major pathogens in bloodstream infections, often involving indwelling devices. Materials with antifungal properties may provide an important deterrent to these infections. Here we describe amphogel, a dextran-based hydrogel into which amphotericin B is adsorbed. Amphogel kills fungi within 2 h of contact and can be reused for at least 53 days without losing its effectiveness against Candida albicans. The antifungal material is biocompatible in vivo and does not cause hemolysis in human blood. Amphogel inoculated with C. albicans and implanted in mice prevents fungal infection. Amphogel also mitigates fungal biofilm formation. An antifungal matrix with these properties could be used to coat a variety of medical devices such as catheters as well as industrial surfaces. PMID:17664427

  5. Proteomic Analysis of Propiconazole Responses in Mouse Liver-Comparison of Genomic and Proteomic Profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive profiling of changes in protein expression of soluble proteins in livers from mice treated with the mouse liver tumorigen, propiconazole, to uncover the pathways and networks altered by this commonly used fungicide. Utilizing t...

  6. Defining Adverse Outcome Pathways for Effects of the Fungicide Propiconazole of Fish Reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are used to describe the linkage of chemical interactions in terms of molecular initiating events to whole organism responses suitable for risk assessment. This study was conducted to develop AOPs for the model fungicide propiconazole relative to r...

  7. Use of Adverse Outcome Pathways for Assessing Effects of the Fungicide Propiconazole on Fish Reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOP) are used to describe the linkage of biological events from a molecular initiating point, to individual-level-endpoints relevant to risk assessment. This study was done to assess toxicity outcomes for the conazole fungicide propiconazole based on a p...

  8. Proteomic analysis of propiconazole responses in mouse liver: comparison of genomic and proteomic profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive profiling of changes in protein expression of soluble proteins in livers from mice treated with the mouse liver tumorigen, propiconazole, to uncover the pathways and networks altered by this fungicide. Utilizing twodimensional...

  9. What causes the difference in synergistic potentials of propiconazole and prochloraz toward pyrethroids in Daphnia magna?

    PubMed

    Dalhoff, Kristoffer; Gottardi, Michele; Kretschmann, Andreas; Cedergreen, Nina

    2016-03-01

    Azole fungicides (imidazoles and triazoles) are known to function synergistically with several compounds, especially with pyrethroid insecticides, most likely by inhibiting cytochrome P450. Different azole fungicides have been shown to differ in their synergistic potentials usually with the imidazoles being stronger synergists than the triazoles. This study investigated whether the toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic (TKTD) properties of the imidazole prochloraz and triazole propiconazole can explain their different synergistic potential toward the freshwater macroinvertebrate Daphnia magna. Pulse exposure to external concentrations of propiconazole (1.4μM) and prochloraz (1.7μM) for 18h resulted in internal concentrations of 22.7 and 53.5μmolkg(-1)w.w. for propiconazole and prochloraz, respectively. This 2-fold difference in bioaccumulation corresponded very well with the observed 2.7-fold lower external EC50-estimate (7 days) for prochloraz compared to propiconazole. The estimated IC50 for the in vivo inhibition of cytochrome P450 (ECOD) activity, however, measured as transformation of 7-ethoxycoumarin into 7-hydroxycoumarin, was almost 500-fold higher for prochloraz (IC50: 0.011±0.002μM) compared to propiconazole (IC50: 4.9±0.06μM). When indirectly measuring the binding strength of the two azoles, daphnids exposed to propiconazole recovered roughly 80% of their ECOD activity compared to the control shortly after being moved to azole-free medium, indicating that propiconazole causes reversible inhibition of cytochrome P450. In contrast, the ECOD-activity remained inhibited in the prochloraz-exposed daphnids for 12h following transfer to azole-free medium, which correlated with elimination of the measured internal prochloraz concentration (DT95≈13h). These results indicate that lethal toxicity of the azole fungicides is mainly driven by toxicokinetics through their hydrophobicities resulting in different internal concentrations. Their synergistic potential

  10. Development and application of quantitative methods for monitoring dermal and inhalation exposure to propiconazole.

    PubMed

    Flack, Sheila; Goktepe, Ipek; Ball, Louise M; Nylander-French, Leena A

    2008-03-01

    Quantitative methods to measure dermal and inhalation exposure to the fungicide propiconazole were developed in the laboratory and applied in the occupational exposure setting for monitoring five farm workers' exposure during pesticide preparation and application to peach crops. Dermal exposure was measured with tape-strips applied to the skin, and the amount of propiconazole was normalized to keratin content in the tape-strip. Inhalation exposure was measured with an OVS tube placed in the worker's breathing-zone during pesticide handling. Samples were analyzed by GC-MS in EI+ mode (limit of detection 6 pg microl(-1)). Dermal exposure ranged from non-detectable to 32.1 +/- 22.6 ng per microg keratin while breathing-zone concentrations varied from 0.2 to 2.2 microg m(-3). A positive correlation was observed between breathing-zone concentrations and ambient air temperature (r2 = 0.87, p < 0.01). Breathing-zone concentrations did not correlate with dermal exposure levels (r2 = 0.11, p = 0.52). Propiconazole levels were below limit of detection when rubber gloves, coveralls, and full-face mask were used. The total-body propiconazole dose, determined for each worker by summing the estimated dermal dose and inhalation dose, ranged from 0.01 to 12 microg per kg body weight per day. Our results show that tape-stripping of the skin and the OVS can be effectively utilized to measure dermal and inhalation exposure to propiconazole, respectively, and that the dermal route of exposure contributed substantially more to the total dose than the inhalation route. PMID:18392276

  11. Short-term effects of propiconazole on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function in the fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is an ergosterol inhibitor commonly used in agriculture and has been detected in aquatic environments. Ergosterol inhibitors decrease fungal growth through effects on 14á-demethylase, a cytochrome P450 (CYP), isoform important for ergosterol biosynthesis. In higher ...

  12. Dynamics of difenoconazole and propiconazole residues on pomegranate over 2 years under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Soudamini

    2016-03-01

    Residue dynamics of difenoconazole and propiconazole on pomegranate was studied after application at the recommended and double doses of 125 and 250 g active ingredient (a.i.) ha(-1) during August-October 2012. The study was repeated during the same period in 2013. QuEChERS method, in conjunction with gas chromatography (GC), was used for analysis of the fungicides after carrying out the method validation. The recoveries of the fungicides from pomegranate and soil were between 80.3 and 96.2 %; the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.016 and 0.05 mg kg(-1), respectively. The uncertainties of measurement were between 9.7 and 16.3 %. The initial residue deposits of difenoconazole were 0.875 and 1.205 mg kg(-1) from treatment at the recommended dose and 1.54 and 1.672 mg kg(-1) from treatment at the double dose from the first- and second-year studies. Propiconazole residues were 0.663 and 0.864 mg kg(-1) from recommended dose treatments and 1.474 and 2.045 mg kg(-1) from double dose treatments from the first- and second-year studies. The half-lives of degradation of difenoconazole were 6.4-8.4 days and propiconazole 7.9-8.5 days over the 2 years. Residues of difenoconazole and propiconazole remained on the pomegranate fruit surface and did not move to the edible part (aril). The pre-harvest intervals (PHIs), the time required for the residues to reduce below their respective EU maximum residue limits (MRLs), were 25.4 and 30.8 days for difenoconazole and 33.3 and 43.8 days for propiconazole from treatments at the recommended and double doses, respectively. Keeping in view consumer safety, the longer PHI from the two studies has been selected. PMID:26590055

  13. Antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Ryder, N S

    1999-12-01

    At this year's ICAAC Meeting, new data on approximately 20 different antifungal agents were presented, while no new agents were disclosed. Drugs in late development include the triazoles, voriconazole (Pfizer Ltd) and Sch-56592 (Schering-Plough Corp), and the echinocandins, caspofungin (Merck & Co Inc) and FK-463 (Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Co Ltd). In contrast to previous years, presentations on these and earlier developmental compounds were relatively modest in scope, with few significant new data. Little new information appeared on the most recent novel class of agents, the sordarins (Glaxo Wellcome plc). Early clinical results were presented for FK-463, showing acceptable tolerability and dose-dependent efficacy in AIDS-associated esophageal candidiasis. A new liposomal formulation of nystatin (Nyotran; Aronex Pharmaceuticals Inc) was shown to be equivalent to conventional amphotericin B in empiric therapy of presumed fungal infection in neutropenic patients, but with reduced toxicity. Intravenous itraconazole (Janssen Pharmaceutica NV) was an effective prophylactic therapy in invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, while oral itraconazole was discussed as a treatment for fungal infection in heart and liver transplant patients. The allylamine compound, terbinafine (Novartis AG), showed good clinical efficacy against fungal mycetoma, a serious tropical infection. A major highlight was the first presentation of inhibitors of fungal efflux pumps as a strategy for overcoming resistance. MC-510027 (milbemycin alpha-9; Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc) and its derivatives, potentiated the antifungal activity of triazoles and terbinafine in a number of Candida spp. Another pump inhibitor, MC-005172 (Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc) showed in vivo potentiation of fluconazole in a mouse kidney infection model. Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc also presented inhibitors of bacterial efflux pumps. PMID:16113946

  14. Propiconazole enhanced hepatic cell proliferation is associated with dysregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway leading to activation of Erk1/2 through Ras famesylation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide designed to inhibit CYP51, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in fungi and is widely used in agriculture to prevent fungal growth. Metabolomic studies in mice revealed that propiconazole increased levels of hepatic ...

  15. Loss of Propiconazole and its Four Stereoisomers from the Water Phase of Two Soil-Water Slurries as Measured by Capillary Electrophoresis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is a chiral fungicide used in agriculture for control of many fungal diseases on a variety of crops. This use provides opportunities for pollution of soil and, subsequently, groundwater. The rate of loss of propiconazole from the water phase of two different soil-wa...

  16. Fate and transport of agriculturally applied fungicidal compounds, azoxystrobin and propiconazole.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Paul G; Murphy, Tracye M; Lydy, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Fungicidal active ingredients azoxystrobin and propiconazole, individually and in combination, have been marketed worldwide in a range of fungicide treatment products for preventative and curative purposes, respectively. Their presence in streams located throughout the midwestern and southeastern United States warrant the need for research into the potential routes of transport of these fungicides in an agricultural field setting. Potential canopy penetration and drift effects of these fungicides during aerial and ground applications were studied in the current project. Canopy penetration was observed for both application types, however drift was associated only with the aerial application of these fungicides. Azoxystrobin and propiconazole persisted in the soil up to 301 d, with peak concentrations occurring approximately 30 d after application. The predominant mode of transport for these compounds was agricultural runoff water, with the majority of the fungicidal active ingredients leaving the target area during the first rain event following application. The timing of application in relation to the first rain event significantly affected the amount of loss that occurred, implying application practices should follow manufacturer recommended guidelines. PMID:26741551

  17. Variation in sorption of propiconazole with biochars: The effect of temperature, mineral, molecular structure, and nano-porosity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorption behavior of propiconazole (PROPI) by plant-residue derived biochars (PLABs) and animal manure-derived biochars (ANIBs) obtained at three heating treatment temperatures (HTTs) at 300, 450 and 600 degrees Celsius (denoted as BCs300, BCs450, and BCs600) and their corresponding de-ashed BCs450 ...

  18. Pediatric Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Moran, Cassandra; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Smith, P Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review In immunocompromised hosts, invasive fungal infections are common and fatal. In the past decade, the antifungal armamentarium against invasive mycoses has expanded greatly. The purpose of this report is to review the most recent literature addressing the use of antifungal agents in children. Recent findings Most studies evaluating the safety and efficacy of antifungal agents are limited to adults. However, important progress has been made in describing the pharmacokinetics and safety of newer antifungal agents in children, including the echinocandins. Summary Dosage guidelines for newer antifungal agents are currently based on adult and limited pediatric data. Because important developmental pharmacology changes occur throughout childhood impacting the pharmacokinetics of these agents, antifungal studies specifically designed for children are necessary. PMID:19741525

  19. Propiconazole-enhanced hepatic cell proliferation is associated with dysregulation of the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway leading to activation of Erk1/2 through Ras farnesylation

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Lynea A.; Moore, Tanya; Nesnow, Stephen

    2012-04-15

    Propiconazole is a mouse hepatotumorigenic fungicide designed to inhibit CYP51, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ergosterol in fungi and is widely used in agriculture to prevent fungal growth. Metabolomic studies in mice revealed that propiconazole increased levels of hepatic cholesterol metabolites and bile acids, and transcriptomic studies revealed that genes within the cholesterol biosynthesis, cholesterol metabolism and bile acid biosyntheses pathways were up-regulated. Hepatic cell proliferation was also increased by propiconazole. AML12 immortalized hepatocytes were used to study propiconazole's effects on cell proliferation focusing on the dysregulation of cholesterol biosynthesis and resulting effects on Ras farnesylation and Erk1/2 activation as a primary pathway. Mevalonate, a key intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, increases cell proliferation in several cancer cell lines and tumors in vivo and serves as the precursor for isoprenoids (e.g. farnesyl pyrophosphate) which are crucial in the farnesylation of the Ras protein by farnesyl transferase. Farnesylation targets Ras to the cell membrane where it is involved in signal transduction, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. In our studies, mevalonic acid lactone (MVAL), a source of mevalonic acid, increased cell proliferation in AML12 cells which was reduced by farnesyl transferase inhibitors (L-744,832 or manumycin) or simvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, indicating that this cell system responded to alterations in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Cell proliferation in AML12 cells was increased by propiconazole which was reversed by co-incubation with L-744,832 or simvastatin. Increasing concentrations of exogenous cholesterol muted the proliferative effects of propiconazole and the inhibitory effects of L-733,832, results ascribed to reduced stimulation of the endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. Western blot analysis of subcellular

  20. Triazole antifungals: a review.

    PubMed

    Peyton, L R; Gallagher, S; Hashemzadeh, M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive fungal infections and systemic mycosis, whether from nosocomial infection or immunodeficiency, have been on an upward trend for numerous years. Despite advancements in antifungal medication, treatment in certain patients can still be difficult for reasons such as impaired organ function, limited administration routes or poor safety profiles of the available antifungal medications. The growing number of invasive fungal species becoming resistant to current antifungal medications is of appreciable concern. Triazole compounds containing one or more 1,2,4-triazole rings have been shown to contain some of the most potent antifungal properties. Itracon-azole and fluconazole were some of the first triazoles synthesized, but had limitations associated with their use. Second-generation triazoles such as voriconazole, posa-conazole, albaconazole, efinaconazole, ravuconazole and isavuconazole are all derivatives of either itraconazole or fluconazole, and designed to overcome the deficiencies of their parent drugs. The goal of this manuscript is to review antifungal agents derived from triazole. PMID:26798851

  1. Antifungal Compounds from Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shishido, Tânia K.; Humisto, Anu; Jokela, Jouni; Liu, Liwei; Wahlsten, Matti; Tamrakar, Anisha; Fewer, David P.; Permi, Perttu; Andreote, Ana P. D.; Fiore, Marli F.; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes found in a range of environments. They are infamous for the production of toxins, as well as bioactive compounds, which exhibit anticancer, antimicrobial and protease inhibition activities. Cyanobacteria produce a broad range of antifungals belonging to structural classes, such as peptides, polyketides and alkaloids. Here, we tested cyanobacteria from a wide variety of environments for antifungal activity. The potent antifungal macrolide scytophycin was detected in Anabaena sp. HAN21/1, Anabaena cf. cylindrica PH133, Nostoc sp. HAN11/1 and Scytonema sp. HAN3/2. To our knowledge, this is the first description of Anabaena strains that produce scytophycins. We detected antifungal glycolipopeptide hassallidin production in Anabaena spp. BIR JV1 and HAN7/1 and in Nostoc spp. 6sf Calc and CENA 219. These strains were isolated from brackish and freshwater samples collected in Brazil, the Czech Republic and Finland. In addition, three cyanobacterial strains, Fischerella sp. CENA 298, Scytonema hofmanni PCC 7110 and Nostoc sp. N107.3, produced unidentified antifungal compounds that warrant further characterization. Interestingly, all of the strains shown to produce antifungal compounds in this study belong to Nostocales or Stigonematales cyanobacterial orders. PMID:25871291

  2. Impact of Fungicides Chlorothalonil and Propiconazole on Microbial Activities in Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Soils

    PubMed Central

    Ramudu, A. C.; Mohiddin, G. Jaffer; Srinivasulu, M.; Madakka, M.; Rangaswamy, V.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction of agrochemicals (fungicides) into soil may have lasting effects on soil microbial activities and thus affect soil health. In order to determine the changes in microbial activity in a black clay and red sandy loam soils of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cultivated fields, a case study was conducted with propiconazole and chlorothalonil to evaluate its effects on soil enzymes (cellulase and invertase) throughout 40 days of incubation under laboratory conditions with different concentrations (1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 kg ha−1). Individual application of the two fungicides at 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 kg ha−1 to the soil distinctly enhanced the activities of cellulase and invertase but at higher concentrations of 7.5 and 10 kg ha−1 was toxic or innocuous to both cellulase and invertase activities. In soil samples receiving 2.5–5.0 kg ha−1 of the fungicides, the accumulation of reducing sugar was pronounced more at 20 days, and the activity of the cellulase and invertase was drastically decreased with increasing period of incubation up to 30 and 40 days. PMID:23724306

  3. Multiple biomarkers responses in juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, after acute exposure to a fungicide propiconazole.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Hua; Zlabek, Vladimir; Velisek, Josef; Grabic, Roman; Machova, Jana; Kolarova, Jitka; Li, Ping; Randak, Tomas

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the toxic effects of propiconazole (PCZ), a triazole fungicide present in aquatic environment, were studied in juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, by acute toxicity test with the concentration of 5.04 mg/L (96 h LC50). Morphological indices, hematological parameters, liver xenobiotic-metabolizing response, and tissue antioxidant status were evaluated. Compared with the control group, fish exposed to PCZ showed significantly higher Leuko, PCV, MCHC, and hepatic EROD, and significantly lower MCV. CF and HSI were not significantly different among groups. SOD, CAT, GPx, and GR activities increased significantly in liver of experimental groups, but decreased significantly in gill. In general, antioxidant enzyme activity in intestine was less evident than in liver. Oxidative stress indices (levels of LPO and CP) were significantly higher in gill. Additionally, through chemometrics of all parameters measured in this study, two groups with 67.29% of total accumulated variance were distinguished. In short, the physiological and biochemical responses in different tissues of fish indicated that PCZ-induced the stressful environmental conditions. But according to PCZ residual status in the natural environment, more long-term experiments at lower concentrations will be necessary in the future. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2013. PMID:21384499

  4. New antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Tomas, Elizabeth

    2003-07-01

    Currently, use of standard antifungal therapies can be limited because of toxicity, low efficacy rates, and drug resistance. New formulations are being prepared to improve absorption and efficacy of some of these standard therapies. Various new antifungals have demonstrated therapeutic potential. These new agents may provide additional options for the treatment of superficial fungal infections and they may help to overcome the limitations of current treatments. Liposomal formulations of AmB have a broad spectrum of activity against invasive fungi, such as Candida spp., C. neoformans, and Aspergillus spp., but not dermatophyte fungi. The liposomal AmB is associated with significantly less toxicity and good rates of efficacy, which compare or exceed that of standard AmB. These factors may provide enough of an advantage to patients to overcome the increased costs of these formulations. Three new azole drugs have been developed, and may be of use in both systemic and superficial fungal infections. Voriconazole, ravuconazole, and posaconazole are triazoles, with broad-spectrum activity. Voriconazole has a high bioavailability, and has been used with success in immunocompromised patients with invasive fungal infections. Ravuconazole has shown efficacy in candidiasis in immunocompromised patients, and onychomycosis in healthy patients. Preliminary in vivo studies with posaconazole indicated potential use in a variety of invasive fungal infections including oropharyngeal candidiasis. Echinocandins and pneumocandins are a new class of antifungals, which act as fungal cell wall beta-(1,3)-D-glucan synthase enzyme complex inhibitors. Caspofungin (MK-0991) is the first of the echinocandins to receive Food and Drug Administration approval for patients with invasive aspergillosis not responding or intolerant to other antifungal therapies, and has been effective in patients with oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis. Standardization of MIC value determination has improved the

  5. PROPICONAZOLE-INDUCED CYTOCHROME P450 GENE EXPRESSION AND ENZYMATIC ACTIVITIES IN RAT AND MOUSE LIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are N-substituted azole antifungal agents used as both pesticides and drugs. Some of these compounds are hepatocarcinogenic in mice and some can induce thyroid tumors in rats. Many of these compounds are able to induce and/or inhibit mammalian hepatic cytochrome P450s t...

  6. Variation in sorption of propiconazole with biochars: The effect of temperature, mineral, molecular structure, and nano-porosity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ke; Kang, Mingjie; Ro, Kyoung S; Libra, Judy A; Zhao, Ye; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-01-01

    Sorption behavior of propiconazole (PROPI) by plant-residue derived biochars (PLABs) and animal waste-derived biochars (ANIBs) obtained at three heating treatment temperatures (HTTs) (300, 450 and 600 °C) (e.g., BCs300, BCs450, and BCs600) and their corresponding de-ashed BCs450 was investigated. PLABs belonged to high- or medium-C biochars and ANIBs were low-C biochars. Surface C concentrations of the tested biochars were generally higher than their corresponding bulk C. Surface polar groups were mainly composed of O-containing groups of minerals within biochars. The nonlinearity coefficients (n) of propiconazole (PROPI) sorption isotherms ranged from 0.23 to 0.64, which was significantly and negatively related to organic carbon (OC)-normalized CO2-surface area (CO2-SA/OC) of biochars. This correlation along with the positive relationship between CO2-SA/OC and aromaticity indicates that pore-filling in nanopores within aromatic C dominate nonlinear PROPI sorption. HTTs or C contents do not necessarily regulate PROPI sorption. Removal of minerals from BCs450 elevated PROPI sorption because minerals may exert certain influence on sorption via impacting spatial arrangement of polar groups and/or organic matter (OM)-mineral interactions. This study helps to better understand sorption behavior of PROPI to biochars and evaluate the potential role of biochar in water treatment systems. PMID:26206746

  7. Letter to the Editor, Response to Commentary "Re-Evaluation of the Big Blue® Mouse Assay of Propiconazole Suggests Lack of Mutagenicity"

    EPA Science Inventory

    In their commentary titled "Re-Evaluation of the Big Blue® Mouse Assay of Propiconazole Suggests Lack of Mutagenicity", Shane et 01. present an overview of portions of our previously reported work examining the potential for some conazole fungicides to induce increases in mutant ...

  8. EUCAST breakpoints for antifungals.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan L; Arendrup, Maiken C; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Donnelly, J Peter; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2010-03-01

    Susceptibility testing of fungi and development of interpretative breakpoints has become increasingly important due to the growing incidence of invasive fungal infections, the number and classes of antifungals, and the emerging reports of acquired resistance. The subcommittee on antifungal susceptibility testing of the European Committee on Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) has developed standards for susceptibility testing of fermentative yeasts and molds as well as proposing breakpoints for fluconazole and voriconazole against Candida. The aim of this work is to describe the EUCAST process of setting breakpoints for antifungals. Five aspects are evaluated during the process of developing breakpoints: 1) the most common dosage used in each European country, 2) the definition of the wild-type population for each target microorganism at the species level and the determination of epidemiological cutoffs, 3) the drug's pharmacokinetics and 4) pharmacodynamics, including Monte Carlo simulations, and 5) the correlation of MICs with clinical outcome of patients treated with the compound. When insufficient data are available (e.g., due to lack of information on the clinical outcome of infections caused by isolates with an elevated MIC), epidemiological cutoff values, rather than breakpoints, are recommended until the necessary information becomes available. PMID:20369073

  9. Tissue Penetration of Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Felton, Timothy; Troke, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding the tissue penetration of systemically administered antifungal agents is critical for a proper appreciation of their antifungal efficacy in animals and humans. Both the time course of an antifungal drug and its absolute concentrations within tissues may differ significantly from those observed in the bloodstream. In addition, tissue concentrations must also be interpreted within the context of the pathogenesis of the various invasive fungal infections, which differ significantly. There are major technical obstacles to the estimation of concentrations of antifungal agents in various tissue subcompartments, yet these agents, even those within the same class, may exhibit markedly different tissue distributions. This review explores these issues and provides a summary of tissue concentrations of 11 currently licensed systemic antifungal agents. It also explores the therapeutic implications of their distribution at various sites of infection. PMID:24396137

  10. Chalcone derivatives as potential antifungal agents: Synthesis, and antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepa; Jain, D K

    2015-01-01

    Much research has been carried out with the aim to discover the therapeutic values of chalcone derivatives. Chalcones possess wide range of pharmacological activity such as antibacterial, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, antitubercular, anticancer, and antifungal agents etc. The presence of reactive α,β-unsaturated keto group in chalcones is found to be responsible for their biological activity. The rapid developments of resistance to antifungal agents, led to design, and synthesize the new antifungal agents. The derivatives of chalcones were prepared using Claisen-Schmidt condensation scheme with appropriate tetralone and aldehyde derivatives. Ten derivatives were synthesized and were biologically screened for antifungal activity. The newly synthesized derivatives of chalcone showed antifungal activity against fungal species, Microsporum gypseum. The results so obtained were superior or comparable to ketoconazole. It was observed that none of the compounds tested showed positive results for fungi Candida albicans nor against fungi Aspergillus niger. Chalcone derivatives showed inhibitory effect against M. gypseum species of fungus. It was found that among the chalcone derivatives so synthesized, two of them, that is, 4-chloro derivative, and unsubstituted derivative of chalcone showed antifungal activity superior to ketoconazole. Thus, these can be the potential new molecule as antifungal agent. PMID:26317075

  11. Update on azole antifungals.

    PubMed

    Zonios, Dimitrios I; Bennett, John E

    2008-04-01

    This is a comprehensive, clinically oriented review of the four commercially available triazoles: fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole. Emphasis is placed in pharmacology, drug interactions, adverse events, antifungal activity, and the evolving perspective of their clinical use. Key clinical trials are briefly discussed, and specific drug indications summarized. Fluconazole remains a valuable low-cost choice for the treatment of various fungal infections, including candidiasis and cryptococcosis. It has relatively few drug interactions and is safe but lacks activity against filamentous fungi. The use of itraconazole is historically plagued by erratic bioavailability of the oral capsule, improved with the oral solution. Drug interactions are numerous. Itraconazole exhibits significant activity against Aspergillus and the endemic fungi. Voriconazole has revolutionized the treatment of aspergillosis in severely immunocompromised patients, but its use is compromised by complicated pharmacokinetics, notable drug interactions, and relatively significant adverse events. Finally, posaconazole is the last addition to the azole armamentarium with extended antifungal spectrum, significant activity against the zygomycetes, and, apparently, optimal safety profile. Posaconazole has a significant role for the prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections in severely immunocompromised patients. Multiple daily dosing, a need for fatty foods for absorption, and absence of an intravenous formulation restrict its use to selected populations. PMID:18366001

  12. Recent advances in antifungal chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Petrikkos, George; Skiada, Anna

    2007-08-01

    For over 50 years, amphotericin B deoxycholate (AmBD) has been the 'gold standard' in antifungal chemotherapy, despite its frequent toxicities. However, improved treatment options for invasive fungal infections (IFIs) have been developed during the last 15 years. Newer antifungal agents, including less toxic lipid preparations of AmBD, triazoles and the echinocandins, have been added to our armamentarium against IFIs. Some of these newer drugs can now replace AmBD as primary therapy (e.g. caspofungin for candidiasis, voriconazole for aspergillosis), whilst others offer new therapeutic options for difficult-to-treat IFIs (e.g. posaconazole for zygomycosis, fusariosis and chromoblastomycosis). It is interesting that extended use of newer antifungals such as fluconazole, despite decreasing the mortality attributed to candidiasis, resulted in selection of species resistant to several antifungals (Candida krusei, Candida glabrata); whilst several publications suggest that prolonged use of voriconazole may expose severely immunocompromised patients to the risk of zygomycosis (breakthrough). On the other hand, the differences in the mode of action of newer antifungals such as echinocandins raise the question whether combination antifungal therapy is more effective than monotherapy. Finally, the availability of an oral formulation with excellent biosafety of several newer antifungals (e.g. posaconazole) makes them candidates for prophylactic or prolonged maintenance therapy. PMID:17524625

  13. COMPARISON OF GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES FROM RATS FED THREE TOXICOLOGICALLY DIFFERENT CONAZOLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles arc a class of fungicides used as pharmaceutical and agricultural products. In chronic bioassays, triadimefon was hepatotoxic and induced transitional cell adenomas in the thyroid gland. Both propiconazole and myclobutanil were hepatotoxic but had no effect on the thyro...

  14. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA damage correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mouse liver tumorigenic conazolefungicides triadimefon and propiconazole have previously been shown to be in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses, whereas the nontumorigenic conazole myclobutanil w...

  15. RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY-BASED METABOLOMICS FOR DIFFERENTIATING EXPOSURES TO TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES USING RAT URINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Normal Raman spectroscopy was evaluated as a metabolomic tool for assessing the impacts of exposure to environmental contaminants, using rat urine collected during the course of a toxicological study. Specifically, one of three triazole fungicides, myclobutanil, propiconazole or ...

  16. ALTERATIONS IN A11 TRANS RETINOIC ACID METABOLISM IN LIVER MICROSOMES FROM MICE TREATED WITH HEPATOTUMORIGENIC AND NON-HEPATOTUMORIGENIC CONAZOLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides used in crop protection and as pharmaceuticals. Triadimefon and propiconazole are hepatotumorigenic in mice, while myclobutanil is not. Previous toxicogenomic studies suggest that alteration of the retinoic acid metabolism pathway may be a key event in co...

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF CYPS IN THE METABOLISM OF ALL TRANS RETINOIC ACID BY LIVER MICROSOMES FROM MICE TREATED WITH CONAZOLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides used in crop protection and as pharmaceuticals. Triadimefon and propiconazole are hepatotumorigenic in mice, while myclobutanil is not. Previous toxicogenomic studies suggest that alteration of the retinoic acid metabolism pathway may involve in conazole-...

  18. DIFFERENTIAL EXPRESSION OF RETINOIC ACID BIOSYNTHETIC AND METABOLISM GENES IN LIVERS FROM MICE TREATED WITH HEPATOTUMORIGENIC AND NON-HEPATOTUMORIGENIC CONAZOLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides used in crop protection and as pharmaceuticals. Triadimefon and propiconazole are hepatotumorigenic in mice, while myclobutanil is not. Previous toxicogenomic studies suggest that alteration of the retinoic acid metabolism pathway may play a key event in ...

  19. Gene Expression Profiling in Liver and Testis of Rats to Characterize the Toxicity of Triazole Fungicides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four triazole fungicides were studied using toxicogenomic techniques to identify potential mechanisms of action. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed for 14 days by gavage with fluconazole, myclobutanil, propiconazole, or triadimefon. Following exposure, serum was collected ...

  20. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING IN LIVER AND TESTIS OF RATS TO CHARACTERIZE THE TOXICITY OF TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four triazole fungicides were studied using toxicogenomic techniques to identify potential mechanisms of action. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed for 14 days by gavage with fluconazole, myclobutanil, propiconazole, or triadimefon. Following exposure, serum was collected ...

  1. Suppressive drug interactions between antifungals.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Marjon G J; Bollenbach, Tobias

    2014-04-24

    In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Cokol and colleagues report a systematic study of drug interactions between antifungal compounds. Suppressive drug interactions occur more frequently than previously realized and come in different flavors with interesting implications. PMID:24766845

  2. Antifungal therapy with an emphasis on biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Christopher G.; Srinivasan, Anand; Uppuluri, Priya; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.; López-Ribot, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Fungal infections are on the rise as advances in modern medicine prolong the lives of severely ill patients. Fungi are eukaryotic organisms and there are a limited number of targets for antifungal drug development; as a result the antifungal arsenal is exceedingly limited. Azoles, polyenes and echinocandins, constitute the mainstay of antifungal therapy for patients with life-threatening mycoses. One of the main factors complicating antifungal therapy is the formation of fungal biofilms, microbial communities displaying resistance to most antifungal agents. A better understanding of fungal biofilms provides for new opportunities for the development of urgently needed novel antifungal agents and strategies. PMID:24011516

  3. Comparison of echinocandin antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Eschenauer, Gregory; DePestel, Daryl D; Carver, Peggy L

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of invasive fungal infections, especially those due to Aspergillus spp. and Candida spp., continues to increase. Despite advances in medical practice, the associated mortality from these infections continues to be substantial. The echinocandin antifungals provide clinicians with another treatment option for serious fungal infections. These agents possess a completely novel mechanism of action, are relatively well-tolerated, and have a low potential for serious drug–drug interactions. At the present time, the echinocandins are an option for the treatment of infections due Candida spp (such as esophageal candidiasis, invasive candidiasis, and candidemia). In addition, caspofungin is a viable option for the treatment of refractory aspergillosis. Although micafungin is not Food and Drug Administration-approved for this indication, recent data suggests that it may also be effective. Finally, caspofungin- or micafungin-containing combination therapy should be a consideration for the treatment of severe infections due to Aspergillus spp. Although the echinocandins share many common properties, data regarding their differences are emerging at a rapid pace. Anidulafungin exhibits a unique pharmacokinetic profile, and limited cases have shown a potential far activity in isolates with increased minimum inhibitory concentrations to caspofungin and micafungin. Caspofungin appears to have a slightly higher incidence of side effects and potential for drug–drug interactions. This, combined with some evidence of decreasing susceptibility among some strains of Candida, may lessen its future utility. However, one must take these findings in the context of substantially more data and use with caspofungin compared with the other agents. Micafungin appears to be very similar to caspofungin, with very few obvious differences between the two agents. PMID:18360617

  4. The synergistic potential of the azole fungicides prochloraz and propiconazole toward a short α-cypermethrin pulse increases over time in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Kretschmann, Andreas; Gottardi, Michele; Dalhoff, Kristoffer; Cedergreen, Nina

    2015-05-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are highly toxic to non-target aquatic invertebrates. Their high toxicity is synergized when co-occurring with azole fungicides in the aquatic environment. Little is known about the importance of synergy, when pyrethroids only occur during a short pulse of a few hours, as it is likely to happen in the environment, nor about the persistence of synergy over time. This study analyzed the synergistic potential of the fungicides propiconazole and prochloraz toward Daphnia magna, when exposed to a pulse (7.2 h) of α-cypermethrin at different concentrations (average pulse concentrations 0.07-11 nM). Immobilization was monitored during exposure and a subsequent recovery period (87.5h) with and without continuous co-exposure to the azoles (1.4 and 1.7 μM, respectively). EC50 values for immobilization decreased exponentially over time with a higher rate in the presence of the azoles. EC50 values for α-cypermethrin determined at the end of the experiment were 3.3±0.5 nM in the absence of azoles and 0.26±0.04, and 0.08±0.01 nM in the presence of propiconazole and prochloraz, respectively. The synergistic potential of the azoles was strongly dependent on time: no synergism could be detected during the pulse, but with azole co-exposure EC50 values decreased during the recovery period by a factor of up to 13 (propiconazole) and 61 (prochloraz) compared to values without azole exposure. Such high synergistic ratios have not been reported for pesticide mixtures in literature before. Our findings highlight that a pulse of the pyrethroid α-cypermethrin is synergized far beyond the actual pulse and beyond standardized test durations. Long post-exposure times are therefore mandatory in order to capture full synergism. PMID:25797530

  5. Alternative approaches to antifungal therapies

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, T; Köberle, M; Braunsdorf, C; Mailänder-Sanchez, D; Borelli, C; Schaller, M

    2012-01-01

    The expansive use of immunosuppressive medications in fields such as transplantational medicine and oncology, the higher frequency of invasive procedures in an aging population and the HIV/AIDS pandemic have increased the frequency of systemic fungal infections. At the same time, increased resistance of pathogenic fungi to classical antifungal agents has led to sustained research efforts targeting alternative antifungal strategies. In this review, we focus on two promising approaches: cationic peptides and the targeting of fungal virulence factors. Cationic peptides are small, predominantly positively charged protein fragments which exert direct and indirect antifungal activities, one mechanism of action being the permeabilization of the fungal membrane. They include lysozyme, defensins, and cathelicidins, as well as novel synthetic peptides. Amongst fungal virulence factors, the targeting of candidal secreted aspartic proteinases seems to be a particularly promising approach. PMID:23078400

  6. Haloprogin: a Topical Antifungal Agent

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, E. F.; Zwadyk, P.; Bequette, R. J.; Hamlow, E. E.; Tavormina, P. A.; Zygmunt, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Haloprogin was shown to be a highly effective agent for the treatment of experimentally induced topical mycotic infections in guinea pigs. Its in vitro spectrum of activity also includes yeasts, yeastlike fungi (Candida species), and certain gram-positive bacteria. The in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity of haloprogin against dermatophytes was equal to that observed with tolnaftate. The striking differences between the two agents were the marked antimonilial and selective antibacterial activities shown by haloprogin, contrasted with the negligible activities found with tolnaftate. Addition of serum decreased the in vitro antifungal activity of haloprogin to a greater extent than that of tolnaftate; however, diminished antifungal activity was not observed when haloprogin was applied topically to experimental dermatophytic infections. Based on its broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, haloprogin may prove to be a superior topical agent in the treatment of dermatophytic and monilial infections in man. PMID:5422306

  7. Antifungal Compounds from Piper Species

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-Hui; Li, Xing-Cong

    2013-01-01

    This review documents chemical structures and antifungal activities of 68 compounds isolated from 22 Piper species of the plant family Piperaceae. These compounds include amides, flavonoids, prenylated benzoic acid derivatives, lignans, phenylpropanoids, butenolides, and cyclopentendiones. Some of them may serve as leads for potential pharmaceutical or agricultural fungicide development. PMID:24307889

  8. Antifungal activity of juniper extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sawdust from three species of Juniperus (i.e., J. virginianna, J. occidentalis, and J. ashei) were extracted with hexane or ethanol and the extracts tested for antifungal activity against four species of wood-rot fungi. These species studied represent the junipers with the greatest potential for co...

  9. Side effects of propiconazole (tilt 250 EC(TM)) on non-target soil fungi in a field trial compared with natural stress effects.

    PubMed

    Elmholt, S

    1991-12-01

    The present study was performed as a dose-response field experiment using a trade marked formulation of the ergosterol biosynthesis inhibiting fungicide, propiconazole, applied at the recommended and ten times the recommended application rates. The soil dilution plate method was used to isolate fungi from 0-1 and 1-2 cm soil depth. Soil samples were taken 10 times during the period from May 22 to August 11, 1986. The numbers of yeasts and filamentous fungi were enumerated, the latter includingCladosporium andPenicillium, which were also enumerated separately. The fluctuations in fungal occurrence due to the propiconazole treatment were smaller than seasonal fluctuations, these most likely being caused by variations in the soil matric potential and by soil invasion of phyllosphere fungi. Fungicide treatment had significant inhibitory effects on the filamentous fungi, especially on theCladosporium, whereas no significant effects were found on the yeasts and onPenicillium spp. From an ecotoxicological point of view, it is important that the effects were considerably delayed, with respect to the time of fungicide application. PMID:24194329

  10. A Prototype Antifungal Contact Lens

    PubMed Central

    Ciolino, Joseph B.; Hudson, Sarah P.; Mobbs, Ashley N.; Hoare, Todd R.; Iwata, Naomi G.; Fink, Gerald R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To design a contact lens to treat and prevent fungal ocular infections. Methods. Curved contact lenses were created by encapsulating econazole-impregnated poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) films in poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) by ultraviolet photopolymerization. Release studies were conducted in phosphate-buffered saline at 37°C with continuous shaking. The contact lenses and their release media were tested in an antifungal assay against Candida albicans. Cross sections of the pre- and postrelease contact lenses were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and by Raman spectroscopy. Results. Econazole-eluting contact lenses provided extended antifungal activity against Candida albicans fungi. Fungicidal activity varied in duration and effectiveness depending on the mass of the econazole-PLGA film encapsulated in the contact lens. Conclusions. An econazole-eluting contact lens could be used as a treatment for fungal ocular infections. PMID:21527380

  11. Advancements in Topical Antifungal Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Kircik, Leon H

    2016-02-01

    The primary treatment for superficial fungal infections is antifungal topical formulations, and allylamines and azoles represent the two major classes of topical formulations that are used to treat these infections. The stratum corneum (SC) is composed of keratinocytes that are surrounded by a matrix of lipids. The efficacy of topically applied formulations depends on their ability to penetrate this lipid matrix, and the vehicle plays an integral role in the penetration of active molecule into skin. There are several challenges to formulating topical drugs, which include the biotransformation of the active molecules as they pass through the SC and the physical changes that occur to the vehicle itself when it is applied to the skin. This article will review current and emerging topical antifungal vehicles. PMID:26885798

  12. Antifungal stilbenoids from Stemona japonica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Zhong; Xu, Guo-Bing; Zhang, Tong

    2008-01-01

    Three new dihydrostilbenes, stilbostemins P-R (1-3), and a new dihydrophenanthrene, stemanthrene G (4), were isolated from the roots of Stemona japonica together with three known bibenzyls, 3,5-dihydroxy-2'-methoxy bibenzyl (5), 3,3'-dihydroxy-2,5'-dimethoxy bibenzyl (6), and 3,5,2'-trihydroxy-4-methyl bibenzyl (7). Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses. Compounds 5 and 6 exhibited strong antifungal activities against Candida albicans. PMID:18636375

  13. Defensins: antifungal lessons from eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patrícia M.; Gonçalves, Sónia; Santos, Nuno C.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last years, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been the focus of intense research toward the finding of a viable alternative to current antifungal drugs. Defensins are one of the major families of AMPs and the most represented among all eukaryotic groups, providing an important first line of host defense against pathogenic microorganisms. Several of these cysteine-stabilized peptides present a relevant effect against fungi. Defensins are the AMPs with the broader distribution across all eukaryotic kingdoms, namely, Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia, and were recently shown to have an ancestor in a bacterial organism. As a part of the host defense, defensins act as an important vehicle of information between innate and adaptive immune system and have a role in immunomodulation. This multidimensionality represents a powerful host shield, hard for microorganisms to overcome using single approach resistance strategies. Pathogenic fungi resistance to conventional antimycotic drugs is becoming a major problem. Defensins, as other AMPs, have shown to be an effective alternative to the current antimycotic therapies, demonstrating potential as novel therapeutic agents or drug leads. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on some eukaryotic defensins with antifungal action. An overview of the main targets in the fungal cell and the mechanism of action of these AMPs (namely, the selectivity for some fungal membrane components) are presented. Additionally, recent works on antifungal defensins structure, activity, and cytotoxicity are also reviewed. PMID:24688483

  14. Evaluation of vaginal antifungal formulations in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    McRipley, R. J.; Erhard, P. J.; Schwind, R. A.; Whitney, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    Relatively simple and rapid procedures have been developed for evaluating the local efficacy of vaginal antifungal agents in vivo in a vaginal candidiasis model in ovariectomized rats. The results of this investigation indicate that the model and methods described are quite suitable for screening potential antifungal substances and for assessing the chemotherapeutic effectiveness of new antifungal agents and formulations before carrying out clinical studies. PMID:392480

  15. Antibacterial and Antifungal Compounds from Marine Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijian; Meng, Wei; Cao, Cong; Wang, Jian; Shan, Wenjun; Wang, Qinggui

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews 116 new compounds with antifungal or antibacterial activities as well as 169 other known antimicrobial compounds, with a specific focus on January 2010 through March 2015. Furthermore, the phylogeny of the fungi producing these antibacterial or antifungal compounds was analyzed. The new methods used to isolate marine fungi that possess antibacterial or antifungal activities as well as the relationship between structure and activity are shown in this review. PMID:26042616

  16. Phenobarbital and propiconazole toxicogenomic profiles in mice show major similarities consistent with the key role that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation plays in their mode of action.

    PubMed

    Currie, Richard A; Peffer, Richard C; Goetz, Amber K; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Goodman, Jay I

    2014-07-01

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) is employed frequently to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of the compound of interest and, thus, has become an aid to mode of action determination. However, the results and interpretation of a TGx dataset are influenced by the experimental design and methods of analysis employed. This article describes an evaluation and reanalysis, by two independent laboratories, of previously published TGx mouse liver microarray data for a triazole fungicide, propiconazole (PPZ), and the anticonvulsant drug phenobarbital (PB). Propiconazole produced an increase incidence of liver tumors in male CD-1 mice only at a dose that exceeded the maximum tolerated dose (2500 ppm). Firstly, we illustrate how experimental design differences between two in vivo studies with PPZ and PB may impact the comparisons of TGx results. Secondly, we demonstrate that different researchers using different pathway analysis tools can come to different conclusions on specific mechanistic pathways, even when using the same datasets. Finally, despite these differences the results across three different analyses also show a striking degree of similarity observed for PPZ and PB treated livers when the expression data are viewed as major signaling pathways and cell processes affected. Additional studies described here show that the postulated key event of hepatocellular proliferation was observed in CD-1 mice for both PPZ and PB, and that PPZ is also a potent activator of the mouse CAR nuclear receptor. Thus, with regard to the events which are hallmarks of CAR-induced effects that are key events in the mode of action (MOA) of mouse liver carcinogenesis with PB, PPZ-induced tumors can be viewed as being promoted by a similar PB-like CAR-dependent MOA. PMID:24675475

  17. Phenobarbital and propiconazole toxicogenomic profiles in mice show major similarities consistent with the key role that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation plays in their mode of action

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Richard A.; Peffer, Richard C.; Goetz, Amber K.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Goodman, Jay I.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicogenomics (TGx) is employed frequently to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of the compound of interest and, thus, has become an aid to mode of action determination. However, the results and interpretation of a TGx dataset are influenced by the experimental design and methods of analysis employed. This article describes an evaluation and reanalysis, by two independent laboratories, of previously published TGx mouse liver microarray data for a triazole fungicide, propiconazole (PPZ), and the anticonvulsant drug phenobarbital (PB). Propiconazole produced an increase incidence of liver tumors in male CD-1 mice only at a dose that exceeded the maximum tolerated dose (2500 ppm). Firstly, we illustrate how experimental design differences between two in vivo studies with PPZ and PB may impact the comparisons of TGx results. Secondly, we demonstrate that different researchers using different pathway analysis tools can come to different conclusions on specific mechanistic pathways, even when using the same datasets. Finally, despite these differences the results across three different analyses also show a striking degree of similarity observed for PPZ and PB treated livers when the expression data are viewed as major signaling pathways and cell processes affected. Additional studies described here show that the postulated key event of hepatocellular proliferation was observed in CD-1 mice for both PPZ and PB, and that PPZ is also a potent activator of the mouse CAR nuclear receptor. Thus, with regard to the events which are hallmarks of CAR-induced effects that are key events in the mode of action (MOA) of mouse liver carcinogenesis with PB, PPZ-induced tumors can be viewed as being promoted by a similar PB-like CAR-dependent MOA. PMID:24675475

  18. Antifungals: Mechanism of Action and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra; Shah, Abdul Haseeb; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    There are currently few antifungals in use which show efficacy against fungal diseases. These antifungals mostly target specific components of fungal plasma membrane or its biosynthetic pathways. However, more recent class of antifungals in use is echinocandins which target the fungal cell wall components. The availability of mostly fungistatic antifungals in clinical use, often led to the development of tolerance to these very drugs by the pathogenic fungal species. Thus, the development of clinical multidrug resistance (MDR) leads to higher tolerance to drugs and its emergence is helped by multiple mechanisms. MDR is indeed a multifactorial phenomenon wherein a resistant organism possesses several mechanisms which contribute to display reduced susceptibility to not only single drug in use but also show collateral resistance to several drugs. Considering the limited availability of antifungals in use and the emergence of MDR in fungal infections, there is a continuous need for the development of novel broad spectrum antifungal drugs with better efficacy. Here, we briefly present an overview of the current understanding of the antifungal drugs in use, their mechanism of action and the emerging possible novel antifungal drugs with great promise. PMID:26721281

  19. Natural and synthetic peptides with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Conti, Stefania; Magliani, Walter; Santinoli, Claudia; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the increase of invasive fungal infections and the emergence of antifungal resistance stressed the need for new antifungal drugs. Peptides have shown to be good candidates for the development of alternative antimicrobial agents through high-throughput screening, and subsequent optimization according to a rational approach. This review presents a brief overview on antifungal natural peptides of different sources (animals, plants, micro-organisms), peptide fragments derived by proteolytic cleavage of precursor physiological proteins (cryptides), synthetic unnatural peptides and peptide derivatives. Antifungal peptides are schematically reported based on their structure, antifungal spectrum and reported effects. Natural or synthetic peptides and their modified derivatives may represent the basis for new compounds active against fungal infections. PMID:27502155

  20. Antifungal Activity of C-27 Steroidal Saponins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chong-Ren; Zhang, Ying; Jacob, Melissa R.; Khan, Shabana I.; Zhang, Ying-Jun; Li, Xing-Cong

    2006-01-01

    As part of our search for new antifungal agents from natural resources, 22 C-27 steroidal saponins and 6 steroidal sapogenins isolated from several monocotyledonous plants were tested for their antifungal activity against the opportunistic pathogens Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus fumigatus. The results showed that the antifungal activity of the steroidal saponins was associated with their aglycone moieties and the number and structure of monosaccharide units in their sugar chains. Within the 10 active saponins, four tigogenin saponins (compounds 1 to 4) with a sugar moiety of four or five monosaccharide units exhibited significant activity against C. neoformans and A. fumigatus, comparable to the positive control amphotericin B. The antifungal potency of these compounds was not associated with cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. This suggests that the C-27 steroidal saponins may be considered potential antifungal leads for further preclinical study. PMID:16641439

  1. Active packaging with antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Van Long, N; Joly, Catherine; Dantigny, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    There have been many reviews concerned with antimicrobial food packaging, and with the use of antifungal compounds, but none provided an exhaustive picture of the applications of active packaging to control fungal spoilage. Very recently, many studies have been done in these fields, therefore it is timely to review this topic. This article examines the effects of essential oils, preservatives, natural products, chemical fungicides, nanoparticles coated to different films, and chitosan in vitro on the growth of moulds, but also in vivo on the mould free shelf-life of bread, cheese, and fresh fruits and vegetables. A short section is also dedicated to yeasts. All the applications are described from a microbiological point of view, and these were sorted depending on the name of the species. Methods and results obtained are discussed. Essential oils and preservatives were ranked by increased efficacy on mould growth. For all the tested molecules, Penicillium species were shown more sensitive than Aspergillus species. However, comparison between the results was difficult because it appeared that the efficiency of active packaging depended greatly on the environmental factors of food such as water activity, pH, temperature, NaCl concentration, the nature, the size, and the mode of application of the films, in addition to the fact that the amount of released antifungal compounds was not constant with time. PMID:26803804

  2. Antifungal susceptibilities of Paecilomyces species.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, C; Pujol, I; Sala, J; Guarro, J

    1998-07-01

    The MICs and minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) of amphotericin B, miconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, fluconazole, and flucytosine for 52 isolates of Paecilomyces species were evaluated by the broth microdilution method, largely based on the recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (document M27-A). The fungal isolates tested included 16 P. variotii, 11 P. lilacinus, 9 P. marquandii, 6 P. fumosoroseus, 4 P. javanicus, and 2 P. viridis isolates and 1 isolate of each of the following species: P. carneus, P. farinosus, P. fulvus, and P. niveus. The MFCs and the MICs at which 90% of isolates were inhibited (MIC90s) for the six antifungal agents were remarkably high; the MIC50s indicated that amphotericin B, miconazole, itraconazole, and ketoconazole had good activities, while fluconazole and flucytosine demonstrated poor efficacy. The ranges of the MICs were generally wider and lower than those of the MFCs. There were significant susceptibility differences among the species. All species with the exception of P. variotii were highly resistant to fluconazole and flucytosine; P. variotii was susceptible to flucytosine. Amphotericin B and the rest of the azoles showed good activity against P. variotii, while all the antifungal agents assayed showed low efficacy against P. lilacinus. PMID:9660991

  3. Antifungal Susceptibilities of Paecilomyces Species

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, C.; Pujol, I.; Sala, J.; Guarro, J.

    1998-01-01

    The MICs and minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) of amphotericin B, miconazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, fluconazole, and flucytosine for 52 isolates of Paecilomyces species were evaluated by the broth microdilution method, largely based on the recommendations of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (document M27-A). The fungal isolates tested included 16 P. variotii, 11 P. lilacinus, 9 P. marquandii, 6 P. fumosoroseus, 4 P. javanicus, and 2 P. viridis isolates and 1 isolate of each of the following species: P. carneus, P. farinosus, P. fulvus, and P. niveus. The MFCs and the MICs at which 90% of isolates were inhibited (MIC90s) for the six antifungal agents were remarkably high; the MIC50s indicated that amphotericin B, miconazole, itraconazole, and ketoconazole had good activities, while fluconazole and flucytosine demonstrated poor efficacy. The ranges of the MICs were generally wider and lower than those of the MFCs. There were significant susceptibility differences among the species. All species with the exception of P. variotii were highly resistant to fluconazole and flucytosine; P. variotii was susceptible to flucytosine. Amphotericin B and the rest of the azoles showed good activity against P. variotii, while all the antifungal agents assayed showed low efficacy against P. lilacinus. PMID:9660991

  4. Antifungal proteins: More than antimicrobials?

    PubMed Central

    Hegedüs, Nikoletta; Marx, Florentine

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial proteins (AMPs) are widely distributed in nature. In higher eukaryotes, AMPs provide the host with an important defence mechanism against invading pathogens. AMPs of lower eukaryotes and prokaryotes may support successful competition for nutrients with other microorganisms of the same ecological niche. AMPs show a vast variety in structure, function, antimicrobial spectrum and mechanism of action. Most interestingly, there is growing evidence that AMPs also fulfil important biological functions other than antimicrobial activity. The present review focuses on the mechanistic function of small, cationic, cysteine-rich AMPs of mammals, insects, plants and fungi with antifungal activity and specifically aims at summarizing current knowledge concerning additional biological properties which opens novel aspects for their future use in medicine, agriculture and biotechnology. PMID:23412850

  5. Antifungal isopimaranes from Hypoestes serpens.

    PubMed

    Rasoamiaranjanahary, L; Guilet, D; Marston, A; Randimbivololona, F; Hostettmann, K

    2003-09-01

    Five isopimarane diterpenes (7beta-hydroxyisopimara-8,15-dien-14-one, 14alpha-hydroxyisopimara-7,15-dien-1-one, 1beta,14alpha-dihydroxyisopimara-7,15-diene, 7beta-hydroxyisopimara-8(14),15-dien-1-one and 7beta-acetoxyisopimara-8(14),15-dien-1-one) have been isolated from the leaves of Hypoestes serpens (Acanthaceae). All compounds exhibited antifungal activity against both the plant pathogenic fungus Cladosporium cucumerinum and the yeast Candida albicans; two of them also displayed an acetylcholinesterase inhibition. The structures of the compounds were determined by means of spectrometric methods, including 1D and 2D NMR experiments and MS analysis. PMID:12943772

  6. Topical antifungals for seborrhoeic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Okokon, Enembe O; Verbeek, Jos H; Ruotsalainen, Jani H; Ojo, Olumuyiwa A; Bakhoya, Victor Nyange

    2015-01-01

    Background Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that is distributed worldwide. It commonly affects the scalp, face and flexures of the body. Treatment options include antifungal drugs, steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, keratolytic agents and phototherapy. Objectives To assess the effects of antifungal agents for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the face and scalp in adolescents and adults. A secondary objective is to assess whether the same interventions are effective in the management of seborrhoeic dermatitis in patients with HIV/AIDS. Search methods We searched the following databases up to December 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Issue 11), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974) and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (from 1982). We also searched trials registries and checked the bibliographies of published studies for further trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of topical antifungals used for treatment of seborrhoeic dermatitis in adolescents and adults, with primary outcome measures of complete clearance of symptoms and improved quality of life. Data collection and analysis Review author pairs independently assessed eligibility for inclusion, extracted study data and assessed risk of bias of included studies. We performed fixed-effect meta-analysis for studies with low statistical heterogeneity and used a random-effects model when heterogeneity was high. Main results We included 51 studies with 9052 participants. Of these, 45 trials assessed treatment outcomes at five weeks or less after commencement of treatment, and six trials assessed outcomes over a longer time frame. We believe that 24 trials had some form of conflict of interest, such as funding by pharmaceutical companies. Among the included studies were 12 ketoconazole trials (N = 3253), 11 ciclopirox trials (N = 3029), two lithium trials (N = 141

  7. Early state research on antifungal natural products.

    PubMed

    Negri, Melyssa; Salci, Tânia P; Shinobu-Mesquita, Cristiane S; Capoci, Isis R G; Svidzinski, Terezinha I E; Kioshima, Erika Seki

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial infections caused by fungi have increased greatly in recent years, mainly due to the rising number of immunocompromised patients. However, the available antifungal therapeutic arsenal is limited, and the development of new drugs has been slow. Therefore, the search for alternative drugs with low resistance rates and fewer side effects remains a major challenge. Plants produce a variety of medicinal components that can inhibit pathogen growth. Studies of plant species have been conducted to evaluate the characteristics of natural drug products, including their sustainability, affordability, and antimicrobial activity. A considerable number of studies of medicinal plants and alternative compounds, such as secondary metabolites, phenolic compounds, essential oils and extracts, have been performed. Thus, this review discusses the history of the antifungal arsenal, surveys natural products with potential antifungal activity, discusses strategies to develop derivatives of natural products, and presents perspectives on the development of novel antifungal drug candidates. PMID:24609016

  8. Mutation Spectrum Induced by Conazole Fungicides in LacI Transgenic C57BL/6 Mouse Liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are antifungal agents used in both agricultural and pharmaceutical settings. Some conazoles, including propiconazole and triadimefon, induce hepatocellular tumors in mice, while other conazoles do not. We reported in a previous study that both propiconazole and triadime...

  9. Antifungal drug discovery: the process and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Calderone, Richard; Sun, Nuo; Gay-Andrieu, Francoise; Groutas, William; Weerawarna, Pathum; Prasad, Sridhar; Alex, Deepu; Li, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    New data suggest that the global incidence of several types of fungal diseases have traditionally been under-documented. Of these, mortality caused by invasive fungal infections remains disturbingly high, equal to or exceeding deaths caused by drug-resistant tuberculosis and malaria. It is clear that basic research on new antifungal drugs, vaccines and diagnostic tools is needed. In this review, we focus upon antifungal drug discovery including in vitro assays, compound libraries and approaches to target identification. Genome mining has made it possible to identify fungal-specific targets; however, new compounds to these targets are apparently not in the antimicrobial pipeline. We suggest that ‘repurposing’ compounds (off patent) might be a more immediate starting point. Furthermore, we examine the dogma on antifungal discovery and suggest that a major thrust in technologies such as structural biology, homology modeling and virtual imaging is needed to drive discovery. PMID:25046525

  10. New Antifungal Pyranoisoflavone from Ficus tikoua Bur.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shaopeng; Wu, Wenjun; Ji, Zhiqin

    2012-01-01

    Considering the undesirable attributes of synthetic fungicides and the availability of Ficus species in China, the stem of Ficus tikoua Bur. was investigated. One new antifungal pyranoisoflavone, 5,3′,4′-trihydroxy-2″,2″-dimethylpyrano (5″,6″:7,8) isoflavone (1), together with two known isoflavones, wighteone (2) and lupiwighteone (3) (with previously reported antifungal activities), were isolated from ethyl acetate extract by bioassay-guided fractionation. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis, such as NMR (1H-1H COSY, HMQC, HMBC and NOESY), IR, UV and HRMS, as well as ESI-MSn analyses. The antifungal activities of 1–3 against Phytophthora infestans were evaluated by direct spore germination assay, and the IC50 values were 262.442, 198.153 and 90.365 μg·mL−1, respectively. PMID:22837700

  11. Antifungal drug discovery: the process and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Calderone, Richard; Sun, Nuo; Gay-Andrieu, Francoise; Groutas, William; Weerawarna, Pathum; Prasad, Sridhar; Alex, Deepu; Li, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    New data suggest that the global incidence of several types of fungal diseases have traditionally been under-documented. Of these, mortality caused by invasive fungal infections remains disturbingly high, equal to or exceeding deaths caused by drug-resistant tuberculosis and malaria. It is clear that basic research on new antifungal drugs, vaccines and diagnostic tools is needed. In this review, we focus upon antifungal drug discovery including in vitro assays, compound libraries and approaches to target identification. Genome mining has made it possible to identify fungal-specific targets; however, new compounds to these targets are apparently not in the antimicrobial pipeline. We suggest that 'repurposing' compounds (off patent) might be a more immediate starting point. Furthermore, we examine the dogma on antifungal discovery and suggest that a major thrust in technologies such as structural biology, homology modeling and virtual imaging is needed to drive discovery. PMID:25046525

  12. Synthesis, Antifungal Activities and Qualitative Structure Activity Relationship of Carabrone Hydrazone Derivatives as Potential Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Ren, Shuang-Xi; He, Ze-Yu; Wang, De-Long; Yan, Xiao-Nan; Feng, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Xing

    2014-01-01

    Aimed at developing novel fungicides for relieving the ever-increasing pressure of agricultural production caused by phytopathogenic fungi, 28 new hydrazone derivatives of carabrone, a natural bioactive sesquisterpene, in three types were designed, synthesized and their antifungal activities against Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum lagenarium were evaluated. The result revealed that all the derivatives synthesized exhibited considerable antifungal activities in vitro and in vivo, which led to the improved activities for carabrone and its analogues and further confirmed their potential as antifungal agents. PMID:24619221

  13. Antifungal activity of five species of Polygala

    PubMed Central

    Johann, Susana; Mendes, Beatriz G.; Missau, Fabiana C.; de Resende, Maria A.; Pizzolatti, Moacir G.

    2011-01-01

    Crude extracts and fractions of five species of Polygala – P. campestris, P. cyparissias, P. paniculata, P. pulchella and P. sabulosa – were investigated for their in vitro antifungal activity against opportunistic Candida species, Cryptococcus gattii and Sporothrix schenckii with bioautographic and microdilution assays. In the bioautographic assays, the major extracts were active against the fungi tested. In the minimal concentration inhibitory (MIC) assay, the hexane extract of P. paniculata and EtOAc fraction of P. sabulosa showed the best antifungal activity, with MIC values of 60 and 30 μg/mL, respectively, against C. tropicalis, C. gattii and S. schenckii. The compounds isolated from P. sabulosa prenyloxycoumarin and 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexanehexol displayed antifungal activity against S. schenckii (with MICs of 125 μg/mL and 250 μg/mL, respectively) and C. gattii (both with MICs of 250 μg/mL). Rutin and aurapten isolated from P. paniculata showed antifungal activity against C. gattii with MIC values of 60 and 250 μg/mL, respectively. In the antifungal screening, few of the isolated compounds showed good antifungal inhibition. The compound α-spinasterol showed broad activity against the species tested, while rutin had the best activity with the lowest MIC values for the microorganisms tested. These two compounds may be chemically modified by the introduction of a substitute group that would alter several physico-chemical properties of the molecule, such as hydrophobicity, electronic density and steric strain. PMID:24031724

  14. Screening antifungal activities of selected medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, E N; Sampietro, A R; Vattuone, M A

    2001-01-01

    Plants synthesise a vast array of secondary metabolites that are gaining importance for their biotechnological applications. The antifungal activity of the ethanolic extracts of ten Argentinean plants used in native medicine is reported. Antifungal assays included radial growth inhibition, disk and well diffusion assays and growth inhibition by broth dilution tests. The chosen test fungi were yeasts, microfungi and wood-rot causing Basidiomycetes. Extracts of Larrea divaricata, Zuccagnia punctata and Larrea cuneifolia displayed remarkable activity in the assays against the majority of the test fungi. In addition to the former plants, Prosopanche americana also inhibited yeast growth. PMID:11137353

  15. Outcome of empirical or targeted antifungal therapy after antifungal prophylaxis in febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Ast, C; Felder, L; Mayer, K; Mückter, S; Ruhnke, M; Hein, R; Hellmich, M; Schwab, K; Rachow, T; Brossart, P; von Lilienfeld-Toal, M

    2016-05-01

    Azole prophylaxis has been shown to be effective in preventing invasive fungal infections (IFIs) and increasing survival in patients with prolonged neutropenia after myelosuppressive chemotherapy for haematological malignancies. Similarly, empirical antifungal therapy for persistent neutropenic fever has been shown to reduce IFI-related mortality. However, to date, there is little information with regard to the outcome of patients who receive both strategies. Here, we present our retrospective data on three cohorts of patients receiving empirical or targeted antifungal therapy after different antifungal prophylaxis regimens. All records from patients who received myelosuppressive induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in our centre from 2004-2010 were analysed. From 2004-2006, itraconazole was used as antifungal prophylaxis; for the first 6 months in 2007, local polyenes and from mid-2007 till 2010, posaconazole. Data of 315 courses of chemotherapy in 211 patients were analysed. Antifungal therapy (empirical or targeted, time point and antifungal agent at the physician's discretion) was initiated in 50/174 (29 %), 7/18 (39 %) and 34/123 courses (28 %, p = 0.615) in the itra cohort, the cohort without systemic prophylaxis and the posa cohort, respectively, and was effective in 24/50 (48 %), 5/7 (71 %) and 22/34 courses (65 %, p = 0.221), respectively. IFI occurred in 25/174 (14 %), 4/18 (22 %) and 16/123 (13 %) courses, respectively (p = 0.580). IFI-related survival was not different in the three cohorts. Antifungal treatment in patients with AML who received azole prophylaxis resulted in the expected efficacy-importantly, prior posaconazole prophylaxis did not render subsequent antifungal treatment less effective than prior itraconazole prophylaxis. PMID:27021301

  16. Cinnamaldehyde and its derivatives, a novel class of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Shreaz, Sheikh; Wani, Waseem A; Behbehani, Jawad M; Raja, Vaseem; Irshad, Md; Karched, Maribasappa; Ali, Intzar; Siddiqi, Weqar A; Hun, Lee Ting

    2016-07-01

    The last few decades have seen an alarming rise in fungal infections, which currently represent a global health threat. Despite extensive research towards the development of new antifungal agents, only a limited number of antifungal drugs are available in the market. The routinely used polyene agents and many azole antifungals are associated with some common side effects such as severe hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Also, antifungal resistance continues to grow and evolve and complicate patient management, despite the introduction of new antifungal agents. This suitation requires continuous attention. Cinnamaldehyde has been reported to inhibit bacteria, yeasts, and filamentous molds via the inhibition of ATPases, cell wall biosynthesis, and alteration of membrane structure and integrity. In this regard, several novel cinnamaldehyde derivatives were synthesized with the claim of potential antifungal activities. The present article describes antifungal properties of cinnamaldehyde and its derivatives against diverse classes of pathogenic fungi. This review will provide an overview of what is currently known about the primary mode of action of cinnamaldehyde. Synergistic approaches for boosting the effectiveness of cinnamaldehyde and its derivatives have been highlighted. Also, a keen analysis of the pharmacologically active systems derived from cinnamaldehyde has been discussed. Finally, efforts were made to outline the future perspectives of cinnamaldehyde-based antifungal agents. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of current knowledge about the antifungal properties and antifungal mode of action of cinnamaldehyde and its derivatives and to identify research avenues that can facilitate implementation of cinnamaldehyde as a natural antifungal. PMID:27259370

  17. Efflux-Mediated Antifungal Drug Resistance†

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Richard D.; Lamping, Erwin; Holmes, Ann R.; Niimi, Kyoko; Baret, Philippe V.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Tanabe, Koichi; Niimi, Masakazu; Goffeau, Andre; Monk, Brian C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Fungi cause serious infections in the immunocompromised and debilitated, and the incidence of invasive mycoses has increased significantly over the last 3 decades. Slow diagnosis and the relatively few classes of antifungal drugs result in high attributable mortality for systemic fungal infections. Azole antifungals are commonly used for fungal infections, but azole resistance can be a problem for some patient groups. High-level, clinically significant azole resistance usually involves overexpression of plasma membrane efflux pumps belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) or the major facilitator superfamily class of transporters. The heterologous expression of efflux pumps in model systems, such Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has enabled the functional analysis of efflux pumps from a variety of fungi. Phylogenetic analysis of the ABC pleiotropic drug resistance family has provided a new view of the evolution of this important class of efflux pumps. There are several ways in which the clinical significance of efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance can be mitigated. Alternative antifungal drugs, such as the echinocandins, that are not efflux pump substrates provide one option. Potential therapeutic approaches that could overcome azole resistance include targeting efflux pump transcriptional regulators and fungal stress response pathways, blockade of energy supply, and direct inhibition of efflux pumps. PMID:19366916

  18. Synthetic Multivalent Antifungal Peptides Effective against Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianguo; Nandhakumar, Muruganantham; Aung, Thet Tun; Goh, Eunice; Chang, Jamie Ya Ting; Saraswathi, Padhmanaban; Tang, Charles; Safie, Siti Radiah Binte; Lin, Lim Yih; Riezman, Howard; Lei, Zhou; Verma, Chandra S.; Beuerman, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    Taking advantage of the cluster effect observed in multivalent peptides, this work describes antifungal activity and possible mechanism of action of tetravalent peptide (B4010) which carries 4 copies of the sequence RGRKVVRR through a branched lysine core. B4010 displayed better antifungal properties than natamycin and amphotericin B. The peptide retained significant activity in the presence of monovalent/divalent cations, trypsin and serum and tear fluid. Moreover, B4010 is non-haemolytic and non-toxic to mice by intraperitoneal (200 mg/kg) or intravenous (100 mg/kg) routes. S. cerevisiae mutant strains with altered membrane sterol structures and composition showed hyper senstivity to B4010. The peptide had no affinity for cell wall polysaccharides and caused rapid dissipation of membrane potential and release of vital ions and ATP when treated with C. albicans. We demonstrate that additives which alter the membrane potential or membrane rigidity protect C. albicans from B4010-induced lethality. Calcein release assay and molecular dynamics simulations showed that the peptide preferentially binds to mixed bilayer containing ergosterol over phophotidylcholine-cholesterol bilayers. The studies further suggested that the first arginine is important for mediating peptide-bilayer interactions. Replacing the first arginine led to a 2–4 fold decrease in antifungal activities and reduced membrane disruption properties. The combined in silico and in vitro approach should facilitate rational design of new tetravalent antifungal peptides. PMID:24498363

  19. Antifungal effect of some spice hydrosols.

    PubMed

    Boyraz, Nuh; Ozcan, Musa

    2005-12-01

    The antifungal effects of rosemary, cumin, sater (savory), basil and pickling herb hydrosols were investigated against Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp tulipae, Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria citri. Hydrosols of sater and pickling herb showed the most relevant fungicidal activity. PMID:16243447

  20. Antifungal prophylaxis during neutropenia and immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Lortholary, O; Dupont, B

    1997-01-01

    Fungal infections represent a major source of morbidity and mortality in patients with almost all types of immunodeficiencies. These infections may be nosocomial (aspergillosis) or community acquired (cryptococcosis), or both (candidiasis). Endemic mycoses such as histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and penicilliosis may infect many immunocompromised hosts in some geographic areas and thereby create major public health problems. With the wide availability of oral azoles, antifungal prophylactic strategies have been extensively developed. However, only a few well-designed studies involving strict criteria have been performed, mostly in patients with hematological malignancies or AIDS. In these situations, the best dose and duration of administration of the antifungal drug often remain to be determined. In high-risk neutropenic or bone marrow transplant patients, fluconazole is effective for the prevention of superficial and/or systemic candidal infections but is not always able to prolong overall survival and potentially selects less susceptible or resistant Candida spp. Primary prophylaxis against aspergillosis remains investigative. At present, no standard general recommendation for primary antifungal prophylaxis can be proposed for AIDS patients or transplant recipients. However, for persistently immunocompromised patients who previously experienced a noncandidal systemic fungal infection, prolonged suppressive antifungal therapy is often indicated to prevent a relapse. Better strategies for controlling immune deficiencies should also help to avoid some potentially life-threatening deep mycoses. When prescribing antifungal prophylaxis, physicians should be aware of the potential emergence of resistant strains, drug-drug interactions, and the cost. Well-designed, randomized, multicenter clinical trials in high-risk immunocompromised hosts are urgently needed to better define how to prevent severe invasive mycoses. PMID:9227863

  1. Oral Antifungal Drugs in the Treatment of Dermatomycosis.

    PubMed

    Tsunemi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Oral antifungal drugs are used primarily to treat tinea unguium; however, they are also useful for other types of tinea. For example, a combination of topical and oral antifungal drugs is effective in hyperkeratotic tinea pedis that is unresponsive to topical monotherapy. In cases of tinea facialis adjacent to the eyes, ears, or mouth, or widespread tinea corporis, or tinea cruris involving the complex skin folds of the external genitalia, it is difficult to apply topical drugs to all the lesions; therefore, oral antifungal drugs are necessary. Oral antifungal drugs are also useful not only for tinea but for widespread pityriasis versicolor and Malassezia folliculitis, candidal onychomycosis, and candidal paronychia and onychia. Topical antifungal drugs are in fact unsuitable for some mycoses. In tinea capitis, for example, irritation by topical drugs is likely to enhance inflammation; therefore, oral antifungal drug monotherapy is preferable. In interdigital tinea pedis with erosion or contact dermatitis, topical drugs are difficult to use because they tend to cause irritant dermatitis, resulting in exacerbation of the condition. In such cases, treatment should begin with a combination of topical corticosteroid therapy and oral antifungal drugs active against dermatophytes. Topical antifungal drugs are used after the complications resolve. A combination of topical and oral antifungal drugs can shorten the treatment period, thus improving patient adherence to topical treatment. Oral antifungal drugs are useful because of their wide range of applications in the treatment of dermatomycosis. PMID:27251319

  2. Triazole induced drought tolerance in horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum).

    PubMed

    Percival, Glynn C; Noviss, Kelly

    2008-11-01

    We determined the influence of the triazole derivatives paclobutrazol, penconazole, epixiconazole, propiconazole and myclobutanil on the drought tolerance and post drought recovery of container-grown horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) saplings. Myclobutanil neither conferred drought resistance, as assessed by its effects on a number of physiological and biochemical parameters, nor affected growth parameters measured after recovery from drought. Chlorophyll fluorescence (F(v)/F(m)), photosynthetic rates, total foliar chlorophyll and carotenoid concentrations, foliar proline concentration and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were consistently higher and leaf necrosis and cellular electrolyte leakage was lower at the end of a 3-week drought in trees treated with paclobutrazol, penconazole, epixiconazole or propiconazole than in control trees. Twelve weeks after drought treatment, leaf area and shoot, root and total plant dry masses were greater in triazole-treated trees than in control trees with the exception of those treated with myclobutanil. In a separate study, trees were subjected to a 2-week drought and then sprayed with paclobutrazol, penconazole, epixiconazole, propiconazole or myclobutanil. Chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthetic rate, foliar chlorophyll concentration and catalase activity over the following 12 weeks were 20 to 50% higher in triazole-treated trees than in control trees. At the end of the 12-week recovery period, leaf area and shoot, root and total plant dry masses were higher in triazole-treated trees than in control trees, with the exception of trees treated with myclobutanil. Application of triazole derivatives, with the exception of myclobutanil, enhanced tolerance to prolonged drought and, when applied after a 2-week drought, hastened recovery from drought. The magnitude of treatment effects was in the order epixiconazole approximately propiconazole > penconazole > paclobutrazol > myclobutanil. PMID:18765373

  3. From antidiabetic to antifungal: discovery of highly potent triazole-thiazolidinedione hybrids as novel antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shanchao; Zhang, Yongqiang; He, Xiaomeng; Che, Xiaoying; Wang, Shengzheng; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Yan; Liu, Na; Dong, Guoqiang; Yao, Jianzhong; Miao, Zhenyuan; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Wannian; Sheng, Chunquan

    2014-12-01

    In an attempt to discover a new generation of triazole antifungal agents, a series of triazole-thiazolidinedione hybrids were designed and synthesized by molecular hybridization of the antifungal agent fluconazole and rosiglitazone (an antidiabetic). Most of the target compounds showed good to excellent inhibitory activity against a variety of clinically important fungal pathogens. In particular, compounds (Z)-5-(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-3-(2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)propyl)thiazolidine-2,4-dione) (15 c), (Z)-3-(2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)propyl)-5-(furan-3-ylmethylene)thiazolidine-2,4-dione (15 j), and (Z)-3-(2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)propyl)-5-(furan-3-ylmethylene)thiazolidine-2,4-dione (15 r) were highly active against Candida albicans, with MIC80 values in the range of 0.03-0.15 μM. Moreover, compounds 15 j and 15 r were found to be effective against four fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates; these two compounds are particularly promising antifungal leads for further optimization. Molecular docking studies revealed that the hydrogen bonding interactions between thiazolidinedione and CYP51 from C. albicans are important for antifungal activity. This study also demonstrates the effectiveness of molecular hybridization in antifungal drug discovery. PMID:25196996

  4. In vitro antifungal activity of topical and systemic antifungal drugs against Malassezia species.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso Javier; Rojas, Florencia; Tur-Tur, Cristina; de Los Ángeles Sosa, María; Diez, Gustavo Ortiz; Espada, Carmen Martín; Payá, María Jesús; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2013-09-01

    The strict nutritional requirements of Malassezia species make it difficult to test the antifungal susceptibility. Treatments of the chronic and recurrent infections associated with Malassezia spp. are usually ineffective. The objective of this study was to obtain in vitro susceptibility profile of 76 clinical isolates of Malassezia species against 16 antifungal drugs used for topical or systemic treatment. Isolates were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were obtained by a modified microdilution method based on the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute reference document M27-A3. The modifications allowed a good growth of all tested species. High in vitro antifungal activity of most tested drugs was observed, especially triazole derivatives, except for fluconazole which presented the highest MICs and widest range of concentrations. Ketoconazole and itraconazole demonstrated a great activity. Higher MICs values were obtained with Malassezia furfur indicating a low susceptibility to most of the antifungal agents tested. Malassezia sympodialis and Malassezia pachydermatis were found to be more-susceptible species than M. furfur, Malassezia globosa, Malassezia slooffiae and Malassezia restricta. Topical substances were also active but provide higher MICs than the compounds for systemic use. The differences observed in the antifungals activity and interspecies variability demonstrated the importance to studying the susceptibility profile of each species to obtain reliable information for defining an effective treatment regimen. PMID:23496653

  5. Photodynamic therapy as an antifungal treatment

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, YI; LU, LI-MING; CHEN, YONG; LIN, YOU-KUN

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the systemic or topical application of a photosensitizer (PS), alongside the selective illumination of the target lesion with light of an appropriate wavelength, in order to promote localized oxidative photodamage and subsequent cell death. Numerous studies have demonstrated that PDT is highly effective in the destruction of fungi in vitro. The mechanism underlying the effects of PDT results from the photons of visible light of an appropriate wavelength interacting with the intracellular molecules of the PS. Reactive species are produced as a result of the oxidative stress caused by the interaction between the visible light and the biological tissue. At present, no antifungal treatment based on PDT has been licensed. However, antifungal PDT is emerging as an area of interest for research. PMID:27347012

  6. Natural Killer Cells and Antifungal Host Response

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Stanislaw; Zimmermann, Stefanie-Yvonne; Tramsen, Lars; Koehl, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    As a result of improved experimental methodologies and a better understanding of the immune system, there is increasing insight into the antifungal activity of natural killer (NK) cells. Murine and human NK cells are able to damage fungi of different genera and species in vitro, and they exert both direct and indirect antifungal activity through cytotoxic molecules such as perforin and through cytokines and interferons, respectively. On the other hand, recent data suggest that fungi exhibit immunosuppressive effects on NK cells. Whereas clear in vivo data are lacking in humans, the importance of NK cells in the host response against fungi has been demonstrated in animal models. Further knowledge of the interaction of NK cells with fungi might help to better understand the pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections and to improve treatment strategies. PMID:23365210

  7. Antifungal activity of 10 Guadeloupean plants.

    PubMed

    Biabiany, Murielle; Roumy, Vincent; Hennebelle, Thierry; François, Nadine; Sendid, Boualem; Pottier, Muriel; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Rouaud, Isabelle; Lohézic-Le Dévéhat, Françoise; Joseph, Henry; Bourgeois, Paul; Sahpaz, Sevser; Bailleul, François

    2013-11-01

    Screening of the antifungal activities of ten Guadeloupean plants was undertaken to find new extracts and formulations against superficial mycoses such as onychomycosis, athlete's foot, Pityriasis versicolor, as well as the deep fungal infection Pneumocystis pneumonia. For the first time, the CMI of these plant extracts [cyclohexane, ethanol and ethanol/water (1:1, v/v)] was determined against five dermatophytes, five Candida species, Scytalidium dimidiatum, a Malassezia sp. strain and Pneumocystis carinii. Cytotoxicity tests of the most active extracts were also performed on an HaCat keratinocyte cell line. Results suggest that the extracts of Bursera simaruba, Cedrela odorata, Enterolobium cyclocarpum and Pluchea carolinensis have interesting activities and could be good candidates for developing antifungal formulations. PMID:23280633

  8. Antifungal ellagitannin isolated from Euphorbia antisyphilitica Zucc

    PubMed Central

    Ascacio-Valdés, Juan; Burboa, Edgardo; Aguilera-Carbo, Antonio F; Aparicio, Mario; Pérez-Schmidt, Ramón; Rodríguez, Raúl; Aguilar, Cristóbal N

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study antifungal activity of a new ellagitannin isolated from the plant residues of Euphorbia antisyphilitica (E. antisyphilitica) Zucc in the wax extraction process. Methods An extract was prepared from dehydrated and pulverized residues and fractionated by liquid chromatography on Amberilte XAD-16, until obtained an ellagitannin-rich ethanolic fraction which was treated by rotaevaporation to recover the ellagitannin as fine powder. An aqueous solution was prepared and treated through ionic exchange liquid chromatography (Q XL) and gel permeation chromatography (G 25). The ellagitannin-rich fraction was thermogravimetrically evaluated (TGA and DTA) to test the thermo-stability of ellagic acid (monomeric unit). Then ellagitannin powder was analyzed by infrared spectrospcopy to determinate the functional groups and, also mass spectroscopy was used to determine the molecular ion. Results The principal functional groups of ellagitannin were determined, the molecular weight was 860.7 g/mol; and an effective antifungal activity against phytopathogenic fungi was demonstrated. Conclusions It can be concluded that the new ellagitannin (860.7 g/mol) isolated from E. antisyphilitica Zucc is an effective antifungal agent against Alternaria alternata, Fusarium oxyzporum, Colletotrichum gloeosporoides and Rhizoctnia solani. PMID:23570015

  9. Current and Emerging Azole Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Daniel J.; Hitchcock, Christopher A.; Sibley, Carol M.

    1999-01-01

    Major developments in research into the azole class of antifungal agents during the 1990s have provided expanded options for the treatment of many opportunistic and endemic fungal infections. Fluconazole and itraconazole have proved to be safer than both amphotericin B and ketoconazole. Despite these advances, serious fungal infections remain difficult to treat, and resistance to the available drugs is emerging. This review describes present and future uses of the currently available azole antifungal agents in the treatment of systemic and superficial fungal infections and provides a brief overview of the current status of in vitro susceptibility testing and the growing problem of clinical resistance to the azoles. Use of the currently available azoles in combination with other antifungal agents with different mechanisms of action is likely to provide enhanced efficacy. Detailed information on some of the second-generation triazoles being developed to provide extended coverage of opportunistic, endemic, and emerging fungal pathogens, as well as those in which resistance to older agents is becoming problematic, is provided. PMID:9880474

  10. Econazole imprinted textiles with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mirza Akram; Lalloz, Augustine; Benhaddou, Aicha; Pagniez, Fabrice; Raymond, Martine; Le Pape, Patrice; Simard, Pierre; Théberge, Karine; Leblond, Jeanne

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we propose pharmaceutical textiles imprinted with lipid microparticles of Econazole nitrate (ECN) as a mean to improve patient compliance while maintaining drug activity. Lipid microparticles were prepared and characterized by laser diffraction (3.5±0.1 μm). Using an optimized screen-printing method, microparticles were deposited on textiles, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The drug content of textiles (97±3 μg/cm(2)) was reproducible and stable up to 4 months storage at 25 °C/65% Relative Humidity. Imprinted textiles exhibited a thermosensitive behavior, as witnessed by a fusion temperature of 34.8 °C, which enabled a larger drug release at 32 °C (temperature of the skin) than at room temperature. In vitro antifungal activity of ECN textiles was compared to commercial 1% (wt/wt) ECN cream Pevaryl®. ECN textiles maintained their antifungal activity against a broad range of Candida species as well as major dermatophyte species. In vivo, ECN textiles also preserved the antifungal efficacy of ECN on cutaneous candidiasis infection in mice. Ex vivo percutaneous absorption studies demonstrated that ECN released from pharmaceutical textiles concentrated more in the upper skin layers, where the fungal infections develop, as compared to dermal absorption of Pevaryl®. Overall, these results showed that this technology is promising to develop pharmaceutical garments textiles for the treatment of superficial fungal infections. PMID:26883854

  11. [New antifungal agents: voriconazole and caspofungin].

    PubMed

    Dupont, B

    2003-12-01

    Among new available antifungal agents voriconazole is a new triazole with an intravenous (i.v.) and oral formulation, and caspofungin is an echinocandin, new family with a new mode of action on the cell wall. It is available as an i.v. preparation. Both drugs have a broad spectrum targeting most of the usual pathogens: Candida and Aspergillus, even with low suceptibility or resistance to other antifungals. Voriconazole is also active on Scedosporium and Fusarium. The efficacy of these molecules was established in vitro and in experimental infections in animals either normal or immunosuppressed. Voriconazole is active in oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis, in refractory invasive candidiasis and as a first line treatment of invasive aspergillosis with better results than amphotéricine B. It was also effective in scedosporiosis and in fusariosis. Caspofungin is active in oropharyngeal and esophageal candidiasis, in invasive candidiasis ranking among the best drugs in non neutropenic patients. It was shown effective in refractory aspergillosis. As empirical treatment of febrile neutropenic patients, these molecules should probably be restricted to the highest risk-population. Safety is good, side effects are a rare cause of discontinuation of treatment, class specific drug-drug interactions occur with voriconazole. These molecules open an important field of investigations with combination of antifungal agents. PMID:15022787

  12. Antifungal serum concentration monitoring: an update.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Megan L; Drew, Richard H

    2008-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are occurring with increasing incidence and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Understanding the relationship between the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of antifungals is essential to optimize the potential for favourable clinical and microbiological outcomes while minimizing risks of treatment-related toxicity. Antifungal serum concentrations may aid in the determination of appropriate dosing in select circumstances. The polyene and echinocandin classes of antifungals lack sufficient data to justify serum concentration monitoring in routine clinical practice. In contrast, serum concentration monitoring of flucytosine may help to reduce the risk of treatment-related haematological toxicity. Determination of itraconazole serum concentrations is advised in situations where the drug is used for prolonged periods to treat serious IFIs (such as invasive aspergillosis or histoplasmosis) because of variability in absorption following oral administration (most notable for the capsule formulation). The use of serum concentration monitoring during therapy with the extended-spectrum triazoles (i.e. voriconazole and posaconazole) is still evolving, due primarily to inter-patient variability in drug exposure combined with sparse data regarding relationships with efficacy (posaconazole) and both safety and efficacy (voriconazole). PMID:17999982

  13. Antifungal activity of Eugenia umbelliflora against dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Machado, Karina E; Cechinel Filho, Valdir; Cruz, Rosana C B; Meyre-Silva, Christiane; Cruz, Alexandre Bella

    2009-09-01

    Antifungal activities of Eugenia umbelliflora Berg. (Myrtaceae) were tested in vitro against a panel of standard and clinical isolates of human fungal pathogens (dermatophytes and opportunistic saprobes). Methanol extracts of leaves and fruits of E. umbelliflora were separately prepared and partitioned, to yield dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EtOAc) and aqueous fractions (Aq). Three compounds (1-3) were obtained from the DCM extract using chromatographic procedures. Antifungal assays were performed using agar dilution techniques. Both extracts (fruits and leaves), their DCM and EtOAc fractions, and compound 2 (betulin and betulinic acid) presented selective antifungal activity against dermatophytes (Epidermophyton floccosum, Microsporum canis, Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes), with MIC values between 200 and 1000 microg/mL, and interestingly, inhibited 4/5 species with MIC values of < or = 500 microg/mL. The aqueous fractions of fruits and leaves, and compounds 1 (alpha, beta amyrin) and 3 (taraxerol) were inactive up to the maximum concentrations tested (1000 microg/mL). PMID:19831024

  14. Antifungal Activity of Maytenin and Pristimerin

    PubMed Central

    Gullo, Fernanda P.; Sardi, Janaina C. O.; Santos, Vânia A. F. F. M.; Sangalli-Leite, Fernanda; Pitangui, Nayla S.; Rossi, Suélen A.; de Paula e Silva, Ana C. A.; Soares, Luciana A.; Silva, Julhiany F.; Oliveira, Haroldo C.; Furlan, Maysa; Silva, Dulce H. S.; Bolzani, Vanderlan S.; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José S.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa

    2012-01-01

    Fungal infections in humans have increased alarmingly in recent years, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. Among the infections systemic candidiasis, aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, and histoplasmosis mortality are more prevalent and more severe in humans. The current high incidence of dermatophytosis is in humans, especially as the main etiologic agents Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Molecules pristimerin and maytenin obtained from the plant Maytenus ilicifolia (Celastraceae) are known to show various pharmacological activities. This study aimed to evaluate the spectrum of antifungal activity of maytenin and pristimerin and their cytotoxicity in human keratinocytes (NOK cells of the oral mucosa). It was concluded that the best spectrum of antifungal activity has been shown to maytenin with MIC varying from 0.12 to 125 mg/L, although it is also active with pristimerin MIC ranging between 0.12 and 250 mg/L. Regarding the toxicity, both showed to have high IC50. The SI showed high pristimerin against some species of fungi, but SI maytenin was above 1.0 for all fungi tested, showing a selective action of fungi. However, when comparing the two substances, maytenin also showed better results. The two molecules can be a possible prototype with a broad spectrum of action for the development of new antifungal agents. PMID:22675379

  15. Hydroxytyrosol expresses antifungal activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zoric, Natasa; Horvat, Igor; Kopjar, Nevenka; Vucemilovic, Ante; Kremer, Dario; Tomic, Sinisa; Kosalec, Ivan

    2013-08-01

    Hydroxytyrosol (HT) is a potent antioxidant found in olive oil and leaves. Using several in vitro approaches, we tested antifungal activity of HT. HT showed broad spectrum of antifungal activity against medically important yeasts and dermatophyte strains with MIC values ranging between 97.6 µgml⁻¹ and 6.25 mgml⁻¹. The antimicrobial activity of HT was also tested using the time-kill methodology. Below the MIC value, HT showed potent damage of cell wall of Candida albicans ATCC 10231 using fluorescent dye-exclusion method. At the subinhibitory concentration, HT also influenced dimorphic transition of Candida indicating that HT is inhibitor of germ-tube formation as one of the most important virulence factor of C. albicans. Furthermore, HT showed disturbances in cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of C. albicans. The in vitro results indicate that HT caused a significant cell wall damage and changes in CSH as well as inhibition of germ-tube formation as virulence factor of C. albicans. The study indicates that HT has a considerable in vitro antifungal activity against medically important yeasts. PMID:23721186

  16. Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Ascomycetous Yeasts Isolated from Animals.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; García, Marta E; Peláez, Teresa; Martínez-Nevado, Eva; Blanco, José L

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that antifungal resistance in yeast isolates of veterinary origin may be an underdiagnosed threat. We tested a collection of 92 ascomycetous yeast isolates that were obtained in Spain from birds, mammals and insects for antifungal susceptibility. MICs to amphotericin B and azoles were low, and no resistant isolates were detected. Despite these results, and given the potential role of animals as reservoirs of resistant strains, continuous monitoring of antifungal susceptibility in the veterinary setting is recommended. PMID:27216048

  17. [Synthesis and antifungal activity of butenafine hydrochloride (KP-363), a new benzylamine antifungal agent].

    PubMed

    Maeda, T; Takase, M; Ishibashi, A; Yamamoto, T; Sasaki, K; Arika, T; Yokoo, M; Amemiya, K

    1991-02-01

    In screening of new antifungal agents, bis(naphthalenemethyl)amines were found to have more potent antifungal activity than clotrimazole. Studies on their structure-activity relationships indicated that benzylamines had potent antifungal activity. Among them, butenafine hydrochloride (N-p-tert-butylbenzyl-N-methyl-1-naphthalenemethylamine hydrochloride, KP-363) has proved to show the strongest activity. It exhibits a wide spectrum activity in vitro against particularly dermatophytes (87 strains; minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) range, 0.0015 to 0.05 microgram/ml), and also against Aspergillus (15 strains; MIC range, 0.025 to 0.78 microgram/ml), Cryptococcus neoformans (4 strains; MICs 0.78 and 1.56 micrograms/ml) and yeasts of genus Candida (67 strains; MIC range, 3.13 to greater than 100 micrograms/ml). PMID:2056447

  18. Nonanoic Acid, an Antifungal Compound from Hibiscus syriacus Ggoma

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yun-Woo; Jung, Jin-Young; Lee, In-Kyoung

    2012-01-01

    The root of Hibiscus syriacus (Malvaceae) has been used for treatment of fungal diseases such as tinea pedis (athlete's foot). In this study, we investigated the antifungal constituent of the root of Hibiscus syriacus Ggoma, which was produced by a mutation breeding using gamma ray irradiation, and compared the antifungal activity of H. syriacus Ggoma and its parent type. According to the results, the methanolic extract of H. syriacus Ggoma exhibited four times higher antifungal activity than its parent type against Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Following purification through various column chromatographies, the antifungal substance was identified as nonanoic acid on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. PMID:22870060

  19. Nonanoic Acid, an Antifungal Compound from Hibiscus syriacus Ggoma.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yun-Woo; Jung, Jin-Young; Lee, In-Kyoung; Kang, Si-Yong; Yun, Bong-Sik

    2012-06-01

    The root of Hibiscus syriacus (Malvaceae) has been used for treatment of fungal diseases such as tinea pedis (athlete's foot). In this study, we investigated the antifungal constituent of the root of Hibiscus syriacus Ggoma, which was produced by a mutation breeding using gamma ray irradiation, and compared the antifungal activity of H. syriacus Ggoma and its parent type. According to the results, the methanolic extract of H. syriacus Ggoma exhibited four times higher antifungal activity than its parent type against Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Following purification through various column chromatographies, the antifungal substance was identified as nonanoic acid on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. PMID:22870060

  20. Antifungal Resistance and New Strategies to Control Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vandeputte, Patrick; Ferrari, Selene; Coste, Alix T.

    2012-01-01

    Despite improvement of antifungal therapies over the last 30 years, the phenomenon of antifungal resistance is still of major concern in clinical practice. In the last 10 years the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon were extensively unraveled. In this paper, after a brief overview of currently available antifungals, molecular mechanisms of antifungal resistance will be detailed. It appears that major mechanisms of resistance are essential due to the deregulation of antifungal resistance effector genes. This deregulation is a consequence of point mutations occurring in transcriptional regulators of these effector genes. Resistance can also follow the emergence of point mutations directly in the genes coding antifungal targets. In addition we further describe new strategies currently undertaken to discover alternative therapy targets and antifungals. Identification of new antifungals is essentially achieved by the screening of natural or synthetic chemical compound collections. Discovery of new putative antifungal targets is performed through genome-wide approaches for a better understanding of the human pathogenic fungi biology. PMID:22187560

  1. Identification of Antifungal Substances of Lactobacillus sakei subsp. ALI033 and Antifungal Activity against Penicillium brevicompactum Strain FI02

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Chang Ki; Hwang, Tae Yean

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the antifungal substances and the antifungal activity against fungi of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from kimchi. LAB from kimchi in Imsil showed antifungal activity against Penicillium brevicompactum strain FI02. LAB LI031 was identified as Lactobacillus sakei subsp. Antifungal substances contained in L. sakei subsp. ALI033 culture media were unstable at high pH levels. Both, the control and proteinase K and protease treated samples showed clear zones, suggesting that the antifungal substances produced by ALI033 were non-protein substances unaffected by protesases. Both, the control and catalase showed clear zones, suggesting that the antifungal metabolite was not H2O2. The molecular weights of the antifungal substances were ≤3,000 Da. The organic acid content of crude antifungal substances produced by L. sakei subsp. ALI033 showed high concentrations of lactic acid (502.47 mg/100 g). Therefore, these results suggest that antifungal substance produced by L. sakei subsp. ALI033 is most likely due to its ability in producing organic acid. PMID:27069906

  2. Identification of Antifungal Substances of Lactobacillus sakei subsp. ALI033 and Antifungal Activity against Penicillium brevicompactum Strain FI02.

    PubMed

    Huh, Chang Ki; Hwang, Tae Yean

    2016-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the antifungal substances and the antifungal activity against fungi of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from kimchi. LAB from kimchi in Imsil showed antifungal activity against Penicillium brevicompactum strain FI02. LAB LI031 was identified as Lactobacillus sakei subsp. Antifungal substances contained in L. sakei subsp. ALI033 culture media were unstable at high pH levels. Both, the control and proteinase K and protease treated samples showed clear zones, suggesting that the antifungal substances produced by ALI033 were non-protein substances unaffected by protesases. Both, the control and catalase showed clear zones, suggesting that the antifungal metabolite was not H2O2. The molecular weights of the antifungal substances were ≤3,000 Da. The organic acid content of crude antifungal substances produced by L. sakei subsp. ALI033 showed high concentrations of lactic acid (502.47 mg/100 g). Therefore, these results suggest that antifungal substance produced by L. sakei subsp. ALI033 is most likely due to its ability in producing organic acid. PMID:27069906

  3. EFFECT OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES ON REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT IN THE FEMALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three triazole fungicides were evaluated for effects on female rat reproductive development. Rats were exposed via feed to propiconazole (P) (100, 500, or 2500 ppm), myclobutanil (M) (100, 500, or 2000 ppm), or triadimefon (T) (100, 500, or 1800 ppm) from gestation day 6 to postn...

  4. ALTERATIONS IN mRNA GENE EXPRESSION ASSOCIATED WITH CHOLESTEROL METABOLISM, CELL CYCLE, AND OXIDATIVE STRESS INDUCED BY TRIAZOLE CONTAINING CONAZOLES IN RAT LIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides used as pharmaceuticals and in agriculture. Triadimefon was hepatotoxic and induced follicular cell adenomas in the thyroid gland. In contrast,propiconazole and myclobutanil were hepatotoxic but had no effect on the thyroid gland. It was proposed that tri...

  5. Antifungal activity of Piper diospyrifolium Kunth (Piperaceae) essential oil

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Silvia Cristina Heredia; de Paulo, Luis Fernando; Svidzinski, Terezinha Inez Estivaleti; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; de Souza, Amanda; Young, Maria Cláudia Marx; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia

    2011-01-01

    In vitro activity of the essential oil from Piper diospyrifolium leaves was tested using disk diffusion techniques. The antifungal assay showed significant potencial antifungal activity: the oil was effective against several clinical fungal strains. The majority compounds in the essential oil were identified as sesquiterpenoids by GC-MS and GC-FID techniques. PMID:24031717

  6. Antifungal cyclic peptides from the marine sponge Microscleroderma herdmani

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Screening natural product extracts from National Cancer Institute Open Repository for antifungal discovery afforded hits for bioassay-guided fractionation. Upon LC-MS analysis of column fractions with antifungal activities to generate information on chemical structure, two new cyclic hexapeptides, m...

  7. Antifungal and antiviral products of marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Pan, Wen Liang; Chan, Yau Sang; Yin, Cui Ming; Dan, Xiu Li; Wang, He Xiang; Fang, Evandro Fei; Lam, Sze Kwan; Ngai, Patrick Hung Kui; Xia, Li Xin; Liu, Fang; Ye, Xiu Yun; Zhang, Guo Qing; Liu, Qing Hong; Sha, Ou; Lin, Peng; Ki, Chan; Bekhit, Adnan A; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Ye, Xiu Juan; Xia, Jiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-04-01

    Marine organisms including bacteria, fungi, algae, sponges, echinoderms, mollusks, and cephalochordates produce a variety of products with antifungal activity including bacterial chitinases, lipopeptides, and lactones; fungal (-)-sclerotiorin and peptaibols, purpurides B and C, berkedrimane B and purpuride; algal gambieric acids A and B, phlorotannins; 3,5-dibromo-2-(3,5-dibromo-2-methoxyphenoxy)phenol, spongistatin 1, eurysterols A and B, nortetillapyrone, bromotyrosine alkaloids, bis-indole alkaloid, ageloxime B and (-)-ageloxime D, haliscosamine, hamigeran G, hippolachnin A from sponges; echinoderm triterpene glycosides and alkene sulfates; molluscan kahalalide F and a 1485-Da peptide with a sequence SRSELIVHQR; and cepalochordate chitotriosidase and a 5026.9-Da antifungal peptide. The antiviral compounds from marine organisms include bacterial polysaccharide and furan-2-yl acetate; fungal macrolide, purpurester A, purpurquinone B, isoindolone derivatives, alterporriol Q, tetrahydroaltersolanol C and asperterrestide A, algal diterpenes, xylogalactofucan, alginic acid, glycolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, sulfated polysaccharide p-KG03, meroditerpenoids, methyl ester derivative of vatomaric acid, lectins, polysaccharides, tannins, cnidarian zoanthoxanthin alkaloids, norditerpenoid and capilloquinol; crustacean antilipopolysaccharide factors, molluscan hemocyanin; echinoderm triterpenoid glycosides; tunicate didemnin B, tamandarins A and B and; tilapia hepcidin 1-5 (TH 1-5), seabream SauMx1, SauMx2, and SauMx3, and orange-spotted grouper β-defensin. Although the mechanisms of antifungal and antiviral activities of only some of the aforementioned compounds have been elucidated, the possibility to use those known to have distinctly different mechanisms, good bioavailability, and minimal toxicity in combination therapy remains to be investigated. It is also worthwhile to test the marine antimicrobials for possible synergism with existing drugs. The prospects of

  8. Chemical modification of antifungal polyene macrolide antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovieva, S. E.; Olsufyeva, E. N.; Preobrazhenskaya, M. N.

    2011-02-01

    The review summarizes advances in the methods for the synthesis of polyene antibiotics (amphotericin B, partricin A, etc.) and investigations of the structure-activity relationship made in the last 15 years. State-of-the-art approaches based on the combination of the chemical synthesis and genetic engineering are considered. Emphasis is given to the design of semisynthetic antifungal agents against chemotherapy-resistant pathogens having the highest therapeutic indices. Recent results of research on the mechanisms of action of polyenes are outlined.

  9. Histone deacetylases: Targets for antifungal drug development

    PubMed Central

    Kmetzsch, Livia

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of pathogens and its hosts causes a drastic change in the transcriptional landscape in both cells. Among the several mechanisms of gene regulation, transcriptional initiation is probably the main point. In such scenario, the access of transcriptional machinery to promoter is highly regulated by post-translational modification of histones, such as acetylation, phosphorylation and others. Inhibition of histone deacetylases is able to reduce fungal pathogens fitness during infection and, therefore, is currently being considered for the development of new antifungal therapy strategies. PMID:26151486

  10. Combination Antifungal Therapy for Invasive Aspergillosis Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Panackal, Anil A.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) causes significant morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised hosts. Combination therapy with mold-active triazoles and echinocandins has been used with the hope of improving outcomes over monotherapy, especially in the setting of refractory disease. Herein, I update our prior systematic review and meta-analysis on combination therapy for salvage IA in the context of the recently published randomized clinical trial of combination therapy for primary IA. Clinicians should consider combination antifungals for IA in refractory disease despite immune reconstitution when there are concerns for resistance or pharmacokinetic variability. PMID:27441304

  11. Emerging Threats in Antifungal-Resistant Fungal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sanglard, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The use of antifungal drugs in the therapy of fungal diseases can lead to the development of antifungal resistance. Resistance has been described for virtually all antifungal agents in diverse pathogens, including Candida and Aspergillus species. The majority of resistance mechanisms have also been elucidated at the molecular level in these pathogens. Drug resistance genes and genome mutations have been identified. Therapeutic choices are limited for the control of fungal diseases, and it is tempting to combine several drugs to achieve better therapeutic efficacy. In the recent years, several novel resistance patterns have been observed, including antifungal resistance originating from environmental sources in Aspergillus fumigatus and the emergence of simultaneous resistance to different antifungal classes (multidrug resistance) in different Candida species. This review will summarize these current trends. PMID:27014694

  12. Synthesis and investigation of novel benzimidazole derivatives as antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Chandrika, Nishad Thamban; Shrestha, Sanjib K; Ngo, Huy X; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2016-08-15

    The rise and emergence of resistance to antifungal drugs by diverse pathogenic fungal strains have resulted in an increase in demand for new antifungal agents. Various heterocyclic scaffolds with different mechanisms of action against fungi have been investigated in the past. Herein, we report the synthesis and antifungal activities of 18 alkylated mono-, bis-, and trisbenzimidazole derivatives, their toxicities against mammalian cells, as well as their ability to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in yeast cells. Many of our bisbenzimidazole compounds exhibited moderate to excellent antifungal activities against all tested fungal strains, with MIC values ranging from 15.6 to 0.975μg/mL. The fungal activity profiles of our bisbenzimidazoles were found to be dependent on alkyl chain length. Our most potent compounds were found to display equal or superior antifungal activity when compared to the currently used agents amphotericin B, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, and voriconazole against many of the strains tested. PMID:27301676

  13. Advances in synthetic approach to and antifungal activity of triazoles

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nitin; Drabu, Sushma; Sharma, Pramod Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Summary Several five membered ring systems, e.g., triazole, oxadiazole dithiazole and thiadiazole with three heteroatoms at symmetrical or asymmetrical positions have been studied because of their interesting pharmacological properties. In this article our emphasis is on synthetic development and pharmacological activity of the triazole moiety which exhibit a broad spectrum of pharmacological activity such as antifungal, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and anticancer etc. Triazoles have increased our ability to treat many fungal infections, for example, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, aspergillosis etc. However, mortality due to these infections even with antifungal therapy is still unacceptably high. Therefore, the development of new antifungal agents targeting specific fungal structures or functions is being actively pursued. Rapid developments in molecular mycology have led to a concentrated search for more target antifungals. Although we are entering a new era of antifungal therapy in which we will continue to be challenged by systemic fungal diseases, the options for treatment will have greatly expanded. PMID:21804864

  14. Resistance to antifungals that target CYP51.

    PubMed

    Parker, Josie E; Warrilow, Andrew G S; Price, Claire L; Mullins, Jonathan G L; Kelly, Diane E; Kelly, Steven L

    2014-10-01

    Fungal diseases are an increasing global burden. Fungi are now recognised to kill more people annually than malaria, whilst in agriculture, fungi threaten crop yields and food security. Azole resistance, mediated by several mechanisms including point mutations in the target enzyme (CYP51), is increasing through selection pressure as a result of widespread use of triazole fungicides in agriculture and triazole antifungal drugs in the clinic. Mutations similar to those seen in clinical isolates as long ago as the 1990s in Candida albicans and later in Aspergillus fumigatus have been identified in agriculturally important fungal species and also wider combinations of point mutations. Recently, evidence that mutations originate in the field and now appear in clinical infections has been suggested. This situation is likely to increase in prevalence as triazole fungicide use continues to rise. Here, we review the progress made in understanding azole resistance found amongst clinically and agriculturally important fungal species focussing on resistance mechanisms associated with CYP51. Biochemical characterisation of wild-type and mutant CYP51 enzymes through ligand binding studies and azole IC50 determinations is an important tool for understanding azole susceptibility and can be used in conjunction with microbiological methods (MIC50 values), molecular biological studies (site-directed mutagenesis) and protein modelling studies to inform future antifungal development with increased specificity for the target enzyme over the host homologue. PMID:25320648

  15. Mechanisms of echinocandin antifungal drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections due to Candida and Aspergillus species cause extensive morbidity and mortality, especially among immunosuppressed patients, and antifungal therapy is critical to patient management. Yet only a few drug classes are available to treat invasive fungal diseases, and this problem is compounded by the emergence of antifungal resistance. Echinocandin drugs are the preferred choice to treat candidiasis. They are the first cell wall–active agents and target the fungal-specific enzyme glucan synthase, which catalyzes the biosynthesis of β-1,3-glucan, a key cell wall polymer. Therapeutic failures occur rarely among common Candida species, with the exception of Candida glabrata, which are frequently multidrug resistant. Echinocandin resistance in susceptible species is always acquired during therapy. The mechanism of resistance involves amino acid changes in hot-spot regions of Fks subunits of glucan synthase, which decrease the sensitivity of the enzyme to drug. Cellular stress response pathways lead to drug adaptation, which promote the formation of resistant fks strains. Clinical factors promoting echinocandin resistance include empiric therapy, prophylaxis, gastrointestinal reservoirs, and intra-abdominal infections. A better understanding of the echinocandin resistance mechanism, along with cellular and clinical factors promoting resistance, will promote more effective strategies to overcome and prevent echinocandin resistance. PMID:26190298

  16. Novel antifungal peptides from Ceylon spinach seeds.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Ng, T B

    2001-11-01

    Two novel antifungal peptides, designated alpha- and beta-basrubrins, respectively, were isolated from seeds of the Ceylon spinach Basella rubra. The purification procedure involved saline extraction, (NH(4))(2)SO(4) precipitation, ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose and FPLC-gel filtration on Superdex peptide column. alpha- and beta-basrubrins exhibited a molecular weight of 4.3 and 5 kDa, respectively. They inhibited translation in a rabbit reticulocyte system with an IC(50) value of 400 and 100 nM, respectively. alpha- and beta-basrubrin inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by (79.4 +/- 7.8)% and (54.6 +/- 3.6)%, respectively, at a concentration of 400 microM, and (10.56 +/- 0.92)% and (2.12 +/- 0.81)%, respectively, at a concentration of 40 microM. Both alpha- and beta-basrubrins exerted potent antifungal activity toward Botrytis cinerea, Mycosphaerella arachidicola, and Fusarium oxysporum. PMID:11688973

  17. Antifungal Th Immunity: Growing up in Family

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Monica; Renga, Giorgia; Puccetti, Matteo; Oikonomou, Vasileios; Palmieri, Melissa; Galosi, Claudia; Bartoli, Andrea; Romani, Luigina

    2014-01-01

    Fungal diseases represent an important paradigm in immunology since they can result from either the lack of recognition or over-activation of the inflammatory response. Current understanding of the pathophysiology underlying fungal infections and diseases highlights the multiple cell populations and cell-signaling pathways involved in these conditions. A systems biology approach that integrates investigations of immunity at the systems-level is required to generate novel insights into this complexity and to decipher the dynamics of the host–fungus interaction. It is becoming clear that a three-way interaction between the host, microbiota, and fungi dictates the types of host–fungus relationship. Tryptophan metabolism helps support this interaction, being exploited by the mammalian host and commensals to increase fitness in response to fungi via resistance and tolerance mechanisms of antifungal immunity. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that provide immune homeostasis with the fungal biota and its possible rupture in fungal infections and diseases will be discussed within the expanding role of antifungal Th cell responses. PMID:25360137

  18. [An update on antifungal susceptibility testing].

    PubMed

    Tapia P, Cecilia V

    2009-04-01

    Due to increasing of invasive fungal infections and emergeney of antifungal drugs resistant fungi, standardized methods of antifungal susceptibility testing (AST) have been developed. The Clinical Laboratory Standards Instutute (CLSI) and the European for Committee Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) have guidelines for susceptibility of yeasts by broth microdilution (M27-A2 and E. Dis. 7.1 documents, respectively). Both are equivalent, although they present methodological and interpretative breakpoints differences. In addition, the CLSI have the M38-A (for filamentous fungi) and M44-A (disk diffusion) documents, whereas EUCAST is developing a document for Aspergillus spp. Furthermore, commercial methods are available that display good correlation with the methods of reference such as E-test, Sensititre and Vitek2. The interpretation of the results must be careful because the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (CIM) is difficult for fungi, there are host factors involved and not always there is a correlation between MIC and clinical outcome. Due to these methods are laborious and require trained personnel, to ask for AST to a reference laboratory is recommendable. PMID:19621145

  19. Synergistic Antifungal Effect of Glabridin and Fluconazole

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Li, Li Ping; Zhang, Jun Dong; Li, Qun; Shen, Hui; Chen, Si Min; He, Li Juan; Yan, Lan; Xu, Guo Tong; An, Mao Mao; Jiang, Yuan Ying

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of invasive fungal infections is increasing in recent years. The present study mainly investigated glabridin (Gla) alone and especially in combination with fluconazole (FLC) against Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida species (Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis and Candida Glabratas) by different methods. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) indicated that Gla possessed a broad-spectrum antifungal activity at relatively high concentrations. After combining with FLC, Gla exerted a potent synergistic effect against drug-resistant C. albicans and C. tropicalis at lower concentrations when interpreted by fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI). Disk diffusion test and time-killing test confirming the synergistic fungicidal effect. Cell growth tests suggested that the synergistic effect of the two drugs depended more on the concentration of Gla. The cell envelop damage including a significant decrease of cell size and membrane permeability increasing were found after Gla treatment. Together, our results suggested that Gla possessed a synergistic effect with FLC and the cell envelope damage maybe contributed to the synergistic effect, which providing new information for developing novel antifungal agents. PMID:25058485

  20. Microbial Biotransformation to Obtain New Antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Bianchini, Luiz F.; Arruda, Maria F. C.; Vieira, Sergio R.; Campelo, Patrícia M. S.; Grégio, Ana M. T.; Rosa, Edvaldo A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Antifungal drugs belong to few chemical groups and such low diversity limits the therapeutic choices. The urgent need of innovative options has pushed researchers to search new bioactive molecules. Literature regarding the last 15 years reveals that different research groups have used different approaches to achieve such goal. However, the discovery of molecules with different mechanisms of action still demands considerable time and efforts. This review was conceived to present how Pharmaceutical Biotechnology might contribute to the discovery of molecules with antifungal properties by microbial biotransformation procedures. Authors present some aspects of (1) microbial biotransformation of herbal medicines and food; (2) possibility of major and minor molecular amendments in existing molecules by biocatalysis; (3) methodological improvements in processes involving whole cells and immobilized enzymes; (4) potential of endophytic fungi to produce antimicrobials by bioconversions; and (5) in silico research driving to the improvement of molecules. All these issues belong to a new conception of transformation procedures, so-called “green chemistry,” which aims the highest possible efficiency with reduced production of waste and the smallest environmental impact. PMID:26733974

  1. Potentiation of Azole Antifungals by 2-Adamantanamine

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lingmei; Lister, Ida; Keating, John; Nantel, Andre; Long, Lisa; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; North, Jeffrey; Lee, Richard E.; Coleman, Ken; Dahl, Thomas; Lewis, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Azoles are among the most successful classes of antifungals. They act by inhibiting α-14 lanosterol demethylase in the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) occurs in about 90% of HIV-infected individuals, and 4 to 5% are refractory to current therapies, including azoles, due to the formation of resistant biofilms produced in the course of OPC. We reasoned that compounds affecting a different target may potentiate azoles to produce increased killing and an antibiofilm therapeutic. 2-Adamantanamine (AC17) was identified in a screen for compounds potentiating the action of miconazole against biofilms of Candida albicans. AC17, a close structural analog to the antiviral amantadine, did not affect the viability of C. albicans but caused the normally fungistatic azoles to become fungicidal. Transcriptome analysis of cells treated with AC17 revealed that the ergosterol and filamentation pathways were affected. Indeed, cells exposed to AC17 had decreased ergosterol contents and were unable to invade agar. In vivo, the combination of AC17 and fluconazole produced a significant reduction in fungal tissue burden in a guinea pig model of cutaneous candidiasis, while each treatment alone did not have a significant effect. The combination of fluconazole and AC17 also showed improved efficacy (P value of 0.018) compared to fluconazole alone when fungal lesions were evaluated. AC17 is a promising lead in the search for more effective antifungal therapeutics. PMID:23689724

  2. Antifungal Quinoline Alkaloids from Waltheria indica.

    PubMed

    Cretton, Sylvian; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Azzollini, Antonio; Favre-Godal, Quentin; Marcourt, Laurence; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Voinesco, Francine; Michellod, Emilie; Sanglard, Dominique; Gindro, Katia; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Cuendet, Muriel; Christen, Philippe

    2016-02-26

    Chemical investigation of a dichloromethane extract of the aerial parts of Waltheria indica led to the isolation and characterization of five polyhydroxymethoxyflavonoids, namely, oxyanin A (1), vitexicarpin (3), chrysosplenol E (4), flindulatin (5), 5-hydroxy-3,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone (6), and six quinolone alkaloids, waltheriones M-Q (2, 7, 8, 10, 11) and 5(R)-vanessine (9). Among these, compounds 2, 7, 8, 10, and 11 have not yet been described in the literature. Their chemical structures were established by means of spectroscopic data interpretation including (1)H and (13)C, HSQC, HMBC, COSY, and NOESY NMR experiments and UV, IR, and HRESIMS. The absolute configurations of the compounds were established by ECD. The isolated constituents and 10 additional quinoline alkaloids previously isolated from the roots of the plant were evaluated for their in vitro antifungal activity against the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, and 10 compounds (7, 9, 11-16, 18, 21) showed growth inhibitory activity on both planktonic cells and biofilms (MIC ≤ 32 μg/mL). Their spectrum of activity against other pathogenic Candida species and their cytotoxicity against human HeLa cells were also determined. In addition, the cytological effect of the antifungal isolated compounds on the ultrastructure of C. albicans was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. PMID:26848627

  3. Antifungal drug resistance of oral fungi.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Masakazu; Firth, Norman A; Cannon, Richard D

    2010-02-01

    Fungi comprise a minor component of the oral microbiota but give rise to oral disease in a significant proportion of the population. The most common form of oral fungal disease is oral candidiasis, which has a number of presentations. The mainstay for the treatment of oral candidiasis is the use of polyenes, such as nystatin and amphotericin B, and azoles including miconazole, fluconazole, and itraconazole. Resistance of fungi to polyenes is rare, but some Candida species, such as Candida glabrata and C. krusei, are innately less susceptible to azoles, and C. albicans can acquire azole resistance. The main mechanism of high-level fungal azole resistance, measured in vitro, is energy-dependent drug efflux. Most fungi in the oral cavity, however, are present in multispecies biofilms that typically demonstrate an antifungal resistance phenotype. This resistance is the result of multiple factors including the expression of efflux pumps in the fungal cell membrane, biofilm matrix permeability, and a stress response in the fungal cell. Removal of dental biofilms, or treatments to prevent biofilm development in combination with antifungal drugs, may enable better treatment and prevention of oral fungal disease. PMID:20155503

  4. Microbial Biotransformation to Obtain New Antifungals.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, Luiz F; Arruda, Maria F C; Vieira, Sergio R; Campelo, Patrícia M S; Grégio, Ana M T; Rosa, Edvaldo A R

    2015-01-01

    Antifungal drugs belong to few chemical groups and such low diversity limits the therapeutic choices. The urgent need of innovative options has pushed researchers to search new bioactive molecules. Literature regarding the last 15 years reveals that different research groups have used different approaches to achieve such goal. However, the discovery of molecules with different mechanisms of action still demands considerable time and efforts. This review was conceived to present how Pharmaceutical Biotechnology might contribute to the discovery of molecules with antifungal properties by microbial biotransformation procedures. Authors present some aspects of (1) microbial biotransformation of herbal medicines and food; (2) possibility of major and minor molecular amendments in existing molecules by biocatalysis; (3) methodological improvements in processes involving whole cells and immobilized enzymes; (4) potential of endophytic fungi to produce antimicrobials by bioconversions; and (5) in silico research driving to the improvement of molecules. All these issues belong to a new conception of transformation procedures, so-called "green chemistry," which aims the highest possible efficiency with reduced production of waste and the smallest environmental impact. PMID:26733974

  5. Identification of antifungal compounds produced by Lactobacillus casei AST18.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjuan; Liu, Lu; Zhang, Shuwen; Cui, Wenming; Lv, Jiaping

    2012-08-01

    Lactobacillus casei AST18 was screened as an antifungal lactic acid bacteria which we have reported before. In this research, the antifungal properties of cell-free culture filtrate (CCF) from L. casei AST18 were detected, and the antifungal compounds of CCF were prepared by ultrafiltration, and semi-preparative HPLC, and then determined by GC-MS. CCF was sensitive to pH and heat treatment but it was not affected by the treatment of trypsin and pepsin. Through the treatment of ultrafiltration and semi-preparative HPLC there were two parts of CCF which showed antifungal activities: part 1 and part 4. Lactic acid was identified as the main antifungal compound in part 1. In part 4, three small molecular substances were detected with GC-MS. The three potential antifungal substances were cyclo-(Leu-Pro), 2,6-diphenyl-piperidine, and 5,10-diethoxy-2,3,7,8-tetrahydro-1H,6H-dipyrrolo[1,2-a;1',2'-d]pyrazine. The antifungal activity of L. casei AST18 was a synergistic effect of lactic acid and cyclopeptides. PMID:22580887

  6. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Antifungals in Children: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Autmizguine, Julie; Guptill, Jeffrey T.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Capparelli, Edmund V.

    2014-01-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) remains life-threatening in premature infants and immunocompromised children despite the recent development of new antifungal agents. Optimal dosing of antifungals is one of the few factors clinicians can control to improve outcomes of IFD. However, dosing in children cannot be extrapolated from adult data because IFD pathophysiology, immune response, and drug disposition differ from adults. We critically examined the literature on pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of antifungal agents and highlight recent developments in treating pediatric IFD. To match adult exposure in pediatric patients, dosing adjustment is necessary for almost all antifungals. In young infants, the maturation of renal and metabolic functions occurs rapidly and can significantly influence drug exposure. Fluconazole clearance doubles from birth to 28 days of life and, beyond the neonatal period, agents like fluconazole, voriconazole, and micafungin require higher dosing than in adults due to faster clearance in children. As a result, dosing recommendations are specific to bracketed ranges of age. Pharmacodynamics principles of antifungals mostly rely on in vitro and in vivo models but very few pharmacodynamics studies specifically address IFD in children. Exposure-response relationship may differ in younger children compared with adults, especially in infants with invasive candidiasis who are at higher risk of disseminated disease and meningoencephalitis, and by extension severe neurodevelopmental impairment. Micafungin is the only antifungal agent for which a specific target of exposure was proposed based on a neonatal hematogenous Candida meningoencephalitis animal model. In this review, we found that pediatric data on drug disposition of newer triazoles and echinocandins are lacking, dosing of older antifungals such as fluconazole and amphotericin B products still need optimization in young infants, and that target PK/PD indices need to be

  7. Novel drug delivery strategies for improving econazole antifungal action.

    PubMed

    Firooz, Alireza; Nafisi, Shohreh; Maibach, Howard I

    2015-11-10

    Econazole is a commonly used azole antifungal in clinical treatment of superficial fungal infections. It is generally used as conventional cream and gel preparations under the brand names of Spectazole (United States), Ecostatin (Canada), Pevaryl (Western Europe). Treatment efficiency of antifungal drugs depends on their penetration through target layers of skin at effective concentrations. Econazole's poor water solubility limits its bioavailability and antifungal effects. Therefore, formulation strategies have been examined for delivering econazole through targeted skin sites. The present overview focuses on novel nano-based formulation approaches used to improve econazole penetration through skin for treatment of superficial fungal infections. PMID:26383840

  8. Antifungal Treatment in Stem Cell Transplantation Centers in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Akan, Hamdi; Atilla, Erden

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of various guidelines, the approach to antifungal treatment in stem cell transplantation centers differs according to country or even between centers. This led to the development of another survey that aims to understand the antifungal treatment policies of Turkish stem cell transplantation centers. Although there has been an increasing trend towards the use of diagnostic-based treatments in Turkey in the last few years, empirical treatment is still the main approach. The practices of the stem cell transplantation centers reflect the general trends and controversies in this area, while there is a considerable use of antifungal combination therapy. PMID:25913124

  9. Functionalised isocoumarins as antifungal compounds: Synthesis and biological studies.

    PubMed

    Simic, Milena; Paunovic, Nikola; Boric, Ivan; Randjelovic, Jelena; Vojnovic, Sandra; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Pekmezovic, Marina; Savic, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel 3-substituted isocoumarins was prepared via Pd-catalysed coupling processes and screened in vitro for antifungal activity against Candida species. The study revealed antifungal potential of isocoumarins possessing the azole substituents, which, in some cases, showed biological properties equal to those of clinically used voriconazole. Selected compounds were also screened against voriconazole resistant Candida krusei 6258 and a clinical isolate Candida parapsilosis CA-27. Although the activity against these targets needs to be improved further, the results emphasise additional potential of this new class of antifungal compounds. PMID:26586600

  10. Neutral red assay in minimum fungicidal concentrations of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, T; Naka, W; Tajima, S; Nishikawa, T

    1996-01-01

    We assayed the fungicidal effects of antifungal agents using neutral red staining. Fungal elements of Trichophyton mentagrophytes and T. rubrum were treated with various concentrations of antifungal agents in 96-well filtration plates and then stained with neutral red. The amount of neutral red incorporated by the surviving viable cells was determined from the automated spectrophotometric readings at 550 nm. The minimum fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) of antifungal agents determined by this assay correlated well with those determined by conventional assay. This newly developed procedure should provide a rapid, reproducible, quantitative, qualitative and semi-automated susceptibility test for determination of the MFCs of the fungicidal agents. PMID:8912170

  11. Antifungal activity of Brevibacillus laterosporus JX-5 and characterization of its antifungal components.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongxia; Wang, Xiaohui; Xiao, Chengze; Wang, Weiyan; Zhao, Xu; Sui, Junkang; Sa, Rongbo; Guo, Tai L; Liu, Xunli

    2015-10-01

    The establishment of safe and effective methods for controlling fungal disease is an urgent issue in agriculture and forestry. Microbiological control of plant disease is expected to achieve better results than use of chemically derived fungicides. This study aimed to establish Brevibacillus laterosporus JX-5 as a potential microbiological control agent of poplar canker. The bacterium was isolated from the poplar rhizosphere and demonstrated significant growth inhibition of several pathogenic fungi in vitro. The antifungal components of Br. laterosporus JX-5 were isolated and identified. The fermentation broth of Br. laterosporus JX-5 and its main antifungal component, designated as component B, reduced Botryosphaeria dothidea associated canker of the excised poplar branch by 70 and 90%, respectively. Component B is considerably heat-stable, adaptable to a broad pH range, and UV-resistant. It could inhibit Bo. dothidea by permeating the fungal membrane, fracturing the nuclei, damaging the cell wall, and eventually killing the pathogenic fungus. The antifungal activity exhibited by Br. laterosporus JX-5 and its bioactive metabolic products indicate its feasibility as a potential biocontrol agent for plant diseases. PMID:26265360

  12. Antifungal Susceptibilities of Bloodstream Isolates of Candida Species from Nine Hospitals in Korea: Application of New Antifungal Breakpoints and Relationship to Antifungal Usage

    PubMed Central

    Won, Eun Jeong; Shin, Jong Hee; Choi, Min Ji; Lee, Wee Gyo; Park, Yeon-Joon; Uh, Young; Kim, Shine-Young; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Soo Hyun; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    We applied the new clinical breakpoints (CBPs) of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) to a multicenter study to determine the antifungal susceptibility of bloodstream infection (BSI) isolates of Candida species in Korea, and determined the relationship between the frequency of antifungal-resistant Candida BSI isolates and antifungal use at hospitals. Four hundred and fifty BSI isolates of Candida species were collected over a 1-year period in 2011 from nine hospitals. The susceptibilities of the isolates to four antifungal agents were determined using the CLSI M27 broth microdilution method. By applying the species-specific CBPs, non-susceptibility to fluconazole was found in 16.4% (70/428) of isolates, comprising 2.6% resistant and 13.8% susceptible-dose dependent isolates. However, non-susceptibility to voriconazole, caspofungin, or micafungin was found in 0% (0/370), 0% (0/437), or 0.5% (2/437) of the Candida BSI isolates, respectively. Of the 450 isolates, 72 (16.0%) showed decreased susceptibility to fluconazole [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥4 μg/ml]. The total usage of systemic antifungals varied considerably among the hospitals, ranging from 190.0 to 7.7 defined daily dose per 1,000 patient days, and fluconazole was the most commonly prescribed agent (46.3%). By Spearman’s correlation analysis, fluconazole usage did not show a significant correlation with the percentage of fluconazole resistant isolates at hospitals. However, fluconazole usage was significantly correlated with the percentage of fluconazole non-susceptible isolates (r = 0.733; P = 0.025) or the percentage of isolates with decreased susceptibility to fluconazole (MIC ≥4 μg/ml) (r = 0.700; P = 0.036) at hospitals. Our work represents the first South Korean multicenter study demonstrating an association between antifungal use and antifungal resistance among BSI isolates of Candida at hospitals using the new CBPs of the CLSI. PMID:25706866

  13. Antifungal steroid saponins from Dioscorea cayenensis.

    PubMed

    Sautour, M; Mitaine-Offer, A-C; Miyamoto, T; Dongmo, A; Lacaille-Dubois, M-A

    2004-01-01

    From the rhizomes of Dioscorea cayenensis Lam.-Holl (Dioscoreaceae), the new 26- O- beta- D-glucopyranosyl-22-methoxy-3 beta,26-dihydroxy-25( R)-furost-5-en-3- O- alpha- L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)- alpha- L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)-[ alpha- L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)]- beta- D-glucopyranoside ( 1) was isolated together with the known dioscin ( 2) and diosgenin 3- O- alpha- L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)- alpha- L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->4)-[ alpha- L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)]- beta- D-glucopyranoside ( 3). Their structures were established on the basis of spectral data. Compound 2 exhibited antifungal activity against the human pathogenic yeasts Candida albicans, C. glabrata and C. tropicalis (MICs of 12.5, 12.5 and 25 micro g/mL, respectively) whereas 3 showed weak activity and 1 was inactive. PMID:14765305

  14. Voriconazole: a new triazole antifungal agent.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Leonard B; Kauffman, Carol A

    2003-03-01

    Voriconazole is a second-generation azole antifungal agent that shows excellent in vitro activity against a wide variety of yeasts and molds. It can be given by either the intravenous or the oral route; the oral formulation has excellent bioavailability. The side effect profile of voriconazole is unique in that non-sight-threatening, transient visual disturbances occur in approximately 30% of patients given the drug. Rash (which can manifest as photosensitivity) and hepatitis also occur. The potential for drug-drug interactions is high and requires that careful attention be given to dosage regimens and monitoring of serum levels and effects of interacting drugs. Voriconazole has been approved for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and refractory infections with Pseudallescheria/Scedosporium and Fusarium species, and it will likely become the drug of choice for treatment of serious infections with those filamentous fungi. PMID:12594645

  15. Overview of medically important antifungal azole derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Fromtling, R A

    1988-01-01

    Fungal infections are a major burden to the health and welfare of modern humans. They range from simply cosmetic, non-life-threatening skin infections to severe, systemic infections that may lead to significant debilitation or death. The selection of chemotherapeutic agents useful for the treatment of fungal infections is small. In this overview, a major chemical group with antifungal activity, the azole derivatives, is examined. Included are historical and state of the art information on the in vitro activity, experimental in vivo activity, mode of action, pharmacokinetics, clinical studies, and uses and adverse reactions of imidazoles currently marketed (clotrimazole, miconazole, econazole, ketoconazole, bifonazole, butoconazole, croconazole, fenticonazole, isoconazole, oxiconazole, sulconazole, and tioconazole) and under development (aliconazole and omoconazole), as well as triazoles currently marketed (terconazole) and under development (fluconazole, itraconazole, vibunazole, alteconazole, and ICI 195,739). PMID:3069196

  16. Probiotics as Antifungals in Mucosal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Victor H; Bandara, H M H N; Mayer, Marcia P A; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Candidais an opportunistic pathogen that causes mucosal and deep systemic candidiasis. The emergence of drug resistance and the side effects of currently available antifungals have restricted their use as long-term prophylactic agents for candidal infections. Given this scenario, probiotics have been suggested as a useful alternative for the management of candidiasis. We analyzed the available data on the efficacy of probiotics in candidal colonization of host surfaces. A number of well-controlled studies indicate that probiotics, particularly lactobacilli, suppressCandidagrowth and biofilm development in vitro.A few clinical trials have also shown the beneficial effects of probiotics in reducing oral, vaginal, and enteric colonization byCandida; alleviation of clinical signs and symptoms; and, in some cases, reducing the incidence of invasive fungal infection in critically ill patients. Probiotics may serve in the future as a worthy ally in the battle against chronic mucosal candidal infections. PMID:26826375

  17. Antifungal activity of fruit pulp extract from Bromelia pinguin.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Hernández, I L; Chávez-Velázquez, J A; Uribe-Beltrán, M J; Ríos-Morgan, A; Delgado-Vargas, F

    2002-08-01

    The methanol extract of the fruit pulp of Bromelia pinguin was evaluated for its antifungal activity. The extract showed a significant activity against some Trichophyton strains, although Candida strains were generally insensitive. PMID:12165338

  18. Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents, 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl

    1991-09-01

    This study is a continuation of ``Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents'' sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (Schreck et al. 1990). The objectives of the present study was to evaluate up to 10 candidate fungicides.

  19. Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents, 1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl

    1993-10-01

    This study is a continuation of ``Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents'' sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (Schreck et al. 1990, 1991, and 1992). The objectives of the present study were to select and evaluate candidate fungicides.

  20. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of Indonesian ethnomedical plants.

    PubMed

    Goun, E; Cunningham, G; Chu, D; Nguyen, C; Miles, D

    2003-09-01

    Methylene chloride and methanol extracts of 20 Indonesian plants with ethnomedical uses have been assessed for in vitro antibacterial and antifungal properties by disk diffusion method. Extracts of the six plants: Terminalia catappa, Swietenia mahagoni Jacq., Phyllanthus acuminatus, Ipomoea spp., Tylophora asthmatica and Hyptis brevipes demonstrated high activity in this bioassay system. These findings should stimulate the search for novel, natural product such as new antibacterial and antifungal agents. PMID:12946723

  1. Chemosensitization as a Means to Augment Commercial Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Bruce C.; Chan, Kathleen L.; Kim, Jong H.

    2012-01-01

    Antimycotic chemosensitization and its mode of action are of growing interest. Currently, use of antifungal agents in agriculture and medicine has a number of obstacles. Foremost of these is development of resistance or cross-resistance to one or more antifungal agents. The generally high expense and negative impact, or side effects, associated with antifungal agents are two further issues of concern. Collectively, these problems are exacerbated by efforts to control resistant strains, which can evolve into a treadmill of higher dosages for longer periods. This cycle in turn, inflates cost of treatment, dramatically. A further problem is stagnation in development of new and effective antifungal agents, especially for treatment of human mycoses. Efforts to overcome some of these issues have involved using combinations of available antimycotics (e.g., combination therapy for invasive mycoses). However, this approach has had inconsistent success and is often associated with a marked increase in negative side effects. Chemosensitization by natural compounds to increase effectiveness of commercial antimycotics is a somewhat new approach to dealing with the aforementioned problems. The potential for safe natural products to improve antifungal activity has been observed for over three decades. Chemosensitizing agents possess antifungal activity, but at insufficient levels to serve as antimycotics, alone. Their main function is to disrupt fungal stress response, destabilize the structural integrity of cellular and vacuolar membranes or stimulate production of reactive oxygen species, augmenting oxidative stress and apoptosis. Use of safe chemosensitizing agents has potential benefit to both agriculture and medicine. When co-applied with a commercial antifungal agent, an additive or synergistic interaction may occur, augmenting antifungal efficacy. This augmentation, in turn, lowers effective dosages, costs, negative side effects and, in some cases, countermands resistance

  2. Antioxidant and antifungal activity of Verbena officinalis L. leaves.

    PubMed

    Casanova, E; García-Mina, J M; Calvo, M I

    2008-09-01

    The scavenging activity against DPPH (1,1-diphenil-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical and the antifungal effect against chloroform, ethyl acetate and 50% methanolic extracts of Verbena officinalis leaves were investigated. The activity of different fractions of 50% methanolic extract and some isolated compounds were also investigated. The results suggest that 50% methanolic extract and caffeoyl derivatives could potentially be considered as excellent and readily available sources of natural antifungal and antioxidant compounds. PMID:18498054

  3. Antifungal activity of polymer-based copper nanocomposite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioffi, Nicola; Torsi, Luisa; Ditaranto, Nicoletta; Sabbatini, Luigia; Zambonin, Pier Giorgio; Tantillo, Giuseppina; Ghibelli, Lina; D'Alessio, Maria; Bleve-Zacheo, Teresa; Traversa, Enrico

    2004-09-01

    Eukaryotes, such as fungi, can be harmful pathogen agents, and the control of their bioactivity is critical as humans are eukaryote organisms, too. Here, copper/polymer nanocomposites are proposed as antifungal spinnable coatings with controlled copper-releasing properties. The tests of the bioactivity show that fungal growth is inhibited on the nanocomposite-coated plates, and the antifungal activity can be modulated by controlling the Cu nanoparticle loading.

  4. Amphiphilic Tobramycin Analogues as Antibacterial and Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sanjib K.; Fosso, Marina Y.; Green, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the in vitro antifungal activities, cytotoxicities, and membrane-disruptive actions of amphiphilic tobramycin (TOB) analogues. The antifungal activities were established by determination of MIC values and in time-kill studies. Cytotoxicity was evaluated in mammalian cell lines. The fungal membrane-disruptive action of these analogues was studied by using the membrane-impermeable dye propidium iodide. TOB analogues bearing a linear alkyl chain at their 6″-position in a thioether linkage exhibited chain length-dependent antifungal activities. Analogues with C12 and C14 chains showed promising antifungal activities against tested fungal strains, with MIC values ranging from 1.95 to 62.5 mg/liter and 1.95 to 7.8 mg/liter, respectively. However, C4, C6, and C8 TOB analogues and TOB itself exhibited little to no antifungal activity. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for the most potent TOB analogues (C12 and C14) against A549 and Beas 2B cells were 4- to 64-fold and 32- to 64-fold higher, respectively, than their antifungal MIC values against various fungi. Unlike conventional aminoglycoside antibiotics, TOB analogues with alkyl chain lengths of C12 and C14 appear to inhibit fungi by inducing apoptosis and disrupting the fungal membrane as a novel mechanism of action. Amphiphilic TOB analogues showed broad-spectrum antifungal activities with minimal mammalian cell cytotoxicity. This study provides novel lead compounds for the development of antifungal drugs. PMID:26033722

  5. Oral fungi in HIV: challenges in antifungal therapies.

    PubMed

    Nittayananta, W

    2016-04-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) caused by Candida species is a common fungal infection among HIV-infected individuals. Despite the wide use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) resulting in a declined prevalence, OC remains the most common oral lesions seen in those living with HIV/AIDS. Various topical and systemic antifungal drugs are available to treat OC. However, due to the patients' immunodeficiency and the nature of OC as biofilm-associated infection, relapse is frequently observed after cessation of antifungal therapy. In addition, long-term antifungal therapy may lead to drug resistance. This review article addressed three major challenges in the treatment of OC in HIV infection including antifungal drug resistance, biofilm-associated infection of OC, and the host underlying immunodeficiency. To reduce the risks of antifungal drug resistance, the author recommends that future studies should focus on herbal plant-derived compounds with antifungal activity that may be used in combination with the drugs. Also, it is recommended that more research should be carried out to explore how to enhance the host innate immunity against oral Candida. PMID:27109279

  6. Update on antifungal drug resistance mechanisms of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Chamilos, G; Kontoyiannis, D P

    2005-12-01

    Although the arsenal of agents with anti-Aspergillus activity has expanded over the last decade, mortality due to invasive aspergillosis (IA) remains unacceptably high. Aspergillus fumigatus still accounts for the majority of cases of IA; however less susceptible to antifungals non-fumigatus aspergilli began to emerge. Antifungal drug resistance of Aspergillus might partially account for treatment failures. Recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms of antifungal drug action in Aspergillus, along with the standardization of in vitro susceptibility testing methods, has brought resistance testing to the forefront of clinical mycology. In addition, molecular biology has started to shed light on the mechanisms of resistance of A. fumigatus to azoles and the echinocandins, while genome-based assays show promise for high-throughput screening for genotypic antifungal resistance. Several problems remain, however, in the study of this complex area. Large multicenter clinical studies--point prevalence or longitudinal--to capture the incidence and prevalence of antifungal resistance in A. fumigatus isolates are lacking. Correlation of in vitro susceptibility with clinical outcome and susceptibility breakpoints has not been established. In addition, the issue of cross-resistance between the newer triazoles is of concern. Furthermore, in vitro resistance testing for polyenes and echinocandins is difficult, and their mechanisms of resistance are largely unknown. This review examines challenges in the diagnosis, epidemiology, and mechanisms of antifungal drug resistance in A. fumigatus. PMID:16488654

  7. Synthesis and antifungal activity of benzimidazole, benzotriazole and aminothiazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Khabnadideh, S; Rezaei, Z; Pakshir, K; Zomorodian, K; Ghafari, N

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, the use of antifungal drugs in human medicine has increased, especially with the advent of AIDS epidemic. Efforts have focused on the development of new, less toxic and more efficacious antifungal drugs with novel mechanism of action. The purpose of this study was to synthesize of some new benzimidazole, benzotriazole and aminothiazole derivatives and to evaluate their activity against some species of Candida, Aspergillus and dermatophytes. The desired compounds were synthesized by the reaction of benzimidazole and benzotriazole with bromoalkanes and also by the reaction of an amide derivative of aminothiazole with 2-piperazino-1-ethanol in an efficient solvent in the presence of tetraethyl ammounim bromide or triethylamine) as catalyst. Chemical structures of all the new compounds were confirmed by spectrophotometric methods. Antifungal activities of the new compounds were evaluated by broth micro dilution method as recommended by CLSI. Among the tested compounds, 1-nonyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazole and 1-decyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazole exhibited the best antifungal activities. Of the examined synthetic compounds in different categories, benzimidazole derivatives established better antifungal activities than benzotriazole derivatives, and the piperazine analogue had no significant antifungal effect. PMID:23181082

  8. Role of antifungal agents in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Nicol, Karyn; Batra, Roma

    2004-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a superficial fungal disease of the skin, occurring in areas rich in sebaceous glands. It is thought that an association exists between Malassezia yeasts and seborrheic dermatitis. This may, in part, be due to an abnormal or inflammatory immune response to these yeasts. The azoles represent the largest class of antifungals used in the treatment of this disease to date. In addition to their antifungal properties, some azoles, including bifonazole, itraconazole, and ketoconazole, have demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity, which may be beneficial in alleviating symptoms. Other topical antifungal agents, such as the allylamines (terbinafine), benzylamines (butenafine), hydroxypyridones (ciclopirox), and immunomodulators (pimecrolimus and tacrolimus), have also been effective. In addition, recent studies have revealed that tea tree oil (Melaleuca oil), honey, and cinnamic acid have antifungal activity against Malassezia species, which may be of benefit in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. In cases where seborrheic dermatitis is widespread, the use of an oral therapy, such as ketoconazole, itraconazole, and terbinafine, may be preferred. Essentially, antifungal therapy reduces the number of yeasts on the skin, leading to an improvement in seborrheic dermatitis. With a wide availability of preparations, including creams, shampoos, and oral formulations, antifungal agents are safe and effective in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. PMID:15663338

  9. Pharmacokinetics of antifungal agents in onychomycoses.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, D; Coquerel, A

    2001-01-01

    Onychomycosis is caused by infection by fungi, mainly dermatophytes and nondermatophyte yeasts or moulds; it affects the fingernails and, more frequently, the toenails. Dermatophytes are responsible for about 90 to 95% of fungal infections. Trichophyton rubrum is the most common dermatophyte; Candida albicans is the major nondermatophyte yeast. Although topical therapy of onchomycosis does not lead to systemic adverse effects or interactions with concomitantly taken drugs, it does not provide high cure rates and requires complete compliance from the patient. At present there are 3 oral antifungal medications that are generally used for the short term treatment of onychomycosis: itraconazole, terbinafine and fluconazole. The persistence of these active drugs in nails allows weekly administration, reduced treatment or a pulse regimen. Good clinical and mycological efficacies are obtained with itraconazole 100 to 200 mg daily, terbinafine 250mg daily for 3 months, or fluconazole 150 mg weekly for at least 6 months. Itraconazole is a synthetic triazole with a broad spectrum of action. It is well absorbed when administered orally and can be detected in nails 1 to 2 weeks after the start of therapy. The nail : plasma ratio stabilises at around 1 by week 18 of treatment. Itraconazole is still detectable in nails 27 weeks after stopping administration. Nail concentrations are higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for most dermatophytes and Candida species from the first month of treatment. The elimination half-life of itraconazole from nails is long, ranging from 32 to 147 days. Terbinafine is a synthetic allylamine that is effective against dermatophytes. Terbinafine is well absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, and the time to reach effective concentrations in nail is 1 to 2 weeks. The half-life is from 24 to 156 days, explaining the observed persistence of terbinafine in nails for longer than 252 days. Fluconazole is a bis-triazole broad spectrum

  10. Interaction of Common Azole Antifungals with P Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Er-jia; Lew, Karen; Casciano, Christopher N.; Clement, Robert P.; Johnson, William W.

    2002-01-01

    Both eucaryotic and procaryotic cells are resistant to a large number of antibiotics because of the activities of export transporters. The most studied transporter in the mammalian ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily, P glycoprotein (P-gp), ejects many structurally unrelated amphiphilic and lipophilic xenobiotics. Observed clinical interactions and some in vitro studies suggest that azole antifungals may interact with P-gp. Such an interaction could both affect the disposition and exposure to azole antifungal therapeutics and partially explain the clinical drug interactions observed with some antifungals. Using a whole-cell assay in which the retention of a marker substrate is evaluated and quantified, we studied the abilities of the most widely prescribed orally administered azole antifungals to inhibit the function of this transporter. In a cell line presenting an overexpressed amount of the human P-gp transporter, itraconazole and ketoconazole inhibited P-gp function with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of ∼2 and ∼6 μM, respectively. Cyclosporin A was inhibitory with an IC50 of 1.4 μM in this system. Uniquely, fluconazole had no effect in this assay, a result consistent with known clinical interactions. The effects of these azole antifungals on ATP consumption by P-gp (representing transport activity) were also assessed, and the Km values were congruent with the IC50s. Therefore, exposure of tissue to the azole antifungals may be modulated by human P-gp, and the clinical interactions of azole antifungals with other drugs may be due, in part, to inhibition of P-gp transport. PMID:11751127

  11. New generation azole antifungals in clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Girmenia, Corrado

    2009-09-01

    Considerable progress in treating systemic mycoses has been achieved in the past years through development of new drugs in association with more advanced diagnostic procedures. Here, we review the pharmacological, microbiological and clinical development progress with the so-called 'second generation' triazoles: voriconazole, posaconazole, ravuconazole, isavuconazole and albaconazole. All these drugs exhibit a favourable pharmacokinetic and toxicity profile and possess high activity against resistant and emerging pathogens. However, only voriconazole and posaconazole have been adequately investigated in Phase III studies and have been approved by the regulatory agencies in the treatment and prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections, respectively. On the contrary, ravuconazole, isavuconazole and albaconazole have not been investigated in adequate clinical trials and, in the absence of proper data, the real possibilities of these agents as competitors for the treatment and prevention of invasive mycoses in the clinical setting are still unknown. The drug interactions and the variability in the absorption and/or metabolism of the triazoles, in particular voriconazole and posaconazole, may determine an unpredictable exposure of the pathogens to the antifungal treatments. Literature evidences strongly support the use of therapeutic drug monitoring for these triazoles which may be crucial for the proper management of severe invasive fungal infections. PMID:19678798

  12. Antifungal Hydrolases in Pea Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Mauch, Felix; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte; Boller, Thomas

    1988-01-01

    Chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase purified from pea pods acted synergistically in the degradation of fungal cell walls. The antifungal potential of the two enzymes was studied directly by adding protein preparations to paper discs placed on agar plates containing germinated fungal spores. Protein extracts from pea pods infected with Fusarium solani f.sp. phaseoli, which contained high activities of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase, inhibited growth of 15 out of 18 fungi tested. Protein extracts from uninfected pea pods, which contained low activities of chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase, did not inhibit fungal growth. Purified chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase, tested individually, did not inhibit growth of most of the test fungi. Only Trichoderma viride was inhibited by chitinase alone, and only Fusarium solani f.sp. pisi was inhibited by β-1,3-glucanase alone. However, combinations of purified chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase inhibited all fungi tested as effectively as crude protein extracts containing the same enzyme activities. The pea pathogen, Fusarium solani f.sp. pisi, and the nonpathogen of peas, Fusarium solani f.sp. phaseoli, were similarly strongly inhibited by chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase, indicating that the differential pathogenicity of the two fungi is not due to differential sensitivity to the pea enzymes. Inhibition of fungal growth was caused by the lysis of the hyphal tips. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16666407

  13. Antifungal activity of plant and bacterial ureases.

    PubMed

    Becker-Ritt, A B; Martinelli, A H S; Mitidieri, S; Feder, V; Wassermann, G E; Santi, L; Vainstein, M H; Oliveira, J T A; Fiuza, L M; Pasquali, G; Carlini, C R

    2007-12-01

    Ureases (EC 3.5.1.5) are nickel-dependent metalloenzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of urea to ammonia and carbon dioxide. Produced by plants, fungi and bacteria, but not by animals, ureases share significant homology and similar mechanisms of catalysis, although differing in quaternary structures. While fungal and plant ureases are homo-oligomeric proteins of 90 kDa subunits, bacterial ureases are multimers of two (e.g. Helicobacter pylori) or three subunit complexes. It has been proposed that in plants these enzymes are involved in nitrogen bioavailability and in protection against pathogens. Previous studies by our group have shown that plant ureases, but not a bacterial (Bacillus pasteurii) urease, display insecticidal activity. Herein we demonstrate that (Glycine max) embryo-specific soybean urease, jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis) major urease and a recombinant H. pylori urease impair growth of selected phytopathogenic fungi at sub-micromolar concentrations. This antifungal property of ureases is not affected by treatment of the proteins with an irreversible inhibitor of the ureolytic activity. Scanning electron microscopy of urease-treated fungi suggests plasmolysis and cell wall injuries. Altogether, our data indicate that ureases probably contribute to the plant arsenal of defense compounds against predators and phytopathogens and that the urease defense mechanism is independent of ammonia release from urea. PMID:17825863

  14. Antifungal Indole Alkaloids from Winchia calophylla.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei-Li; Chen, Jia; Sun, Meng; Zhang, Dong-Bo; Gao, Kun

    2016-05-01

    Ten indole alkaloids (1-10) were obtained from an antifungal extract of Winchia calophylla, of which two (2 and 4) were new. N(4)-Methyl-10-hydroxyl-desacetylakuammilin (2) was an akuammiline-type indole alkaloid. N(1)-Methyl-echitaminic acid (4) was an unusual zwitterion with a basic vincorine-type skeleton. This is the first report of 10 in W. calophylla. The structures of all of the compounds were determined based on spectroscopic data, and their bioactivities were assessed. Compound 1 showed potent activity against the plant pathogenic fungi of Penicillium italicum and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp cubens with IC50 s of 10.4 and 11.5 µM, respectively, and 3 inhibited Rhizoctonia solani with an IC50 of 11.7 µM. Compounds 2 and 4 showed weak cytotoxicity against the human leukemic cell line HL-60 in vitro with IC50 s of 51.4 and 75.3 µM, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 displayed weak activity against acetylcholinesterase with IC50 s around 61.3 and 52.6 µM, respectively. PMID:27002397

  15. Characterization of Antifungal Activity and Nail Penetration of ME1111, a New Antifungal Agent for Topical Treatment of Onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Yuji; Takei-Masuda, Naomi; Kubota, Natsuki; Takahata, Sho; Ohyama, Makoto; Kaneda, Kaori; Iida, Maiko; Maebashi, Kazunori

    2016-02-01

    Fungal nail infection (onychomycosis) is a prevalent disease in many areas of the world, with a high incidence approaching 23%. Available antifungals to treat the disease suffer from a number of disadvantages, necessitating the discovery of new efficacious and safe antifungals. Here, we evaluate the in vitro antifungal activity and nail penetration ability of ME1111, a novel antifungal agent, along with comparator drugs, including ciclopirox, amorolfine, terbinafine, and itraconazole. ME1111 showed potent antifungal activity against Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes (the major etiologic agents of onychomycosis) strains isolated in Japan and reference fungal strains with an MIC range of 0.12 to 0.5 mg/liter and an MIC50 and MIC90 of 0.5 mg/liter for both. Importantly, none of the tested isolates showed an elevated ME1111 MIC. Moreover, the antifungal activity of ME1111 was minimally affected by 5% wool keratin powder in comparison to the other antifungals tested. The ME1111 solution was able to penetrate human nails and inhibit fungal growth in a dose-dependent manner according to the TurChub assay. In contrast, 8% ciclopirox and 5% amorolfine nail lacquers showed no activity under the same conditions. ME1111 demonstrated approximately 60-fold-greater selectivity in inhibition of Trichophyton spp. than of human cell lines. Our findings demonstrate that ME1111 possesses potent antidermatophyte activity, maintains this activity in the presence of keratin, and possesses excellent human nail permeability. These results suggest that ME1111 is a promising topical medication for the treatment of onychomycosis and therefore warrants further clinical evaluation. PMID:26643333

  16. In Search of the Holy Grail of Antifungal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Stanley W.; Sullivan, Donna C.; Cleary, John D.

    2008-01-01

    The ideal antifungal agent remains an elusive goal for treatment of life-threatening systemic fungal infections. Such an agent would have broad antifungal activity, low rates of resistance, flexible routes of administration, few associated adverse events, and limited drug-drug interactions. Only three of the seven classes of antifungal agents currently available are suitable for treatment of systemic infection: the polyenes, the azoles, and the echinocandins. None match all the characteristics of an ideal agent, the Holy Grail of antifungal therapy. Academia and industry need to collaborate in the search for new lead antifungal compounds using traditional screening methods as well as the new pharmacogenomics methods. Enhancing efficacy and reducing toxicity of the currently available therapeutic agents is also another important avenue of study. As an example, the Mycosis Research Center at the University of Mississippi Medical Center has identified pyogenic polyenes in commercial preparations of amphotericin B deoxycholate which correlate with infusion related toxicities. A highly purified formulation of amphotericin B appears promising, with a better therapeutic index compared to its parent compound as evidenced by results of in vitro and in vivo studies reviewed in this presentation. PMID:18596853

  17. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species isolated from urine culture.

    PubMed

    Toka Özer, Türkan; Durmaz, Süleyman; Yula, Erkan

    2016-09-01

    Candida spp. are the most common opportunistic mycosis worldwide. Although Candida albicans is the most common cause of urinary tract infections, the frequency of non-albicans Candida species is increasing with common use of antifungal in the prophylaxis and treatment. This may lead to difficulties in treatment. Antifungal tests should be applied with identification of species for effective treatment. In this study, identification of Candida species isolated from urine culture and investigation of susceptibility of these strains to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole was aimed. In this study, 58 Candida strains isolated from urine cultures at Osmaniye State Hospital between January 2012 and April 2013 were included. Urine culture and antifungal susceptibility tests were applied. Incidence rate of Candida spp. was determined as C. albicans (56.9%), Candida glabrata (20.6%), Candida tropicalis (10.3%), Candida parapsilosis (7%), Candida krusei (3.4%), Candida kefyr (1.8%). Most of the isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole. Twenty three (39.7%) Candida strains were isolated from internal medical branches and Intensive Care Unit and 12 (20.6%) from the Surgical Medical Branches. C. albicans and C. glabrata species were isolated most frequently as a candiduria factor in this hospital between January 2012 and April 2013. The analysis of antifungal susceptibility profile shows no significant resistance to antifungals. PMID:27452427

  18. Chloroquine sensitizes biofilms of Candida albicans to antifungal azoles.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Ravikumar Bapurao; Raut, Jayant Shankar; Chauhan, Nitin Mahendra; Karuppayil, Sankunny Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms formed by Candida albicans, a human pathogen, are known to be resistant to different antifungal agents. Novel strategies to combat the biofilm associated Candida infections like multiple drug therapy are being explored. In this study, potential of chloroquine to be a partner drug in combination with four antifungal agents, namely fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B, and caspofungin, was explored against biofilms of C. albicans. Activity of various concentrations of chloroquine in combination with a particular antifungal drug was analyzed in a checkerboard format. Growth of biofilm in presence of drugs was analyzed by XTT-assay, in terms of relative metabolic activity compared to that of drug free control. Results obtained by XTT-metabolic assay were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The interactions between chloroquine and four antifungal drugs were determined by calculating fractional inhibitory concentration indices. Azole resistance in biofilms was reverted significantly (p<0.05) in presence of 250μg/mL of chloroquine, which resulted in inhibition of biofilms at very low concentrations of antifungal drugs. No significant alteration in the sensitivity of biofilms to caspofungin and amphotericin B was evident in combination with chloroquine. This study for the first time indicates that chloroquine potentiates anti-biofilm activity of fluconazole and voriconazole. PMID:23602464

  19. Antifungal activity of essential oils against selected terverticillate penicillia.

    PubMed

    Felšöciová, Soňa; Kačániová, Miroslava; Horská, Elena; Vukovič, Nenad; Hleba, Lukáš; Petrová, Jana; Rovná, Katarina; Stričík, Michal; Hajduová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to screen 15 essential oils of selected plant species, viz. Lavandula angustifolia, Carum carvi, Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Mentha piperita, Chamomilla recutita L., Pinus sylvestris, Satureia hortensis L., Origanum vulgare L., Pimpinella anisum, Rosmarinus officinalis L., Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch, Thymus vulgaris L., Origanum vulgare L. for antifungal activity against five Penicillium species: Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium crustosum, Penicillium expansum and Penicillium griseofulvum. The method used for screening included the disc diffusion method. The study points out the wide spectrum of antifungal activity of essential oils against Penicillium fungi. There were five essential oils of the 15 mentioned above which showed a hopeful antifungal activity: Pimpinella anisum, Chamomilla recutita L., Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare L. The most hopeful antifungal activity and killing effect against all tested penicillia was found to be Origanum vulgare L. and Pimpinella anisum. The lowest level of antifungal activity was demonstrated by the oils Pinus mungo var. pulmilio, Salvia officinalis L., Abietis albia etheroleum, Chamomilla recutita L. Rausch, Rosmarinus officinalis. PMID:25780826

  20. Antifungal activity of multifunctional Fe 3O 4-Ag nanocolloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudasama, Bhupendra; Vala, Anjana K.; Andhariya, Nidhi; Upadhyay, R. V.; Mehta, R. V.

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, rapid increase has been observed in the population of microbes that are resistant to conventionally used antibiotics. Antifungal drug therapy is no exception and now resistance to many of the antifungal agents in use has emerged. Therefore, there is an inevitable and urgent medical need for antibiotics with novel antimicrobial mechanisms. Aspergillus glaucus is the potential cause of fatal brain infections and hypersensitivity pneumonitis in immunocompromised patients and leads to death despite aggressive multidrug antifungal therapy. In the present article, we describe the antifungal activity of multifunctional core-shell Fe 3O 4-Ag nanocolloids against A. glaucus isolates. Controlled experiments are also carried out with Ag nanocolloids in order to understand the role of core (Fe 3O 4) in the antifungal action. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nanocolloids is determined by the micro-dilution method. MIC of A. glaucus is 2000 μg/mL. The result is quite promising and requires further investigations in order to develop a treatment methodology against this death causing fungus in immunocompromised patients.

  1. Exploring the molecular basis of antifungal synergies using genome-wide approaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a review article summarizing genomic profiling strategies for determining the mechanism of action of antifungal synergies, and highlighting the potential applications of these technologies. Given the limitations of currently available antifungal agents and the development of drug resistance...

  2. Peptide-based Antifungal Therapies against Emerging Infections

    PubMed Central

    Matejuk, A.; Leng, Q.; Begum, M.D.; Woodle, M.C.; Scaria, P.; Chou, S-T; Mixson, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance to mycotic infections is rapidly emerging as a major medical problem. Opportunistic fungal infections create therapeutic challenges, particularly in high risk immunocompromised patients with AIDS, cancer, and those undergoing transplantation. Higher mortality and/or morbidity rates due to invasive mycosis have been increasing over the last 20 years, and in light of growing resistance to commonly used antibiotics, novel antifungal drugs and approaches are required. Currently there is considerable interest in antifungal peptides that are ubiquitous in plant and animal kingdoms. These small cationic peptides may have specific targets or may be multifunctional in their mechanism of action. On the basis of recent advances in protein engineering and solid phase syntheses, the utility and potential of selected peptides as efficient antifungal drugs with acceptable toxicity profiles are being realized. This review will discuss recent advances in peptide therapy for opportunistic fungal infections. PMID:20495663

  3. Survey of small antifungal peptides with chemotherapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Desbois, Andrew P; Tschörner, David; Coote, Peter J

    2011-08-01

    Many cationic peptides with antimicrobial properties have been isolated from bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. These peptides vary in molecular size, potency and spectra of activities. This report surveyed the literature to highlight the peptides that have antifungal activity and greatest potential for development as new therapeutic agents. Thus, to be included in the evaluation, each peptide had to fulfil the following criteria: (i) potent antifungal activity, (ii) no, or minimal, mammalian cell toxicity, (iii) of ≤25 amino acids in length, which minimises the costs of synthesis, reduces immunogenicity and enhances bioavailability and stability in vivo, (iv) minimal post-translational modifications (also reduces the production costs). The ~80 peptides that satisfied these criteria are discussed with respect to their structures, mechanisms of antimicrobial action and in vitro and in vivo toxicities. Certainly, some of these small peptides warrant further study and have potential for future exploitation as new antifungal agents. PMID:21470150

  4. Antifungal Effect of Chitosan as Ca2+ Channel Blocker

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choon Geun; Koo, Ja Choon; Park, Jae Kweon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate antifungal activity of a range of different molecular weight (MW) chitosan against Penicillium italicum. Our results demonstrate that the antifungal activity was dependent both the MW and concentration of the chitosan. Among a series of chitosan derived from the hydrolysis of high MW chitosan, the fractions containing various sizes of chitosan ranging from 3 to 15 glucosamine units named as chitooligomers-F2 (CO-F2) was found to show the highest antifungal activity against P. italicum. Furthermore, the effect of CO-F2 toward this fungus was significantly reduced in the presence of Ca2+, whereas its effect was recovered by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, suggesting that the CO-F2 acts via disruption of Ca2+ gradient required for survival of the fungus. Our results suggest that CO-F2 may serve as potential compounds to develop alternatives to synthetic fungicides for the control of the postharvest diseases. PMID:27298599

  5. Comparison of antifungal activities of Vietnamese citrus essential oils.

    PubMed

    Van Hung, Pham; Chi, Pham Thi Lan; Phi, Nguyen Thi Lan

    2013-03-01

    Citrus essential oils (EOs) are volatile compounds from citrus peels and widely used in perfumes, cosmetics, soaps and aromatherapy. In this study, inhibition of citrus EOs extracted from Vietnamese orange (Citrus sinensis), mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco), pomelo (Citrus grandis Osbeck) and lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle) on the growth of plant pathogenic fungi, Mucor hiemalis, Penicillium expansum and Fusarium proliferatum was investigated. The EOs of the citrus peels were obtained by cold-pressing method and the antifungal activity of EOs was evaluated using the agar dilution method. The results show that the EOs had significant antifungal activity. Lime EO was the best inhibitor of M. hiemalis and F. proliferatum while pomelo EO was the most effective against P. expansum. These results indicate that citrus EOs can be used as antifungal natural products in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. PMID:22799453

  6. Antifungal Effect of Chitosan as Ca(2+) Channel Blocker.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choon Geun; Koo, Ja Choon; Park, Jae Kweon

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate antifungal activity of a range of different molecular weight (MW) chitosan against Penicillium italicum. Our results demonstrate that the antifungal activity was dependent both the MW and concentration of the chitosan. Among a series of chitosan derived from the hydrolysis of high MW chitosan, the fractions containing various sizes of chitosan ranging from 3 to 15 glucosamine units named as chitooligomers-F2 (CO-F2) was found to show the highest antifungal activity against P. italicum. Furthermore, the effect of CO-F2 toward this fungus was significantly reduced in the presence of Ca(2+), whereas its effect was recovered by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, suggesting that the CO-F2 acts via disruption of Ca(2+) gradient required for survival of the fungus. Our results suggest that CO-F2 may serve as potential compounds to develop alternatives to synthetic fungicides for the control of the postharvest diseases. PMID:27298599

  7. Enhancement of Commercial Antifungal Agents by Kojic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong H.; Chang, Perng-Kuang; Chan, Kathleen L.; Faria, Natália C. G.; Mahoney, Noreen; Kim, Young K.; Martins, Maria de L.; Campbell, Bruce C.

    2012-01-01

    Natural compounds that pose no significant medical or environmental side effects are potential sources of antifungal agents, either in their nascent form or as structural backbones for more effective derivatives. Kojic acid (KA) is one such compound. It is a natural by-product of fungal fermentation commonly employed by food and cosmetic industries. We show that KA greatly lowers minimum inhibitory (MIC) or fungicidal (MFC) concentrations of commercial medicinal and agricultural antifungal agents, amphotericin B (AMB) and strobilurin, respectively, against pathogenic yeasts and filamentous fungi. Assays using two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) mutants, i.e., sakAΔ, mpkCΔ, of Aspergillus fumigatus, an agent for human invasive aspergillosis, with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or AMB indicate such chemosensitizing activity of KA is most conceivably through disruption of fungal antioxidation systems. KA could be developed as a chemosensitizer to enhance efficacy of certain conventional antifungal drugs or fungicides. PMID:23203038

  8. Antifungal effect of TONS504-photodynamic therapy on Malassezia furfur.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Nakajima, Susumu; Sakata, Isao; Iizuka, Hajime

    2014-10-01

    Numerous reports indicate therapeutic efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) against skin tumors, acne and for skin rejuvenation. However, few reports exist regarding its efficacy for fungal skin diseases. In order to determine the antifungal effect, PDT was applied on Malassezia furfur. M. furfur was cultured in the presence of a novel cationic photosensitizer, TONS504, and was irradiated with a 670-nm diode laser. TONS504-PDT showed a significant antifungal effect against M. furfur. The effect was irradiation dose- and TONS504 concentration-dependent and the maximal effect was observed at 100 J/cm2 and 1 μg/mL, respectively. In conclusion, TONS504-PDT showed antifungal effect against M. furfur in vitro, and may be a new therapeutic modality for M. furfur-related skin disorders. PMID:25226792

  9. Potent In Vitro Antifungal Activities of Naturally Occurring Acetylenic Acids▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing-Cong; Jacob, Melissa R.; Khan, Shabana I.; Ashfaq, M. Khalid; Babu, K. Suresh; Agarwal, Ameeta K.; ElSohly, Hala N.; Manly, Susan P.; Clark, Alice M.

    2008-01-01

    Our continuing effort in antifungal natural product discovery has led to the identification of five 6-acetylenic acids with chain lengths from C16 to C20: 6-hexadecynoic acid (compound 1), 6-heptadecynoic acid (compound 2), 6-octadecynoic acid (compound 3), 6-nonadecynoic acid (compound 4), and 6-icosynoic acid (compound 5) from the plant Sommera sabiceoides. Compounds 2 and 5 represent newly isolated fatty acids. The five acetylenic acids were evaluated for their in vitro antifungal activities against Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Trichophyton rubrum by comparison with the positive control drugs amphotericin B, fluconazole, ketoconazole, caspofungin, terbinafine, and undecylenic acid. The compounds showed various degrees of antifungal activity against the 21 tested strains. Compound 4 was the most active, in particular against the dermatophytes T. mentagrophytes and T. rubrum and the opportunistic pathogens C. albicans and A. fumigatus, with MICs comparable to several control drugs. Inclusion of two commercially available acetylenic acids, 9-octadecynoic acid (compound 6) and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (compound 7), in the in vitro antifungal testing further demonstrated that the antifungal activities of the acetylenic acids were associated with their chain lengths and positional triple bonds. In vitro toxicity testing against mammalian cell lines indicated that compounds 1 to 5 were not toxic at concentrations up to 32 μM. Furthermore, compounds 3 and 4 did not produce obvious toxic effects in mice at a dose of 34 μmol/kg of body weight when administered intraperitoneally. Taking into account the low in vitro and in vivo toxicities and significant antifungal potencies, these 6-acetylenic acids may be excellent leads for further preclinical studies. PMID:18458131

  10. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma as an antifungal therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Peng; Wu Haiyan; Sun Yi; Liu Wei; Li Ruoyu; Zhu Weidong; Lopez, Jose L.; Zhang Jue; Fang Jing

    2011-01-10

    A microhollow cathode based, direct-current, atmospheric pressure, He/O{sub 2} (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to inactive antifungal resistants Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Candida glabrata in air and in water. Effective inactivation (>90%) was achieved in 10 min in air and 1 min in water. Antifungal susceptibility tests showed drastic reduction of the minimum inhibitory concentration after plasma treatment. The inactivation was attributed to the reactive oxygen species generated in plasma or in water. Hydroxyl and singlet molecular oxygen radicals were detected in plasma-water system by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. This approach proposed a promising clinical dermatology therapy.

  11. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma as an antifungal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng; Sun, Yi; Wu, Haiyan; Zhu, Weidong; Lopez, Jose L.; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jue; Li, Ruoyu; Fang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    A microhollow cathode based, direct-current, atmospheric pressure, He/O2 (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to inactive antifungal resistants Candida albicans, Candida krusei, and Candida glabrata in air and in water. Effective inactivation (>90%) was achieved in 10 min in air and 1 min in water. Antifungal susceptibility tests showed drastic reduction of the minimum inhibitory concentration after plasma treatment. The inactivation was attributed to the reactive oxygen species generated in plasma or in water. Hydroxyl and singlet molecular oxygen radicals were detected in plasma-water system by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. This approach proposed a promising clinical dermatology therapy.

  12. Antifungal Drugs for Onychomycosis: Efficacy, Safety, and Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Theodore; Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-03-01

    In 1996, oral terbinafine joined itraconazole and fluconazole on the short list of systemic medications that could be used to treat onychomycosis (although fluconazole was not approved for this indication by the US Food and Drug Administration [FDA], it was commonly used for this purpose). In 1999, ciclopirox was the first topical treatment to be FDA approved. The addition of the topical antifungal agents efinaconazole and tavaborole in 2014 expanded the roster of medications available to more effectively manage onychomycosis in a wide range of patients, including those for whom comorbid conditions, concomitant medications, or patient preference limited the use of systemic antifungals. PMID:27074700

  13. Recent advances in topical formulation carriers of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Bseiso, Eman Ahmed; Nasr, Maha; Sammour, Omaima; Abd El Gawad, Nabaweya A

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections are amongst the most commonly encountered diseases affecting the skin. Treatment approaches include both topical and oral antifungal agents. The topical route is generally preferred due to the possible side effects of oral medication. Advances in the field of formulation may soon render outdated conventional products such as creams, ointments and gels. Several carrier systems loaded with antifungal drugs have demonstrated promising results in the treatment of skin fungal infections. Examples of these newer carriers include micelles, lipidic systems such as solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers, microemulsions and vesicular systems such as liposomes, niosomes, transfersomes, ethosomes, and penetration enhancer vesicles. PMID:26261140

  14. Fungal virulence genes as targets for antifungal chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Perfect, J R

    1996-01-01

    Fungal virulence genes have now met the age of molecular pathogenesis. The definition of virulence genes needs to be broad so that it encompasses the focus on molecular antifungal targets and vaccine epitopes. However, in the broad but simple definition of a virulence gene, there will be many complex genetic and host interactions which investigators will need to carefully define. Nevertheless, with the increasing numbers of serious fungal infections produced by old and newly reported organisms, the paucity of present antifungal drugs, and the likelihood of increasing drug resistance, the need for investigations into understanding fungal virulence at the molecular level has never been more important. PMID:8807043

  15. Antifungal activity of three mouth rinses--in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Abirami, C P; Venugopal, Pankajalakshmi V

    2005-01-01

    Mouthrinses are nowadays routinely included in the home care oral hygiene maintenance besides dentifrice/tooth paste. Mouthrinses prevent bacterial attachment and prevent or slow down bacterial proliferation. Fungal organisms have now gained more importance due to increased incidence of AIDS/HIV. This has necessitated for mouthrinses to possess antifungal activity also. The mouthrinses used were Povidone iodine ( Wokadine), Thymol with Eucalyptol and Benzoic acid (Listerine) and fluoride with Triclosan (Colgate Plax), which were tested against oral isolates of different species of Candida. The agar diffusion test was used to evaluate the inhibitory activity of the mouthrinses and all of them exhibited antifungal activity especially against Candida albicans. PMID:16758789

  16. Antifungal Activities of SCY-078 (MK-3118) and Standard Antifungal Agents against Clinical Non-Aspergillus Mold Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Lamoth, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The limited armamentarium of active and oral antifungal drugs against emerging non-Aspergillus molds is of particular concern. Current antifungal agents and the new orally available beta-1,3-d-glucan synthase inhibitor SCY-078 were tested in vitro against 135 clinical non-Aspergillus mold isolates. Akin to echinocandins, SCY-078 showed no or poor activity against Mucoromycotina and Fusarium spp. However, SCY-078 was highly active against Paecilomyces variotii and was the only compound displaying some activity against notoriously panresistant Scedosporium prolificans. PMID:25896696

  17. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of antifungal agents: guidelines from the British Society for Medical Mycology

    PubMed Central

    Ashbee, H. Ruth; Barnes, Rosemary A.; Johnson, Elizabeth M.; Richardson, Malcolm D.; Gorton, Rebecca; Hope, William W.

    2014-01-01

    The burden of human disease related to medically important fungal pathogens is substantial. An improved understanding of antifungal pharmacology and antifungal pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics has resulted in therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) becoming a valuable adjunct to the routine administration of some antifungal agents. TDM may increase the probability of a successful outcome, prevent drug-related toxicity and potentially prevent the emergence of antifungal drug resistance. Much of the evidence that supports TDM is circumstantial. This document reviews the available literature and provides a series of recommendations for TDM of antifungal agents. PMID:24379304

  18. [Recent advances in the study of antifungal lead compounds with new chemical scaffolds].

    PubMed

    Shao, Lü-cheng; Sheng, Chun-quan; Zhang, Wan-nian

    2007-11-01

    In recent years, the incidence of infections caused by invasive fungal pathogens has increased dramatically. However, most antifungal agents used in clinic have many drawbacks and cannot meet the demand of the clinical use. Therefore, for the development of new generation of antifungal agents, it is of great significance to find antifungal lead compounds with novel chemical scaffolds and new mode of action. Novel antifungal lead compounds reported in recent years are reviewed. Their chemical structures, antifungal activity and structure-activity relationship are discussed in detail, and current problems and trends in future research are also emphasized. PMID:18300466

  19. [Antifungal activity of 5-benzilidene pyrrolone and furanone derivatives].

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, M G; Pitta, I da R; Galdino, S L; Takaki, G de C; Bergé, G

    1989-01-01

    The antifungal activity against Neurospora crassa of some 5-benzilidene pyrrolone and furanone derivatives was realised. Relations between the structure and this biological activity are established with Fujita-Ban and Hansch methods. The preponderant part of lipophilicity, resonance effect and E or Z configurations have been showed. PMID:2535109

  20. Antifungal activity of heartwood extracts from three Juniperus species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heartwood samples from three species of Juniperus (i.e., J. virginianna, J. occidentalis, and J. ashei) were extracted with hexane, ethanol and methanol and the hexane and ethanol extracts were tested for antifungal activity against four species of wood-rot fungi. These three species represent the ...

  1. Activation of Melanin Synthesis in Alternaria infectoria by Antifungal Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Chantal; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Silva, Branca M. A.; Nakouzi-Naranjo, Antonio; Zuzarte, Mónica; Chatterjee, Subhasish; Stark, Ruth E.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    The importance of Alternaria species fungi to human health ranges from their role as etiological agents of serious infections with poor prognoses in immunosuppressed individuals to their association with respiratory allergic diseases. The present work focuses on Alternaria infectoria, which was used as a model organism of the genus, and was designed to unravel melanin production in response to antifungals. After we characterized the pigment produced by A. infectoria, we studied the dynamics of 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin production during growth, the degree of melanization in response to antifungals, and how melanization affected susceptibility to several classes of therapeutic drugs. We demonstrate that A. infectoria increased melanin deposition in cell walls in response to nikkomycin Z, caspofungin, and itraconazole but not in response to fluconazole or amphotericin B. These results indicate that A. infectoria activates DHN-melanin synthesis in response to certain antifungal drugs, possibly as a protective mechanism against these drugs. Inhibition of DHN-melanin synthesis by pyroquilon resulted in a lower minimum effective concentration (MEC) of caspofungin and enhanced morphological changes (increased hyphal balloon size), characterized by thinner and less organized A. infectoria cell walls. In summary, A. infectoria synthesizes melanin in response to certain antifungal drugs, and its susceptibility is influenced by melanization, suggesting the therapeutic potential of drug combinations that affect melanin synthesis. PMID:26711773

  2. Activation of Melanin Synthesis in Alternaria infectoria by Antifungal Drugs.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Chantal; Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Silva, Branca M A; Nakouzi-Naranjo, Antonio; Zuzarte, Mónica; Chatterjee, Subhasish; Stark, Ruth E; Casadevall, Arturo; Gonçalves, Teresa

    2016-03-01

    The importance of Alternaria species fungi to human health ranges from their role as etiological agents of serious infections with poor prognoses in immunosuppressed individuals to their association with respiratory allergic diseases. The present work focuses on Alternaria infectoria, which was used as a model organism of the genus, and was designed to unravel melanin production in response to antifungals. After we characterized the pigment produced by A. infectoria, we studied the dynamics of 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin production during growth, the degree of melanization in response to antifungals, and how melanization affected susceptibility to several classes of therapeutic drugs. We demonstrate that A. infectoria increased melanin deposition in cell walls in response to nikkomycin Z, caspofungin, and itraconazole but not in response to fluconazole or amphotericin B. These results indicate that A. infectoria activates DHN-melanin synthesis in response to certain antifungal drugs, possibly as a protective mechanism against these drugs. Inhibition of DHN-melanin synthesis by pyroquilon resulted in a lower minimum effective concentration (MEC) of caspofungin and enhanced morphological changes (increased hyphal balloon size), characterized by thinner and less organized A. infectoria cell walls. In summary, A. infectoria synthesizes melanin in response to certain antifungal drugs, and its susceptibility is influenced by melanization, suggesting the therapeutic potential of drug combinations that affect melanin synthesis. PMID:26711773

  3. Antifungal Lock Therapy with Liposomal Amphotericin B: A Prospective Trial.

    PubMed

    McGhee, William; Michaels, Marian G; Martin, Judith M; Mazariegos, George V; Green, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a prospective pilot study to evaluate the potential role of combined systemic antifungal and liposomal amphotericin B lock therapy in children with intestinal insufficiency with fungal catheter-related bloodstream infections whose central venous catheters had not been removed. Our results provide supportive evidence for the conduct of larger clinical trials to confirm the efficacy and safety of this approach. PMID:26908494

  4. Enhancement of commercial antifungal agents by kojic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kojic acid (KA), a natural by-product of fungal fermentation, is a commonly used food and cosmetic additive. We show that KA increases activity of amphotericin B and strobilurin, medical and agricultural antifungal agents, respectively, possibly targeting the fungal antioxidative system. KA shows pr...

  5. Simplifungin and Valsafungins, Antifungal Antibiotics of Fungal Origin.

    PubMed

    Ishijima, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Ryuji; Ohtawa, Masaki; Kondo, Ariko; Nagai, Kenichiro; Shima, Keisuke; Nonaka, Kenichi; Masuma, Rokuro; Iwamoto, Susumu; Onodera, Hideyuki; Nagamitsu, Tohru; Tomoda, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    The targets of antifungal antibiotics in clinical use are more limited than those of antibacterial antibiotics. Therefore, new antifungal antibiotics with different mechanisms of action are desired. In the course of our screening for antifungal antibiotics of microbial origins, new antifungal antibiotics, simplifungin (1) and valsafungins A (2) and B (3), were isolated from cultures of the fungal strains Simplicillium minatense FKI-4981 and Valsaceae sp. FKH-53, respectively. The structures of 1 to 3 including their absolute stereochemistries were elucidated using various spectral analyses including NMR and collision-induced dissociation (CID)-MS/MS as well as chemical approaches including modifications to the Mosher's method. They were structurally related to myriocin. They inhibited the growth of yeast-like and zygomycetous fungi with MICs ranging between 0.125 and 8.0 μg/mL. An examination of their mechanisms of action by the newly established assay using LC-MS revealed that 1 and 2 inhibited serine palmitoyltransferase activity, which is involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis, with IC50 values of 224 and 24 nM, respectively. PMID:27400027

  6. Successful management of renal mucormycosis with antifungal therapy and drainage

    PubMed Central

    Devana, Sudheer K.; Bora, Girdhar S.; Mavuduru, Ravimohan S.; Panwar, Pankaj; Kakkar, Nandita; Mandal, Arup K.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of isolated extensive renal mucormycosis in an immunocompetent adult, who was successfully managed conservatively without surgical debridement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case where antifungal therapy alone was sufficient even with such an extensive involvement. PMID:27127360

  7. Antifungal activities of nine traditional Mexican medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Navarro García, V M; Gonzalez, A; Fuentes, M; Aviles, M; Rios, M Y; Zepeda, G; Rojas, M G

    2003-07-01

    Eighteen plant extracts from nine traditional Mexican medicinal plants were tested for antifungal activity against two dermatophyte fungal species (Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Trichophyton rubrum), one non-dermatophyte (Aspergillus niger), and one yeast (Candida albicans). The strongest effect was manifested by the hexane extracts from Eupatorium aschenbornianum and Sedum oxypetalum, as well as the methanol extracts from Lysiloma acapulcensis and Annona cherimolia. PMID:12787958

  8. Identification of Ebsulfur Analogues with Broad-Spectrum Antifungal Activity.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Huy X; Shrestha, Sanjib K; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2016-07-19

    Invasive fungal infections are on the rise due to an increased population of critically ill patients as a result of HIV infections, chemotherapies, and organ transplantations. Current antifungal drugs are helpful, but are insufficient in addressing the problem of drug-resistant fungal infections. Thus, there is a growing need for novel antimycotics that are safe and effective. The ebselen scaffold has been evaluated in clinical trials and has been shown to be safe in humans. This makes ebselen an attractive scaffold for facile translation from bench to bedside. We recently reported a library of ebselen-inspired ebsulfur analogues with antibacterial properties, but their antifungal activity has not been characterized. In this study, we repurposed ebselen, ebsulfur, and 32 additional ebsulfur analogues as antifungal agents by evaluating their antifungal activity against a panel of 13 clinically relevant fungal strains. The effect of induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by three of these compounds was evaluated. Their hemolytic and cytotoxicity activities were also determined using mouse erythrocytes and mammalian cells. The MIC values of these compounds were found to be in the range of 0.02-12.5 μg mL(-1) against the fungal strains tested. Notably, yeast cells treated with our compounds showed an accumulation of ROS, which may further contribute to the growth-inhibitory effect against fungi. This study provides new lead compounds for the development of antimycotic agents. PMID:27334363

  9. Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents, 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl

    1993-03-01

    This study is a continuation of ``Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents'' sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (Schreck et al. 1990 and Schreck et al. 1991). The objectives of the present study were to select and evaluate up to 10 candidate fungicides.

  10. Determination of antifungal, biochemical and physiological features of Trichoderma koningiopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trichoderma koningiopsis is a species that has been recently identified and has not yet been published, but is in press. Due to the absence of reported data on this species, antifungal, biochemical and physiological features were analyzed for the Trichoderma koningiopsis strain isolated from root se...

  11. 21 CFR 333.210 - Antifungal active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antifungal active ingredients. 333.210 Section 333.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE...

  12. 21 CFR 333.210 - Antifungal active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antifungal active ingredients. 333.210 Section 333.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE...

  13. 21 CFR 333.210 - Antifungal active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antifungal active ingredients. 333.210 Section 333.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE...

  14. 21 CFR 333.210 - Antifungal active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antifungal active ingredients. 333.210 Section 333.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE...

  15. 21 CFR 333.210 - Antifungal active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antifungal active ingredients. 333.210 Section 333.210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE...

  16. Human Pharmacogenomic Variations and Their Implications for Antifungal Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Meletiadis, Joseph; Chanock, Stephen; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics is defined as the study of the impacts of heritable traits on pharmacology and toxicology. Candidate genes with potential pharmacogenomic importance include drug transporters involved in absorption and excretion, phase I enzymes (e.g., cytochrome P450-dependent mixed-function oxidases) and phase II enzymes (e.g., glucuronosyltransferases) contributing to metabolism, and those molecules (e.g., albumin, A1-acid glycoprotein, and lipoproteins) involved in the distribution of antifungal compounds. By using the tools of population genetics to define interindividual differences in drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, pharmacogenomic models for genetic variations in antifungal pharmacokinetics can be derived. Pharmacogenomic factors may become especially important in the treatment of immunocompromised patients or those with persistent or refractory mycoses that cannot be explained by elevated MICs and where rational dosage optimization of the antifungal agent may be particularly critical. Pharmacogenomics has the potential to shift the paradigm of therapy and to improve the selection of antifungal compounds and adjustment of dosage based upon individual variations in drug absorption, metabolism, and excretion. PMID:17041143

  17. In vitro antifungal activity of Schizozygia coffaeoides bail. (Apocynaceae) extracts.

    PubMed

    Kariba, R M; Siboe, G M; Dossaji, S F

    2001-01-01

    Leaf extracts of Schizozygia coffaeoides were investigated for antifungal activity using the disc diffusion assay technique. Petroleum ether 40-60 degrees C, dichloromethane-ethyl acetate (1:1) and methanol extracts were fungitoxic to Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Microsporum gypseum, Cladosporium cucumerinum and Candida albicans. The extracts were fungistatic in action. PMID:11137346

  18. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of liriodenine and related oxoaporphine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Hufford, C D; Sharma, A S; Oguntimein, B O

    1980-10-01

    Liriodenine was evaluated for its antibacterial and antifungal activity against several microorganisms. Other related oxoaporphine alkaloids also were evaluated. Attempts to prepare oxoaporphine alkaloids from N-acetylnoraporphines were unsuccessful, but an unexpected phenanthrene alkaloid was obtained. A novel N-demethylation reaction was noted when oxogaucine methiodide and liriodenine methiodide were treated with alumina. PMID:7420287

  19. Chemosensitization as a means to augment commercial antifungal agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is growing list of papers on antimycotic chemosensitization and the mechanisms by which they function. Currently, antifungal agents used in agriculture and in human or veterinary medicine are confronted by a number of obstacles, the main one being continual development of resistance to one, or...

  20. Prediction of antifungal activity of gemini imidazolium compounds.

    PubMed

    Pałkowski, Łukasz; Błaszczyński, Jerzy; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Błaszczak, Jan; Nowaczyk, Alicja; Wróblewska, Joanna; Kożuszko, Sylwia; Gospodarek, Eugenia; Słowiński, Roman; Krysiński, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    The progress of antimicrobial therapy contributes to the development of strains of fungi resistant to antimicrobial drugs. Since cationic surfactants have been described as good antifungals, we present a SAR study of a novel homologous series of 140 bis-quaternary imidazolium chlorides and analyze them with respect to their biological activity against Candida albicans as one of the major opportunistic pathogens causing a wide spectrum of diseases in human beings. We characterize a set of features of these compounds, concerning their structure, molecular descriptors, and surface active properties. SAR study was conducted with the help of the Dominance-Based Rough Set Approach (DRSA), which involves identification of relevant features and relevant combinations of features being in strong relationship with a high antifungal activity of the compounds. The SAR study shows, moreover, that the antifungal activity is dependent on the type of substituents and their position at the chloride moiety, as well as on the surface active properties of the compounds. We also show that molecular descriptors MlogP, HOMO-LUMO gap, total structure connectivity index, and Wiener index may be useful in prediction of antifungal activity of new chemical compounds. PMID:25961015

  1. Prediction of Antifungal Activity of Gemini Imidazolium Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Pałkowski, Łukasz; Błaszczyński, Jerzy; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Błaszczak, Jan; Nowaczyk, Alicja; Wróblewska, Joanna; Kożuszko, Sylwia; Gospodarek, Eugenia; Słowiński, Roman; Krysiński, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    The progress of antimicrobial therapy contributes to the development of strains of fungi resistant to antimicrobial drugs. Since cationic surfactants have been described as good antifungals, we present a SAR study of a novel homologous series of 140 bis-quaternary imidazolium chlorides and analyze them with respect to their biological activity against Candida albicans as one of the major opportunistic pathogens causing a wide spectrum of diseases in human beings. We characterize a set of features of these compounds, concerning their structure, molecular descriptors, and surface active properties. SAR study was conducted with the help of the Dominance-Based Rough Set Approach (DRSA), which involves identification of relevant features and relevant combinations of features being in strong relationship with a high antifungal activity of the compounds. The SAR study shows, moreover, that the antifungal activity is dependent on the type of substituents and their position at the chloride moiety, as well as on the surface active properties of the compounds. We also show that molecular descriptors MlogP, HOMO-LUMO gap, total structure connectivity index, and Wiener index may be useful in prediction of antifungal activity of new chemical compounds. PMID:25961015

  2. Antifungal effect and action mechanism of antimicrobial peptide polybia-CP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kairong; Jia, Fengjing; Dang, Wen; Zhao, Yanyan; Zhu, Ranran; Sun, Mengyang; Qiu, Shuai; An, Xiaoping; Ma, Zelin; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Yan, Jiexi; Kong, Ziqing; Yan, Wenjin; Wang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of life-threatening invasive fungal infections increased significantly in recent years. However, the antifungal therapeutic options are very limited. Antimicrobial peptides are a class of potential lead chemical for the development of novel antifungal agents. Antimicrobial peptide polybia-CP was purified from the venom of the social wasp Polybia paulista. In this study, we synthesized polybia-CP and determined its antifungal effects against a series of Candidian species. Our results showed that polybia-CP has potent antifungal activity and fungicidal activity against the tested fungal cells with a proposed membrane-active action mode. In addition, polybia-CP could induce the increase of cellular reactive oxygen species production, which would attribute to its antifungal activity. In conclusion, the present study suggests that polybia-CP has potential as an antifungal agent or may offer a new strategy for antifungal therapeutic option. PMID:26680221

  3. Identification and biological activity of antifungal saponins from shallot ( Allium cepa L. Aggregatum group).

    PubMed

    Teshima, Yoshiki; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Imada, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Kazunori; El-Sayed, Magdi A; Shigyo, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Shuhei; Ito, Shin-Ichi

    2013-08-01

    The n-butanol extract of shallot basal plates and roots showed antifungal activity against plant pathogenic fungi. The purified compounds from the extract were examined for antifungal activity to determine the predominant antifungal compounds in the extract. Two major antifungal compounds purified were determined to be alliospiroside A (ALA) and alliospiroside B. ALA had prominent antifungal activity against a wide range of fungi. The products of acid hydrolysis of ALA showed a reduced antifungal activity, suggesting that the compound's sugar chain is essential for its antifungal activity. Fungal cells treated with ALA showed rapid production of reactive oxygen species. The fungicidal action of ALA was partially inhibited by a superoxide scavenger, Tiron, suggesting that superoxide anion generation in the fungal cells may be related to the compound's action. Inoculation experiments showed that ALA protected strawberry plants against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides , indicating that ALA has the potential to control anthracnose of the plant. PMID:24138065

  4. Sporothrix schenckii complex in Iran: Molecular identification and antifungal susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Shahram; Zaini, Farideh; Kordbacheh, Parivash; Safara, Mahin; Heidari, Mansour

    2016-08-01

    Sporotrichosis is a global subcutaneous fungal infection caused by the Sporothrix schenckii complex. Sporotrichosis is an uncommon infection in Iran, and there have been no phenotypic, molecular typing or antifungal susceptibility studies of Sporothrix species. This study aimed to identify nine Iranian isolates of the S. schenckii complex to the species level using colony morphology, carbohydrate assimilation tests, and PCR-sequencing of the calmodulin gene. The antifungal susceptibilities of these Sporothrix isolates to five antifungal agents (amphotericin B (AMB), voriconazole (VRC), itraconazole (ITC), fluconazole (FLC), and terbinafine (TRB)) were also evaluated according to the M27-A3 and M38-A2 protocols of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute for yeast and mycelial phases, respectively. Five of seven clinical isolates were identified as S. schenckii, and two clinical and two environmental isolates were identified as S. globosa. This is the first report of S. globosa in Iran. There was significant agreement (73%) between the results of the phenotypic and genotypic identification methods. TRB and ITC were the most effective antifungals against the Sporothrix isolates. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of TRB for the yeast and mycelial phases of S. schenckii differed significantly. There was also a significant difference in the minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) values of AMB and TRB for the two phases. Considering the low efficacy of VRC and FLC and the wide MIC ranges of AMB (1-16 μg/ml and 1-8 μg/ml for yeast and mycelial forms, respectively) observed in the present study, in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing should be performed to determine appropriate therapeutic regimens. PMID:26933207

  5. In Vitro Antifungal Activities against Moulds Isolated from Dermatological Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Nizam, Tzar; Binting, Rabiatul Adawiyah AG.; Mohd Saari, Shafika; Kumar, Thivyananthini Vijaya; Muhammad, Marianayati; Satim, Hartini; Yusoff, Hamidah; Santhanam, Jacinta

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of various antifungal agents against moulds isolated from dermatological specimens. Methods We identified 29 moulds from dermatological specimens between October 2012 and March 2013 by conventional methods. We performed antifungal susceptibility testing on six antifungal agents, amphotericin B, clotrimazole, itraconazole, ketoconazole, miconazole and terbinafine, according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines contained in the M38-A2 document. Results Most antifungal agents were active against the dermatophytes, except for terbinafine against Trichophyton rubrum (geometric mean MIC, MICGM 3.17 μg/mL). The dematiaceous moulds were relatively susceptible to amphotericin B and azoles (MICGM 0.17–0.34 μg/mL), but not to terbinafine (MICGM 3.62 μg/mL). Septate hyaline moulds showed variable results between the relatively more susceptible Aspergillus spp. (MICGM 0.25–4 μg/mL) and the more resistant Fusarium spp. (MICGM 5.66–32 μg/mL). The zygomycetes were susceptible to amphotericin B (MICGM 0.5 μg/mL) and clotrimazole (MICGM 0.08 μg/mL), but not to other azoles (MICGM 2.52–4 μg/mL). Conclusion Amphotericin B and clotrimazole were the most effective antifungal agents against all moulds excepting Fusarium spp., while terbinafine was useful against dermatophytes (except T. rubrum) and Aspergillus spp. However, a larger study is required to draw more solid conclusions. PMID:27418867

  6. Evaluation of the antifungal activity and modulation between Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp. leaves and roots ethanolic extracts and conventional antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Samara A.; Rodrigues, Fabíola F. G.; Campos, Adriana R.; da Costa, José G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The use and investigation of natural products with antimicrobial activity from vegeral source have been reported by several researchers. Cajanus cajan (Fabaceae) is a multiple use specie mainly as human food. In popular medicine, diverse parts of the plant are used as sedative and to treat cough, hepatitis, and diabetes. Materials and Methods: This study shows the characterization of secondary metabolites present in ehtanolic extracts from leaves and roots of Cajanus cajan by phytochemical prospection. The evaluation of the antifungal activity was performed by the microdilution method, and from the subinhibitory concentrations (MIC 1/8) the modulatory activity of antifungical (fluconazole and ketoconazole) was analyzed by the direct contact assay against C. albicans ATCC40006, Candida krusei ATCC 6538 and Candida tropicalis ATCC 40042. Results: The results showed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, and alkaloids in both extracts as the clinically relevant antifungal activity. The modulatory potential is presented by the antifungal tested against yeasts. Conclusion: The extracts studied here have demonstrated to be a new therapeutic source to treat these microorganism-associated diseases. PMID:22701281

  7. Antifungal effects of citronella oil against Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Ru; Shi, Qing-Shan; Ouyang, You-Sheng; Chen, Yi-Ben; Duan, Shun-Shan

    2013-08-01

    Essential oils are aromatic oily liquids obtained from some aromatic plant materials. Certain essential oils such as citronella oil contain antifungal activity, but the antifungal effect is still unknown. In this study, we explored the antifungal effect of citronella oil with Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404. The antifungal activity of citronella oil on conidia of A. niger was determined by poisoned food technique, broth dilution method, and disc volatility method. Experimental results indicated that the citronella oil has strong antifungal activity: 0.125 (v/v) and 0.25 % (v/v) citronella oil inhibited the growth of 5 × 10⁵ spore/ml conidia separately for 7 and 28 days while 0.5 % (v/v) citronella oil could completely kill the conidia of 5 × 10⁵ spore/ml. Moreover, the fungicidal kinetic curves revealed that more than 90 % conidia (initial concentration is 5 × 10⁵ spore/ml) were killed in all the treatments with 0.125 to 2 % citronella oil after 24 h. Furthermore, with increase of citronella oil concentration and treatment time, the antifungal activity was increased correspondingly. The 0.5 % (v/v) concentration of citronella oil was a threshold to kill the conidia thoroughly. The surviving conidia treated with 0.5 to 2 % citronella oil decreased by an order of magnitude every day, and no fungus survived after 10 days. With light microscope, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope, we found that citronella oil could lead to irreversible alteration of the hyphae and conidia. Based on our observation, we hypothesized that the citronella oil destroyed the cell wall of the A. niger hyphae, passed through the cell membrane, penetrated into the cytoplasm, and acted on the main organelles. Subsequently, the hyphae was collapsed and squashed due to large cytoplasm loss, and the organelles were severely destroyed. Similarly, citronella oil could lead to the rupture of hard cell wall and then act on the sporoplasm to kill the

  8. Design, synthesis and antifungal activity of novel furancarboxamide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fang; Jin, Hong; Tao, Ke; Hou, Taiping

    2016-09-14

    Twenty-seven novel furancarboxamide derivatives with a diphenyl ether moiety were synthesized and evaluated for their antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani, Botrytis cirerea, Valsa mali and Sphaceloma ampelimum. Antifungal bioassay results indicated that most compounds had good or excellent fungicidal activities for R. solani and S. ampelimum at 20 mg L(-1). Among synthesized compounds, compound 18e showed a greater inhibitory effect against S. ampelimum, with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values of 0.020 mg L(-1). This strong activity rivals currently used commercial fungicides, such as Boscalid and Carbendazim, and has great potential as a lead compound for future development of novel fungicides. PMID:27191618

  9. Conventional and alternative antifungal therapies to oral candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Anibal, Paula Cristina; de Cássia Orlandi Sardi, Janaina; Peixoto, Iza Teixeira Alves; de Carvalho Moraes, Julianna Joanna; Höfling, José Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is the most common form of oral candidal infection, with Candida albicans being the principal etiological agent. Candida adheres directly or via an intermediary layer of plaque-forming bacteria to denture acrylic. Despite antifungal therapy to treat denture stomatitis, infection is reestablished soon after the treatment ceases. In addition, many predisposing factors have been identified as important in the development of oral candidiasis, including malnourishment, common endocrine disorders, such as diabetis mellitus, antibacterial drug therapy, corticosteroids, radiotherapy and other immunocompromised conditions, such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). These often results in increased tolerance to the most commonly used antifungals. So this review suggests new therapies to oral candidiasis. PMID:24031562

  10. Virulence and Resistance to Antifungal Therapies of Scopulariopsis Species.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Katihuska; Capilla, Javier; Mayayo, Emilio; Guarro, Josep

    2016-04-01

    Scopulariopsisis an emerging opportunistic fungus characterized by its high resistance to antifungal therapies. We have developed a murine model of disseminated infection in immunosuppressed animals by intravenous inoculation ofScopulariopsis brevicaulisandScopulariopsis brumptii, the most clinically relevant species, in order to evaluate their virulence and their responses to conventional antifungal treatments. Survival and tissue burden studies showed thatS. brumptiiwas more virulent thanS. brevicaulis The three drugs tested, liposomal amphotericin B, posaconazole, and voriconazole, prolonged the survival of mice infected withS. brumptii, but none showed efficacy againstS. brevicaulis The different therapies were only able to modestly reduce the fungal burden of infected tissue; however, in general, despite the high serum levels reached, they showed poor efficacy in the treatment of the infection. Unfortunately, the most effective therapy forScopulariopsisinfections remains unresolved. PMID:26787688