Science.gov

Sample records for antigen presentation capability

  1. Equine infectious anemia virus-infected dendritic cells retain antigen presentation capability

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Julie A.; McGuire, Travis C. . E-mail: mcguiret@vetmed.wsu.edu

    2005-05-10

    To determine if equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) were susceptible to equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection, ex vivo-generated DC were infected with virus in vitro. EIAV antigen was detected by immunofluorescence 3 days post-infection with maximum antigen being detected on day 4, whereas there was no antigen detected in DC incubated with the same amount of heat-inactivated EIAV. No cytolytic activity was observed after EIAV{sub WSU5} infection of DC. These monocyte-derived DC were more effective than macrophages and B cells in stimulating allogenic T lymphocytes. Both infected macrophages and DC stimulated similar levels of memory CTL responses in mixtures of CD8+ and CD4+ cells as detected with {sup 51}Cr-release assays indicating that EIAV infection of DC did not alter antigen presentation. However, EIAV-infected DC were more effective than infected macrophages when used to stimulate memory CTL in isolated CD8+ cells. The maintenance of antigen processing and presenting function by EIAV-infected DC in vitro suggests that this function is maintained during in vivo infection.

  2. Presentation of hepatocellular antigens

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, Arash; Crispe, Ian Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The liver is an organ in which antigen-specific T-cell responses manifest a bias toward immune tolerance. This is clearly seen in the rejection of allogeneic liver transplants, and multiple other phenomena suggest that this effect is more general. These include tolerance toward antigens introduced via the portal vein, immune failure to several hepatotropic viruses, the lack of natural liver-stage immunity to malaria parasites, and the frequent metastasis of cancers to the liver. Here we review the mechanisms by which T cells engage with hepatocellular antigens, the context in which such encounters occur, and the mechanisms that act to suppress a full T-cell response. While many mechanisms play a role, we will argue that two important processes are the constraints on the cross-presentation of hepatocellular antigens, and the induction of negative feedback inhibition driven by interferons. The constant exposure of the liver to microbial products from the intestine may drive innate immunity, rendering the local environment unfavorable for specific T-cell responses through this mechanism. Nevertheless, tolerance toward hepatocellular antigens is not monolithic and under specific circumstances allows both effective immunity and immunopathology. PMID:26924525

  3. A functional recombinant single-chain T cell receptor fragment capable of selectively targeting antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Epel, Malka; Ellenhorn, Joshua D; Diamond, Don J; Reiter, Yoram

    2002-11-01

    Specificity in the immune system is dictated and regulated by specific recognition of peptide/major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) by the T cell receptor (TCR). Such peptide/MHC complexes are a desirable target for novel approaches in immunotherapy because of their highly restricted fine specificity. Recently a potent anti-human p53 CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response has been developed in HLA-A2 transgenic mice after immunization with peptides corresponding to HLA-A2 motifs from human p53. An alpha/beta T-cell receptor was cloned from such CTL which exhibited a moderately high affinity to the human p53(149-157) peptide. In this report, we investigated the possibility of using a recombinant tumor-specific TCR for antigen-specific elimination of cells that express the specific MHC-peptide complex. To this end, we constructed a functional single-chain Fv fragment from the cloned TCR and fused it to a very potent cytotoxic molecule, a truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE38). The p53 TCR scFv-P38 fusion protein was generated by in vitro refolding from bacterially-expressed inclusion bodies, and was found to be functional by its ability to bind antigen-presenting cells (APC) which express the specific p53-derived peptide. Moreover, we have shown that the p53-specific TCR scFv-PE38 molecule specifically kills APC in a peptide-dependent manner. These results represent the first time that a TCR-derived recombinant single-chain Fv fragment has been used as a targeting moiety to deliver a cytotoxic effector molecule to cells and has been able to mediate the efficient killing of the particular cell population that expresses the specific MHC/peptide complex. Similarly to antibody-based targeting approaches, TCR with tumor cell specificity represent attractive candidates for generating new, very specific targeting moieties for various modes of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:12384808

  4. Proteolysis, proteasomes and antigen presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, A. L.; Rock, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins presented to the immune system must first be cleaved to small peptides by intracellular proteinases. Proteasomes are proteolytic complexes that degrade cytosolic and nuclear proteins. These particles have been implicated in ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and in the processing of intracellular antigens for cytolytic immune responses.

  5. MiR-381-3p Regulates the Antigen-Presenting Capability of Dendritic Cells and Represses Antituberculosis Cellular Immune Responses by Targeting CD1c.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qian; Zhou, Chaoying; Xiong, Wenjing; Su, Jing; He, Jianchun; Zhang, Shimeng; Du, Xialin; Liu, Sudong; Wang, Juanjuan; Ma, Li

    2016-07-15

    Tuberculosis is still the widest spread infectious disease in the world, and more in-depth studies are needed on the interaction between the pathogen and the host. Due to the highest lipid components in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the CD1 family that specifically presents antigenic lipids plays important roles in the antituberculosis immunity, especially CD1c, which functions as the intracellular Ag inspector at the full intracellular range. However, downregulation of the CD1c mRNA level has been observed in M. tuberculosis-infected cells, which is consistent with the regulatory mechanism of miRNA on gene expression. In this study, through combinatory analysis of previous miRNA transcriptomic assays and bioinformatic predictions by web-based algorithms, miR-381-3p was predicted to bind the 3'-untranslated region of CD1c gene. In vivo expression of miR-381-3p in dendritic cells (DCs) of TB patients is higher than in DCs of healthy individuals, inversely related to CD1c. Suppression of CD1c expression in bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-infected DCs was accompanied with upregulation of miR-381-3p, whereas inhibition of miR-381-3p could reverse suppression of CD1c expression and promote T cell responses against BCG infection. Further study indicated that miR-381-3p is also one of the mediators of the immune suppressor IL-10. Collectively, these results demonstrated the mechanism that suppression of CD1c by BCG infection is mediated by miR-381-3p. This finding may provide a novel approach to boost immune responses to M. tuberculosis. PMID:27296666

  6. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  7. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Vela Ramirez, J.E.; Roychoudhury, R.; Habte, H.H.; Cho, M. W.; Pohl, N. L. B.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells, and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by dendritic cells. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and antigen presenting cells and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  8. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  9. The molecular basis of antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Germain, R N; Sant, A J; Braunstein, N S; Ronchese, F

    1988-01-01

    We have used a multifactorial approach to investigate the relationship between the structure of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded cell surface molecules (Ia) and the recognition of Ia-bound peptide antigens by clonally distributed alpha beta heterodimeric T cell receptors (TCR). Four distinct parameters of Ia structure-function--1) control of Ia assembly and transport to the surface membrane; 2) serological reactivity with panels of monoclonal antibodies; 3) ability to present peptide antigens to T cells for functional activation; and 4) differential peptide binding independent of the TCR--have been measured. This has allowed assignment of allelically polymorphic subregions or individual residues to locations in a model class II molecular structure and attribution to these subregions and residues of specific functions such as control of alpha beta chain interaction and protein folding, antigenic peptide binding, or TCR binding. The results of these analyses have provided an internally consistent picture of the class II molecule that fits well with a hypothetical model for Ia derived by analogy from the recently solved HLA class I crystal structure. They have also given us the first clear definition of specific peptide binding residues within the general peptide binding region of Ia and have revealed an unexpected asymmetry in the structure-function relationships of the putative alpha and beta chain helical regions. Overall, the results of these studies indicate the critical importance of multi-parameter analysis in creating useful molecular models using non-chemical techniques. They also suggest that hypotheses about TCR-Ia interaction may have to take into account a significant asymmetry in the function of the two major polymorphic regions of histocompatibility molecules. PMID:3269359

  10. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion. PMID:26764596

  11. Instrument Pointing Capabilities: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars; Murray, Emmanuell; Scharf, Daniel P.; Aung, Mimi; Bayard, David; Brugarolas, Paul; Hadaegh, Fred; Lee, Allan; Milman, Mark; Sirlin, Sam; Kang, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This paper surveys the instrument pointing capabilities of past, present and future space telescopes and interferometers. As an important aspect of this survey, we present a taxonomy for "apples-to-apples" comparisons of pointing performances. First, pointing errors are defined relative to either an inertial frame or a celestial target. Pointing error can then be further sub-divided into DC, that is, steady state, and AC components. We refer to the magnitude of the DC error relative to the inertial frame as absolute pointing accuracy, and we refer to the magnitude of the DC error relative to a celestial target as relative pointing accuracy. The magnitude of the AC error is referred to as pointing stability. While an AC/DC partition is not new, we leverage previous work by some of the authors to quantitatively clarify and compare varying definitions of jitter and time window averages. With this taxonomy and for sixteen past, present, and future missions, pointing accuracies and stabilities, both required and achieved, are presented. In addition, we describe the attitude control technologies used to and, for future missions, planned to achieve these pointing performances.

  12. Isolation and In vivo Transfer of Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pooja; Kharkwal, Shalu Sharma; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Transfer of antigen presenting cells in vivo is a method used by immunologists to examine the potency of antigen presentation by a selected population of cells. This method is most commonly used to analyze presentation of protein antigens to MHC class I or II restricted T cells, but it can also be used for studies of nonconventional antigens such as CD1-presented lipids. In a recent study focusing on CD1d-restricted glycolipid antigen presentation to Natural Killer T cells, we compared antigen presenting properties of splenic B cells, CD8αPos dendritc cells (DCs) and CD8αNeg DCs (Arora et al., 2014). This protocol describes the detailed method used for isolation of these cell populations, and their transfer into recipient mice to analyze their antigen presenting properties. PMID:27390759

  13. The intracellular pathway for the presentation of vitamin B-related antigens by the antigen-presenting molecule MR1.

    PubMed

    McWilliam, Hamish E G; Eckle, Sidonia B G; Theodossis, Alex; Liu, Ligong; Chen, Zhenjun; Wubben, Jacinta M; Fairlie, David P; Strugnell, Richard A; Mintern, Justine D; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; Villadangos, Jose A

    2016-05-01

    The antigen-presenting molecule MR1 presents vitamin B-related antigens (VitB antigens) to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells through an uncharacterized pathway. We show that MR1, unlike other antigen-presenting molecules, does not constitutively present self-ligands. In the steady state it accumulates in a ligand-receptive conformation within the endoplasmic reticulum. VitB antigens reach this location and form a Schiff base with MR1, triggering a 'molecular switch' that allows MR1-VitB antigen complexes to traffic to the plasma membrane. These complexes are endocytosed with kinetics independent of the affinity of the MR1-ligand interaction and are degraded intracellularly, although some MR1 molecules acquire new ligands during passage through endosomes and recycle back to the surface. MR1 antigen presentation is characterized by a rapid 'off-on-off' mechanism that is strictly dependent on antigen availability. PMID:27043408

  14. Present and future capabilities of MCNP

    PubMed

    Hendricks; Adam; Booth; Briesmeister; Carter; Cox; Favorite; Forster; McKinney; Prael

    2000-10-01

    Several new capabilities have been added to MCNP4C including: (1) macrobody surfaces; (2) the superimposed mesh importance functions, so that it is no longer necessary to subdivide geometries for variance reduction; and (3) Xlib graphics and DVF Fortran 90 for PCs. There are also improvements in neutron physics, electron physics, perturbations, and parallelization. In the more distant future we are working on adaptive Monte Carlo code modernization, more parallelization, visualization, and charged particles. PMID:11003531

  15. The known unknowns of antigen processing and presentation

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Jatin M.; Van der Veen, Annemarthe G.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2009-01-01

    The principal components of both MHC class I and class II antigen processing and presentation pathways are well known. Within dendritic cells, these pathways are tightly regulated by Toll-like receptor signalling and include features, such as cross-presentation, that are not seen in other cell types. The exact mechanisms involved in the subcellular trafficking of antigens remain poorly understood and in some cases are controversial. Recent data suggest that diverse cellular machineries including autophagy participate in antigen processing and presentation, though their relative contributions remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we highlight some emerging themes of antigen processing and presentation that we believe merit further attention. PMID:18641646

  16. Multiphoton microscopy of antigen presenting cells in experimental cancer therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Simon C.; Papworth, Glenn D.; Spencer, Lori A.; Larregina, Adriana T.; Hackstein, Holger

    2002-06-01

    The absence of effective conventional therapy for most cancer patients justifies the application of novel, experimental approaches. One alternative to conventional cytotoxic agents is a more defined molecular approach for cancer immune treatment; promotion of the immune system specifically to target and eliminate tumor cells on the basis of expression of tumor-associated antigens (TAA). TAA could be presented to T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) that generate a more efficient and effective anti-tumor immune response. In fact, it has been well documented that dendritic cells, the most immunologically potent APC, are capable of recognizing, processing and presenting TAA, in turn initiating a specific antitumor immune response. Results from several laboratories and clinical trials suggested significant but still limited efficacy of TAA-pulsed dendritic cells administered to tumor-bearing hosts. Following such delivery, it is fundamentally necessary to dynamically assess cell abundance within the microenvironment of the tumor in the presence of the appropriate therapeutic agent. Multiphoton microscopy was used to assess the trafficking of pulsed dendritic cells and other APC in skin, lymph nodes and brain of several animal tumor models, following different routes of administration.

  17. Antigenically Modified Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jieming; Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide a promising platform to produce dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. To streamline the production process, we investigated a unique antigen-loading strategy that suits this novel platform. Specifically, we stably modified hPSCs using tumour antigen genes in the form of a full-length tumour antigen gene or an artificial tumour antigen epitope-coding minigene. Such antigenically modified hPSCs were able to differentiate into tumour antigen-presenting DCs. Without conventional antigen-loading, DCs derived from the minigene-modified hPSCs were ready to prime a tumour antigen-specific T cell response and further expand these specific T cells in restimulation processes. These expanded tumour antigen-specific T cells were potent effectors with central memory or effector memory phenotype. Thus, we demonstrated that immunocompetent tumour antigen-loaded DCs can be directly generated from antigenically modified hPSCs. Using such strategy, we can completely eliminate the conventional antigen-loading step and significantly simplify the production of DC vaccine from hPSCs. PMID:26471005

  18. MHC Class II Auto-Antigen Presentation is Unconventional

    PubMed Central

    Sadegh-Nasseri, Scheherazade; Kim, AeRyon

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is highly critical in adoptive immunity. Only by interacting with antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, helper T cells can be stimulated to fight infections or diseases. The degradation of a full protein into small peptide fragments bound to class II molecules is a dynamic, lengthy process consisting of many steps and chaperons. Deregulation in any step of antigen processing could lead to the development of self-reactive T cells or defective immune response to pathogens. Indeed, human leukocyte antigens class II genes are the predominant contributors to susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. Conventional antigen-processing calls for internalization of extracellular antigens followed by processing and epitope selection within antigen-processing subcellular compartments, enriched with all necessary accessory molecules, processing enzymes, and proper pH and denaturing conditions. However, recent data examining the temporal relationship between antigen uptakes, processing, and epitope selection revealed unexpected characteristics for auto-antigenic epitopes, which were not shared with antigenic epitopes from pathogens. This review provides a discussion of the relevance of these findings to the mechanisms of autoimmunity. PMID:26257739

  19. MHC structure and function – antigen presentation. Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Anna Carla; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The setting for the occurrence of an immune response is that of the need to cope with a vast array of different antigens from both pathogenic and non-pathogenic sources. When the first barriers against infection and innate defense fail, adaptive immune response enters the stage for recognition of the antigens by means of extremely variable molecules, namely immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors. The latter recognize the antigen exposed on cell surfaces, in the form of peptides presented by the HLA molecule. The first part of this review details the central role played by these molecules, establishing the close connection existing between their structure and their antigen presenting function. PMID:25807245

  20. Cathepsin G: roles in antigen presentation and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Burster, Timo; Macmillan, Henriette; Hou, Tieying; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Contributions from multiple cathepsins within endosomal antigen processing compartments are necessary to process antigenic proteins into antigenic peptides. Cysteine and aspartyl cathepsins have been known to digest antigenic proteins. A role for the serine protease, Cathepsin G (CatG), in this process has been described only recently, although CatG has long been known to be a granule-associated proteolytic enzyme of neutrophils. In line with a role for this enzyme in antigen presentation, CatG is found in endocytic compartments of a variety of antigen presenting cells. CatG is found in primary human monocytes, B cells, myeloid dendritic cells 1 (mDC1), mDC2, plasmacytoid DC (pDC), and murine microglia, but is not expressed in B cell lines or monocyte-derived DC. Purified CatG can be internalized into endocytic compartments in CatG non-expressing cells, widening the range of cells where this enzyme may play a role in antigen processing. Functional assays have implicated CatG as a critical enzyme in processing of several antigens and autoantigens. In this review, historical and recent data on CatG expression, distribution, function and involvement in disease will be summarized and discussed, with a focus on its role in antigen presentation and immune-related events. PMID:19910052

  1. Artificial antigen presenting cells for use in adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Turtle, Cameron J.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2010-01-01

    The observation that T cells can recognize and specifically eliminate cancer cells has spurred interest in the development of efficient methods to generate large numbers of T cells with specificity for tumor antigens that can be harnessed for use in cancer therapy. Recent studies have demonstrated that during encounter with tumor antigen, the signals delivered to T cells by professional antigen presenting cells can affect T cell programming and their subsequent therapeutic efficacy. This has stimulated efforts to develop artificial antigen presenting cells that allow optimal control over the signals provided to T cells. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cellular and acellular artificial antigen presenting cell systems and their use in T cell adoptive immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:20693850

  2. Modes of Antigen Presentation by Lymph Node Stromal Cells and Their Immunological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hirosue, Sachiko; Dubrot, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is no longer the exclusive domain of cells of hematopoietic origin. Recent works have demonstrated that lymph node stromal cell (LNSC) populations, such as fibroblastic reticular cells, lymphatic and blood endothelial cells, not only provide a scaffold for lymphocyte interactions but also exhibit active immunomodulatory roles that are critical to mounting and resolving effective immune responses. Importantly, LNSCs possess the ability to present antigens and establish antigen-specific interactions with T cells. One example is the expression of peripheral tissue antigens, which are presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I molecules with tolerogenic consequences on T cells. Additionally, exogenous antigens, including self and tumor antigens, can be processed and presented on MHC-I complexes, which result in dysfunctional activation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. While MHC-I is widely expressed on cells of both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origins, antigen presentation via MHC-II is more precisely regulated. Nevertheless, LNSCs are capable of endogenously expressing, or alternatively, acquiring MHC-II molecules. Transfer of antigen between LNSC and dendritic cells in both directions has been recently suggested to promote tolerogenic roles of LNSCs on the CD4+ T cell compartment. Thus, antigen presentation by LNSCs is thought to be a mechanism that promotes the maintenance of peripheral tolerance as well as generates a pool of diverse antigen-experienced T cells for protective immunity. This review aims to integrate the current and emerging literature to highlight the importance of LNSCs in immune responses, and emphasize their role in antigen trafficking, retention, and presentation. PMID:26441957

  3. Dendritic cell function and antigen presentation in malaria.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Ian A; Zavala, Fidel

    2016-06-01

    Due to the diverse roles T cells play in protection against malaria as well as pathogenesis it is critical to know which cells present antigen and the nature of the antigens they present. During pre-erythrocytic stages of infection, cutting-edge imaging studies have shown how Plasmodium antigens are presented during both the priming and effector phases of the protective CD8+ T cell response. During blood stages, pathology is in part due to the loss of DC function and the action of pathogenic T cells in the brain. Recently endothelial cells presenting malaria antigen to cognate T cells have emerged as critical players in malaria pathogenesis. Manipulating these processes may inform both vaccine design and the development of therapies for cerebral malaria. PMID:26845735

  4. Evasion and subversion of antigen presentation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Baena, Andres; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the most successful of human pathogens, and has acquired the ability to establish latent or progressive infection and persist even in the presence of a fully functioning immune system. The ability of M. tuberculosis to avoid immune-mediated clearance is likely to reflect a highly evolved and coordinated program of immune evasion strategies, including some that interfere with antigen presentation to prevent or alter the quality of T cell responses. Here we review an extensive array of published studies supporting the view that antigen presentation pathways are targeted at many points by pathogenic mycobacteria. These studies reveal the multiple potential mechanisms by which M. tuberculosis may actively inhibit, subvert or otherwise modulate antigen presentation by MHC class I, class II and CD1 molecules. Unraveling the mechanisms by which M. tuberculosis evades or modulates antigen presentation is of critical importance for the development of more effective new vaccines based on live attenuated mycobacterial strains. PMID:19563525

  5. Self-Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Ann-Katrin; Rupp, Anne; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    The operation of both central and peripheral tolerance ensures the prevention of autoimmune diseases. The maintenance of peripheral tolerance requires self-antigen presentation by professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered as major APCs involved in this process. The current review discusses the role of DCs in autoimmune diseases, the various factors involved in the induction and maintenance of tolerogenic DC phenotype, and pinpoints their therapeutic capacity as well as potential novel targets for future clinical studies. PMID:24592266

  6. Lipid peroxidation causes endosomal antigen release for cross-presentation.

    PubMed

    Dingjan, Ilse; Verboogen, Daniëlle Rj; Paardekooper, Laurent M; Revelo, Natalia H; Sittig, Simone P; Visser, Linda J; Mollard, Gabriele Fischer von; Henriet, Stefanie Sv; Figdor, Carl G; Ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) present foreign antigen in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic T cells in a process called cross-presentation. An important step in this process is the release of antigen from the lumen of endosomes into the cytosol, but the mechanism of this step is still unclear. In this study, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the NADPH-oxidase complex NOX2 cause lipid peroxidation, a membrane disrupting chain-reaction, which in turn results in antigen leakage from endosomes. Antigen leakage and cross-presentation were inhibited by blocking ROS production or scavenging radicals and induced when using a ROS-generating photosensitizer. Endosomal antigen release was impaired in DCs from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients with dysfunctional NOX2. Thus, NOX2 induces antigen release from endosomes for cross-presentation by direct oxidation of endosomal lipids. This constitutes a new cellular function for ROS in regulating immune responses against pathogens and cancer. PMID:26907999

  7. Lipid peroxidation causes endosomal antigen release for cross-presentation

    PubMed Central

    Dingjan, Ilse; Verboogen, Daniëlle RJ; Paardekooper, Laurent M; Revelo, Natalia H; Sittig, Simone P; Visser, Linda J; Mollard, Gabriele Fischer von; Henriet, Stefanie SV; Figdor, Carl G; ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) present foreign antigen in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic T cells in a process called cross-presentation. An important step in this process is the release of antigen from the lumen of endosomes into the cytosol, but the mechanism of this step is still unclear. In this study, we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the NADPH-oxidase complex NOX2 cause lipid peroxidation, a membrane disrupting chain-reaction, which in turn results in antigen leakage from endosomes. Antigen leakage and cross-presentation were inhibited by blocking ROS production or scavenging radicals and induced when using a ROS-generating photosensitizer. Endosomal antigen release was impaired in DCs from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients with dysfunctional NOX2. Thus, NOX2 induces antigen release from endosomes for cross-presentation by direct oxidation of endosomal lipids. This constitutes a new cellular function for ROS in regulating immune responses against pathogens and cancer. PMID:26907999

  8. Prolonged antigen survival and cytosolic export in cross-presenting human γδ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Meuter, Simone; Eberl, Matthias; Moser, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Human blood Vγ9Vδ2 T cells respond to signals from microbes and tumors and subsequently differentiate into professional antigen-presenting cells (γδ T-APCs) for induction of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. γδ T-APCs readily take up and degrade exogenous soluble protein for peptide loading on MHC I, in a process termed antigen cross-presentation. The mechanisms underlying antigen cross-presentation are ill-defined, most notably in human dendritic cells (DCs), and no study has addressed this process in γδ T-APCs. Here we show that intracellular protein degradation and endosomal acidification were significantly delayed in γδ T-APCs compared with human monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs). Such conditions are known to favor antigen cross-presentation. In both γδ T-APCs and moDCs, internalized antigen was transported across insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP)–positive early and late endosomes; however, and in contrast to various human DC subsets, γδ T-APCs efficiently translocated soluble antigen into the cytosol for processing via the cytosolic proteasome-dependent cross-presentation pathway. Of note, γδ T-APCs cross-presented influenza antigen derived from virus-infected cells and from free virus particles. The robust cross-presentation capability appears to be a hallmark of γδ T-APCs and underscores their potential application in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:20413723

  9. Internalization and presentation of myelin antigens by the brain endothelium guides antigen-specific T cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Lopes Pinheiro, Melissa A; Kamermans, Alwin; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van het Hof, Bert; Wierts, Laura; O'Toole, Tom; Boeve, Daniël; Verstege, Marleen; van der Pol, Susanne MA; van Kooyk, Yvette; de Vries, Helga E; Unger, Wendy WJ

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking of myelin-reactive CD4+ T-cells across the brain endothelium, an essential step in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), is suggested to be an antigen-specific process, yet which cells provide this signal is unknown. Here we provide direct evidence that under inflammatory conditions, brain endothelial cells (BECs) stimulate the migration of myelin-reactive CD4+ T-cells by acting as non-professional antigen presenting cells through the processing and presentation of myelin-derived antigens in MHC-II. Inflamed BECs internalized myelin, which was routed to endo-lysosomal compartment for processing in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, myelin/MHC-II complexes on inflamed BECs stimulated the trans-endothelial migration of myelin-reactive Th1 and Th17 2D2 cells, while control antigen loaded BECs did not stimulate T-cell migration. Furthermore, blocking the interaction between myelin/MHC-II complexes and myelin-reactive T-cells prevented T-cell transmigration. These results demonstrate that endothelial cells derived from the brain are capable of enhancing antigen-specific T cell recruitment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13149.001 PMID:27336724

  10. Antigen Presentation by Monocytes and Monocyte-derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Jakubzick, Claudia; Qu, Chunfeng

    2008-01-01

    Summary Monocytes are circulating mononuclear phagocytes with a fundamental capacity to differentiate into macrophages. This differentiation can, in the presence of the right environmental cues, be re-directed instead to dendritic cells (DCs). Recent advances have been made in understanding the role of monocytes and their derivatives in presenting antigen to drive immune responses, and we review this topic herein. We briefly discuss the heterogeneity of monocytes in the blood and subsequently raise the possibility that one of the major monocyte phenotypes in the blood corresponds with a population of “blood DCs” previously proposed to drive T-independent antibody reactions in the spleen. Then we evaluate the role of monocytes in T-dependent immunity, considering their role in acquiring antigens for presentation prior to exiting the bloodstream and their ability to differentiate into macrophages versus antigen-presenting DCs. Finally, we review recent literature on the role of monocyte-derived cells in cross-presentation and discuss the possibility that monocyte-derived cells participate critically in processing antigen for cross-priming, even if they do not present that antigen to T cells themselves. PMID:18160272

  11. MHC structure and function − antigen presentation. Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Anna Carla; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The second part of this review deals with the molecules and processes involved in the processing and presentation of the antigenic fragments to the T-cell receptor. Though the nature of the antigens presented varies, the most significant class of antigens is proteins, processed within the cell to be then recognized in the form of peptides, a mechanism that confers an extraordinary degree of precision to this mode of immune response. The efficiency and accuracy of this system is also the result of the myriad of mechanisms involved in the processing of proteins and production of peptides, in addition to the capture and recycling of alternative sources aiming to generate further diversity in the presentation to T-cells. PMID:25807243

  12. Autophagy proteins in antigen processing for presentation on MHC molecules.

    PubMed

    Münz, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Autophagy describes catabolic pathways that deliver cytoplasmic constituents for lysosomal degradation. Since major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules sample protein degradation products and present them to T cells for adaptive immunity, it is maybe not too surprising that autophagy contributes to this protein antigen processing for MHC presentation. However, the recently recognized breath of pathways, by which autophagy contributes to MHC antigen processing, is exciting. Macroautophagy does not only seem to deliver intracellular but facilitates also extracellular antigen processing by lysosomal hydrolysis for MHC class II presentation. Moreover, even MHC class I molecules that usually display proteasomal products are regulated by macroautophagy, probably using a pool of these molecules outside the endoplasmic reticulum, where MHC class I molecules are loaded with peptide during canonical MHC class I antigen processing. This review aims to summarize these recent developments and point out gaps of knowledge, which should be filled by further investigation, in order to harness the different antigen-processing pathways via autophagy for vaccine improvement. PMID:27319339

  13. Comparative Analysis of Gingival Tissue Antigen Presentation Pathways in Aging and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, O.A.; Novak, M.J.; Kirakodu, S.; Orraca, L.; Chen, K.C.; Strom-berg, A.; Gonzalez-Martinez, J.; Ebersole, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Gingival tissues of periodontitis lesions contribute to local elevations in mediators, including both specific T cell and antibody immune responses to oral bacterial antigens. Thus, antigen processing and presentation activities must exist in these tissues to link antigen-presenting cells with adaptive immunity. We hypothesized that alterations in the transcriptome of antigen processing and presentation genes occur in aging gingival tissues and that periodontitis enhances these differences reflecting tissues less capable of immune resistance to oral pathogens. Materials and Methods Rhesus monkeys (n=34) from 3–23 years of age were examined. A buccal gingival sample from healthy or periodontitis sites were obtained, total RNA isolated, and microarray analysis was used to describe the transcriptome. Results The results demonstrated increased transcription of genes related to the MHC class II and negative regulation of NK cells with aging in healthy gingival tissues. In contrast, both adult and aging periodontitis tissues showed decreased transcription of genes for MHC class II antigens, coincident with up-regulation of MHC class I-associated genes. Conclusion These transcriptional changes suggest a response of healthy aging tissues through the class II pathway (i.e., endocytosed antigens) and altered responses in periodontitis that could reflect host-associated self-antigens or targeting cytosolic intra-cellular microbial pathogens. PMID:24304139

  14. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Shanshan W.; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA), parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFNγ stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention. PMID:26046849

  15. Neutrophil elastase enhances antigen presentation by upregulating human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Akhil; Alatrash, Gheath; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Kerros, Celine; Diaconu, Iulia; Gall, Victor; Neal, Samantha; Peters, Haley L; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an innate immune cell-derived inflammatory mediator that we have shown increases the presentation of tumor-associated peptide antigens in breast cancer. In this study, we extend these observations to show that NE uptake has a broad effect on enhancing antigen presentation by breast cancer cells. We show that NE increases human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on the surface of breast cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. HLA class I upregulation requires internalization of enzymatically active NE. Western blots of NE-treated breast cancer cells confirm that the expression of total HLA class I as well as the antigen-processing machinery proteins TAP1, LMP2, and calnexin does not change following NE treatment. This suggests that NE does not increase the efficiency of antigen processing; rather, it mediates the upregulation of HLA class I by stabilizing and reducing membrane recycling of HLA class I molecules. Furthermore, the effects of NE extend beyond breast cancer since the uptake of NE by EBV-LCL increases the presentation of HLA class I-restricted viral peptides, as shown by their increased sensitivity to lysis by EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Together, our results show that NE uptake increases the responsiveness of breast cancer cells to adaptive immunity by broad upregulation of membrane HLA class I and support the conclusion that the innate inflammatory mediator NE enhances tumor cell recognition and increases tumor sensitivity to the host adaptive immune response. PMID:27129972

  16. Mice completely lacking immunoproteasomes display major alterations in antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Kincaid, Eleanor Z; Che, Jenny W; York, Ian; Escobar, Hernando; Reyes-Vargas, Eduardo; Delgado, Julio C.; Welsh, Raymond M; Karow, Margaret L.; Murphy, Andrew J.; Valenzuela, David M.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Rock, Kenneth L

    2011-01-01

    The importance of immunoproteasomes to antigen presentation has been unclear because animals totally lacking immunoproteasomes have not been previously developed. Here we show that dendritic cells from mice lacking the three immunoproteasome catalytic subunits display defects in presenting multiple major histocompatability (MHC) class I epitopes. During viral infection in vivo, the presentation of a majority of MHC class I epitopes is markedly reduced in immunoproteasome-deficient animals, while presentation of MHC class II peptides is unaffected. By mass spectrometry the repertoire of MHC class I-presented peptides is ~50% different and these differences are sufficient to stimulate robust transplant rejection of wild type cells in mutant mice. These results indicate that immunoproteasomes play a much more important role in antigen presentation than previously thought. PMID:22197977

  17. Tumour immunogenicity, antigen presentation and immunological barriers in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Escors, David

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20(th) century, scientists have tried to stimulate the anti-tumour activities of the immune system to fight against cancer. However, the scientific effort devoted on the development of cancer immunotherapy has not been translated into the expected clinical success. On the contrary, classical anti-neoplastic treatments such as surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are the first line of treatment. Nevertheless, there is compelling evidence on the immunogenicity of cancer cells, and the capacity of the immune system to expand cancer-specific effector cytotoxic T cells. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses strongly depends on efficient tumour antigen presentation from professional antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Several strategies have been used to boost DC antigen presenting functions, but at the end cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as would be expected according to preclinical models. In this review we comment on these discrepancies, focusing our attention on the contribution of regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells to the lack of therapeutic success of DC-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24634791

  18. Tailored immunity by skin antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Clement; Perrin, Helene; Combadiere, Behazine

    2014-01-01

    Skin vaccination aims at targeting epidermal and dermal antigen-presenting cells (APCs), indeed many subsets of different origin endowed with various functions populate the skin. The idea that the skin could represent a particularly potent site to induce adaptive and protective immune response emerged after the success of vaccinia virus vaccination by skin scarification. Recent advances have shown that multiple subsets of APCs coexist in the skin and participate in immunity to infectious diseases. Induction of an adaptive immune response depends on the initial recognition and capture of antigens by skin APCs and their transport to lymphoid organs. Innovative strategies of vaccination have thus been developed to target skin APCs for tailored immunity, hence this review will discuss recent insights into skin APC subsets characterization and how they can shape adaptive immune responses. PMID:25483512

  19. Advanced Telescopes and Observatories Capability Roadmap Presentation to the NRC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of the NASA Advanced Planning and Integration Office (APIO) roadmap for developing technological capabilities for telescopes and observatories in the following areas: Optics; Wavefront Sensing and Control and Interferometry; Distributed and Advanced Spacecraft; Large Precision Structures; Cryogenic and Thermal Control Systems; Infrastructure.

  20. Presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: evidence for specific and non-specific presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Zouhair Atassi, M. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Non-immune SJL (H-2s) spleen cells were fused with non-secreting, non-antigen presenting (H-2d) Balb/c 653-myeloma cells and the hybridomas were cloned by two limiting dilutions. The resulting hybrid B-cell clones were tested for their antigen presentation capability to SJL T-cell lines that were specific for either lysozyme or myoglobin. In proliferative assays, 53% of the antigen presenting B-cell clones presented both myoglobin and lysozyme (general presenters) while the other 47% presented specifically either myoglobin or lysozyme (specific presenters). The ability to selectively present either myoglobin or lysozyme indicates that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific depending on the particular B-cell clone.

  1. Presentation Capability of Compound Displays for Pressure and Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohka, Masahiro; Kato, Keitaro; Fujiwara, Takehiro; Mitsuya, Yasunaga; Miyaoka, Tetsu

    The authors developed advanced haptic displays capable of stimulating the muscles and tendons of the forearms and tactile receptors in fingers to investigate tactile and force effects on simultaneous presentation. Display A is comprised of a master hand with two sets of tactile display with a 4-by-6 array of stimulus pins driven by micro-actuators and an articulated manipulator. Display B is comprised of an articulated manipulator and an 8-by-8 array type tactile display developed in a previous paper. A series of experiments was performed using the above A and B displays to verify the presentation capability of this display type. In Experiment I, subjects grasped virtual pegs and judged their diameters. In Experiment II, subjects tried to insert the pegs into holes. In Experiment III, the crossed-angle of a comparison texture was adjusted to bring it as close as possible to the standard texture fixed during experiments. Since diameter discrimination and insertion precision of the virtual peg were increased by tactile information, tactile-force presentation was effective for peg-in-hole for relatively large clearance. On the other hand, recognition capability for virtual texture was not enhanced compared to a mouse-mounted tactile display previously developed. While the pressure display is effective for instant of touch and peg rotation representations, rotation tactile imaging is not always effective for texture recognitions.

  2. Past and Present Large Solid Rocket Motor Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Robert R.; Owen, David B., II

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to identify the current and historical trends in the capability of solid rocket motor testing in the United States. The study focused on test positions capable of testing solid rocket motors of at least 10,000 lbf thrust. Top-level information was collected for two distinct data points plus/minus a few years: 2000 (Y2K) and 2010 (Present). Data was combined from many sources, but primarily focused on data from the Chemical Propulsion Information Analysis Center s Rocket Propulsion Test Facilities Database, and heritage Chemical Propulsion Information Agency/M8 Solid Rocket Motor Static Test Facilities Manual. Data for the Rocket Propulsion Test Facilities Database and heritage M8 Solid Rocket Motor Static Test Facilities Manual is provided to the Chemical Propulsion Information Analysis Center directly from the test facilities. Information for each test cell for each time period was compiled and plotted to produce a graphical display of the changes for the nation, NASA, Department of Defense, and commercial organizations during the past ten years. Major groups of plots include test facility by geographic location, test cells by status/utilization, and test cells by maximum thrust capability. The results are discussed.

  3. Phenotypic and functional profiling of mouse intestinal antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Harusato, Akihito; Flannigan, Kyle L; Geem, Duke; Denning, Timothy L

    2015-06-01

    The microbiota that populates the mammalian intestine consists of hundreds of trillions of bacteria that are separated from underlying immune cells by a single layer of epithelial cells. The intestinal immune system effectively tolerates components of the microbiota that provide benefit to the host while remaining poised to eliminate those that are harmful. Antigen presenting cells, especially macrophages and dendritic cells, play important roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis via their ability to orchestrate appropriate responses to the microbiota. Paramount to elucidating intestinal macrophage- and dendritic cell-mediated functions is the ability to effectively isolate and identify these cells from a complex cellular environment. In this review, we summarize methodology for the isolation and phenotypic characterization of macrophages and DCs from the mouse intestine and discuss how this may be useful for gaining insight into the mechanisms by which mucosal immune tolerance is maintained. PMID:25891794

  4. Antigen presenting cells in situ: their identification and involvement in immunopathology.

    PubMed Central

    Poulter, L W

    1983-01-01

    Macrophages and other dendritic non-lymphoid cells have been shown to be functionally capable of presenting antigen to induce lymphocyte responses. These cells can now be studied in situ and distinguished, one from another, within normal tissues and sites of cellular infiltration. Analysis of the microenvironment within which these cells are found can be made with immunohistological methods using monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) and cytochemical techniques. In some cases McAbs are specific for particular types of antigen presenting cell. Using such reagents, evidence is accumulating that these cells may be intimately involved in the pathogenesis of immunoregulatory disorders. What is now required is a more definitive correlation between functional capacity and cell phenotype established with cells isolated from blood, and from normal and pathological tissues. If this is possible the immunopathologist may be able, not only to analyse complex microenvironments but also directly determine the interactions and mechanisms at play within the diseased tissues. PMID:6352095

  5. Differential presentation of tumor antigen-derived epitopes by MHC-class I and antigen-positive tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Held, Gerhard; Neumann, Frank; Sturm, Christine; Kaestner, Lars; Dauth, Nina; de Bruijn, Diederik R; Renner, Christoph; Lipp, Peter; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2008-10-15

    SSX2 is a member of the family of cancer/testis antigens. The SSX2 derived peptide SSX2(103-111) has been shown to be presented to cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) by Major-Histocompatibility (MHC) Class-I complexes after endogenous processing, more precisely by the allele HLA-A*0201. The HLA-A*0201- and SSX2-positive melanoma cell line SK-Mel-37 but not Me275 had been shown to elicit reactivity in SSX2(103-111) specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. To analyze the correlation between SSX2(103-111) presentation and T-cell stimulation, we intended to visualize presentation of SSX2(103-111) in these melanoma cell lines. Fab-antibodies were established from a human phage library with specificity for SSX2(103-111)/HLA-A*0201 complexes (but non-reactive with HLA-A*0201 or SSX2(103-111) alone) and used to visualize the presentation of SSX2(103-111) in the context of HLA-A*0201 by fluorescence microscopy. Presentation of SSX2(103-111) the context of HLA-A*0201 was demonstrated for the majority of SK-Mel-37, but for only a small fraction (<1%) of Me275 as indicated by a clear membrane-staining pattern in fluorescence microscopy. The presentation of SSX2(103-111) on SK-Mel37 and Me275, but not the expression of the SSX2 protein correlated with the capability of these cells to stimulate cells of an SSX2(103-111)-specific T-cell clone. MHC-peptide specific antibodies are a valuable tool for the analysis of antigenic peptides in the context of MHC-I molecules and for the structural definition of immunodominant epitopes. PMID:18688854

  6. Presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: evidence for specific and non-specific presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Atassi, M. Z.

    1988-01-01

    Non-immune SJL (H-2s) spleen cells were fused with (H-2d) Balb/c 653-myeloma cells and the hybridomas were cloned by two limiting dilutions. The resulting hybrid B- cell clones were tested for their antigen presentation capability to SJL T-cell lines that were specific for either lysozyme or myoglobin. In proliferative assays, 53% of the antigen presenting B-cell clones were able to present both myoglobin and lysozyme (general presenters) while the other 47% presented specifically either myoglobin or lysozyme (specific presenters). The ability to selectively present either myoglobin or lysozyme indicates that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific depending on the particular B-cell clone.

  7. A new TLR2 agonist promotes cross-presentation by mouse and human antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Santone, Melissa; Aprea, Susanna; Wu, Tom Y H; Cooke, Michael P; Mbow, M Lamine; Valiante, Nicholas M; Rush, James S; Dougan, Stephanie; Avalos, Ana; Ploegh, Hidde; De Gregorio, Ennio; Buonsanti, Cecilia; D'Oro, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    Cross-presentation is the process by which professional APCs load peptides from an extracellularly derived protein onto class I MHC molecules to trigger a CD8+ T cell response. The ability to enhance this process is therefore relevant for the development of antitumor and antiviral vaccines. We investigated a new TLR2-based adjuvant, Small Molecule Immune Potentiator (SMIP) 2.1, for its ability to stimulate cross-presentation. Using OVA as model antigen, we demonstrated that a SMIP2.1-adjuvanted vaccine formulation induced a greater CD8+ T cell response, in terms of proliferation, cytokine production and cytolytic activity, than a non-adjuvanted vaccine. Moreover, using an OVA-expressing tumor model, we showed that the CTLs induced by the SMIP2.1 formulated vaccine inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Using a BCR transgenic mouse model we found that B cells could cross-present the OVA antigen when stimulated with SMIP2.1. We also used a flow cytometry assay to detect activation of human CD8+ T cells isolated from human PBMCs of cytomegalovirus-seropositive donors. Stimulation with SMIP2.1 increased the capacity of human APCs, pulsed in vitro with the pp65 CMV protein, to activate CMV-specific CD8+ T cells. Therefore, vaccination with an exogenous antigen formulated with SMIP2.1 is a successful strategy for the induction of a cytotoxic T cell response along with antibody production. PMID:26024409

  8. Dendritic cell preactivation impairs MHC class II presentation of vaccines and endogenous viral antigens

    PubMed Central

    Young, Louise J.; Wilson, Nicholas S.; Schnorrer, Petra; Mount, Adele; Lundie, Rachel J.; La Gruta, Nicole L.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Heath, William R.; Villadangos, Jose A.

    2007-01-01

    When dendritic cells (DCs) encounter signals associated with infection or inflammation, they become activated and undergo maturation. Mature DCs are very efficient at presenting antigens captured in association with their activating signal but fail to present subsequently encountered antigens, at least in vitro. Such impairment of MHC class II (MHC II) antigen presentation has generally been thought to be a consequence of down-regulation of endocytosis, so it might be expected that antigens synthesized by the DCs themselves (for instance, viral antigens) would still be presented by mature DCs. Here, we show that DCs matured in vivo could still capture and process soluble antigens, but were unable to present peptides derived from these antigens. Furthermore, presentation of viral antigens synthesized by the DCs themselves was also severely impaired. Indeed, i.v. injection of pathogen mimics, which caused systemic DC activation in vivo, impaired the induction of CD4 T cell responses against subsequently encountered protein antigens. This immunosuppressed state could be reversed by adoptive transfer of DCs loaded exogenously with antigens, demonstrating that impairment of CD4 T cell responses was due to lack of antigen presentation rather than to overt suppression of T cell activation. The biochemical mechanism underlying this phenomenon was the down-regulation of MHC II–peptide complex formation that accompanied DC maturation. These observations have important implications for the design of prophylactic and therapeutic DC vaccines and contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms causing immunosuppression during systemic blood infections. PMID:17978177

  9. Characterization of cutaneous antigen presentation in partially inbred miniature swine.

    PubMed

    Grabbe, S; Fishbein, J M; Sachs, D H; Flotte, T J; Granstein, R D

    1994-12-01

    MHC class I and II-defined, partially inbred miniature swine have recently become available as a large animal model in transplantation immunology. To investigate cutaneous immunocompetence in this model, cutaneous antigen presenting cell (APC) function was assessed. For morphologic analysis, punch biopsies were examined by electron microscopy. By this technique, epidermal Langerhans cells bearing typical Birbeck granules could be detected. For functional studies, epidermal cell (EC) suspensions were prepared from split thickness skin specimens. Using FACS analysis, freshly prepared epidermal cell suspensions contained 1.8-4.7% MHC class II-positive cells. These EC potently stimulated allogeneic nylon wool-enriched peripheral blood T cells in the primary mixed EC-lymphocyte reaction. For in vivo assessment of cutaneous APC function, EC suspensions enriched for or depleted of class II-positive EC were generated by panning of class II-positive EC using mouse anti-MHC class II antibodies and anti-mouse IgG-coated petri dishes. EC were then coupled to the hapten trinitrophenol (TNP) and injected s.c. into autologous or MHC-mismatched pigs twice at a one week interval. One week later, pigs were challenged by s.c.-injection of 0.5-1 x 10(7) TNP-coupled or uncoupled EC. Autologous unseparated EC as well as EC enriched for MHC class II-positive cells were able to sensitize naive animals against TNP, whereas neither TNP-coupled EC depleted of class II-positive APC, MHC-mismatched EC coupled to TNP, nor uncoupled EC induced immunity to TNP. Our data indicate that inbred miniature swine possess competent cutaneous APC which are able to induce cutaneous APC which are able to induce cutaneous immunity in a matter similar to Langerhans cells in murine or human skin. PMID:7749572

  10. Wheeling and Dealing With Antigen Presentation in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    In tuberculosis, antigens are transferred from infected to uninfected dendritic cells. Does this favor T lymphocyte response and anti-mycobacterial host defense? In a recent report published in Cell Host & Microbe, Ernst and colleagues show that Mycobacterium tuberculosis seems to have hijacked this mechanism for its own benefit. PMID:26794467

  11. Antigen presentation by hapten-specific B lymphocytes. II. Specificity and properties of antigen-presenting B lymphocytes, and function of immunoglobulin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, A.K.; Haber, S.; Rock, K.L.

    1985-09-01

    Studies were designed to examine the ability of hapten-binding murine B lymphocytes to present hapten-protein conjugates to protein antigen-specific, Ia-restricted T cell hybridomas. BALB/c B cells specific for TNP or FITC presented hapten-modified proteins (TNP-G1 phi, TNP-OVA, or FITC-OVA) to the relevant T cell hybridomas at concentrations below 0.1 microgram/ml. Effective presentation of the same antigens by B lymphocyte-depleted splenocytes, and of unmodified proteins by either hapten-binding B cells or Ig spleen cells, required about 10(3)-to 10(4)-fold higher concentrations of antigen. The use of two different haptens and two carrier proteins showed that this extremely efficient presentation of antigen was highly specific, with hapten specificity being a property of the B cells and carrier specificity of the responding T cells. The presentation of hapten-proteins by hapten-binding B lymphocytes was radiosensitive and was not affected by the depletion of plastic-adherent cells, suggesting that conventional APCs (macrophages or dendritic cells) are not required in this phenomenon. Antigen-pulsing and antibody-blocking experiments showed that this hapten-specific antigen presentation required initial binding of antigen to surface Ig receptors. Moreover, linked recognition of hapten and carrier determinants was required, but these recognition events could be temporally separated. Finally, an antigen-processing step was found to be necessary, and this step was disrupted by ionizing radiation. These data suggest a role for B cell surface Ig in providing a specific high-affinity receptor to allow efficient uptake or focusing of antigen for its subsequent processing and presentation to T lymphocytes.

  12. Modulation of antigen presentation by autoreactive B cell clones specific for GAD65 from a type I diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    BANGA, J P; MOORE, J K; DUHINDAN, N; MADEC, A M; VAN ENDERT, P M; ORGIAZZI, J; ENDL, J

    2004-01-01

    We used a GAD65-specific human B–T cell line cognate system in vitro to investigate the modulation of GAD65 presentation by autoantibody, assessed in a proliferation assay. Generally, if the T cell determinant overlaps or resides within the antibody epitope, effects of presentation are blunted while if they are distant can lead to potent presentation. For three different autoreactive B–T cell line cognate pairs, the modulation of GAD65 presentation followed the mode of overlapping or distant epitopes with resultant potent or undetectable presentation. However, other cognate pairs elicited variability in this pattern of presentation. Notably, one B cell line, DPC, whose antibody epitope did not overlap with the T cell determinants, was consistently poor in presenting GAD65. Using the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor 647 conjugated to GAD65 to study receptor-mediated antigen endocytosis showed that all the antigen-specific B cell clones were efficient in intracellular accumulation of the antigen. Additionally, multicolour immunofluorescence microscopy showed that the internalized GAD65/surface IgG complexes were rapidly targeted to a perinuclear compartment in all GAD-specific B cell clones. This analysis also demonstrated that HLA-DM expression was reduced strongly in DPC compared to the stimulatory B cell clones. Thus the capability of antigen-specific B cells to capture and present antigen to human T cell lines is dependent on the spatial relationship of B and T cell epitopes as well other factors which contribute to the efficiency of presentation. PMID:14678267

  13. Endogenous Antigen Presentation of MHC Class II Epitopes through Non-Autophagic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Carol S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Antigenic peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are generally derived from exogenous proteins acquired by antigen presenting cells. However, in some circumstances, MHC class II molecules can present intracellular proteins expressed within the antigen-presenting cells. There are several described pathways by which endogenous antigens are degraded and gain access to MHC class II molecules. These include autophagy and other non-autophagic pathways; the latter category includes the MHC class I-like pathways, heat shock protein 90-mediated pathways, and internalization from the plasma membrane. This review will summarize and discuss the non-autophagic pathways. PMID:26441969

  14. Distribution of Primed T Cells and Antigen-Loaded Antigen Presenting Cells Following Intranasal Immunization in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ciabattini, Annalisa; Pettini, Elena; Fiorino, Fabio; Prota, Gennaro; Pozzi, Gianni; Medaglini, Donata

    2011-01-01

    Priming of T cells is a key event in vaccination, since it bears a decisive influence on the type and magnitude of the immune response. T-cell priming after mucosal immunization via the nasal route was studied by investigating the distribution of antigen-loaded antigen presenting cells (APCs) and primed antigen-specific T cells. Nasal immunization studies were conducted using the model protein antigen ovalbumin (OVA) plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotide adjuvant. Trafficking of antigen-specific primed T cells was analyzed in vivo after adoptive transfer of OVA-specific transgenic T cells in the presence or absence of fingolimod, a drug that causes lymphocytes sequestration within lymph nodes. Antigen-loaded APCs were observed in mediastinal lymph nodes, draining the respiratory tract, but not in distal lymph nodes. Antigen-specific proliferating T cells were first observed within draining lymph nodes, and later in distal iliac and mesenteric lymph nodes and in the spleen. The presence at distal sites was due to migration of locally primed T cells as shown by fingolimod treatment that caused a drastic reduction of proliferated T cells in non-draining lymph nodes and an accumulation of extensively divided T cells within draining lymph nodes. Homing of nasally primed T cells in distal iliac lymph nodes was CD62L-dependent, while entry into mesenteric lymph nodes depended on both CD62L and α4β7, as shown by in vivo antibody-mediated inhibition of T-cell trafficking. These data, elucidating the trafficking of antigen-specific primed T cells to non-draining peripheral and mucosa-associated lymph nodes following nasal immunization, provide relevant insights for the design of vaccination strategies based on mucosal priming. PMID:21559409

  15. Original Encounter with Antigen Determines Antigen-Presenting Cell Imprinting of the Quality of the Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Abadie, Valérie; Bonduelle, Olivia; Duffy, Darragh; Parizot, Christophe; Verrier, Bernard; Combadière, Béhazine

    2009-01-01

    Background Obtaining a certain multi-functionality of cellular immunity for the control of infectious diseases is a burning question in immunology and in vaccine design. Early events, including antigen shuttling to secondary lymphoid organs and recruitment of innate immune cells for adaptive immune response, determine host responsiveness to antigens. However, the sequence of these events and their impact on the quality of the immune response remain to be elucidated. Here, we chose to study Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) which is now replacing live Smallpox vaccines and is proposed as an attenuated vector for vaccination strategies against infectious diseases. Methodology/Principal findings We analyzed in vivo mechanisms triggered following intradermal (i.d.) and intramuscular (i.m.) Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) administration. We demonstrated significant differences in the antigen shuttling to lymphoid organs by macrophages (MΦs), myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), and neutrophils (PMNs). MVA i.d. administration resulted in better antigen distribution and more sustained antigen-presenting cells (APCs) recruitment into draining lymph nodes than with i.m. administration. These APCs, which comprise both DCs and MΦs, were differentially involved in T cell priming and shaped remarkably the quality of cytokine-producing virus-specific T cells according to the entry route of MVA. Conclusions/Significance This study improves our understanding of the mechanisms of antigen delivery and their consequences on the quality of immune responses and provides new insights for vaccine development. PMID:19997562

  16. Molecular basis of mycobacterial lipid antigen presentation by CD1c and its recognition by αβ T cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sobhan; Ly, Dalam; Li, Nan-Sheng; Altman, John D; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Moody, D Branch; Adams, Erin J

    2014-10-28

    CD1c is a member of the group 1 CD1 family of proteins that are specialized for lipid antigen presentation. Despite high cell surface expression of CD1c on key antigen-presenting cells and the discovery of its mycobacterial lipid antigen presentation capability, the molecular basis of CD1c recognition by T cells is unknown. Here we present a comprehensive functional and molecular analysis of αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of CD1c presenting mycobacterial phosphomycoketide antigens. Our structure of CD1c with the mycobacterial phosphomycoketide (PM) shows similarities to that of CD1c-mannosyl-β1-phosphomycoketide in that the A' pocket accommodates the mycoketide alkyl chain; however, the phosphate head-group of PM is shifted ∼6 Å in relation to that of mannosyl-β1-PM. We also demonstrate a bona fide interaction between six human TCRs and CD1c-mycoketide complexes, measuring high to moderate affinities. The crystal structure of the DN6 TCR and mutagenic studies reveal a requirement of five complementarity determining region (CDR) loops for CD1c recognition. Furthermore, mutagenesis of CD1c reveals residues in both the α1 and α2 helices involved in TCR recognition, yet not entirely overlapping among the examined TCRs. Unlike patterns for MHC I, no archetypical binding footprint is predicted to be shared by CD1c-reactive TCRs, even when recognizing the same or similar antigens. PMID:25298532

  17. Molecular basis of mycobacterial lipid antigen presentation by CD1c and its recognition by αβ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sobhan; Ly, Dalam; Li, Nan-Sheng; Altman, John D.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Moody, D. Branch; Adams, Erin J.

    2014-01-01

    CD1c is a member of the group 1 CD1 family of proteins that are specialized for lipid antigen presentation. Despite high cell surface expression of CD1c on key antigen-presenting cells and the discovery of its mycobacterial lipid antigen presentation capability, the molecular basis of CD1c recognition by T cells is unknown. Here we present a comprehensive functional and molecular analysis of αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of CD1c presenting mycobacterial phosphomycoketide antigens. Our structure of CD1c with the mycobacterial phosphomycoketide (PM) shows similarities to that of CD1c-mannosyl-β1-phosphomycoketide in that the A' pocket accommodates the mycoketide alkyl chain; however, the phosphate head-group of PM is shifted ∼6 Å in relation to that of mannosyl-β1-PM. We also demonstrate a bona fide interaction between six human TCRs and CD1c-mycoketide complexes, measuring high to moderate affinities. The crystal structure of the DN6 TCR and mutagenic studies reveal a requirement of five complementarity determining region (CDR) loops for CD1c recognition. Furthermore, mutagenesis of CD1c reveals residues in both the α1 and α2 helices involved in TCR recognition, yet not entirely overlapping among the examined TCRs. Unlike patterns for MHC I, no archetypical binding footprint is predicted to be shared by CD1c-reactive TCRs, even when recognizing the same or similar antigens. PMID:25298532

  18. Generation of competent bone marrow-derived antigen presenting cells from the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus)

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Bennett J; Willis, Derall G; Prescott, Joseph; Farrell, Regina M; Coons, Teresa A; Schountz, Tony

    2004-01-01

    Background Human infections with Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and related New World hantaviruses often lead to hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS), a sometimes fatal illness. Lungs of patients who die from HCPS exhibit cytokine-producing mononuclear infiltrates and pronounced pulmonary inflammation. Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) are the principal natural hosts of SNV, in which the virus establishes life-long persistence without conspicuous pathology. Little is known about the mechanisms SNV employs to evade the immune response of deer mice, and experimental examination of this question has been difficult because of a lack of methodologies for examining such responses during infection. One such deficiency is our inability to characterize T cell responses because susceptible syngeneic deer mice are not available. Results To solve this problem, we have developed an in vitro method of expanding and generating competent antigen presenting cells (APC) from deer mouse bone marrow using commercially-available house mouse (Mus musculus) granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. These cells are capable of processing and presenting soluble protein to antigen-specific autologous helper T cells in vitro. Inclusion of antigen-specific deer mouse antibody augments T cell stimulation, presumably through Fc receptor-mediated endocytosis. Conclusions The use of these APC has allowed us to dramatically expand deer mouse helper T cells in culture and should permit extensive characterization of T cell epitopes. Considering the evolutionary divergence between deer mice and house mice, it is probable that this method will be useful to other investigators using unconventional models of rodent-borne diseases. PMID:15458574

  19. Rationally designed inhibitor targeting antigen-trimming aminopeptidases enhances antigen presentation and cytotoxic T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Zervoudi, Efthalia; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Birtley, James R; Seregin, Sergey S; Reeves, Emma; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Amalfitano, Andrea; Mavridis, Irene M; James, Edward; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2013-12-01

    Intracellular aminopeptidases endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases 1 and 2 (ERAP1 and ERAP2), and as well as insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP) process antigenic epitope precursors for loading onto MHC class I molecules and regulate the adaptive immune response. Their activity greatly affects the antigenic peptide repertoire presented to cytotoxic T lymphocytes and as a result can regulate cytotoxic cellular responses contributing to autoimmunity or immune evasion by viruses and cancer cells. Therefore, pharmacological regulation of their activity is a promising avenue for modulating the adaptive immune response with possible applications in controlling autoimmunity, in boosting immune responses to pathogens, and in cancer immunotherapy. In this study we exploited recent structural and biochemical analysis of ERAP1 and ERAP2 to design and develop phosphinic pseudopeptide transition state analogs that can inhibit this family of enzymes with nM affinity. X-ray crystallographic analysis of one such inhibitor in complex with ERAP2 validated our design, revealing a canonical mode of binding in the active site of the enzyme, and highlighted the importance of the S2' pocket for achieving inhibitor potency. Antigen processing and presentation assays in HeLa and murine colon carcinoma (CT26) cells showed that these inhibitors induce increased cell-surface antigen presentation of transfected and endogenous antigens and enhance cytotoxic T-cell responses, indicating that these enzymes primarily destroy epitopes in those systems. This class of inhibitors constitutes a promising tool for controlling the cellular adaptive immune response in humans by modulating the antigen processing and presentation pathway. PMID:24248368

  20. Present and Future Capabilities of High Energy Density Experiments*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzen, M. Keith

    2002-04-01

    In recent years, experiments on high energy lasers and pulsed power facilities have successfully reached extreme conditions of temperature and pressure in the laboratory, allowing replication of conditions relevant to areas of high energy density (HED) plasma physics (for example, astrophysics, planetary interiors, stellar physics, and Inertial Confinement Fusion). Experiments in these areas are now routinely providing high quality data in the areas of high energy density hydrodynamics and implosions, radiation transport, and equation-of-state. Current facilities include pulsed-power accelerators, such as the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories, and high-energy lasers, such as the 60-beam Omega laser at the Laboratory of Laser Energetics at Rochester, as well as other MA-class pulsed-power facilities and kJ-class lasers worldwide. These facilities routinely conduct experiments at radiation temperatures of 200 eV and pressures up to 40 MBar. New facilities, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the refurbished Z facility, will extend the experimental regimes to higher temperatures and densities. The National Petawatt laser initiative is examining the physics regimes that could be explored by coupling energetic short-pulse lasers (multi-kJ energies at ps pulse widths) to experiments on these large HED facilities. We will review capabilities of the existing HED facilities, highlight examples of recent experimental results in HED plasma physics, discuss new regimes that might be achievable on next-generation facilities (e.g. NIF and refurbished Z), and explore the potential applications resulting from coupling multi-PW laser pulses with HED plasmas produced on these facilities. *Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  1. Cross-Presentation of Cell-Associated Antigens by MHC Class I in Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Martínez, Enric; Planès, Remi; Anselmi, Giorgio; Reynolds, Matthew; Menezes, Shinelle; Adiko, Aimé Cézaire; Saveanu, Loredana; Guermonprez, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have the unique ability to pick up dead cells carrying antigens in tissue and migrate to the lymph nodes where they can cross-present cell-associated antigens by MHC class I to CD8+ T cells. There is strong in vivo evidence that the mouse XCR1+ DCs subset acts as a key player in this process. The intracellular processes underlying cross-presentation remain controversial and several pathways have been proposed. Indeed, a wide number of studies have addressed the cellular process of cross-presentation in vitro using a variety of sources of antigen and antigen-presenting cells. Here, we review the in vivo and in vitro evidence supporting the current mechanistic models and disscuss their physiological relevance to the cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens by DCs subsets. PMID:26236315

  2. Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    An antigen is any substance that causes your immune system to produce antibodies against it. This means your immune ... and is trying to fight it off. An antigen may be a substance from the environment, such ...

  3. Regulation of protein synthesis and autophagy in activated dendritic cells: implications for antigen processing and presentation.

    PubMed

    Argüello, Rafael J; Reverendo, Marisa; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Antigenic peptides presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules originate from the degradation of both self and non-self proteins. T cells can therefore recognize at the surface of surveyed cells, the self-peptidome produced by the cell itself (mostly inducing tolerance) or immunogenic peptides derived from exogenous origins. The initiation of adaptive immune responses by dendritic cells (DCs), through the antigenic priming of naïve T cells, is associated to microbial pattern recognition receptors engagement. Activation of DCs by microbial product or inflammatory cytokines initiates multiple processes that maximize DC capacity to present exogenous antigens and stimulate T cells by affecting major metabolic and membrane traffic pathways. These include the modulation of protein synthesis, the regulation of MHC and co-stimulatory molecules transport, as well as the regulation of autophagy, that, all together promote exogenous antigen presentation while limiting the display of self-antigens by MHC molecules. PMID:27319340

  4. Direct laser writing of auxetic structures: present capabilities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengsbach, Stefan; Díaz Lantada, Andrés

    2014-08-01

    Auxetic materials (or metamaterials) are those with a negative Poisson ratio (NPR) and that display the unexpected property of lateral expansion when stretched, as well as an equal and opposing densification when compressed. Such geometries are being progressively employed in the development of novel products, especially in the fields of intelligent expandable actuators, shape morphing structures and minimally invasive implantable devices. Although several micromanufacturing technologies have already been applied to the development of auxetic geometries and devices, additional precision is needed to take full advantage of their special mechanical properties. In this study we present a very promising approach for the development of auxetic metamaterials and devices based on the use of direct laser writing. The process stands out for its precision and complex three-dimensional (3D) geometries attainable without the need of supporting structures. To our knowledge it represents one of the first examples of the application of this technology to the manufacture of auxetic geometries and mechanical metamaterials, with details even more remarkable than those shown in very recent studies, almost reaching the current limit of this additive manufacturing technology. We have used some special 3D auxetic designs whose remarkable NPR has been previously highlighted.

  5. Differential Effects of a Saturated and a Monounsaturated Fatty Acid on MHC Class I Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, S. R.; Mitchell, D.; Carroll, E.; Li, M.; Schneck, J.; Edidin, M.

    2009-01-01

    Lipid overload, associated with metabolic disorders, occurs when fatty acids accumulate in non-adipose tissues. Cells of these tissues use major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to present antigen to T cells in order to eliminate pathogens. As obesity is associated with impaired immune responses, we tested the hypothesis that the early stages of lipid overload with saturated fatty acids (SFA) alters MHC class I antigen presentation. Antigen presenting cells (APC) were treated with either the saturated palmitic acid (PA), abundant in the high fat Western diet, or the monounsaturated oleic acid (OA), a component of the Mediterranean diet. PA-treatment lowered APC lysis by activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes and inhibited APC ability to stimulate naïve T cells. Inhibition of immune responses with PA was due to a significant reduction in MHC class I surface expression, inhibition in the rate of APC–T-cell conjugation, and lowering of plasma membrane F-actin levels. OA-treatment had no effect on antigen presentation and upon exposure with PA, prevented the phenotypic effects of PA. OA-treatment conferred protection against changes in antigen presentation by accumulating fatty acids into triglyceride-rich lipid droplets of APC. Our findings establish for the first time a link between the early stages of lipid overload and antigen presentation and suggest that dietary SFA could impair immunity by affecting MHC I-mediated antigen presentation; this could be prevented, paradoxically, by accumulation of triglycerides rich in monounsaturated fatty acids. PMID:18533931

  6. Differential effects of a saturated and a monounsaturated fatty acid on MHC class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, S R; Mitchell, D; Carroll, E; Li, M; Schneck, J; Edidin, M

    2008-07-01

    Lipid overload, associated with metabolic disorders, occurs when fatty acids accumulate in non-adipose tissues. Cells of these tissues use major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to present antigen to T cells in order to eliminate pathogens. As obesity is associated with impaired immune responses, we tested the hypothesis that the early stages of lipid overload with saturated fatty acids (SFA) alters MHC class I antigen presentation. Antigen presenting cells (APC) were treated with either the saturated palmitic acid (PA), abundant in the high fat Western diet, or the monounsaturated oleic acid (OA), a component of the Mediterranean diet. PA-treatment lowered APC lysis by activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes and inhibited APC ability to stimulate naïve T cells. Inhibition of immune responses with PA was due to a significant reduction in MHC class I surface expression, inhibition in the rate of APC-T-cell conjugation, and lowering of plasma membrane F-actin levels. OA-treatment had no effect on antigen presentation and upon exposure with PA, prevented the phenotypic effects of PA. OA-treatment conferred protection against changes in antigen presentation by accumulating fatty acids into triglyceride-rich lipid droplets of APC. Our findings establish for the first time a link between the early stages of lipid overload and antigen presentation and suggest that dietary SFA could impair immunity by affecting MHC I-mediated antigen presentation; this could be prevented, paradoxically, by accumulation of triglycerides rich in monounsaturated fatty acids. PMID:18533931

  7. Antigenic competition between dengue and Coxsackie viruses for presentation to B cells by macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, N.; Chaturvedi, U. C.; Mathur, A.

    1990-01-01

    Macrophages (M phi) pulsed with dengue type 2 (DV) and Coxsackie B4 (CoxB) viruses present antigen to B lymphocytes leading to their clonal expansion as detected by counting antigen-specific IgM antibody plaque-forming cells (PFC). The present study was undertaken to investigate the site for competition in M phi between the two heterologous antigens, DV and CoxB, for their presentation to B cells. It was observed that DV-pulsed M phi presented antigen to B cells in mice depleted of T cells by treatment with anti-Thy 1.2 monoclonal antibodies. The B cells could not be stimulated in absence of M phi in mice treated with silica. The PFC counts for both the antigens were inhibited when M phi were pulsed simultaneously with DV and CoxB. PFC counts were increased by 53-120% by predigesting the antigens by trypsin. Inhibition of DV-specific response by CoxB was abrogated by predigesting CoxB. A marked reduction in DV-specific PFC response was observed when CoxB was superimposed on M phi pulsed with DV 24 h earlier. CoxB-specific PFC counts were not affected by superimposing DV on M phi pulsed with CoxB 24 h earlier. PFC response to the antigen given to M phi before glutaraldehyde fixation was not affected while that for the antigen given to glutaraldehyde-fixed M phi was markedly depressed. It is concluded that the competition between DV and CoxB for antigen presentation to B cells occurs in M phi at the level of antigen processing. PMID:2177622

  8. The role of a human antigen specific T8+ cell subset in antigen presentation, helper function and contrasuppression.

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, T; Avery, J; Jones, T

    1985-01-01

    Regulation of the human immune response was studied by sequential separation of subsets of T cells, followed by assessment of their helper and suppressor functions in a series of reconstitution experiments. T8+ lymphocytes were separated by panning on streptococcal antigen (SA) coated plates into T8+ SA-adherent cells (T8+SA+) and T8+ SA-non-adherent cells (T8+SA-). The helper and suppressor functions of the T8+SA+ and T8+SA- cells, reconstituted with T4+ helper cells were then studied by a direct antibody forming cell assay. T4+ cells will not induce helper activity by 1000 ng SA alone but require the accessory function of monocytes (Mo). However, replacing Mo by T8+SA+ cells will elicit a similar helper activity by T4+ cells and SA as that induced by Mo. In addition to the antigen-specific presentation and induction of helper activity, the T8+SA+ subset displays the properties of antigen-specific contrasuppressor cells. Thus, reconstitution of T4+ cells and T8+SA- (suppressor cells) with T8+SA+ and 1000 ng SA induces helper and no suppressor activity. Substitution of Mo for the T8+SA+ cells converts the helper to a predominantly suppressor-cell function. T8+SA- cells elicit suppression with 1 ng SA in the absence of accessory cells and reconstitution with Mo, T8+SA+ or T4+ cells failed to affect the suppressor activity. Total reconstitution of the four principle subsets of T4+, T8+SA+, T8+SA- cells and Mo elicited similar antigen dose-dependent responses as those of the unseparated mononuclear cells. It seems that all four cell subsets are required for optimal immunoregulation. We suggest that the T8+SA+ can present antigen to T4+ helper cells and induce helper activity, but in addition these cells can prevent the suppressor subset of T8+ cells from inhibiting T4+ helper cells and function as contrasuppressor cells. The mechanism of these functions is not known but HLA class II antigens might play an essential role in antigen binding, presentation and

  9. Vaccine delivery by penetratin: mechanism of antigen presentation by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pouniotis, Dodie; Tang, Choon-Kit; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Pietersz, Geoffrey

    2016-08-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) or membrane-translocating peptides such as penetratin from Antennapedia homeodomain or TAT from human immunodeficiency virus are useful vectors for the delivery of protein antigens or their cytotoxic (Tc) or helper (Th) T cell epitopes to antigen-presenting cells. Mice immunized with CPP containing immunogens elicit antigen-specific Tc and/or Th responses and could be protected from tumor challenges. In the present paper, we investigate the mechanism of class I and class II antigen presentation of ovalbumin covalently linked to penetratin (AntpOVA) by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells with the use of biochemical inhibitors of various pathways of antigen processing and presentation. Results from our study suggested that uptake of AntpOVA is via a combination of energy-independent (membrane fusion) and energy-dependent pathways (endocytosis). Once internalized by either mechanism, multiple tap-dependent or independent antigen presentation pathways are accessed while not completely dependent on proteasomal processing but involving proteolytic trimming in the ER and Golgi compartments. Our study provides an understanding on the mechanism of antigen presentation mediated by CPP and leads to greater insights into future development of vaccine formulations. PMID:27138940

  10. Enhanced Direct Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Self-Antigen Presentation Induced by Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cram, Erik D.; Simmons, Ryan S.; Palmer, Amy L.; Hildebrand, William H.; Rockey, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    The direct major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway ensures intracellular peptides are displayed at the cellular surface for recognition of infected or transformed cells by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Chlamydia spp. are obligate intracellular bacteria and, as such, should be targeted by CD8+ T cells. It is likely that Chlamydia spp. have evolved mechanisms to avoid the CD8+ killer T cell responses by interfering with MHC class I antigen presentation. Using a model system of self-peptide presentation which allows for posttranslational control of the model protein's stability, we tested the ability of various Chlamydia species to alter direct MHC class I antigen presentation. Infection of the JY lymphoblastoid cell line limited the accumulation of a model host protein and increased presentation of the model-protein-derived peptides. Enhanced self-peptide presentation was detected only when presentation was restricted to defective ribosomal products, or DRiPs, and total MHC class I levels remained unaltered. Skewed antigen presentation was dependent on a bacterial synthesized component, as evidenced by reversal of the observed phenotype upon preventing bacterial transcription, translation, and the inhibition of bacterial lipooligosaccharide synthesis. These data suggest that Chlamydia spp. have evolved to alter the host antigen presentation machinery to favor presentation of defective and rapidly degraded forms of self-antigen, possibly as a mechanism to diminish the presentation of peptides derived from bacterial proteins. PMID:26597986

  11. Calmodulin kinase II regulates the maturation and antigen presentation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Tara L; Morita, Craig T; Lee, Kelvin; Kusner, David J

    2005-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells, which activate the adaptive immune system. Upon receiving a danger signal, they undergo a maturation process, which increases their antigen presentation capacity, but the responsible regulatory mechanisms remain incompletely understood. A Ca2+-calmodulin (Cam)-Cam kinase II (CamK II) pathway regulates phagosome maturation in macrophages, and this pathway is inhibited by pathogenic microbes. Our hypothesis is that signal transduction events which control phagosome maturation also regulate antigen presentation. Stimulation of primary human DC or the human DC line KG-1, with particulate antigen, resulted in the activation of CamK II and its localization to the phagosome and plasma membrane. Two mechanistically distinct inhibitors of CamK II significantly reduced DC maturation, as determined by up-regulation of surface costimulatory and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and secretion of cytokines. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that the CamK II inhibitors blocked the antigen-induced increase in total cellular MHC class molecules as well as their trafficking to the plasma membrane. Inhibition of CamK II was associated with decreased presentation of particulate and soluble MHC class II-restricted antigen, with a greater effect on the former. These data support a model in which CamK II regulates critical stages of the maturation and antigen presentation capacity of human DC, particularly in response to stimulation via phagocytosis. PMID:16204647

  12. Towards a systems understanding of MHC class I and MHC class II antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Neefjes, Jacques; Jongsma, Marlieke L M; Paul, Petra; Bakke, Oddmund

    2011-12-01

    The molecular details of antigen processing and presentation by MHC class I and class II molecules have been studied extensively for almost three decades. Although the basic principles of these processes were laid out approximately 10 years ago, the recent years have revealed many details and provided new insights into their control and specificity. MHC molecules use various biochemical reactions to achieve successful presentation of antigenic fragments to the immune system. Here we present a timely evaluation of the biology of antigen presentation and a survey of issues that are considered unresolved. The continuing flow of new details into our understanding of the biology of MHC class I and class II antigen presentation builds a system involving several cell biological processes, which is discussed in this Review. PMID:22076556

  13. Regulation of antigen presentation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a role for Toll-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Clifford V.; Boom, W. Henry

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis survives in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as macrophages and dendritic cells. APCs present antigens in association with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules to stimulate CD4+ T cells, and this process is essential to contain M. tuberculosis infection. Immune evasion allows M. tuberculosis to establish persistent or latent infection in macrophages and results in Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent inhibition of MHC class II transactivator expression, MHC class II molecule expression and antigen presentation. This reduction of antigen presentation might reflect a general mechanism of negative-feedback regulation that prevents excessive T cell-mediated inflammation and that M. tuberculosis has subverted to create a niche for survival in infected macrophages and evasion of recognition by CD4+ T cells. PMID:20234378

  14. Autoinflammation and HLA-B27: Beyond Antigen Presentation.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Cailin H

    2016-08-01

    HLA-B27 associated disorders comprise a group of inflammatory conditions which have in common an association with the HLA class I molecule, HLA-B27. Given this association, these diseases are classically considered disorders of adaptive immunity. However, mounting data are challenging this assumption and confirming that innate immunity plays a more prominent role in pathogenesis than previously suspected. In this review, the concept of autoinflammation is discussed and evidence is presented from human and animal models to support a key role for innate immunity in HLA-B27 associated disorders. PMID:27229619

  15. SAMHD1 Limits HIV-1 Antigen Presentation by Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bruel, Timothée; Cardinaud, Sylvain; Porrot, Françoise; Prado, Julia G.; Moris, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) stimulate CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) by presenting endogenous and exogenous viral peptides via major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules. MDDC are poorly susceptible to HIV-1, in part due to the presence of SAMHD1, a cellular enzyme that depletes intracellular deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) and degrades viral RNA. Vpx, an HIV-2/SIVsm protein absent from HIV-1, antagonizes SAMHD1 by inducing its degradation. The impact of SAMHD1 on the adaptive cellular immune response remains poorly characterized. Here, we asked whether SAMHD1 modulates MHC-I-restricted HIV-1 antigen presentation. Untreated MDDC or MDDC pretreated with Vpx were exposed to HIV-1, and antigen presentation was examined by monitoring the activation of an HIV-1 Gag-specific CTL clone. SAMHD1 depletion strongly enhanced productive infection of MDDC as well as endogenous HIV-1 antigen presentation. Time-lapse microscopy analysis demonstrated that in the absence of SAMHD1, the CTL rapidly killed infected MDDC. We also report that various transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV-1 strains poorly infected MDDC and, as a consequence, did not stimulate CTL. Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) pseudotyping of T/F alleviated a block in viral entry and induced antigen presentation only in the absence of SAMHD1. Furthermore, by using another CTL clone that mostly recognizes incoming HIV-1 antigens, we demonstrate that SAMHD1 does not influence exogenous viral antigen presentation. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the antiviral activity of SAMHD1 impacts antigen presentation by DC, highlighting the link that exists between restriction factors and adaptive immune responses. IMPORTANCE Upon viral infection, DC may present antigens derived from incoming viral material in the absence of productive infection of DC or from newly synthesized viral proteins. In the case of HIV, productive infection of DC is blocked at an early

  16. Cross presentation of antigen by dendritic cells: mechanisms and implications for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sachamitr, Patty; Fairchild, Paul J

    2012-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) possess the specialized potential to present exogenously derived antigen to cytotoxic T lymphocytes to elicit an immune response. This process, termed cross presentation, is crucial in the generation of immune response to viruses, tumors and in autoimmune disease. The ability of DCs to cross-present exogenous antigen to cytotoxic T lymphocytes makes them an attractive target for exploitation in immunotherapy. In recent years, significant advances have been made in understanding the mechanism of cross-presentation and the DC subsets involved. The recent discovery of the human cross presenting DC has given this field a new lease of life. In this report, the authors provide an overview of cross-presentation of antigen by DCs, focusing on the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the process. The authors also discuss the DC subsets involved in cross presentation and its role in health and disease. PMID:22992149

  17. Formaldehyde treatment of proteins can constrain presentation to T cells by limiting antigen processing.

    PubMed Central

    di Tommaso, A; de Magistris, M T; Bugnoli, M; Marsili, I; Rappuoli, R; Abrignani, S

    1994-01-01

    Proteins to be used as vaccines are frequently treated with formaldehyde, although little is known about the effects of this treatment on protein antigenicity. To investigate the effect of formaldehyde treatment on antigen recognition by T cells, we compared the in vitro T-cell response to proteins that have been formaldehyde treated with the response to untreated proteins. We found that peripheral blood mononuclear cells from individuals vaccinated with three formaldehyde-treated proteins (pertussis toxin, filamentous hemagglutinin, pertactin) of Bordetella pertussis showed little or no response to the formaldehyde-treated proteins but proliferated very well in response to the corresponding untreated protein. These findings were further confirmed with CD4+ T-cell clones specific for defined epitopes of the bacterial proteins. We found that some epitopes are presented poorly or not at all when formaldehyde-treated proteins are used, whereas other epitopes are equally presented to T-cell clones when either formaldehyde-treated or untreated antigens are used. However, T-cell recognition could be restored by either antigen degradation before formaldehyde treatment or heat denaturation after such treatment. Parallel digestion with trypsin of both formaldehyde-treated and untreated proteins showed that fragments generated from the two forms of the same antigen were different in size. These results demonstrate that formaldehyde treatment can constrain antigen presentation to T cells and that this may be due to an altered proteolytic processing of formaldehyde-treated proteins. Images PMID:7513307

  18. Redirecting soluble antigen for MHC class I cross-presentation during phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hari, Aswin; Ganguly, Anutosh; Mu, Libing; Davis, Shevaun P.; Stenner, Melanie D.; Lam, Raymond; Munro, Fay; Namet, Inana; Alghamdi, Enaam; Fürstenhaupt, Tobias; Dong, Wei; Detampel, Pascal; Shen, Lian Jun; Amrein, Matthias W.; Yates, Robin M.; Shi, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Peptides presented by MHC class I molecules are derived mostly from proteins synthesized by the antigen-presenting cell itself, while peptides presented by MHC class II molecules are derived predominantly from materials acquired by endocytosis. External antigens can also be presented by MHC class I molecules in a process referred to as cross-presentation. We report that mouse dendritic cell engagement of a phagocytic target alters endocytic processing and inhibits their proteolytic activities. During phagocytosis, endosome maturation is delayed, shows less progression towards the lysosome, and the endocytosed soluble antigen is targeted for MHC class I cross-presentation. The antigen processing in these arrested endosomes is under the control of NAPDH oxidase associated ROS. We also show that cathepsin S is responsible for the generation of the MHC class I epitope. Our results suggest that in addition to solid structure uptake, DC phagocytosis simultaneously modifies the kinetics of endosomal trafficking and maturation. As a consequence, external soluble antigens are targeted into the MHC class I cross-presentation pathway. PMID:25378230

  19. CD1c bypasses lysosomes to present a lipopeptide antigen with 12 amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Young, David C.; De Jong, Annemieke; Vazquez, Jenny; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Talekar, Rahul; Barral, Duarte C.; León, Luis; Brenner, Michael B.; Katz, Joel T.; Riese, Richard; Ruprecht, Ruth M.; O'Connor, Peter B.; Costello, Catherine E.; Porcelli, Steven A.; Briken, Volker

    2009-01-01

    The recent discovery of dideoxymycobactin (DDM) as a ligand for CD1a demonstrates how a nonribosomal lipopeptide antigen is presented to T cells. DDM contains an unusual acylation motif and a peptide sequence present only in mycobacteria, but its discovery raises the possibility that ribosomally produced viral or mammalian proteins that commonly undergo lipidation might also function as antigens. To test this, we measured T cell responses to synthetic acylpeptides that mimic lipoproteins produced by cells and viruses. CD1c presented an N-acyl glycine dodecamer peptide (lipo-12) to human T cells, and the response was specific for the acyl linkage as well as the peptide length and sequence. Thus, CD1c represents the second member of the CD1 family to present lipopeptides. lipo-12 was efficiently recognized when presented by intact cells, and unlike DDM, it was inactivated by proteases and augmented by protease inhibitors. Although lysosomes often promote antigen presentation by CD1, rerouting CD1c to lysosomes by mutating CD1 tail sequences caused reduction in lipo-12 presentation. Thus, although certain antigens require antigen processing in lysosomes, others are destroyed there, providing a hypothesis for the evolutionary conservation of large CD1 families containing isoforms that survey early endosomal pathways. PMID:19468063

  20. Role of Metalloproteases in Vaccinia Virus Epitope Processing for Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP)-independent Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-B7 Class I Antigen Presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Elena; García, Ruth; Mir, Carmen; Barriga, Alejandro; Lemonnier, François A.; Ramos, Manuel; López, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates the viral proteolytic peptides generated by the proteasome and other proteases in the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. There, they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules, which are subsequently recognized by the CD8+ lymphocyte cellular response. However, individuals with nonfunctional TAP complexes or tumor or infected cells with blocked TAP molecules are able to present HLA class I ligands generated by TAP-independent processing pathways. Herein, using a TAP-independent polyclonal vaccinia virus-polyspecific CD8+ T cell line, two conserved vaccinia-derived TAP-independent HLA-B*0702 epitopes were identified. The presentation of these epitopes in normal cells occurs via complex antigen-processing pathways involving the proteasome and/or different subsets of metalloproteinases (amino-, carboxy-, and endoproteases), which were blocked in infected cells with specific chemical inhibitors. These data support the hypothesis that the abundant cellular proteolytic systems contribute to the supply of peptides recognized by the antiviral cellular immune response, thereby facilitating immunosurveillance. These data may explain why TAP-deficient individuals live normal life spans without any increased susceptibility to viral infections. PMID:22298786

  1. The Role of Insulin-Regulated Aminopeptidase in MHC Class I Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Saveanu, Loredana; van Endert, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Production of MHC-I ligands from antigenic proteins generally requires multiple proteolytic events. While the proteolytic steps required for antigen processing in the endogenous pathway are clearly established, persisting gaps of knowledge regarding putative cross-presentation compartments have made it difficult to map the precise proteolytic events required for generation of cross-presented antigens. It is only in the past decade that the importance of aminoterminal trimming as the final step in the endogenous presentation pathway has been recognized and that the corresponding enzymes have been described. This review focuses on the aminoterminal trimming of exogenous cross-presented peptides, with particular emphasis on the identification of insulin responsive aminopeptidase (IRAP) as the principal trimming aminopeptidase in endosomes and phagosomes. PMID:22566938

  2. Chronic HIV Infection Enhances the Responsiveness of Antigen Presenting Cells to Commensal Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Lauren H.; Grishina, Irina; Macal, Monica; Hirao, Lauren A.; Hu, William K.; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Gaulke, Christopher A.; Pollard, Richard; Brown, Jennifer; Suni, Maria; Baumler, Andreas J.; Ghanekar, Smita; Marco, Maria L.; Dandekar, Satya

    2013-01-01

    Chronic immune activation despite long-term therapy poses an obstacle to immune recovery in HIV infection. The role of antigen presenting cells (APCs) in chronic immune activation during HIV infection remains to be fully determined. APCs, the frontline of immune defense against pathogens, are capable of distinguishing between pathogens and non-pathogenic, commensal bacteria. We hypothesized that HIV infection induces dysfunction in APC immune recognition and response to some commensal bacteria and that this may promote chronic immune activation. Therefore we examined APC inflammatory cytokine responses to commensal lactobacilli. We found that APCs from HIV-infected patients produced an enhanced inflammatory response to Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 as compared to APCs from healthy, HIV-negative controls. Increased APC expression of TLR2 and CD36, signaling through p38-MAPK, and decreased expression of MAP kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in HIV infection was associated with this heightened immune response. Our findings suggest that chronic HIV infection enhances the responsiveness of APCs to commensal lactobacilli, a mechanism that may partly contribute to chronic immune activation. PMID:24023646

  3. Killer artificial antigen-presenting cells: the synthetic embodiment of a 'guided missile'.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christian; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan P; Mackensen, Andreas; Fleck, Martin

    2010-07-01

    At present, the treatment of T-cell-dependent autoimmune diseases relies exclusively on strategies leading to nonspecific suppression of the immune systems causing a substantial reduced ability to control concomitant infections or malignancies. Furthermore, long-term treatment with most drugs is accompanied by several serious adverse effects and does not consequently result in cure of the primary immunological malfunction. By contrast, antigen-specific immunotherapy offers the potential to achieve the highest therapeutic efficiency in accordance with minimal adverse effects. Therefore, several studies have been performed utilizing antigen-presenting cells specifically engineered to deplete allo- or antigen-specific T cells ('guided missiles'). Many of these strategies take advantage of the Fas/Fas ligand signaling pathway to efficiently induce antigen-presenting cell-mediated apoptosis in targeted T cells. In this article, we discuss the advantages and shortcomings of a novel non-cell-based 'killer artificial antigen-presenting cell' strategy, developed to overcome obstacles related to current cell-based approaches for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmunity. PMID:20636007

  4. Antigen presentation by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: presentation of synthetic antigenic sites reveals clones that exhibit no specificity and clones that present only one epitope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Atassi, M. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, we reported the preparation and antigen-presenting properties of hybridoma B-cell clones obtained after fusing non-secreting, non-antigen presenting Balb/c 653-myeloma cells with non-immune SJL spleen cells. It was found that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific, depending on the particular B-cell clone. In the present work, one specific and one general presenter B-cell clones were tested for their epitope presentation ability to SJL T-cells that were specific to lysozyme or myoglobin. B-cell clone A1G12, a general presenter which presented both lysozyme and myoglobin to their respective T-cell lines, was found to present all five myoglobin epitopes while clone A1L16, a lysozyme specific presenter presented only one of the three epitopes of lysozyme. The latter reveals a hitherto unknown submolecular specificity (to a given epitope within a protein) for antigen presenting cells at the clonal level. Therefore, the specificity of T-cell recognition does not only derive from the T-cell but may also be dependent on the epitope specificity of the antigen-presenting B-cell.

  5. Parkinson's Disease-Related Proteins PINK1 and Parkin Repress Mitochondrial Antigen Presentation.

    PubMed

    Matheoud, Diana; Sugiura, Ayumu; Bellemare-Pelletier, Angélique; Laplante, Annie; Rondeau, Christiane; Chemali, Magali; Fazel, Ali; Bergeron, John J; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Burelle, Yan; Gagnon, Etienne; McBride, Heidi M; Desjardins, Michel

    2016-07-14

    Antigen presentation is essential for establishing immune tolerance and for immune responses against infectious disease and cancer. Although antigen presentation can be mediated by autophagy, here we demonstrate a pathway for mitochondrial antigen presentation (MitAP) that relies on the generation and trafficking of mitochondrial-derived vesicles (MDVs) rather than on autophagy/mitophagy. We find that PINK1 and Parkin, two mitochondrial proteins linked to Parkinson's disease (PD), actively inhibit MDV formation and MitAP. In absence of PINK1 or Parkin, inflammatory conditions trigger MitAP in immune cells, both in vitro and in vivo. MitAP and the formation of MDVs require Rab9 and Sorting nexin 9, whose recruitment to mitochondria is inhibited by Parkin. The identification of PINK1 and Parkin as suppressors of an immune-response-eliciting pathway provoked by inflammation suggests new insights into PD pathology. PMID:27345367

  6. Exploring genome-wide datasets of MHC class II antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Wijdeven, Ruud H; Bakker, Jeroen M; Paul, Petra; Neefjes, Jacques

    2013-09-01

    MHC class II molecules (MHCII) are critical for presenting antigens to CD4(+) T-cells. They control ignition of CD4(+) T cells and are as such involved in most auto-immune diseases. To define proteins and pathways controlling MHCII antigen presentation and expression, we performed a genome-wide flow cytometry based RNAi screen. Hits were subsequently classified by two screens that monitored the intracellular distribution and transcription of MHCII. This multi-dimensional approach allowed subclassification of hits into functional groups as a first step to defining new pathways controlling MHCII antigen presentation. The datasets from this screen are used as a template for several follow-up studies. This overview focuses on how data from genome-wide screens can be used for target-lead finding, data mining, systems biology and systematic cell biology. PMID:23137594

  7. Intracellular Transport Routes for MHC I and Their Relevance for Antigen Cross-Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Adiko, Aimé Cézaire; Babdor, Joel; Gutiérrez-Martínez, Enric; Guermonprez, Pierre; Saveanu, Loredana

    2015-01-01

    Cross-presentation, in which exogenous antigens are presented via MHC I complexes, is involved both in the generation of anti-infectious and anti-tumoral cytotoxic CD8+ T cells and in the maintenance of immune tolerance. While cross-presentation was described almost four decades ago and while it is now established that some dendritic cell (DC) subsets are better than others in processing and cross-presenting internalized antigens, the involved molecular mechanisms remain only partially understood. Some of the least explored molecular mechanisms in cross-presentation concern the origin of cross-presenting MHC I molecules and the cellular compartments where antigenic peptide loading occurs. This review focuses on MHC I molecules and their intracellular trafficking. We discuss the source of cross-presenting MHC I in DCs as well as the role of the endocytic pathway in their recycling from the cell surface. Next, we describe the importance of the TAP peptide transporter for delivering peptides to MHC I during cross-presentation. Finally, we highlight the impact of innate immunity mechanisms on specific antigen cross-presentation mechanisms in which TLR activation modulates MHC I trafficking and TAP localization. PMID:26191062

  8. Inhibition of MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation by gamma 2-herpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, P G; Efstathiou, S; Doherty, P C; Lehner, P J

    2000-07-18

    The gamma-herpesviruses, in contrast to the alpha- and beta-herpesviruses, are not known to inhibit antigen presentation to CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) during lytic cycle replication. However, murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 causes a chronic lytic infection in CD4(+) T cell-deficient mice despite the persistence of a substantial CTL response, suggesting that CTL evasion occurs. Here we show that, distinct from host protein synthesis shutoff, gamma-herpesvirus 68 down-regulates surface MHC class I expression on lytically infected fibroblasts and inhibits their recognition by antigen-specific CTLs. The viral K3 gene, encoding a zinc-finger-containing protein, dramatically reduced the half-life of nascent class I molecules and the level of surface MHC class I expression and was by itself sufficient to block antigen presentation. The homologous K3 and K5 genes of the related Kaposi's sarcoma-associated virus also inhibited antigen presentation and decreased cell surface expression of HLA class I antigens. Thus it appears that an immune evasion strategy shared by at least two gamma-herpesviruses allows continued lytic infection in the face of strong CTL immunity. PMID:10890918

  9. Macroautophagy in Endogenous Processing of Self- and Pathogen-Derived Antigens for MHC Class II Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Duraes, Fernanda V.; Niven, Jennifer; Dubrot, Juan; Hugues, Stéphanie; Gannagé, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Although autophagy is a process that has been studied for several years its link with antigen presentation and T cell immunity has only recently emerged. Autophagy, which means “self-eating,” is important to maintain cell homeostasis and refers to a collection of mechanisms that delivers intracellular material for degradation into lysosomes. Among them, macroautophagy pathway has many implications in different biological processes, including innate and adaptive immunity. In particular, macroautophagy can provide a substantial source of intracellular antigens for loading onto MHC class II molecules using the alternative MHC class II pathway. Through autophagosomes, endogenous self-antigens as well as antigens derived from intracellular pathogens can be delivered to MHC class II compartment and presented to CD4+ T cells. The pathway will, therefore, impact both peripheral T cell tolerance and the pathogen specific immune response. This review will describe the contribution of autophagy to intracellular presentation of endogenous self- or pathogen-derived antigens via MHC class II and its consequences on CD4+ T cell responses. PMID:26441964

  10. Characterization of a cancer/testis (CT) antigen gene family capable of eliciting humoral response in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Bettoni, Fabiana; Vibranovski, Maria D.; Lopes, Marilene H.; Martins, Waleska K.; Cunha, Isabela W.; Soares, Fernando A.; Simpson, Andrew J. G.; de Souza, Sandro J.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2006-01-01

    Cancer/testis (CT) antigens are immunogenic proteins expressed in normal gametogenic tissues and in different types of tumors. CT antigens are promising candidates for cancer immunotherapy, and the identification of novel CT antigens is a prerequisite for the development of cancer vaccines. We have identified a CT antigen, named CTSP-1, with partial similarity to the breast differentiation antigen NY-BR-1. CTSP-1 presents several splicing and polyadenylation variants and has a very restricted expression pattern among normal tissues. CTSP-1 is exclusively expressed in normal testis and is aberrantly expressed in 47.6% (10 of 21) of tumor cell lines and in 44.4% (75 of 169) of tumors from different histological types. The highest percentages of positive expression were observed in melanomas (59.0%) followed by prostate (58.0%) and lung (57.0%) tumors. CTSP-1 is part of a highly conserved gene family, and members of this family also have a restricted expression pattern and similar protein structure. Antibodies against members of this gene family were detected in 10% (14 of 141) of plasma samples from patients with a wide spectrum of tumors. The highest percentages of antibody response were observed in patients with prostate (20.8%), thyroid (20.0%), and breast (16.6%) tumors. Because of its very restricted expression pattern in normal tissues and immunogenicity in different types of tumors, CTSP-1 should be considered a promising candidate for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:17114284

  11. Pros and Cons of Antigen-Presenting Cell Targeted Tumor Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2015-01-01

    In therapeutic antitumor vaccination, dendritic cells play the leading role since they decide if, how, when, and where a potent antitumor immune response will take place. Since the disentanglement of the complexity and merit of different antigen-presenting cell subtypes, antitumor immunotherapeutic research started to investigate the potential benefit of targeting these subtypes in situ. This review will discuss which antigen-presenting cell subtypes are at play and how they have been targeted and finally question the true meaning of targeting antitumor-based vaccines. PMID:26583156

  12. Efficient major histocompatibility complex class I presentation of exogenous antigen upon phagocytosis by macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacsovics-Bankowski, M; Clark, K; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1993-01-01

    Antigens in extracellular fluids can be processed and presented with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules by a subset of antigen presenting cells (APCs). Chicken egg ovalbumin (Ova) linked to beads was presented with MHC class I molecules by these cells up to 10(4)-fold more efficiently than soluble Ova. This enhanced presentation was observed with covalently or noncovalently linked Ova and with beads of different compositions. A key parameter in the activity of these conjugates was the size of the beads. The APC that is responsible for this form of presentation is a macrophage. These cells internalize the antigen constructs through phagocytosis, since cytochalasin B inhibited presentation. Processing of the antigen and association with MHC class I molecules appears to occur intracellularly as presentation was observed under conditions where there was no detectable release of peptides into the extracellular fluids. When injected in vivo in C57BL/6 mice, Ova-beads, but not soluble Ova, primed CD4- CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Similar results were obtained in BALB/c mice immunized with beta-galactosidase-beads. The implications of these findings for development of nonliving vaccines that stimulate CTL immunity are discussed. PMID:8506338

  13. No Major Role for Insulin-Degrading Enzyme in Antigen Presentation by MHC Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsiang-Ting; Burgevin, Anne; Guénette, Suzanne; Moser, Anna; van Endert, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules requires degradation of epitope source proteins in the cytosol. Although the preeminent role of the proteasome is clearly established, evidence suggesting a significant role for proteasome-independent generation of class I ligands has been reported repeatedly. However, an enzyme responsible for such a role has not been identified. Recently insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) was shown to produce an antigenic peptide derived from the tumor antigen MAGE-A3 in an entirely proteasome-independent manner, raising the question of the global impact of IDE in MHC class I antigen processing. Here we report that IDE knockdown in human cell lines, or knockout in two different mouse strains, has no effect on cell surface expression of various MHC class I molecules, including allomorphs such as HLA-A3 and HLA-B27 suggested to be loaded in an at least a partly proteasome-independent manner. Moreover, reduced or absent IDE expression does not affect presentation of five epitopes including epitopes derived from beta amyloid and proinsulin, two preferred IDE substrates. Thus, IDE does not play a major role in MHC class I antigen processing, confirming the dominant and almost exclusive role of the proteasome in cytosolic production of MHC class I ligands. PMID:24516642

  14. Vaccinia Virus A35R Inhibits MHC Class II Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Kristina E.; Connor, Ramsey F.; Jones, Gwendolyn J.B.; Yimbu, Kenneth; Roper, Rachel L.

    2009-01-01

    The Vaccinia virus gene A35R (Copenhagen designation) is highly conserved in mammalian-tropic poxviruses and is an important virulence factor, but its function was unknown. We show herein that A35 does not affect viral infectivity, apoptosis induction, or replication; however, we found that A35 significantly inhibited MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation, immune priming of T lymphocytes, and subsequent chemokine and cytokine synthesis. A35 localized to endosomes and reduced the amount of a model antigenic peptide displayed in the cleft of class II MHC. In addition, A35 decreased VV specific T cell responses in vivo. Thus, this is the first report identifying a function for the A35 protein in virulence as well as the first report identifying a VV gene that inhibits peptide antigen presentation. PMID:19954808

  15. Dendritic Cells Are the Major Antigen Presenting Cells in Inflammatory Lesions of Murine Mycoplasma Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiangle; Jones, Harlan P.; Dobbs, Nicole; Bodhankar, Sheetal; Simecka, Jerry W.

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasmas cause chronic respiratory diseases in animals and humans, and to date, development of vaccines have been problematic. Using a murine model of mycoplasma pneumonia, lymphocyte responses, specifically T cells, were shown to confer protection as well as promote immunopathology in mycoplasma disease. Because T cells play such a critical role, it is important to define the role of antigen presenting cells (APC) as these cells may influence either exacerbation of mycoplasma disease pathogenesis or enhancement of protective immunity. The roles of APC, such as dendritic cells and/or macrophages, and their ability to modulate adaptive immunity in mycoplasma disease are currently unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify individual pulmonary APC populations that may contribute to the activation of T cell responses during mycoplasma disease pathogenesis. The present study indeed demonstrates increasing numbers of CD11c− F4/80+ cells, which contain macrophages, and more mature/activated CD11c+ F4/80− cells, containing DC, in the lungs after infection. CD11c− F4/80+ macrophage-enriched cells and CD11c+ F4/80− dendritic cell-enriched populations showed different patterns of cytokine mRNA expression, supporting the idea that these cells have different impacts on immunity in response to infection. In fact, DC containing CD11c+ F4/80− cell populations from the lungs of infected mice were most capable of stimulating mycoplasma-specific CD4+ Th cell responses in vitro. In vivo, these CD11c+F4/80− cells were co-localized with CD4+ Th cells in inflammatory infiltrates in the lungs of mycoplasma-infected mice. Thus, CD11c+F4/80− dendritic cells appear to be the major APC population responsible for pulmonary T cell stimulation in mycoplasma-infected mice, and these dendritic cells likely contribute to responses impacting disease pathogenesis. PMID:23390557

  16. Skin tumor immunity: Site does matter for antigen presentation by DCs.

    PubMed

    Waithman, Jason; Gebhardt, Thomas; Bedoui, Sammy

    2016-03-01

    The immune system has the ability to specifically identify and eliminate tumors, but the underlying mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are not fully understood. A study published in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology now provides new insights into this important problem. Joncker et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2016. 46: 609-618] show that the timely mobilization of tumor antigen-bearing dendritic cells (DCs) from the periphery to the lymph nodes is critical for effective antitumor T-cell immunity, and that DCs present tumor antigens much more efficiently when encountered in the skin rather than in the subcutaneous tissues. PMID:26842676

  17. Unique Transcompartmental Bridge: Antigen-Presenting Cells Sampling across Endothelial and Mucosal Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Frederick; Tong, Alexander A.; Huang, Alex Y.

    2016-01-01

    Potentially harmful pathogens can gain access to tissues and organ systems through body sites that are in direct contact with the outside environment, such as the skin, the gut, and the airway mucosa. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) represent a bridge between the innate and adaptive immunity, and their capacity for constant immune surveillance and rapid sampling of incoming pathogens and other potentially harmful antigens is central for mounting an effective and robust protective host response. The classical view is that APCs perform this task efficiently within the tissue to sense invading agents intra-compartmentally. However, recent data based on high resolution imaging support an additional transcompartmental surveillance behavior by APC by reaching across intact physical barriers. In this review, we summarize intravital microscopic evidences of APC to sample antigens transcompartmentally at the gut mucosa and other body sites. PMID:27375624

  18. Suppression of autophagy and antigen presentation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE_PGRS47.

    PubMed

    Saini, Neeraj K; Baena, Andres; Ng, Tony W; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Kennedy, Steven C; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Carreño, Leandro J; Xu, Jiayong; Chan, John; Larsen, Michelle H; Jacobs, William R; Porcelli, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Suppression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen presentation is believed to be among the major mechanisms used by Mycobacterium tuberculosis to escape protective host immune responses. Through a genome-wide screen for the genetic loci of M. tuberculosis that inhibit MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation by mycobacteria-infected dendritic cells, we identified the PE_PGRS47 protein as one of the responsible factors. Targeted disruption of the PE_PGRS47 (Rv2741) gene led to attenuated growth of M. tuberculosis in vitro and in vivo, and a PE_PGRS47 mutant showed enhanced MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation during in vivo infection of mice. Analysis of the effects of deletion or over-expression of PE_PGRS47 implicated this protein in the inhibition of autophagy in infected host phagocytes. Our findings identify PE_PGRS47 as a functionally relevant, non-redundant bacterial factor in the modulation of innate and adaptive immunity by M. tuberculosis, suggesting strategies for improving antigen presentation and the generation of protective immunity during vaccination or infection. PMID:27562263

  19. [Use of heat shock of antigen-presenting cells for functional testing of allospecificity memory T-cells].

    PubMed

    Kazanskiĭ, D B; Petrishchev, V N; Shtil', A A; Chernysheva, A D; Sernova, N V; Abronina, I F; Pobezinskiĭ, L A; Agafonova, E L

    1999-02-01

    For many years, the search for the appropriate method of testing the functional activity of the memory T-cells was an urgent problem and determined progress in the study of immunological memory. We proposed simple methods of functional testing the memory of CD8+ T-cells specific to the H-2Kb alloantigen based on measuring their proliferation in response to heat-treated allogenic splenocytes and cells of allogenic tumors in vitro. Primary proliferative response to the alloantigen was shown not to develop when the allogenic antigen-presenting cells were subjected to an acute (45 degrees C, 1 h) or moderate (42 degrees C, 30 min) heat shock. The block of the primary allogenic response of naive T-lymphocytes to the heated splenocytes could not be abrogated by the addition of exogenous IL-2 and was not due to deletion or suppression of antigen-reactive clones. On the contrary, the long-lived memory CD8+ T-cells induced in the course of the primary in vivo response were capable of proliferation in response to heat-treated allogenic stimulators carrying the same immunizing antigen. The different response of the naive T-cells and memory T-cells to the allogenic stimulators subjected to a heat shock might be due to a strict dependence of the naive T-cells on the inducing co-stimulation provided by the B7 ligand, whose expression was suppressed in the cultures containing the heat-treated stimulator cells. These results probably suggest that a specific immunoregulatory mechanism exists that is based on a disorder in costimulatory functions due to the cellular stress-response induced in the antigen-presenting cells. PMID:10495901

  20. CLIC1 regulates dendritic cell antigen processing and presentation by modulating phagosome acidification and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Salao, Kanin; Jiang, Lele; Li, Hui; Tsai, Vicky W-W; Husaini, Yasmin; Curmi, Paul M G; Brown, Louise J; Brown, David A; Breit, Samuel N

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular chloride channel protein 1 (CLIC1) participates in inflammatory processes by regulating macrophage phagosomal functions such as pH and proteolysis. Here, we sought to determine if CLIC1 can regulate adaptive immunity by actions on dendritic cells (DCs), the key professional antigen presenting cells. To do this, we first generated bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from germline CLIC1 gene-deleted (CLIC1(-/-)) and wild-type (CLIC1(+/+)) mice, then studied them in vitro and in vivo We found phagocytosis triggered cytoplasmic CLIC1 translocation to the phagosomal membrane where it regulated phagosomal pH and proteolysis. Phagosomes from CLIC1(-/-) BMDCs displayed impaired acidification and proteolysis, which could be reproduced if CLIC1(+/+), but not CLIC1(-/-) cells, were treated with IAA94, a CLIC family ion channel blocker. CLIC1(-/-) BMDC displayed reduced in vitro antigen processing and presentation of full-length myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) and reduced MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data suggest that CLIC1 regulates DC phagosomal pH to ensure optimal processing of antigen for presentation to antigen-specific T-cells. Further, they indicate that CLIC1 is a novel therapeutic target to help reduce the adaptive immune response in autoimmune diseases. PMID:27113959

  1. CLIC1 regulates dendritic cell antigen processing and presentation by modulating phagosome acidification and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Salao, Kanin; Jiang, Lele; Li, Hui; Tsai, Vicky W.-W.; Husaini, Yasmin; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Brown, Louise J.; Brown, David A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular chloride channel protein 1 (CLIC1) participates in inflammatory processes by regulating macrophage phagosomal functions such as pH and proteolysis. Here, we sought to determine if CLIC1 can regulate adaptive immunity by actions on dendritic cells (DCs), the key professional antigen presenting cells. To do this, we first generated bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from germline CLIC1 gene-deleted (CLIC1−/−) and wild-type (CLIC1+/+) mice, then studied them in vitro and in vivo. We found phagocytosis triggered cytoplasmic CLIC1 translocation to the phagosomal membrane where it regulated phagosomal pH and proteolysis. Phagosomes from CLIC1−/− BMDCs displayed impaired acidification and proteolysis, which could be reproduced if CLIC1+/+, but not CLIC1−/− cells, were treated with IAA94, a CLIC family ion channel blocker. CLIC1−/− BMDC displayed reduced in vitro antigen processing and presentation of full-length myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) and reduced MOG-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data suggest that CLIC1 regulates DC phagosomal pH to ensure optimal processing of antigen for presentation to antigen-specific T-cells. Further, they indicate that CLIC1 is a novel therapeutic target to help reduce the adaptive immune response in autoimmune diseases. PMID:27113959

  2. Human Peritoneal Mesothelial Cells Display Phagocytic and Antigen-Presenting Functions to Contribute to Intraperitoneal Immunity.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Tanya J; Zhang, Xiang Y; Huo, Zhiming; Robertson, David; Lovell, Patricia A; Dalgleish, Angus G; Barton, Desmond P J

    2016-06-01

    Mesothelial cells lining the peritoneal cavity are strategically positioned to respond to and counter intraperitoneal infections, cancer cells, and other challenges. We have investigated human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs) for phagocytic activity, expression of surface Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II and accessory molecules involved in antigen presentation, and the ability to present recall antigens to T cells. Phagocytosis of dextran, latex beads, and Escherichia coli was observed by flow cytometry, and internalization was visualized using confocal and electron microscopy. Flow cytometry and/or cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed constitutive expression of ICAM-1, LFA-3, and B7-1, but not B7-2 or MHC class II. Interferon-gamma induced MHC II and ICAM-1 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Importantly, HPMCs induced autologous CD3 T-lymphocyte proliferation (H incorporation) after pulse with recall antigen. Human peritoneal mesothelial cells equipped with phagocytic and antigen-presenting machinery are anticipated to have an integral role in intraperitoneal immune surveillance. PMID:27120688

  3. Engineering an intracellular pathway for major histocompatibility complex class II presentation of antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T C; Guarnieri, F G; Staveley-O'Carroll, K F; Viscidi, R P; Levitsky, H I; Hedrick, L; Cho, K R; August, J T; Pardoll, D M

    1995-01-01

    The presentation of antigenic peptides by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules to CD4+ T cells is critical to the function of the immune system. In this study, we have utilized the sorting signal of the lysosomal-associated membrane protein LAMP-1 to target a model antigen, human papillomavirus 16 E7 (HPV-16 E7), into the endosomal and lysosomal compartments. The LAMP-1 sorting signal reroutes the antigen into the MHC class II processing pathway, resulting in enhanced presentation to CD4+ cells in vitro. In vivo immunization experiments in mice demonstrated that vaccinia containing the chimeric E7/LAMP-1 gene generated greater E7-specific lymphoproliferative activity, antibody titers, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activities than vaccinia containing the wild-type HPV-16 E7 gene. These results suggest that specific targeting of an antigen to the endosomal and lysosomal compartments enhances MHC class II presentation and vaccine potency. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8524826

  4. The Central Role of Antigen Presentation in Islets of Langerhans in Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Calderon, Boris; Carrero, Javier A.; Unanue, Emil R.

    2014-01-01

    The islets of Langerhans normally contain resident antigen presenting cells (APCs), which in normal conditions are mostly represented by macrophages, with a few dendritic cells (DC). We present here the features of these islet APCs, making the point that they have a supportive function in islet homeostasis. Islet APCs express high levels of major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) molecules on their surfaces and are highly active in antigen presentation in the autoimmune diabetes of the NOD mouse: they do this by presenting peptides derived from molecules of the β-cells. These APCs also are instrumental in the localization of diabetogenic T cells into islets. The islet APC present exogenous peptides derived from secretory granules of the beta cell, giving rise to unique peptide-MHC complexes (pMHC) that activate those non-conventional T cells that bypass thymus selection. PMID:24556398

  5. The central role of antigen presentation in islets of Langerhans in autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Boris; Carrero, Javier A; Unanue, Emil R

    2014-02-01

    The islets of Langerhans normally contain resident antigen presenting cells (APCs), which in normal conditions are mostly represented by macrophages, with a few dendritic cells (DC). We present here the features of these islet APCs, making the point that they have a supportive function in islet homeostasis. Islet APCs express high levels of major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) molecules on their surfaces and are highly active in antigen presentation in the autoimmune diabetes of the NOD mouse: they do this by presenting peptides derived from molecules of the β-cells. These APCs also are instrumental in the localization of diabetogenic T cells into islets. The islet APC present exogenous peptides derived from secretory granules of the β-cell, giving rise to unique peptide-MHC complexes (pMHC) that activate those non-conventional T cells that bypass thymus selection. PMID:24556398

  6. Mechanisms of antigen presentation to T cells in murine graft-versus-host disease: cross-presentation and the appearance of cross-presentation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojian; Li, Hongmei; Matte-Martone, Catherine; Cui, Weiguo; Li, Ning; Tan, Hung Sheng; Roopenian, Derry

    2011-01-01

    Recipient antigen-presenting cells (APCs) initiate GVHD by directly presenting host minor histocompatibility antigens (miHAs) to donor CD8 cells. However, later after transplantation, host APCs are replaced by donor APCs, and if pathogenic CD8 cells continue to require APC stimulation, then donor APCs must cross-present host miHAs. Consistent with this, CD8-mediated GVHD is reduced when donor APCs are MHC class I−. To study cross-presentation, we used hosts that express defined MHC class I Kb-restricted miHAs, crossed to Kb-deficient backgrounds, such that these antigens cannot be directly presented. Cross-priming was surprisingly efficient, whether antigen was restricted to the hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic compartments. Cross-primed CD8 cells were cytolytic and produced IFN-γ. CD8 cells were exclusively primed by donor CD11c+ cells, and optimal cross-priming required that they are stimulated by both type I IFNs and CD40L. In studying which donor APCs acquire host miHAs, we made the surprising discovery that there was a large-scale transfer of transmembrane proteins from irradiated hosts, including MHC class I–peptide complexes, to donor cells, including dendritic cells. Donor dendritic cells that acquired host MHC class I–peptide complexes were potent stimulators of peptide-specific T cells. These studies identify new therapeutic targets for GVHD treatment and a novel mechanism whereby donor APCs prime host-reactive T cells. PMID:21963602

  7. Phylogeny of immune recognition: antigen processing/presentation in channel catfish immune responses to hemocyanins.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, A N; Miller, N W; Jørgensen, T; Clem, L W

    1990-10-15

    Studies were conducted to address the role(s) of antigen (Ag) processing/presentation in channel catfish immune responses. Vigorous and specific secondary in vitro proliferative and antibody (Ab) responses were obtained to keyhole limpet and Limulus polyphemus hemocyanins with peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from catfish previously primed in vivo with Ag. In addition, such antigen-specific in vitro proliferative and Ab responses were efficiently elicited by antigen-pulsed and subsequently paraformaldehyde-fixed autologous PBL used as putative antigen-presenting cells (APC) but not by APC fixed prior to Ag pulsing. Treatment of these putative APC with lysosomotropic agents, protease inhibitors, or the ionophore monensin prior to or during pulsing with Ag significantly inhibited both in vitro responses. Furthermore, the use of radiolabeled protein indicated that both untreated and inhibitor-treated PBL but not erythrocytes take up Ag; however, only untreated PBL were able to degrade Ag. Immune restriction was indicated by the use of allogeneic PBL as APC in that only strong MLRs were generated with no detectable antibodies produced in vitro. Finally, the employment of isolated leukocyte subpopulations demonstrated that both catfish B (sIg+) lymphocytes and monocytes were efficient Ag presentors. PMID:2208303

  8. Aspirations and Capabilities of Rural Youth in Relation to Present and Projected Labor Market Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Max F.; And Others

    A study was conducted to: determine the aspirations and capabilities of rural youth in selected low-income counties in Arkansas; relate aspirations, capabilities, and the discrepancy between the two to the experience background of the youths studied; and relate the youths' occupational plans to present and projected labor market requirements. The…

  9. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy Augments Antigen-Specific PD-1-Mediated Anti-Tumor Immune Responses via Cross-Presentation of Tumor Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Andrew B.; Nirschl, Christopher J.; Kochel, Christina M.; Nirschl, Thomas R.; Francisca, Brian J.; Velarde, Esteban; Deweese, Theodore L.; Drake, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    The immune-modulating effects of radiation therapy have gained considerable interest recently and there have been multiple reports of synergy between radiation and immunotherapy. However, additional pre-clinical studies are needed to demonstrate the antigen-specific nature of radiation-induced immune responses and elucidate potential mechanisms of synergy with immunotherapy. Here we demonstrate the ability of stereotactic radiotherapy to induce endogenous antigen-specific immune responses when combined with anti-PD-1 checkpoint blockade immunotherapy. Using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP), image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy delivered to B16-OVA melanoma or 4T1-HA breast carcinoma tumors resulted in the development of antigen-specific T and B cell-mediated immune responses. These immune-stimulating effects of radiotherapy were significantly increased when combined with either anti-PD-1 therapy or regulatory T cell (Treg) depletion, resulting in improved local tumor control. Phenotypic analyses of antigen-specific CD8 T cells revealed that radiotherapy increased the percentage of antigen-experienced T cells and effector memory T cells. Mechanistically we found that radiotherapy up-regulates tumor-associated antigen-MHC complexes, enhances antigen cross-presentation in the draining lymph node, and increased T-cell infiltration into tumors. These findings demonstrate the ability of radiotherapy to prime an endogenous antigen-specific immune response and provide additional mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with PD-1 blockade in the clinic. PMID:25527358

  10. Salt bridge residues between I-Ak dimer of dimers alpha-chains modulate antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Yadati, S; Nydam, T; Demian, D; Wade, T K; Gabriel, J L; Barisas, B G; Wade, W F

    1999-03-15

    Class II dimers of dimers are predicted to have functional significance in antigen presentation. The putative contact amino acids of the I-Ak class II dimer of dimers have been identified by molecular modeling based on the DR1 crystal structure (Nydam et al., Int. Immunol. 10, 1237,1998). We have previously reported the role in antigen presentation of dimer of dimers contact amino acids located in the C-terminal domains of the alpha- and beta-chains of class II. Our calculations show that residues Ealpha89 and Ralpha145 in the alpha2-domain form an inter alpha-chain salt bridge between pairs of alphabeta-heterodimers. Other residues, Qalpha92 and Nalpha115, may be involved in close association in that part of the alpha-chain. We investigated the role of these amino acids on class II expression and antigen presentation. Class II composed of an Ealpha89K substituted alpha-chain paired with a wt beta-chain exhibited inhibited antigen presentation and expression of alpha-chain serologic epitopes. In contrast, mutation of Ralpha145E had less affect on antigen presentation and did not affect I-Ak serologic epitopes. Interchanging charges of the salt bridge residues by expressing both Ralpha145E and Ealpha89K on the same chain obviated the large negative effect of the Ealpha89K mutation on antigen presentation but not on the serologic epitopes. Our results are similar for those reported for mutation of DR3's inter-chain salt bridge with the exception that double mutants did not moderate the DR3 defect. Interestingly, the amino acids differences between I-A and DR change the location of the inter-chain salt bridges. In DR1 these residues are located at positions Ealpha88 and Kalpha111; in I-Ak these residues are located at position Ealpha89 and Ralpha145. Inter alpha-chain salt bridges are thus maintained in various class II molecules by amino acids located in different parts of the alpha2-domain. This conservation of structure suggests that considerable functional

  11. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  12. Presenting native-like trimeric HIV-1 antigens with self-assembling nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    He, Linling; de Val, Natalia; Morris, Charles D; Vora, Nemil; Thinnes, Therese C; Kong, Leopold; Azadnia, Parisa; Sok, Devin; Zhou, Bin; Burton, Dennis R; Wilson, Ian A; Nemazee, David; Ward, Andrew B; Zhu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Structures of BG505 SOSIP.664 trimer in complex with broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) have revealed the critical role of trimeric context for immune recognition of HIV-1. Presentation of trimeric HIV-1 antigens on nanoparticles may thus provide promising vaccine candidates. Here we report the rational design, structural analysis and antigenic evaluation of HIV-1 trimer-presenting nanoparticles. We first demonstrate that both V1V2 and gp120 can be presented in native-like trimeric conformations on nanoparticles. We then design nanoparticles presenting various forms of stabilized gp140 trimer based on ferritin and a large, 60-meric E2p that displays 20 spikes mimicking virus-like particles (VLPs). Particle assembly is confirmed by electron microscopy (EM), while antigenic profiles are generated using representative bNAbs and non-NAbs. Lastly, we demonstrate high-yield gp140 nanoparticle production and robust stimulation of B cells carrying cognate VRC01 receptors by gp120 and gp140 nanoparticles. Together, our study provides an arsenal of multivalent immunogens for HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:27349934

  13. Presenting native-like trimeric HIV-1 antigens with self-assembling nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    He, Linling; de Val, Natalia; Morris, Charles D.; Vora, Nemil; Thinnes, Therese C.; Kong, Leopold; Azadnia, Parisa; Sok, Devin; Zhou, Bin; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A; Nemazee, David; Ward, Andrew B.; Zhu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Structures of BG505 SOSIP.664 trimer in complex with broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) have revealed the critical role of trimeric context for immune recognition of HIV-1. Presentation of trimeric HIV-1 antigens on nanoparticles may thus provide promising vaccine candidates. Here we report the rational design, structural analysis and antigenic evaluation of HIV-1 trimer-presenting nanoparticles. We first demonstrate that both V1V2 and gp120 can be presented in native-like trimeric conformations on nanoparticles. We then design nanoparticles presenting various forms of stabilized gp140 trimer based on ferritin and a large, 60-meric E2p that displays 20 spikes mimicking virus-like particles (VLPs). Particle assembly is confirmed by electron microscopy (EM), while antigenic profiles are generated using representative bNAbs and non-NAbs. Lastly, we demonstrate high-yield gp140 nanoparticle production and robust stimulation of B cells carrying cognate VRC01 receptors by gp120 and gp140 nanoparticles. Together, our study provides an arsenal of multivalent immunogens for HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:27349934

  14. MHC Class II Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells Regulated through Endosomal Sorting

    PubMed Central

    ten Broeke, Toine; Wubbolts, Richard; Stoorvogel, Willem

    2013-01-01

    For the initiation of adaptive immune responses, dendritic cells present antigenic peptides in association with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) to naïve CD4+ T lymphocytes. In this review, we discuss how antigen presentation is regulated through intracellular processing and trafficking of MHCII. Newly synthesized MHCII is chaperoned by the invariant chain to endosomes, where peptides from endocytosed pathogens can bind. In nonactivated dendritic cells, peptide-loaded MHCII is ubiquitinated and consequently sorted by the ESCRT machinery to intraluminal vesicles of multivesicular bodies, ultimately leading to lysosomal degradation. Ubiquitination of newly synthesized MHCII is blocked when dendritic cells are activated, now allowing its transfer to the cell surface. This mode of regulation for MHCII is a prime example of how molecular processing and sorting at multivesicular bodies can determine the expression of signaling receptors at the plasma membrane. PMID:24296169

  15. Antigen Presentation, Autoantigens, and Immune Regulation in Multiple Sclerosis and Other Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Riedhammer, Christine; Weissert, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is in the center of the immune system, both in host defense against pathogens, but also when the system is unbalanced and autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) develop. It is not just by chance that a major histocompatibility complex gene is the major genetic susceptibility locus in MS; a feature that MS shares with other autoimmune diseases. The exact etiology of the disease, however, has not been fully understood yet. T cells are regarded as the major players in the disease, but most probably a complex interplay of altered central and peripheral tolerance mechanisms, T-cell and B-cell functions, characteristics of putative autoantigens, and a possible interference of environmental factors like microorganisms are at work. In this review, new data on all these different aspects of antigen presentation and their role in MS will be discussed, probable autoantigens will be summarized, and comparisons to other autoimmune diseases will be drawn. PMID:26136751

  16. Antigen Presentation and T-Cell Activation Are Critical for RBP4-Induced Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M; Castoldi, Angela; Aryal, Pratik; Wellenstein, Kerry; Peroni, Odile D; Kahn, Barbara B

    2016-05-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation contributes to impaired insulin action, which is a major cause of type 2 diabetes. RBP4 is an adipocyte- and liver-derived protein with an important role in insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and AT inflammation. RBP4 elevation causes AT inflammation by activating innate immunity, which elicits an adaptive immune response. RBP4-overexpressing mice (RBP4-Ox) are insulin resistant and glucose intolerant and have increased AT macrophages and T-helper 1 cells. We show that high-fat diet-fed RBP4(-/-) mice have reduced AT inflammation and improved insulin sensitivity versus wild type. We also elucidate the mechanism for RBP4-induced macrophage antigen presentation and subsequent T-cell activation. In RBP4-Ox, AT macrophages display enhanced c-Jun N-terminal kinase, extracellular signal-related kinase, and p38 phosphorylation. Inhibition of these pathways and of NF-κB reduces activation of macrophages and CD4 T cells. MyD88 is an adaptor protein involved in proinflammatory signaling. In macrophages from MyD88(-/-) mice, RBP4 fails to stimulate secretion of tumor necrosis factor, IL-12, and IL-6 and CD4 T-cell activation. In vivo blockade of antigen presentation by treating RBP4-Ox mice with CTLA4-Ig, which blocks costimulation of T cells, is sufficient to reduce AT inflammation and improve insulin resistance. Thus, MyD88 and downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-κB pathways are necessary for RBP4-induced macrophage antigen presentation and subsequent T-cell activation. Also, blocking antigen presentation with CTLA4-Ig improves RBP4-induced insulin resistance and macrophage-induced T-cell activation. PMID:26936962

  17. Cytokine profiles and phenotype regulation of antigen presenting cells by genotype-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the immunological response of antigen presenting cells (APC) to genotype-I isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection by analysing the cytokine profile induced and evaluating the changes taking place upon infection on immunologically relevant cell markers (MHCI, MHCII, CD80/86, CD14, CD16, CD163, CD172a, SWC9). Several types of APC were infected with 39 PRRSV isolates. The results show that different isolates were able to induce different patterns of IL-10 and TNF-α. The four possible phenotypes based on the ability to induce IL-10 and/or TNF-α were observed, although different cell types seemed to have different capabilities. In addition, isolates inducing different cytokine-release profiles on APC could induce different expression of cell markers. PMID:21314968

  18. Cytokine profiles and phenotype regulation of antigen presenting cells by genotype-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, Mariona; Darwich, Laila; Diaz, Ivan; de la Torre, Eugenia; Pujols, Joan; Martín, Marga; Inumaru, Shigeki; Cano, Esmeralda; Domingo, Mariano; Montoya, Maria; Mateu, Enric

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the immunological response of antigen presenting cells (APC) to genotype-I isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection by analysing the cytokine profile induced and evaluating the changes taking place upon infection on immunologically relevant cell markers (MHCI, MHCII, CD80/86, CD14, CD16, CD163, CD172a, SWC9). Several types of APC were infected with 39 PRRSV isolates. The results show that different isolates were able to induce different patterns of IL-10 and TNF-α. The four possible phenotypes based on the ability to induce IL-10 and/or TNF-α were observed, although different cell types seemed to have different capabilities. In addition, isolates inducing different cytokine-release profiles on APC could induce different expression of cell markers. PMID:21314968

  19. Cimetidine modulates the antigen presenting capacity of dendritic cells from colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kubota, T; Fujiwara, H; Ueda, Y; Itoh, T; Yamashita, T; Yoshimura, T; Okugawa, K; Yamamoto, Y; Yano, Y; Yamagishi, H

    2002-04-22

    Cimetidine, a H(2) receptor antagonist, has been reported to improve survival in gastrointestinal cancer patients. These effects have largely been attributed to the enhancing effects of cimetidine on the host's antitumour cell-mediated immune response, such as inhibition of suppressor T lymphocyte activity, stimulation of natural killer cell activity and increase of interleukin-2 production from helper T lymphocytes. We conducted an in vitro study on the effects of cimetidine on differentiation and antigen presenting capacity of monocyte-derived dendritic cells from advanced colorectal cancer patients and normal controls. As a result, an investigation of expression of surface molecules associated with dendritic cells by flow cytometric analyses showed that cimetidine had no enhancing effect on differentiation of dendritic cells from cancer patients and normal controls. An investigation of [(3)H]thymidine incorporation by allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions revealed that cimetidine increased the antigen presenting capacity of dendritic cells from both materials. Moreover, a higher antigen presenting capacity was observed in advanced cancer patients compared to normal controls. These effects might be mediated via specific action of cimetidine and not via H(2) receptors because famotidine did not show similar effects. Our results suggest that cimetidine may enhance the host's antitumour cell-mediated immunity by improving the suppressed dendritic cells function of advanced cancer patients. PMID:11953882

  20. Antigen uptake and expression of antigen presentation-related immune genes in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) after vaccination with an inactivated Edwardsiella tarda immersion vaccine, following hyperosmotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yingli; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Antigen uptake is a critical process for activation of the immune system, and therefore the ability to enhance antigen uptake is a primary consideration in the development of an immersion vaccination of fish. In the present work, flounders (Paralichthys olivaceus) were immersed in three hyperosmotic solutions with 40, 50 and 60‰ salinities, then transferred into seawater of normal salinity (i.e. 30‰) containing formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda for 30 min. The antigen uptake in vaccinated flounder was determined using an absolute quantitative PCR (qPCR). The results showed significantly higher antigen uptake in the tissues of flounders immersed in solutions with 50‰ and 60‰ salinity compared to the control group directly immersed in vaccine (DI) (P < 0.05), and the highest amount of antigen was detected in flounders immersed in the 50‰ salinity solution, whereas there was no significant difference in antigen uptake between the 40‰ salinity group and the DI group (P > 0.05). A rapid and significant increase in antigen uptake was detected in the mucosal-associated tissues including the gill, skin and intestine (P < 0.05) compared with the spleen, kidney and liver. Antigen uptake in the gill and skin both peaked at 30 min post immersion, which was significantly higher than the levels of uptake measured in the other tissues (P < 0.05), and then quickly declined. In contrast, antigen uptake in the spleen, kidney and liver gradually increased 3 h post immersion (hpi). The expression profiles of four antigen presentation-related immune genes (MHC Iα, MHC IIα, CD4-1 and CD8α) were investigated after immersion. These four genes showed a significantly stronger response in the immersed flounders exposed to 50‰ salinity compared with the DI group (P < 0.05). In the mucosal-associated tissues, the expression of MHC Iα and CD8α genes peaked at 24 hpi, while the expression of MHC IIα and CD4-1 genes showed up-regulation in the gill and skin

  1. Understanding the immunogenicity and antigenicity of nanomaterials: Past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Ilinskaya, Anna N; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2016-05-15

    Nanoparticle immunogenicity and antigenicity have been under investigation for many years. During the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding what makes a nanoparticle immunogenic, how immune cells respond to nanoparticles, what consequences of nanoparticle-specific antibody formation exist and how they challenge the application of nanoparticles for drug delivery. Moreover, it has been recognized that accidental contamination of therapeutic protein formulations with nanosized particulate materials may contribute to the immunogenicity of this type of biotechnology products. While the immunological properties of engineered nanomaterials and their application as vaccine carriers and adjuvants have been given substantial consideration in the current literature, little attention has been paid to nanoparticle immuno- and antigenicity. To fill in this gap, we herein provide an overview of this subject to highlight the current state of the field, review past and present research, and discuss future research directions. PMID:26773813

  2. An Overview of B-1 Cells as Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popi, Ana F.; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda M.; Mariano, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The role of B cells as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) has been extensively studied, mainly in relation to the activation of memory T cells. Considering the B cell subtypes, the role of B-1 cells as APCs is beginning to be explored. Initially, it was described that B-1 cells are activated preferentially by T-independent antigens. However, some reports demonstrated that these cells are also involved in a T-dependent response. The aim of this review is to summarize information about the ability of B-1 cells to play a role as APCs and to briefly discuss the role of the BCR and toll-like receptor signals in this process. Furthermore, some characteristics of B-1 cells, such as natural IgM production and phagocytic ability, could interfere in the participation of these cells in the onset of an adaptive response. PMID:27148259

  3. Blood coagulation protein fibrinogen promotes autoimmunity and demyelination via chemokine release and antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jae Kyu; Petersen, Mark A.; Murray, Sara G.; Baeten, Kim M.; Meyer-Franke, Anke; Chan, Justin P.; Vagena, Eirini; Bedard, Catherine; Machado, Michael R.; Coronado, Pamela E. Rios; Prod'homme, Thomas; Charo, Israel F.; Lassmann, Hans; Degen, Jay L.; Zamvil, Scott S.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity and macrophage recruitment into the central nervous system (CNS) are critical determinants of neuroinflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms that drive immunological responses targeted to the CNS remain largely unknown. Here we show that fibrinogen, a central blood coagulation protein deposited in the CNS after blood–brain barrier disruption, induces encephalitogenic adaptive immune responses and peripheral macrophage recruitment into the CNS leading to demyelination. Fibrinogen stimulates a unique transcriptional signature in CD11b+ antigen-presenting cells inducing the recruitment and local CNS activation of myelin antigen-specific Th1 cells. Fibrinogen depletion reduces Th1 cells in the multiple sclerosis model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II-dependent antigen presentation, CXCL10- and CCL2-mediated recruitment of T cells and macrophages, respectively, are required for fibrinogen-induced encephalomyelitis. Inhibition of the fibrinogen receptor CD11b/CD18 protects from all immune and neuropathologic effects. Our results show that the final product of the coagulation cascade is a key determinant of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:26353940

  4. MHC class I antigen processing and presenting machinery: organization, function, and defects in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Leone, Patrizia; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Perosa, Federico; Vacca, Angelo; Dammacco, Franco; Racanelli, Vito

    2013-08-21

    The surface presentation of peptides by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is critical to all CD8(+) T-cell adaptive immune responses, including those against tumors. The generation of peptides and their loading on MHC class I molecules is a multistep process involving multiple molecular species that constitute the so-called antigen processing and presenting machinery (APM). The majority of class I peptides begin as proteasome degradation products of cytosolic proteins. Once transported into the endoplasmic reticulum by TAP (transporter associated with antigen processing), peptides are not bound randomly by class I molecules but are chosen by length and sequence, with peptidases editing the raw peptide pool. Aberrations in APM genes and proteins have frequently been observed in human tumors and found to correlate with relevant clinical variables, including tumor grade, tumor stage, disease recurrence, and survival. These findings support the idea that APM defects are immune escape mechanisms that disrupt the tumor cells' ability to be recognized and killed by tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. Detailed knowledge of APM is crucial for the optimization of T cell-based immunotherapy protocols. PMID:23852952

  5. Pollen-induced antigen presentation by mesenchymal stem cells and T cells from allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mauli B; Gavrilova, Tatyana; Liu, Jianjun; Patel, Shyam A; Kartan, Saritha; Greco, Steven J; Capitle, Eugenio; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2013-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising cellular suppressor of inflammation. This function of MSCs is partly due to their licensing by inflammatory mediators. In cases with reduced inflammation, MSCs could become immune-enhancer cells. MSCs can suppress the inflammatory response of antigen-challenged lymphocytes from allergic asthma. Although allergic rhinitis (AR) is also an inflammatory response, it is unclear if MSCs can exert similar suppression. This study investigated the immune effects (suppressor vs enhancer) of MSCs on allergen-stimulated lymphocytes from AR subjects (grass or weed allergy). In contrast to subjects with allergic asthma, MSCs caused a significant (P<0.05) increase in the proliferation of antigen-challenged lymphocytes from AR subjects. The increase in lymphocyte proliferation was caused by the MSCs presenting the allergens to CD4(+) T cells (antigen-presenting cells (APCs)). This correlated with increased production of inflammatory cytokines from T cells, and increased expressions of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-II and CD86 on MSCs. The specificity of APC function was demonstrated in APC assay using MSCs that were knocked down for the master regulator of MHC-II transcription, CIITA. The difference in the effects of MSCs on allergic asthma and AR could not be explained by the sensitivity to the allergen, based on skin tests. Thus, we deduced that the contrasting immune effects of MSCs for antigen-challenged lymphocytes on AR and allergic asthma could be disease specific. It is possible that the enhanced inflammation from asthma might be required to license the MSCs to become suppressor cells. This study underscores the need for robust preclinical studies to effectively translate MSCs for any inflammatory disorder. PMID:25505949

  6. Targeting Antigen to Clec9A Primes Follicular Th Cell Memory Responses Capable of Robust Recall.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yu; Zaid, Ali; Davey, Gayle M; Mueller, Scott N; Nutt, Stephen L; Zotos, Dimitra; Tarlinton, David M; Shortman, Ken; Lahoud, Mireille H; Heath, William R; Caminschi, Irina

    2015-08-01

    Targeting Ags to dendritic cell (DC) surface receptors can induce a variety of responses depending on the DC type targeted, the receptor targeted, and the adjuvant used. Clec9A (DNGR-1), which is expressed by CD8(+) DCs, has been shown to bind F-actin exposed on damaged cells. Targeting Ag to this receptor in mice and nonhuman primates induces strong humoral immunity even in the absence of adjuvant, a process seen for a few select DC receptors. In contrast with other receptors, however, targeting Clec9A induces long-lived, affinity-matured Ab responses that are associated with efficient CD4(+) T cell responses shown to possess properties of follicular Th cells (TFH). In this article, we provide definitive evidence that Clec9A targeting promotes the development of TFH by showing that responding CD4 T cells express CXCR5, PD1, the TFH transcription factor Bcl6, and the cytokine IL-21, and that these cells localize to germinal centers. Furthermore, we extend studies from the model Ag OVA to the viral Ag glycoprotein D of HSV-1 and examine the capacity of primed TFH to form functional memory. We show that targeting glycoprotein D to Clec9A even in the absence of adjuvant induced long-lived memory CXCR5(+) PD1(hi) CD4(+) T cells that proliferated extensively upon secondary challenge and rapidly developed into effector TFH. This was associated with enhanced germinal center B cell responses and accelerated Ab production. Our study indicates that targeting Ags to Clec9A in the absence of adjuvant routinely generates TFH responses that form long-lived memory capable of robust secondary TFH responses. PMID:26101322

  7. Assessing Preservice Teachers' Presentation Capabilities: Contrasting the Modes of Communication with the Constructed Impression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Matt G.; Moloney, Robyn A.; Cavanagh, Michael S.; Sweller, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    A research-based understanding of how to develop and assess classroom presentation skills is vital for the effective development of pre-service teacher communication capabilities. This paper identifies and compares two different models of assessing pre-service teachers' presentation performance--one based on the Modes of Communication (voice,…

  8. The dominant role of CD8+ dendritic cells in cross-presentation is not dictated by antigen capture

    PubMed Central

    Schnorrer, Petra; Behrens, Georg M. N.; Wilson, Nicholas S.; Pooley, Joanne L.; Smith, Christopher M.; El-Sukkari, Dima; Davey, Gayle; Kupresanin, Fiona; Li, Ming; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Carbone, Francis R.; Shortman, Ken; Heath, William R.; Villadangos, Jose A.

    2006-01-01

    Mouse spleens contain three populations of conventional (CD11chigh) dendritic cells (DCs) that play distinct functions. The CD8+ DC are unique in that they can present exogenous antigens on their MHC class I molecules, a process known as cross-presentation. It is unclear whether this special ability is because only the CD8+ DC can capture the antigens used in cross-presentation assays, or because this is the only DC population that possesses specialized machinery for cross-presentation. To solve this important question we examined the splenic DC subsets for their ability to both present via MHC class II molecules and cross-present via MHC class I using four different forms of the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA). These forms include a cell-associated form, a soluble form, OVA expressed in bacteria, or OVA bound to latex beads. With the exception of bacterial antigen, which was poorly cross-presented by all DC, all antigenic forms were cross-presented much more efficiently by the CD8+ DC. This pattern could not be attributed simply to a difference in antigen capture because all DC subsets presented the antigen via MHC class II. Indeed, direct assessments of endocytosis showed that CD8+ and CD8− DC captured comparable amounts of soluble and bead-associated antigen, yet only the CD8+ DC cross-presented these antigenic forms. Our results indicate that cross-presentation requires specialized machinery that is expressed by CD8+ DC but largely absent from CD8− DC. This conclusion has important implications for the design of vaccination strategies based on antigen targeting to DC. PMID:16807294

  9. Nanoengineering approaches to the design of artificial antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Sunshine, Joel C; Green, Jordan J

    2014-01-01

    Artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) have shown great initial promise for ex vivo activation of cytotoxic T cells. The development of aAPCs has focused mainly on the choice of proteins to use for surface presentation to T cells when conjugated to various spherical, microscale particles. We review here biomimetic nanoengineering approaches that have been applied to the development of aAPCs that move beyond initial concepts about aAPC development. This article also discusses key technologies that may be enabling for the development of nano- and micro-scale aAPCs with nanoscale features, and suggests several future directions for the field. PMID:23837856

  10. Antigen recognition and presentation in periapical tissues: a role for TLR expressing cells?

    PubMed

    Desai, S V; Love, R M; Rich, A M; Seymour, G J

    2011-02-01

    Bacteria are the prime cause of periapical diseases and root canal microbiology is a well-researched area of endodontics. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are present in periapical lesions of endodontic origin and play a substantial role in recognizing, processing and presenting pathogenic antigens to the adaptive immune system such as an effective and long-lasting immune response is generated against the specific pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are germ-line encoded pathogen recognition receptors (PRR) expressed by various APCs which induce their maturation, lead to gene transcription in the nucleus and the production of several pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Thirteen TLRs have been discovered, 10 of which have been identified in humans so far. Preliminary studies of dental pulp tissue have demonstrated various cell types expressing different TLRs in response to commonly encountered microorganisms. However, there is little information available regarding the expression and function of the various TLRs in human periapical lesions. This review discusses the interactions of various APCs in periapical lesions and the possible roles of different TLRs and APCs in pulp/periapical pathogen recognition and presentation to the adaptive immune system in the initiation and sustaining of periapical diseases. PMID:21083574

  11. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md.; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8+ cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8+ T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8+ T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine. PMID:27251373

  12. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8(+) cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8(+) T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8(+) T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8(+) T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine. PMID:27251373

  13. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8+ T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md.; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-06-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8+ cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8+ T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8+ T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine.

  14. COMPUTER SUPPORT SYSTEMS FOR ESTIMATING CHEMICAL TOXICITY: PRESENT CAPABILITIES AND FUTURE TRENDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer Support Systems for Estimating Chemical Toxicity: Present Capabilities and Future Trends

    A wide variety of computer-based artificial intelligence (AI) and decision support systems exist currently to aid in the assessment of toxicity for environmental chemicals. T...

  15. Survival and signaling changes in antigen presenting cell subsets after radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jennifer Janell

    Radiation therapy is a widely used cancer treatment that has the potential to influence anti-tumor immune responses. Both myeloablative and non-myeloablative radiation are often used as part of preparatory regimens for hematopoetic stem cell transplantation, in combination with other chemotherapy or immuno-modulatory (e.g. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG)) therapies for both cytotoxic and immune modulatory purposes. However, the mechanisms responsible for the effect of radiation on antigen presenting cell (APC) responsiveness and radioresistance are poorly understood. The first studies described in this thesis were designed to identify and characterize early radiation-induced signaling changes in antigen presenting cells and to determine the effects of these signaling changes on APC receptor expression and function. The NFkappaB pathway in antigen presenting cells was chosen for study because it is activated by radiation in a wide range of other cell types and plays a vital role in the maintenance and regulation of the immune system. The effects of therapeutically relevant doses radiation (2 and 20 Gy) were compared at various timepoints in the human monocytic cell line (U937) using phospho-flow cytometry staining methods and cytometric analysis. These studies demonstrated that radiation-induced changes in the phosphorylation state of NFkappaB family members that were p53 independent. However, these changes were dependent upon activation of ATM in response to single or double-stranded breaks in DNA, as shown in experiments using an inhibitor of ATM and ATM siRNA knockdown U937 cells. In addition, studies examining the effect of radiation on co-stimulatory receptors with and without inhibition of the NFkappaB pathway via phospho-flow cytometry revealed that radiation-induced phosphorylation of NEMO promoted the activation and functional maturation of U937 cells. Furthermore, functional studies using both phospho-flow cytometry and/or mixed lymphocyte reactions to

  16. Network-based gene expression analysis of intracranial aneurysm tissue reveals role of antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Krischek, B; Kasuya, H; Tajima, A; Akagawa, H; Sasaki, T; Yoneyama, T; Ujiie, H; Kubo, O; Bonin, M; Takakura, K; Hori, T; Inoue, I

    2008-07-17

    Little is known about the pathology and pathogenesis of the rupture of intracranial aneurysms. For a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in intracranial aneurysm (IA) formation we performed a gene expression analysis comparing ruptured and unruptured aneurysm tissue to a control artery. Tissue samples of six ruptured and four unruptured aneurysms, and four cerebral arteries serving as controls, were profiled using oligonucleotide microarrays. Gene ontology classification of the differentially expressed genes was analyzed and regulatory functional networks and canonical pathways were identified with a network-based computational pathway analysis tool. Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining were performed as confirmation. Analysis of aneurysmal and control tissue revealed 521 differentially expressed genes. The most significantly associated gene ontology term was antigen processing (P=1.64E-16). Further network-based analysis showed the top scoring regulatory functional network to be built around overexpressed major histocompatibility class (MHC) I and II complex related genes and confirmed the canonical pathway "Antigen Presentation" to have the highest upregulation in IA tissue (P=7.3E-10). Real time RT-PCR showed significant overexpression of MHC class II genes. Immunohistochemical staining showed strong positivity for MHC II molecule specific antibody (HLA II), for CD68 (macrophages, monocytes), for CD45RO (T-cells) and HLA I antibody. Our results offer strong evidence for MHC class II gene overexpression in human IA tissue and that antigen presenting cells (macrophages, monocytes) play a key role in IA formation. PMID:18538937

  17. Examining the presentation of tumor-associated antigens on peptide-pulsed T2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Bossi, Giovanna; Gerry, Andrew B; Paston, Samantha J; Sutton, Deborah H; Hassan, Namir J; Jakobsen, Bent K

    2014-01-01

    Peptide-pulsed T2 cells are routinely used to study T-cell activation by MHC-restricted peptides derived from tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Nevertheless, the capacity of T2 cells to present antigenic epitopes remains to be precisely quantified, primarily due to the detection limits imposed by available methods. Since naturally-processed TAA-derived epitopes have been shown to be displayed at levels as low as 10–150 copies per cell, highly sensitive detection and quantification techniques are essential to assess the natural degree of T-cell sensitivity. Here, we report the use of soluble, high-affinity T-cell receptors (TCRs) coupled with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to quantify three reported TAA-derived epitopes on peptide-pulsed T2 cells, dissecting the relationship between concentration of exogenous peptide, number of epitopes presented, and activation of epitope-specific T cells. Our findings indicate that peptide concentrations in the low nanomolar range are required for T2 cells to present TAAs in extents that are comparable to those of malignant cells.

  18. Ly6C+ monocyte efferocytosis and cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens

    PubMed Central

    Larson, S R; Atif, S M; Gibbings, S L; Thomas, S M; Prabagar, M G; Danhorn, T; Leach, S M; Henson, P M; Jakubzick, C V

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was shown that circulating Ly6C+ monocytes traffic from tissue to the draining lymph nodes (LNs) with minimal alteration in their overall phenotype. Furthermore, in the steady state, Ly6C+ monocytes are as abundant as classical dendritic cells (DCs) within the draining LNs, and even more abundant during inflammation. However, little is known about the functional roles of constitutively trafficking Ly6C+ monocytes. In this study we investigated whether Ly6C+ monocytes can efferocytose (acquire dying cells) and cross-present cell-associated antigen, a functional property particularly attributed to Batf3+ DCs. We demonstrated that Ly6C+ monocytes intrinsically efferocytose and cross-present cell-associated antigen to CD8+ T cells. In addition, efferocytosis was enhanced upon direct activation of the Ly6C+ monocytes through its corresponding TLRs, TLR4 and TLR7. However, only ligation of TLR7, and not TLR4, enhanced cross-presentation by Ly6C+ monocytes. Overall, this study outlines two functional roles, among others, that Ly6C+ monocytes have during an adaptive immune response. PMID:26990659

  19. Antigen presentation events during the initiation of autoimmune diabetes in the NOD mouse.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Stephen T; Carrero, Javier A; Unanue, Emil R

    2016-07-01

    This is a brief summary of our studies of NOD autoimmune diabetes examining the events during the initial stage of the process. Our focus has been on antigen presentation events and the antigen presenting cells (APC) inside islets. Islets of non-diabetic mice contain resident macrophages that are developmentally distinct from those in the inter-acinar stroma. The autoimmune process starts with the entrance of CD4+ T cells together with a burst of a subset of dendritic cells (DC) bearing CD103. The CD103+ DC develop under the influence of the Batf3 transcription factor. Batf3 deficient mice do not develop diabetes and their islets are uninfiltrated throughout life. Thus, the CD103+ DC are necessary for the progression of autoimmune diabetes. The major CD4+ T cell response in NOD are the T cells directed to insulin. In particular, the non-conventional 12-20 segment of the insulin B chain is presented by the class II MHC molecule I-A(g7) and elicits pathogenic CD4+ T cells. We discuss that the diabetic process requires the CD103+ DC, the CD4+ T cells to insulin peptides, and NOD specific I-Ag(7) MHC-II allele. Finally, our initial studies indicate that beta cells transfer insulin containing vesicles to the local APC in a contact-dependent reaction. Live images of beta cells interactions with the APC and electron micrographs of islet APCs also show the transfer of granules. PMID:27021276

  20. Ly6C(+) monocyte efferocytosis and cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Larson, S R; Atif, S M; Gibbings, S L; Thomas, S M; Prabagar, M G; Danhorn, T; Leach, S M; Henson, P M; Jakubzick, C V

    2016-06-01

    Recently it was shown that circulating Ly6C(+) monocytes traffic from tissue to the draining lymph nodes (LNs) with minimal alteration in their overall phenotype. Furthermore, in the steady state, Ly6C(+) monocytes are as abundant as classical dendritic cells (DCs) within the draining LNs, and even more abundant during inflammation. However, little is known about the functional roles of constitutively trafficking Ly6C(+) monocytes. In this study we investigated whether Ly6C(+) monocytes can efferocytose (acquire dying cells) and cross-present cell-associated antigen, a functional property particularly attributed to Batf3(+) DCs. We demonstrated that Ly6C(+) monocytes intrinsically efferocytose and cross-present cell-associated antigen to CD8(+) T cells. In addition, efferocytosis was enhanced upon direct activation of the Ly6C(+) monocytes through its corresponding TLRs, TLR4 and TLR7. However, only ligation of TLR7, and not TLR4, enhanced cross-presentation by Ly6C(+) monocytes. Overall, this study outlines two functional roles, among others, that Ly6C(+) monocytes have during an adaptive immune response. PMID:26990659

  1. Vaccinia virus infection induces dendritic cell maturation but inhibits antigen presentation by MHC class II

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yongxue; Li, Ping; Singh, Pratibha; Thiele, Allison T.; Wilkes, David S.; Renukaradhya, Gourapura J.; Brutkiewicz, Randy R.; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Luker, Gary D.; Hong, Soon-Cheol; Blum, Janice S.; Chang, Cheong-Hee

    2007-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) infection is known to inhibit dendritic cells (DC) functions in vitro. Paradoxically, VV is also highly immunogenic and thus has been used as a vaccine. In the present study, we investigated the effects of an in vivo VV infection on DC function by focusing on early innate immunity. Our data indicated that DC are activated upon in vivo VV infection of mice. Splenic DC from VV-infected mice expressed elevated levels of MHC class I and co-stimulatory molecules on their cell surface and exhibited the enhanced potential to produce cytokines upon LPS stimulation. DC from VV-infected mice also expressed a high level of interferon-β. However, a VV infection resulted in the down-regulation of MHC class II expression and the impairment of antigen presentation to CD4 T cells by DC. Thus, during the early stage of a VV infection, although DC are impaired in some of the critical antigen presentation functions, they can promote innate immune defenses against viral infection. PMID:17678637

  2. Antigen-induced regulation of T-cell motility, interaction with antigen-presenting cells and activation through endogenous thrombospondin-1 and its receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Sten-Erik; Uzunel, Mehmet; Talme, Toomas; Bergdahl, Eva; Sundqvist, Karl-Gösta

    2015-01-01

    Antigen recognition reduces T-cell motility, and induces prolonged contact with antigen-presenting cells and activation through mechanisms that remain unclear. Here we show that the T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD28 regulate T-cell motility, contact with antigen-presenting cells and activation through endogenous thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) and its receptors low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), calreticulin and CD47. Antigen stimulation induced a prominent up-regulation of TSP-1 expression, and transiently increased and subsequently decreased LRP1 expression whereas calreticulin was unaffected. This antigen-induced TSP-1/LRP1 response down-regulated a motogenic mechanism directed by LRP1-mediated processing of TSP-1 in cis within the same plasma membrane while promoting contact with antigen-presenting cells and activation through cis interaction of the C-terminal domain of TSP-1 with CD47 in response to N-terminal TSP-1 triggering by calreticulin. The antigen-induced TSP-1/LRP1 response maintained a reduced but significant motility level in activated cells. Blocking CD28 co-stimulation abrogated LRP1 and TSP-1 expression and motility. TCR/CD3 ligation alone enhanced TSP-1 expression whereas CD28 ligation alone enhanced LRP1 expression. Silencing of TSP-1 inhibited T-cell conjugation to antigen-presenting cells and T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokine responses. The Th1 response enhanced motility and increased TSP-1 expression through interleukin-2, whereas the Th2 response weakened motility and reduced LRP1 expression through interleukin-4. Ligation of the TCR and CD28 therefore elicits a TSP-1/LRP1 response that stimulates prolonged contact with antigen-presenting cells and, although down-regulating motility, maintains a significant motility level to allow serial contacts and activation. Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses differentially regulate T-cell expression of TSP-1 and LRP1 and motility. PMID:25393517

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif Protein Enhances the Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP) and Reduces Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Antigen Presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Ely, Kenneth H.; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A.; Green, William R.; Enelow, Richard I.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8+ T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation. PMID:24247241

  4. Surface presentation of Shigella flexneri invasion plasmid antigens requires the products of the spa locus.

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, M M; Buysse, J M; Oaks, E V

    1992-01-01

    An avirulent, invasion plasmid insertion mutant of Shigella flexneri 5 (pHS1059) was restored to the virulence phenotype by transformation with a partial HindIII library of the wild-type invasion plasmid constructed in pBR322. Western immunoblot analysis of pHS1059 whole-cell lysates revealed that the synthesis of the invasion plasmid antigens VirG, IpaA, IpaB, IpaC, and IpaD was similar to that seen in the corresponding isogenic S. flexneri 5 virulent strain, M90T. IpaB and IpaC, however, were not present on the surface of pHS1059 as was found in M90T, suggesting that the transport or presentation of the IpaB and IpaC proteins onto the bacterial surface was defective in the mutant. pHS1059 was complemented by pWR266, which carried contiguous 1.2- and 4.1-kb HindIII fragments of the invasion plasmid. pHS1059(pWR266) cells were positive in the HeLa cell invasion assay as well as colony immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, using monoclonal antibodies to IpaB and IpaC. These studies established that the antigens were expressed on the surface of the transformed bacteria. In addition, water extraction of pHS1059 and pHS1059(pWR266) whole cells, which can be used to remove IpaB and IpaC antigens from the surface of wild-type M90T bacteria, yielded significant amounts of these antigens from pHS1059(pWR266) but not from pHS1059. Minicell and DNA sequence analysis indicated that several proteins were encoded by pWR266, comprising the spa loci, which were mapped to a region approximately 18 kb upstream of the ipaBCDAR gene cluster. Subcloning and deletion analysis revealed that more than one protein was involved in complementing the Spa- phenotype in pHS1059. One of these proteins, Spa47, showed striking homology to ORF4 of the Bacillus subtilis flaA locus and the fliI gene sequence of Salmonella typhimurium, both of which bear strong resemblance to the alpha and beta subunits of bacterial, mitochondrial, and chloroplast proton-translocating F0F1 ATPases

  5. Gatekeeper role of brain antigen-presenting CD11c+ cells in neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Paterka, Magdalena; Siffrin, Volker; Voss, Jan O; Werr, Johannes; Hoppmann, Nicola; Gollan, René; Belikan, Patrick; Bruttger, Julia; Birkenstock, Jérôme; Jung, Steffen; Esplugues, Enric; Yogev, Nir; Flavell, Richard A; Bopp, Tobias; Zipp, Frauke

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most frequent chronic inflammatory disease of the CNS. The entry and survival of pathogenic T cells in the CNS are crucial for the initiation and persistence of autoimmune neuroinflammation. In this respect, contradictory evidence exists on the role of the most potent type of antigen-presenting cells, dendritic cells. Applying intravital two-photon microscopy, we demonstrate the gatekeeper function of CNS professional antigen-presenting CD11c(+) cells, which preferentially interact with Th17 cells. IL-17 expression correlates with expression of GM-CSF by T cells and with accumulation of CNS CD11c(+) cells. These CD11c(+) cells are organized in perivascular clusters, targeted by T cells, and strongly express the inflammatory chemokines Ccl5, Cxcl9, and Cxcl10. Our findings demonstrate a fundamental role of CNS CD11c(+) cells in the attraction of pathogenic T cells into and their survival within the CNS. Depletion of CD11c(+) cells markedly reduced disease severity due to impaired enrichment of pathogenic T cells within the CNS. PMID:26612827

  6. Role of antigen presenting cell invariant chain in the development of hepatic steatosis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Alaknanda; Iyer, Srikanth; Kesarwani, Ashwani; Baligar, Prakash; Arya, Satya Pal; Arindkar, Shailendra; Kumar, M J Mahesh; Upadhyay, Pramod; Majumdar, Subeer S; Nagarajan, Perumal

    2016-08-15

    The role of Invariant chain (CD74 or Ii) in antigen presentation via Antigen Presenting Cells (APC), macrophage recruitment as well as survival, T cell activation and B cell differentiation has been well recognized. However, the aspect of CD74 which is involved in the development of hepatic steatosis and the pathways through which it acts remain to be studied. In this study, we investigated the role of CD74 in the inflammatory pathway and its contribution to development of hepatic steatosis. For this, wild type C57BL/6J and CD74 deficient mice (Ii(-/-) mice) were fed with high fat high fructose (HFHF) diet for 12 weeks. Chronic consumption of this feed did not develop hepatic steatosis, glucose intolerance or change in the level of immune cells in Ii(-/-) mice. Moreover, there was relatively delayed expression of genes involved in development of non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in HFHF fed Ii(-/-) mice as compared to that of C57BL/6J phenotype. Taken together, the data suggest that HFHF diet fed Ii(-/-) mice fail to develop hepatic steatosis, suggesting that Ii mediated pathways play a vital role in the initiation and propagation of liver inflammation. PMID:27371158

  7. TLR7 and TLR9 ligands regulate antigen presentation by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Celhar, Teja; Pereira-Lopes, Selma; Thornhill, Susannah I; Lee, Hui Yin; Dhillon, Manprit K; Poidinger, Michael; Connolly, John E; Lim, Lina H K; Biswas, Subhra K; Fairhurst, Anna-Marie

    2016-05-01

    The toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important innate receptors recognizing potentially pathogenic material. However, they also play a significant role in the development of Alzheimer's disease, cancer, autoimmunity and the susceptibility to viral infections. Macrophages are essential for an effective immune response to foreign material and the resolution of inflammation. In these studies, we examined the impact of different TLR ligands on macrophage cell function. We demonstrate that stimulation of all TLRs tested increases the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages. TLR7 and TLR9 ligation decreased the levels of the surface co-expression molecules CD86 and MHCII, which was associated with a concomitant reduction in antigen presentation and proliferation of T cells. This down-regulation in macrophage function was not due to an increase in cell death. In fact, exposure to TLR7 or TLR9 ligands promoted cell viability for up to 9 days, in contrast to TLR3 or TLR4. Additionally, macrophages exposed to TLR7/TLR9 ligands had a significantly lower ratio of Il-12/Il-10 mRNA expression compared with those treated with the TLR4 ligand, LPS. Taken together, these data demonstrate that TLR7/TLR9 ligands push the macrophage into a phagocytic long-lived cell, with a decreased capacity of antigen presentation and reminiscent of the M2 polarized state. PMID:26567289

  8. CD1d-restricted antigen presentation by Vγ9Vδ2-T cells requires trogocytosis.

    PubMed

    Schneiders, Famke L; Prodöhl, Jan; Ruben, Jurjen M; O'Toole, Tom; Scheper, Rik J; Bonneville, Marc; Scotet, Emmanuel; Verheul, Henk M W; de Gruijl, Tanja D; van der Vliet, Hans J

    2014-08-01

    CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT) constitute an important immunoregulatory T-cell subset that can be activated by the synthetic glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) and play a dominant role in antitumor immunity. Clinical trials with α-GalCer-pulsed monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC) have shown anecdotal antitumor activity in advanced cancer. It was reported that phosphoantigen (pAg)-activated Vγ9Vδ2-T cells can acquire characteristics of professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). Considering the clinical immunotherapeutic applications, Vγ9Vδ2-T APC can offer important advantages over moDC, potentially constituting an attractive novel APC platform. Here, we demonstrate that Vγ9Vδ2-T APC can present antigens to iNKT. However, this does not result from de novo synthesis of CD1d by Vγ9Vδ2-T, but critically depends on trogocytosis of CD1d-containing membrane fragments from pAg-expressing cells. CD1d-expressing Vγ9Vδ2-T cells were able to activate iNKT in a CD1d-restricted and α-GalCer-dependent fashion. Although α-GalCer-loaded moDC outperformed Vγ9Vδ2-T APC on a per cell basis, Vγ9Vδ2-T APC possess unique features with respect to clinical immunotherapeutic application that make them an interesting platform for consideration in future clinical trials. PMID:24934445

  9. Mannosylated poly(beta-amino esters) for targeted antigen presenting cell immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Charles H; Chen, Mingfu; Ravikrishnan, Anitha; Reddinger, Ryan; Zhang, Guojian; Hakansson, Anders P; Pfeifer, Blaine A

    2015-01-01

    Given the rise of antibiotic resistance and other difficult-to-treat diseases, genetic vaccination is a promising preventative approach that can be tailored and scaled according to the vector chosen for gene delivery. However, most vectors currently utilized rely on ubiquitous delivery mechanisms that ineffectively target important immune effectors such as antigen presenting cells (APCs). As such, APC targeting allows the option for tuning the direction (humoral vs cell-mediated) and strength of the resulting immune responses. In this work, we present the development and assessment of a library of mannosylated poly(beta-amino esters) (PBAEs) that represent a new class of easily synthesized APC-targeting cationic polymers. Polymeric characterization and assessment methodologies were designed to provide a more realistic physiochemical profile prior to in vivo evaluation. Gene delivery assessment in vitro showed significant improvement upon PBAE mannosylation and suggested that mannose-mediated uptake and processing influence the magnitude of gene delivery. Furthermore, mannosylated PBAEs demonstrated a strong, efficient, and safe in vivo humoral immune response without use of adjuvants when compared to genetic and protein control antigens. In summary, the gene delivery effectiveness provided by mannosylated PBAE vectors offers specificity and potency in directing APC activation and subsequent immune responses. PMID:25453962

  10. HAM56 and CD68 antigen presenting cells surrounding a sarcoidal granulomatous tattoo

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Ana Maria Abreu; DeJoseph, Louis M.; Howard, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Context Tattoos are produced by introducing colorants of various compositions into the skin, either accidentally or for cosmetic purposes. Case Report: A 62-year-old male presented with a cosmetic tattoo and requested a total excision of the lesion. Dermatopathologic analysis of the excised tissue with hematoxylin and eosin examination, as well as immunohistochemistry was performed. H&E staining demonstrated classic histologic features of a tattoo. Utilizing immunohistochemistry, dermal histiocytic antigen presenting cells stained with HAM56 and CD68 antibodies; the staining was present surrounding the tattoo pigment. Conclusions We identified two macrophage markers (HAM56 and CD68) surrounding dermal tattoo pigment. A minimal dermal inflammatory immune was noted to the tattoo pigment. Moreover, the immune response and/or tolerance to tattoos is not well characterized. We suggest that tattoo materials and techniques could be utilized in therapeutic delivery for diseases such recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, potentially preventing immune rejection of gene therapy agents. PMID:22363088

  11. P2X7 Receptor Activation Impairs Exogenous MHC Class I Oligopeptides Presentation in Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8+ T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8+ T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:23940597

  12. P2X7 receptor activation impairs exogenous MHC class I oligopeptides presentation in antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8(+) T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8(+) T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8(+) T cell immunity. PMID:23940597

  13. Antigen-presenting cells but not lymphocytes in the joint may indicate the cause of reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Stagg, A J; Hughes, R A; Keat, A C; Elsley, W A; Knight, S C

    1996-11-01

    T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APC) accumulate in the joint in reactive arthritis and there are reports that the T cells are a population selected for responsiveness to the causative agent. In this work, the latter view is questioned by detailed studies of the antigen specificities of the lymphocytes within the joint (SFMC) and peripheral blood (PBMC) of patients with reactive arthritis triggered by infection with Chlamydia trachomatis. Using a hanging-drop microculture system. SFMC displayed enhanced responses not only to antigens from the triggering organism, but also to other antigens, including PPD and tetanus toxoid, to which the patients were likely to have had prior exposure. No evidence was obtained for a dominant cross-reactive T-cell response to epitopes common to these antigen preparations, confirming the polyclonal nature of the infiltrate. In contrast to the broad specificity of the T-cell infiltrate, two experimental approaches indicated that APC within the joint carried chlamydial antigen. The failure of antigen-bearing APC to interact with T cells at this site may underlie the inability to clear microbial antigen from the joint. PMID:8948293

  14. Cross-presentation through langerin and DC-SIGN targeting requires different formulations of glycan-modified antigens.

    PubMed

    Fehres, Cynthia M; Kalay, Hakan; Bruijns, Sven C M; Musaafir, Sara A M; Ambrosini, Martino; van Bloois, Louis; van Vliet, Sandra J; Storm, Gert; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-04-10

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and Langerhans cells (LC) are professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) that initiate humoral and cellular immune responses. Targeted delivery of antigen towards DC- or LC-specific receptors enhances vaccine efficacy. In this study, we compared the efficiency of glycan-based antigen targeting to both the human DC-specific C-type lectin receptor (CLR) DC-SIGN and the LC-specific CLR langerin. Since DC-SIGN and langerin are able to recognize the difucosylated oligosaccharide Lewis Y (Le(Y)), we prepared neoglycoconjugates bearing this glycan epitope to allow targeting of both lectins. Le(Y)-modified liposomes, with an approximate diameter of 200nm, were significantly endocytosed by DC-SIGN(+) DCs and mediated efficient antigen presentation to CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Surprisingly, although langerin bound to Le(Y)-modified liposomes, LCs exposed to Le(Y)-modified liposomes could not endocytose liposomes nor mediate antigen presentation to T cells. However, LCs mediated an enhanced cross-presentation when antigen was delivered through langerin using Le(Y)-modified synthetic long peptides. In contrast, Le(Y)-modified synthetic long peptides were recognized by DC-SIGN, but did not trigger antigen internalization nor antigen cross-presentation. These data demonstrate that langerin and DC-SIGN have different size requirements for antigen uptake. Although using glycans remains an interesting option in the design of anti-cancer vaccines targeting multiple CLRs, aspects such as molecule size and conformation need to be taken in consideration. PMID:25656175

  15. Uptake of HLA Alloantigens via CD89 and CD206 Does Not Enhance Antigen Presentation by Indirect Allorecognition

    PubMed Central

    Breman, Eytan; Ruben, Jurjen M.; Franken, Kees L.; Heemskerk, Mirjam H. M.; Roelen, Dave L.; Claas, Frans H.

    2016-01-01

    In organ transplantation, alloantigens are taken up by antigen presenting cells and presented via the indirect pathway to T-cells which in turn can induce allograft rejection. Monitoring of these T-cells is of major importance; however no reliable assay is available to routinely monitor indirect allorecognition. Recently we showed that HLA monomers can be successfully used to monitor indirect allorecognition. Targeting antigens to endocytic receptors on antigen presenting cells may further enhance the presentation of antigens via HLA class II and improve the efficiency of this assay. In the current study we explored targeting of HLA monomers to either CD89 expressing monocytes or mannose receptor expressing dendritic cells. Monomer-antibody complexes were generated using biotin-labeled monomers and avidin labeling of the antibodies. We demonstrate that targeting the complexes to these receptors resulted in a dose-dependent HLA class II mediated presentation to a T-cell clone. The immune-complexes were efficiently taken up and presented to T-cells. However, the level of T-cell reactivity was similar to that when only exogenous antigen was added. We conclude that HLA-A2 monomers targeted for presentation through CD89 on monocytes or mannose receptor on dendritic cells lead to proper antigen presentation but do not enhance indirect allorecognition via HLA-DR. PMID:27413760

  16. Aluminum hydroxide adjuvant induces macrophage differentiation towards a specialized antigen-presenting cell type.

    PubMed

    Rimaniol, Anne-Cécile; Gras, Gabriel; Verdier, François; Capel, Francis; Grigoriev, Vladimir B; Porcheray, Fabrice; Sauzeat, Elisabeth; Fournier, Jean-Guy; Clayette, Pascal; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Dormont, Dominique

    2004-08-13

    Aluminum hydroxide (AlOOH) has been used for many years as a vaccine adjuvant, but little is known about its mechanism of action. We investigated in this study the in vitro effect of aluminum hydroxide adjuvant on isolated macrophages. We showed that AlOOH-stimulated macrophages contain large and persistent intracellular crystalline inclusions, a characteristic property of muscle infiltrated macrophages described in animal models of vaccine injection, as well as in the recently described macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF) histological reaction in humans. AlOOH-loaded macrophages exhibited phenotypical and functional modifications, as they expressed the classical markers of myeloid dendritic cells (HLA-DR(high)/CD86(high)/CD83(+)/CD1a(-)/CD14(-)) and displayed potent ability to induce MHC-II-restricted antigen specific memory responses, but kept a macrophage morphology. This suggests a key role of macrophages, in the reaction to AlOOH-adjuvanted vaccines and these mature antigen-presenting macrophages may therefore be of particular importance in the establishment of memory responses and in vaccination mechanisms leading to long-lasting protection. PMID:15297065

  17. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-06-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2-24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  18. Engineering tolerance using biomaterials to target and control antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Tostanoski, Lisa H; Gosselin, Emily A; Jewell, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when cells of the adaptive immune system incorrectly recognize and attack "self" tissues. Importantly, the proliferation and differentiation of these cells is triggered and controlled by interactions with antigen presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells. Thus, modulating the signals transduced by APCs (e.g., cytokines, costimulatory surface proteins) has emerged as a promising strategy to promote tolerance for diseases such as multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and lupus. However, many approaches have been hindered by non-specific activity of immunosuppressive or immunoregulatory cues, following systemic administration of soluble factors via traditional injections routes (e.g., subcutaneous, intravenous). Biomaterials offer a unique opportunity to control the delivery of tolerogenic signals in vivo via properties such as controlled particle size, tunable release kinetics, and co-delivery of multiple classes of cargo. In this review, we highlight recent reports that exploit these properties of biomaterials to target APCs and promote tolerance via three strategies, i) passive or active targeting of particulate carriers to APCs, ii) biomaterial-mediated control over antigen localization and processing, and iii) targeted delivery of encapsulated or adsorbed immunomodulatory signals. These reports represent exciting advances toward the goal of more effective therapies for autoimmune diseases, without the broad suppressive effects associated with current clinically-approved therapies. PMID:27355336

  19. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    PubMed Central

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-01-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2–24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines. PMID:10823919

  20. Immunology by numbers: quantitation of antigen presentation completes the quantitative milieu of systems immunology!

    PubMed

    Purcell, Anthony W; Croft, Nathan P; Tscharke, David C

    2016-06-01

    We review approaches to quantitate antigen presentation using a variety of biological and biochemical readouts and highlight the emerging role of mass spectrometry (MS) in defining and quantifying MHC-bound peptides presented at the cell surface. The combination of high mass accuracy in the determination of the molecular weight of the intact peptide of interest and its signature pattern of fragmentation during tandem MS provide an unambiguous and definitive identification. This is in contrast to the potential receptor cross-reactivity towards closely related peptides and variable dose responsiveness seen in biological readouts. In addition, we gaze into the not too distant future where big data approaches in MS can be accommodated to quantify whole immunopeptidomes both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27060633

  1. The saga of MHC-bound peptides: a renaissance for antigen presentation?

    PubMed Central

    Teyton, Luc

    2007-01-01

    In this issue of the JCI, two separate studies on MHC-bound peptides reopen the debate on the utility of peptides for the purposes of vaccination and treatment of autoimmune diseases. In the first study, by Wahlström et al., peptides bound to HLA-DR17 from bronchoalveolar lavage cells of sarcoidosis patients were analyzed in order to identify target antigens of the autoimmune response (see the related article beginning on page 3576). In the second study, by Le Gall et al., the modulation of epitope immunodominance and the processing and presentation of HIV peptides for MHC class I recognition were shown to be dependent on flanking residues that were N terminal to the natural epitopes (see the related article beginning on page 3563). Both studies highlight the tremendous therapeutic potential of MHC-bound peptides. They also emphasize that technical issues are still plaguing this field and hindering our understanding of MHC presentation in vivo. PMID:17975658

  2. Targeting tumor-associated antigens to the MHC class I presentation pathway.

    PubMed

    Gross, G; Margalit, A

    2007-06-01

    There is little doubt that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can kill tumor cells in-vivo. However, most CTL-inducing immunization protocols examined so far in cancer patients have yielded only limited clinical benefits, underscoring the urge to improve current approaches for the effective induction of tumor-reactive CTLs. The tumor side of the immunological frontline is armed with large masses, high mutability and an arsenal of immune evasion and suppression mechanisms. Accordingly, the confronting CTLs should come in large numbers, recognize an assortment of MHC class I (MHC-I) bound tumor-associated peptides and be brought into action under effective immunostimulatory conditions. Naïve CTLs are activated to become effector cells in secondary lymphoid organs, following their productive encounter with MHC-I-bound peptides at the surface of dendritic cells (DCs). Therefore, many cancer vaccines under development focus on the optimization of peptide presentation by DCs at this critical stage. The elucidation of discrete steps and the subsequent identification of inherent bottlenecks in the MHC-I antigen presentation pathway have fueled elaborate efforts to enhance vaccine efficacy by the rational targeting of proteins or peptides, formulated into these vaccines, to this pathway. Protein- and gene-based strategies are accordingly devised to deliver tumor-associated peptides to selected cellular compartments, which are essential for the generation of functional CTL ligands. Many of these strategies target the conventional, endogenous route, while others harness the unique pathways that enable DCs to present exogenous antigens, known as cross-presentation. Here we dissect the intricate machinery that produces CTL ligands and examine how knowledge-based cancer vaccines can target the sequence of workstations, biochemical utensils and molecular intermediates comprising this production line. PMID:17584150

  3. The effect of stable macromolecular complexes of ionic polyphosphazene on HIV Gag antigen and on activation of human dendritic cells and presentation to T-cells.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christine D; Ninković, Jana; Prokopowicz, Zofia M; Mancuso, Christy J; Marin, Alexander; Andrianov, Alexander K; Dowling, David J; Levy, Ofer

    2014-10-01

    Neonates and infants are susceptible to infection due to distinct immune responses in early life. Therefore, development of vaccine formulation and delivery systems capable of activating human newborn leukocytes is of global health importance. Poly[di(carboxylatophenoxy)phosphazene] (PCPP) belongs to a family of ionic synthetic polyphosphazene polyelectrolyte compounds that can form non-covalent interactions with protein antigens and demonstrate adjuvant activity in animals and in human clinical trials. However, little is known about their ability to activate human immune cells. In this study, we characterized the effects of PCPP alone or in combination with a model antigen (recombinant HIV-Gag (Gag)), on the maturation, activation and antigen presentation by human adult and newborn dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. PCPP treatment induced DC activation as assessed by upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokine production. Studies benchmarking PCPP to Alum, the most commonly used vaccine adjuvant, demonstrated that both triggered cell death and release of danger signals in adult and newborn DCs. When complexed with Gag antigen, PCPP maintained its immunostimulatory characteristics while permitting internalization and presentation of Gag by DCs to HIV-Gag-specific CD4(+) T cell clones. The PCPP vaccine formulation outlined here has intrinsic adjuvant activity, can facilitate effective delivery of antigen to DCs, and may be advantageous for induction of beneficial T cell-mediated immunity. Moreover, polyphosphazenes can further reduce cost of vaccine production and distribution through their dose-sparing and antigen-stabilizing properties, thus potentially eliminating the need for cold chain distribution. PMID:25023392

  4. Effective Inhibition of Kb- and Db-Restricted Antigen Presentation in Primary Macrophages by Murine Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    LoPiccolo, Diane M.; Gold, Marielle C.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Wagner, Markus; Koszinowski, Ulrich H.; Hill, Ann B.

    2003-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection in vivo, both in disseminating infection and in harboring latent virus. MCMV encodes three immune evasion genes (m4, m6, and m152) that interfere with the ability of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) to detect virus-infected fibroblasts, but the efficacy of immune evasion in macrophages has been controversial. Here we show that MCMV immune evasion genes function in H-2b primary bone marrow macrophages (BMMφ) in the same way that they do in fibroblasts. Metabolic labeling experiments showed that class I is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum by MCMV infection and associates with m4/gp34 to a similar extent in fibroblasts and BMMφ. We tested a series of Kb- and Db-restricted CTL clones specific for MCMV early genes against a panel of MCMV wild-type virus and mutants lacking m152, m4, or m6. MCMV immune evasion genes effectively inhibited antigen presentation. m152 appeared sufficient to abolish Db-restricted presentation in infected macrophages, as has been previously observed in infected fibroblasts. However, for inhibition of recognition of infected macrophages by Kb-restricted CTL, m4, m6, and m152 were all required. The contribution of m4 to inhibition of recognition appeared much more important in macrophages than in fibroblasts. Thus, MCMV immune evasion genes function effectively in primary macrophages to prevent CTL recognition of early antigens and show the same pattern of major histocompatibility complex class I allele discrimination as is seen in fibroblasts. Furthermore, for inhibition of Kb-restricted presentation, a strong synergistic effect was noted among m152, m4, and m6. PMID:12477835

  5. One-step spray-dried polyelectrolyte microparticles enhance the antigen cross-presentation capacity of porcine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Devriendt, Bert; Baert, Kim; Dierendonck, Marijke; Favoreel, Herman; De Koker, Stefaan; Remon, Jean Paul; De Geest, Bruno G; Cox, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Vaccination is regarded as the most efficient and cost-effective way to prevent infectious diseases. Vaccine design nowadays focuses on the implementation of safer recombinant subunit vaccines. However, these recombinant subunit antigens are often poor immunogens and several strategies are currently under investigation to enhance their immunogenicity. The encapsulation of antigens in biodegradable microparticulate delivery systems seems a promising strategy to boost their immunogenicity. Here, we evaluate the capacity of polyelectrolyte complex microparticles (PECMs), fabricated by single step spray-drying, to deliver antigens to porcine dendritic cells and how these particles affect the functional maturation of dendritic cells (DCs). As clinically relevant model antigen F4 fimbriae, a bacterial adhesin purified from a porcine-specific enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain was chosen. The resulting antigen-loaded PECMs are efficiently internalised by porcine monocyte-derived DCs. F4 fimbriae-loaded PECMs (F4-PECMs) enhanced CD40 and CD25 surface expression by DCs and this phenotypical maturation correlated with an increased secretion of IL-6 and IL-1β. More importantly, F4-PECMs enhance both the T cell stimulatory and antigen presentation capacity of DCs. Moreover, PECMs efficiently promoted the CD8(+) T cell stimulatory capacity of dendritic cells, indicating an enhanced ability to cross-present the encapsulated antigens. These results could accelerate the development of veterinary and human subunit vaccines based on polyelectrolyte complex microparticles to induce protective immunity against a variety of extra- and intracellular pathogens. PMID:23207327

  6. Spatiotemporally separated antigen uptake by alveolar dendritic cells and airway presentation to T cells in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Emily E.; Looney, Mark R.; Bose, Oishee; Sen, Debasish; Sheppard, Dean; Locksley, Richard; Huang, Xiaozhu

    2012-01-01

    Asthma pathogenesis is focused around conducting airways. The reasons for this focus have been unclear because it has not been possible to track the sites and timing of antigen uptake or subsequent antigen presentation to effector T cells. In this study, we use two-photon microscopy of the lung parenchyma and note accumulation of CD11b+ dendritic cells (DCs) around the airway after allergen challenge but very limited access of these airway-adjacent DCs to the contents of the airspace. In contrast, we observed prevalent transepithelial uptake of particulate antigens by alveolar DCs. These distinct sites are temporally linked, as early antigen uptake in alveoli gives rise to DC and antigen retention in the airway-adjacent region. Antigen-specific T cells also accumulate in the airway-adjacent region after allergen challenge and are activated by the accumulated DCs. Thus, we propose that later airway hyperreactivity results from selective retention of allergen-presenting DCs and antigen-specific T cells in airway-adjacent interaction zones, not from variation in the abilities of individual DCs to survey the lung. PMID:22585735

  7. Deficiency of Antigen Presenting Cell Invariant Chain Reduces Atherosclerosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiusong; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Chou, Meng-Yun; Zhang, Yadong; Sukhova, Galina K.; Zhang, Jie; Lopez-Ilasaca, Marco; Diehl, Cody J.; Yakov, Niva; Harats, Dror; George, Jacob; Witztum, Joseph L.; Libby, Peter; Ploegh, Hidde; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Background Adaptive and innate immunity play important roles in atherogenesis. Invariant chain (CD74) mediates antigen presenting cell (APC) antigen presentation and T cell activation. This study tested the hypothesis that CD74-deficient mice have reduced numbers of active T cells and resist atherogenesis. Methods and Results In low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice (Ldlr−/−), CD74 deficiency (Ldlr−/−Cd74−/−) significantly reduced atherosclerosis and CD25+ activated T cells in the atheromata. While Ldlr−/−Cd74−/− mice had decreased levels of plasma IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG2c against malondialdehyde-modified LDL (MDA-LDL), presumably due to impaired APC function, Ldlr−/−Cd74−/− mice showed higher levels of anti-MDA-LDL IgM and IgG3. After immunization with MDA-LDL, Ldlr−/−Cd74−/− mice had lower levels of all anti-MDA-LDL immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes compared with Ldlr−/− mice. As anticipated, only Ldlr−/− splenocytes responded to in vitro stimulation with MDA-LDL, producing Th1/Th2 cytokines. Heat shock protein-65 (HSP65) immunization enhanced atherogenesis in Ldlr−/− mice, but Ldlr−/−Cd74−/− mice remained protected. Compared with Ldlr−/− mice, Ldlr−/−Cd74−/− mice had higher anti-MDA-LDL autoantibody titers, fewer lesion CD25+ activated T cells, impaired release of Th1/Th2 cytokines from APC after HSP65-stimulation, and reduced levels of all plasma anti-HSP65 Ig isotypes. Cytofluorimetry of splenocytes and peritoneal cavity cells of MDA-LDL- or HSP65-immunized mice showed increased percentages of autoantibody-producing marginal zone-B and B-1 cells in Ldlr−/−Cd74−/− mice compared to Ldlr−/− mice. Conclusion Invariant chain deficiency in Ldlr−/− mice reduced atherosclerosis. This finding was associated with an impaired adaptive immune response to disease-specific antigens. Concomitantly, there occurred an unexpected increase in the number of innate-like peripheral B-1 cell

  8. Vaccine activation of the nutrient sensor GCN2 in dendritic cells enhances antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Rajesh; Khan, Nooruddin; Nakaya, Helder I; Li, Shuzhao; Loebbermann, Jens; Maddur, Mohan S; Park, Youngja; Jones, Dean P; Chappert, Pascal; Davoust, Jean; Weiss, David S; Virgin, Herbert W; Ron, David; Pulendran, Bali

    2014-01-17

    The yellow fever vaccine YF-17D is one of the most successful vaccines ever developed in humans. Despite its efficacy and widespread use in more than 600 million people, the mechanisms by which it stimulates protective immunity remain poorly understood. Recent studies using systems biology approaches in humans have revealed that YF-17D-induced early expression of general control nonderepressible 2 kinase (GCN2) in the blood strongly correlates with the magnitude of the later CD8(+) T cell response. We demonstrate a key role for virus-induced GCN2 activation in programming dendritic cells to initiate autophagy and enhanced antigen presentation to both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. These results reveal an unappreciated link between virus-induced integrated stress response in dendritic cells and the adaptive immune response. PMID:24310610

  9. Tubulin and actin interplay at the T cell and antigen-presenting cell interface.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cófreces, Noa Beatriz; Alarcón, Balbino; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    T cells reorganize their actin and tubulin-based cytoskeletons to provide a physical basis to the immune synapse. However, growing evidence shows that their roles on T cell activation are more dynamic than merely serving as tracks or scaffold for different molecules. The crosstalk between both skeletons may be important for the formation and movement of the lamella at the immunological synapse by increasing the adhesion of the T cell to the antigen-presenting cells (APC), thus favoring the transport of components toward the plasma membrane and in turn regulating the T-APC intercellular communication. Microtubules and F-actin appear to be essential for the transport of the different signaling microclusters along the membrane, therefore facilitating the propagation of the signal. Finally, they can also be important for regulating the endocytosis, recycling, and degradation of the T cell receptor signaling machinery, thus helping both to sustain the activated state and to switch it off. PMID:22566814

  10. Tubulin and Actin Interplay at the T Cell and Antigen-Presenting Cell Interface

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cófreces, Noa Beatriz; Alarcón, Balbino; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    T cells reorganize their actin and tubulin-based cytoskeletons to provide a physical basis to the immune synapse. However, growing evidence shows that their roles on T cell activation are more dynamic than merely serving as tracks or scaffold for different molecules. The crosstalk between both skeletons may be important for the formation and movement of the lamella at the immunological synapse by increasing the adhesion of the T cell to the antigen-presenting cells (APC), thus favoring the transport of components toward the plasma membrane and in turn regulating the T-APC intercellular communication. Microtubules and F-actin appear to be essential for the transport of the different signaling microclusters along the membrane, therefore facilitating the propagation of the signal. Finally, they can also be important for regulating the endocytosis, recycling, and degradation of the T cell receptor signaling machinery, thus helping both to sustain the activated state and to switch it off. PMID:22566814

  11. Phase I study utilizing a novel antigen-presenting cell-targeted vaccine with Toll-like receptor stimulation to induce immunity to self antigens in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Michael A.; Chapman, Robert; Powderly, John; Blackwell, Kimberly; Keler, Tibor; Green, Jennifer; Riggs, Renee; He, Li-Zhen; Ramakrishna, Venky; Vitale, Laura; Zhao, Biwei; Butler, Stephen A.; Hobeika, Amy; Osada, Takuya; Davis, Thomas; Clay, Timothy; Lyerly, H. Kim

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The use of tumor-derived proteins as cancer vaccines is complicated by tolerance to these self antigens. Tolerance may be broken by immunization with activated, autologous, ex vivo generated and antigen-loaded, antigen-presenting cells (APC); however, targeting tumor antigen directly to APC in vivo would be a less complicated strategy. We wished to test whether targeted delivery of an otherwise poorly immunogenic, soluble antigen to APC through their mannose receptors (MR) would induce clinically relevant immunity. Experimental Design Two phase I studies were performed with CDX-1307, a vaccine composed of human chorionic gonadotropin beta chain (hCG-β) fused to a MR-specific monoclonal antibody, administered either locally (intradermally) or systemically (intravenously) in patients with advanced epithelial malignancies. An initial dose-escalation of single agent CDX-1307 was followed by additional cohorts of CDX-1307 combined with GM-CSF and the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-3 agonist poly-ICLC and TLR7/8 agonist resiquimod to activate the APC. Results CDX-1307 induced consistent humoral and T cell responses to hCG-β when co-administered with TLR agonists. Greater immune responses and clinical benefit, including the longest duration of stable disease, were observed with immunization combined with local TLR agonists. Immune responses were induced equally efficiently in patients with elevated and non-elevated levels of serum hCG-β. Antibodies within the serum of vaccinated participants had tumor suppressive function in vitro. Toxicity consisted chiefly of mild injection site reactions. Conclusions APC targeting and activation induce adaptive immunity against poorly immunogenic self antigens which has implications for enhancing the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:21632857

  12. MHC class II antigen presentation pathway in murine tumours: tumour evasion from immunosurveillance?

    PubMed Central

    Walter, W; Lingnau, K; Schmitt, E; Loos, M; Maeurer, M J

    2000-01-01

    Qualitative differences in the MHC class II antigen processing and presentation pathway may be instrumental in shaping the CD4+ T cell response directed against tumour cells. Efficient loading of many MHC class II alleles with peptides requires the assistance of H2-M, a heterodimeric MHC class II-like molecule. In contrast to the HLA-DM region in humans, the β-chain locus is duplicated in mouse, with the H2-Mb1 (Mb1β-chain distal to H2-Mb2 (Mb2) and the H2-Ma (Ma) α-chain gene). Here, we show that murine MHC class II and H2-M genes are coordinately regulated in murine tumour cell lines by T helper cell 1 (IFN-γ) and T helper cell 2 (IL-4 or IL-10) cytokines in the presence of the MHC class II-specific transactivator CIITA as determined by mRNA expression and Western blot analysis. Furthermore, Mαβ1 and Mαβ2 heterodimers are differentially expressed in murine tumour cell lines of different histology. Both H2-M isoforms promote equally processing and presentation of native protein antigens to H2-Ad- and H2-Ed-restricted CD4+ T cells. Murine tumour cell lines could be divided into three groups: constitutive MHC class II and CIITA expression; inducible MHC class II and CIITA expression upon IFN-γ-treatment; and lack of constitutive and IFN-γ-inducible MHC class II and CIITA expression. These differences may impact on CD4+ T cell recognition of cancer cells in murine tumour models. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027433

  13. Extracts from presumed "reduced harm" cigarettes induce equivalent or greater toxicity in antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vassallo, Robert; Wang, Lei; Hirano, Yoshimi; Walters, Paula; Grill, Diane

    2015-09-01

    The tobacco industry has promoted certain cigarette products with claims that their use may be less harmful to the smoker as they purportedly deliver lower amounts of toxic chemicals compared to conventional cigarettes. This study was designed to compare the relative antigen presenting cellular toxicity of Eclipse, a presumed reduced exposure product (PREP) cigarette, when compared with the reference research 3R4F cigarettes (Kentucky University). Utilizing a murine macrophage cell line, murine bone marrow derived dendritic cells (DCs) and human monocyte-derived DCs incubated with extracts generated from Eclipse and Kentucky reference 3R4F cigarettes, we determined the relative toxic effects of the different cigarette smoke extracts on cellular viability, oxidative stress, T-helper-1 (Th-1) polarizing cytokine production and general gene expression. Eclipse and 3R4F cigarette smoke extracts induced equivalent oxidatively-mediated cellular heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein levels in macrophages and DCs. Cellular viability determination demonstrated greater induction of cell death by apoptosis and necrosis by Eclipse extracts in DCs. The production of the key Th-1 polarizing cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) by activated DCs or macrophages was suppressed to an equivalent or greater extent by Eclipse extracts. Microarray studies performed on bone marrow derived murine DCs incubated with Eclispe or 3R4F cigarette extracts showed identical genotoxic profiles. These studies imply that presumed reduced harm Eclipse cigarettes induce equivalent or greater antigen presenting cell dysfunction relative to 3R4F cigarettes and illustrate the importance of independent validation and testing of similar products claimed to be associated with reduced toxicity relative to other cigarettes. PMID:26169828

  14. An evolutionary analysis of antigen processing and presentation across different timescales reveals pervasive selection.

    PubMed

    Forni, Diego; Cagliani, Rachele; Tresoldi, Claudia; Pozzoli, Uberto; De Gioia, Luca; Filippi, Giulia; Riva, Stefania; Menozzi, Giorgia; Colleoni, Marta; Biasin, Mara; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Mazzotta, Francesco; Comi, Giacomo P; Bresolin, Nereo; Clerici, Mario; Sironi, Manuela

    2014-03-01

    The antigenic repertoire presented by MHC molecules is generated by the antigen processing and presentation (APP) pathway. We analyzed the evolutionary history of 45 genes involved in APP at the inter- and intra-species level. Results showed that 11 genes evolved adaptively in mammals. Several positively selected sites involve positions of fundamental importance to the protein function (e.g. the TAP1 peptide-binding domains, the sugar binding interface of langerin, and the CD1D trafficking signal region). In CYBB, all selected sites cluster in two loops protruding into the endosomal lumen; analysis of missense mutations responsible for chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) showed the action of different selective forces on the very same gene region, as most CGD substitutions involve aminoacid positions that are conserved in all mammals. As for ERAP2, different computational methods indicated that positive selection has driven the recurrent appearance of protein-destabilizing variants during mammalian evolution. Application of a population-genetics phylogenetics approach showed that purifying selection represented a major force acting on some APP components (e.g. immunoproteasome subunits and chaperones) and allowed identification of positive selection events in the human lineage. We also investigated the evolutionary history of APP genes in human populations by developing a new approach that uses several different tests to identify the selection target, and that integrates low-coverage whole-genome sequencing data with Sanger sequencing. This analysis revealed that 9 APP genes underwent local adaptation in human populations. Most positive selection targets are located within noncoding regions with regulatory function in myeloid cells or act as expression quantitative trait loci. Conversely, balancing selection targeted nonsynonymous variants in TAP1 and CD207 (langerin). Finally, we suggest that selected variants in PSMB10 and CD207 contribute to human phenotypes

  15. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway.

    PubMed

    Tooker, Brian C; Brindley, Stephen M; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Newman, Lee S

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, it was determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) than HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ. PMID:24932923

  16. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Newman, Lee S.

    2014-06-16

    We report that exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, we determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) then HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.

  17. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Detection of Beryllium Ions in the Antigen Processing and Presentation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Newman, Lee S.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, it was determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) then HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ. PMID:24932923

  18. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Newman, Lee S.

    2014-06-16

    We report that exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstratemore » that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, we determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) then HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.« less

  19. Origin and Role of a Subset of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils with Antigen-Presenting Cell Features in Early-Stage Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sunil; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik S; O'Brien, Shaun; Moon, Edmund K; Garfall, Alfred L; Rao, Abhishek S; Quatromoni, Jon G; Stephen, Tom Li; Litzky, Leslie; Deshpande, Charuhas; Feldman, Michael D; Hancock, Wayne W; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R; Albelda, Steven M; Eruslanov, Evgeniy B

    2016-07-11

    Based on studies in mouse tumor models, granulocytes appear to play a tumor-promoting role. However, there are limited data about the phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in humans. Here, we identify a subset of TANs that exhibited characteristics of both neutrophils and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in early-stage human lung cancer. These APC-like "hybrid neutrophils," which originate from CD11b(+)CD15(hi)CD10(-)CD16(low) immature progenitors, are able to cross-present antigens, as well as trigger and augment anti-tumor T cell responses. Interferon-γ and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor are requisite factors in the tumor that, working through the Ikaros transcription factor, synergistically exert their APC-promoting effects on the progenitors. Overall, these data demonstrate the existence of a specialized TAN subset with anti-tumor capabilities in human cancer. PMID:27374224

  20. Polymer nanoparticles for cross-presentation of exogenous antigens and enhanced cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune response

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chanyoung; Noh, Young-Woock; Lim, Yong Taik

    2016-01-01

    Effective induction of an antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) immune response is one of the key goals of cancer immunotherapy. We report the design and fabrication of polyethylenimine (PEI)-coated polymer nanoparticles (NPs) as efficient antigen-delivery carriers that can induce antigen cross-presentation and a strong CTL response. After synthesis of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) NPs containing ovalbumin (OVA) by the double-emulsion solvent-evaporation method, cationic-charged PLGA NPs were generated by coating them with PEI. In a methyl tetrazolium salt assay, no discernible cytotoxic effect of PEI-coated PLGA (OVA) NPs was observed. The capacity and mechanism of PEI-coated PLGA (OVA) NPs for antigen delivery and cross-presentation on dendritic cells (DCs) were determined by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. PEI-coated PLGA (OVA) NPs were internalized efficiently via phagocytosis or macropinocytosis in DCs and induced efficient cross-presentation of the antigen on MHC class I molecules via both endosome escape and a lysosomal processing mechanism. The DCs treated with PEI-coated PLGA (OVA) NPs induced a release of IL-2 cytokine from OVA-specific CD8-OVA1.3 T cells more efficiently than DCs treated with PLGA (OVA) NPs. Therefore, the PEI-coated PLGA (OVA) NPs can induce antigen cross-presentation and are expected to be used for induction of a strong CTL immune response and for efficient anticancer immunotherapy. PMID:27540289

  1. A Novel Laser Vaccine Adjuvant Increases the Motility of Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinyuan; Kim, Pilhan; Farinelli, Bill; Doukas, Apostolos; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Gelfand, Jeffrey A.; Anderson, Richard R.; Wu, Mei X.

    2010-01-01

    Background Development of a potent vaccine adjuvant without introduction of any side effects remains an unmet challenge in the field of the vaccine research. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that laser at a specific setting increased the motility of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and immune responses, with few local or systemic side effects. This laser vaccine adjuvant (LVA) effect was induced by brief illumination of a small area of the skin or muscle with a nondestructive, 532 nm green laser prior to intradermal (i.d.) or intramuscular (i.m.) administration of vaccines at the site of laser illumination. The pre-illumination accelerated the motility of APCs as shown by intravital confocal microscopy, leading to sufficient antigen (Ag)-uptake at the site of vaccine injection and transportation of the Ag-captured APCs to the draining lymph nodes. As a result, the number of Ag+ dendritic cells (DCs) in draining lymph nodes was significantly higher in both the 1° and 2° draining lymph nodes in the presence than in the absence of LVA. Laser-mediated increases in the motility and lymphatic transportation of APCs augmented significantly humoral immune responses directed against a model vaccine ovalbumin (OVA) or influenza vaccine i.d. injected in both primary and booster vaccinations as compared to the vaccine itself. Strikingly, when the laser was delivered by a hair-like diffusing optical fiber into muscle, laser illumination greatly boosted not only humoral but also cell-mediated immune responses provoked by i.m. immunization with OVA relative to OVA alone. Conclusion/Significance The results demonstrate the ability of this safe LVA to augment both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. In comparison with all current vaccine adjuvants that are either chemical compounds or biological agents, LVA is novel in both its form and mechanism; it is risk-free and has distinct advantages over traditional vaccine adjuvants. PMID:21048884

  2. Modulation of liver tolerance by conventional and nonconventional antigen-presenting cells and regulatory immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Andrea Kristina; Neumann, Katrin; Diehl, Linda; Tiegs, Gisa

    2016-01-01

    The liver is a tolerogenic organ with exquisite mechanisms of immune regulation that ensure upkeep of local and systemic immune tolerance to self and foreign antigens, but that is also able to mount effective immune responses against pathogens. The immune privilege of liver allografts was recognized first in pigs in spite of major histo-compatibility complex mismatch, and termed the “liver tolerance effect”. Furthermore, liver transplants are spontaneously accepted with only low-dose immunosuppression, and induce tolerance for non-hepatic co-transplanted allografts of the same donor. Although this immunotolerogenic environment is favorable in the setting of organ transplantation, it is detrimental in chronic infectious liver diseases like hepatitis B or C, malaria, schistosomiasis or tumorigenesis, leading to pathogen persistence and weak anti-tumor effects. The liver is a primary site of T-cell activation, but it elicits poor or incomplete activation of T cells, leading to their abortive activation, exhaustion, suppression of their effector function and early death. This is exploited by pathogens and can impair pathogen control and clearance or allow tumor growth. Hepatic priming of T cells is mediated by a number of local conventional and nonconventional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), which promote tolerance by immune deviation, induction of T-cell anergy or apoptosis, and generating and expanding regulatory T cells. This review will focus on the communication between classical and nonclassical APCs and lymphocytes in the liver in tolerance induction and will discuss recent insights into the role of innate lymphocytes in this process. PMID:27041638

  3. Capacities of Migrating CD1b+ Lymph Dendritic Cells to Present Salmonella Antigens to Naive T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Michel; Foret, Benjamin; Le Vern, Yves; Guilloteau, Laurence A.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are well known as professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) able to initiate specific T-cell responses to pathogens in lymph nodes (LN) draining the site of infection. However, the respective contribution of migratory and LN-resident DCs in this process remains unclear. As DC subsets represent important targets for vaccination strategies, more precise knowledge of DC subsets able to present vaccine antigens to T cells efficiently is required. To investigate the capacities of DCs migrating in the lymph (L-DCs) to initiate a specific T-cell response, we used physiologically generated DCs collected from a pseudoafferent lymphatic cannulation model in sheep. The CD1b+ L-DCs were assessed for presenting antigens from the vaccine attenuated strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Abortusovis. CD1b+ L-DCs were able to phagocytose, process and to present efficiently Salmonella antigens to effector/memory T cells in vitro. They were shown to be efficient APC for the priming of allogeneic naive T cells associated with inducing both IFN-γ and IL-4 responses. They were also efficient in presenting Salmonella antigens to autologous naive T cells associated with inducing both IFN-γ and IL-10 responses. The capacities of L-DCs to process and present Salmonella antigens to T cells were investigated in vivo after conjunctival inoculation of Salmonella. The CD1b+ L-DCs collected after inoculation were able to induce the proliferative response of CD4+ T cells suggesting the in vivo capture of Salmonella antigens by the CD1b+ L-DCs, and their potential to present them directly to CD4+ T cells. In this study, CD1b+ L-DCs present potential characteristics of APC to initiate by themselves T cell priming in the LN. They could be used as target cells for driving immune activation in vaccinal strategies. PMID:22279590

  4. Cytokines Regulate Proteolysis in Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II–Dependent Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiebiger, Edda; Meraner, Paul; Weber, Ekkehard; Fang, I-Fei; Stingl, Georg; Ploegh, Hidde; Maurer, Dieter

    2001-01-01

    Endo/lysosomal proteases control two key events in antigen (Ag) presentation: the degradation of protein Ag and the generation of peptide-receptive major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. Here we show that the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin (IL)-1β rapidly increase the activity of cathepsin (cat) S and catB in human dendritic cells (DCs). As a consequence, a wave of MHC class II sodium dodecyl sulfate stable dimer formation ensues in a catS-dependent fashion. In contrast, the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 renders DCs incapable of upregulating catS and catB activity and in fact, attenuates the level of both enzymes. Suppressed catS and catB activity delays MHC class II sodium dodecyl sulfate stable dimer formation and impairs Ag degradation. In DCs exposed to tetanus toxoid, IL-10 accordingly reduces the number of MHC class II–peptide complexes accessible to tetanus toxoid–specific T cell receptors, as analyzed by measuring T cell receptor downregulation in Ag-specific T cell clones. Thus, the control of protease activity by pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines is an essential feature of the Ag presentation properties of DCs. PMID:11304549

  5. Regulation of Hemichannels and Gap Junction Channels by Cytokines in Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Kenji F.; Aguirre, Adam; Sáez, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Autocrine and paracrine signals coordinate responses of several cell types of the immune system that provide efficient protection against different challenges. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) coordinate activation of this system via homocellular and heterocellular interactions. Cytokines constitute chemical intercellular signals among immune cells and might promote pro- or anti-inflammatory effects. During the last two decades, two membrane pathways for intercellular communication have been demonstrated in cells of the immune system. They are called hemichannels (HCs) and gap junction channels (GJCs) and provide new insights into the mechanisms of the orchestrated response of immune cells. GJCs and HCs are permeable to ions and small molecules, including signaling molecules. The direct intercellular transfer between contacting cells can be mediated by GJCs, whereas the release to or uptake from the extracellular milieu can be mediated by HCs. GJCs and HCs can be constituted by two protein families: connexins (Cxs) or pannexins (Panxs), which are present in almost all APCs, being Cx43 and Panx1 the most ubiquitous members of each protein family. In this review, we focus on the effects of different cytokines on the intercellular communication mediated by HCs and GJCs in APCs and their impact on purinergic signaling. PMID:25301274

  6. Antibody-Functionalized Peptidic Membranes for Neutralization of Allogeneic Skin Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yi; Liu, Wen; Bagia, Christina; Zhang, Shaojuan; Bai, Mingfeng; Janjic, Jelena M.; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gawalt, Ellen S.; Meng, Wilson S.

    2014-01-01

    We report herein application of an in situ material strategy to attenuate allograft T cell responses in a skin transplant mouse model. Functionalized peptidic membranes were used to impede trafficking of donor antigen-presenting cells (dAPCs) from skin allografts in recipient mice. Membranes formed by self-assembling peptides (SAPs) presenting antibodies were found to remain underneath grafted skins for up to 6 days. At the host-graft interface, dAPCs were targeted by using a monoclonal antibody that binds to a class II MHC molecule (IAd) expressed exclusively by donor cells. Using a novel cell labeling near-infrared nanoemulsion, we found more dAPCs remained in allografts treated with membranes loaded with aI-Ad than without. In vitro, dAPCs released from skin explants were found adsorbed preferentially on aI-Ad membranes. Recipient T cells from these mice produced lower concentrations of interferon-gamma cultured ex vivo with donor cells. Taken together, the data indicate that the strategy has the potential to alter the natural course of rejection immune mechanisms in stringent allogeneic models. PMID:25117952

  7. HLA-Ig Based Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells for Efficient ex vivo Expansion of Human CTL

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yen-Ling; Schneck, Jonathan P.; Oelke, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    CTL with optimal effector function play critical roles in mediating protection against various intracellular infections and cancer. However, individuals may exhibit suppressive immune microenvironment and, in contrast to activating CTL, their autologous antigen presenting cells may tend to tolerize or anergize antigen specific CTL. As a result, although still in the experimental phase, CTL-based adoptive immunotherapy has evolved to become a promising treatment for various diseases such as cancer and virus infections. In initial experiments ex vivo expanded CMV (cytomegalovirus) specific CTL have been used for treatment of CMV infection in immunocompromised allogeneic bone marrow transplant patients. While it is common to have life-threatening CMV viremia in these patients, none of the patients receiving expanded CTL develop CMV related illness, implying the anti-CMV immunity is established by the adoptively transferred CTL1. Promising results have also been observed for melanoma and may be extended to other types of cancer2. While there are many ways to ex vivo stimulate and expand human CTL, current approaches are restricted by the cost and technical limitations. For example, the current gold standard is based on the use of autologous DC. This requires each patient to donate a significant number of leukocytes and is also very expensive and laborious. Moreover, detailed in vitro characterization of DC expanded CTL has revealed that these have only suboptimal effector function 3. Here we present a highly efficient aAPC based system for ex vivo expansion of human CMV specific CTL for adoptive immunotherapy (Figure 1). The aAPC were made by coupling cell sized magnetic beads with human HLA-A2-Ig dimer and anti-CD28mAb4. Once aAPC are made, they can be loaded with various peptides of interest, and remain functional for months. In this report, aAPC were loaded with a dominant peptide from CMV, pp65 (NLVPMVATV). After culturing purified human CD8+ CTL from a healthy

  8. The receptor for interleukin-17E is induced by Th2 cytokines in antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Gratchev, A; Kzhyshkowska, J; Duperrier, K; Utikal, J; Velten, F W; Goerdt, S

    2004-09-01

    Interleukin-17E (IL-17E) (IL-25) is a recently identified cytokine capable to induce Th2-associated cytokine production (IL-5 and IL-13) and T helper 2 (Th2)-type pathologies in animal models. The IL-17E-responsive cell population in vivo was described to be a further uncharacterized non-T-, non-B-splenic accessory cell. Despite the identification of IL-17BR as the receptor for IL-17E, the cell population expressing IL-17BR has hitherto not been identified. Here, we show that human monocyte-derived Th2-skewed antigen-presenting cells (APC2) express membrane-bound and soluble forms of IL-17BR on the mRNA and protein level upon stimulation with IL-4, IL-10, IL-13 or transforming growth factor-betain vitro. These results indicate that IL-17BR-expressing APC2s may mediate the development of the IL-17E-mediated immunological reaction patterns observed in vivo. PMID:15320879

  9. Development of the Nanobody display technology to target lentiviral vectors to antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Goyvaerts, C; De Groeve, K; Dingemans, J; Van Lint, S; Robays, L; Heirman, C; Reiser, J; Zhang, X-Y; Thielemans, K; De Baetselier, P; Raes, G; Breckpot, K

    2012-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) provide unique opportunities for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies, as they transduce a variety of cells in situ, including antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Engineering LVs to specifically transduce APCs is required to promote their translation towards the clinic. We report on the Nanobody (Nb) display technology to target LVs to dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages. This innovative approach exploits the budding mechanism of LVs to incorporate an APC-specific Nb and a binding-defective, fusion-competent form of VSV.G in the viral envelope. In addition to production of high titer LVs, we demonstrated selective, Nb-dependent transduction of mouse DCs and macrophages both in vitro and in situ. Moreover, this strategy was translated to a human model in which selective transduction of in vitro generated or lymph node (LN)-derived DCs and macrophages, was demonstrated. In conclusion, the Nb display technology is an attractive approach to generate LVs targeted to specific cell types. PMID:22241177

  10. mTOR controls lysosome tubulation and antigen presentation in macrophages and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Saric, Amra; Hipolito, Victoria E. B.; Kay, Jason G.; Canton, Johnathan; Antonescu, Costin N.; Botelho, Roberto J.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) convert their lysosomes from small, punctate organelles into a network of tubules. Tubular lysosomes have been implicated in phagosome maturation, retention of fluid phase, and antigen presentation. There is a growing appreciation that lysosomes act as sensors of stress and the metabolic state of the cell through the kinase mTOR. Here we show that LPS stimulates mTOR and that mTOR is required for LPS-induced lysosome tubulation and secretion of major histocompatibility complex II in macrophages and dendritic cells. Specifically, we show that the canonical phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase–Akt–mTOR signaling pathway regulates LPS-induced lysosome tubulation independently of IRAK1/4 and TBK. Of note, we find that LPS treatment augmented the levels of membrane-associated Arl8b, a lysosomal GTPase required for tubulation that promotes kinesin-dependent lysosome movement to the cell periphery, in an mTOR-dependent manner. This suggests that mTOR may interface with the Arl8b-kinesin machinery. To further support this notion, we show that mTOR antagonists can block outward movement of lysosomes in cells treated with acetate but have no effect in retrograde movement upon acetate removal. Overall our work provides tantalizing evidence that mTOR plays a role in controlling lysosome morphology and trafficking by modulating microtubule-based motor activity in leukocytes. PMID:26582390

  11. Role of antigen presentation in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in obese adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Majdoubi, Abdelilah; Kishta, Osama A; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Type II diabetes regroups different physiological anomalies that ultimately lead to low-grade chronic inflammation, insulin resistance and loss of pancreatic β-cells. Obesity is one of the best examples of such a condition that can develop into Metabolic Syndrome, causing serious health problems of great socio-economic consequences. The pathological outcome of obesity has a genetic basis and depends on the delicate balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory effectors of the immune system. The causal link between obesity and inflammation is well established. While innate immunity plays a key role in the development of a pro-inflammatory state in obese adipose tissues, it has now become clear that adaptive immune cells are also involved and participate in the cascade of events that lead to metabolic perturbations. The efficacy of some immunotherapeutic protocols in reducing the symptoms of obesity-driven metabolic syndrome in mice implicated all arms of the immune response. Recently, the production of pathogenic immunoglobulins and pro-inflammatory cytokines by B and T lymphocytes suggested an auto-immune basis for the establishment of a non-healthy obese state. Understanding the cellular landscape of obese adipose tissues and how immune cells sustain chronic inflammation holds the key to the development of targeted therapies. In this review, we emphasize the role of antigen-presenting cells and MHC molecules in obese adipose tissue and the general contribution of the adaptive arm of the immune system in inflammation-induced insulin resistance. PMID:26854212

  12. mTOR controls lysosome tubulation and antigen presentation in macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Saric, Amra; Hipolito, Victoria E B; Kay, Jason G; Canton, Johnathan; Antonescu, Costin N; Botelho, Roberto J

    2016-01-15

    Macrophages and dendritic cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) convert their lysosomes from small, punctate organelles into a network of tubules. Tubular lysosomes have been implicated in phagosome maturation, retention of fluid phase, and antigen presentation. There is a growing appreciation that lysosomes act as sensors of stress and the metabolic state of the cell through the kinase mTOR. Here we show that LPS stimulates mTOR and that mTOR is required for LPS-induced lysosome tubulation and secretion of major histocompatibility complex II in macrophages and dendritic cells. Specifically, we show that the canonical phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt-mTOR signaling pathway regulates LPS-induced lysosome tubulation independently of IRAK1/4 and TBK. Of note, we find that LPS treatment augmented the levels of membrane-associated Arl8b, a lysosomal GTPase required for tubulation that promotes kinesin-dependent lysosome movement to the cell periphery, in an mTOR-dependent manner. This suggests that mTOR may interface with the Arl8b-kinesin machinery. To further support this notion, we show that mTOR antagonists can block outward movement of lysosomes in cells treated with acetate but have no effect in retrograde movement upon acetate removal. Overall our work provides tantalizing evidence that mTOR plays a role in controlling lysosome morphology and trafficking by modulating microtubule-based motor activity in leukocytes. PMID:26582390

  13. Dermal dendrocytes FXIIIa+ are essential antigen-presenting cells in indeterminate leprosy.

    PubMed

    de Alvarenga Lira, Marcia Lanzoni; Pagliari, Carla; de Lima Silva, Aline Alves; de Andrade, Heitor Franco; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas

    2015-04-01

    Indeterminate leprosy (IL) is the early phase of Hansen disease and reword (APCs). Langerhans cells and dermal dendrocytes FXIIIa positive (DDFXIIIa) are the major APCs in the skin and can be identified by the expression of CD1a and FXIIIa, respectively, by immunohistochemical techniques. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) are another type of dermal dendrocytes with a questionable antigen-presenting function and can be highlighted by anti-CD123 expression. To our knowledge, there are no studies evaluating DDFXIIIa and PDC in IL. The purpose was to investigate the involvement of these cells in the pathogenesis of IL. The authors performed a retrospective study on 18 cases of IL (10 confirmed and 8 suspected) to investigate expression of FXIIIa, CD1a, and CD123. The results were compared with normal skin (for CD1a and FXIIIa only). A higher amount of FXIIIa-positive cells (P , 0.05) in confirmed and suspected IL cases was noted when comparing with normal skin. However, CD1a showed no quantitative differences in the epidermis of IL lesions when comparing with normal skin and CD123 expression was negligible. Based on these findings, the authors postulate that Langerhans cells and PDCs do not have a major role in IL and that DDFXIIIa may be the main APCs in IL. Further study is required to establish this. PMID:25365500

  14. A novel approach for reliable detection of cathepsin S activities in mouse antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Steimle, Alex; Kalbacher, Hubert; Maurer, Andreas; Beifuss, Brigitte; Bender, Annika; Schäfer, Andrea; Müller, Ricarda; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    Cathepsin S (CTSS) is a eukaryotic protease mostly expressed in professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Since CTSS activity regulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, Sjögren's syndrome and psoriasis as well as in cancer progression, there is an ongoing interest in the reliable detection of cathepsin S activity. Various applications have been invented for specific detection of this enzyme. However, most of them have only been shown to be suitable for human samples, do not deliver quantitative results or the experimental procedure requires technical equipment that is not commonly available in a standard laboratory. We have tested a fluorogen substrate, Mca-GRWPPMGLPWE-Lys(Dnp)-DArg-NH2, that has been described to specifically detect CTSS activities in human APCs for its potential use for mouse samples. We have modified the protocol and thereby offer a cheap, easy, reproducible and quick activity assay to detect CTSS activities in mouse APCs. Since most of basic research on CTSS is performed in mice, this method closes a gap and offers a possibility for reliable and quantitative CTSS activity detection that can be performed in almost every laboratory. PMID:26899824

  15. HIV-1 Trans Infection of CD4+ T Cells by Professional Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldo, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1990s we have known of the fascinating ability of a complex set of professional antigen presenting cells (APCs; dendritic cells, monocytes/macrophages, and B lymphocytes) to mediate HIV-1 trans infection of CD4+ T cells. This results in a burst of virus replication in the T cells that is much greater than that resulting from direct, cis infection of either APC or T cells, or trans infection between T cells. Such APC-to-T cell trans infection first involves a complex set of virus subtype, attachment, entry, and replication patterns that have many similarities among APC, as well as distinct differences related to virus receptors, intracellular trafficking, and productive and nonproductive replication pathways. The end result is that HIV-1 can sequester within the APC for several days and be transmitted via membrane extensions intracellularly and extracellularly to T cells across the virologic synapse. Virus replication requires activated T cells that can develop concurrently with the events of virus transmission. Further research is essential to fill the many gaps in our understanding of these trans infection processes and their role in natural HIV-1 infection. PMID:24278768

  16. Therapeutic antiviral T cells noncytopathically clear persistently infected microglia after conversion into antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Jasmin; Johnson, Kory R.

    2015-01-01

    Several viruses can infect the mammalian nervous system and induce neurological dysfunction. Adoptive immunotherapy is an approach that involves administration of antiviral T cells and has shown promise in clinical studies for the treatment of peripheral virus infections in humans such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and adenovirus, among others. In contrast, clearance of neurotropic infections is particularly challenging because the central nervous system (CNS) is relatively intolerant of immunopathological reactions. Therefore, it is essential to develop and mechanistically understand therapies that noncytopathically eradicate pathogens from the CNS. Here, we used mice persistently infected from birth with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) to demonstrate that therapeutic antiviral T cells can completely purge the persistently infected brain without causing blood–brain barrier breakdown or tissue damage. Mechanistically, this is accomplished through a tailored release of chemoattractants that recruit antiviral T cells, but few pathogenic innate immune cells such as neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. Upon arrival, T cells enlisted the support of nearly all brain-resident myeloid cells (microglia) by inducing proliferation and converting them into CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Two-photon imaging experiments revealed that antiviral CD8+ and CD4+ T cells interacted directly with CD11c+ microglia and induced STAT1 signaling but did not initiate programmed cell death. We propose that noncytopathic CNS viral clearance can be achieved by therapeutic antiviral T cells reliant on restricted chemoattractant production and interactions with apoptosis-resistant microglia. PMID:26122661

  17. Antigen presenting cell abnormalities in the Cln3(-/-) mouse model of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Hersrud, Samantha L; Kovács, Attila D; Pearce, David A

    2016-07-01

    Mutations of the CLN3 gene lead to juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL), an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder that causes progressive neurodegeneration in children and adolescents. There is evidence of immune system involvement in pathology that has been only minimally investigated. We characterized bone marrow stem cell-derived antigen presenting cells (APCs), peritoneal macrophages, and leukocytes from spleen and blood, harvested from the Cln3(-/-) mouse model of JNCL. We detected dramatically elevated CD11c surface levels and increased total CD11c protein in Cln3(-/-) cell samples compared to wild type. This phenotype was specific to APCs and also to a loss of CLN3, as surface levels did not differ from wild type in other leukocyte subtypes nor in cells from two other NCL mouse models. Subcellularly, CD11c was localized to lipid rafts, indicating that perturbation of surface levels is attributable to derangement of raft dynamics, which has previously been shown in Cln3 mutant cells. Interrogation of APC function revealed that Cln3(-/-) cells have increased adhesiveness to CD11c ligands as well as an abnormal secretory pattern that closely mimics what has been previously reported for Cln3 mutant microglia. Our results show that CLN3 deficiency alters APCs, which can be a major contributor to the autoimmune response in JNCL. PMID:27101989

  18. Therapeutic antiviral T cells noncytopathically clear persistently infected microglia after conversion into antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Herz, Jasmin; Johnson, Kory R; McGavern, Dorian B

    2015-07-27

    Several viruses can infect the mammalian nervous system and induce neurological dysfunction. Adoptive immunotherapy is an approach that involves administration of antiviral T cells and has shown promise in clinical studies for the treatment of peripheral virus infections in humans such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and adenovirus, among others. In contrast, clearance of neurotropic infections is particularly challenging because the central nervous system (CNS) is relatively intolerant of immunopathological reactions. Therefore, it is essential to develop and mechanistically understand therapies that noncytopathically eradicate pathogens from the CNS. Here, we used mice persistently infected from birth with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) to demonstrate that therapeutic antiviral T cells can completely purge the persistently infected brain without causing blood-brain barrier breakdown or tissue damage. Mechanistically, this is accomplished through a tailored release of chemoattractants that recruit antiviral T cells, but few pathogenic innate immune cells such as neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. Upon arrival, T cells enlisted the support of nearly all brain-resident myeloid cells (microglia) by inducing proliferation and converting them into CD11c(+) antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Two-photon imaging experiments revealed that antiviral CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells interacted directly with CD11c(+) microglia and induced STAT1 signaling but did not initiate programmed cell death. We propose that noncytopathic CNS viral clearance can be achieved by therapeutic antiviral T cells reliant on restricted chemoattractant production and interactions with apoptosis-resistant microglia. PMID:26122661

  19. Dendritic cells cross-present HIV antigens from live as well as apoptotic infected CD4+ T lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marañón, Concepción; Desoutter, Jean-François; Hoeffel, Guillaume; Cohen, William; Hanau, Daniel; Hosmalin, Anne

    2004-04-01

    A better understanding of the antigen presentation pathways that lead to CD8+ T cell recognition of HIV epitopes in vivo is needed to achieve better immune control of HIV replication. Here, we show that cross-presentation of very small amounts of HIV proteins from apoptotic infected CD4+ T lymphocytes by dendritic cells to CD8+ T cells is much more efficient than other known HIV presentation pathways, i.e., direct presentation of infectious virus or cross-presentation of defective virus. Unexpectedly, dendritic cells also take up actively antigens into endosomes from live infected CD4+ T lymphocytes and cross-present them as efficiently as antigens derived from apoptotic infected cells. Moreover, live infected CD4+ T cells costimulate cross-presenting dendritic cells in the process. Therefore, dendritic cells can present very small amounts of viral proteins from infected T cells either after apoptosis, which is frequent during HIV infection, or not. Thus, if HIV expression is transiently induced while costimulation is enhanced (for instance after IL-2 and IFN immune therapy), this HIV antigen presentation pathway could be exploited to eradicate latently infected reservoirs, which are poorly recognized by patients' immune systems.

  20. Effects of messenger RNA structure and other translational control mechanisms on major histocompatibility complex-I mediated antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Murat, Pierre; Tellam, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Effective T-cell surveillance of antigen-presenting cells is dependent on the expression of an array of antigenic peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (MHC-I) or class II (MHC-II) molecules. Pathogens co-evolving with their hosts exploit crucial translational regulatory mechanisms in order to evade host immune recognition and thereby sustain their infection. Evasion strategies that downregulate viral protein synthesis and thereby restrict antigen presentation to cytotoxic T-cells through the endogenous MHC-I pathway have been implicated in the pathogenesis of viral-associated malignancies. An understanding of the mechanisms by which messenger RNA (mRNA) structure modulates both viral mRNA translation and the antigen processing machinery to escape immune surveillance, will stimulate the development of alternative therapeutic strategies focused on RNA-directed drugs designed to enhance immune responses against infected cells. In this review, we discuss regulatory aspects of the MHC-I pathway and summarize current knowledge of the role attributed by mRNA structure and other translational regulatory mechanisms in immune evasion. In particular we highlight the impact of recently identified G-quadruplex structures within virally encoded transcripts as unique regulatory signals for translational control and antigen presentation. WIREs RNA 2015, 6:157–171. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1262 PMID:25264139

  1. Carbon monoxide impairs mitochondria-dependent endosomal maturation and antigen presentation in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Sebastián A; Pogu, Julien; Anegon, Ignacio; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-12-01

    Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) prevents T cell-mediated inflammatory disease by producing carbon monoxide (CO) and impairing DC immunogenicity. However, the cellular mechanisms causing this inhibition are unknown. Here, we show that CO impairs mitochondrial function in DCs by reducing both the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production, and resembling the effect of a nonlethal dose of a classical mitochondria uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP). Moreover, both CO and CCCP reduced cargo transport, endosome-to-lysosome fusion, and antigen processing, dampening the production of peptide-MHC complexes on the surface of DCs. As a result, the inhibition of naive CD4(+) T-cell priming was observed. Furthermore, mitochondrial dysfunction in DCs also significantly reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent type 1 diabetes onset in vivo. These results showed for the first time that CO interferes with T-cell priming by blocking an unknown mitochondria-dependent antigen-processing pathway in mature DC. Interestingly, other immune functions in DCs such as antigen capture, cytokine secretion, costimulation, and cell survival relied on glycolysis, suggesting that oxidative phosphorylation might only play a key role for the maturation of antigen-containing endosomes. In conclusion, CO produced by HO-1 impairs antigen-dependent inflammation by regulating DC immunogenicity by a mitochondria-dependent mechanism. PMID:26461179

  2. Deep reactive ion etching of auxetic structures: present capabilities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muslija, Alban; Díaz Lantada, Andrés

    2014-08-01

    Auxetic materials (or metamaterials) have negative Poisson ratios (NPR) and display the unexpected properties of lateral expansion when stretched, and equal and opposing densification when compressed. Such auxetic materials are being used more frequently in the development of novel products, especially in the fields of intelligent expandable actuators, shape-morphing structures and minimally invasive implantable devices. Although several micromanufacturing technologies have already been applied to the development of auxetic materials and devices, additional precision is needed to take full advantage of their special mechanical properties. In this study, we present a very promising approach for the development of auxetic materials and devices based on the use of deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). The process stands out for its precision and its potential applications to mass production. To our knowledge, it represents the first time this technology has been applied to the manufacture of auxetic materials with nanometric details. We take into account the present capabilities and challenges linked to the use of DRIE in the development of auxetic materials and auxetic-based devices.

  3. Association of Polymorphisms in HLA Antigen Presentation-Related Genes with the Outcomes of HCV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaomei; Xu, Yin; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Yun; Yu, Rongbin; Su, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-presentation genes play a vital role in the pathogenesis of HCV infection. However, the relationship of variants of these genes with spontaneous outcomes of HCV infection has not been fully investigated. To explore novel loci in the Chinese population, 34 tagging-SNPs in 9 candidate genes were genotyped for their associations with the outcomes of HCV infection. The distributions of different genotypes and haplotypes were compared among 773 HCV-negative controls, 246 subjects with HCV natural clearance, and 218 HCV persistent carriers recruited from hemodialysis patients and intravenous drug users. Our study implicated that TAP2, HLA-DOA, HLA-DOB, and tapasin loci were novel candidate regions for susceptibility to HCV infection and viral clearance in the Chinese population. Logistic regression analyses showed that TAP2 rs1800454 A (OR = 1.48, P = 0.002) and HLA-DOB rs2071469 G (OR = 1.23, P = 0.048) were significantly associated with increased susceptibility to establishment of HCV infection. However, high-risk behavior exposure and age were stronger predictors of HCV infection. Mutation of tapasin rs9277972 T (OR = 1.57, P =0.043) increased the risk of HCV chronicity, and HLA-DOA rs3128935 C (OR = 0.62, P = 0.019) increased the chance of viral resolution. With regards to the effect of rs3128925, interactions were found with high-risk behavior (P = 0.013) and age (P = 0.035). The risk effect of rs3128925 T for persistent HCV infection was higher in injecting drug users (vs. dialysis patients) and in subjects ≥ 40 years old (vs. < 40 years old). PMID:25874709

  4. Antigen presenting cell-selective drug delivery by glycan-decorated nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Frenz, Theresa; Grabski, Elena; Durán, Verónica; Hozsa, Constantin; Stępczyńska, Anna; Furch, Marcus; Gieseler, Robert K; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems hold promise for selective provision of active compounds to distinct tissues or cell subsets. Thus, locally enhanced drug concentrations are obtained that would confer improved efficacy. As a consequence adverse effects should be diminished, as innocent bystander cells are less affected. Currently, several controlled drug delivery systems based on diverse materials are being developed. Some systems exhibit material-associated toxic effects and/or show low drug loading capacity. In contrast, liposomal nanocarriers are particularly favorable because they are well tolerated, poorly immunogenic, can be produced in defined sizes, and offer a reasonable payload capacity. Compared with other immune cells, professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) demonstrate enhanced liposome uptake mediated by macropinocytosis, phagocytosis and presumably also by clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. In order to further enhance the targeting efficacy toward APCs, receptor-mediated uptake appears advisable. Since APC subsets generally do not express single linage-specific receptors, members of the C-type lectin receptor (CLR) family are compelling targets. Examples of CLR expressed by APCs include DEC-205 (CD205) expressed by myeloid dendritic cells (DC) and monocytes, the mannose receptor C type 1 (MR, CD206) expressed by DC, monocytes and macrophages, DC-SIGN (CD209) expressed by DC, and several others. These receptors bind glycans, which are typically displayed by pathogens and thus support pathogen uptake and endocytosis. Further research will elucidate whether glycan-decorated liposomes will not only enhance APCs targeting but also enable preferential delivery of their payload to discrete subcellular compartments. PMID:25701806

  5. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4{sup +} intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4{sup +} IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4{sup +} IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4{sup +} IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} LPLs and primed splenic CD4{sup +} T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4{sup +} IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo.

  6. Fast whole-brain optical tomography capable of automated slice-collection (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jing; Jiang, Tao; Deng, Lei; Long, Beng; Peng, Jie; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Acquiring brain-wide composite information of neuroanatomical and molecular phenotyping is crucial to understand brain functions. However, current whole-brain imaging methods based on mechnical sectioning haven't achieved brain-wide acquisition of both neuroanatomical and molecular phenotyping due to the lack of appropriate whole-brain immunostaining of embedded samples. Here, we present a novel strategy of acquiring brain-wide structural and molecular maps in the same brain, combining whole-brain imaging and subsequent immunostaining of automated-collected slices. We developed a whole-brain imaging system capable of automatically imaging and then collecting imaged tissue slices in order. The system contains three parts: structured illumination microscopy for high-throughput optical sectioning, vibratome for high-precision sectioning and slice-collection device for automated collecting of tissue slices. Through our system, we could acquire a whole-brain dataset of agarose-embedded mouse brain at lateral resolution of 0.33 µm with z-interval sampling of 100 µm in 9 h, and automatically collect the imaged slices in sequence. Subsequently, we performed immunohistochemistry of the collected slices in the routine way. We acquired mouse whole-brain imaging datasets of multiple specific types of neurons, proteins and gene expression profiles. We believe our method could accelerate systematic analysis of brain anatomical structure with specific proteins or genes expression information and understanding how the brain processes information and generates behavior.

  7. The tumor antigen N-glycolyl-GM3 is a human CD1d ligand capable of mediating B cell and natural killer T cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Gentilini, M Virginia; Pérez, M Eugenia; Fernández, Pablo Mariano; Fainboim, Leonardo; Arana, Eloísa

    2016-05-01

    The expression of N-glycolyl-monosialodihexosyl-ganglioside (NGcGM3) in humans is restricted to cancer cells; therefore, it is a tumor antigen. There are measurable quantities of circulating anti-NGcGM3 antibodies (aNGcGM3 Abs) in human serum. Interestingly, some people have circulating Ag-specific immunoglobulins G (IgGs) that are capable of complement mediated cytotoxicity against NGcGM3 positive cells, which is relevant for tumor surveillance. In light of the chemical nature of Ag, we postulated it as a candidate ligand for CD1d. Furthermore, we hypothesize that the immune mechanism involved in the generation of these Abs entails cross talk between B lymphocytes (Bc) and invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT). Combining cellular techniques, such as flow cytometry and biochemical assays, we demonstrated that CD1d binds to NGcGM3 and that human Bc present NGcGM3 in a CD1d context according to two alternative strategies. We also showed that paraformaldehyde treatment of cells expressing CD1d affects the presentation. Finally, by co-culturing primary human Bc with iNKT and measuring Ki-67 expression, we detected a reproducible increment in the proliferation of the iNKT population when Ag was on the medium. Our findings identify a novel, endogenous, human CD1d ligand, which is sufficiently competent to stimulate iNKT. We postulate that CD1d-restricted Bc presentation of NGcGM3 drives effective iNKT activation, an immunological mechanism that has not been previously described for humans, which may contribute to understanding aNGcGM3 occurrence. PMID:26969612

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis vaccine therapies: perspectives and lessons from therapeutic ligand epitope antigen presentation system vaccines for models of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Kenneth S.; Mikecz, Katalin; Steiner, Harold L.; Glant, Tibor T.; Finnegan, Alison; Carambula, Roy E.; Zimmerman, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The current status of therapeutic vaccines for autoimmune diseases is reviewed with rheumatoid arthritis as the focus. Therapeutic vaccines for autoimmune diseases must regulate or subdue responses to common self-antigens. Ideally, such a vaccine would initiate an antigen-specific modulation of the T-cell immune response that drives the inflammatory disease. Appropriate animal models and types of T helper cells and signature cytokine responses that drive autoimmune disease are also discussed. Interpretation of these animal models must be done cautiously because the means of initiation, autoantigens, and even the signature cytokine and T helper cell (Th1 or Th17) responses that are involved in the disease may differ significantly from those in humans. We describe ligand epitope antigen presentation system vaccine modulation of T-cell autoimmune responses as a strategy for the design of therapeutic vaccines for rheumatoid arthritis, which may also be effective in other autoimmune conditions. PMID:25787143

  9. Tolerance is dependent on complement C3 fragment iC3b binding to antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jeong-Hyeon; Bora, Puran S.; Suk, Hye-Jung; Molina, Hector; Kaplan, Henry J.; Bora, Nalini S.

    2007-01-01

    Systemic tolerance can be induced by the introduction of antigen into an immune-privileged site. Here we investigated the role of complement in the induction of tolerance after intraocular injection. We found that the development of antigen-specific tolerance is dependent on a complement activation product. The ligation of the complement C3 activation product iC3b to complement receptor type 3 (the iC3b receptor) on antigen-presenting cells resulted in the sequential production of transforming growth factor-β2 and interleukin-10, which is essential for the induction of tolerance. These observations may extend to the development of both neonatal tolerance and other forms of acquired tolerance. PMID:12514742

  10. The proteasome activator 11 S REG (PA28) and class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed Central

    Rechsteiner, M; Realini, C; Ustrell, V

    2000-01-01

    There are two immune responses in vertebrates: humoral immunity is mediated by circulating antibodies, whereas cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) confer cellular immunity. CTL lyse infected cells upon recognition of cell-surface MHC Class I molecules complexed with foreign peptides. The displayed peptides are produced in the cytosol by degradation of host proteins or proteins from intracellular pathogens that might be present. Proteasomes are cylindrical multisubunit proteases that generate many of the peptides eventually transferred to the cell surface for immune surveillance. In mammalian proteasomes, six active sites face a central chamber. As this chamber is sealed off from the enzyme's surface, there must be mechanisms to promote entry of substrates. Two protein complexes have been found to bind the ends of the proteasome and activate it. One of the activators is the 19 S regulatory complex of the 26 S proteasome; the other activator is '11 S REG' [Dubiel, Pratt, Ferrell and Rechsteiner (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 22369-22377] or 'PA28' [Ma, Slaughter and DeMartino (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 10515-10523]. During the past 7 years, our understanding of the structure of REG molecules has increased significantly, but much less is known about their biological functions. There are three REG subunits, namely alpha, beta and gamma. Recombinant REGalpha forms a ring-shaped heptamer of known crystal structure. 11 S REG is a heteroheptamer of alpha and beta subunits. REGgamma is also presumably a heptameric ring, and it is found in the nuclei of the nematode work Caenorhabditis elegans and higher organisms, where it may couple proteasomes to other nuclear components. REGalpha and REGbeta, which are abundant in vertebrate immune tissues, are located mostly in the cytoplasm. Synthesis of REG alpha and beta subunits is induced by interferon-gamma, and this has led to the prevalent hypothesis that REG alpha/beta hetero-oligomers play an important role in Class I antigen

  11. Effect of dendritic cell state and antigen-presentation conditions on resulting T-cell phenotypes and Th cytokine profiles.

    PubMed

    de Lastic, Anne-Lise; Rodi, Maria; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-08-01

    T cells play a pivotal role in controlling the immune response and have been the focus of extensive research. We studied the process of in vitro generation of antigen-specific T effector cells (Teffs) to assess the dynamics of antigen presentation and determine the best conditions for cell therapy. We used a peptidic construct consisting of combined HLA class I and II epitopes of the tumor antigen MAGE-3 as an antigen. Monocytes were isolated from healthy donors and were differentiated to dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. The peptide was added to the DC culture, the pulsed cells were transferred to a co-culture with lymphocytes from the same donor, either as irradiated feeders or untreated, and were cultured in the presence or absence of IL-2. Several rounds of restimulation followed. The cells were analyzed by Flow Cytometry, and cytokine levels were measured by ELISA and Cytometric Bead Array for Th1/Th2/Th17 profiling. The results showed that the lymphocytes in culture upregulated their activation markers and produced Th1 proinflammatory cytokines in response to the peptide, optimally when it was presented by non-irradiated dendritic cells in the presence of IL-2. In contrast, DC irradiation resulted in low activation potential and a shift toward a suppressive phenotype. After prolonged antigenic stimulation, the culture displayed Th17 polarization. In conclusion, the functional integrity of DCs is necessary for the development of antigen-specific Teffs, and culture conditions can be developed to create Teffs with specific properties for eventual use in cell therapy applications. PMID:27130240

  12. Autoreactive natural killer T cells: promoting immune protection and immune tolerance through varied interactions with myeloid antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Subramanya; Fox, Lisa; Wang, Xiaohua; Gumperz, Jenny E

    2010-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate T lymphocytes that are restricted by CD1d antigen-presenting molecules and recognize lipids and glycolipids as antigens. NKT cells have attracted attention for their potent immunoregulatory effects. Like other types of regulatory lymphocytes, a high proportion of NKT cells appear to be autoreactive to self antigens. Thus, as myeloid antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) constitutively express CD1d, NKT cells are able to interact with these APCs not only during times of immune activation but also in immunologically quiescent periods. The interactions of NKT cells with myeloid APCs can have either pro-inflammatory or tolerizing outcomes, and a central question is how the ensuing response is determined. Here we bring together published results from a variety of model systems to highlight three critical factors that influence the outcome of the NKT–APC interaction: (i) the strength of the antigenic signal delivered to the NKT cell, as determined by antigen abundance and/or T-cell receptor (TCR) affinity; (ii) the presence or absence of cytokines that costimulate NKT cells [e.g. interleukin (IL)-12, IL-18 and interferon (IFN)-α]; (iii) APC intrinsic factors such as differentiation state (e.g. monocyte versus DC) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation. Together with recent findings that demonstrate new links between NKT cell activation and endogenous lipid metabolism, these results outline a picture in which the functions of NKT cells are closely attuned to the existing biological context. Thus, NKT cells may actively promote tolerance until a critical level of danger signals arises, at which point they switch to activating pro-inflammatory immune responses. PMID:20465577

  13. Lead enhances CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation indirectly by targeting antigen presenting cells and modulating antigen-specific interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Farrer, David G.; Hueber, Sara M.; McCabe, Michael J. . E-mail: michael_mccabe@urmc.rochester.edu

    2005-09-01

    Although Pb is a well-known immunotoxicant, its mechanism of action is not well understood. Low levels of Pb ({approx}1 {mu}M) markedly enhance the proliferative T cell response in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC), a process we have termed allo-enhancement. As Pb allo-enhancement occurs whether alloantigen presenting cells (APC) are derived from C57BL/6 or BALB.B10, the allo-reactive T cells involved are likely to be specific for peptide in the context of the IA{sup b} molecule as the IE molecule is null in H-2{sup b} mice. Analysis of T cell division in MLC with Pb treatment indicated that there was no significant difference between Pb and non-Pb-treated cultures until day 4 when the frequency of proliferating T cells was much greater than in non-treated cultures. Our data suggest that this increased proliferation is not coupled with increased IL-2 levels in the media as these were actually decreased with Pb treatment and that Pb-induced enhancement in the allo-proliferative response is only partially dependent upon IL-2. Pb allo-enhancement is abrogated when stimulating allo-APCs are paraformaldehyde-fixed, and T cell proliferation stimulated by concanavalin A is not enhanced with Pb treatment, suggesting that the APC is the proximate target of Pb in allo-MLC. Pb allo-enhancement does not occur when T cells respond to irradiated allo-B cells, alone; however, it is restored when syngeneic CD11c-enriched cells are added. Of the CD11c-enriched splenocytes, the fraction that is adherent after 24 h, consistent with macrophages, appears to be the cell type targeted by Pb. Using T cells from DO11.10 transgenic mice, we determined that the effect of Pb is centered around specific p:MHC interactions and that enhanced costimulation is an unlikely mechanism for Pb allo-enhancement.

  14. The effect of CpG-ODN on antigen presenting cells of the foal

    PubMed Central

    Flaminio, M Julia BF; Borges, Alexandre S; Nydam, Daryl V; Horohov, David W; Hecker, Rolf; Matychak, Mary Beth

    2007-01-01

    Background Cytosine-phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) has been used successfully to induce immune responses against viral and intracellular organisms in mammals. The main objective of this study was to test the effect of CpG-ODN on antigen presenting cells of young foals. Methods Peripheral blood monocytes of foals (n = 7) were isolated in the first day of life and monthly thereafter up to 3 months of life. Adult horse (n = 7) monocytes were isolated and tested once for comparison. Isolated monocytes were stimulated with IL-4 and GM-CSF (to obtain dendritic cells, DC) or not stimulated (to obtain macrophages). Macrophages and DCs were stimulated for 14–16 hours with either CpG-ODN, LPS or not stimulated. The stimulated and non-stimulated cells were tested for cell surface markers (CD86 and MHC class II) using flow cytometry, mRNA expression of cytokines (IL-12, IFNα, IL-10) and TLR-9 using real time quantitative RT-PCR, and for the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB p65 using a chemiluminescence assay. Results The median fluorescence of the MHC class II molecule in non-stimulated foal macrophages and DCs at birth were 12.5 times and 11.2 times inferior, respectively, than adult horse cells (p = 0.009). That difference subsided at 3 months of life (p = 0.3). The expression of the CD86 co-stimulatory molecule was comparable in adult horse and foal macrophages and DCs, independent of treatment. CpG-ODN stimulation induced IL-12p40 (53 times) and IFNα (23 times) mRNA expression in CpG-ODN-treated adult horse DCs (p = 0.078), but not macrophages, in comparison to non-stimulated cells. In contrast, foal APCs did not respond to CpG-ODN stimulation with increased cytokine mRNA expression up to 3 months of age. TLR-9 mRNA expression and NF-kB activation (NF-kB p65) in foal DCs and macrophages were comparable (p > 0.05) to adult horse cells. Conclusion CpG-ODN treatment did not induce specific maturation and cytokine expression in foal

  15. Effects of topical corticosteroid therapy on Langerhans cell antigen presenting function in human skin.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, J; Booker, J; Breathnach, S M

    1988-04-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms by which topical corticosteroids modulate cutaneous immune reactions in man. Volunteers applied clobetasone butyrate 0.05% (Eumovate; EV), betamethasone valerate 0.1% (Betnovate; BV), clobetasol propionate 0.05% (Dermovate; DV), and control vehicles twice daily to forearm skin for 7 days. Steroid therapy significantly decreased the number of HLA-DR/T6 (CD1a) positive Langerhans cells (LCs) per mm2 in suction blister-derived epidermal sheets, expressed as a mean percentage of controls, as follows: EV 69.2%; BV 67.3%; DV 37.8%. LC antigen presenting capacity was determined in the allogeneic and autologous epidermal cell-lymphocyte reactions. The LC-dependent allostimulatory capacity of epidermal cells, expressed as a mean percentage of controls, was also significantly reduced by steroid therapy: EV 45.1%; BV 41.9%; DV 23.4%. Following therapy with clobetasol propionate 0.05%, the capacity of epidermal cells to present tetanus toxoid to, and to augment concanavalin A mediated lymphocyte stimulation of, autologous lymphocytes was reduced to 33.6% and 19.7% respectively of controls. Depression of epidermal cell allostimulatory capacity was not the result of a steroid-induced decrease in the production of epidermal cell-derived thymocyte activating factor (ETAF)/interleukin 1 by keratinocytes, since it could not be reversed by addition of exogenous interleukin 1. Indomethacin, added to block any potential prostaglandin synthesis during the culture period, did not restore the allostimulatory capacity of epidermal cells from steroid-treated sites. Addition of epidermal cells from DV-treated sites depressed the capacity of control epidermal cells to stimulate lymphocytes in the allogeneic epidermal-lymphocyte reaction. Our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory action of topical corticosteroids in man is associated not only with a reduction in the number of HLA-DR/T6 positive LCs, but also with a marked decrease in Langerhans cell

  16. An AXL/LRP-1/RANBP9 complex mediates DC efferocytosis and antigen cross-presentation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Hayes, Crystal D.; Thome, Joseph J.; Thorp, Edward; Matsushima, Glenn K.; Herz, Joachim; Farber, Donna L.; Liu, Kang; Lakshmana, Madepalli; Tabas, Ira

    2014-01-01

    The phagocytosis of apoptotic cells (ACs), or efferocytosis, by DCs is critical for self-tolerance and host defense. Although many efferocytosis-associated receptors have been described in vitro, the functionality of these receptors in vivo has not been explored in depth. Using a spleen efferocytosis assay and targeted genetic deletion in mice, we identified a multiprotein complex — composed of the receptor tyrosine kinase AXL, LDL receptor–related protein–1 (LRP-1), and RAN-binding protein 9 (RANBP9) — that mediates DC efferocytosis and antigen cross-presentation. We found that AXL bound ACs, but required LRP-1 to trigger internalization, in murine CD8α+ DCs and human-derived DCs. AXL and LRP-1 did not interact directly, but relied on RANBP9, which bound both AXL and LRP-1, to form the complex. In a coculture model of antigen presentation, the AXL/LRP-1/RANBP9 complex was used by DCs to cross-present AC-associated antigens to T cells. Furthermore, in a murine model of herpes simplex virus–1 infection, mice lacking DC-specific LRP-1, AXL, or RANBP9 had increased AC accumulation, defective viral antigen-specific CD8+ T cell activation, enhanced viral load, and decreased survival. The discovery of this multiprotein complex that mediates functionally important DC efferocytosis in vivo may have implications for future studies related to host defense and DC-based vaccines. PMID:24509082

  17. Transduction of Human Antigen-Presenting Cells with Integrase-Defective Lentiviral Vector Enables Functional Expansion of Primed Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bona, Roberta; Michelini, Zuleika; Leone, Pasqualina; Macchia, Iole; Klotman, Mary E.; Salvatore, Mirella

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nonintegrating lentiviral vectors are being developed as a efficient and safe delivery system for both gene therapy and vaccine purposes. Several reports have demonstrated that a single immunization with integration-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) delivering viral or tumor model antigens in mice was able to elicit broad and long-lasting specific immune responses in the absence of vector integration. At present, no evidence has been reported showing that IDLVs are able to expand preexisting immune responses in the human context. In the present study, we demonstrate that infection of human antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages with IDLVs expressing influenza matrix M1 protein resulted in effective induction of in vitro expansion of M1-primed CD8+ T cells, as evaluated by both pentamer staining and cytokine production. This is the first demonstration that IDLVs represent an efficient delivery system for gene transfer and expression in human APCs, useful for immunotherapeutic applications. PMID:20210625

  18. Hepatitis B virus-like particles access major histocompatibility class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Jessica M; Cheong, Wan-Shoo; Villadangos, José A; Mintern, Justine D; Netter, Hans J

    2013-04-26

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) represent high density displays of viral proteins that efficiently trigger immunity. VLPs composed of the small hepatitis B virus envelope protein (HBsAgS) are useful vaccine platforms that induce humoral and cellular immune responses. Notably, however, some studies suggest HBsAgS VLPs impair dendritic cell (DC) function. Here we investigated HBsAgS VLP interaction with DC subsets and antigen access to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs. HBsAgS VLPs impaired plasmacytoid DC (pDC) interferon alpha (IFNα) production in response to CpG in vitro, but did not alter conventional DC (cDC) or pDC phenotype when administered in vivo. To assess cellular immune responses, HBsAgS VLPs were generated containing the ovalbumin (OVA) model epitopes OVA(257-264) and OVA(323-339) to access MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways, respectively; both in vitro and following immunisation in vivo. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) elicited CTL responses in vivo that were not enhanced by inclusion of an additional MHCII helper epitope. HBsAgS VLP-OVA(257-264) administered in vivo was cross-presented by CD8(+) DCs, but not CD8(-) DCs. Therefore, HBsAgS VLPs can deliver antigen to both MHCI and MHCII antigen presentation pathways in primary DCs and promote cytotoxic and helper T cell priming despite their suppressive effect on pDCs. PMID:23473776

  19. Luciferase mRNA Transfection of Antigen Presenting Cells Permits Sensitive Nonradioactive Measurement of Cellular and Humoral Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Omokoko, Tana A; Luxemburger, Uli; Bardissi, Shaheer; Simon, Petra; Utsch, Magdalena; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is rapidly evolving as an effective treatment option for many cancers. With the emerging fields of cancer vaccines and adoptive cell transfer therapies, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput in vitro cytotoxicity assays that efficiently analyze immune effector functions. The gold standard (51)Cr-release assay is very accurate but has the major disadvantage of being radioactive. We reveal the development of a versatile and nonradioactive firefly luciferase in vitro transcribed (IVT) RNA-based assay. Demonstrating high efficiency, consistency, and excellent target cell viability, our optimized luciferase IVT RNA is used to transfect dividing and nondividing primary antigen presenting cells. Together with the long-lasting expression and minimal background, the direct measurement of intracellular luciferase activity of living cells allows for the monitoring of killing kinetics and displays paramount sensitivity. The ability to cotransfect the IVT RNA of the luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest into the antigen presenting cells and its simple read-out procedure render the assay high-throughput in nature. Results generated were comparable to the (51)Cr release and further confirmed the assay's ability to measure antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The assay's combined simplicity, practicality, and efficiency tailor it for the analysis of antigen-specific cellular and humoral effector functions during the development of novel immunotherapies. PMID:27057556

  20. Luciferase mRNA Transfection of Antigen Presenting Cells Permits Sensitive Nonradioactive Measurement of Cellular and Humoral Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Omokoko, Tana A.; Luxemburger, Uli; Bardissi, Shaheer; Simon, Petra; Utsch, Magdalena; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is rapidly evolving as an effective treatment option for many cancers. With the emerging fields of cancer vaccines and adoptive cell transfer therapies, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput in vitro cytotoxicity assays that efficiently analyze immune effector functions. The gold standard 51Cr-release assay is very accurate but has the major disadvantage of being radioactive. We reveal the development of a versatile and nonradioactive firefly luciferase in vitro transcribed (IVT) RNA-based assay. Demonstrating high efficiency, consistency, and excellent target cell viability, our optimized luciferase IVT RNA is used to transfect dividing and nondividing primary antigen presenting cells. Together with the long-lasting expression and minimal background, the direct measurement of intracellular luciferase activity of living cells allows for the monitoring of killing kinetics and displays paramount sensitivity. The ability to cotransfect the IVT RNA of the luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest into the antigen presenting cells and its simple read-out procedure render the assay high-throughput in nature. Results generated were comparable to the 51Cr release and further confirmed the assay's ability to measure antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The assay's combined simplicity, practicality, and efficiency tailor it for the analysis of antigen-specific cellular and humoral effector functions during the development of novel immunotherapies. PMID:27057556

  1. Past, Present, and Future Capabilities of the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel from an Aeroelasticity Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stanley R.; Garcia, Jerry L.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) has provided a unique capability for aeroelastic testing for forty years. The facility has a rich history of significant contributions to the design of many United States commercial transports, military aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. The facility has many features that contribute to its uniqueness for aeroelasticity testing, perhaps the most important feature being the use of a heavy gas test medium to achieve higher test densities. Higher test medium densities substantially improve model-building requirements and therefore simplify the fabrication process for building aeroelastically scaled wind tunnel models. Aeroelastic scaling for the heavy gas results in lower model structural frequencies. Lower model frequencies tend to a make aeroelastic testing safer. This paper will describe major developments in the testing capabilities at the TDT throughout its history, the current status of the facility, and planned additions and improvements to its capabilities in the near future.

  2. Cross-presentation of viral antigens in dribbles leads to efficient activation of virus-specific human memory t cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Autophagy regulates innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens and tumors. We have reported that autophagosomes derived from tumor cells after proteasome inhibition, DRibbles (Defective ribosomal products in blebs), were excellent sources of antigens for efficient cross priming of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells, which mediated regression of established tumors in mice. But the activity of DRibbles in human has not been reported. Methods DRibbles or cell lysates derived from HEK293T or UbiLT3 cell lines expressing cytomegalovirus (CMV) pp65 protein or transfected with a plasmid encoding dominant HLA-A2 restricted CMV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Influenza (Flu) epitopes (CEF) were loaded onto human monocytes or PBMCs and the response of human CMV pp65 or CEF antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ memory T cells was detected by intracellular staining. The effect of cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-4, IL-12, TNF-α, IFN-α and IFN-γ) TLR agonists (Lipopolysaccharide, Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C), M52-CpG, R848, TLR2 ligand) and CD40 ligand on the cross-presentation of antigens contained in DRibbles or cell lysates was explored. Results In this study we showed that purified monocytes, or human PBMCs, loaded with DRibbles isolated from cells expressing CMV or CEF epitopes, could activate CMV- or CEF-specific memory T cells. DRibbles were significantly more efficient at stimulating CD8+ memory T cells compared to cell lysates expressing the same antigenic epitopes. We optimized the conditions for T-cell activation and IFN-γ production following direct loading of DRibbles onto PBMCs. We found that the addition of Poly(I:C), CD40 ligand, and GM-CSF to the PBMCs together with DRibbles significantly increased the level of CD8+ T cell responses. Conclusions DRibbles containing specific viral antigens are an efficient ex vivo activator of human antigen-specific memory T cells specific for those antigens. This function could be enhanced by combining with Poly

  3. Effect of oestradiol and pathogen-associated molecular patterns on class II-mediated antigen presentation and immunomodulatory molecule expression in the mouse female reproductive tract

    PubMed Central

    Ochiel, Daniel O; Rossoll, Richard M; Schaefer, Todd M; Wira, Charles R

    2012-01-01

    Cells of the female reproductive tract (FRT) can present antigen to naive and memory T cells. However, the effects of oestrogen, known to modulate immune responses, on antigen presentation in the FRT remain undefined. In the present study, DO11.10 T-cell antigen receptor transgenic mice specific for the class II MHC-restricted ovalbumin (OVA) 323–339 peptide were used to study the effects of oestradiol and pathogen-associated molecular patterns on antigen presentation in the FRT. We report here that oestradiol inhibited antigen presentation of OVA by uterine epithelial cells, uterine stromal cells and vaginal cells to OVA-specific memory T cells. When ovariectomized animals were treated with oestradiol for 1 or 3 days, antigen presentation was decreased by 20–80%. In contrast, incubation with PAMP increased antigen presentation by epithelial cells (Pam3Cys), stromal cells (peptidoglycan, Pam3Cys) and vaginal cells (Pam3Cys). In contrast, CpG inhibited both stromal and vaginal cell antigen presentation. Analysis of mRNA expression by reverse transcription PCR indicated that oestradiol inhibited CD40, CD80 and class II in the uterus and CD40, CD86 and class II in the vagina. Expression in isolated uterine and vaginal cells paralleled that seen in whole tissues. In contrast, oestradiol increased polymeric immunoglobulin receptor mRNA expression in the uterus and decreased it in the vagina. These results indicate that antigen-presenting cells in the uterus and vagina are responsive to oestradiol, which inhibits antigen presentation and co-stimulatory molecule expression. Further, these findings suggest that antigen-presenting cells in the uterus and vagina respond to selected Toll-like receptor agonists with altered antigen presentation. PMID:22043860

  4. Antigen presentation of detergent free glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65) is affected by human serum albumin as carrier protein

    PubMed Central

    Steed, Jordan; Gilliam, Lisa K.; Harris, Robert A.; Lernmark, Åke; Hampe, Christiane S.

    2008-01-01

    1. Summary The smaller isoform of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65) is a major autoantigen in type 1 diabetes (TID). Its hydrophobic character requires detergent to keep the protein in solution, which complicates studies of antigen processing and presentation. In this study an attempt was made to replace detergent with human serum albumin (HSA) for in vitro antigen presentation. Different preparations of recombinant human GAD65 complexed with HSA were incubated with Priess B cells (HLA DRB1*0401) and antigen presentation was tested with HLA DRB1*0401-restricted and epitope-specific T33.1 (GAD65 epitope 274-286) and T35 (GAD65 epitope 115-127) T cell hybridomas. Specific epitope recognition by T33.1 (274-286) and T35 (115-127) cells varied between the different GAD65/HSA preparations, and a reverse pattern of antigen presentation were detected by the two hybridoma. The HSA-specific T-cell hybridoma 17.9 response to the different GAD65/HSA preparations followed the same pattern as that observed for the T33.1 cells. The content of immunoreactive GAD65 measured with four GAD65 antibodies indicated that the lowest GAD65 concentration resulted in the highest 274-286, but the lowest 115-127 presentation. This suggests that HSA-GAD65 complexes qualitatively affect the epitope specificity of GAD65 presentation. HSA may enhance the 274-286 epitope presentation, while suppressing the 115-127 epitope. PMID:18353353

  5. Manufacture of clinical-grade CD19-specific T cells stably expressing chimeric antigen receptor using Sleeping Beauty system and artificial antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harjeet; Figliola, Matthew J; Dawson, Margaret J; Olivares, Simon; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Ge; Maiti, Sourindra; Manuri, Pallavi; Senyukov, Vladimir; Jena, Bipulendu; Kebriaei, Partow; Champlin, Richard E; Huls, Helen; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28) that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of interleukin (IL)-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼10(10) T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion. PMID:23741305

  6. Manufacture of Clinical-Grade CD19-Specific T Cells Stably Expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptor Using Sleeping Beauty System and Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harjeet; Figliola, Matthew J.; Dawson, Margaret J.; Olivares, Simon; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Ge; Maiti, Sourindra; Manuri, Pallavi; Senyukov, Vladimir; Jena, Bipulendu; Kebriaei, Partow; Champlin, Richard E.; Huls, Helen; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28) that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of interleukin (IL)-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼1010 T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion. PMID:23741305

  7. Metformin Suppresses MHC-Restricted Antigen Presentation by Inhibiting Co-Stimulatory Factors and MHC Molecules in APCs

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seulmee; Hyun, Bobae; Lee, Aeri; Kong, Hyunseok; Han, Shinha; Lee, Chong-Kil; Ha, Nam-Joo; Kim, Kyungjae

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is widely used for T2D therapy but its cellular mechanism of action is undefined. Recent studies on the mechanism of metformin in T2D have demonstrated involvement of the immune system. Current immunotherapies focus on the potential of immunomodulatory strategies for the treatment of T2D. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on the antigen-presenting function of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Metformin decreased both MHC class I and class II-restricted presentation of OVA and suppressed the expression of both MHC molecules and co-stimulatory factors such as CD54, CD80, and CD86 in DCs, but did not affect the phagocytic activity toward exogenous OVA. The class II-restricted OVA presentation-regulating activity of metformin was also confirmed using mice that had been injected with metformin followed by soluble OVA. These results provide an understanding of the mechanisms of the T cell response-regulating activity of metformin through the inhibition of MHC-restricted antigen presentation in relation to its actions on APCs. PMID:24009856

  8. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hui; Peng, Ji-Run; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei; Qiao, Shi-Shi; Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua; Leng, Xi-Sheng

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. {yields} An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. {yields} Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. {yields} This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  9. Dual stimulation of antigen presenting cells using carbon nanotube-based vaccine delivery system for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hatem A F M; Smyth, Lesley; Wang, Julie T-W; Costa, Pedro M; Ratnasothy, Kulachelvy; Diebold, Sandra S; Lombardi, Giovanna; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2016-10-01

    Although anti-cancer immuno-based combinatorial therapeutic approaches have shown promising results, efficient tumour eradication demands further intensification of anti-tumour immune response. With the emerging field of nanovaccinology, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have manifested prominent potentials as tumour antigen nanocarriers. Nevertheless, the utilization of MWNTs in co-delivering antigen along with different types of immunoadjuvants to antigen presenting cells (APCs) has not been investigated yet. We hypothesized that harnessing MWNT for concurrent delivery of cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG) and anti-CD40 Ig (αCD40), as immunoadjuvants, along with the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) could potentiate immune response induced against OVA-expressing tumour cells. We initially investigated the effective method to co-deliver OVA and CpG using MWNT to the APC. Covalent conjugation of OVA and CpG prior to loading onto MWNTs markedly augmented the CpG-mediated adjuvanticity, as demonstrated by the significantly increased OVA-specific T cell responses in vitro and in C57BL/6 mice. αCD40 was then included as a second immunoadjuvant to further intensify the immune response. Immune response elicited in vitro and in vivo by OVA, CpG and αCD40 was significantly potentiated by their co-incorporation onto the MWNTs. Furthermore, MWNT remarkably improved the ability of co-loaded OVA, CpG and αCD40 in inhibiting the growth of OVA-expressing B16F10 melanoma cells in subcutaneous or lung pseudo-metastatic tumour models. Therefore, this study suggests that the utilization of MWNTs for the co-delivery of tumour-derived antigen, CpG and αCD40 could be a competent approach for efficient tumours eradication. PMID:27475727

  10. Self-Antigen Presentation by Keratinocytes in the Inflamed Adult Skin Modulates T-Cell Auto-Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Meister, Michael; Tounsi, Amel; Gaffal, Evelyn; Bald, Tobias; Papatriantafyllou, Maria; Ludwig, Julia; Pougialis, Georg; Bestvater, Felix; Klotz, Luisa; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Tüting, Thomas; Hämmerling, Günter J; Arnold, Bernd; Oelert, Thilo

    2015-08-01

    Keratinocytes have a pivotal role in the regulation of immune responses, but the impact of antigen presentation by these cells is still poorly understood, particularly in a situation where the antigen will be presented only in adult life. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse model in which keratinocytes exclusively present a myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide covalently linked to the major histocompatibility complex class II β-chain, solely under inflammatory conditions. In these mice, inflammation caused by epicutaneous contact sensitizer treatment resulted in keratinocyte-mediated expansion of MBP-specific CD4(+) T cells in the skin. Moreover, repeated contact sensitizer application preceding a systemic MBP immunization reduced the reactivity of the respective CD4(+) T cells and lowered the symptoms of the resulting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. This downregulation was CD4(+) T-cell-mediated and dependent on the presence of the immune modulator Dickkopf-3. Thus, presentation of a neo self-antigen by keratinocytes in the inflamed, adult skin can modulate CD4(+) T-cell auto-aggression at a distal organ. PMID:25835957

  11. Aromatic-dependent salmonella as anti-bacterial vaccines and as presenters of heterologous antigens or of DNA encoding them.

    PubMed

    Stocker, B A

    2000-09-29

    The development of live bacterial vaccines is reviewed, in particular aromatic-dependent Salmonella, either for protection against the corresponding infections (including typhoid fever) or as carrier-presenter of antigens of unrelated pathogens or of DNA specifying them. Aromatic-dependent Salmonella live vaccines are also compared with BCG and Ty21a and the recent records of exceptional situations are discussed in which aroA (deletion) strains of Salmonella typhimurium cause progressive disease in mice. PMID:11000459

  12. Interleukin-15-Induced CD56+ Myeloid Dendritic Cells Combine Potent Tumor Antigen Presentation with Direct Tumoricidal Potential

    PubMed Central

    Anguille, Sébastien; Lion, Eva; Tel, Jurjen; de Vries, I. Jolanda M; Couderé, Karen; Fromm, Phillip D.; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the quintessential antigen-presenting cells of the human immune system and play a prime role in coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses, explaining the strong and still growing interest in their application for cancer immunotherapy. Much current research in the field of DC-based immunotherapy focuses on optimizing the culture conditions for in vitro DC generation in order to assure that DCs with the best possible immunogenic qualities are being used for immunotherapy. In this context, monocyte-derived DCs that are alternatively induced by interleukin-15 (IL-15 DCs) have attracted recent attention due to their superior immunostimulatory characteristics. In this study, we show that IL-15 DCs, in addition to potent tumor antigen-presenting function, possess tumoricidal potential and thus qualify for the designation of killer DCs. Notwithstanding marked expression of the natural killer (NK) cell marker CD56 on a subset of IL-15 DCs, we found no evidence of a further phenotypic overlap between IL-15 DCs and NK cells. Allostimulation and antigen presentation assays confirmed that IL-15 DCs should be regarded as bona fide myeloid DCs not only from the phenotypic but also from the functional point of view. Concerning their cytotoxic activity, we demonstrate that IL-15 DCs are able to induce apoptotic cell death of the human K562 tumor cell line, while sparing tumor antigen-specific T cells. The cytotoxicity of IL-15 DCs is predominantly mediated by granzyme B and, to a small extent, by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) but is independent of perforin, Fas ligand and TNF-α. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of a previously unappreciated role for IL-15 in the differentiation of human monocytes towards killer DCs. The observation that IL-15 DCs have killer DC capacity lends further support to their implementation in DC-based immunotherapy protocols. PMID:23284789

  13. Emerging roles for antigen presentation in establishing host-microbiome symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Bessman, Nicholas J; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2016-07-01

    Trillions of beneficial bacteria inhabit the intestinal tract of healthy mammals from birth. Accordingly, mammalian hosts have evolved a series of complementary and redundant pathways to limit pathologic immune responses against these bacteria, while simultaneously protecting against enteric pathogen invasion. These pathways can be generically responsive to the presence of any commensal bacteria and innate in nature, as for IL-22-related pathways. Alternatively, specific bacterial antigens can drive a distinct set of adaptive immune cell responses, including IgA affinity maturation and secretion, and a recently described pathway of intestinal selection whereby MHCII(+) ILC3 deletes commensal bacteria-reactive CD4 T cells. These pathways can either promote or inhibit colonization by specific subsets of commensal bacteria, and cooperatively maintain intestinal homeostasis. In this review, we will highlight recent developments in understanding how these diverse pathways complement each other to cooperatively shape the symbiotic relationship between commensal bacteria and mammalian hosts. PMID:27319348

  14. Present capabilities and new developments in antenna modeling with the numerical electromagnetics code NEC

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G.J.

    1988-04-08

    Computer modeling of antennas, since its start in the late 1960's, has become a powerful and widely used tool for antenna design. Computer codes have been developed based on the Method-of-Moments, Geometrical Theory of Diffraction, or integration of Maxwell's equations. Of such tools, the Numerical Electromagnetics Code-Method of Moments (NEC) has become one of the most widely used codes for modeling resonant sized antennas. There are several reasons for this including the systematic updating and extension of its capabilities, extensive user-oriented documentation and accessibility of its developers for user assistance. The result is that there are estimated to be several hundred users of various versions of NEC world wide. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Peripheral blood and synovial fluid T cells differ in their response to alloantigens and recall antigens presented by dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stagg, A J; Harding, B; Hughes, R A; Keat, A; Knight, S C

    1991-01-01

    Properties of T cells from inflammatory lesions were analysed by comparing the response of peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) T cells from 19 patients with a range of arthropathies to enriched allogeneic dendritic cells (DC) in a primary mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR). In 17 patients the proliferative response of SF T cells was significantly (P less than 0.05) less than that of PB lymphocytes. The reduced response of SF T cells was observed in all disease categories studied and could not be attributed to differences in cell number requirements or response kinetics. Addition of recombinant interleukin-2 enhanced the response of SF T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Cell mixing experiments suggested that active suppression was not the underlying mechanism of the poor MLR response of SF T cells. In contrast to the MLR response. SF T cells were able to mount vigorous proliferative responses to recall antigen presented by autologous antigen-presenting cells. The possibility is discussed that T cells compartmentalized at inflammatory lesions are a unique population with a diminished ability to interact with DC and respond to primary stimuli but an ability to respond to secondary antigenic challenge. PMID:1826648

  16. Hsp90-peptide complexes stimulate antigen presentation through the class II pathway after binding scavenger receptor SREC-I

    PubMed Central

    Murshid, Ayesha; Gong, Jianlin; Calderwood, Stuart K

    2016-01-01

    Molecular chaperones such as heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) have been shown to form complexes with tumor antigens and can be used to prepare anticancer vaccines largely due to this property. Earlier studies had suggested that, mice immunized with a molecular chaperone based vaccine derived from tumors became immune to further vaccination and that both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells were activated by the chaperone vaccine in a manner dependent on scavenger receptor SREC-I. Here we have investigated mechanisms whereby SREC-I might facilitate uptake of Hsp90 conjugated peptides by APC into the MHC class II pathway for presentation to CD4+ T cells. Our studies showed that antigenic peptides associated with Hsp90 were taken up into the Class II pathway by a mechanism dependent on SREC-I binding and internalization and presented to CD4+ T cells. In addition our studies showed that SREC-I could associate with MHC class II molecules on the cell surface and in intracellular endosomes, suggesting a mechanism involving facilitated uptake of peptides into the MHC class II pathway. These studies in addition to our earlier findings showed SREC-I to play a primary role in chaperone-associated antigen uptake both through cross priming of MHC class I molecules and entry into the class II pathway. PMID:25155057

  17. NLRC5 elicits antitumor immunity by enhancing processing and presentation of tumor antigens to CD8+ T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Galaxia M.; Bobbala, Diwakar; Serrano, Daniel; Mayhue, Marian; Champagne, Audrey; Saucier, Caroline; Steimle, Viktor; Kufer, Thomas A.; Menendez, Alfredo; Ramanathan, Sheela; Ilangumaran, Subburaj

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancers can escape immunesurveillance by diminishing the expression of MHC class-I molecules (MHC-I) and components of the antigen-processing machinery (APM). Developing new approaches to reverse these defects could boost the efforts to restore antitumor immunity. Recent studies have shown that the expression of MHC-I and antigen-processing molecules is transcriptionally regulated by NOD-like receptor CARD domain containing 5 (NLRC5). To investigate whether NLRC5 could be used to improve tumor immunogenicity, we established stable lines of B16-F10 melanoma cells expressing NLRC5 (B16-5), the T cell co-stimulatory molecule CD80 (B16-CD80) or both (B16-5/80). Cells harboring NLRC5 constitutively expressed MHC-I and LMP2, LMP7 and TAP1 genes of the APM. The B16-5 cells efficiently presented the melanoma antigenic peptide gp10025–33 to Pmel-1 TCR transgenic CD8+ T cells and induced their proliferation. In the presence of CD80, B16-5 cells stimulated Pmel-1 cells even without the addition of gp100 peptide, indicating that NLRC5 facilitated the processing and presentation of endogenous tumor antigen. Upon subcutaneous implantation, B16-5 cells showed markedly reduced tumor growth in C57BL/6 hosts but not in immunodeficient hosts, indicating that the NLRC5-expressing tumor cells elicited antitumor immunity. Following intravenous injection, B16-5 and B16-5/80 cells formed fewer lung tumor foci compared to control cells. In mice depleted of CD8+ T cells, B16-5 cells formed large subcutaneous and lung tumors. Finally, immunization with irradiated B16-5 cells conferred protection against challenge by parental B16 cells. Collectively, our findings indicate that NLRC5 could be exploited to restore tumor immunogenicity and to stimulate protective antitumor immunity. PMID:27471621

  18. NLRC5 elicits antitumor immunity by enhancing processing and presentation of tumor antigens to CD8(+) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Galaxia M; Bobbala, Diwakar; Serrano, Daniel; Mayhue, Marian; Champagne, Audrey; Saucier, Caroline; Steimle, Viktor; Kufer, Thomas A; Menendez, Alfredo; Ramanathan, Sheela; Ilangumaran, Subburaj

    2016-06-01

    Cancers can escape immunesurveillance by diminishing the expression of MHC class-I molecules (MHC-I) and components of the antigen-processing machinery (APM). Developing new approaches to reverse these defects could boost the efforts to restore antitumor immunity. Recent studies have shown that the expression of MHC-I and antigen-processing molecules is transcriptionally regulated by NOD-like receptor CARD domain containing 5 (NLRC5). To investigate whether NLRC5 could be used to improve tumor immunogenicity, we established stable lines of B16-F10 melanoma cells expressing NLRC5 (B16-5), the T cell co-stimulatory molecule CD80 (B16-CD80) or both (B16-5/80). Cells harboring NLRC5 constitutively expressed MHC-I and LMP2, LMP7 and TAP1 genes of the APM. The B16-5 cells efficiently presented the melanoma antigenic peptide gp10025-33 to Pmel-1 TCR transgenic CD8(+) T cells and induced their proliferation. In the presence of CD80, B16-5 cells stimulated Pmel-1 cells even without the addition of gp100 peptide, indicating that NLRC5 facilitated the processing and presentation of endogenous tumor antigen. Upon subcutaneous implantation, B16-5 cells showed markedly reduced tumor growth in C57BL/6 hosts but not in immunodeficient hosts, indicating that the NLRC5-expressing tumor cells elicited antitumor immunity. Following intravenous injection, B16-5 and B16-5/80 cells formed fewer lung tumor foci compared to control cells. In mice depleted of CD8(+) T cells, B16-5 cells formed large subcutaneous and lung tumors. Finally, immunization with irradiated B16-5 cells conferred protection against challenge by parental B16 cells. Collectively, our findings indicate that NLRC5 could be exploited to restore tumor immunogenicity and to stimulate protective antitumor immunity. PMID:27471621

  19. Development of a highly sensitive bioluminescent enzyme immunoassay for hepatitis B virus surface antigen capable of detecting divergent mutants.

    PubMed

    Minekawa, Takayuki; Takehara, Shizuka; Takahashi, Masaharu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are sometimes overlooked when using commercial kits to measure hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) due to their low sensitivities and reactivities to mutant strains of various genotypes. We developed an ultrasensitive bioluminescent enzyme immunoassay (BLEIA) for HBsAg using firefly luciferase, which is adaptable to a variety of HBsAg mutants, by combining four monoclonal antibodies with a polyclonal antibody against HBsAg. The measurement of seroconversion panels showed trace amounts of HBsAg during the early infection phase by the BLEIA because of its high sensitivity of 5 mIU/ml. The BLEIA detected HBsAg as early as did PCR in five of seven series and from 2.1 to 9.4 days earlier than commercial immunoassay methods. During the late infection phase, the BLEIA successfully detected HBsAg even 40 days after the disappearance of HBV DNA and the emergence of antibodies against HBsAg. The HBsAg BLEIA successfully detected all 13 recombinant HBsAg and 45 types of HBsAg mutants with various mutations within amino acids 90 to 164 in the S gene product. Some specimens had higher values determined by the BLEIA than those by a commercial chemiluminescent immunoassay; this suggests that such discrepancies were caused by the dissociation of preS1/preS2 peptides from the particle surface. With its highly sensitive detection of low-titer HBsAg, including various mutants, the HBsAg BLEIA is considered to be useful for the early diagnosis and prevention of HBV infection because of the shorter window of infection prior to detection, which facilitates early prediction of recurrence in HBV-infected individuals. PMID:23761660

  20. Processing and MHC class II presentation of exogenous soluble antigen involving a proteasome-dependent cytosolic pathway in CD40-activated B cells.

    PubMed

    Becker, Hans Jiro; Kondo, Eisei; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Theurich, Sebastian; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    Activated B cells have the capacity to present antigen and induce immune responses as potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs). As in other APCs, antigen presentation by B cells involves antigen internalization, antigen processing, and peptide loading onto MHC molecules. However, while the mechanism of antigen processing has been studied extensively in other APCs, this pathway remains elusive in B cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the MHC class II processing pathway in CD40-activated B cells (CD40Bs), as a model for activated, antigen-presenting B cells. Using CMV pp65 as a model antigen, we evaluated processing and presentation of the CD4 + T-cell epitope 509-523 (K509) by human CD40Bs in ELISPOT assays. As expected, stimulation of specific CD4 + T-cell clones was attenuated after pretreatment of CD40Bs with inhibitors of classic class II pathway components. However, proteasome inhibitors such as epoxomicin limited antigen presentation as well. This suggests that the antigen is processed in a non-classical, cytosolic MHC class II pathway. Further experiments with truncated protein variants revealed involvement of the proteasome in processing of the N and C extensions of the epitope. Access to the cytosol was shown to be size dependent. Epoxomicin sensitivity exclusively in CD40B cells, but not in dendritic cells, suggests a novel processing mechanism unique to this APC. Our data suggest that B cells process antigen using a distinct, non-classical class II pathway. PMID:26561366

  1. Immunoglobulin-like Transcript 4 (ILT4) Inhibits Lipid Antigen Presentation through Direct CD1d Interaction1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Demin; Wang, Lili; Yu, Li; Freundt, Eric C.; Jin, Boquan; Screaton, Gavin R.; Xu, Xiao-Ning

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells recognize lipid antigens presented by CD1d molecules and play an important role in the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. Here we report the identification of a membrane-associated protein, immunoglobulin-like transcript 4 (ILT4), as a novel human CD1d receptor that inhibits CD1d-mediated immune responses. We found that native CD1d tetramer generated by mammalian cells was able to specifically bind human monocytes in the peripheral blood, and this binding was at least partly mediated by monocyte-expressed ILT4. The interaction between ILT4 and CD1d involves the two N-terminal domains of ILT4 and the antigen-binding groove of CD1d (α1/α2 domain). This interaction has been identified on the cell surface as well as in the endosomal and lysosomal compartments. Functional analysis showed that ILT4 could block the loading of lipid antigens such as α-GalCer, and consequently inhibited NKT recognition. The interaction between ILT4 and CD1d may provide new insights into the regulation of NKT-mediated immunity. PMID:19124746

  2. Presenting a foreign antigen on live attenuated Edwardsiella tarda using twin-arginine translocation signal peptide as a multivalent vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yamin; Yang, Weizheng; Wang, Qiyao; Qu, Jiangbo; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2013-12-01

    The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system is a major pathway for transmembrane translocation of fully folded proteins. In this study, a multivalent vaccine to present foreign antigens on live attenuated vaccine Edwardsiella tarda WED using screened Tat signal peptide was constructed. Because the Tat system increases the yields of folded antigens in periplasmic space or extracellular milieu, it is expected to contribute to the production of conformational epitope-derived specific antibodies. E. tarda Tat signal peptides fused with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was constructed under the control of an in vivo inducible dps promoter. The resulting plasmids were electroporated into WED and the subcellular localizations of GFP were analyzed with Western blotting. Eight signal peptides with optimized GFP translocation efficiency were further fused to a protective antigen glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapA) from a fish pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila. Signal peptides of DmsA, NapA, and SufI displayed high efficiency for GapA translocation. The relative percent survival (RPS) of turbot was measured with a co-infection of E. tarda and A. hydrophila, and the strain with DmsA signal peptide showed the maximal protection. This study demonstrated a new platform to construct multivalent vaccines using optimized Tat signal peptide in E. tarda. PMID:23994481

  3. Second-Generation Fuel Cell Stack Durability and Freeze Capability from National FCV Learning Demonstration (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Garbak, J.

    2009-11-18

    This presentation provides information about the objectives and partners of the National Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration, the status of vehicle and station deployment, and results of vehicle and infrastructure analysis.

  4. Inflammatory environment and oxidized LDL convert circulating human proangiogenic cells into functional antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Maria Cristina; Piacentini, Luca; Chiesa, Mattia; Saporiti, Federica; Colombo, Gualtiero I; Pesce, Maurizio

    2015-09-01

    The function of human circulating PACs has been described extensively. However, little focus has been placed on understanding how these cells differ in their functions in the presence of microenvironments mimicking vascular inflammation. We hypothesized that exposure to proinflammatory cytokines or the oxLDL, an autoantigen abundant in advanced atherosclerotic plaques, converts PACs into immune-modulating/proinflammatory cells. Hence, we examined the effect of oxLDL and inflammatory stimuli on their phenotype by use of a functional genomics model based on secretome and whole genome transcriptome profiling. PACs obtained from culturing a PBMC fraction in angiogenic medium were primed with DC differentiation cytokines and then exposed to proinflammatory cytokines or oxLDL. Under these conditions, PACs converted into APCs, expressed maturation markers CD80 and CD83, and showed an increased up-regulation of CD86. APCcy and APCox induced a robust T cell BrdU incorporation. Despite a similar ability to induce lymphocyte proliferation, APCcy and APCox differed for the secretory pathway and mRNA expression. Analysis of the differentially expressed genes identified 4 gene "clusters," showing reciprocal modulation in APCcy vs. APCox, justifying, according to functional genomics analyses, a different putative function of the cells in antigen processing. Together, these data show that treatment with inflammatory cytokines or oxLDL converts human PAC phenotypes and functions into that of APCs with similar lymphocyte-activating ability but distinct maturation degree and paracrine functions. PMID:25990243

  5. Increased generation of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells by manipulating antigen presentation in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiqiang; Yang, Lu; Silva, Hernandez Moura; Trzeciak, Alissa; Choi, Yongwon; Schwab, Susan R; Dustin, Michael L; Lafaille, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T-cell (Treg) selection in the thymus is essential to prevent autoimmune diseases. Although important rules for Treg selection have been established, there is controversy regarding the degree of self-reactivity displayed by T-cell receptors expressed by Treg cells. In this study we have developed a model of autoimmune skin inflammation, to determine key parameters in the generation of skin-reactive Treg cells in the thymus (tTreg). tTreg development is predominantly AIRE dependent, with an AIRE-independent component. Without the knowledge of antigen recognized by skin-reactive Treg cells, we are able to enhance skin-specific tTreg cell generation using three approaches. First, we increase medullary thymic epithelial cells by using mice lacking osteoprotegerin or by adding TRANCE (RANKL, Tnfsf11). Second, we inject intrathymically peripheral dendritic cells from skin-draining sites. Finally, we inject skin tissue lysates intrathymically. These findings have implications for enhancing the generation of organ-specific Treg cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26923114

  6. Increased generation of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells by manipulating antigen presentation in the thymus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiqiang; Yang, Lu; Silva, Hernandez Moura; Trzeciak, Alissa; Choi, Yongwon; Schwab, Susan R.; Dustin, Michael L.; Lafaille, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T-cell (Treg) selection in the thymus is essential to prevent autoimmune diseases. Although important rules for Treg selection have been established, there is controversy regarding the degree of self-reactivity displayed by T-cell receptors expressed by Treg cells. In this study we have developed a model of autoimmune skin inflammation, to determine key parameters in the generation of skin-reactive Treg cells in the thymus (tTreg). tTreg development is predominantly AIRE dependent, with an AIRE-independent component. Without the knowledge of antigen recognized by skin-reactive Treg cells, we are able to enhance skin-specific tTreg cell generation using three approaches. First, we increase medullary thymic epithelial cells by using mice lacking osteoprotegerin or by adding TRANCE (RANKL, Tnfsf11). Second, we inject intrathymically peripheral dendritic cells from skin-draining sites. Finally, we inject skin tissue lysates intrathymically. These findings have implications for enhancing the generation of organ-specific Treg cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26923114

  7. Robert Feulgen Prize Lecture 1995. Electronic light microscopy: present capabilities and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Shotton, D M

    1995-08-01

    Electronic light microscopy involves the combination of microscopic techniques with electronic imaging and digital image processing, resulting in dramatic improvements in image quality and ease of quantitative analysis. In this review, after a brief definition of digital images and a discussion of the sampling requirements for the accurate digital recording of optical images, I discuss the three most important imaging modalities in electronic light microscopy--video-enhanced contrast microscopy, digital fluorescence microscopy and confocal scanning microscopy--considering their capabilities, their applications, and recent developments that will increase their potential. Video-enhanced contrast microscopy permits the clear visualisation and real-time dynamic recording of minute objects such as microtubules, vesicles and colloidal gold particles, an order of magnitude smaller than the resolution limit of the light microscope. It has revolutionised the study of cellular motility, and permits the quantitative tracking of organelles and gold-labelled membrane bound proteins. In combination with the technique of optical trapping (optical tweezers), it permits exquisitely sensitive force and distance measurements to be made on motor proteins. Digital fluorescence microscopy enables low-light-level imaging of fluorescently labelled specimens. Recent progress has involved improvements in cameras, fluorescent probes and fluorescent filter sets, particularly multiple bandpass dichroic mirrors, and developments in multiparameter imaging, which is becoming particularly important for in situ hybridisation studies and automated image cytometry, fluorescence ratio imaging, and time-resolved fluorescence. As software improves and small computers become more powerful, computational techniques for out-of-focus blur deconvolution and image restoration are becoming increasingly important. Confocal microscopy permits convenient, high-resolution, non-invasive, blur-free optical

  8. The Exonuclease Domain of Lassa Virus Nucleoprotein Is Involved in Antigen-Presenting-Cell-Mediated NK Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Russier, Marion; Reynard, Stéphanie; Carnec, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lassa virus is an Old World Arenavirus which causes Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans, mostly in West Africa. Lassa fever is an important public health problem, and a safe and effective vaccine is urgently needed. The infection causes immunosuppression, probably due to the absence of activation of antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages), low type I interferon (IFN) production, and deficient NK cell function. However, a recombinant Lassa virus carrying D389A and G392A substitutions in the nucleoprotein that abolish the exonuclease activity and IFN activation loses its inhibitory activity and induces strong type I IFN production by dendritic cells and macrophages. We show here that during infection by this mutant Lassa virus, antigen-presenting cells trigger efficient human NK cell responses in vitro, including production of IFN-γ and cytotoxicity. NK cell activation involves close contact with both antigen-presenting cells and soluble factors. We report that infected dendritic cells and macrophages express the NKG2D ligands major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chains A and B and that they may produce interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-15, and IL-18, all involved in NK cell functions. NK cell degranulation is significantly increased in cocultures, suggesting that NK cells seem to kill infected dendritic cells and macrophages. This work confirms the inhibitory function of Lassa virus nucleoprotein. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time that Lassa virus nucleoprotein is involved in the inhibition of antigen-presenting cell-mediated NK cell responses. IMPORTANCE The pathogenesis and immune responses induced by Lassa virus are poorly known. Recently, an exonuclease domain contained in the viral nucleoprotein has been shown to be able to inhibit the type I IFN response by avoiding the recognition of viral RNA by cell sensors. Here, we studied the responses of NK cells to dendritic cells and macrophages infected with a

  9. The role of islet antigen presenting cells and the presentation of insulin in the initiation of autoimmune diabetes in the NOD mouse.

    PubMed

    Unanue, Emil R; Ferris, Stephen T; Carrero, Javier A

    2016-07-01

    We have been examining antigen presentation and the antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the islets of Langerhans of the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse. The purpose is to identify the earliest events that initiate autoimmunity in this confined tissue. Islets normally have a population of macrophages that is distinct from those that inhabit the exocrine pancreas. Also found in NOD islets is a minor population of dendritic cells (DCs) that bear the CD103 integrin. We find close interactions between beta cells and the two APCs that result in the initiation of the autoimmunity. Even under non-inflammatory conditions, beta cells transfer insulin-containing vesicles to the APCs of the islet. This reaction requires live cells and intimate contact. The autoimmune process starts in islets with the entrance of CD4(+) T cells and an increase in the CD103(+) DCs. Mice deficient in the Batf3 transcription factor never develop diabetes due to the absence of the CD103/CD8α lineage of DCs. We hypothesize that the 12-20 peptide of the beta chain of insulin is responsible for activation of the initial CD4(+) T-cell response during diabetogenesis. PMID:27319351

  10. A Factor Capable of Increasing Vascular Permeability Present in Lymph Node Cells

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, D. A.; Boughton, Barbara; Schild, H. O.

    1963-01-01

    A soluble extract from guinea-pig lymph node cells (LPF) has been found to increase vascular permeability in the skin of the rat. The active substance has been differentiated from histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, bradykinin, substance P, kallikrein and the globulin permeability factors from rat and guinea-pig serum by means of parallel quantitative assays. LPF was present in both sensitized and non-sensitized guinea-pig lymph node cells and in lymph node cells from rats and mice. LPF also increased vascular permeability in the skin of guinea-pigs, mice and rabbits. The possible importance of this factor in the mechanism of the delayed reactions is discussed. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 3 PMID:14069726

  11. Identification of putative cathepsin S in mangrove red snapper Lutjanus argentimaculatus and its role in antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jin; Li, Lei; Cai, Zhong-Hua

    2012-05-01

    Cathepsin S (CTSS) is a key enzyme employed in the histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted antigens, which are presented by processing class II-associated invariant chains and loaded antigen peptides into class II molecules. To date, little is known about the character and function of CTSS in fish. In the present study, we screened and identified a CTSS cDNA sequence from the mangrove red snapper head kidney cDNA library. The full-length CTSS cDNA contained 1339-bp nucleotide acids encoding 337 amino acids. The sequence shared high identity and similarity with other known cathepsins, especially CTSS (about 56-78% and 79-89%, respectively). Like other cathepsins, the deduced peptide consisted of regions with N-terminal signal peptides, propeptides, and mature peptides. A typical ERWNIN motif in L-like cathepsins and three conservative catalytic activity sites forming a catalytic triad active center were respectively identified in the pro-peptide and mature peptide regions of CTSS. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that mangrove red snapper CTSS was located in the CTSS clade belonging to the L-like cathepsin group, and evolved from the same ancestry. To further characterize the biological activity of the putative CTSS of mangrove snapper, CTSS was expressed in Escherichia coli M15 strains. Like other mammalian CTSS, the recombinant CTSS (rCTSS) had autocatalytic activation properties, can remove pro-peptides, and can release active mature peptides. Active CTSS had the ability to catalyze Z-Phe-Arg-AMC substrates in acidic conditions (pH 5.0) and weak alkaline environments (pH 7.5); this activity could be blocked by the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64. Active CTSS can process recombinant Ii chains (invariant chains) in a stepwise manner in vitro. The results indicate that mangrove red snapper CTSS is a lysosomal cysteine protease family member with a key role in antigen processing in fish. PMID:22210546

  12. Microbe-specific unconventional T-cells induce human neutrophil differentiation into antigen cross-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzi, Anna Rita; Tyler, Christopher J.; Khan, Mohd Wajid A.; Szakmany, Tamas; Hall, Judith E.; Moser, Bernhard; Eberl, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The early immune response to microbes is dominated by the recruitment of neutrophils whose primary function is to clear invading pathogens. However, there is emerging evidence that neutrophils play additional effector and regulatory roles. The present study demonstrates that human neutrophils assume antigen cross-presenting functions, and suggests a plausible scenario for the local generation of APC-like neutrophils through the mobilization of unconventional T-cells in response to microbial metabolites. Vγ9/Vδ2 T-cells and MAIT cells are abundant in blood, inflamed tissues and mucosal barriers. Here, both human cell types responded rapidly to neutrophils after phagocytosis of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria producing the corresponding ligands, and in turn mediated the differentiation of neutrophils into APCs for both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells through secretion of GM-CSF, IFN-γ and TNF-α. In patients with acute sepsis, circulating neutrophils displayed a similar APC-like phenotype and readily processed soluble proteins for cross-presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8+ T-cells, at a time when peripheral Vγ9/Vδ2 T-cells were highly activated. Our findings indicate that unconventional T-cells represent key controllers of neutrophil-driven innate and adaptive responses to a broad range of pathogens. PMID:25165152

  13. Lithography-based ceramic manufacture (LCM) of auxetic structures: present capabilities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; de Blas Romero, Adrián; Schwentenwein, Martin; Jellinek, Christopher; Homa, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    Auxetic metamaterials are known for having a negative Poisson’s ratio (NPR) and for displaying the unexpected properties of lateral expansion when stretched and densification when compressed. Even though a wide set of micro-manufacturing resources have been used for the development of auxetic metamaterials and related devices, additional precision and an extension to other families of materials is needed for their industrial expansion. In addition, their manufacture using ceramic materials is still challenging. In this study we present a very promising approach for the development of auxetic metamaterials and devices based on the use of lithography-based ceramic manufacturing. The process stands out for its precision and complex three-dimensional geometries attainable, without the need of supporting structures, and for enabling the manufacture of ceramic auxetics with their geometry controlled from the design stage with micrometric precision. To our knowledge it represents the first example of application of this technology to the manufacture of auxetic geometries using ceramic materials. We have used a special three-dimensional auxetic design whose remarkable NPR has been previously highlighted.

  14. Cross-presentation of cutaneous melanoma antigen by migratory XCR1+CD103− and XCR1+CD103+ dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Ben; Seppanen, Elke; Xiao, Kun; Zemek, Rachael; Zanker, Damien; Prato, Sandro; Foley, Bree; Hart, Prue H; Kroczek, Richard A; Chen, Weisan; Waithman, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The question of which dendritic cells (DCs) cross-present peripheral tumor antigens remains unanswered. We assessed the ability of multiple skin-derived and lymphoid resident DCs to perform this function in a novel orthotopic murine melanoma model where tumor establishment and expansion is within the skin. Two migratory populations defined as CD103−XCR1+ and CD103+XCR1+ efficiently cross-presented melanoma-derived antigen, with the CD103−XCR1+ DCs surprisingly dominating this process. These results are critical for understanding how antitumor CD8+ T cell immunity is coordinated to tumor antigens present within the skin. PMID:26405572

  15. Membrane-bound heat shock proteins facilitate the uptake of dying cells and cross-presentation of cellular antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiyan; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Dongmei; Wu, Weicheng; Shao, Miaomiao; Wang, Lan; Gu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were originally identified as stress-responsive proteins and serve as molecular chaperones in different intracellular compartments. Translocation of HSPs to the cell surface and release of HSPs into the extracellular space have been observed during the apoptotic process and in response to a variety of cellular stress. Here, we report that UV irradiation and cisplatin treatment rapidly induce the expression of membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 upstream the phosphatidylserine exposure. Membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 could promote the release of IL-6 and IL-1β as well as DC maturation by the evaluation of CD80 and CD86 expression. On the other hand, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 on cells could facilitate the uptake of dying cells by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), as a common receptor for Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90, is response for their recognition and mediates the uptake of dying cells. Furthermore, membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 could promote the cross-presentation of OVA antigen from E.G7 cells and inhibition of the uptake of dying cells by LOX-1 decreases the cross-presentation of cellular antigen. Therefore, the rapid exposure of HSPs on dying cells at the early stage allows for the recognition by and confers an activation signal to the immune system. PMID:26481477

  16. Synthesis of Dideoxymycobactin Antigens Presented by CD1a Reveals T Cell Fine Specificity for Natural Lipopeptide Structures*

    PubMed Central

    Young, David C.; Kasmar, Anne; Moraski, Garrett; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Walz, Andrew J.; Hu, Jingdan; Xu, Yanping; Endres, Gregory W.; Uzieblo, Adam; Zajonc, Dirk; Costello, Catherine E.; Miller, Marvin J.; Moody, D. Branch

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival in cells requires mycobactin siderophores. Recently, the search for lipid antigens presented by the CD1a antigen-presenting protein led to the discovery of a mycobactin-like compound, dideoxymycobactin (DDM). Here we synthesize DDMs using solution phase and solid phase peptide synthesis chemistry. Comparison of synthetic standards to natural mycobacterial mycobactins by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry allowed identification of an unexpected α-methyl serine unit in natural DDM. This finding further distinguishes these pre-siderophores as foreign compounds distinct from conventional peptides, and we provide evidence that this chemical variation influences the T cell response. One synthetic DDM recapitulated natural structures and potently stimulated T cells, making it suitable for patient studies of CD1a in infectious disease. DDM analogs differing in the stereochemistry of their butyrate or oxazoline moieties were not recognized by human T cells. Therefore, we conclude that T cells show precise specificity for both arms of the peptide, which are predicted to lie at the CD1a-T cell receptor interface. PMID:19605355

  17. Interleukin-1β triggers the differentiation of macrophages with enhanced capacity to present mycobacterial antigen to T cells

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Mirjam; Fabri, Mario; Krutzik, Stephan R; Lee, Delphine J; Vu, David M; Sieling, Peter A; Montoya, Dennis; Liu, Philip T; Modlin, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    The rapid differentiation of monocytes into macrophages (MΦ) and dendritic cells is a pivotal aspect of the innate immune response. Differentiation is triggered following recognition of microbial ligands that activate pattern recognition receptors or directly by pro-inflammatory cytokines. We demonstrate that interleukin-1β (IL-1β) induces the rapid differentiation of monocytes into CD209+ MΦ, similar to activation via Toll-like receptor 2/1, but with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics. The IL-1β induced MΦ express higher levels of key markers of phagocytosis, including the Fc-receptors CD16 and CD64, as well as CD36, CD163 and CD206. In addition, IL-1β-induced MΦ exert potent phagocytic activity towards inert particles, oxidized low-density lipoprotein and mycobacteria. Furthermore, IL-1β-induced MΦ express higher levels of HLA-DR and effectively present mycobacterial antigens to T cells. Therefore, the ability of IL-1β to induce monocyte differentiation into MΦ with both phagocytosis and antigen-presenting function is a distinct part of the innate immune response in host defence against microbial infection. PMID:24032597

  18. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. PMID:27338097

  19. Role of the mannose receptor in phagocytosis of Enterococcus faecalis strain EC-12 by antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruta, Takeshi; Inoue, Ryo; Nagino, Takayuki; Nishibayashi, Ryoichiro; Makioka, Yuko; Ushida, Kazunari

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to clarify the phagocytic mechanisms of a heat-killed cell preparation of Enterococcus faecalis strain EC-12 (EC-12) by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled EC-12 was cocultured with peritoneal macrophage and the amount of EC-12 phagocytosed by peritoneal macrophages was measured using a microplate fluorometer. Peritoneal macrophages from toll-like receptor (TLR)2-, TLR7-, and MyD88-deficient knockout (KO) mice exhibited similar levels of EC-12 phagocytosis to those from wild-type mice. Similarly, dectin-1 neutralization of peritoneal macrophages had no effect on EC-12 phagocytosis. However, blockade of the mannose receptor (MR) significantly decreased the amount of EC-12 phagocytosed by peritoneal macrophages; the same effect was observed in bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells. Our findings suggest that MR plays a major role in EC-12 phagocytosis by the APCs. This aim of this study was to clarify the phagocytic mechanisms of a heat-killed cell preparation of Enterococcus faecalis strain EC-12 (EC-12) by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Our findings suggest that mannose receptor (MR) plays a major role in EC-12 phagocytosis by the APCs. PMID:23801521

  20. Giving CD4+ T cells the slip: viral interference with MHC class II-restricted antigen processing and presentation.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Katherine S; Eisenlohr, Laurence C

    2016-06-01

    Activation of CD4+ T cells through interactions with peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II (MHC-II) molecules is a crucial step in clearance of most pathogens. Consequently, many viruses have evolved ways of blocking this aspect of adaptive immunity, from specific targeting of processing and presentation components to modulation of signaling pathways that regulate peptide presentation in addition to many other host defense mechanisms. Such cases of interference are far less common compared to what has been elucidated in MHC-I processing and presentation. This may be attributable in part to the complexity of MHC-II antigen processing, the scope of which is only now coming to light. PMID:27115617

  1. Presentation of the candidate rheumatoid arthritis autoantigen aggrecan by antigen-specific B cells induces enhanced CD4(+) T helper type 1 subset differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Caroline L; Hine, Dominic W; Pradipta, Ariel; Pearson, Jeffrey P; van Eden, Willem; Robinson, John H; Knight, Andrew M

    2012-04-01

    Effective immune responses require antigen uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APC), followed by controlled endocytic proteolysis resulting in the generation of antigen-derived peptide fragments that associate with intracellular MHC class II molecules. The resultant peptide-MHC class II complexes then move to the APC surface where they activate CD4(+) T cells. Dendritic cells (DC), macrophages and B cells act as efficient APC. In many settings, including the T helper type 1 (Th1) -dependent, proteoglycan-induced arthritis model of rheumatoid arthritis, accumulating evidence demonstrates that antigen presentation by B cells is required for optimal CD4(+) T cell activation. The reasons behind this however, remain unclear. In this study we have compared the activation of CD4(+) T cells specific for the proteoglycan aggrecan following antigen presentation by DC, macrophages and B cells. We show that aggrecan-specific B cells are equally efficient APC as DC and macrophages and use similar intracellular antigen-processing pathways. Importantly, we also show that antigen presentation by aggrecan-specific B cells to TCR transgenic CD4(+) T cells results in enhanced CD4(+) T cell interferon-γ production and Th1 effector sub-set differentiation compared with that seen with DC. We conclude that preferential CD4(+) Th1 differentiation may define the requirement for B cell APC function in both proteoglycan-induced arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:22182481

  2. Fas-mediated elimination of antigen-presenting cells and autoreactive T cells contribute to prevention of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Stranges, Peter. B.; Watson, Jessica; Cooper, Cristie J.; Choisy-Rossi, Caroline-Morgane; Stonebraker, Austin C.; Beighton, Ryan A.; Hartig, Heather; Sundberg, John P.; Servick, Stein; Kaufmann, Gunnar; Fink, Pamela J.; Chervonsky, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Fas (Apo-1, CD95) receptor has been suggested to control T cell expansion by triggering T cell-autonomous apoptosis. This paradigm is based on the extensive lymphoproliferation and systemic autoimmunity in mice and humans lacking Fas or its ligand. However, with systemic loss of Fas, it is unclear whether T cell-extrinsic mechanisms contribute to autoimmunity. We found that tissue-specific deletion of Fas in mouse antigen presenting cells (APC) was sufficient to cause systemic autoimmunity, implying that normally APC are destroyed during immune responses via a Fas-mediated mechanism. Fas expression by APC was increased by exposure to microbial stimuli. Analysis of mice with Fas loss restricted to T cells revealed that Fas indeed controls autoimmune T cells, but not T cells responding to strong antigenic stimulation. Thus, Fas-dependent elimination of APC is a major regulatory mechanism curbing autoimmune responses and acts in concert with Fas-mediated regulation of chronically activated autoimmune T cells. PMID:17509906

  3. Presentation of peptides from Bacillus anthracis protective antigen on Tobacco Mosaic Virus as an epitope targeted anthrax vaccine.

    PubMed

    McComb, Ryan C; Ho, Chi-Lee; Bradley, Kenneth A; Grill, Laurence K; Martchenko, Mikhail

    2015-11-27

    The current anthrax vaccine requires improvements for rapidly invoking longer-lasting neutralizing antibody responses with fewer doses from a well-defined formulation. Designing antigens that target neutralizing antibody epitopes of anthrax protective antigen, a component of anthrax toxin, may offer a solution for achieving a vaccine that can induce strong and long lasting antibody responses with fewer boosters. Here we report implementation of a strategy for developing epitope focused virus nanoparticle vaccines against anthrax by using immunogenic virus particles to present peptides derived from anthrax toxin previously identified in (1) neutralizing antibody epitope mapping studies, (2) toxin crystal structure analyses to identify functional regions, and (3) toxin mutational analyses. We successfully expressed two of three peptide epitopes from anthrax toxin that, in previous reports, bound antibodies that were partially neutralizing against toxin activity, discovered cross-reactivity between vaccine constructs and toxin specific antibodies raised in goats against native toxin and showed that antibodies induced by our vaccine constructs also cross-react with native toxin. While protection against intoxication in cellular and animal studies were not as effective as in previous studies, partial toxin neutralization was observed in animals, demonstrating the feasibility of using plant-virus nanoparticles as a platform for epitope defined anthrax vaccines. PMID:26514421

  4. Heparan sulfates targeting increases MHC class I- and MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation and CD8(+) T-cell response.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Delphine; Gadzinski, Adeline; Hua, Stéphane; Denizeau, Jordan; Savatier, Alexandra; de la Rochère, Philippe; Boulain, Jean-Claude; Amigorena, Sebastian; Piaggio, Eliane; Sedlik, Christine; Léonetti, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Heparan sulfates (HS) are carbohydrate moieties of HS proteoglycans (HSPGs). They often represent alternative attachment points for proteins or microorganisms targeting receptors. HSPGs, which are ubiquitously expressed, thereby participate in numerous biological processes. We previously showed that MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation is increased when antigens are coupled to HS ligands, suggesting that HSPGs might contribute to adaptive immune responses. Here, we examined if HSPG targeting influences other aspects of immune responses. We found that coupling of an HS ligand to the antigen increases antigen presentation to CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells after antigen targeting to membrane immunoglobulins or to MHC-II molecules. Moreover, this increased stimulating capacity correlates with an enhanced CD8(+) immune response in mice. Last, animals control more effectively the growth of Ova-expressing tumour cells when they are immunized with an Ova construct targeting HSPGs and MHC-II molecules. Our results indicate that ubiquitous molecules can influence both MHC class I- and MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation and behave as co-receptors during T-cell stimulation. Moreover, they suggest that tumour-antigens endowed with the ability to target both HSPGs and MHC-II molecules could be of value to increase CD8(+) immune response and control tumour-growth, opening new perspectives for the design of highly immunogenic protein-based vaccines. PMID:27154391

  5. Enhanced immune stimulation by a therapeutic lymphoma tumor antigen vaccine produced in insect cells involves mannose receptor targeting to antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Betting, David J; Mu, Xi Y; Kafi, Kamran; McDonnel, Desmond; Rosas, Francisco; Gold, Daniel P; Timmerman, John M

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination of lymphoma patients with tumor-specific immunoglobulin (idiotype, Id) coupled to the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (Id-KLH) is undergoing clinical investigation, and methods to improve the immunogenicity of these and other protein tumor antigen vaccines are being sought. Id proteins can be produced via tumor-myeloma hybridomas or recombinant methods in mammalian, bacteria, or insect cells. We now demonstrate that terminal mannose residues, characteristic of recombinant proteins produced in insect cells, yield Id proteins with significantly enhanced immunostimulatory properties compared to Id proteins derived from mammalian cells. Recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cell-derived Id showed higher binding to and activation of human dendritic cells mediated by mannose receptors. In vivo, insect cell-derived Id elicited higher levels of tumor-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and improved eradication of pre-established murine lymphoma. Insect cell and mammalian Id generated similar levels of tumor-specific antibodies, showing no impairment in antibody responses to native tumor antigen despite the glycoslylation differences in the immunogen. Combining insect cell production and maleimide-based KLH conjugation offered the highest levels of anti-tumor immunity. Our data comparing sources of recombinant Id protein tumor antigens used in therapeutic cancer vaccines demonstrate that insect cell-derived antigens can offer several immunologic advantages over proteins derived from mammalian sources. PMID:19000731

  6. Enhanced immune stimulation by a therapeutic lymphoma tumor antigen vaccine produced in insect cells involves mannose receptor targeting to antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Betting, David J.; Mu, Xi Y.; Kafi, Kamran; McDonnel, Desmond; Rosas, Francisco; Gold, Daniel P.; Timmerman, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination of lymphoma patients with tumor-specific immunoglobulin (idiotype, Id) coupled to the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (Id-KLH) is undergoing clinical investigation, and methods to improve the immunogenicity of these and other protein tumor antigen vaccines are being sought. Id proteins can be produced via tumor-myeloma hybridomas or recombinant methods in mammalian, bacteria, or insect cells. We now demonstrate that terminal mannose residues, characteristic of recombinant proteins produced in insect cells, yield Id proteins with significantly enhanced immunostimulatory properties compared to Id proteins derived from mammalian cells. Recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cell-derived Id showed higher binding to and activation of human dendritic cells mediated by mannose receptors. In vivo, insect cell-derived Id elicited higher levels of tumor-specific CD8+ CTL and improved eradication of pre-established murine lymphoma. Insect cell and mammalian Id generated similar levels of tumor-specific antibodies, showing no impairment in antibody responses to native tumor antigen despite the glycoslylation differences in the immunogen. Combining insect cell production and maleimide-based KLH conjugation offered the highest levels of anti-tumor immunity. Our data comparing sources of recombinant Id protein tumor antigens used in therapeutic cancer vaccines demonstrate that insect cell-derived antigens can offer several immunologic advantages over proteins derived from mammalian sources. PMID:19000731

  7. Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells efficiently capture HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins via CD4 for antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Sandgren, Kerrie J; Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Forsell, Mattias N; Soldemo, Martina; Adams, William C; Liang, Frank; Perbeck, Leif; Koup, Richard A; Wyatt, Richard T; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Loré, Karin

    2013-07-01

    Advances in HIV-1 vaccine clinical trials and preclinical research indicate that the virus envelope glycoproteins (Env) are likely to be an essential component of a prophylactic vaccine. Efficient Ag uptake and presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) is important for strong CD4(+) Th cell responses and the development of effective humoral immune responses. In this study, we examined the capacity of distinct primary human DC subsets to internalize and present recombinant Env to CD4(+) T cells. Consistent with their specific receptor expression, skin DCs bound and internalized Env via C-type lectin receptors, whereas blood DC subsets, including CD1c(+) myeloid DCs, CD123(+) plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs), and CD141(+) DCs exhibited a restricted repertoire of C-type lectin receptors and relied on CD4 for uptake of Env. Despite a generally poor capacity for Ag uptake compared with myeloid DCs, the high expression of CD4 on PDCs allowed them to bind and internalize Env very efficiently. CD4-mediated uptake delivered Env to EEA1(+) endosomes that progressed to Lamp1(+) and MHC class II(+) lysosomes where internalized Env was degraded rapidly. Finally, all three blood DC subsets were able to internalize an Env-CMV pp65 fusion protein via CD4 and stimulate pp65-specific CD4(+) T cells. Thus, in the in vitro systems described in this paper, CD4-mediated uptake of Env is a functional pathway leading to Ag presentation, and this may therefore be a mechanism used by blood DCs, including PDCs, for generating immune responses to Env-based vaccines. PMID:23729440

  8. Functional Specialty of CD40 and Dendritic Cell Surface Lectins for Exogenous Antigen Presentation to CD8(+) and CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenjie; Gorvel, Laurent; Zurawski, Sandra; Li, Dapeng; Ni, Ling; Duluc, Dorothée; Upchurch, Katherine; Kim, JongRok; Gu, Chao; Ouedraogo, Richard; Wang, Zhiqing; Xue, Yaming; Joo, HyeMee; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells that can efficiently prime and cross-prime antigen-specific T cells. Delivering antigen to DCs via surface receptors is thus an appealing strategy to evoke cellular immunity. Nonetheless, which DC surface receptor to target to yield the optimal CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses remains elusive. Herein, we report the superiority of CD40 over 9 different lectins and scavenger receptors at evoking antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. However, lectins (e.g., LOX-1 and Dectin-1) were more efficient than CD40 at eliciting CD4(+) T cell responses. Common and distinct patterns of subcellular and intracellular localization of receptor-bound αCD40, αLOX-1 and αDectin-1 further support their functional specialization at enhancing antigen presentation to either CD8(+) or CD4(+) T cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that antigen targeting to CD40 can evoke potent antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in human CD40 transgenic mice. This study provides fundamental information for the rational design of vaccines against cancers and viral infections. PMID:27077111

  9. Functional Specialty of CD40 and Dendritic Cell Surface Lectins for Exogenous Antigen Presentation to CD8+ and CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenjie; Gorvel, Laurent; Zurawski, Sandra; Li, Dapeng; Ni, Ling; Duluc, Dorothée; Upchurch, Katherine; Kim, JongRok; Gu, Chao; Ouedraogo, Richard; Wang, Zhiqing; Xue, Yaming; Joo, HyeMee; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells that can efficiently prime and cross-prime antigen-specific T cells. Delivering antigen to DCs via surface receptors is thus an appealing strategy to evoke cellular immunity. Nonetheless, which DC surface receptor to target to yield the optimal CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses remains elusive. Herein, we report the superiority of CD40 over 9 different lectins and scavenger receptors at evoking antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses. However, lectins (e.g., LOX-1 and Dectin-1) were more efficient than CD40 at eliciting CD4+ T cell responses. Common and distinct patterns of subcellular and intracellular localization of receptor-bound αCD40, αLOX-1 and αDectin-1 further support their functional specialization at enhancing antigen presentation to either CD8+ or CD4+ T cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that antigen targeting to CD40 can evoke potent antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in human CD40 transgenic mice. This study provides fundamental information for the rational design of vaccines against cancers and viral infections. PMID:27077111

  10. Class-switched anti-insulin antibodies originate from unconventional antigen presentation in multiple lymphoid sites.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoxiao; Thomas, James W; Unanue, Emil R

    2016-05-30

    Autoantibodies to insulin are a harbinger of autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes in humans and in non-obese diabetic mice. To understand the genesis of these autoantibodies, we investigated the interactions of insulin-specific T and B lymphocytes using T cell and B cell receptor transgenic mice. We found spontaneous anti-insulin germinal center (GC) formation throughout lymphoid tissues with GC B cells binding insulin. Moreover, because of the nature of the insulin epitope recognized by the T cells, it was evident that GC B cells presented a broader repertoire of insulin epitopes. Such broader recognition was reproduced by activating naive B cells ex vivo with a combination of CD40 ligand and interleukin 4. Thus, insulin immunoreactivity extends beyond the pancreatic lymph node-islets of Langerhans axis and indicates that circulating insulin, despite its very low levels, can have an influence on diabetogenesis. PMID:27139492

  11. Minimum information about tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (MITAP): a first step towards reproducibility and standardisation of cellular therapies

    PubMed Central

    Spiering, Rachel; Aguillon, Juan C.; Anderson, Amy E.; Appel, Silke; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel; ten Brinke, Anja; Broere, Femke; Cools, Nathalie; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Diboll, Julie; Geissler, Edward K.; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gregori, Silvia; van Ham, S. Marieke; Lattimer, Staci; Marshall, Lindsay; Harry, Rachel A.; Hutchinson, James A.; Isaacs, John D.; Joosten, Irma; van Kooten, Cees; Lopez Diaz de Cerio, Ascension; Nikolic, Tatjana; Oral, Haluk Barbaros; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana; Ritter, Thomas; Riquelme, Paloma; Thomson, Angus W.; Trucco, Massimo; Vives-Pi, Marta; Martinez-Caceres, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular therapies with tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (tolAPC) show great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and for the prevention of destructive immune responses after transplantation. The methodologies for generating tolAPC vary greatly between different laboratories, making it difficult to compare data from different studies; thus constituting a major hurdle for the development of standardised tolAPC therapeutic products. Here we describe an initiative by members of the tolAPC field to generate a minimum information model for tolAPC (MITAP), providing a reporting framework that will make differences and similarities between tolAPC products transparent. In this way, MITAP constitutes a first but important step towards the production of standardised and reproducible tolAPC for clinical application.

  12. Interleukin-10 Modulates Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells through Regulation of NLRP3 Inflammasome Assembly during Chlamydia Infection

    PubMed Central

    Omosun, Yusuf; McKeithen, Danielle; Ryans, Khamia; Kibakaya, Caroline; Blas-Machado, Uriel; Li, Duo; Singh, Rajesh; Inoue, Koichi; Xiong, Zhi-Gang; Eko, Francis; Black, Carolyn; Igietseme, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) has been implicated in susceptibility to genital chlamydial infection and the development of tubal pathologies. IL-10 limitation also resulted in the rapid elicitation of immune responses against Chlamydia, and decreased levels of IL-10 correlated with protective anti-Chlamydia immunity. To investigate the molecular basis for these effects, we compared the reproductive pathologies and fertility rates in Chlamydia-infected wild-type (WT) and IL-10-knockout (IL-10−/−) mice; we also analyzed the expression of the Toll-like receptor (TLR)/interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) superfamily, IL-1β production, NLRP3 inflammasome assembly and activation, and the immunostimulatory capacity and apoptotic predilection of Chlamydia-exposed dendritic cells (DCs) from WT and IL-10−/− mice. Our results revealed that, in addition to the rapid clearance of infection, genitally infected IL-10−/− mice were protected from tubal pathologies and infertility, whereas WT (IL-10+/+) mice were not. Chlamydia-pulsed IL-10−/− DCs expressed larger numbers of TLR4/IL-1R molecules and had enhanced IL-1β production. In addition, NLRP3 inflammasome assembly was suppressed in IL-10−/− DCs through the inhibition of the P2X purinoceptor 7 (P2X7) receptor (P2X7R), an ATP-gated ion channel, and a decrease in intracellular Ca2+ levels, which inhibited DC apoptosis. Thus, the potent immunostimulatory capacity of IL-10-deficient DCs is due, at least in part, to the suppression of the intracellular inflammasome assembly, which prevents DC apoptosis, allowing efficient antigen presentation. The results indicate that IL-10 deficiency enables efficient antigen presentation by DCs for rapid and enhanced immune activation against Chlamydia, which results in rapid microbial clearance, which prevents tubal pathologies during infection. Our finding has important implications for the induction of protective immunity against Chlamydia and other infectious and noninfectious

  13. Role of p47phox in Antigen-Presenting Cell-Mediated Regulation of Humoral Immunity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vasilevsky, Sam; Liu, Qi; Koontz, Sherry M.; Kastenmayer, Robin; Shea, Katherine; Jackson, Sharon H.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial-induced inflammation is important for eliciting humoral immunity. Genetic defects of NADPH oxidase 2–based proteins interrupt phagocyte superoxide generation and are the basis for the human immunodeficiency chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Hyperinflammation is also a significant clinical manifestation of CGD. Herein, we evaluated humoral immunity in the phagocyte oxidase p47phox-deficient model of CGD and found that UV-inactivated Streptococcus pneumoniae and Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) elicited higher specific antibody (Ab) titers in p47phox-/- mice than wild-type (WT) mice. Both organisms elicited robust and distinct antigen-presenting cell maturation phenotypes, including IL-12 hypersecretion, and higher major histocompatibility complex II and costimulatory protein expression in Lm-stimulated p47phox-/- dendritic cells (DCs) relative to WT DCs. Furthermore, p47phox-/- DCs pulsed with Lm and adoptively transferred into naïve WT mice elicited Ab titers, whereas Lm-pulsed WT DCs did not elicit these titers. The observed robust p47phox-/- mouse humoral response was recapitulated with live Lm and sustained in vivo in p47phox-/- mice. Notably, anti–serum samples from p47phox-/- mice that survived secondary Lm infection were protective in WT and p47phox-/- mice that were rechallenged with secondary lethal Lm infection. These findings demonstrate a novel benefit of NADPH oxidase 2 deficiency (ie, dependent inflammation in antigen-presenting cell–mediated humoral immunity) and that anti-Lm Ab can be protective in an immunodeficient CGD host. PMID:21641399

  14. Interleukin-10 modulates antigen presentation by dendritic cells through regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome assembly during Chlamydia infection.

    PubMed

    Omosun, Yusuf; McKeithen, Danielle; Ryans, Khamia; Kibakaya, Caroline; Blas-Machado, Uriel; Li, Duo; Singh, Rajesh; Inoue, Koichi; Xiong, Zhi-Gang; Eko, Francis; Black, Carolyn; Igietseme, Joseph; He, Qing

    2015-12-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) has been implicated in susceptibility to genital chlamydial infection and the development of tubal pathologies. IL-10 limitation also resulted in the rapid elicitation of immune responses against Chlamydia, and decreased levels of IL-10 correlated with protective anti-Chlamydia immunity. To investigate the molecular basis for these effects, we compared the reproductive pathologies and fertility rates in Chlamydia-infected wild-type (WT) and IL-10-knockout (IL-10(-/-)) mice; we also analyzed the expression of the Toll-like receptor (TLR)/interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) superfamily, IL-1β production, NLRP3 inflammasome assembly and activation, and the immunostimulatory capacity and apoptotic predilection of Chlamydia-exposed dendritic cells (DCs) from WT and IL-10(-/-) mice. Our results revealed that, in addition to the rapid clearance of infection, genitally infected IL-10(-/-) mice were protected from tubal pathologies and infertility, whereas WT (IL-10(+/+)) mice were not. Chlamydia-pulsed IL-10(-/-) DCs expressed larger numbers of TLR4/IL-1R molecules and had enhanced IL-1β production. In addition, NLRP3 inflammasome assembly was suppressed in IL-10(-/-) DCs through the inhibition of the P2X purinoceptor 7 (P2X7) receptor (P2X7R), an ATP-gated ion channel, and a decrease in intracellular Ca(2+) levels, which inhibited DC apoptosis. Thus, the potent immunostimulatory capacity of IL-10-deficient DCs is due, at least in part, to the suppression of the intracellular inflammasome assembly, which prevents DC apoptosis, allowing efficient antigen presentation. The results indicate that IL-10 deficiency enables efficient antigen presentation by DCs for rapid and enhanced immune activation against Chlamydia, which results in rapid microbial clearance, which prevents tubal pathologies during infection. Our finding has important implications for the induction of protective immunity against Chlamydia and other infectious and noninfectious diseases by

  15. Neoantigen Load, Antigen Presentation Machinery, and Immune Signatures Determine Prognosis in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hirokazu; Sato, Yusuke; Karasaki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Tohru; Kume, Haruki; Ogawa, Seishi; Homma, Yukio; Kakimi, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    Tumors commonly harbor multiple genetic alterations, some of which initiate tumorigenesis. Among these, some tumor-specific somatic mutations resulting in mutated protein have the potential to induce antitumor immune responses. To examine the relevance of the latter to immune responses in the tumor and to patient outcomes, we used datasets of whole-exome and RNA sequencing from 97 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients to identify neoepitopes predicted to be presented by each patient's autologous HLA molecules. We found that the number of nonsilent or missense mutations did not correlate with patient prognosis. However, combining the number of HLA-restricted neoepitopes with the cell surface expression of HLA or β2-microglobulin(β2M) revealed that an A-neo(hi)/HLA-A(hi) or ABC-neo(hi)/β2M(hi) phenotype correlated with better clinical outcomes. Higher expression of immune-related genes from CD8 T cells and their effector molecules [CD8A, perforin (PRF1) and granzyme A (GZMA)], however, did not correlate with prognosis. This may have been due to the observed correlation of these genes with the expression of other genes that were associated with immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment (CTLA-4, PD-1, LAG-3, PD-L1, PD-L2, IDO1, and IL10). This suggested that abundant neoepitopes associated with greater antitumor effector immune responses were counterbalanced by a strongly immunosuppressive microenvironment. Therefore, immunosuppressive molecules should be considered high-priority targets for modulating immune responses in patients with ccRCC. Blockade of these molecular pathways could be combined with immunotherapies targeting neoantigens to achieve synergistic antitumor activity. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(5); 463-71. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26980598

  16. Resistance induced by drug abbreviated Schistosoma mansoni infections: treatment with the drug Ro11-3128 leads to enhanced antigen presentation.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D A; Bickle, Q D; Kaye, P M

    1994-01-01

    Treatment of mice with the benzodiazepine derivative Ro11-3128 1-2 days post-infection with Schistosoma mansoni leads to arrest of virtually all schistosomula at the skin stage, and results in the development of protective immunity to challenge infection. A characteristic feature of Ro11-3128 treatment in vitro is the formation of exudates and membranous blebs at the schistosomular surface; other drugs tested, such as Ro15-5458 and oxamniquine which are also effective against the skin stages but relatively ineffective in inducing protection, do not induce this reaction. Here, we have examined whether such in vitro treatment causes enhanced presentation of schistosomular antigens by host antigen-presenting cells (APC) using an in vitro assay with activated peritoneal adherent cells as APC and T cells from S. mansoni antigen-sensitized mice. We have shown that viable mechanically transformed schistosomula (MS) can be processed and presented with similar kinetics to soluble antigen. However, in vitro drug treatment leads to enhanced presentation of MS. Experiments in which membranous blebs and antigen released by Ro11-3128-treated parasites during in vitro culture were separated from the remaining intact schistosomula, demonstrated significant stimulatory activity in the soluble and particulate-released antigen fractions. Filtration, antigen transfer experiments and SDS-PAGE analysis of the released material further suggested that most of the activity resided in the particulate fraction. Thus, quantitative and qualitative changes to antigen presentation by Ro11-3128 treatment early after infection may underlie the immunoprotective efficacy of Ro11-3128-abbreviated infections. Images Figure 3 Figure 9 PMID:7959877

  17. Programmed Death-Ligand 1 on Antigen-presenting Cells Facilitates the Induction of Antigen-specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes: Application to Adoptive T-Cell Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tatsunori; Nishida, Tetsuya; Takagi, Erina; Miyao, Kotaro; Koyama, Daisuke; Sakemura, Reona; Hanajiri, Ryo; Watanabe, Keisuke; Imahashi, Nobuhiko; Terakura, Seitaro; Murata, Makoto; Kiyoi, Hitoshi

    2016-10-01

    Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) binds to programmed death-1 (PD-1) on activated T cells and contributes to T-cell exhaustion. PD-L1 expressed on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) could be thought to inhibit the induction of Ag-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by transducing negative signal into T cells; however, the roles of PD-L1 on APCs have not yet been well examined. Therefore, we evaluated the roles of PD-L1 on APCs in the induction of Ag-specific CTLs. CD3 T cells isolated from cytomegalovirus (CMV)-seropositive healthy donors were stimulated with mature dendritic cells pulsed with CMV pp65-derived HLA-restricted peptides in the presence of anti-PD-L1 blocking antibody. Unexpectedly, PD-L1 blockade resulted in a less efficient induction of CMV-specific CTLs, suggesting that PD-L1 play a positive role in the induction of Ag-specific CTLs. For further evaluations and application to adoptive immunotherapy, we generated K562-based artificial APCs, which were retrovirally transduced with HLA class I molecules and various combinations of CD80/86 and PD-L1. K562/HLA+CD80/86+PD-L1 cells produced significantly higher induction of CMV-specific CTLs than K562/HLA or K562/HLA+CD80/86 cells without causing excessive differentiation or functional exhaustion of the induced CTLs, whereas PD-L1 itself did not have a stimulatory effect. Furthermore, only K562/HLA+CD80/86+PD-L1 cells pulsed with HLA-A*24:02-restricted Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) peptide clearly expanded WT1-specific CTLs from healthy donors. Our findings presumed that PD-L1 expressed on APCs along with CD80/86 enhanced the induction of Ag-specific CTLs probably depending on fine-tuning excessive stimulation of CD80/86, and that K562/HLA+CD80/86+PD-L1 cells has therapeutic potential as a novel type of artificial APCs for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27548033

  18. αvβ3-dependent cross-presentation of matrix metalloproteinase–2 by melanoma cells gives rise to a new tumor antigen

    PubMed Central

    Godefroy, Emmanuelle; Moreau-Aubry, Agnes; Diez, Elisabeth; Dreno, Brigitte; Jotereau, Francine; Guilloux, Yannick

    2005-01-01

    A large array of antigens that are recognized by tumor-specific T cells has been identified and shown to be generated through various processes. We describe a new mechanism underlying T cell recognition of melanoma cells, which involves the generation of a major histocompatibility complex class I–restricted epitope after tumor-mediated uptake and processing of an extracellular protein—a process referred to as cross-presentation—which is believed to be restricted to immune cells. We show that melanoma cells cross-present, in an αvβ3-dependent manner, an antigen derived from secreted matrix metalloproteinase–2 (MMP-2) to human leukocyte antigen A*0201-restricted T cells. Because MMP-2 activity is critical for melanoma progression, the MMP-2 peptide should be cross-presented by most progressing melanomas and represents a unique antigen for vaccine therapy of these tumors. PMID:15998788

  19. Influenza A virus infection of human primary dendritic cells impairs their ability to cross-present antigen to CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Chalouni, Cécile; Chatterjee, Bithi; Cohn, Lillian; Blattmann, Peter; Nakamura, Norihiro; Delamarre, Lélia; Mellman, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection is normally controlled by adaptive immune responses initiated by dendritic cells (DCs). We investigated the consequences of IAV infection of human primary DCs on their ability to function as antigen-presenting cells. IAV was internalized by both myeloid DCs (mDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs but only mDCs supported viral replication. Although infected mDCs efficiently presented endogenous IAV antigens on MHC class II, this was not the case for presentation on MHC class I. Indeed, cross-presentation by uninfected cells of minute amounts of endocytosed, exogenous IAV was -300-fold more efficient than presentation of IAV antigens synthesized by infected cells and resulted in a statistically significant increase in expansion of IAV-specific CD8 T cells. Furthermore, IAV infection also impaired cross-presentation of other exogenous antigens, indicating that IAV infection broadly attenuates presentation on MHC class I molecules. Our results suggest that cross-presentation by uninfected mDCs is a preferred mechanism of antigen-presentation for the activation and expansion of CD8 T cells during IAV infection. PMID:22412374

  20. Immune Tolerance Maintained by Cooperative Interactions between T Cells and Antigen Presenting Cells Shapes a Diverse TCR Repertoire.

    PubMed

    Best, Katharine; Chain, Benny; Watkins, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The T cell population in an individual needs to avoid harmful activation by self peptides while maintaining the ability to respond to an unknown set of foreign peptides. This property is acquired by a combination of thymic and extra-thymic mechanisms. We extend current models for the development of self/non-self discrimination to consider the acquisition of self-tolerance as an emergent system level property of the overall T cell receptor repertoire. We propose that tolerance is established at the level of the antigen presenting cell/T cell cluster, which facilitates and integrates cooperative interactions between T cells of different specificities. The threshold for self-reactivity is therefore imposed at a population level, and not at the level of the individual T cell/antigen encounter. Mathematically, the model can be formulated as a linear programing optimization problem that can be implemented as a multiplicative update algorithm, which shows a rapid convergence to a stable state. The model constrains self-reactivity within a predefined threshold, but maintains repertoire diversity and cross reactivity which are key characteristics of human T cell immunity. We show further that the size of individual clones in the model repertoire becomes heterogeneous, and that new clones can establish themselves even when the repertoire has stabilized. Our study combines the salient features of the "danger" model of self/non-self discrimination with the concepts of quorum sensing, and extends repertoire generation models to encompass the establishment of tolerance. Furthermore, the dynamic and continuous repertoire reshaping, which underlies tolerance in this model, suggests opportunities for therapeutic intervention to achieve long-term tolerance following transplantation. PMID:26300880

  1. Immune Tolerance Maintained by Cooperative Interactions between T Cells and Antigen Presenting Cells Shapes a Diverse TCR Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Best, Katharine; Chain, Benny; Watkins, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The T cell population in an individual needs to avoid harmful activation by self peptides while maintaining the ability to respond to an unknown set of foreign peptides. This property is acquired by a combination of thymic and extra-thymic mechanisms. We extend current models for the development of self/non-self discrimination to consider the acquisition of self-tolerance as an emergent system level property of the overall T cell receptor repertoire. We propose that tolerance is established at the level of the antigen presenting cell/T cell cluster, which facilitates and integrates cooperative interactions between T cells of different specificities. The threshold for self-reactivity is therefore imposed at a population level, and not at the level of the individual T cell/antigen encounter. Mathematically, the model can be formulated as a linear programing optimization problem that can be implemented as a multiplicative update algorithm, which shows a rapid convergence to a stable state. The model constrains self-reactivity within a predefined threshold, but maintains repertoire diversity and cross reactivity which are key characteristics of human T cell immunity. We show further that the size of individual clones in the model repertoire becomes heterogeneous, and that new clones can establish themselves even when the repertoire has stabilized. Our study combines the salient features of the “danger” model of self/non-self discrimination with the concepts of quorum sensing, and extends repertoire generation models to encompass the establishment of tolerance. Furthermore, the dynamic and continuous repertoire reshaping, which underlies tolerance in this model, suggests opportunities for therapeutic intervention to achieve long-term tolerance following transplantation. PMID:26300880

  2. Susceptibility to measles virus-induced encephalitis in mice correlates with impaired antigen presentation to cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Niewiesk, S; Brinckmann, U; Bankamp, B; Sirak, S; Liebert, U G; ter Meulen, V

    1993-01-01

    In measles virus (MV) infection in humans, meningitis and encephalitis are important complications. However, little is known of the pathogenesis of MV encephalitis, in particular about the role of the immune response. We have examined the role of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in a mouse model of MV-induced encephalitis. We report here that the resistance of inbred strains of mice to MV-induced encephalitis correlated with the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype and that only resistant mouse strains mounted an effective CTL response to MV. Mice with low susceptibility to MV infection, such as the BALB/c strain (H-2d), generated CTL, whereas the highly susceptible strains, C3H (H-2k) and C57BL/6 (H-2b), revealed very poor CTL responses. MV-induced CTL were usually CD8+, and the generation of these cells was independent of the route of inoculation or the time postinfection. CD4+ T cells were generally only weakly lytic. The nucleocapsid protein was the major target antigen for CTL in BALB/c mice, although in some experiments the hemagglutinin was also recognized. CTL from C3H and C57BL/6 mice did not lyse MV-infected target cells. However, targets infected with vaccinia virus recombinants expressing the nucleocapsid protein or hemagglutinin were lysed, but levels of cytotoxicity were still low. Experiments using target cells transfected with single MHC class I genes suggested inefficient antigen presentation of MV proteins by the MHC molecules of the H-2k and H-2b haplotypes. PMID:8093223

  3. Spatial separation of the processing and MHC class I loading compartments for cross-presentation of the tumor-associated antigen HER2/neu by human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Rietscher, René; Diedrich, Andrea; Czaplewska, Justyna A; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Scherließ, Regina; Hanefeld, Andrea; Gottschaldt, Michael; Walden, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cross-presentation is the process by which professional antigen presenting cells (APCs) (B cells, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages) present endocytosed antigens (Ags) via MHC-I to CD8+ T cells. This process is crucial for induction of adaptive immune responses against tumors and infected cells. The pathways and cellular compartments involved in cross-presentation are unresolved and controversial. Among the cells with cross-presenting capacity, DCs are the most efficient, which was proposed to depend on prevention of endosomal acidification to block degradation of the epitopes. Contrary to this view, we show in this report that some cargoes induce strong endosomal acidification following uptake by human DCs, while others not. Moreover, processing of the tumor-associated antigen HER2/neu delivered in nanoparticles (NP) for cross-presentation of the epitope HER2/neu369–377 on HLA-A2 depended on endosomal acidification and cathepsin activity as well as proteasomes, and newly synthesized HLA class I. However, the HLA-A*0201/HER2/neu369–377 complexes were not found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) nor in endolysosomes but in hitherto not described vesicles. The data thus indicate spatial separation of antigen processing and loading of MHC-I for cross-presentation: antigen processing occurs in the uptake compartment and the cytosol whereas MHC-I loading with peptide takes place in a distinct subcellular compartment. The findings further elucidate the cellular pathways involved in the cross-presentation of a full-length, clinically relevant tumor-associated antigen by human DCs, and the impact of the vaccine formulation on antigen processing and CD8+ T cell induction. PMID:26985398

  4. Assessment of the present NASA optical metrology capabilities and recommendations for establishing an in-house NASA Optical Metrology Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation into when it was first recognized that there was a deficiency in NASA optical metrology oversight capability, why this deficiency existed unnoticed for so long, and a proposal for correcting the problem is presented. It is explained why this optical metrology oversight is so critical to program success and at the same time, why it is difficult to establish due to the nature of the technology. The solution proposed is the establishment of an Optics Metrology Group within the NASA/MSFC Optics Branch with a line of authority from NASA S & MA.

  5. Anthrax lethal toxin impairs CD1d-mediated antigen presentation by targeting the extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Khan, Masood A; Gallo, Richard M; Brutkiewicz, Randy R

    2010-05-01

    Lethal toxin (LT) is a critical virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis and an important means by which this bacterium evades the host's immune system. In this study, we demonstrate that CD1d-expressing cells treated with LT have reduced CD1d-mediated antigen presentation. We earlier showed an important role for the mitogen-activated protein kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in the regulation of CD1d-mediated antigen presentation, and we report here that LT impairs antigen presentation by CD1d in an ERK1/2-dependent manner. Similarly, LT and the ERK1/2 pathway-specific inhibitor U0126 caused a decrease in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-mediated antigen presentation. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed altered intracellular distribution of CD1d and LAMP-1 in LT-treated cells, similar to the case for ERK1/2-inhibited cells. These results suggest that Bacillus anthracis has the ability to evade the host's innate immune system by reducing CD1d-mediated antigen presentation through targeting the ERK1/2 pathway. PMID:20194602

  6. Myeloid Cell Nuclear Differentiation Antigen (MNDA) Expression Distinguishes Extramedullary Presentations of Myeloid Leukemia From Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ryan C; Kim, Jinah; Natkunam, Yasodha; Sundram, Uma; Freud, Aharon G; Gammon, Bryan; Cascio, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Myeloid neoplasms constitute one of the most common malignancies in adults. In most cases these proliferations initially manifest in the blood and marrow; however, extramedullary involvement may precede blood or marrow involvement in a subset of cases, making a definitive diagnosis challenging by morphologic and immunohistochemical assessment alone. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare, aggressive entity that frequently presents in extramedullary sites and can show morphologic and immunophenotypic overlap with myeloid neoplasms. Given that BPDCN and myeloid neoplasms may both initially present in extramedullary sites and that novel targeted therapies may be developed that exploit the unique molecular signature of BPDCN, new immunophenotypic markers that can reliably separate myeloid neoplasms from BPDCN are desirable. We evaluated the utility of myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen (MNDA) expression in a series of extramedullary myeloid leukemias (EMLs) and BPDCN. Forty biopsies containing EML and 19 biopsies containing BPDCN were studied by MNDA immunohistochemistry. The majority of myeloid neoplasms showed nuclear expression of MNDA (65%). In contrast, all cases of BPDCN lacked MNDA expression. These findings show that MNDA is expressed in the majority of EMLs and support the inclusion of MNDA immunohistochemistry in the diagnostic evaluation of blastic hematopoietic infiltrates, particularly when the differential diagnosis is between myeloid leukemia and BPDCN. PMID:26796502

  7. Targeting human dendritic cells via DEC-205 using PLGA nanoparticles leads to enhanced cross-presentation of a melanoma-associated antigen.

    PubMed

    Saluja, Sandeep S; Hanlon, Douglas J; Sharp, Fiona A; Hong, Enping; Khalil, David; Robinson, Eve; Tigelaar, Robert; Fahmy, Tarek M; Edelson, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    Targeting antigen to dendritic cells (DCs) is a powerful and novel strategy for vaccination. Priming or loading DCs with antigen controls whether subsequent immunity will develop and hence whether effective vaccination can be achieved. The goal of our present work was to increase the potency of DC-based antitumor vaccines by overcoming inherent limitations associated with antigen stability and cross-presentation. Nanoparticles prepared from the biodegradable polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) have been extensively used in clinical settings for drug delivery and are currently the subject of intensive investigation as antigen delivery vehicles for vaccine applications. Here we describe a nanoparticulate delivery system with the ability to simultaneously carry a high density of protein-based antigen while displaying a DC targeting ligand on its surface. Utilizing a targeting motif specific for the DC-associated surface ligand DEC-205, we show that targeted nanoparticles encapsulating a MART-127-35 peptide are both internalized and cross-presented with significantly higher efficiency than isotype control-coated nanoparticles in human cells. In addition, the DEC-205-labeled nanoparticles rapidly escape from the DC endosomal compartment and do not colocalize with markers of early (EEA-1) or late endosome/lysosome (LAMP-1). This indicates that encapsulated antigens delivered by nanoparticles may have direct access to the class I cytoplasmic major histocompatibility complex loading machinery, overcoming the need for "classical" cross-presentation and facilitating heightened DC stimulation of anti-tumor CD8(+) T-cells. These results indicate that this delivery system provides a flexible and versatile methodology to deliver melanoma-associated antigen to DCs, with both high efficiency and heightened potency. PMID:25419128

  8. Targeting human dendritic cells via DEC-205 using PLGA nanoparticles leads to enhanced cross-presentation of a melanoma-associated antigen

    PubMed Central

    Saluja, Sandeep S; Hanlon, Douglas J; Sharp, Fiona A; Hong, Enping; Khalil, David; Robinson, Eve; Tigelaar, Robert; Fahmy, Tarek M; Edelson, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    Targeting antigen to dendritic cells (DCs) is a powerful and novel strategy for vaccination. Priming or loading DCs with antigen controls whether subsequent immunity will develop and hence whether effective vaccination can be achieved. The goal of our present work was to increase the potency of DC-based antitumor vaccines by overcoming inherent limitations associated with antigen stability and cross-presentation. Nanoparticles prepared from the biodegradable polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) have been extensively used in clinical settings for drug delivery and are currently the subject of intensive investigation as antigen delivery vehicles for vaccine applications. Here we describe a nanoparticulate delivery system with the ability to simultaneously carry a high density of protein-based antigen while displaying a DC targeting ligand on its surface. Utilizing a targeting motif specific for the DC-associated surface ligand DEC-205, we show that targeted nanoparticles encapsulating a MART-127–35 peptide are both internalized and cross-presented with significantly higher efficiency than isotype control-coated nanoparticles in human cells. In addition, the DEC-205-labeled nanoparticles rapidly escape from the DC endosomal compartment and do not colocalize with markers of early (EEA-1) or late endosome/lysosome (LAMP-1). This indicates that encapsulated antigens delivered by nanoparticles may have direct access to the class I cytoplasmic major histocompatibility complex loading machinery, overcoming the need for “classical” cross-presentation and facilitating heightened DC stimulation of anti-tumor CD8+ T-cells. These results indicate that this delivery system provides a flexible and versatile methodology to deliver melanoma-associated antigen to DCs, with both high efficiency and heightened potency. PMID:25419128

  9. HLA-B27-restricted antigen presentation in the absence of tapasin reveals polymorphism in mechanisms of HLA class I peptide loading.

    PubMed

    Peh, C A; Burrows, S R; Barnden, M; Khanna, R; Cresswell, P; Moss, D J; McCluskey, J

    1998-05-01

    Tapasin is a resident ER protein believed to be critical for antigen presentation by HLA class I molecules. We demonstrate that allelic variation in MHC class I molecules influences their dependence on tapasin for peptide loading and antigen presentation. HLA-B*2705 molecules achieve high levels of surface expression and present specific viral peptides in the absence of tapasin. In contrast, HLA-B*4402 molecules are highly dependent upon human tapasin for these functions, while HLA-B8 molecules are intermediate in this regard. Significantly, HLA-B*2705 like HLA-B*4402, requires tapasin to associate efficiently with TAP (transporters associated with antigen processing). The unusual ability of HLA-B*2705 to form peptide complexes without associating with TAP or tapasin confers flexibility in the repertoire of peptides presented by this molecule. We speculate that these properties might contribute to the role of HLA-B27 in conferring susceptibility to inflammatory spondyloarthropathies. PMID:9620674

  10. Balancing Selection Maintains a Form of ERAP2 that Undergoes Nonsense-Mediated Decay and Affects Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, Warren W.; Cannons, Jennifer L.; Lee-Lin, Shih-Queen; Hurle, Belen; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Nielsen, Rasmus; Clark, Andrew G.; Green, Eric D.

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable characteristic of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is its extreme genetic diversity, which is maintained by balancing selection. In fact, the MHC complex remains one of the best-known examples of natural selection in humans, with well-established genetic signatures and biological mechanisms for the action of selection. Here, we present genetic and functional evidence that another gene with a fundamental role in MHC class I presentation, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2), has also evolved under balancing selection and contains a variant that affects antigen presentation. Specifically, genetic analyses of six human populations revealed strong and consistent signatures of balancing selection affecting ERAP2. This selection maintains two highly differentiated haplotypes (Haplotype A and Haplotype B), with frequencies 0.44 and 0.56, respectively. We found that ERAP2 expressed from Haplotype B undergoes differential splicing and encodes a truncated protein, leading to nonsense-mediated decay of the mRNA. To investigate the consequences of ERAP2 deficiency on MHC presentation, we correlated surface MHC class I expression with ERAP2 genotypes in primary lymphocytes. Haplotype B homozygotes had lower levels of MHC class I expressed on the surface of B cells, suggesting that naturally occurring ERAP2 deficiency affects MHC presentation and immune response. Interestingly, an ERAP2 paralog, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1), also shows genetic signatures of balancing selection. Together, our findings link the genetic signatures of selection with an effect on splicing and a cellular phenotype. Although the precise selective pressure that maintains polymorphism is unknown, the demonstrated differences between the ERAP2 splice forms provide important insights into the potential mechanism for the action of selection. PMID:20976248

  11. Understanding MHC Class I Presentation of Viral Antigens by Human Dendritic Cells as a Basis for Rational Design of Therapeutic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    van Montfoort, Nadine; van der Aa, Evelyn; Woltman, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective viral clearance requires the induction of virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Since dendritic cells (DC) have a central role in initiating and shaping virus-specific CTL responses, it is important to understand how DC initiate virus-specific CTL responses. Some viruses can directly infect DC, which theoretically allow direct presentation of viral antigens to CTL, but many viruses target other cells than DC and thus the host depends on the cross-presentation of viral antigens by DC to activate virus-specific CTL. Research in mouse models has highly enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cross-presentation and the dendritic cells (DC) subsets involved, however, these results cannot be readily translated toward the role of human DC in MHC class I-antigen presentation of human viruses. Here, we summarize the insights gained in the past 20 years on MHC class I presentation of viral antigen by human DC and add to the current debate on the capacities of different human DC subsets herein. Furthermore, possible sources of viral antigens and essential DC characteristics for effective induction of virus-specific CTL are evaluated. We conclude that cross-presentation is not only an efficient mechanism exploited by DC to initiate immunity to viruses that do not infect DC but also to viruses that do infect DC, because cross-presentation has many conceptual advantages and bypasses direct immune modulatory effects of the virus on its infected target cells. Since knowledge on the mechanism of viral antigen presentation and the preferred DC subsets is crucial for rational vaccine design, the obtained insights are very instrumental for the development of effective anti-viral immunotherapy. PMID:24795724

  12. The 2.5 Å Structure of CD1c in Complex with a Mycobacterial Lipid Reveals an Open Groove Ideally Suited for Diverse Antigen Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, Louise; Li, Nan-Sheng; Hawk, Andrew J.; Garzón, Diana; Zhang, Tejia; Fox, Lisa M.; Kazen, Allison R.; Shah, Sneha; Haddadian, Esmael J.; Gumperz, Jenny E.; Saghatelian, Alan; Faraldo-Gómez, José D.; Meredith, Stephen C.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Adams, Erin J.

    2011-08-24

    CD1 molecules function to present lipid-based antigens to T cells. Here we present the crystal structure of CD1c at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution, in complex with the pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen mannosyl-{beta}1-phosphomycoketide (MPM). CD1c accommodated MPM's methylated alkyl chain exclusively in the A pocket, aided by a unique exit portal underneath the {alpha}1 helix. Most striking was an open F pocket architecture lacking the closed cavity structure of other CD1 molecules, reminiscent of peptide binding grooves of classical major histocompatibility complex molecules. This feature, combined with tryptophan-fluorescence quenching during loading of a dodecameric lipopeptide antigen, provides a compelling model by which both the lipid and peptide moieties of the lipopeptide are involved in CD1c presentation of lipopeptides.

  13. Modest Interference with Actin Dynamics in Primary T Cell Activation by Antigen Presenting Cells Preferentially Affects Lamellal Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roybal, Kole T.; Mace, Emily M.; Clark, Danielle J.; Leard, Alan D.; Herman, Andrew; Verkade, Paul; Orange, Jordan S.; Wülfing, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic subcellular distributions of signaling system components are critical regulators of cellular signal transduction through their control of molecular interactions. Understanding how signaling activity depends on such distributions and the cellular structures driving them is required for comprehensive insight into signal transduction. In the activation of primary murine T cells by antigen presenting cells (APC) signaling intermediates associate with various subcellular structures, prominently a transient, wide, and actin-associated lamellum extending from an interdigitated T cell:APC interface several micrometers into the T cell. While actin dynamics are well established as general regulators of cellular organization, their role in controlling signaling organization in primary T cell:APC couples and the specific cellular structures driving it is unresolved. Using modest interference with actin dynamics with a low concentration of Jasplakinolide as corroborated by costimulation blockade we show that T cell actin preferentially controls lamellal signaling localization and activity leading downstream to calcium signaling. Lamellal localization repeatedly related to efficient T cell function. This suggests that the transient lamellal actin matrix regulates T cell signaling associations that facilitate T cell activation. PMID:26237588

  14. Intracellular transport of MHC class II and associated invariant chain in antigen presenting cells from AP-3-deficient mocha mice.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, L M; Richter, S S; Miller, J

    2001-06-15

    MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation requires trafficking of newly synthesized class II-invariant chain complexes from the trans-Golgi network to endosomal, peptide-loading compartments. This transport is mediated by dileucine-like motifs within the cytosolic tail of the invariant chain. Although these signals have been well characterized, the cytosolic proteins that interact with these dileucine signals and mediate Golgi sorting and endosomal transport have not been identified. Recently, an adaptor complex, AP-3, has been identified that interacts with dileucine motifs and mediates endosomal/lysosomal transport in yeast, Drosophila, and mammals. In this report, we have assessed class II-invariant chain trafficking in a strain of mice (mocha) which lacks expression of AP-3. Our studies demonstrate that the lack of AP-3 does not affect the kinetics of invariant chain degradation, the route of class II-invariant chain transport, or the rate and extent of class II-peptide binding as assessed by the generation of SDS-stable dimers. The possible role of other known or unknown adaptor complexes in class II-invariant chain transport is discussed. PMID:11520080

  15. Immunomodulation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble factors on antigen-presenting cells of healthy blood donors.

    PubMed

    Fong, Fiona Long Yan; Kirjavainen, Pirkka V; El-Nezami, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) cells have been shown to promote type-1 immune responsiveness; however knowledge of immunomodulation of soluble factors secreted by LGG is limited. This is the first study to investigate whether LGG soluble factors promote a comparable immune responsiveness as the bacterial cells. Both treatments - LGG conditioned medium with (CM + LGG) or without (CM) LGG cells, in this study increased expression of several toll-like receptors (TLRs) in all studied cell types and antigen presentation-associated receptor HLA-DR in macrophages and "intermediate" monocytes; but decreased that of activation markers on monocytes and macrophages and production of IL-10, IL-12 and TNFα in macrophages. In co-culture with mononuclear cells, CM increased Th1-type cytokine profile but not as pronounced as CM + LGG. This study suggests that LGG soluble factors exert similar immunomodulatory effects as the intact cells, but cells may be required for optimal type-1 immune responsiveness polarizing capacity of this probiotic strain. PMID:26961406

  16. Ectopic ATP synthase facilitates transfer of HIV-1 from antigen-presenting cells to CD4+ target cells

    PubMed Central

    Yavlovich, Amichai; Viard, Mathias; Zhou, Ming; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Wang, Ji Ming; Gong, Wanghua; Heldman, Eliahu; Blumenthal, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) act as vehicles that transfer HIV to their target CD4+ cells through an intercellular junction, termed the virologic synapse. The molecules that are involved in this process remain largely unidentified. In this study, we used photoaffinity labeling and a proteomic approach to identify new proteins that facilitate HIV-1 transfer. We identified ectopic mitochondrial ATP synthase as a factor that mediates HIV-1 transfer between APCs and CD4+ target cells. Monoclonal antibodies against the β-subunit of ATP synthase inhibited APC-mediated transfer of multiple strains HIV-1 to CD4+ target cells. Likewise, the specific inhibitors of ATPase, citreoviridin and IF1, completely blocked APC-mediated transfer of HIV-1 at the APC-target cell interaction step. Confocal fluorescent microscopy showed localization of extracellular ATP synthase at junctions between APC and CD4+ target cells. We conclude that ectopic ATP synthase could be an accessible molecular target for inhibiting HIV-1 proliferation in vivo. PMID:22753871

  17. Immunomodulation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble factors on antigen-presenting cells of healthy blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Fiona Long Yan; Kirjavainen, Pirkka V.; El-Nezami, Hani

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) cells have been shown to promote type-1 immune responsiveness; however knowledge of immunomodulation of soluble factors secreted by LGG is limited. This is the first study to investigate whether LGG soluble factors promote a comparable immune responsiveness as the bacterial cells. Both treatments − LGG conditioned medium with (CM + LGG) or without (CM) LGG cells, in this study increased expression of several toll-like receptors (TLRs) in all studied cell types and antigen presentation-associated receptor HLA-DR in macrophages and “intermediate” monocytes; but decreased that of activation markers on monocytes and macrophages and production of IL-10, IL-12 and TNFα in macrophages. In co-culture with mononuclear cells, CM increased Th1-type cytokine profile but not as pronounced as CM + LGG. This study suggests that LGG soluble factors exert similar immunomodulatory effects as the intact cells, but cells may be required for optimal type-1 immune responsiveness polarizing capacity of this probiotic strain. PMID:26961406

  18. Nano-clustering of ligands on surrogate antigen presenting cells modulates T cell membrane adhesion and organization.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Pierre; Pi, Fuwei; Lellouch, Annemarie C; Limozin, Laurent; Sengupta, Kheya

    2016-03-14

    We investigate the adhesion and molecular organization of the plasma membrane of T lymphocytes interacting with a surrogate antigen presenting cell comprising glass supported ordered arrays of antibody (α-CD3) nano-dots dispersed in a non-adhesive matrix of polyethylene glycol (PEG). The local membrane adhesion and topography, as well as the distribution of the T cell receptors (TCRs) and the kinase ZAP-70, are influenced by dot-geometry, whereas the cell spreading area is determined by the overall average density of the ligands rather than specific characteristics of the dots. TCR clusters are recruited preferentially to the nano-dots and the TCR cluster size distribution has a weak dot-size dependence. On the patterns, the clusters are larger, more numerous, and more enriched in TCRs, as compared to the homogeneously distributed ligands at comparable concentrations. These observations support the idea that non-ligated TCRs residing in the non-adhered parts of the proximal membrane are able to diffuse and enrich the existing clusters at the ligand dots. However, long distance transport is impaired and cluster centralization in the form of a central supramolecular cluster (cSMAC) is not observed. Time-lapse imaging of early cell-surface contacts indicates that the ZAP-70 microclusters are directly recruited to the site of the antibody dots and this process is concomitant with membrane adhesion. These results together point to a complex interplay of adhesion, molecular organization and activation in response to spatially modulated stimulation. PMID:26887857

  19. The Effect of the Nonionic Block Copolymer Pluronic P85 on Gene Expression in Mouse Muscle and Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaymalov, Zagit Z.; Yang, Zhihui; Pisarev, Vladimir M.; Alakhov, Valery Yu.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    DNA vaccines can be greatly improved by polymer agents that simultaneously increase transgene expression and activate immunity. We describe here Pluronic P85 (P85), a triblock copolymer of ethylene oxide (EO) and propylene oxide (PO) EO26-PO40-EO26,. Using a mouse model we demonstrate that co-administration of a bacterial plasmid DNA with P85 in a skeletal muscle greatly increases gene expression in the injection site and distant organs, especially the draining lymph nodes and spleen. The reporter expression colocalizes with the specific markers of myocytes and keratinocytes in the muscle, as well as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages in the muscle, lymph nodes and spleen. Furthermore, DNA/P85 and P85 alone increase the systemic expansion of CD11c+ (DC), and local expansion of CD11c+, CD14+ (macrophages) and CD49b+ (natural killer) cell populations. DNA/P85 (but not P85) also increases maturation of local DC (CD11c+CD86+, CD11c+CD80+, and CD11c+CD40+). We suggest that DNA/P85 promotes the activation and recruitment of the antigen-presenting cells, which further incorporate, express and carry the transgene to the immune system organs. PMID:19064283

  20. Chronic bronchitis with fungal infection presenting with marked elevation of serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ping; Yan, Wei; Luo, Yi; Tu, Wei; He, Jia-Yi; Liu, Jing-Mei; Gong, Jin; Wang, Yun-Wu; Li, Meng-Ke; Tian, De-An; Huang, Huan-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) is the most frequently applied serum tumor marker for diagnosis of cancers in the digestive organs. However, some patients with benign diseases can have elevated serum levels of CA19-9 as well. The current study presents a 55-year-old female who was admitted to our hospital for further evaluation of a nodular cavity shadow in the right lower lobe and clarification of the cause of the marked elevation of serum CA19-9 levels. Abdominal MRI and gastrointestinal endoscopy did not find any malignancy. As lung cancer cannot be excluded in this patient, a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was carried, intraoperative and postoperative biopsy analysis both suggested chronic bronchitis with fungal infection (due to Histoplasma capsulatum or Penicillium marneffei) and organization. Immunohistochemistry showed marked positive staining for CA19-9 in the damaged lung tissue. The CA19-9 levels quickly returned to the normal range following lobe resection. Therefore, the marked elevation of serum CA19-9 levels, in this case, may have resulted from the chronic bronchitis with fungal infection. PMID:25337284

  1. Specific Targeting of a Naturally Presented Osteosarcoma Antigen, Papillomavirus Binding Factor Peptide, Using an Artificial Monoclonal Antibody*

    PubMed Central

    Tsukahara, Tomohide; Emori, Makoto; Murata, Kenji; Hirano, Takahisa; Muroi, Norihiro; Kyono, Masanori; Toji, Shingo; Watanabe, Kazue; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Kochin, Vitaly; Asanuma, Hiroko; Matsumiya, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Keiji; Himi, Tetsuo; Ichimiya, Shingo; Wada, Takuro; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Sato, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a rare but highly malignant tumor occurring most frequently in adolescents. The prognosis of non-responders to chemotherapy is still poor, and new treatment modalities are needed. To develop peptide-based immunotherapy, we previously identified autologous cytotoxic T lymphocyte-defined osteosarcoma antigen papillomavirus binding factor (PBF) in the context of HLA-B55 and the cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope (PBF A2.2) presented by HLA-A2. PBF and HLA class I are expressed in ∼90 and 70% of various sarcomas, respectively. However, the expression status of peptide PBF A2.2 presented by HLA-A2 on osteosarcoma cells has remained unknown because it is difficult to generate a specific probe that reacts with the HLA·peptide complex. For detection and qualification of the HLA-A*02:01·PBF A2.2 peptide complex on osteosarcoma cells, we tried to isolate a single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody directed to the HLA-*A0201·PBF A2.2 complex using a naïve scFv phage display library. As a result, scFv clone D12 with high affinity (KD = 1.53 × 10−9 m) was isolated. D12 could react with PBF A2.2 peptide-pulsed T2 cells and HLA-A2+PBF+ osteosarcoma cell lines and simultaneously demonstrated that the HLA·peptide complex was expressed on osteosarcoma cells. In conclusion, scFv clone D12 might be useful to select candidate patients for PBF A2.2 peptide-based immunotherapy and develop antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:24962571

  2. Role of the mononuclear phagocyte as an antigen-presenting cell for human gamma delta T cells activated by live Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Boom, W H; Chervenak, K A; Mincek, M A; Ellner, J J

    1992-01-01

    gamma delta T cells, both human and murine, have been found to be highly responsive to mycobacterial antigens. However, the role and function of gamma delta T cells in the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis remain largely unknown. In earlier studies, we demonstrated that monocytes infected with live M. tuberculosis were particularly effective inducers of human peripheral blood gamma delta T cells. The present studies were performed to further characterize the interaction between human mononuclear phagocytes, gamma delta T cells, and live M. tuberculosis, in comparison with CD4+ T cells. First, we found that resting gamma delta T cells expanded in vitro by live M. tuberculosis were specific for M. tuberculosis, and that heat killing and washing the mycobacteria removed the antigen(s) for gamma delta T cells. In contrast, the heat-killed mycobacteria retained significant antigenicity for CD4+ T cells. Second, live M. tuberculosis-expanded gamma delta T cells from healthy tuberculin-positive donors did not respond significantly to the antigens in M. tuberculosis culture filtrate, including the 65- and 71-kDa mycobacterial heat shock proteins. Third, the activation of gamma delta T cells by live mycobacteria was dependent on antigen-presenting cells, and mononuclear phagocytes were found to be very efficient antigen-presenting cells both for resting peripheral blood gamma delta T cells and for activated expanded gamma delta T cells. The mononuclear phagocyte carried the necessary costimulatory factors necessary for gamma delta T-cell proliferation. Fourth, the antigen repertoire and HLA requirements for CD4+ memory T cells and those for gamma delta T cells appear to be quite distinct from each other. CD4+ T cells recognized both soluble protein antigens and whole organisms in a class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted manner, whereas gamma delta T cells appeared to recognize only constituents associated with the whole organism and were not

  3. Modeling the presentation of C3d-coated antigen by B lymphocytes: enhancement by CR1/2-BCR co-ligation is selective for the co-ligating antigen.

    PubMed

    Prechl, József; Baiu, Dana C; Horváth, Attila; Erdei, Anna

    2002-03-01

    We have used a set of single-chain variable fragment antibodies (sc) genetically fused with an influenza hemagglutinin-derived peptide as a means to investigate the role of CR1 and CR2 in antigen presentation by B cells. When incubated with the B cell lymphoma 2PK3, peptide-containing sc specific for either CR1 or CR1/2 mediated activation of the hemagglutinin peptide-specific T cell line IP-12-7, as assessed by IL-2 production. Efficient presentation was dependent on the binding of the constructs to CR1/2, implying that receptor-mediated endocytosis is responsible for the effect. Cross-linkage of CR1/2 or CD19 by mAb did not increase the extent of T cell activation. However, when CR1/2 was co-ligated with the BCR--using either polyclonal goat anti-mouse IgG or recombinant protein LA--the antigen concentration required to activate T cells decreased by two orders of magnitude. Moreover, this enhancement was selective for the antigen included in these complexes and did not affect the presentation of a free peptide or of antigen bound to CR1/2 excluded from the complexes. These results suggest that B cells may bind various C3d-coated antigens at a time, but only the one which reacts with the BCR will be processed with high efficiency. This mechanism may ensure the specificity of cognate T cell help. PMID:11867560

  4. Disruption of HLA class II antigen presentation in Burkitt lymphoma: implication of a 47 000 MW acid labile protein in CD4+ T-cell recognition

    PubMed Central

    God, Jason M; Zhao, Dan; Cameron, Christine A; Amria, Shereen; Bethard, Jennifer R; Haque, Azizul

    2014-01-01

    While Burkitt lymphoma (BL) has a well-known defect in HLA class I-mediated antigen presentation, the exact role of BL-associated HLA class II in generating a poor CD4+ T-cell response remains unresolved. Here, we found that BL cells are deficient in their ability to optimally stimulate CD4+ T cells via the HLA class II pathway. This defect in CD4+ T-cell recognition was not associated with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules on BL cells, as addition of external co-stimulation failed to elicit CD4+ T-cell activation by BL. Further, the defect was not caused by faulty antigen/class II interaction, because antigenic peptides bound with measurable affinity to BL-associated class II molecules. Interestingly, functional class II–peptide complexes were formed at acidic pH 5·5, which restored immune recognition. Acidic buffer (pH 5·5) eluate from BL cells contained molecules that impaired class II-mediated antigen presentation and CD4+ T-cell recognition. Biochemical analysis showed that these molecules were greater than 30 000 molecular weight in size, and proteinaceous in nature. In addition, BL was found to have decreased expression of a 47 000 molecular weight enolase-like molecule that enhances class II-mediated antigen presentation in B cells, macrophages and dendritic cells, but not in BL cells. These findings demonstrate that BL likely has multiple defects in HLA class II-mediated antigen presentation and immune recognition, which may be exploited for future immunotherapies. PMID:24628049

  5. Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunizations are mediated via action on professional antigen-presenting cells to up-regulate IL-12 production

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Y; Liu, L -J; Shono, N; Hinkula, J; Kjerrström, A; Aoki, I; Okuda, K; Wahren, B; Fukushima, J

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of DNA-based immunization in conferring protective immunity against certain microbial pathogens including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been described. The potential advantage of DNA-based immunization over the traditional vaccines largely results from its capacity to efficiently induce Th1-biased immune responses against an encoded antigen. We describe how Th1-biased immune responses are induced by DNA-based immunization, using a DNA vaccine construct encoding HIV-1 gp160 cDNA and an eukaryotic expression plasmid carrying murine IFN-γ cDNA. Transfection of an eukaryotic expression plasmid carrying immunostimulatory sequences (ISS) as well as a gene of interest (DNA vaccine) into professional antigen presenting cells (APC) induced transactivation of IL-12 mRNA, which resulted in antigen-specific Th1-biased immune responses against the encoded antigen. Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunization were substantially upregulated by a codelivery of an ectopic IFN-γ expression system, and this augmentation was mediated via action on professional antigen presenting cells to upregulate IL-12 production. Taken together, it appears likely that Th1-biased immune responses induced by DNA-based immunization are mediated via action on professional antigen-presenting cells to produce IL-12. Interestingly, the model provided strikingly resembles that previously described in infection with Listeria monocytogenes, an intracellular Gram-positive bacterium that induces strong Th1-biased immune responses. The result suggests that DNA-based immunization mimics certain aspects of natural infection with microbial organisms like attenuated vaccines, which in turn provides a rationale to the question of why DNA-based immunization so efficiently induces protective immunity against these microbial pathogens. PMID:10606974

  6. Evidence of Microbial Translocation Associated with Perturbations in T Cell and Antigen-Presenting Cell Homeostasis in Hookworm Infections

    PubMed Central

    George, Palakkal Jovvian; Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Kumaraswami, Vasanthapuram; Nutman, Thomas B.; Babu, Subash

    2012-01-01

    Background Microbial translocation (MT) is the process by which microbes or microbial products translocate from the intestine to the systemic circulation. MT is a common cause of systemic immune activation in HIV infection and is associated with reduced frequencies of CD4+ T cells; no data exist, however, on the role of MT in intestinal helminth infections. Methods We measured the plasma levels of MT markers, acute-phase proteins, and pro- and anti - inflammatory cytokines in individuals with or without hookworm infections. We also estimated the absolute counts of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as the frequencies of memory T cell and dendritic cell subsets. Finally, we also measured the levels of all of these parameters in a subset of individuals following treatment of hookworm infection. Results Our data suggest that hookworm infection is characterized by increased levels of markers associated with MT but not acute-phase proteins nor pro-inflammatory cytokines. Hookworm infections were also associated with increased levels of the anti – inflammatory cytokine – IL-10, which was positively correlated with levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, MT was associated with decreased numbers of CD8+ T cells and diminished frequencies of particular dendritic cell subsets. Antihelmintic treatment of hookworm infection resulted in reversal of some of the hematologic and microbiologic alterations. Conclusions Our data provide compelling evidence for MT in a human intestinal helminth infection and its association with perturbations in the T cell and antigen-presenting cell compartments of the immune system. Our data also reveal that at least one dominant counter-regulatory mechanism i.e. increased IL-10 production might potentially protect against systemic immune activation in hookworm infections. PMID:23056659

  7. PD-1 on Immature and PD-1 Ligands on Migratory Human Langerhans Cells Regulate Antigen-Presenting Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Cruz, Victor; McDonough, Sean M.; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Crum, Christopher P.; Carrasco, Ruben D.; Freeman, Gordon J.

    2010-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are known as “sentinels” of the immune system that function as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) after migration to draining lymph node. LCs are proposed to have a role in tolerance and the resolution of cutaneous immune responses. The Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) receptor and its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, are a co-inhibitory pathway that contributes to the negative regulation of T-lymphocyte activation and peripheral tolerance. Surprisingly, we found PD-1 to be expressed on immature LCs (iLCs) in situ. PD-1 engagement on iLCs reduced IL-6 and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α cytokine production in response to TLR2 signals but had no effect on LC maturation. PD-L1 and PD-L2 were expressed at very low levels on iLCs. Maturation of LCs upon migration from epidermis led to loss of PD-l expression and gain of high expression of PD-L1 and PD-L2 as well as co-stimulatory molecules. Blockade of PD-L1 and/or PD-L2 on migratory LCs (mLCs) and DDCs enhanced T-cell activation, as has been reported for other APCs. Thus the PD-1 pathway is active in iLCs and inhibits iLC activities, but expression of receptor and ligands reverses upon maturation and PD-L1 and PD-L2 on mLC function to inhibit T-cell responses. PMID:20445553

  8. Immunobiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains differentially modulate antiviral immune response in porcine intestinal epithelial and antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous findings suggested that Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 is able to increase resistance of children to intestinal viral infections. However, the intestinal cells, cytokines and receptors involved in the immunoregulatory effect of this probiotic strain have not been fully characterized. Results We aimed to gain insight into the mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory effect of the CRL1505 strain and therefore evaluated in vitro the crosstalk between L. rhamnosus CRL1505, porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and antigen presenting cells (APCs) from swine Peyer’s patches in order to deepen our knowledge about the mechanisms, through which this strain may help preventing viral diarrhoea episodes. L. rhamnosus CRL1505 was able to induce IFN–α and –β in IECs and improve the production of type I IFNs in response to poly(I:C) challenge independently of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 or TLR9 signalling. In addition, the CRL1505 strain induced mRNA expression of IL-6 and TNF-α via TLR2 in IECs. Furthermore, the strain significantly increased surface molecules expression and cytokine production in intestinal APCs. The improved Th1 response induced by L. rhamnosus CRL1505 was triggered by TLR2 signalling and included augmented expression of MHC-II and co-stimulatory molecules and expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ in APCs. IL-10 was also significantly up-regulated by CRL1505 in APCs. Conclusions It was recently reviewed the emergence of TLR agonists as new ways to transform antiviral treatments by introducing panviral therapeutics with less adverse effects than IFN therapies. The use of L. rhamnosus CRL1505 as modulator of innate immunity and inductor of antiviral type I IFNs, IFN-γ, and regulatory IL-10 clearly offers the potential to overcome this challenge. PMID:24886142

  9. Characterization of the Antigen Processing Machinery and Endogenous Peptide Presentation of a Bat MHC Class I Molecule.

    PubMed

    Wynne, James W; Woon, Amanda P; Dudek, Nadine L; Croft, Nathan P; Ng, Justin H J; Baker, Michelle L; Wang, Lin-Fa; Purcell, Anthony W

    2016-06-01

    Bats are a major reservoir of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, including severe acute respiratory syndrome-like coronaviruses, henipaviruses, and Ebola virus. Although highly pathogenic to their spillover hosts, bats harbor these viruses, and a large number of other viruses, with little or no clinical signs of disease. How bats asymptomatically coexist with these viruses is unknown. In particular, little is known about bat adaptive immunity, and the presence of functional MHC molecules is mostly inferred from recently described genomes. In this study, we used an affinity purification/mass spectrometry approach to demonstrate that a bat MHC class I molecule, Ptal-N*01:01, binds antigenic peptides and associates with peptide-loading complex components. We identified several bat MHC class I-binding partners, including calnexin, calreticulin, protein disulfide isomerase A3, tapasin, TAP1, and TAP2. Additionally, endogenous peptide ligands isolated from Ptal-N*01:01 displayed a relatively broad length distribution and an unusual preference for a C-terminal proline residue. Finally, we demonstrate that this preference for C-terminal proline residues was observed in Hendra virus-derived peptides presented by Ptal-N*01:01 on the surface of infected cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify endogenous and viral MHC class I ligands for any bat species and, as such, provides an important avenue for monitoring and development of vaccines against major bat-borne viruses both in the reservoir and spillover hosts. Additionally, it will provide a foundation to understand the role of adaptive immunity in bat antiviral responses. PMID:27183594

  10. Particle-based transcutaneous administration of HIV-1 p24 protein to human skin explants and targeting of epidermal antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Amselgruber, Sarah; Hadam, Sabrina; Munier, Sevérine; Pavot, Vincent; Verrier, Bernard; Hackbarth, Steffen; Combadiere, Behazine; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2014-02-28

    Transcutaneous immunization is a promising vaccination strategy for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. In this study, we investigate the combination of cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping (CSSS) and particle-based antigen delivery to target the HIV-1 p24 protein to skin antigen presenting cells (APC). The CSSS treatment pre-activates skin APC and opens hair follicles, where protein-loaded particles accumulate and allow for sustained delivery of the loaded antigen to perifollicular APC. We found that poly-lactic acid (PLA) and polystyrene (PS) particles targeted the adsorbed HIV-1 p24 protein to the hair follicles. Small amounts of PS and PLA particles were found to translocate to the epidermis and be internalized by skin cells, whereas most of the particles aggregated in the hair follicle canal, where they released the loaded antigen. The p24 protein diffused to the epidermis and dermis and was detected in skin cells, especially in Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. Furthermore, the combination of CSSS and particle-based delivery resulted in activation and maturation of Langerhans cells (HLA-DR, CD80 and CD83). We conclude that particle-based antigen delivery across partially disrupted skin barrier is a feasible and effective approach to needle-free transcutaneous vaccination. PMID:24384300

  11. T lymphocyte responses to anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA) antigens are present in patients with ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis and persist during disease remission

    PubMed Central

    King, W J; Brooks, C J; Holder, R; Hughes, P; Adu, D; Savage, C O S

    1998-01-01

    ANCA with specificity for myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3) are present in patients with systemic vasculitis. The aim of this work was to determine whether such patients have T cell responses to these antigens and whether these responses are related to disease activity. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 45 patients and 19 controls were cultured with ANCA antigens and proliferation measured. The antigens used were heat-inactivated (HI) MPO, HI PR3, native (non-HI) PR3, HI whole α-granules, and 25 overlapping peptides covering the entire PR3 sequence. Significant responses to both whole PR3 preparations were seen from patient and control groups, and to the α-granules from the patient group. Patients responded at all stages of disease: active, remitting, treated or untreated. Only two patients responded significantly to MPO. Responses were significantly higher with the patient group than the control group to all four whole ANCA antigens. Responses to those PR3 peptides containing epitopes known to be recognized by ANCA were detected from one patient. Thus, these studies demonstrate that T cells from vasculitis patients can proliferate to PR3 and occasionally to associated ANCA antigens. Further, responses may persist even after disease remission has been achieved. PMID:9649227

  12. Autoreactive Antibodies are Present in Sheep with Johne's Disease and Cross-react with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Antigens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterial infection has been linked to the generation of autoantibodies, including antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA), in clinical studies and small animal models. In an attempt to identify antibodies that react with both self and mycobacterial antigens in naturally-infected rumina...

  13. Structural Characteristics and Antioxidative Capability of the Soluble Polysaccharides Present in Dictyophora indusiata (Vent. Ex Pers.) Fish Phallaceae

    PubMed Central

    Ker, Yaw-Bee; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Peng, Chiung-Chi; Hsieh, Chiu-Lan; Peng, Robert Y.

    2011-01-01

    Dictyophora indusiata (Vent. ex Pers.) Fish Phallaceae (Chinese name Zhu-Sūn, the bamboo fungi) has been used as a medicinal mushroom to treat many inflammatory, gastric and neural diseases since 618 AD in China. We hypothesize that the soluble polysaccharides (SP) present in D. indusiata and their monosaccharide profiles can act as an important role affecting the antioxidative capability, which in turn would influence the biological activity involving anti-inflammatory, immune enhancing and anticancer. We obtained six SP fractions and designated them as D1, a galactoglucan; D2, a galactan; D3, the isoelectrically precipitated riboglucan from 2% NaOH; D4, a myoinositol; D5 and D6, the mannogalactans. The total SP accounted for 37.44% w/w, their molecular weight (MW) ranged within 801–4656 kDa. D3, having the smallest MW 801 kDa, exhibited the most potent scavenging effect against the α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl, •OH−, and •O2− radicals, yielding IC50 values 0.11, 1.02 and 0.64 mg mL−1, respectively. Thus we have confirmed our hypothesis that the bioactivity of D. indusiata is related in majority, if not entirely, to its soluble polysaccharide type regarding the MW and monosaccharide profiles. PMID:21799678

  14. Regulation of Lipid Specific and Vitamin Specific Non-MHC Restricted T Cells by Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Therapeutic Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Salio, Mariolina; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Since initial reports, more than 25 years ago, that T cells recognize lipids in the context on non-polymorphic CD1 molecules, our understanding of antigen presentation to non-peptide-specific T cell populations has deepened. It is now clear that αβ T cells bearing semi-invariant T cell receptor, as well as subsets of γδ T cells, recognize a variety of self and non-self lipids and contribute to shaping immune responses via cross talk with dendritic cells and B cells. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that small molecules derived from the microbial riboflavin biosynthetic pathway (vitamin B2) bind monomorphic MR1 molecules and activate mucosal-associated invariant T cells, another population of semi-invariant T cells. Novel insights in the biological relevance of non-peptide-specific T cells have emerged with the development of tetrameric CD1 and MR1 molecules, which has allowed accurate enumeration and functional analysis of CD1- and MR1-restricted T cells in humans and discovery of novel populations of semi-invariant T cells. The phenotype and function of non-peptide-specific T cells will be discussed in the context of the known distribution of CD1 and MR1 molecules by different subsets of antigen-presenting cells at steady state and following infection. Concurrent modulation of CD1 transcription and lipid biosynthetic pathways upon TLR stimulation, coupled with efficient lipid antigen processing, result in the increased cell surface expression of antigenic CD1–lipid complexes. Similarly, MR1 expression is almost undetectable in resting APC and it is upregulated following bacterial infection, likely due to stabilization of MR1 molecules by microbial antigens. The tight regulation of CD1 and MR1 expression at steady state and during infection may represent an important mechanism to limit autoreactivity, while promoting T cell responses to foreign antigens. PMID:26284072

  15. Analysis of chronic rejection and obliterative arteriopathy. Possible contributions of donor antigen-presenting cells and lymphatic disruption.

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, A. J.; Murase, N.; Ye, Q.; Galvao, F. H.; Richert, C.; Saad, R.; Pham, S.; Duquesnoy, R. J.; Zeevi, A.; Fung, J. J.; Starzl, T. E.

    1997-01-01

    hypothesis that direct presentation of alloantigen by donor antigen-presenting cells is required for long-term, chronic-rejection-free allograft acceptance. In addition, chronic intermittent lymphatic disruption is implicated as a possible mechanism for the association between chronic interstitial allograft inflammation and the development of obliterative arteriopathy. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:9033271

  16. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4+ T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms inhibiting MHC-II function are currently unknown. Here, we show that, in addition to transcriptional regulation of MHC-II, the parasite modulates the expression of key components of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway, namely, the MHC-II-associated invariant chain (Ii or CD74) and the peptide editor H2-DM, in professional antigen-presenting cells (pAPCs). Genetic deletion of CD74 restored the ability of infected dendritic cells to present a parasite antigen in the context of MHC-II in vitro. CD74 mRNA and protein levels were, surprisingly, elevated in infected cells, whereas MHC-II and H2-DM expression was inhibited. CD74 accumulated mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and this phenotype required live parasites, but not active replication. Finally, we compared the impacts of genetic deletion of CD74 and H2-DM genes on parasite dissemination toward lymphoid organs in mice, as well as activation of CD4+ T cells and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels during acute infection. Cyst burdens and survival during the chronic phase of infection were also evaluated in wild-type and knockout mice. These results highlight the fact that the infection is influenced by multiple levels of parasite manipulation of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. PMID:26195549

  17. Parasite Manipulation of the Invariant Chain and the Peptide Editor H2-DM Affects Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Antigen Presentation during Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Nishi, Manami; El-Hage, Sandy; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Dzierszinski, Florence S

    2015-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite. This apicomplexan is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a leading cause of central nervous system disease in AIDS. It has long been known that T. gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) antigen presentation to attenuate CD4(+) T cell responses and establish persisting infections. Transcriptional downregulation of MHC-II genes by T. gondii was previously established, but the precise mechanisms inhibiting MHC-II function are currently unknown. Here, we show that, in addition to transcriptional regulation of MHC-II, the parasite modulates the expression of key components of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway, namely, the MHC-II-associated invariant chain (Ii or CD74) and the peptide editor H2-DM, in professional antigen-presenting cells (pAPCs). Genetic deletion of CD74 restored the ability of infected dendritic cells to present a parasite antigen in the context of MHC-II in vitro. CD74 mRNA and protein levels were, surprisingly, elevated in infected cells, whereas MHC-II and H2-DM expression was inhibited. CD74 accumulated mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and this phenotype required live parasites, but not active replication. Finally, we compared the impacts of genetic deletion of CD74 and H2-DM genes on parasite dissemination toward lymphoid organs in mice, as well as activation of CD4(+) T cells and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels during acute infection. Cyst burdens and survival during the chronic phase of infection were also evaluated in wild-type and knockout mice. These results highlight the fact that the infection is influenced by multiple levels of parasite manipulation of the MHC-II antigen presentation pathway. PMID:26195549

  18. Tumors Escape CD4+ T-cell-Mediated Immunosurveillance by Impairing the Ability of Infiltrating Macrophages to Indirectly Present Tumor Antigens.

    PubMed

    Tveita, Anders Aune; Schjesvold, Fredrik; Haabeth, Ole Audun; Fauskanger, Marte; Bogen, Bjarne

    2015-08-15

    Tumors cells can escape cytotoxic CD8+ T cells by preventing MHC I display of tumor antigens. It is unknown how tumors evade CD4+ T-cell responses, but because many tumor cells lack MHC II expression, novel mechanisms would be required. We have investigated this issue in a model in which MHC II(NEG) myeloma cells secrete a monoclonal Ig containing a V region L chain (VL) epitope recognized by CD4+ T cells. Infiltrating macrophages process and present the secreted tumor antigen to Th1 cells, resulting in induction of macrophage cytotoxicity and apparent rejection of the tumor. Despite long-term tumor protection in VL-specific T-cell receptor transgenic mice, we here describe that some myeloma cells persisted in a dormant state and, eventually, formed expanding tumors. Escape tumor cells maintained their secretion of complete (H+L) monoclonal Ig with unchanged sequence, while secretion of surplus free L chain was severely diminished. Although free L chains were efficiently processed and presented by tumor-infiltrating macrophages to CD4+ T cells, complete (H+L) monoclonal Ig was not. Forced overexpression of free L chain secretion reinstated tumor rejection. These results show that tumors can escape CD4+ T-cell-mediated rejection by impairing indirect presentation of tumor antigen by infiltrating macrophages. This occurs through a novel mechanism of immunoediting, in which modulation of the quaternary structure of the secreted tumor-specific antigen reduces its immunogenicity. PMID:26038231

  19. Neuroblastoma killing properties of V-delta 2 and V-delta2 negative gamma delta T cells following expansion by artificial antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jonathan P.H.; Yan, Mengyong; Heuijerjens, Jennifer; Carter, Lisa; Abolhassani, Ayda; Frosch, Jennifer; Wallace, Rebecca; Flutter, Barry; Capsomidis, Anna; Hubank, Mike; Klein, Nigel; Callard, Robin; Gustafsson, Kenth; Anderson, John

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The majority of circulating human γδT lymphocytes are of the Vγ9Vδ2 lineage, and have TCR specificity for non-peptide phosphoantigens. Previous attempts to stimulate and expand these cells have therefore focussed on stimulation using ligands of the Vγ9Vδ2 receptor, whilst relatively little is known about variant blood γδT subsets and their potential role in cancer immunotherapy. Experimental Design To expand the full repertoire of γδT without bias towards specific T cell receptors, we made use of artificial antigen presenting cells loaded with an anti gamma delta T cell receptor antibody that promoted unbiased expansion of the γδT repertoire. Expanded cells from adult blood donors were sorted into 3 populations expressing respectively Vδ2 TCR chains (Vδ2+), Vδ1 chains (Vδ1+) and TCR of other delta chain subtypes (Vδ1negVδ2neg) Results Both freshly isolated and expanded cells showed heterogeneity of differentiation markers, with a less differentiated phenotype in the Vδ1 and Vδ1negVδ2neg populations. Expanded cells were largely of an effector memory phenotype although there were higher numbers of less differentiated cells in the Vδ1+ and Vδ1negVδ2neg populations. Using neuroblastoma tumor cells and the anti-GD2 therapeutic monoclonal antibody ch14.18 as a model system, all three populations showed clinically relevant cytotoxicity. Whilst killing by expanded Vδ2 cells was predominantly antibody dependent and proportionate to upregulated CD16, Vδ1 cells killed by antibody independent mechanisms. Conclusions In conclusion we have demonstrated that polyclonal expanded populations of γδT cells are capable of both antibody dependent and independent effector functions in neuroblastoma. PMID:24893631

  20. ESAT-6 Targeting to DEC205+ Antigen Presenting Cells Induces Specific-T Cell Responses against ESAT-6 and Reduces Pulmonary Infection with Virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Sánchez, Aarón; Meza-Pérez, Selene; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Donis-Maturano, Luis; Estrada-García, Iris; Calderón-Amador, Juana; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Idoyaga, Juliana; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2015-01-01

    Airways infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is contained mostly by T cell responses, however, Mtb has developed evasion mechanisms which affect antigen presenting cell (APC) maturation/recruitment delaying the onset of Ag-specific T cell responses. Hypothetically, bypassing the natural infection routes by delivering antigens directly to APCs may overcome the pathogen’s naturally evolved evasion mechanisms, thus facilitating the induction of protective immune responses. We generated a murine monoclonal fusion antibody (α-DEC-ESAT) to deliver Early Secretory Antigen Target (ESAT)-6 directly to DEC205+ APCs and to assess its in vivo effects on protection associated responses (IFN-γ production, in vivo CTL killing, and pulmonary mycobacterial load). Treatment with α-DEC-ESAT alone induced ESAT-6-specific IFN-γ producing CD4+ T cells and prime-boost immunization prior to Mtb infection resulted in early influx (d14 post-infection) and increased IFN-γ+ production by specific T cells in the lungs, compared to scarce IFN-γ production in control mice. In vivo CTL killing was quantified in relevant tissues upon transferring target cells loaded with mycobacterial antigens. During infection, α-DEC-ESAT-treated mice showed increased target cell killing in the lungs, where histology revealed cellular infiltrate and considerably reduced bacterial burden. Targeting the mycobacterial antigen ESAT-6 to DEC205+ APCs before infection expands specific T cell clones responsible for early T cell responses (IFN-γ production and CTL activity) and substantially reduces lung bacterial burden. Delivering mycobacterial antigens directly to APCs provides a unique approach to study in vivo the role of APCs and specific T cell responses to assess their potential anti-mycobacterial functions. PMID:25915045

  1. Immune privilege in the anterior chamber of the eye: alloantigens and tumour-specific antigens presented into the anterior chamber simultaneously induce suppression and activation of delayed hypersensitivity to the respective antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Benson, J L; Niederkorn, J Y

    1992-01-01

    Allografts placed into the anterior chamber of the eye enjoy prolonged and sometimes permanent survival while similar grafts are promptly rejected if transplanted to non-privileged sites. The immunological privilege of the anterior chamber is due, in large part, to the systemic suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) that is induced by anterior chamber presentation of alloantigens and is termed anterior chamber-associated immune deviation (ACAID). Although many categories of antigens elicit ACAID, strong tumour-specific transplantation antigens (TSTA) do not induce ACAID and instead, provoke potent DTH responses following anterior chamber presentation. The present study sought to determine if the anterior chamber were simultaneously confronted with these two categories of antigens, which systemic immune response would prevail: DTH or suppression of DTH? The results show that inoculation of minor histocompatibility alloantigens and TSTA into the anterior chamber induced both afferent and efferent suppression of specific anti-alloantigen DTH responses, yet simultaneously induced normal anti-TSTA DTH responses. Both responses (i.e. DTH and suppression) were transferable with lymphoid cells. PMID:1427974

  2. Evaluation of a new syringe presentation of reduced-antigen content diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine in healthy adolescents - A single blind randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Pavia-Ruz, Noris; Abarca, Katia; Lepetic, Alejandro; Cervantes-Apolinar, Maria Yolanda; Hardt, Karin; Jayadeva, Girish; Kuriyakose, Sherine; Han, Htay Htay; de la O, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-antigen-content diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (dTpa) vaccine, Boostrix™, is indicated for booster vaccination of children, adolescents and adults. The original prefilled disposable dTpa syringe presentation was recently replaced by another prefilled-syringe presentation with latex-free tip-caps and plunger-stoppers. 671 healthy adolescents aged 10–15 years who had previously received 5 or 6 previous DT(P)/dT(pa) vaccine doses, were randomized (1:1) to receive dTpa booster, injected using the new (dTpa-new) or previous syringe (dTpa-previous) presentations. Immunogenicity was assessed before and 1-month post-booster vaccination; safety/reactogenicity were assessed during 31-days post-vaccination. Non-inferiority of dTpa-new versus dTpa-previous was demonstrated for all antigens (ULs 95% CIs for GMC ratios ranged between 1.03-1.13). 1-month post-booster, immune responses were in similar ranges for all antigens with both syringe presentations. dTpa delivered using either syringe presentation was well-tolerated. These clinical results complement the technical data and support the use of the new syringe presentation to deliver the dTpa vaccine. PMID:26075317

  3. Evaluation of a new syringe presentation of reduced-antigen content diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine in healthy adolescents--A single blind randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Pavia-Ruz, Noris; Abarca, Katia; Lepetic, Alejandro; Cervantes-Apolinar, Maria Yolanda; Hardt, Karin; Jayadeva, Girish; Kuriyakose, Sherine; Han, Htay Htay; de la O, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-antigen-content diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (dTpa) vaccine, Boostrix™, is indicated for booster vaccination of children, adolescents and adults. The original prefilled disposable dTpa syringe presentation was recently replaced by another prefilled-syringe presentation with latex-free tip-caps and plunger-stoppers. 671 healthy adolescents aged 10-15 years who had previously received 5 or 6 previous DT(P)/dT(pa) vaccine doses, were randomized (1:1) to receive dTpa booster, injected using the new (dTpa-new) or previous syringe (dTpa-previous) presentations. Immunogenicity was assessed before and 1-month post-booster vaccination; safety/reactogenicity were assessed during 31-days post-vaccination. Non-inferiority of dTpa-new versus dTpa-previous was demonstrated for all antigens (ULs 95% CIs for GMC ratios ranged between 1.03-1.13). 1-month post-booster, immune responses were in similar ranges for all antigens with both syringe presentations. dTpa delivered using either syringe presentation was well-tolerated. These clinical results complement the technical data and support the use of the new syringe presentation to deliver the dTpa vaccine. PMID:26075317

  4. Mitochondrial H2O2 in Lung Antigen-Presenting Cells Blocks NF-κB Activation to Prevent Unwarranted Immune Activation.

    PubMed

    Khare, Anupriya; Raundhal, Mahesh; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Das, Sudipta; Corey, Catherine; Kamga, Christelle K; Quesnelle, Kelly; St Croix, Claudette; Watkins, Simon C; Morse, Christina; Oriss, Timothy B; Huff, Rachael; Hannum, Rachel; Ray, Prabir; Shiva, Sruti; Ray, Anuradha

    2016-05-24

    Inhalation of environmental antigens such as allergens does not always induce inflammation in the respiratory tract. While antigen-presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells and macrophages, take up inhaled antigens, the cell-intrinsic molecular mechanisms that prevent an inflammatory response during this process, such as activation of the transcription factor NF-κB, are not well understood. Here, we show that the nuclear receptor PPARγ plays a critical role in blocking NF-κB activation in response to inhaled antigens to preserve immune tolerance. Tolerance induction promoted mitochondrial respiration, generation of H2O2, and suppression of NF-κB activation in WT, but not PPARγ-deficient, APCs. Forced restoration of H2O2 in PPARγ-deficient cells suppressed IκBα degradation and NF-κB activation. Conversely, scavenging reactive oxygen species from mitochondria promoted IκBα degradation with loss of regulatory and promotion of inflammatory T cell responses in vivo. Thus, communication between PPARγ and the mitochondria maintains immune quiescence in the airways. PMID:27184852

  5. Very small size proteoliposomes abrogate cross-presentation of tumor antigens by myeloid-derived suppressor cells and induce their differentiation to dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are among the major obstacles that adjuvants for cancer vaccines have to overcome. These cells cross-present tumor-associated antigens (TAA) to naive T lymphocytes with a tolerogenic outcome. Very Small Size Proteoliposomes (VSSP) is used as adjuvant by four therapeutic cancer vaccines currently in Phase I and II clinical trials. We previously found that VSSP reduces the suppressive function of MDSCs, then activating antigen-specific CTL responses in tumor-bearing (TB) mice, with the consequent reduction of tumor growth. However the mechanistic explanation for the immunomodulatory effect of this adjuvant in TB hosts has not been addressed before. Methods TB mice were inoculated with VSSP and MDSCs isolated and characterized by their expression of Arg1 and Nos2 genes by RT-PCR. The effect of VSSP on antigen cross-presentation by MDSCs, regulatory T cells (Tregs) expansion and MDSCs differentiation towards dendritic cells (DCs) was analyzed by FACS. Student’s t test or ANOVA and Tukey’s tests were used for statistical analyses. Results After inoculating VSSP into TB mice, a significant reduction of Arg1 and Nos2 gene expression was observed in recovered MDSCs. Concurrently the ability of these cells to induce down-regulation of CD3ζ chain on T cells was lost. Likewise in mice inoculated with the adjuvant lower percentages of Tregs were detected. In vitro, VSSP treatment was enough to differentiate MDSCs into phenotypically mature DCs, eliminating the former suppressive effect. Noteworthy, in vivo administration of VSSP to OVA-expressing (EG.7) TB mice abrogated this model antigen cross-presentation by splenic MDSCs. Similar results were obtained even when OVA antigen was administered into these TB mice formulated in VSSP. On the contrary, immunization with the same protein in polyI:C did not change the percentage of MDSCs expressing SIINFEKL/H-2Kb complexes, whereas a concomitant injection of VSSP aborted the

  6. Presentation of human minor histocompatibility antigens by HLA-B35 and HLA-B38 molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, J; Kariyone, A; Akiyama, N; Kano, K; Takiguchi, M

    1990-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones specific for human minor histocompatibility antigens (hmHAs) were produced from a patient who had been grafted with the kidneys from his mother and two HLA-identical sisters. Of eight CTL clones generated, four recognized an hmHA (hmHA-1) expressed on cells from the mother and sister 3 (second donor); two recognized another antigen (hmHA-2) on cells from the father, sister 2 (third donor), and sister 3; and the remaining two clones recognized still another antigen (hmHA-3) on cells from the father and sister 3. Panel studies revealed that CTL recognition of hmHA-1 was restricted by HLA-B35 and that of hmHA-2 and hmHA-3 was restricted by HLA-B38. The HLA-B35 restriction of the hmHA-1-specific CTL clones was substantiated by the fact that they killed HLA-A null/HLA-B null Hmy2CIR targets transfected with HLA-B35 but not HLA-B51, -Bw52, or -Bw53 transfected Hmy2CIR targets. These data demonstrated that the five amino acids substitutions on the alpha 1 domain between HLA-B35 and -Bw53, which are associated with Bw4/Bw6 epitopes, play a critical role in the relationship of hmHA-1 to HLA-B35 molecules. The fact that the hmHA-1-specific CTLs failed to kill Hmy2CIR cells expressing HLA-B35/51 chimeric molecules composed of the alpha 1 domain of HLA-B35 and other domains of HLA-B51 indicated that eight residues on the alpha 2 domain also affect the interaction of hmHA-1 and the HLA-B35 molecules. PMID:2157206

  7. Half-antibody functionalized lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to carcinoembryonic antigen presenting pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Che-Ming Jack; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Tran Cao, Hop S; Aryal, Santosh; Sartor, Marta; Esener, Sadik; Bouvet, Michael; Zhang, Liangfang

    2010-06-01

    Current chemotherapy regimens against pancreatic cancer are met with little success as poor tumor vascularization significantly limits the delivery of oncological drugs. High-dose targeted drug delivery, through which a drug delivery vehicle releases a large payload upon tumor localization, is thus a promising alternative strategy against this lethal disease. Herein, we synthesize anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) half-antibody conjugated lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles and characterize their ligand conjugation yields, physicochemical properties, and targeting ability against pancreatic cancer cells. Under the same drug loading, the half-antibody targeted nanoparticles show enhanced cancer killing effect compared to the corresponding nontargeted nanoparticles. PMID:20394436

  8. The HIV-1 gp120/V3 modifies the response of uninfected CD4 T cells to antigen presentation: mapping of the specific transcriptional signature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The asymptomatic phase of HIV-1 infection is characterized by a progressive depletion of uninfected peripheral effector/memory CD4+ T cells that subsequently leads to immune dysfunction and AIDS symptoms. We have previously demonstrated that the presence of specific gp120/V3 peptides during antigen presentation can modify the activation of normal T-cells leading to altered immune function. The aim of the present study was to map the specific transcriptional profile invoked by an HIV-1/V3 epitope in uninfected T cells during antigen presentation. Methods We exposed primary human peripheral blood monocytes to V3 lipopeptides using a liposome delivery system followed by a superantigen-mediated antigen presentation system. We then evaluated the changes in the T-cell transcriptional profile using oligonucleotide microarrays and performed Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) and DAVID analysis. The results were validated using realtime PCR, FACS, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Results Our results revealed that the most highly modulated transcripts could almost entirely be categorized as related to the cell cycle or transcriptional regulation. The most statistically significant enriched categories and networks identified by IPA were associated with cell cycle, gene expression, immune response, infection mechanisms, cellular growth, proliferation and antigen presentation. Canonical pathways involved in energy and cell cycle regulation, and in the co-activation of T cells were also enriched. Conclusions Taken together, these results document a distinct transcriptional profile invoked by the HIV-1/V3 epitope. These data could be invaluable to determine the underlying mechanism by which HIV-1 epitopes interfere with uninfected CD4+ T-cell function causing hyper proliferation and AICD. PMID:21943198

  9. Human cytomegalovirus pp65- and immediate early 1 antigen-specific HLA class I-restricted cytotoxic T cell responses induced by cross-presentation of viral antigens.

    PubMed

    Tabi, Z; Moutaftsi, M; Borysiewicz, L K

    2001-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the development of anti-viral CD8(+) CTL responses. This is straightforward if they are directly infected with virus, but is less clear in response to viruses that cannot productively infect DCS: Human CMV (HCMV) shows strain-specific cell tropism: fibroblast (Fb)-adapted laboratory strains (AD169) and recent clinical isolates do not infect DCs, whereas endothelial cell-adapted strains (TB40/E) result in productive lytic DC infection. However, we show here that uninfected DCs induce CD8(+) T cell cytotoxicity and IFN-gamma production against HCMV pp65 and immediate early 1 Ags following in vitro coculture with HCMV-AD169-infected Fbs, regardless of the HLA type of these FBS: CD8(+) T cell stimulation was inhibited by pretreatment of DCs with cytochalasin B or brefeldin A, indicating a phagosome/endosome to cytosol pathway. HCMV-infected Fbs were not apoptotic as measured by annexin V binding, and induction of apoptosis of infected Fbs in vitro did not augment CTL induction by DCs, suggesting a mechanism other than apoptosis in the initiation of cross-presentation. Furthermore, HCMV-infected Fbs provided a maturation signal for immature DCs during coculture, as evidenced by increased CD83 and HLA class II expression. Cross-presentation of HCMV Ags by host DCs enables these professional APCs to bypass some of the evasion mechanisms HCMV has developed to avoid T cell recognition. It may also serve to explain the presence of immediate early 1 Ag-specific CTLs in the face of pp65-induced inhibition of Ag presentation at the level of the infected cell. PMID:11313411

  10. Human dendritic cells process and present Listeria antigens for in vitro priming of autologous CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Eppler, Elisabeth; Walch, Michael; Latinovic-Golic, Sonja; Dumrese, Claudia; Filgueira, Luis; Groscurth, Peter

    2005-02-01

    The role of human dendritic cells (DC) in the immune response toward intracellularly growing Listeria was analyzed under in vitro conditions using several morphological and functional methods. DC incubated with Listeria innocua and L. monocytogenes, respectively, readily phagocytosed the bacteria. Listeria did not impair viability and immunogenic potential of human DC. Listerial antigens were found to be processed within the lysosomal compartment of DC and colocalized with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, as shown by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. DC challenged with apathogenic L. innocua were highly effective in priming autologous naive T cells (mainly CD4+) in vitro. The T cells strongly proliferated in the presence of DC incubated with L. innocua, which could be significantly inhibited by anti-MHC II mAb. L. innocua-primed T cells were also successfully stimulated by DC harboring the pathogenic L. monocytogenes, either the wild-type strain EGD or the p60 reduced mutant strain RIII. From our results, we conclude that human DC infected with nonpathogenic intracellular bacteria are able to efficiently prime naive T cells, which are then suitable for recognition of antigens derived from related virulent bacterial species. This in vitro human model provides an interesting tool for basic research in infectious immunology and possibly for a new immunotherapy. PMID:15812647

  11. Direct recognition by alphabeta cytolytic T cells of Hfe, a MHC class Ib molecule without antigen-presenting function.

    PubMed

    Rohrlich, Pierre S; Fazilleau, Nicolas; Ginhoux, Florent; Firat, Hüseyin; Michel, Frédérique; Cochet, Madeleine; Laham, Nihay; Roth, Marie Paule; Pascolo, Steve; Nato, Faridabano; Coppin, Hélène; Charneau, Pierre; Danos, Olivier; Acuto, Oreste; Ehrlich, Rachel; Kanellopoulos, Jean; Lemonnier, François A

    2005-09-01

    Crystallographic analysis of human Hfe has documented an overall structure similar to classical (class Ia) MHC molecules with a peptide binding groove deprived of ligand. Thus, to address the question of whether alphabeta T cells could recognize MHC molecules independently of bound ligands, we studied human and mouse Hfe interactions with T lymphocytes. We provide formal evidence of direct cytolytic recognition of human Hfe by mouse alphabeta T cell receptors (TCR) in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice and that this interaction results in ZAP-70 phosphorylation. Furthermore, direct recognition of mouse Hfe molecules by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was demonstrated in DBA/2 Hfe knockout mice. These CTLs express predominantly two T cell antigen receptor alpha variable gene segments (AV6.1 and AV6.6). Interestingly, in wild-type mice we identified a subset of CD8+ T cells positively selected by Hfe that expresses the AV6.1/AV6.6 gene segments. T cell antigen receptor recognition of MHC molecules independently of bound ligand has potential general implications in alloreactivity and identifies in the Hfe case a cognitive link supporting the concept that the immune system could be involved in the control of iron metabolism. PMID:16123136

  12. Proteasome Subtypes and Regulators in the Processing of Antigenic Peptides Presented by Class I Molecules of the Major Histocompatibility Complex

    PubMed Central

    Vigneron, Nathalie; Van den Eynde, Benoît J.

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome is responsible for the breakdown of cellular proteins. Proteins targeted for degradation are allowed inside the proteasome particle, where they are cleaved into small peptides and released in the cytosol to be degraded into amino acids. In vertebrates, some of these peptides escape degradation in the cytosol, are loaded onto class I molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and displayed at the cell surface for scrutiny by the immune system. The proteasome therefore plays a key role for the immune system: it provides a continued sampling of intracellular proteins, so that CD8-positive T-lymphocytes can kill cells expressing viral or tumoral proteins. Consequently, the repertoire of peptides displayed by MHC class I molecules at the cell surface depends on proteasome activity, which may vary according to the presence of proteasome subtypes and regulators. Besides standard proteasomes, cells may contain immunoproteasomes, intermediate proteasomes and thymoproteasomes. Cells may also contain regulators of proteasome activity, such as the 19S, PA28 and PA200 regulators. Here, we review the effects of these proteasome subtypes and regulators on the production of antigenic peptides. We also discuss an unexpected function of the proteasome discovered through the study of antigenic peptides: its ability to splice peptides. PMID:25412285

  13. Selection of restriction specificities of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells in the thymus: no evidence for a crucial role of antigen-presenting cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkernagel, R.M.

    1982-12-01

    The proposal was tested that (P1 X P2) F1 leads to P1 irradiation bone marrow chimeras expressed predominantly P1-restricted T cells because donor derived stem cells were exposed to recipient derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus. Because P1 recipient-derived antigen-presenting cells are replaced only slowly after 6-8 wk by (P1 X P2) donor-derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus and because replenished pools of mature T cells may by then prevent substantial numbers of P2-restricted T cells to be generated, a large portion of thymus cells and mature T cells were eliminated using the following treatments of 12-20-wk-old (P1 X P2) F1 leads to P1 irradiation bone marrow chimeras: (a) cortisone plus antilymphocyte serum, (b) Cytoxan, (c) three doses of sublethal irradiation (300 rad) 2d apart, and (d) lethal irradiation (850 rad) and reconstitution with T cell-depleted (P1 X P2) F1 stem cells. 12-20 wk after this second treatment, (P1 X P2) leads to P1 chimeras were infected with vaccinia-virus. Virus-specific cytotoxic T cell reactivity was expressed by chimeric T cells of (P1 X P(2) F1 origin and was restricted predominantly to P1. Virus-specific cytotoxic T cells, therefore, do not seem to be selected to measurable extent by the immigrating donor-derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus; their selection depends apparently from the recipient-derived radioresistant thymus cells.

  14. Multiple Viral Ligands Naturally Presented by Different Class I Molecules in Transporter Antigen Processing-Deficient Vaccinia Virus-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Elena; Infantes, Susana; Barnea, Eilon; Beer, Ilan; García, Ruth; Lasala, Fátima; Jiménez, Mercedes; Vilches, Carlos; Lemonnier, François A.; Admon, Arie

    2012-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) delivers the viral proteolytic products generated by the proteasome in the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen that are subsequently recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, several viral epitopes have been identified in TAP-deficient models. Using mass spectrometry to analyze complex human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-bound peptide pools isolated from large numbers of TAP-deficient vaccinia virus-infected cells, we identified 11 ligands naturally presented by four different HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C class I molecules. Two of these ligands were presented by two different HLA class I alleles, and, as a result, 13 different HLA-peptide complexes were formed simultaneously in the same vaccinia virus-infected cells. In addition to the high-affinity ligands, one low-affinity peptide restricted by each of the HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C class I molecules was identified. Both high- and low-affinity ligands generated long-term memory CTL responses to vaccinia virus in an HLA-A2-transgenic mouse model. The processing and presentation of two vaccinia virus-encoded HLA-A2-restricted antigens took place via proteasomal and nonproteasomal pathways, which were blocked in infected cells with chemical inhibitors specific for different subsets of metalloproteinases. These data have implications for the study of the effectiveness of early empirical vaccination with cowpox virus against smallpox disease. PMID:22031944

  15. Neonatal Colonisation Expands a Specific Intestinal Antigen-Presenting Cell Subset Prior to CD4 T-Cell Expansion, without Altering T-Cell Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Mitchard, Louisa; Harley, Ross; Warwick, James; Burt, Rachel; van Diemen, Pauline M.; Stevens, Mark; Bailey, Mick

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between the early-life colonising intestinal microbiota and the developing immune system are critical in determining the nature of immune responses in later life. Studies in neonatal animals in which this interaction can be examined are central to understanding the mechanisms by which the microbiota impacts on immune development and to developing therapies based on manipulation of the microbiome. The inbred piglet model represents a system that is comparable to human neonates and allows for control of the impact of maternal factors. Here we show that colonisation with a defined microbiota produces expansion of mucosal plasma cells and of T-lymphocytes without altering the repertoire of alpha beta T-cells in the intestine. Importantly, this is preceded by microbially-induced expansion of a signal regulatory protein α-positive (SIRPα+) antigen-presenting cell subset, whilst SIRPα−CD11R1+ antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are unaffected by colonisation. The central role of intestinal APCs in the induction and maintenance of mucosal immunity implicates SIRPα+ antigen-presenting cells as orchestrators of early-life mucosal immune development. PMID:22442714

  16. Chronic pulmonary accumulation of iron oxide nanoparticles induced Th1-type immune response stimulating the function of antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Oh, Seung Yun; Lee, Sang Jin; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Younghun; Lee, Byoung-Seok; Kim, Jong Sung

    2015-11-01

    Although there is growing evidence that suggests that pulmonary exposure to nanoparticles causes adverse health effects by modulating immune system of the body, available information is very limited. In this study, we investigated immune response following chronic pulmonary accumulation of iron oxide nanoparticles (FeNPs, Fe2O3). FeNPs have a needle-like shape in suspension (101.3±4.2 nm). On day 90 after a single intratracheal instillation (0.5, 1, and 2 mg/kg), the FeNPs remained in the lung and particle-laden macrophages were clearly observed in the BAL fluid of the treated-mice. The number of total cells and proportions of neutrophils and lymphocytes significantly increased at 2 mg/kg dose, and the percentage of apoptotic cells and LDH release increased in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that Th1-polarized inflammatory response was induced in the lung of the treated group accompanying the elevated secretion of chemokines, including GM-CSF, MCP-1, and MIP-1. Additionally, FeNPs enhanced the expression of antigen presentation-related proteins, including CD80, CD86, and MHC class II, on antigen-presenting cells in BAL fluid. Taken together, we suggest that chronic pulmonary accumulation of FeNPs may induce Th1-polarized immune response augmenting the function of antigen-presenting cells in the lung. PMID:26492398

  17. Organic extract of diesel exhaust particles stimulates expression of Ia and costimulatory molecules associated with antigen presentation in rat peripheral blood monocytes but not in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Eiko . E-mail: ekoike@nies.go.jp; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    2005-12-15

    We hypothesized that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induce the activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in lung. The present study was designed to clarify the following about DEP: (1) whether it affects the expression of Ia and B7 molecules in alveolar macrophages (AM) as a mature cell or in peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) as an immature cell (2) if it affects the antigen-presenting (AP) activity of PBM (3) what component of DEP is responsible for the effects, and (4) whether the effect of DEP is related to oxidative stress. DEP was extracted with methylene chloride. Cells were exposed to whole DEP, organic extract, or residual particles for 24 h. Cell-surface molecules were measured by flow cytometry. AP activity was assessed by antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Whole DEP or organic extract significantly increased the expression of Ia and B7 molecules on PBM but not on AM. No significant effect of residual particles was observed. A low concentration of organic extract also increased the AP activity of PBM. When the induction of an antioxidative enzyme was assessed, heme oxygenase-1 protein was found to be significantly increased by exposure to whole DEP, and the organic extract was more effective than the residual particles. Furthermore, the organic extract-induced expression of Ia antigen on PBM was reduced by the addition of an antioxidative agent. These results suggest that DEP may act on immature APC and enhance their AP activity and that the action contributing to oxidative stress may be mediated by organic compounds of DEP.

  18. A molecular assembly system for presentation of antigens on the surface of HBc virus-like particles

    SciTech Connect

    Blokhina, Elena A.; Kuprianov, Victor V.; Stepanova, Ludmila A.; Tsybalova, Ludmila M.; Kiselev, Oleg I.; Ravin, Nikolai V.; Skryabin, Konstantin G.

    2013-01-20

    Hepatitis B virus-like particles, icosahedral structures formed by multiple core protein dimers, are promising immune-enhancing vaccine carriers for foreign antigens. Insertions into the surface-exposed immunodominant loop are especially immunogenic. However, the need to conserve the particulate structure to ensure high immunogenicity imposes restraints on the nature of the heterologous sequence that can be inserted. We propose a new approach to constructing HBc particles linked to the target epitopes that relies on non-covalent interactions between the epitope and pre-assembled unmodified HBc particles. Interaction was enabled by fusion of the epitope to the GSLLGRMKGA peptide, binding to the spike tips. This peptide may be used as a 'binding tag' allowing in vitro construction of HBc particles carrying the target peptide. Such virus-like particles carrying multiple copies of the extracellular domain of the M2 protein of different influenza strains appeared to be highly immunogenic and protected immunised mice against a lethal influenza challenge.

  19. Differential presentation of endogenous and exogenous hepatitis B surface antigens influences priming of CD8(+) T cells in an epitope-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Petra; Reiser, Michael; Stifter, Katja; Krieger, Jana; Schirmbeck, Reinhold

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about whether presentation of endogenous and exogenous hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigens on APCs targeted by vaccination and/or virus-harboring hepatocytes influences de novo priming of CD8(+) T cells. We showed that surface antigen-expressing transfectants exclusively display a K(b) /S190 epitope, whereas cells pulsed with recombinant surface particles (rSPs) exclusively present a K(b) /S208 epitope to CD8(+) T cells. The differential presentation of these epitopes largely reflects the selective, but not exclusive, priming of K(b) /S190- and K(b) /S208-specific T cells in C57BL/6 mice by endogenous/DNA- or exogenous/protein-based vaccines, respectively. Silencing the K(b) /S190 epitope (K(b) /S190V194F ) in antigen-expressing vectors rescued the presentation of the K(b) /S208 epitope in stable transfectants and significantly enhanced priming of K(b) /S208-specific T cells in C57BL/6 mice. A K(b) /S190-mediated immunodominance operating in surface antigen-expressing cells, but not in rSP-pulsed cells, led to an efficient suppression in the presentation of the K(b) /S208 epitope and a consequent decrease in the priming of K(b) /S208-specific T cells. This K(b) /S190-mediated immunodominance also operated in 1.4HBV-S(mut) transgenic (tg) hepatocytes selectively expressing endogenous surface antigens and allowed priming of K(b) /S208- but not K(b) /S190-specific T cells in 1.4HBV-S(mut) tg mice. However, IFN-γ(+) K(b) /S208-specific T cells could not inhibit HBV replication in the liver of 1.4HBV-S(mut) tg mice. These results have practical implications for the design of T-cell-stimulating therapeutic vaccines. PMID:24723392

  20. Immunomodulatory Glycan Lacto-N-Fucopentaose III Requires Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis To Induce Alternative Activation of Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Leena; Tundup, Smanla; Choi, Beak-San; Norberg, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of alternative activation of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is largely unknown. Lacto-N-fucopentaose III (LNFPIII) is a biologically conserved pentasaccharide that contains the Lewisx trisaccharide. LNFPIII conjugates and schistosome egg antigens, which contain the Lewisx trisaccharide, drive alternative activation of APCs and induce anti-inflammatory responses in vivo, preventing inflammation-based diseases, including psoriasis, transplant organ rejection, and metabolic disease. In this study, we show that LNFPIII conjugates and schistosome egg antigens interact with APCs via a receptor-mediated process, requiring internalization of these molecules through a clathrin/dynamin-dependent but caveolus-independent endocytic pathway. Using inhibitors/small interfering RNA (siRNA) against dynamin and clathrin, we show for the first time that endocytosis of Lewisx-containing glycans is required to drive alternative maturation of antigen-presenting cells and Th2 immune responses. We identified mouse SIGNR-1 as a cell surface receptor for LNFPIII conjugates. Elimination of SIGNR-1 showed no effect on uptake of LNFPIII conjugates, suggesting that other receptors bind to and facilitate uptake of LNFPIII conjugates. We demonstrate that disruption of actin filaments partially prevented the entry of LNFPIII conjugates into APCs and that LNFPIII colocalizes with both early and late endosomal markers and follows the classical endosomal pathway leading to lysosome maturation. The results of this study show that the ability of LNFPIII to induce alternative activation utilizes a receptor-mediated process that requires a dynamin-dependent endocytosis. Thus, key steps have been defined in the previously unknown mechanism of alternative activation that ultimately leads to induction of anti-inflammatory responses. PMID:24566617

  1. The actin cytoskeleton modulates the activation of iNKT cells by segregating CD1d nanoclusters on antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Manzo, Carlo; Salio, Mariolina; Aichinger, Michael C.; Oddone, Anna; Lakadamyali, Melike; Shepherd, Dawn; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells recognize endogenous and exogenous lipid antigens presented in the context of CD1d molecules. The ability of iNKT cells to recognize endogenous antigens represents a distinct immune recognition strategy, which underscores the constitutive memory phenotype of iNKT cells and their activation during inflammatory conditions. However, the mechanisms regulating such “tonic” activation of iNKT cells remain unclear. Here, we show that the spatiotemporal distribution of CD1d molecules on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) modulates activation of iNKT cells. By using superresolution microscopy, we show that CD1d molecules form nanoclusters at the cell surface of APCs, and their size and density are constrained by the actin cytoskeleton. Dual-color single-particle tracking revealed that diffusing CD1d nanoclusters are actively arrested by the actin cytoskeleton, preventing their further coalescence. Formation of larger nanoclusters occurs in the absence of interactions between CD1d cytosolic tail and the actin cytoskeleton and correlates with enhanced iNKT cell activation. Importantly and consistently with iNKT cell activation during inflammatory conditions, exposure of APCs to the Toll-like receptor 7/8 agonist R848 increases nanocluster density and iNKT cell activation. Overall, these results define a previously unidentified mechanism that modulates iNKT cell autoreactivity based on the tight control by the APC cytoskeleton of the sizes and densities of endogenous antigen-loaded CD1d nanoclusters. PMID:26798067

  2. The actin cytoskeleton modulates the activation of iNKT cells by segregating CD1d nanoclusters on antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Torreno-Pina, Juan A; Manzo, Carlo; Salio, Mariolina; Aichinger, Michael C; Oddone, Anna; Lakadamyali, Melike; Shepherd, Dawn; Besra, Gurdyal S; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2016-02-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells recognize endogenous and exogenous lipid antigens presented in the context of CD1d molecules. The ability of iNKT cells to recognize endogenous antigens represents a distinct immune recognition strategy, which underscores the constitutive memory phenotype of iNKT cells and their activation during inflammatory conditions. However, the mechanisms regulating such "tonic" activation of iNKT cells remain unclear. Here, we show that the spatiotemporal distribution of CD1d molecules on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) modulates activation of iNKT cells. By using superresolution microscopy, we show that CD1d molecules form nanoclusters at the cell surface of APCs, and their size and density are constrained by the actin cytoskeleton. Dual-color single-particle tracking revealed that diffusing CD1d nanoclusters are actively arrested by the actin cytoskeleton, preventing their further coalescence. Formation of larger nanoclusters occurs in the absence of interactions between CD1d cytosolic tail and the actin cytoskeleton and correlates with enhanced iNKT cell activation. Importantly and consistently with iNKT cell activation during inflammatory conditions, exposure of APCs to the Toll-like receptor 7/8 agonist R848 increases nanocluster density and iNKT cell activation. Overall, these results define a previously unidentified mechanism that modulates iNKT cell autoreactivity based on the tight control by the APC cytoskeleton of the sizes and densities of endogenous antigen-loaded CD1d nanoclusters. PMID:26798067

  3. Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus Infection of Human and Non-human Primate Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Interaction with CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yu; McArthur, Monica A; Cohen, Melanie; Jahrling, Peter B; Janosko, Krisztina B; Josleyn, Nicole; Kang, Kai; Zhang, Tengfei; Holbrook, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    Humans infected with yellow fever virus (YFV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, can develop illness ranging from a mild febrile disease to hemorrhagic fever and death. The 17D vaccine strain of YFV was developed in the 1930s, has been used continuously since development and has proven very effective. Genetic differences between vaccine and wild-type viruses are few, yet viral or host mechanisms associated with protection or disease are not fully understood. Over the past 20 years, a number of cases of vaccine-associated disease have been identified following vaccination with 17D; these cases have been correlated with reduced immune status at the time of vaccination. Recently, several studies have evaluated T cell responses to vaccination in both humans and non-human primates, but none have evaluated the response to wild-type virus infection. In the studies described here, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and dendritic cells (MoDC) from both humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their ability to support infection with either wild-type Asibi virus or the 17D vaccine strain and the host cytokine and chemokine response characterized. Human MoDC and MDM were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cells. It was found that MoDC and MDM supported viral replication and that there were differential cytokine responses to infection with either wild-type or vaccine viruses. Additionally, MoDCs infected with live 17D virus were able to stimulate IFN-γ and IL-2 production in CD4+ T cells, while cells infected with Asibi virus were not. These data demonstrate that wild-type and vaccine YFV stimulate different responses in target antigen presenting cells and that wild-type YFV can inhibit MoDC activation of CD4+ T cells, a critical component in development of protective immunity. These data provide initial, but critical insight into regulatory capabilities of wild-type YFV in development of disease. PMID:27191161

  4. Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus Infection of Human and Non-human Primate Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Interaction with CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yu; McArthur, Monica A.; Cohen, Melanie; Jahrling, Peter B.; Janosko, Krisztina B.; Josleyn, Nicole; Kang, Kai; Zhang, Tengfei; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Humans infected with yellow fever virus (YFV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, can develop illness ranging from a mild febrile disease to hemorrhagic fever and death. The 17D vaccine strain of YFV was developed in the 1930s, has been used continuously since development and has proven very effective. Genetic differences between vaccine and wild-type viruses are few, yet viral or host mechanisms associated with protection or disease are not fully understood. Over the past 20 years, a number of cases of vaccine-associated disease have been identified following vaccination with 17D; these cases have been correlated with reduced immune status at the time of vaccination. Recently, several studies have evaluated T cell responses to vaccination in both humans and non-human primates, but none have evaluated the response to wild-type virus infection. In the studies described here, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and dendritic cells (MoDC) from both humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their ability to support infection with either wild-type Asibi virus or the 17D vaccine strain and the host cytokine and chemokine response characterized. Human MoDC and MDM were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cells. It was found that MoDC and MDM supported viral replication and that there were differential cytokine responses to infection with either wild-type or vaccine viruses. Additionally, MoDCs infected with live 17D virus were able to stimulate IFN-γ and IL-2 production in CD4+ T cells, while cells infected with Asibi virus were not. These data demonstrate that wild-type and vaccine YFV stimulate different responses in target antigen presenting cells and that wild-type YFV can inhibit MoDC activation of CD4+ T cells, a critical component in development of protective immunity. These data provide initial, but critical insight into regulatory capabilities of wild-type YFV in development of disease. PMID:27191161

  5. Unique Appearance of Proliferating Antigen-Presenting Cells Expressing DC-SIGN (CD209) in the Decidua of Early Human Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kämmerer, Ulrike; Eggert, Andreas O.; Kapp, Michaela; McLellan, Alexander D.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Dietl, Johannes; van Kooyk, Yvette; Kämpgen, Eckhart

    2003-01-01

    Intact human pregnancy can be regarded as an immunological paradox in that the maternal immune system accepts the allogeneic embryo without general immunosuppression. Because dendritic cell (DC) subsets could be involved in peripheral tolerance, the uterine mucosa (decidua) was investigated for DC populations. Here we describe the detailed immunohistochemical and functional characterization of HLA-DR-positive antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in early pregnancy decidua. In contrast to classical macrophages and CD83+ DCs, which were found in comparable numbers in decidua and nonpregnant endometrium, only decidua harbored a significant population of HLA-DR+/DC-SIGN+ APCs further phenotyped as CD14+/CD4+/CD68+/−/CD83−/CD25−. These cells exhibited a remarkable proliferation rate (9.2 to 9.8% of all CD209+ cells) by double staining with Ki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Unique within the DC-family, the majority of DC-SIGN+ decidual APCs were observed in situ to have intimate contact with CD56+/CD16−/ICAM-3+ decidual natural killer cells, another pregnancy-restricted cell population. In vitro, freshly isolated CD14+/DC-SIGN+ decidual cells efficiently took up antigen, but could not stimulate naive allogeneic T cells at all. Treatment with an inflammatory cytokine cocktail resulted in down-regulation of antigen uptake capacity and evolving capacity to effectively stimulate resting T cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis confirmed the maturation of CD14+/DC-SIGN+ decidual cells into CD25+/CD83+ mature DCs. In summary, this is the first identification of a uterine immature DC population expressing DC-SIGN, that appears only in pregnancy-associated tissue, has a high proliferation rate, and a conspicuous association with a natural killer subset. PMID:12598322

  6. Noncapsulated toxinogenic Bacillus anthracis presents a specific growth and dissemination pattern in naive and protective antigen-immune mice.

    PubMed

    Glomski, Ian J; Corre, Jean-Philippe; Mock, Michèle; Goossens, Pierre L

    2007-10-01

    Bacillus anthracis is a spore-forming bacterium that causes anthrax. B. anthracis has three major virulence factors, namely, lethal toxin, edema toxin, and a poly-gamma-D-glutamic acid capsule. The toxins modulate host immune responses, and the capsule inhibits phagocytosis. With the goal of increasing safety, decreasing security concerns, and taking advantage of mammalian genetic tools and reagents, mouse models of B. anthracis infection have been developed using attenuated bacteria that produce toxins but no capsule. While these models have been useful in studying both toxinogenic infections and antitoxin vaccine efficacy, we questioned whether eliminating the capsule changed bacterial growth and dissemination characteristics. Thus, the progression of infection by toxinogenic noncapsulated B. anthracis was analyzed and compared to that by previously reported nontoxinogenic capsulated bacteria, using in vivo bioluminescence imaging. The influence of immunization with the toxin component protective antigen (PA) on the development of infection was also examined. The toxinogenic noncapsulated bacteria were initially confined to the cutaneous site of infection. Bacteria then progressed to the draining lymph nodes and, finally, late in the infection, to the lungs, kidneys, and frequently the gastrointestinal tract. There was minimal colonization of the spleen. PA immunization reduced bacterial growth from the outset and limited infection to the site of inoculation. These in vivo observations show that dissemination by toxinogenic noncapsulated strains differs markedly from that by nontoxinogenic capsulated strains. Additionally, PA immunization counters bacterial growth and dissemination in vivo from the onset of infection. PMID:17635863

  7. Use of human antigen presenting cell gene array profiling to examine the effect of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax on primary human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Jaya; Kampani, Karan; Datta, Suman; Wigdahl, Brian; Flaig, Katherine E; Jain, Pooja

    2006-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is etiologically linked to adult T-cell leukemia and a progressive demyelinating disorder termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). One of the most striking features of the immune response in HAM/TSP centers on the expansion of HTLV-1-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) compartment in the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid. More than 90% of the HTLV-1-specific CTLs are directed against the viral Tax (11-19) peptide implying that Tax is available for immune recognition by antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). DCs obtained from HAM/TSP patients have been shown to be infected with HTLV-1 and exhibit rapid maturation. Therefore, we hypothesized that presentation of Tax peptides by activated DCs to naIve CD8(+) T cells may play an important role in the induction of a Tax-specific CTL response and neurologic dysfunction. In this study, a pathway-specific antigen presenting cell gene array was used to study transcriptional changes induced by exposure of monocyte-derived DCs to extracellular HTLV-1 Tax protein. Approximately 100 genes were differentially expressed including genes encoding toll-like receptors, cell surface receptors, proteins involved in antigen uptake and presentation and adhesion molecules. The differential regulation of chemokines and cytokines characteristic of functional DC activation was also observed by the gene array analyses. Furthermore, the expression pattern of signal transduction genes was also significantly altered. These results have suggested that Tax-mediated DC gene regulation might play a critical role in cellular activation and the mechanisms resulting in HTLV-1-induced disease. PMID:16595374

  8. Cathepsin B in antigen-presenting cells controls mediators of the Th1 immune response during Leishmania major infection.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Leal, Iris J; Röger, Bianca; Schwarz, Angela; Schirmeister, Tanja; Reinheckel, Thomas; Lutz, Manfred B; Moll, Heidrun

    2014-09-01

    Resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection in the murine model is determined by the capacity of the host to mount either a protective Th1 response or a Th2 response associated with disease progression. Previous reports involving the use of cysteine cathepsin inhibitors indicated that cathepsins B (Ctsb) and L (Ctsl) play important roles in Th1/Th2 polarization during L. major infection in both susceptible and resistant mouse strains. Although it was hypothesized that these effects are a consequence of differential patterns of antigen processing, the mechanisms underlying these differences were not further investigated. Given the pivotal roles that dendritic cells and macrophages play during Leishmania infection, we generated bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC) and macrophages (BMM) from Ctsb-/- and Ctsl-/- mice, and studied the effects of Ctsb and Ctsl deficiency on the survival of L. major in infected cells. Furthermore, the signals used by dendritic cells to instruct Th cell polarization were addressed: the expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, and cytokine production. We found that Ctsb-/- BMDC express higher levels of MHC class II molecules than wild-type (WT) and Ctsl-/- BMDC, while there were no significant differences in the expression of co-stimulatory molecules between cathepsin-deficient and WT cells. Moreover, both BMDC and BMM from Ctsb-/- mice significantly up-regulated the levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12) expression, a key Th1-inducing cytokine. These findings indicate that Ctsb-/- BMDC display more pro-Th1 properties than their WT and Ctsl-/- counterparts, and therefore suggest that Ctsb down-regulates the Th1 response to L. major. Moreover, they propose a novel role for Ctsb as a regulator of cytokine expression. PMID:25255101

  9. The inhibition of antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells resulting from UV irradiation of murine skin is restored by in vitro photorepair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers.

    PubMed

    Vink, A A; Moodycliffe, A M; Shreedhar, V; Ullrich, S E; Roza, L; Yarosh, D B; Kripke, M L

    1997-05-13

    Exposing skin to UVB (280-320 nm) radiation suppresses contact hypersensitivity by a mechanism that involves an alteration in the activity of cutaneous antigen-presenting cells (APC). UV-induced DNA damage appears to be an important molecular trigger for this effect. The specific target cells in the skin that sustain DNA damage relevant to the immunosuppressive effect have yet to be identified. We tested the hypothesis that UV-induced DNA damage in the cutaneous APC was responsible for their impaired ability to present antigen after in vivo UV irradiation. Cutaneous APC were collected from the draining lymph nodes of UVB-irradiated, hapten-sensitized mice and incubated in vitro with liposomes containing a photolyase (Photosomes; Applied Genetics, Freeport, NY), which, upon absorption of photoreactivating light, splits UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Photosome treatment followed by photoreactivating light reduced the number of dimer-containing APC, restored the in vivo antigen-presenting activity of the draining lymph node cells, and blocked the induction of suppressor T cells. Neither Photosomes nor photoreactivating light alone, nor photoreactivating light given before Photosomes, restored APC activity, and Photosome treatment did not reverse the impairment of APC function when isopsoralen plus UVA (320-400 nm) radiation was used instead of UVB. These controls indicate that the restoration of APC function matched the requirements of Photosome-mediated DNA repair for dimers and post-treatment photoreactivating light. These results provide compelling evidence that it is UV-induced DNA damage in cutaneous APC that leads to reduced immune function. PMID:9144224

  10. Upregulation of Immunoproteasome Subunits in Myositis Indicates Active Inflammation with Involvement of Antigen Presenting Cells, CD8 T-Cells and IFNγ

    PubMed Central

    Ghannam, Khetam; Martinez-Gamboa, Lorena; Spengler, Lydia; Krause, Sabine; Smiljanovic, Biljana; Bonin, Marc; Bhattarai, Salyan; Grützkau, Andreas; Burmester, Gerd-R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) infiltration of immune cells into muscle and upregulation of MHC-I expression implies increased antigen presentation and involvement of the proteasome system. To decipher the role of immunoproteasomes in myositis, we investigated individual cell types and muscle tissues and focused on possible immune triggers. Methods Expression of constitutive (PSMB5, -6, -7) and corresponding immunoproteasomal subunits (PSMB8, -9, -10) was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR in muscle biopsies and sorted peripheral blood cells of patients with IIM, non-inflammatory myopathies (NIM) and healthy donors (HD). Protein analysis in muscle biopsies was performed by western blot. Affymetrix HG-U133 platform derived transcriptome data from biopsies of different muscle diseases and from immune cell types as well as monocyte stimulation experiments were used for validation, coregulation and coexpression analyses. Results Real-time RT-PCR revealed significantly increased expression of immunoproteasomal subunits (PSMB8/-9/-10) in DC, monocytes and CD8+ T-cells in IIM. In muscle biopsies, the immunosubunits were elevated in IIM compared to NIM and exceeded levels of matched blood samples. Proteins of PSMB8 and -9 were found only in IIM but not NIM muscle biopsies. Reanalysis of 78 myositis and 20 healthy muscle transcriptomes confirmed these results and revealed involvement of the antigen processing and presentation pathway. Comparison with reference profiles of sorted immune cells and healthy muscle confirmed upregulation of PSMB8 and -9 in myositis biopsies beyond infiltration related changes. This upregulation correlated highest with STAT1, IRF1 and IFNγ expression. Elevation of T-cell specific transcripts in active IIM muscles was accompanied by increased expression of DC and monocyte marker genes and thus reflects the cell type specific involvement observed in peripheral blood. Conclusions Immunoproteasomes seem to indicate IIM activity and

  11. Phenotypic and Functional Properties of Human Steady State CD14+ and CD1a+ Antigen Presenting Cells and Epidermal Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fehres, Cynthia. M.; Bruijns, Sven C. M.; Sotthewes, Brigit N.; Kalay, Hakan; Schaffer, Lana; Head, Steven R.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous antigen presenting cells (APCs) are critical for the induction and regulation of skin immune responses. The human skin contains phenotypically and functionally distinct APCs subsets that are present at two separated locations. While CD1ahigh LCs form a dense network in the epidermis, the CD14+ and CD1a+ APCs reside in the dermal compartment. A better understanding of the biology of human skin APC subsets is necessary for the improvement of vaccine strategies that use the skin as administration route. In particular, progress in the characterization of uptake and activatory receptors will certainly improve APC-targeting strategies in vaccination. Here we performed a detailed analysis of the expression and function of glycan-binding and pattern-recognition receptors in skin APC subsets. The results demonstrate that under steady state conditions human CD1a+ dermal dendritic cells (DCs) were phenotypically most mature as measured by the expression of CD83 and CD86, whereas the CD14+ cells showed a higher expression of the CLRs DC-SIGN, mannose receptor and DCIR and had potent antigen uptake capacity. Furthermore, steady state LCs showed superior antigen cross-presentation as compared to the dermal APC subsets. Our results also demonstrate that the TLR3 ligand polyribosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (pI:C) was the most potent stimulator of cytokine production by both LCs and dDCs. These studies warrant further exploration of human CD1a+ dDCs and LCs as target cells for cancer vaccination to induce anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:26605924

  12. Asparagine endopeptidase is not essential for class II MHC antigen presentation but is required for processing of cathepsin L in mice.

    PubMed

    Maehr, René; Hang, Howard C; Mintern, Justine D; Kim, You-Me; Cuvillier, Armelle; Nishimura, Mikio; Yamada, Kenji; Shirahama-Noda, Kanae; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2005-06-01

    Class II MHC molecules survey the endocytic compartments of APCs and present antigenic peptides to CD4 T cells. In this context, lysosomal proteases are essential not only for the generation of antigenic peptides but also for proteolysis of the invariant chain to allow the maturation of class II MHC molecules. Recent studies with protease inhibitors have implicated the asparagine endopeptidase (AEP) in class II MHC-restricted Ag presentation. We now report that AEP-deficient mice show no differences in processing of the invariant chain or maturation of class II MHC products compared with wild-type mice. In the absence of AEP, presentation to primary T cells of OVA and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, two Ags that contain asparagine residues within or in proximity to the relevant epitopes was unimpaired. Cathepsin (Cat) L, a lysosomal cysteine protease essential for the development to CD4 and NK T cells, fails to be processed into its mature two-chain form in AEP-deficient cells. Despite this, the numbers of CD4 and NK T cells are normal, showing that the single-chain form of Cat L is sufficient for its function in vivo. We conclude that AEP is essential for processing of Cat L but not for class II MHC-restricted Ag presentation. PMID:15905550

  13. A solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the antigenic detection of Legionella pneumophila (serogroup 1): A compliment for the space station diagnostic capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejtmancik, Kelly E.

    1987-01-01

    It is necessary that an adequate microbiology capability be provided as part of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) to support expected microbial disease events and environmental monitoring during long periods of space flight. The application of morphological and biochemical studies to confirm the presence of certain bacterial and fungal disease agents are currently available and under consideration. This confirmation would be facilitated through employment of serological methods to aid in the identification of bacterial, fungal, and viral agents. A number of serological approaches are currently being considered, including the use of Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) technology, which could be utilized during microgravity conditions. A solid phase, membrane supported ELISA for the detection of Legionella pneumophila, an expected disease agent, was developed to show a potential model system that would meet the HMF requirements and specifications for the future space station. These studies demonstrate the capability of membrane supported ELISA systems for identification of expected microbial disease agents as part of the HMF.

  14. Identification and Expression of a Mycoplasma gallisepticum Surface Antigen Recognized by a Monoclonal Antibody Capable of Inhibiting Both Growth and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Shigeto; Fujisawa, Ayumi; Tsuzaki, Yoshinari; Saitoh, Shuji

    2000-01-01

    In order to identify antigenic proteins of Mycoplasma gallisepticum, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against virulent M. gallisepticum R strain were produced in mice. MAb 35A6 was selected for its abilities to inhibit both growth and metabolism of M. gallisepticum in vitro. The MAb recognized a membrane protein with an apparent molecular mass of 120 kDa. The corresponding gene, designated the mgc3 gene, was cloned from an M. gallisepticum genomic DNA expression library and sequenced. The mgc3 gene is a homologue of the ORF6 gene encoding 130-kDa protein in the P1 operon of M. pneumoniae and is localized downstream of the mgc1 gene, a homologue of the P1 gene. To assess the characteristics of MGC3 protein, all 10 TGA codons in the mgc3 gene, which encode a tryptophan in the Mycoplasma species, were replaced with TGG codons, and recombinant fowlpox viruses (FPV) harboring the altered mgc3 gene were constructed. One of the recombinant FPVs was improved to express MGC3 protein on the cell surface in which the signal peptide of MGC3 protein was replaced with one from Marek's disease virus gB. These results should provide the impetus to develop a vaccine based on MGC3 protein which can induce antibodies with both growth inhibition and metabolic-inhibition activities using a recombinant FPV. PMID:10816462

  15. Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    This presentation describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver so that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with some preliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simple set of hills.

  16. Artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing HLA class II molecules as an effective tool for amplifying human specific memory CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Anthony; Hamieh, Mohamad; Drouet, Aurélie; Leprince, Jérôme; Vivien, Denis; Frébourg, Thierry; Le Mauff, Brigitte; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Toutirais, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    Owing to their multiple immune functions, CD4(+) T cells are of major interest for immunotherapy in chronic viral infections and cancer, as well as for severe autoimmune diseases and transplantation. Therefore, standardized methods allowing rapid generation of a large number of CD4(+) T cells for adoptive immunotherapy are still awaited. We constructed stable artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs) derived from mouse fibroblasts. They were genetically modified to express human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR molecules and the human accessory molecules B7.1, Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and lymphocyte function-associated antigen-3 (LFA-3). AAPCs expressing HLA-DR1, HLA-DR15 or HLA-DR51 molecules and loaded with peptides derived from influenza hemagglutinin (HA), myelin basic protein (MBP) or factor VIII, respectively, activated specific CD4(+) T-cell clones more effectively than Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cells. We also showed that AAPCs were able to take up and process whole Ag proteins, and present epitopes to specific T cells. In primary cultures, AAPCs loaded with HA peptide allowed generation of specific Th1 lymphocytes from healthy donors as demonstrated by tetramer and intracellular cytokine staining. Although AAPCs were less effective than autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to stimulate CD4(+) T cells in primary culture, AAPCs were more potent to reactivate and expand memory Th1 cells in a strictly Ag-dependent manner. As the availability of autologous APCs is limited, the AAPC system represents a stable and reliable tool to achieve clinically relevant numbers of CD4(+) T cells for adoptive immunotherapy. For fundamental research in immunology, AAPCs are also useful to decipher mechanisms involved in the development of human CD4 T-cell responses. PMID:26924643

  17. Murine Melanoma-Infiltrating Dendritic Cells Are Defective in Antigen Presenting Function Regardless of the Presence of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ataera, Haley; Hyde, Evelyn; Price, Kylie M.; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Ronchese, Franca

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells are often ineffective at presenting tumor-derived antigen in vivo, a defect usually ascribed to the suppressive tumor environment. We investigated the effects of depleting CD4+CD25+ “natural” regulatory T cells (Treg) on the frequency, phenotype and function of total dendritic cell populations in B16.OVA tumors and in tumor-draining lymph nodes. Intraperitoneal injection of the anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody PC61 reduced Treg frequency in blood and tumors, but did not affect the frequency of tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells, or their expression of CD40, CD86 and MHCII. Tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells from PC61-treated or untreated mice induced the proliferation of allogeneic T cells in vitro, but could not induce proliferation of OVA-specific OTI and OTII T cells unless specific peptide antigen was added in culture. Some proliferation of naïve, OVA-specific OTI T cells, but not OTII T cells, was observed in the tumor-draining LN of mice carrying B16.OVA tumors, however, this was not improved by PC61 treatment. Experiments using RAG1−/− hosts adoptively transferred with OTI and CD25-depleted OTII cells also failed to show improved OTI and OTII T cell proliferation in vivo compared to C57BL/6 hosts. We conclude that the defective presentation of B16.OVA tumor antigen by tumor-infiltrating dendritic cells and in the tumor-draining lymph node is not due to the presence of “natural” CD4+CD25+ Treg. PMID:21390236

  18. Delivery of Large Heterologous Polypeptides across the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Antigen-Presenting Cells by the Bordetella RTX Hemolysin Moiety Lacking the Adenylyl Cyclase Domain

    PubMed Central

    Holubova, Jana; Jelinek, Jiri; Tomala, Jakub; Masin, Jiri; Kosova, Martina; Stanek, Ondrej; Bumba, Ladislav; Michalek, Jaroslav; Kovar, Marek; Sebo, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA; also called ACT or AC-Hly) targets CD11b-expressing phagocytes and translocates into their cytosol an adenylyl cyclase (AC) that hijacks cellular signaling by conversion of ATP to cyclic AMP (cAMP). Intriguingly, insertion of large passenger peptides removes the enzymatic activity but not the cell-invasive capacity of the AC domain. This has repeatedly been exploited for delivery of heterologous antigens into the cytosolic pathway of CD11b-expressing dendritic cells by CyaA/AC− toxoids, thus enabling their processing and presentation on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs). We produced a set of toxoids with overlapping deletions within the first 371 residues of CyaA and showed that the structure of the AC enzyme does not contain any sequences indispensable for its translocation across target cell membrane. Moreover, replacement of the AC domain (residues 1 to 371) with heterologous polypeptides of 40, 146, or 203 residues yielded CyaAΔAC constructs that delivered passenger CTL epitopes into antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and induced strong antigen-specific CD8+ CTL responses in vivo in mice and ex vivo in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. This shows that the RTX (repeats in toxin) hemolysin moiety, consisting of residues 374 to 1706 of CyaA, harbors all structural information involved in translocation of the N-terminal AC domain across target cell membranes. These results decipher the extraordinary capacity of the AC domain of CyaA to transport large heterologous cargo polypeptides into the cytosol of CD11b+ target cells and pave the way for the construction of CyaAΔAC-based polyvalent immunotherapeutic T cell vaccines. PMID:22215742

  19. A dual-functional E. coli vector for expressing recombinant protein with high solubility and antigen presentation ability.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chin-Kai; Su, Yu-Show; Fan, Chiu-Tin; Lee, Wen-Chuan; Chen, Ming-Yu

    2009-05-01

    A dual-functional Escherichia coli expression vector capable of producing soluble recombinant proteins with high immunogenicity in animals is introduced. This vector expresses polypeptides fused to a PTD-J-domain peptide. The J-domain peptide is derived from murine Hsp40 by using optimized codons for E. coli. The association of the J-domain to the nucleotide binding domain of the DnaK chaperone increases the probability that the fused polypeptide will be folded by the DnaK and hence increases the solubility of the recombinant protein. The PTD-J-domain can also enhance the immunogenicity of the fused chicken IGF-I polypeptide as well as an oligo-peptide derived from haptoglobin in rodents, possibly via the association with either the extracellular or intracellular Hsp70 proteins. PMID:19162194

  20. An Experimental Two-Axial Actuator for a Tactile Display Capable of Presenting Pressure and Slippage Sensations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohka, Masahiro; Sawamoto, Yasuhiro; Matsukawa, Shiho; Miyaoka, Tetsu; Mitsuya, Yasunaga

    According to the previous psychophysical experimental results, since human beings feel different sensations for pressure and shearing vibration applied to their finger surface, a new tactile display array consisting of multi-axial micro actuators is required to enhance degree of tactile virtual reality. In the present paper, we experimentally design serial and parallel typed two-axial micro actuators, which are utilized for the key part of the tactile display. The serial typed two-axial actuator comprises bimorph actuators connected in series. The parallel typed two-axial actuator is composed of two bimorph piezoelectric actuators and two small links connected by three joints. We formulate kinematics for the parallel typed two-axial actuator because the endpoint is controlled in the two-dimensional coordinate. We perform a series of experiments to evaluate these two-dimensional actuators. Although the serial typed actuator has different characteristics on x- and y-directional coordinates, it has an advantage on compactness. On the other hand, the parallel typed two-axial actuator has almost same characteristics on both x- and y- coordinates, and has wide strokes of about 1mm. Considering these characteristics depended upon actuator type, we will design the tactile display combined the serial and parallel typed two-axial actuator.

  1. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1983 DPF WORKSHOP ON COLLIDER DETECTORS: PRESENT CAPABILITIES AND FUTURE POSSIBILITIES, FEB. 28 - MARCH 4, 1983.

    SciTech Connect

    Loken Ed, S.C.; Nemethy Ed, P.

    1983-04-01

    It is useful before beginning our work here to restate briefly the purpose of this workshop in the light of the present circumstances of elementary particle physics in the U.S. The goal of our field is easily stated in a general way: it is to reach higher center of mass energies and higher luminosities while employing more sensitive and more versatile event detectors, all in order to probe more deeply into the physics of elementary particles. The obstacles to achieving this goal are equally apparent. Escalating costs of construction and operation of our facilities limit alternatives and force us to make hard choices among those alternatives. The necessity to be highly selective in the choice of facilities, in conjunction with the need for increased manpower concentrations to build accelerators and mount experiments, leads to complex social problems within the science. As the frontier is removed ever further, serious technical difficulties and limitations arise. Finally, competition, much of which is usually healthy, now manifests itself with greater intensity on a regional basis within our country and also on an international scale. In the far ({ge}20 yr) future, collaboration on physics facilities by two or more of the major economic entities of the world will possibly be forthcoming. In the near future, we are left to bypass or overcome these obstacles on a regional scale as best we can. The choices we face are in part indicated in the list of planned and contemplated accelerators shown in Table I. The facilities indicated with an asterisk pose immediate questions: (1) Do we need them all and what should be their precise properties? (2) How are the ones we choose to be realized? (3) What is the nature of the detectors to exploit those facilities? (4) How do we respond to the challenge of higher luminosity as well as higher energy in those colliders? The decision-making process in this country and elsewhere depends on the answers to these technical questions

  2. Antigen Presenting Cells and Stromal Cells Trigger Human Natural Killer Lymphocytes to Autoreactivity: Evidence for the Involvement of Natural Cytotoxicity Receptors (NCR) and NKG2D

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Alessandro; Zocchi, Maria Raffaella

    2006-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) lymphocytes should not damage autologous cells due to the engagement of inhibitory receptor superfamily (IRS) members by HLA-I. Nevertheless, NK cells kill self cells expressing low levels or lacking HLA-I, as it may occur during viral infections (missing-self hypothesis). Herein, we show that human NK cells can be activated upon binding with self antigen presenting cells or stromal cells despite the expression of HLA-I. Indeed, NK cells can kill and produce pro-inflammatory and regulating cytokines as IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL10 during interaction with autologous dendritic cells or bone marrow stromal cells or skin fibroblasts. The killing of antigen presenting and stromal cells is dependent on LFA1/ICAM1 interaction. Further, the natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCR) NKp30 and NKp46 are responsible for the delivery of lethal hit to DC, whereas NKG2D activating receptor, the ligand of the MHC-related molecule MIC-A and the UL16 binding protein, is involved in stromal cell killing. These findings indicate that different activating receptors are involved in cell to self cell interaction. Finally, NK cells can revert the veto effect of stromal cells on mixed lymphocyte reaction further supporting the idea that NK cells may alter the interaction between T lymphocytes and microenvironment leading to autoreactivity. PMID:17162374

  3. IgE-mediated enhancement of CD4+ T cell responses requires antigen presentation by CD8α− conventional dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhoujie; Dahlin, Joakim S.; Xu, Hui; Heyman, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    IgE, forming an immune complex with small proteins, can enhance the specific antibody and CD4+ T cell responses in vivo. The effects require the presence of CD23 (Fcε-receptor II)+ B cells, which capture IgE-complexed antigens (Ag) in the circulation and transport them to splenic B cell follicles. In addition, also CD11c+ cells, which do not express CD23, are required for IgE-mediated enhancement of T cell responses. This suggests that some type of dendritic cell obtains IgE-Ag complexes from B cells and presents antigenic peptides to T cells. To elucidate the nature of this dendritic cell, mice were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE and OVA, and different populations of CD11c+ cells, obtained from the spleens four hours after immunization, were tested for their ability to present OVA. CD8α− conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) were much more efficient in inducing specific CD4+ T cell proliferation ex vivo than were CD8α+ cDCs or plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Thus, IgE-Ag complexes administered intravenously are rapidly transported to the spleen by recirculating B cells where they are delivered to CD8α− cDCs which induce proliferation of CD4+ T cells. PMID:27306570

  4. Enhancement in number and function of antigen-presenting cells in the lymphatic tissue of rats after in vivo administration of diphenylhydantoin (DPH).

    PubMed Central

    Petrasch, S; Wacker, H H; Zou, P; Bechtold, D; Brittinger, G

    1989-01-01

    We present a monoclonal IgG1 antibody, KiMy1R, which is specific for macrophages and their derivatives in the lymphatic tissue of the rat, and evaluate the distribution of subsets of mononuclear cells in popliteal and para-aortal lymph nodes of Wistar rats after injection of 50 mg DPH into the hindpads. Compared with resting lymphatic tissue and lymph nodes of animals treated with phenobarbital, DPH induced a significant increase (P less than 0.01) of the proportion of phagocytic cells. Furthermore, the soluble antigen alkaline phosphatase was traced after inoculation into the footpads of rats: in locoregional lymph nodes the percentage (mean 12.8/10(3] and the total number (mean 476 x 10(3) cells/lymph node) of cells with membrane-bound or intracytoplasmic alkaline phosphatase, as detected by a monoclonal anti-alkaline phosphatase antibody, were significantly higher (P less than 0.001) in animals pretreated with DPH than in rats pretreated with phenobarbital (mean 2.1/10(3); 31.2 x 10(3) cells/lymph node) and in untreated animals (mean 1.9/10(3); 4.1 x 10(3) cells/lymph node). If verified in humans, the effect of DPH in enhancing the number and function of macrophages and other antigen-presenting cells may exert favourable effects in patients with impairment of the mononuclear phagocytic system. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2805417

  5. Cholera Toxin Promotes Th17 Cell Differentiation by Modulating Expression of Polarizing Cytokines and the Antigen-Presenting Potential of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Ok; Lee, Jee-Boong

    2016-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT), an exotoxin produced by Vibrio cholera, acts as a mucosal adjuvant. In a previous study, we showed that CT skews differentiation of CD4 T cells to IL-17-producing Th17 cells. Here, we found that intranasal administration of CT induced migration of migratory dendritic cell (DC) populations, CD103+ DCs and CD11bhi DCs, to the lung draining mediastinal lymph nodes (medLN). Among those DC subsets, CD11bhi DCs that were relatively immature had a major role in Th17 cell differentiation after administration of CT. CT-treated BMDCs showed reduced expression of MHC class II and CD86, similar to CD11bhi DCs in medLN, and these BMDCs promoted Th17 cell differentiation more potently than other BMDCs expressing higher levels of MHC class II and CD86. By analyzing the expression of activation markers such as CD25 and CD69, proliferation and IL-2 production, we determined that CT-treated BMDCs showed diminished antigen-presenting potential to CD4+ T cells compared with normal BMDCs. We also found that CT-stimulated BMDCs promote activin A expression as well as IL-6 and IL-1β, and activin A had a synergic role with TGF-β1 in CT-mediated Th17 cell differentiation. Taken together, our results suggest that CT-stimulated DCs promote Th17 cell differentiation by not only modulating antigen-presenting potential but also inducing Th polarizing cytokines. PMID:27271559

  6. IgE-mediated enhancement of CD4(+) T cell responses requires antigen presentation by CD8α(-) conventional dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhoujie; Dahlin, Joakim S; Xu, Hui; Heyman, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    IgE, forming an immune complex with small proteins, can enhance the specific antibody and CD4(+) T cell responses in vivo. The effects require the presence of CD23 (Fcε-receptor II)(+) B cells, which capture IgE-complexed antigens (Ag) in the circulation and transport them to splenic B cell follicles. In addition, also CD11c(+) cells, which do not express CD23, are required for IgE-mediated enhancement of T cell responses. This suggests that some type of dendritic cell obtains IgE-Ag complexes from B cells and presents antigenic peptides to T cells. To elucidate the nature of this dendritic cell, mice were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE and OVA, and different populations of CD11c(+) cells, obtained from the spleens four hours after immunization, were tested for their ability to present OVA. CD8α(-) conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) were much more efficient in inducing specific CD4(+) T cell proliferation ex vivo than were CD8α(+) cDCs or plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Thus, IgE-Ag complexes administered intravenously are rapidly transported to the spleen by recirculating B cells where they are delivered to CD8α(-) cDCs which induce proliferation of CD4(+) T cells. PMID:27306570

  7. A minor subset of Batf3-dependent antigen presenting cells in islets of Langerhans is essential for the development of autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Stephen T.; Carrero, Javier A.; Mohan, James F.; Calderon, Boris; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Unanue, Emil R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune diabetes is characterized by inflammatory infiltration; however the initiating events are poorly understood. We found that the islets of Langerhans in young non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice contained two antigen presenting cell (APC) populations: a major macrophage and a minor CD103+ dendritic cell (DC) population. By four weeks of age, CD4+ T cells entered islets coincident with an increase of CD103+ DCs. In order to examine the role of the CD103+ DCs in diabetes, we examined Batf3-deficient NOD mice that lacked the CD103+ DCs in islets and pancreatic lymph nodes. This led to a lack of autoreactive T cells in islets and, importantly, no incidence of diabetes. Additional examination revealed that presentation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes in the pancreatic lymph nodes was absent with a partial impairment of MHC class II presentation. Altogether, this study reveals that CD103+ DCs were essential for autoimmune diabetes development. PMID:25367577

  8. The Critical Role of Antigen-Presentation-Induced Cytokine Crosstalk in the Central Nervous System in Multiple Sclerosis and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Rebecca A.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that has been extensively studied using the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). It is believed that CD4+ T lymphocytes play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease by mediating the demyelination of neuronal axons via secretion of proinflammatory cytokines resulting in the clinical manifestations. Although a great deal of information has been gained in the last several decades about the cells involved in the inflammatory and disease mediating process, important questions have remained unanswered. It has long been held that initial neuroantigen presentation and T cell activation events occur in the immune periphery and then translocate to the CNS. However, an increasing body of evidence suggests that antigen (Ag) presentation might initiate within the CNS itself. Importantly, it has remained unresolved which antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the CNS are the first to acquire and present neuroantigens during EAE/MS to T cells, and what the conditions are under which this takes place, ie, whether this occurs in the healthy CNS or only during inflammatory conditions and what the related cytokine microenvironment is comprised of. In particular, the central role of interferon-γ as a primary mediator of CNS pathology during EAE has been challenged by the emergence of Th17 cells producing interleukin-17. This review describes our current understanding of potential APCs in the CNS and the contribution of these and other CNS-resident cells to disease pathology. Additionally, we discuss the question of where Ag presentation is initiated and under what conditions neuroantigens are made available to APCs with special emphasis on which cytokines may be important in this process. PMID:21919736

  9. PI3Kδ promotes CD4+ T-cell interactions with antigen-presenting cells by increasing LFA-1 binding to ICAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Garçon, Fabien; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Activation of T lymphocytes by peptide/major histocompatibility complex on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) involves dynamic contacts between the two cells, during which T cells undergo marked morphological changes. These interactions are facilitated by integrins. Activation of the T cells increases the binding of the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) expressed by T cells to intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and ICAM-2 expressed by APCs. The signalling pathways that control integrin affinities are incompletely defined. The phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) generate second-messenger signalling molecules that control cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and trafficking. Here we show that in T cells, PI3Kδ attenuates the activation of Rac1, but sustains the activation of Rap1. Consequently, PI3Kδ increases LFA-1-dependent adhesion to form stable conjugates with APCs. Increased Rap1 activity and LFA-1 adhesion were only in part mediated by the downstream kinase Akt, suggesting the involvement of additional phosphatidylinositol(3,4,5)P3-binding proteins. These results establish a link between PI3K activity, cytoskeletal changes and integrin binding and help explain the impaired T-cell-dependent immune responses in PI3Kδ-deficient mice. PMID:26740009

  10. Rainbow trout CK9, a CCL25-like ancient chemokine that attracts and regulates B cells and macrophages, the main antigen presenting cells in fish

    PubMed Central

    Aquilino, Carolina; Granja, Aitor G.; Castro, Rosario; Wang, Tiehui; Abos, Beatriz; Parra, David; Secombes, Christopher J.; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    CK9 is a rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) CC chemokine phylogenetically related to mammalian CCL25. Although CK9 is known to be transcriptionally regulated in response to inflammation particularly in mucosal tissues, its functionality has never been revealed. In the current work, we have demonstrated that CK9 is chemoattractant for antigen presenting cells (APCs) expressing major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) on the cell surface. Among these APCs, CK9 has a strong chemotactic capacity for both B cells (IgM+ and IgT+) and macrophages. Along with its chemotactic capacities, CK9 modulated the MHC II turnover of B lymphocytes and up-regulated the phagocytic capacity of both IgM+ cells and macrophages. Although CK9 had no lymphoproliferative effects, it increased the survival of IgT+ lymphocytes. Furthermore, we have established that the chemoattractant capacity of CK9 is strongly increased after pre-incubation of leukocytes with a T-independent antigen, whereas B cell receptor (BCR) cross-linking strongly abrogated their capacity to migrate to CK9, indicating that CK9 preferentially attracts B cells at the steady state or under BCR-independent stimulation. These results point to CK9 being a key regulator of B lymphocyte trafficking in rainbow trout, able to modulate innate functions of teleost B lymphocytes and macrophages. PMID:27003360

  11. Exogenous Control of the Expression of Group I CD1 Molecules Competent for Presentation of Microbial Nonpeptide Antigens to Human T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Angelo; Graziani, Grazia; Franzese, Ornella; Prete, Salvatore P.; Bonmassar, Enzo; Bonmassar, Laura; D'Atri, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Group I CD1 (CD1a, CD1b, and CD1c) glycoproteins expressed on immature and mature dendritic cells present nonpeptide antigens (i.e., lipid or glycolipid molecules mainly of microbial origin) to T cells. Cytotoxic CD1-restricted T lymphocytes recognizing mycobacterial lipid antigens were found in tuberculosis patients. However, thanks to a complex interplay between mycobacteria and CD1 system, M. tuberculosis possesses a successful tactic based, at least in part, on CD1 downregulation to evade CD1-dependent immunity. On the ground of these findings, it is reasonable to hypothesize that modulation of CD1 protein expression by chemical, biological, or infectious agents could influence host's immune reactivity against M. tuberculosis-associated lipids, possibly affecting antitubercular resistance. This scenario prompted us to perform a detailed analysis of the literature concerning the effect of external agents on Group I CD1 expression in order to obtain valuable information on the possible strategies to be adopted for driving properly CD1-dependent immune functions in human pathology and in particular, in human tuberculosis. PMID:21603161

  12. PI3Kδ promotes CD4(+) T-cell interactions with antigen-presenting cells by increasing LFA-1 binding to ICAM-1.

    PubMed

    Garçon, Fabien; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Activation of T lymphocytes by peptide/major histocompatibility complex on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) involves dynamic contacts between the two cells, during which T cells undergo marked morphological changes. These interactions are facilitated by integrins. Activation of the T cells increases the binding of the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) expressed by T cells to intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and ICAM-2 expressed by APCs. The signalling pathways that control integrin affinities are incompletely defined. The phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) generate second-messenger signalling molecules that control cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and trafficking. Here we show that in T cells, PI3Kδ attenuates the activation of Rac1, but sustains the activation of Rap1. Consequently, PI3Kδ increases LFA-1-dependent adhesion to form stable conjugates with APCs. Increased Rap1 activity and LFA-1 adhesion were only in part mediated by the downstream kinase Akt, suggesting the involvement of additional phosphatidylinositol(3,4,5)P3-binding proteins. These results establish a link between PI3K activity, cytoskeletal changes and integrin binding and help explain the impaired T-cell-dependent immune responses in PI3Kδ-deficient mice. PMID:26740009

  13. Artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing AFP158-166 peptide and interleukin-15 activate AFP-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Longhao; Guo, Hao; Jiang, Ruoyu; Lu, Li; Liu, Tong; Zhang, Zhixiang; He, Xianghui

    2016-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are potent generators of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) for adoptive immunotherapy; however, generation of APCs is cumbersome, expensive, and subject to the tumor microenvironment. Artificial APCs (aAPCs) have been developed as a cost-effective alternative to APCs. We developed a cellular aAPC that efficiently generated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-specific CTLs. We genetically modified the human B cell lymphoma cell line BJAB with a lentiviral vector to establish an aAPC called BA15. The expression of AFP158-166-HLA-A*02:01 complex, CD80, CD86, and interleukin (IL)-15 in BA15 cells was assessed. The efficiency of BA15 at generating AFP-specific CTLs and the specific cytotoxicity of CTLs against AFP+ cells were also determined. BA15 cells expressed high levels of AFP158-166 peptide, HLA-A2, CD80, CD86, and IL-15. BA15 cells also exhibited higher efficiency in generating AFP-specific CTLs than did dendritic cells. These CTLs had greater cytotoxicity against AFP+ hepatocellular carcinoma cells than did CTLs obtained from dendritic cells in vitro and in vivo. Our novel aAPC system could provide a robust platform for the generation of functional AFP-specific CTLs for adoptive immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27007051

  14. Artificial antigen-presenting cells expressing AFP158-166 peptide and interleukin-15 activate AFP-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Longhao; Guo, Hao; Jiang, Ruoyu; Lu, Li; Liu, Tong; Zhang, Zhixiang; He, Xianghui

    2016-04-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are potent generators of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) for adoptive immunotherapy; however, generation of APCs is cumbersome, expensive, and subject to the tumor microenvironment. Artificial APCs (aAPCs) have been developed as a cost-effective alternative to APCs. We developed a cellular aAPC that efficiently generated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-specific CTLs. We genetically modified the human B cell lymphoma cell line BJAB with a lentiviral vector to establish an aAPC called BA15. The expression of AFP158-166-HLA-A*02:01 complex, CD80, CD86, and interleukin (IL)-15 in BA15 cells was assessed. The efficiency of BA15 at generating AFP-specific CTLs and the specific cytotoxicity of CTLs against AFP+ cells were also determined. BA15 cells expressed high levels of AFP158-166 peptide, HLA-A2, CD80, CD86, and IL-15. BA15 cells also exhibited higher efficiency in generating AFP-specific CTLs than did dendritic cells. These CTLs had greater cytotoxicity against AFP+ hepatocellular carcinoma cells than did CTLs obtained from dendritic cells in vitro and in vivo. Our novel aAPC system could provide a robust platform for the generation of functional AFP-specific CTLs for adoptive immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27007051

  15. Inflammation conditions mature dendritic cells to retain the capacity to present new antigens but with altered cytokine secretion function.

    PubMed

    Vega-Ramos, Javier; Roquilly, Antoine; Zhan, Yifan; Young, Louise J; Mintern, Justine D; Villadangos, Jose A

    2014-10-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are directly activated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and undergo maturation. Mature DCs express high levels of MHC class II molecules ("signal 1"), upregulate T cell costimulatory receptors ("signal 2"), and secrete "signal 3" cytokines (e.g., IL-12). Mature DCs efficiently present Ags linked to the activating PAMP and prime naive T cells. However, mature DCs downregulate MHC II synthesis, which prevents them from presenting newly encountered Ags. DCs can also be indirectly activated by inflammatory mediators released during infection (e.g., IFN). Indirectly activated DCs mature but do not present pathogen Ags (as they have not encountered the pathogen) and do not provide signal 3. Therefore, although they are probably generated in large numbers upon infection or vaccination, indirectly activated DCs are considered to play little or no role in T cell immunity. In this article, we show that indirectly activated DCs retain their capacity to present Ags encountered after maturation in vivo. They can also respond to PAMPs, but the previous encounter of inflammatory signals alters their cytokine (signal 3) secretion pattern. This implies that the immune response elicited by a PAMP is more complex than predicted by the examination of the immunogenic features of directly activated DCs, and that underlying inflammatory processes can skew the immune response against pathogens. Our observations have important implications for the design of vaccines and for the understanding of the interactions between simultaneous infections, or of infection in the context of ongoing sterile inflammation. PMID:25200952

  16. Privileged Antigen Presentation in Splenic B Cell Follicles Maximizes T Cell Responses in Prime-Boost Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Bridle, Byram W; Nguyen, Andrew; Salem, Omar; Zhang, Liang; Koshy, Sandeep; Clouthier, Derek; Chen, Lan; Pol, Jonathan; Swift, Stephanie L; Bowdish, Dawn M E; Lichty, Brian D; Bramson, Jonathan L; Wan, Yonghong

    2016-06-01

    Effector T cells (TEFF) are a barrier to booster vaccination because they can rapidly kill Ag-bearing APCs before memory T cells are engaged. We report in this study that i.v. delivery of rhabdoviral vectors leads to direct infection of follicular B cells in the spleen, where the earliest evidence of secondary T cell responses was observed. This allows booster immunizations to rapidly expand CD8(+) central memory T cells (TCM) during the acute phase of the primary response that is dominated by TEFF Interestingly, although the ablation of B cells before boosting with rhabdoviral vectors diminishes the expansion of memory T cells, B cells do not present Ags directly. Instead, depletion of CD11c(+) dendritic cells abrogates secondary T cell expansion, suggesting that virus-infected follicular B cells may function as an Ag source for local DCs to subsequently capture and present the Ag. Because TCM are located within B cell follicles in the spleen whereas TEFF cannot traffic through follicular regions, Ag production and presentation by follicular APCs represent a unique mechanism to secure engagement of TCM during an ongoing effector response. Our data offer insights into novel strategies for rapid expansion of CD8(+) T cells using prime-boost vaccines by targeting privileged sites for Ag presentation. PMID:27183620

  17. LAMP-2C Inhibits MHC Class II Presentation of Cytoplasmic Antigens by Disrupting Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Liliana; McLetchie, Shawna; Gardiner, Gail J; Deffit, Sarah N; Zhou, Delu; Blum, Janice S

    2016-03-15

    Cells use multiple autophagy pathways to sequester macromolecules, senescent organelles, and pathogens. Several conserved isoforms of the lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2) regulate these pathways influencing immune recognition and responses. LAMP-2A is required for chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), which promotes Ag capture and MHC class II (MHCII) presentation in B cells and signaling in T cells. LAMP-2B regulates lysosome maturation to impact macroautophagy and phagocytosis. Yet, far less is known about LAMP-2C function. Whereas LAMP2A and LAMP2B mRNA were broadly detected in human tissues, LAMP2C expression was more limited. Transcripts for the three LAMP2 isoforms increased with B cell activation, although specific gene induction varied depending on TLR versus BCR engagement. To examine LAMP-2C function in human B cells and specifically its role in Ag presentation, we used ectopic gene expression. Increased LAMP-2C expression in B cells did not alter MHCII expression or invariant chain processing, but did perturb cytoplasmic Ag presentation via CMA. MHCII presentation of epitopes from exogenous and membrane Ags was not affected by LAMP-2C expression in B cells. Similarly, changes in B cell LAMP-2C expression did not impact macroautophagy. The gene expression of other LAMP2 isoforms and proteasome and lysosomal proteases activities were unperturbed by LAMP-2C ectopic expression. LAMP-2C levels modulated the steady-state expression of several cytoplasmic proteins that are targeted for degradation by CMA and diminished peptide translocation via this pathway. Thus, LAMP-2C serves as a natural inhibitor of CMA that can selectively skew MHCII presentation of cytoplasmic Ags. PMID:26856698

  18. Human peptide transporter deficiency: importance of HLA-B in the presentation of TAP-independent EBV antigens.

    PubMed

    de la Salle, H; Houssaint, E; Peyrat, M A; Arnold, D; Salamero, J; Pinczon, D; Stevanovic, S; Bausinger, H; Fricker, D; Gomard, E; Biddison, W; Lehner, P; UytdeHaag, F; Sasportes, M; Donato, L; Rammensee, H G; Cazenave, J P; Hanau, D; Tongio, M M; Bonneville, M

    1997-05-15

    Two siblings with a peptide TAP deficiency were recently described. Despite poor cell surface expression of HLA class I molecules, these patients were not unusually susceptible to viral infections. The majority of the cell surface-expressed class I molecules were HLA-B products as assessed by cytofluorometry and biochemical analysis. Analysis of two peptides eluted from the class I molecules expressed by TAP-deficient EBV B lymphoblastoid cell lines indicated that both were derived from cytosolic proteins and presented by HLA-B molecules. Peripheral alphabeta CD8+ T cells were present and their TCR repertoire was polyclonal. Most of the alphabeta CD8+ T cell clones studied (21 of 22) were nonreactive against cells expressing normal levels of the same HLA alleles as those of the TAP-deficient patients. However, it was possible to isolate one cytotoxic CD8+ alphabeta T cell clone recognizing the EBV protein LMP2 presented by HLA-B molecules on TAP-deficient cells. These observations suggest that in the TAP-deficient patients, CD8+ alphabeta T cells could mature and be recruited in immune responses to mediate HLA class I-restricted cytotoxic defense against viral infections. They also strengthen the physiologic importance of a TAP-independent processing pathway of the LMP2 protein, which was previously shown to contain several other TAP-independent epitopes. PMID:9144467

  19. Dendritic Cell Migration and Antigen Presentation Are Coordinated by the Opposing Functions of the Tetraspanins CD82 and CD37.

    PubMed

    Jones, Eleanor L; Wee, Janet L; Demaria, Maria C; Blakeley, Jessica; Ho, Po Ki; Vega-Ramos, Javier; Villadangos, Jose A; van Spriel, Annemiek B; Hickey, Michael J; Hämmerling, Günther J; Wright, Mark D

    2016-02-01

    This study supports a new concept where the opposing functions of the tetraspanins CD37 and CD82 may coordinate changes in migration and Ag presentation during dendritic cell (DC) activation. We have previously published that CD37 is downregulated upon monocyte-derived DC activation, promotes migration of both skin and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs), and restrains Ag presentation in splenic and BMDCs. In this article, we show that CD82, the closest phylogenetic relative to CD37, appears to have opposing functions. CD82 is upregulated upon activation of BMDCs and monocyte-derived DCs, restrains migration of skin and BMDCs, supports MHC class II maturation, and promotes stable interactions between T cells and splenic DCs or BMDCs. The underlying mechanism involves the rearrangement of the cytoskeleton via a differential activation of small GTPases. Both CD37(-/-) and CD82(-/-) BMDCs lack cellular projections, but where CD37(-/-) BMDCs spread poorly on fibronectin, CD82(-/-) BMDCs are large and spread to a greater extent than wild-type BMDCs. At the molecular level, CD82 is a negative regulator of RhoA, whereas CD37 promotes activation of Rac-1; both tetraspanins negatively regulate Cdc42. Thus, this study identifies a key aspect of DC biology: an unactivated BMDC is CD37(hi)CD82(lo), resulting in a highly motile cell with a limited ability to activate naive T cells. By contrast, a late activated BMDC is CD37(lo)CD82(hi), and thus has modified its migratory, cytoskeletal, and Ag presentation machinery to become a cell superbly adapted to activating naive T cells. PMID:26729805

  20. CD8+ Effector T Cell Migration to Pancreatic Islet Grafts Is Dependent on Cognate Antigen Presentation by Donor Graft Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianqian; Dai, Hehua; Yatim, Karim M; Abou-Daya, Khodor; Williams, Amanda L; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H; Camirand, Geoffrey; Rudd, Christopher E; Lakkis, Fadi G

    2016-08-15

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is a promising therapy for diabetes, but acute rejection of the islets by host effector T cells has hindered clinical application. In this study, we addressed the mechanisms of CD8(+) effector T cell migration to islet grafts because interrupting this step is key to preventing rejection. We found that effector T cell migration to revascularized islet transplants in mice is dependent on non-self Ag recognition rather than signaling via Gαi-coupled chemokine receptors. Presentation of non-self Ag by donor cells was necessary for migration, whereas Ag presentation by recipient cells was dispensable. We also observed that deficiency of SKAP1, an immune cell adaptor downstream of the TCR and important for integrin activation, prolongs allograft survival but does not reduce effector T cell migration to the graft. Therefore, effector T cell migration to transplanted islets is Ag driven, not chemokine driven, but SKAP1 does not play a critical role in this process. PMID:27357151

  1. Human Leukocyte Antigen-Presented Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Is a Surface Biomarker and Potential Therapeutic Target for Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Andrea M; Kaabinejadian, Saghar; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Bardet, Wilfried; Jackson, Ken W; Zuna, Rosemary E; Husain, Sanam; Adams, Gregory P; MacDonald, Glen; Dillon, Rachelle L; Ames, Harold; Buchli, Rico; Hawkins, Oriana E; Weidanz, Jon A; Hildebrand, William H

    2016-02-01

    T cells recognize cancer cells via HLA/peptide complexes, and when disease overtakes these immune mechanisms, immunotherapy can exogenously target these same HLA/peptide surface markers. We previously identified an HLA-A2-presented peptide derived from macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and generated antibody RL21A against this HLA-A2/MIF complex. The objective of the current study was to assess the potential for targeting the HLA-A2/MIF complex in ovarian cancer. First, MIF peptide FLSELTQQL was eluted from the HLA-A2 of the human cancerous ovarian cell lines SKOV3, A2780, OV90, and FHIOSE118hi and detected by mass spectrometry. By flow cytometry, RL21A was shown to specifically stain these four cell lines in the context of HLA-A2. Next, partially matched HLA-A*02:01+ ovarian cancer (n = 27) and normal fallopian tube (n = 24) tissues were stained with RL21A by immunohistochemistry to assess differential HLA-A2/MIF complex expression. Ovarian tumor tissues revealed significantly increased RL21A staining compared with normal fallopian tube epithelium (P < 0.0001), with minimal staining of normal stroma and blood vessels (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001 compared with tumor cells) suggesting a therapeutic window. We then demonstrated the anticancer activity of toxin-bound RL21A via the dose-dependent killing of ovarian cancer cells. In summary, MIF-derived peptide FLSELTQQL is HLA-A2-presented and recognized by RL21A on ovarian cancer cell lines and patient tumor tissues, and targeting of this HLA-A2/MIF complex with toxin-bound RL21A can induce ovarian cancer cell death. These results suggest that the HLA-A2/MIF complex should be further explored as a cell-surface target for ovarian cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26719579

  2. Human sunlight-induced basal-cell-carcinoma-associated dendritic cells are deficient in T cell co-stimulatory molecules and are impaired as antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nestle, F. O.; Burg, G.; Fäh, J.; Wrone-Smith, T.; Nickoloff, B. J.

    1997-01-01

    Immune surveillance of skin cancer involves the stimulation of effector T cells by tumor-derived antigens and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). An effective APC must not only display processed antigen in the context of MHC molecules but also express co-stimulatory molecules that are required to fully activate T cells. One of the most common cutaneous neoplasms is basal cell carcinoma. To investigate expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) on tumor-associated dendritic cells (TADCs), cryosections from basal cell carcinomas were immunostained. In basal cell carcinomas, only 1 to 2% of intratumor and 5 to 10% of peritumor APCs expressed CD80 or CD86. In contrast, biopsies of immunological/inflammatory dermatoses revealed that 38 to 73% of APCs expressed CD80 and CD86. To further evaluate their phenotype and function, TADCs were isolated from tissue samples of basal cell carcinomas; they were non-adherent to plastic, displayed a typical dendritic morphology, and expressed high levels of major histocompatibility class II molecules on their surface. When TADCs were compared with dendritic cells from blood for presentation of superantigens (staphylococcal enterotoxins A and B) to resting autologous T cells, TADCs were consistently weaker stimulators of T cell proliferation than blood dendritic cells. When analyzed by flow cytometry, TADCs expressed high levels of HLA-DR, but only 5 to 10% co-expressed CD80 or CD86. A 3-day culture in granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-containing medium partially reconstituted the TADC expression of CD80 and CD86 as well as their immunostimulatory capacity. Thus, in this common skin cancer, although there are prominent collections of HLA-DR-positive APCs in and around tumor cells, the TADCs are deficient in important co-stimulatory molecules as well as being weak stimulators of T cell proliferation. The paucity of co-stimulatory molecule expression and functional activity of TADCs may explain why

  3. Virus-triggered acquired immunodeficiency by cytotoxic T-cell-dependent destruction of antigen-presenting cells and lymph follicle structure.

    PubMed Central

    Odermatt, B; Eppler, M; Leist, T P; Hengartner, H; Zinkernagel, R M

    1991-01-01

    Virus-induced acquired immune suppression in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus is shown here to be caused by the CD8+-T-cell-dependent elimination of macrophages/antigen-presenting cells. Surprisingly, this is associated with severe destruction of the follicular organization of lymphoid organs, indicating a crucial role for dendritic cells and marginal zone macrophages in maintaining follicular structure. Once established, this immunopathology cannot be readily reversed by the elimination of CD8+ effector cells. Such a T-cell-mediated pathogenesis may play a pivotal role in acquired virus-induced immunosuppression and may represent one strategy by which virus escapes immune surveillance and establishes persistent infections in initially immunocompetent hosts. Images PMID:1910175

  4. A Brucella spp. Protease Inhibitor Limits Antigen Lysosomal Proteolysis, Increases Cross-Presentation, and Enhances CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Coria, Lorena M; Ibañez, Andrés E; Tkach, Mercedes; Sabbione, Florencia; Bruno, Laura; Carabajal, Marianela V; Berguer, Paula M; Barrionuevo, Paula; Schillaci, Roxana; Trevani, Analía S; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Pasquevich, Karina A; Cassataro, Juliana

    2016-05-15

    In this study, we demonstrate that the unlipidated (U) outer membrane protein (Omp) 19 from Brucella spp. is a competitive inhibitor of human cathepsin L. U-Omp19 inhibits lysosome cathepsins and APC-derived microsome activity in vitro and partially inhibits lysosomal cathepsin L activity within live APCs. Codelivery of U-Omp19 with the Ag can reduce intracellular Ag digestion and increases Ag half-life in dendritic cells (DCs). U-Omp19 retains the Ag in Lamp-2(+) compartments after its internalization and promotes a sustained expression of MHC class I/peptide complexes in the cell surface of DCs. Consequently, U-Omp19 enhances Ag cross-presentation by DCs to CD8(+) T cells. U-Omp19 s.c. delivery induces the recruitment of CD11c(+)CD8α(+) DCs and monocytes to lymph nodes whereas it partially limits in vivo Ag proteolysis inside DCs. Accordingly, this protein is able to induce CD8(+) T cell responses in vivo against codelivered Ag. Antitumor responses were elicited after U-Omp19 coadministration, increasing survival of mice in a murine melanoma challenge model. Collectively, these results indicate that a cysteine protease inhibitor from bacterial origin could be a suitable component of vaccine formulations against tumors. PMID:27084100

  5. Novel CD47: SIRPα Dependent Mechanism for the Activation of STAT3 in Antigen-Presenting Cell

    PubMed Central

    Toledano, Natan; Gur-Wahnon, Devorah; Ben-Yehuda, Adi; Rachmilewitz, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface CD47 interacts with its receptor, signal-regulatory-protein α (SIRPα) that is expressed predominantly on macrophages, to inhibit phagocytosis of normal, healthy cells. This “don’t eat me” signal is mediated through tyrosine phosphorylation of SIRPα at the cytoplasmic ITIM motifs and the recruitment of the phosphatase, SHP-1. We previously revealed a novel mechanism for the activation of the STAT3 pathway and the regulation of human APC maturation and function that is based on cell:cell interaction. In this study, we present evidence supporting the notion that CD47:SIRPα serves as a cell surface receptor: ligand pair involved in this contact-dependent STAT3 activation and regulation of APC maturation. We show that upon co-culturing APC with various primary and tumor cell lines STAT3 phosphorylation and IL-10 expression are induced, and such regulation could be suppressed by specific CD47 siRNAs and shRNAs. Significantly, >50% reduction in CD47 expression abolished the contact-dependent inhibition of T cell activation. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical association between SIRPα and STAT3. Thus, we suggest that in addition to signaling through the ITIM-SHP-1 complex that transmit an anti-phagocytotic, CD47:SIRPα also triggers STAT3 signaling that is linked to an immature APC phenotype and peripheral tolerance under steady state and pathological conditions. PMID:24073274

  6. Runx1 Regulates Myeloid Precursor Differentiation Into Osteoclasts Without Affecting Differentiation Into Antigen Presenting or Phagocytic Cells in Both Males and Females.

    PubMed

    Paglia, David N; Yang, Xiaochuan; Kalinowski, Judith; Jastrzebski, Sandra; Drissi, Hicham; Lorenzo, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Runt-related transcription factor 1 (Runx1), a master regulator of hematopoiesis, is expressed in preosteoclasts. Previously we evaluated the bone phenotype of CD11b-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice and demonstrated enhanced osteoclasts and decreased bone mass in males. However, an assessment of the effects of Runx1 deletion in female osteoclast precursors was impossible with this model. Moreover, the role of Runx1 in myeloid cell differentiation into other lineages is unknown. Therefore, we generated LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice, which delete Runx1 equally (∼80% deletion) in myeloid precursor cells from both sexes and examined the capacity of these cells to differentiate into osteoclasts and phagocytic and antigen-presenting cells. Both female and male LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice had decreased trabecular bone mass (72% decrease in bone volume fraction) and increased osteoclast number (2-3 times) (P < .05) without alteration of osteoblast histomorphometric indices. We also demonstrated that loss of Runx1 in pluripotential myeloid precursors with LysM-Cre did not alter the number of myeloid precursor cells in bone marrow or their ability to differentiate into phagocytizing or antigen-presenting cells. This study demonstrates that abrogation of Runx1 in multipotential myeloid precursor cells significantly and specifically enhanced the ability of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand to stimulate osteoclast formation and fusion in female and male mice without affecting other myeloid cell fates. In turn, increased osteoclast activity in LysM-Cre Runx1(fl/fl) mice likely contributed to a decrease in bone mass. These dramatic effects were not due to increased osteoclast precursors in the deleted mutants and argue that inhibition of Runx1 in multipotential myeloid precursor cells is important for osteoclast formation and function. PMID:27267711

  7. T-cell brain infiltration and immature antigen-presenting cells in transgenic models of Alzheimer's disease-like cerebral amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, M T; Merlini, M; Späni, C; Gericke, C; Schweizer, N; Enzmann, G; Engelhardt, B; Kulic, L; Suter, T; Nitsch, R M

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral beta-amyloidosis, one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), elicits a well-characterised, microglia-mediated local innate immune response. In contrast, it is not clear whether cells of the adaptive immune system, in particular T-cells, react to cerebral amyloidosis in AD. Even though parenchymal T-cells have been described in post-mortem brains of AD patients, it is not known whether infiltrating T-cells are specifically recruited to the extracellular deposits of beta-amyloid, and whether they are locally activated into proliferating, effector cells upon interaction with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). To address these issues we have analysed by confocal microscopy and flow-cytometry the localisation and activation status of both T-cells and APCs in transgenic (tg) mice models of AD-like cerebral amyloidosis. Increased numbers of infiltrating T-cells were found in amyloid-burdened brain regions of tg mice, with concomitant up-regulation of endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, compared to non-tg littermates. The infiltrating T-cells in tg brains did not co-localise with amyloid plaques, produced less interferon-gamma than those in controls and did not proliferate locally. Bona-fide dendritic cells were virtually absent from the brain parenchyma of both non-tg and tg mice, and APCs from tg brains showed an immature phenotype, with accumulation of MHC-II in intracellular compartments. These results indicate that cerebral amyloidosis promotes T-cell infiltration but interferes with local antigen presentation and T-cell activation. The inability of the brain immune surveillance to orchestrate a protective immune response to amyloid-beta peptide might contribute to the accumulation of amyloid in the progression of the disease. PMID:26872418

  8. Ternary complex consisting of DNA, polycation, and a natural polysaccharide of schizophyllan to induce cellular uptake by antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yoichi; Shimada, Naohiko; Kaneko, Kenji; Shinkai, Seiji; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2007-04-01

    A natural polysaccharide called schizophyllan (SPG) can form a complex with polynucleotides, and the complex has been shown to deliver biofunctional short DNAs such as antisense DNAs and CpG-DNAs. Although it is a novel and efficient method, there is a drawback: attachment of homo-polynucleotide tails [for example, poly(dA) or poly(C)] to the end of DNA is necessary to stabilize the complex, because DNA heterosequences cannot bind to SPG. The aim of this paper is to present an alternative method in which SPG/DNA complexes can be made without using the tails. The basic strategy is as follows: since SPG can form hydrophobic domains in aqueous solutions, hydrophobic objects should be encapsulated by this domain. DNA alone is highly hydrophilic; however, once DNA/polycation complexes are made, they should be included by the SPG hydrophobic domain. The aim of this paper is to prove the formation of the polycation/DNA/SPG ternary complex. Gel electrophoresis showed that presence of SPG influenced the migration pattern of polycation+DNA mixtures. With increasing the SPG ratio, the zeta potential (zeta) of the polycation+DNA+SPG mixture decreased drastically to reach almost zeta = 0 and the particle size distributions were altered due to the ternary complex formation. Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the polycation/DNA/SPG ternary complexes showed high uptake efficiency when the complexes were exposed to macrophage-like cells (J774.A1). IL-12 secretion was enhanced when CpG-DNA was added as the ternary complex. These features can be ascribed to the fact that J774.A1 has a SPG recognition site called Dectin-1 on the cellular surface and the ternary complex can be ingested by this pathway. PMID:17328571

  9. IRF1 and NF-kB Restore MHC Class I-Restricted Tumor Antigen Processing and Presentation to Cytotoxic T Cells in Aggressive Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Cifaldi, Loredana; Antonucci, Chiara; Citti, Arianna; Boldrini, Renata; Pezzullo, Marco; Castellano, Aurora; Russo, Vincenzo; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Giacomini, Patrizio; Locatelli, Franco; Fruci, Doriana

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common solid extracranial cancer of childhood, displays a remarkable low expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) and Antigen Processing Machinery (APM) molecules, including Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Aminopeptidases, and poorly presents tumor antigens to Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL). We have previously shown that this is due to low expression of the transcription factor NF-kB p65. Herein, we show that not only NF-kB p65, but also the Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF1) and certain APM components are low in a subset of NB cell lines with aggressive features. Whereas single transfection with either IRF1, or NF-kB p65 is ineffective, co-transfection results in strong synergy and substantial reversion of the MHC-I/APM-low phenotype in all NB cell lines tested. Accordingly, linked immunohistochemistry expression patterns between nuclear IRF1 and p65 on the one hand, and MHC-I on the other hand, were observed in vivo. Absence and presence of the three molecules neatly segregated between high-grade and low-grade NB, respectively. Finally, APM reconstitution by double IRF1/p65 transfection rendered a NB cell line susceptible to killing by anti MAGE-A3 CTLs, lytic efficiency comparable to those seen upon IFN-γ treatment. This is the first demonstration that a complex immune escape phenotype can be rescued by reconstitution of a limited number of master regulatory genes. These findings provide molecular insight into defective MHC-I expression in NB cells and provide the rational for T cell-based immunotherapy in NB variants refractory to conventional therapy. PMID:23071666

  10. CD80 and CD86 differentially regulate mechanical interactions of T-cells with antigen-presenting dendritic cells and B-cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tong Seng; Goh, James Kang Hao; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Lim, Chwee Teck; Hämmerling, Günter J; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Functional T-cell responses are initiated by physical interactions between T-cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells (DCs) and B-cells. T-cells are activated more effectively by DCs than by B-cells, but little is known about the key molecular mechanisms that underpin the particular potency of DC in triggering T-cell responses. To better understand the influence of physical intercellular interactions on APC efficacy in activating T-cells, we used single cell force spectroscopy to characterize and compare the mechanical forces of interactions between DC:T-cells and B:T-cells. Following antigen stimulation, intercellular interactions of DC:T-cell conjugates were stronger than B:T-cell interactions. DCs induced higher levels of T-cell calcium mobilization and production of IL-2 and IFNγ than were elicited by B-cells, thus suggesting that tight intercellular contacts are important in providing mechanically stable environment to initiate T-cell activation. Blocking antibodies targeting surface co-stimulatory molecules CD80 or CD86 weakened intercellular interactions and dampen T-cell activation, highlighting the amplificatory roles of CD80/86 in regulating APC:T-cell interactions and T-cell functional activation. The variable strength of mechanical forces between DC:T-cells and B:T-cell interactions were not solely dependent on differential APC expression of CD80/86, since DCs were superior to B-cells in promoting strong interactions with T-cells even when CD80 and CD86 were inhibited. These data provide mechanical insights into the effects of co-stimulatory molecules in regulating APC:T-cell interactions. PMID:23024807

  11. CD80 and CD86 Differentially Regulate Mechanical Interactions of T-Cells with Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells and B-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tong Seng; Goh, James Kang Hao; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Lim, Chwee Teck; Hämmerling, Günter J.; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Functional T-cell responses are initiated by physical interactions between T-cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs), including dendritic cells (DCs) and B-cells. T-cells are activated more effectively by DCs than by B-cells, but little is known about the key molecular mechanisms that underpin the particular potency of DC in triggering T-cell responses. To better understand the influence of physical intercellular interactions on APC efficacy in activating T-cells, we used single cell force spectroscopy to characterize and compare the mechanical forces of interactions between DC:T-cells and B:T-cells. Following antigen stimulation, intercellular interactions of DC:T-cell conjugates were stronger than B:T-cell interactions. DCs induced higher levels of T-cell calcium mobilization and production of IL-2 and IFNγ than were elicited by B-cells, thus suggesting that tight intercellular contacts are important in providing mechanically stable environment to initiate T-cell activation. Blocking antibodies targeting surface co-stimulatory molecules CD80 or CD86 weakened intercellular interactions and dampen T-cell activation, highlighting the amplificatory roles of CD80/86 in regulating APC:T-cell interactions and T-cell functional activation. The variable strength of mechanical forces between DC:T-cells and B:T-cell interactions were not solely dependent on differential APC expression of CD80/86, since DCs were superior to B-cells in promoting strong interactions with T-cells even when CD80 and CD86 were inhibited. These data provide mechanical insights into the effects of co-stimulatory molecules in regulating APC:T-cell interactions. PMID:23024807

  12. Major histocompatibility complex class I-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 association on the surface of target cells: implications for antigen presentation to cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Tatiana; Anikeeva, Nadja; Kalams, Spyros A; Walker, Bruce D; Gaidarov, Ibragim; Keen, James H; Sykulev, Yuri

    2004-12-01

    Polarization and segregation of the T-cell receptor (TCR) and integrins upon productive cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) target cell encounters are well documented. Much less is known about the redistribution of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) proteins on target cells interacting with CTLs. Here we show that human leucocyte antigen-A2 (HLA-A2) MHC-I and ICAM-1 are physically associated and recovered from both the raft fraction and the fraction of soluble membranes of target cells. Conjugation of target cells with surrogate CTLs, i.e. polystyrene beads loaded with antibodies specific for HLA-A2 and ICAM-1, induced the accumulation of membrane rafts, and beads loaded with ICAM-1-specific antibodies caused the selective recruitment of HLA-A2 MHC-I at the contact area of the target cells. Disruption of raft integrity on target cells led to a release of HLA-A2 and ICAM-1 from the raft fraction, abatement of HLA-A2 polarization, and diminished the ability of target cells bearing viral peptides to induce a Ca(2+) flux in virus-specific CTLs. These data suggest that productive engagement of ICAM-1 on target cells facilitates the polarization of MHC-I at the CTL-target cell interface, augmenting presentation of cognate peptide-MHC (pMHC) complexes to CTLs. We propose that ICAM-1-MHC-I association on the cell membrane is a mechanism that enhances the linkage between antigen recognition and early immunological synapse formation. PMID:15554924

  13. miR-24, miR-30b and miR-142-3p interfere with antigen processing and presentation by primary macrophages and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Afsar Raza; Fordham, Jezrom B.; Ganesh, Balaji; Nares, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Antigen uptake, processing and presentation by antigen presenting cells (APCs) are tightly coupled processes which consequently lead to the activation of innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the regulatory role of microRNA (miRNAs) in these critical pathways is poorly understood. In this study, we show that overexpression of miR-24, miR-30b and miR-142-3p attenuates uptake and processing of soluble antigen ovalbumin (Ova) in primary human macrophages and dendritic cells. MiRNA mimic transfected APCs exhibit defects in antigen presentation (Ova and CMV antigen) to CD4+ T-cells leading to reduced cell proliferation. Using transgenic OT-II mice we demonstrated that this impairment in T-cell proliferation is specific to antigen provided i.e., Ova. Further, human T-cells co-cultured with miRNA transfected dendritic cells secrete low levels of T helper (Th)-1 polarization associated cytokines. Analysis of molecules regulating APC and T-cell receptor interaction shows miRNA-mediated induced expression of Programmed Death-Ligand 1 (PD-L1) which inhibits T-cell proliferation. Blocking PD-L1 with antibodies rescues miRNA-mediated inhibition of T cell priming by DCs. These results uncover regulatory functions of miR-24, miR-30b and miR-142-3p in pairing innate and adaptive components of immunity. PMID:27611009

  14. miR-24, miR-30b and miR-142-3p interfere with antigen processing and presentation by primary macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Afsar Raza; Fordham, Jezrom B; Ganesh, Balaji; Nares, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Antigen uptake, processing and presentation by antigen presenting cells (APCs) are tightly coupled processes which consequently lead to the activation of innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the regulatory role of microRNA (miRNAs) in these critical pathways is poorly understood. In this study, we show that overexpression of miR-24, miR-30b and miR-142-3p attenuates uptake and processing of soluble antigen ovalbumin (Ova) in primary human macrophages and dendritic cells. MiRNA mimic transfected APCs exhibit defects in antigen presentation (Ova and CMV antigen) to CD4+ T-cells leading to reduced cell proliferation. Using transgenic OT-II mice we demonstrated that this impairment in T-cell proliferation is specific to antigen provided i.e., Ova. Further, human T-cells co-cultured with miRNA transfected dendritic cells secrete low levels of T helper (Th)-1 polarization associated cytokines. Analysis of molecules regulating APC and T-cell receptor interaction shows miRNA-mediated induced expression of Programmed Death-Ligand 1 (PD-L1) which inhibits T-cell proliferation. Blocking PD-L1 with antibodies rescues miRNA-mediated inhibition of T cell priming by DCs. These results uncover regulatory functions of miR-24, miR-30b and miR-142-3p in pairing innate and adaptive components of immunity. PMID:27611009

  15. Vanilloid Receptor 1 Agonists, Capsaicin and Resiniferatoxin, Enhance MHC Class I-restricted Viral Antigen Presentation in Virus-infected Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Hee; Im, Sun-A; Kim, Ji-Wan

    2016-01-01

    DCs, like the sensory neurons, express vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1). Here we demonstrate that the VR1 agonists, capsaicin (CP) and resiniferatoxin (RTX), enhance antiviral CTL responses by increasing MHC class I-restricted viral antigen presentation in dendritic cells (DCs). Bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs) were infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) expressing OVA (VV-OVA), and then treated with CP or RTX. Both CP and RTX increased MHC class I-restricted presentation of virus-encoded endogenous OVA in BM-DCs. Oral administration of CP or RTX significantly increased MHC class I-restricted OVA presentation by splenic and lymph node DCs in VV-OVA-infected mice, as assessed by directly measuring OVA peptide SIINFEKL-Kb complexes on the cell surface and by performing functional assays using OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Accordingly, oral administration of CP or RTX elicited potent OVA-specific CTL activity in VV-OVA-infected mice. The results from this study demonstrate that VR1 agonists enhance anti-viral CTL responses, as well as a neuro-immune connection in anti-viral immune responses. PMID:27574502

  16. Vanilloid Receptor 1 Agonists, Capsaicin and Resiniferatoxin, Enhance MHC Class I-restricted Viral Antigen Presentation in Virus-infected Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Hee; Im, Sun-A; Kim, Ji-Wan; Lee, Chong-Kil

    2016-08-01

    DCs, like the sensory neurons, express vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1). Here we demonstrate that the VR1 agonists, capsaicin (CP) and resiniferatoxin (RTX), enhance antiviral CTL responses by increasing MHC class I-restricted viral antigen presentation in dendritic cells (DCs). Bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs) were infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) expressing OVA (VV-OVA), and then treated with CP or RTX. Both CP and RTX increased MHC class I-restricted presentation of virus-encoded endogenous OVA in BM-DCs. Oral administration of CP or RTX significantly increased MHC class I-restricted OVA presentation by splenic and lymph node DCs in VV-OVA-infected mice, as assessed by directly measuring OVA peptide SIINFEKL-K(b) complexes on the cell surface and by performing functional assays using OVA-specific CD8 T cells. Accordingly, oral administration of CP or RTX elicited potent OVA-specific CTL activity in VV-OVA-infected mice. The results from this study demonstrate that VR1 agonists enhance anti-viral CTL responses, as well as a neuro-immune connection in anti-viral immune responses. PMID:27574502

  17. HIV-Infected Dendritic Cells Present Endogenous MHC Class II-Restricted Antigens to HIV-Specific CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Pierre-Grégoire; Richetta, Clémence; Rouers, Angéline; Blanchet, Fabien P; Urrutia, Alejandra; Guerbois, Mathilde; Piguet, Vincent; Theodorou, Ioannis; Bet, Anne; Schwartz, Olivier; Tangy, Frédéric; Graff-Dubois, Stéphanie; Cardinaud, Sylvain; Moris, Arnaud

    2016-07-15

    It is widely assumed that CD4(+) T cells recognize antigenic peptides (epitopes) derived solely from incoming, exogenous, viral particles or proteins. However, alternative sources of MHC class II (MHC-II)-restricted Ags have been described, in particular epitopes derived from newly synthesized proteins (so-called endogenous). In this study, we show that HIV-infected dendritic cells (DC) present MHC-II-restricted endogenous viral Ags to HIV-specific (HS) CD4(+) T cells. This endogenous pathway functions independently of the exogenous route for HIV Ag presentation and offers a distinct possibility for the immune system to activate HS CD4(+) T cells. We examined the implication of autophagy, which plays a crucial role in endogenous viral Ag presentation and thymic selection of CD4(+) T cells, in HIV endogenous presentation. We show that infected DC do not use autophagy to process MHC-II-restricted HIV Ags. This is unlikely to correspond to a viral escape from autophagic degradation, as infecting DC with Nef- or Env-deficient HIV strains did not impact HS T cell activation. However, we demonstrate that, in DC, specific targeting of HIV Ags to autophagosomes using a microtubule-associated protein L chain 3 (LC3) fusion protein effectively enhances and broadens HS CD4(+) T cell responses, thus favoring an endogenous MHC-II-restricted presentation. In summary, in DC, multiple endogenous presentation pathways lead to the activation of HS CD4(+) T cell responses. These findings will help in designing novel strategies to activate HS CD4(+) T cells that are required for CTL activation/maintenance and B cell maturation. PMID:27288536

  18. Extreme-Risk Prostate Adenocarcinoma Presenting With Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) >40 ng/ml: Prognostic Significance of the Preradiation PSA Nadir

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Abraham S.; Mydin, Aminudin; Jones, Stuart O.; Christie, Jennifer; Lim, Jan T.W.; Truong, Pauline T.; Ludgate, Charles M.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To examine the impact of patient, disease, and treatment characteristics on survival outcomes in patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and radical external-beam radiotherapy (RT) for clinically localized, extreme-risk prostate adenocarcinoma with a presenting prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration of >40 ng/ml. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review was conducted of 64 patients treated at a single institution between 1991 and 2000 with ADT and RT for prostate cancer with a presenting PSA level of >40 ng/ml. The effects of patient age, tumor (presenting PSA level, Gleason score, and T stage), and treatment (total ADT duration and pre-RT PSA level) characteristics on rates of biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS), and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: Median follow-up time was 6.45 years (range, 0.09-15.19 years). Actuarial bDFS, PCSS, and OS rates at 5 years were 39%, 87%, and 78%, respectively, and 17%, 64%, and 45%, respectively, at 10 years. On multivariate analysis, the pre-RT PSA level ({<=}0.1 versus >0.1 ng/ml) was the single most significant prognostic factor for bDFS (p = 0.033) and OS (p = 0.018) rates, whereas age, T stage, Gleason score, and ADT duration ({<=}6 versus >6 months) were not predictive of outcomes. Conclusion: In prostate cancer patients with high presenting PSA levels, >40 ng/ml, treated with combined modality, neoadjuvant ADT, and RT, the pre-RT PSA nadir, rather than ADT duration, was significantly associated with improved survival. This observation supports the use of neoadjuvant ADT to drive PSA levels to below 0.1 ng/ml before initiation of RT, to optimize outcomes for patients with extreme-risk disease.

  19. Influence of Cationic Lipid Composition on Gene Silencing Properties of Lipid Nanoparticle Formulations of siRNA in Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Genc; Novobrantseva, Tatiana I; Rosin, Nicole; Tam, Yuen Yi C; Hafez, Ismail M; Wong, Matthew K; Sugo, Tsukasa; Ruda, Vera M; Qin, June; Klebanov, Boris; Ciufolini, Marco; Akinc, Akin; Tam, Ying K; Hope, Michael J; Cullis, Pieter R

    2011-01-01

    Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) are currently the most effective in vivo delivery systems for silencing target genes in hepatocytes employing small interfering RNA. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are also potential targets for LNP siRNA. We examined the uptake, intracellular trafficking, and gene silencing potency in primary bone marrow macrophages (bmMΦ) and dendritic cells of siRNA formulated in LNPs containing four different ionizable cationic lipids namely DLinDAP, DLinDMA, DLinK-DMA, and DLinKC2-DMA. LNPs containing DLinKC2-DMA were the most potent formulations as determined by their ability to inhibit the production of GAPDH target protein. Also, LNPs containing DLinKC2-DMA were the most potent intracellular delivery agents as indicated by confocal studies of endosomal versus cytoplamic siRNA location using fluorescently labeled siRNA. DLinK-DMA and DLinKC2-DMA formulations exhibited improved gene silencing potencies relative to DLinDMA but were less toxic. In vivo results showed that LNP siRNA systems containing DLinKC2-DMA are effective agents for silencing GAPDH in APCs in the spleen and peritoneal cavity following systemic administration. Gene silencing in APCs was RNAi mediated and the use of larger LNPs resulted in substantially reduced hepatocyte silencing, while similar efficacy was maintained in APCs. These results are discussed with regard to the potential of LNP siRNA formulations to treat immunologically mediated diseases. PMID:21971424

  20. Rapid Detection of Dendritic Cell and Monocyte Disorders Using CD4 as a Lineage Marker of the Human Peripheral Blood Antigen-Presenting Cell Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Jardine, Laura; Barge, Dawn; Ames-Draycott, Ashley; Pagan, Sarah; Cookson, Sharon; Spickett, Gavin; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Collin, Matthew; Bigley, Venetia

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes are critical regulators and effectors of innate and adaptive immune responses. Monocyte expansion has been described in many pathological states while monocyte and DC deficiency syndromes are relatively recent additions to the catalog of human primary immunodeficiency disorders. Clinically applicable screening tests to diagnose and monitor these conditions are lacking. Conventional strategies for identifying human DCs and monocytes have been based on the use of a lineage gate to exclude lymphocytes, thus preventing simultaneous detection of DCs, monocytes, and lymphocyte subsets. Here we demonstrate that CD4 is a reliable lineage marker for the human peripheral blood antigen-presenting cell compartment that can be used to identify DCs and monocytes in parallel with lymphocytes. Based on this principle, simple modification of a standard lymphocyte phenotyping assay permits simultaneous enumeration of four lymphocyte and five DC/monocyte populations from a single sample. This approach is applicable to clinical samples and facilitates the diagnosis of DC and monocyte disorders in a wide range of clinical settings, including genetic deficiency, neoplasia, and inflammation. PMID:24416034

  1. Mitomycin C-treated antigen-presenting cells as a tool for control of allograft rejection and autoimmunity: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Terness, Peter; Kleist, Christian; Simon, Helmut; Sandra-Petrescu, Flavius; Ehser, Sandra; Chuang, Jing-Jing; Mohr, Elisabeth; Jiga, Lucian; Greil, Johann; Opelz, Gerhard

    2009-07-01

    Cells have been previously used in experimental models for tolerance induction in organ transplantation and autoimmune diseases. One problem with the therapeutic use of cells is standardization of their preparation. We discuss an immunosuppressive strategy relying on cells irreversibly transformed by a chemotherapeutic drug. Dendritic cells (DCs) of transplant donors pretreated with mitomycin C (MMC) strongly prolonged rat heart allograft survival when injected into recipients before transplantation. Likewise, MMC-DCs loaded with myelin basic protein suppressed autoreactive T cells of MS patients in vitro and prevented experimental autoimmune encephalitis in mice. Comprehensive gene microarray analysis identified genes that possibly make up the suppressive phenotype, comprising glucocorticoid leucine zipper, immunoglobulin-like transcript 3, CD80, CD83, CD86, and apoptotic genes. Based on these findings, a hypothetical model of tolerance induction by MMC-treated DCs is delineated. Finally, we describe the first clinical application of MMC-treated monocyte-enriched donor cells in an attempt to control the rejection of a haploidentical stem cell transplant in a sensitized recipient and discuss the pros and cons of using MMC-treated antigen-presenting cells for tolerance induction. Although many questions remain, MMC-treated cells are a promising clinical tool for controlling allograft rejection and deleterious immune responses in autoimmune diseases. PMID:19393276

  2. Nanoparticle-based targeting of vaccine compounds to skin antigen-presenting cells by hair follicles and their transport in mice.

    PubMed

    Mahe, Brice; Vogt, Annika; Liard, Christelle; Duffy, Darragh; Abadie, Valérie; Bonduelle, Olivia; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Sterry, Wolfram; Verrier, Bernard; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Combadiere, Behazine

    2009-05-01

    Particle-based drug delivery systems target active compounds to the hair follicle and may result in a better penetration and higher efficiency of compound uptake by skin resident cells. As previously proposed, such delivery systems could be important tools for vaccine delivery. In this study, we investigated the penetration of solid fluorescent 40 or 200 nm polystyrene nanoparticles (NPs) as well as virus particles in murine skin to further investigate the efficacy of transcutaneously (TC) applied particulate vaccine delivery route. We demonstrated that 40 and 200 nm NPs and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) expressing the green-fluorescent protein penetrated deeply into hair follicles and were internalized by perifollicular antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Fibered-based confocal microscopy analyses allowed visualizing in vivo particle penetration along the follicular duct, diffusion into the surrounding tissue, uptake by APCs and transport to the draining lymph nodes. The application of small particles, such as ovalbumin coding DNA or MVA, induced both humoral and cellular immune responses. Furthermore, TC applied MVA induced protection against vaccinia virus challenge. Our results strengthen the concept of TC targeting of cutaneous APCs by hair follicles and will contribute to the development of advanced vaccination protocols using NPs or viral vectors. PMID:19052565

  3. Immunogenic, but Not Steady-State, Antigen Presentation Permits Regulatory T-Cells To Control CD8+ T-Cell Effector Differentiation by IL-2 Modulation

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Alice; McNally, Michael; Galea, Ryan; Thomas, Ranjeny; Steptoe, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Absorption of IL-2 is one proposed mechanism of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cell (Treg) suppression. Direct in vivo experimental evidence for this has recently been obtained. While modulation of IL-2 bioavailability controls CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation under strongly immunogenic conditions it is not known whether Treg modulate CD8+ T cell responses through this mechanism under steady-state conditions. Here we assess this using a mouse model in which dendritic cells (DC) are manipulated to present cognate antigen to CD8+ T cells either in the steady-state or after activation. Our observations show that Treg exert a check on expansion and effector differentiation of CD8+ T cells under strongly immunogenic conditions associated with TLR ligand activation of DC, and this is mediated by limiting IL-2 availability. In contrast, when DC remain unactivated, depletion of Treg has little apparent effect on effector differentiation or IL-2 homeostasis. We conclude that while modulation of IL-2 homeostasis is an important mechanism through which Treg control CD8+ effector differentiation under immunogenic conditions, this mechanism plays little role in modulating CD8+ T-cell differentiation under steady-state conditions. PMID:24454872

  4. Early Signaling in Primary T Cells Activated by Antigen Presenting Cells Is Associated with a Deep and Transient Lamellal Actin Network

    PubMed Central

    Roybal, Kole T.; Mace, Emily M.; Mantell, Judith M.; Verkade, Paul; Orange, Jordan S.; Wülfing, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Cellular signaling transduction critically depends on molecular interactions that are in turn governed by dynamic subcellular distributions of the signaling system components. Comprehensive insight into signal transduction requires an understanding of such distributions and cellular structures driving them. To investigate the activation of primary murine T cells by antigen presenting cells (APC) we have imaged more than 60 signaling intermediates during T cell stimulation with microscopy across resolution limits. A substantial number of signaling intermediates associated with a transient, wide, and actin-associated lamellum extending from an interdigitated T cell:APC interface several micrometers into the T cell, as characterized in detail here. By mapping the more than 60 signaling intermediates onto the spatiotemporal features of cell biological structures, the lamellum and other ones previously described, we also define distinct spatial and temporal characteristics of T cell signal initiation, amplification, and core signaling in the activation of primary T cells by APCs. These characteristics differ substantially from ones seen when T cells are activated using common reductionist approaches. PMID:26237050

  5. Development of an enhanced bovine viral diarrhea virus subunit vaccine based on E2 glycoprotein fused to a single chain antibody which targets to antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Pecora, Andrea; Malacari, Darío A; Pérez Aguirreburualde, María S; Bellido, Demian; Escribano, José M; Dus Santos, María J; Wigdorovitz, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an important cause of economic losses worldwide. E2 is an immunodominant protein and a promising candidate to develop subunit vaccines. To improve its immunogenicity, a truncated E2 (tE2) was fused to a single chain antibody named APCH, which targets to antigen-presenting cells. APCH-tE2 and tE2 proteins were expressed in the baculovirus system and their immunogenicity was firstly compared in guinea pigs. APCH-tE2 vaccine was the best one to evoke a humoral response, and for this reason, it was selected for a cattle vaccination experiment. All the bovines immunized with 1.5 μg of APCH-tE2 developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies against BVDV up to a year post-immunization, demonstrating its significant potential as a subunit vaccine. This novel vaccine is undergoing scale-up and was transferred to the private sector. Nowadays, it is being evaluated for registration as the first Argentinean subunit vaccine for cattle. PMID:25697468

  6. Pharmacologic IKK/NF-κB inhibition causes antigen presenting cells to undergo TNFα dependent ROS-mediated programmed cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Gaddy, Daniel F.; Zhao, Jing; Davé, Shaival H.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Plevy, Scott E.; Robbins, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Monocyte-derived antigen presenting cells (APC) are central mediators of the innate and adaptive immune response in inflammatory diseases. As such, APC are appropriate targets for therapeutic intervention to ameliorate certain diseases. APC differentiation, activation and functions are regulated by the NF-κB family of transcription factors. Herein, we examined the effect of NF-κB inhibition, via suppression of the IκB Kinase (IKK) complex, on APC function. Murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (DC), as well as macrophage and DC lines, underwent rapid programmed cell death (PCD) after treatment with several IKK/NF-κB inhibitors through a TNFα-dependent mechanism. PCD was induced proximally by reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which causes a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of a caspase signaling cascade. NF-κB-inhibition-induced PCD of APC may be a key mechanism through which therapeutic targeting of NF-κB reduces inflammatory pathologies.

  7. The NS1 protein of influenza A virus suppresses interferon-regulated activation of antigen-presentation and immune-proteasome pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tisoncik, Jennifer R.; Billharz, Rosalind; Burmakina, Svetlana; Belisle, Sarah E.; Proll, Sean C.; Korth, Marcus J.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza virus counters host antiviral defences primarily by antagonizing the type I interferon (IFN) response. Both the N-terminal dsRNA-binding domain and the C-terminal effector domain are required for optimal suppression of host responses during infection. To better understand the regulatory role of the NS1 effector domain, we used an NS1-truncated mutant virus derived from human H1N1 influenza isolate A/Texas/36/91 (Tx/91) and assessed global transcriptional profiles from two independent human lung cell-culture models. Relative to the wild-type Tx/91-induced gene expression, the NS1 mutant virus induced enhanced expression of innate immune genes, specifically NF-κB signalling-pathway genes and IFN-α and -β target genes. We queried an experimentally derived IFN gene set to gauge the proportion of IFN-responsive genes that are suppressed specifically by NS1. We show that the C-terminally truncated NS1 mutant virus is less efficient at suppressing IFN-regulated gene expression associated with activation of antigen-presentation and immune-proteasome pathways. This is the first report integrating genomic analysis from two independent human culture systems, including primary lung cells, using genetically similar H1N1 influenza viruses that differ only in the length of the NS1 protein. PMID:21593271

  8. Human antigen-presenting cells respond differently to gut-derived probiotic bacteria but mediate similar strain-dependent NK and T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Fink, Lisbeth N; Zeuthen, Louise H; Ferlazzo, Guido; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2007-12-01

    The intestinal microbiota is essential for homeostasis of the local and systemic immune system, and particularly strains of lactic acid bacteria and Escherichia coli have been shown to have balancing effects on inflammatory conditions such as allergy and inflammatory bowel disease. However, in vitro assessment of the immunomodulatory effects of distinct strains may depend strongly on the cell type used as a model. To select the most appropriate model for screening of beneficial bacteria in human cells, the response to strains of intestinal bacteria of three types of antigen-presenting cells (APC) was compared; blood myeloid dendritic cells (DC), monocyte-derived DC and monocytes, and the effector response of natural killer cells and naïve T cells was characterized. Maturation induced by gut-derived bacteria differed between APC, with blood DC and monocytes responding with the production of IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha to bacteria, which elicited mainly IL-10 in monocyte-derived DC. In contrast, comparable IFN-gamma production patterns were found in both natural killer cells and T cells induced by all bacteria-matured APC. An inhibitory effect of certain strains on this IFN-gamma production was also mediated by all types of APC. The most potent responses were induced by monocyte-derived DC, which thus constitute a sensitive screening model. PMID:17903206

  9. Pharmacologic IKK/NF-κB inhibition causes antigen presenting cells to undergo TNFα dependent ROS-mediated programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Gaddy, Daniel F.; Zhao, Jing; Davé, Shaival H.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Plevy, Scott E.; Robbins, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Monocyte-derived antigen presenting cells (APC) are central mediators of the innate and adaptive immune response in inflammatory diseases. As such, APC are appropriate targets for therapeutic intervention to ameliorate certain diseases. APC differentiation, activation and functions are regulated by the NF-κB family of transcription factors. Herein, we examined the effect of NF-κB inhibition, via suppression of the IκB Kinase (IKK) complex, on APC function. Murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (DC), as well as macrophage and DC lines, underwent rapid programmed cell death (PCD) after treatment with several IKK/NF-κB inhibitors through a TNFα-dependent mechanism. PCD was induced proximally by reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which causes a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of a caspase signaling cascade. NF-κB-inhibition-induced PCD of APC may be a key mechanism through which therapeutic targeting of NF-κB reduces inflammatory pathologies. PMID:24406986

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase-1 alleles associated with increased risk of Ankylosing Spondylitis reduce HLA-B27 mediated presentation of multiple antigens

    PubMed Central

    Seregin, Sergey S.; Rastall, David P.W.; Evnouchidou, Irini; Aylsworth, Charles F.; Quiroga, Dionisia; Kamal, Ram P.; Godbehere-Roosa, Sarah; Blum, Christopher F.; York, Ian A.; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic arthritic disease that leads to significant disability and loss of quality of life in the ~0.5% of the worldwide human population it affects. There is currently no cure for AS and mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis remain unclear. AS is highly genetic, with over 70% of the genetic risk being associated with the presence of HLA-B27 and endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase-1 (ERAP1) alleles. Furthermore, gene-gene interactions between HLA-B27 and ERAP1 AS risk alleles have recently been confirmed. Here, we demonstrate that various ERAP1 alleles can differentially mediate surface expression of antigens presented by HLA-B27 on human cells. Specifically, for all peptides tested, we found that an ERAP1 variant containing high AS risk SNPs reduced the amount of the peptide presented by HLA-B27, relative to low AS risk ERAP1 variants. These results were further validated using peptide catalysis assays in vitro, suggesting that high AS risk alleles have an enhanced catalytic activity that more rapidly destroys many HLA-B27-destined peptides, a result that correlated with decreased HLA-B27 presentation of the same peptides. These findings suggest that one mechanism underlying AS pathogenesis may involve an altered ability for AS patients harboring both HLA-B27 and high AS risk ERAP1 alleles to correctly display a variety of peptides to the adaptive arm of the immune system, potentially exposing such individuals to higher AS risk due to abnormal display of pathogen or self derived peptides by the adaptive immune system. PMID:24028501

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase-1 alleles associated with increased risk of ankylosing spondylitis reduce HLA-B27 mediated presentation of multiple antigens.

    PubMed

    Seregin, Sergey S; Rastall, David P W; Evnouchidou, Irini; Aylsworth, Charles F; Quiroga, Dionisia; Kamal, Ram P; Godbehere-Roosa, Sarah; Blum, Christopher F; York, Ian A; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic arthritic disease that leads to significant disability and loss of quality of life in the ∼0.5% of the worldwide human population it affects. There is currently no cure for AS and mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis remain unclear. AS is highly genetic, with over 70% of the genetic risk being associated with the presence of HLA-B27 and endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase-1 (ERAP1) alleles. Furthermore, gene-gene interactions between HLA-B27 and ERAP1 AS risk alleles have recently been confirmed. Here, we demonstrate that various ERAP1 alleles can differentially mediate surface expression of antigens presented by HLA-B27 on human cells. Specifically, for all peptides tested, we found that an ERAP1 variant containing high AS risk SNPs reduced the amount of the peptide presented by HLA-B27, relative to low AS risk ERAP1 variants. These results were further validated using peptide catalysis assays in vitro, suggesting that high AS risk alleles have an enhanced catalytic activity that more rapidly destroys many HLA-B27-destined peptides, a result that correlated with decreased HLA-B27 presentation of the same peptides. These findings suggest that one mechanism underlying AS pathogenesis may involve an altered ability for AS patients harboring both HLA-B27 and high AS risk ERAP1 alleles to correctly display a variety of peptides to the adaptive arm of the immune system, potentially exposing such individuals to higher AS risk due to abnormal display of pathogen or self-derived peptides by the adaptive immune system. PMID:24028501

  12. A BTP1 prophage gene present in invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella determines composition and length of the O-antigen of the lipopolysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Kintz, Erica; Davies, Mark R; Hammarlöf, Disa L; Canals, Rocío; Hinton, Jay C D; van der Woude, Marjan W

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium isolate D23580 represents a recently identified ST313 lineage of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonellae (iNTS). One of the differences between this lineage and other non-iNTS S. Typhimurium isolates is the presence of prophage BTP1. This prophage encodes a gtrC gene, implicated in O-antigen modification. GtrCBTP1 is essential for maintaining O-antigen length in isolate D23580, since a gtrBTP1 mutant yields a short O-antigen. This phenotype can be complemented by gtrCBTP1 or very closely related gtrC genes. The short O-antigen of the gtrBTP1 mutant was also compensated by deletion of the BTP1 phage tailspike gene in the D23580 chromosome. This tailspike protein has a putative endorhamnosidase domain and thus may mediate O-antigen cleavage. Expression of the gtrCBTP1 gene is, in contrast to expression of many other gtr operons, not subject to phase variation and transcriptional analysis suggests that gtrC is produced under a variety of conditions. Additionally, GtrCBTP1 expression is necessary and sufficient to provide protection against BTP1 phage infection of an otherwise susceptible strain. These data are consistent with a model in which GtrCBTP1 mediates modification of the BTP1 phage O-antigen receptor in lysogenic D23580, and thereby prevents superinfection by itself and other phage that uses the same O-antigen co-receptor. PMID:25586744

  13. A BTP1 prophage gene present in invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella determines composition and length of the O-antigen of the lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kintz, Erica; Davies, Mark R; Hammarlöf, Disa L; Canals, Rocío; Hinton, Jay C D; van der Woude, Marjan W

    2015-04-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium isolate D23580 represents a recently identified ST313 lineage of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonellae (iNTS). One of the differences between this lineage and other non-iNTS S. Typhimurium isolates is the presence of prophage BTP1. This prophage encodes a gtrC gene, implicated in O-antigen modification. GtrC(BTP) (1) is essential for maintaining O-antigen length in isolate D23580, since a gtr(BTP) (1) mutant yields a short O-antigen. This phenotype can be complemented by gtrC(BTP) (1) or very closely related gtrC genes. The short O-antigen of the gtr(BTP) (1) mutant was also compensated by deletion of the BTP1 phage tailspike gene in the D23580 chromosome. This tailspike protein has a putative endorhamnosidase domain and thus may mediate O-antigen cleavage. Expression of the gtrC(BTP) (1) gene is, in contrast to expression of many other gtr operons, not subject to phase variation and transcriptional analysis suggests that gtrC is produced under a variety of conditions. Additionally, GtrC(BTP) (1) expression is necessary and sufficient to provide protection against BTP1 phage infection of an otherwise susceptible strain. These data are consistent with a model in which GtrC(BTP) (1) mediates modification of the BTP1 phage O-antigen receptor in lysogenic D23580, and thereby prevents superinfection by itself and other phage that uses the same O-antigen co-receptor. PMID:25586744

  14. Cross-Presentation of the Oncofetal Tumor Antigen 5T4 from Irradiated Prostate Cancer Cells--A Key Role for Heat-Shock Protein 70 and Receptor CD91.

    PubMed

    Salimu, Josephine; Spary, Lisa K; Al-Taei, Saly; Clayton, Aled; Mason, Malcolm D; Staffurth, John; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2015-06-01

    Immune responses contribute to the success of radiotherapy of solid tumors; however, the mechanism of triggering CD8(+) T-cell responses is poorly understood. Antigen cross-presentation from tumor cells by dendritic cells (DC) is a likely dominant mechanism to achieve CD8(+) T-cell stimulation. We established a cross-presentation model in which DCs present a naturally expressed oncofetal tumor antigen (5T4) from irradiated DU145 prostate cancer cells to 5T4-specific T cells. The aim was to establish which immunogenic signals are important in radiation-induced cross-presentation. Radiation (12 Gy) caused G2-M cell-cycle arrest and cell death, increased cellular 5T4 levels, high-mobility protein group-B1 (HMGB1) release, and surface calreticulin and heat-shock protein-70 (Hsp70) expression in DU145 cells. DCs phagocytosed irradiated tumor cells efficiently, followed by upregulation of CD86 on phagocytic DCs. CD8(+) 5T4-specific T cells, stimulated with these DCs, proliferated and produced IFNγ. Inhibition of HMGB1 or the TRIF/MyD88 pathway only had a partial effect on T-cell stimulation. Unlike previous investigators, we found no evidence that DCs carrying Asp299Gly Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) single-nucleotide polymorphism had impaired ability to cross-present tumor antigen. However, pretreatment of tumor cells with Hsp70 inhibitors resulted in a highly statistically significant and robust prevention of antigen cross-presentation and CD86 upregulation on DCs cocultured with irradiated tumor cells. Blocking the Hsp70 receptor CD91 also abolished cross-presentation. Together, the results from our study demonstrate that irradiation induces immunologically relevant changes in tumor cells, which can trigger CD8(+) T-cell responses via a predominantly Hsp70-dependent antigen cross-presentation process. PMID:25678582

  15. The ESAT-6 protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis interacts with beta-2-microglobulin (β2M) affecting antigen presentation function of macrophage.

    PubMed

    Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Ahmed, Asma; Parveen, Nazia; Jha, Vishwanath; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Ghosh, Sudip; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2014-10-01

    ESAT-6, an abundantly secreted protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) is an important virulence factor, inactivation of which leads to reduced virulence of M. tuberculosis. ESAT-6 alone, or in complex with its chaperone CFP-10 (ESAT-6:CFP-10), is known to modulate host immune responses; however, the detailed mechanisms are not well understood. The structure of ESAT-6 or ESAT-6:CFP-10 complex does not suggest presence of enzymatic or DNA-binding activities. Therefore, we hypothesized that the crucial role played by ESAT-6 in the virulence of mycobacteria could be due to its interaction with some host cellular factors. Using a yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified that ESAT-6 interacts with the host protein beta-2-microglobulin (β2M), which was further confirmed by other assays, like GST pull down, co-immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. The C-terminal six amino acid residues (90-95) of ESAT-6 were found to be essential for this interaction. ESAT-6, in complex with CFP-10, also interacts with β2M. We found that ESAT-6/ESAT-6:CFP-10 can enter into the endoplasmic reticulum where it sequesters β2M to inhibit cell surface expression of MHC-I-β2M complexes, resulting in downregulation of class I-mediated antigen presentation. Interestingly, the ESAT-6:β2M complex could be detected in pleural biopsies of individuals suffering from pleural tuberculosis. Our data highlight a novel mechanism by which M. tuberculosis may undermine the host adaptive immune responses to establish a successful infection. Identification of such novel interactions may help us in designing small molecule inhibitors as well as effective vaccine design against tuberculosis. PMID:25356553

  16. The ESAT-6 Protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Interacts with Beta-2-Microglobulin (β2M) Affecting Antigen Presentation Function of Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Parveen, Nazia; Jha, Vishwanath; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Ghosh, Sudip; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2014-01-01

    ESAT-6, an abundantly secreted protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) is an important virulence factor, inactivation of which leads to reduced virulence of M. tuberculosis. ESAT-6 alone, or in complex with its chaperone CFP-10 (ESAT-6:CFP-10), is known to modulate host immune responses; however, the detailed mechanisms are not well understood. The structure of ESAT-6 or ESAT-6:CFP-10 complex does not suggest presence of enzymatic or DNA-binding activities. Therefore, we hypothesized that the crucial role played by ESAT-6 in the virulence of mycobacteria could be due to its interaction with some host cellular factors. Using a yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified that ESAT-6 interacts with the host protein beta-2-microglobulin (β2M), which was further confirmed by other assays, like GST pull down, co-immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. The C-terminal six amino acid residues (90–95) of ESAT-6 were found to be essential for this interaction. ESAT-6, in complex with CFP-10, also interacts with β2M. We found that ESAT-6/ESAT-6:CFP-10 can enter into the endoplasmic reticulum where it sequesters β2M to inhibit cell surface expression of MHC-I-β2M complexes, resulting in downregulation of class I-mediated antigen presentation. Interestingly, the ESAT-6:β2M complex could be detected in pleural biopsies of individuals suffering from pleural tuberculosis. Our data highlight a novel mechanism by which M. tuberculosis may undermine the host adaptive immune responses to establish a successful infection. Identification of such novel interactions may help us in designing small molecule inhibitors as well as effective vaccine design against tuberculosis. PMID:25356553

  17. Evaluation of cationic solid lipid microparticles as synthetic carriers for the targeted delivery of macromolecules to phagocytic antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Erni, Corinne; Suard, Catherine; Freitas, Sergio; Dreher, Donatus; Merkle, Hans P; Walter, Elke

    2002-12-01

    Biodegradable microparticles represent a promising carrier system for the efficient delivery of therapeutic macromolecules to phagocytic professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). Solid lipid microparticles (SLM) consisting of a tripalmitin matrix were prepared using a novel micromixer-based solvent extraction process. A positive surface charge was introduced by the incorporation of cationic lipids into the formulation. All obtained SLM were efficiently phagocytosed by primary macrophages in vitro. Complete intracellular degradation was observed already within 24 h, making SLM a suitable carrier for the immediate delivery of therapeutics to APC. Cationic SLM adsorbed plasmid DNA and bovine serum albumin (BSA) used as a model protein, and triggered the cellular internalization of the macromolecules by phagocytic macrophages. Surprisingly, the cationic SLM also triggered the internalization of these molecules by non-phagocytic 293 cells. This was probably due to the detachment of nanocomplexes formed of cationic lipid and DNA or BSA, respectively, from the surface of DNA- or BSA-loaded SLM and their subsequent uptake into the cells. Transfection efficiency of the DNA-loaded SLM was most pronounced in non-phagocytic cells and was not detected in the macrophage cell line or in primary macrophages. Our further studies revealed that cytotoxic effects of cationic SLM were more pronounced in the phagocytic cells, which could be explained by the very rapid uptake and degradation of the cationic SLM in these cells. In conclusion, SLM may provide a new, efficient means for the immediate intracellular delivery of therapeutic macromolecules into APC. Caution is warranted for cationic carriers, which may accentuate cytotoxic effects in the phagocytic cells. PMID:12322988

  18. Mycobacterium-Specific γ9δ2 T Cells Mediate Both Pathogen-Inhibitory and CD40 Ligand-Dependent Antigen Presentation Effects Important for Tuberculosis Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Charles T.; Hamzabegovic, Fahreta; Blazevic, Azra; Xia, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Numerous pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, can activate human γ9δ2 T cells to proliferate and express effector mechanisms. γ9δ2 T cells can directly inhibit the growth of intracellular mycobacteria and may also act as antigen-presenting cells (APC). Despite evidence for γδ T cells having the capacity to function as APC, the mechanisms involved and importance of these effects on overall tuberculosis (TB) immunity are unknown. We prepared M. tuberculosis-specific γ9δ2 T cell lines to study their direct protective effects and APC functions for M. tuberculosis-specific αβ T cells. The direct inhibitory effects on intracellular mycobacteria were measured, and the enhancing effects on proliferative and effector responses of αβ T cells assessed. Furthermore, the importance of cell-to-cell contact and soluble products for γ9δ2 T cell effector responses and APC functions were investigated. We demonstrate, in addition to direct inhibitory effects on intracellular mycobacteria, the following: (i) γ9δ2 T cells enhance the expansion of M. tuberculosis-specific αβ T cells and increase the ability of αβ T cells to inhibit intracellular mycobacteria; (ii) although soluble mediators are critical for the direct inhibitory effects of γ9δ2 T cells, their APC functions do not require soluble mediators; (iii) the APC functions of γ9δ2 T cells involve cell-to-cell contact that is dependent on CD40-CD40 ligand (CD40L) interactions; and (iv) fully activated CD4+ αβ T cells and γ9δ2 T cells provide similar immune enhancing/APC functions for M. tuberculosis-specific T cells. These effector and helper effects of γ9δ2 T cells further indicate that these T cells should be considered important new targets for new TB vaccines. PMID:26644385

  19. Increase in a distinct pulmonary macrophage subset possessing an antigen-presenting cell phenotype and in vitro APC activity following silica exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Migliaccio, Christopher T. . E-mail: christopher.migliaccio@umontana.edu; Hamilton, Raymond F.; Holian, Andrij

    2005-06-01

    Silica inhalation results in chronic lung inflammation and fibrosis. While the role of the alveolar macrophage (AM) is considered key to the effects of silica on lung pathology, the etiology is not completely understood. Evidence suggests an increase in antigen presenting cell (APC) activity as a contributing factor to this process, as well as potential roles for both AM and interstitial macrophages (IM) in silicosis. In order to study the effects of crystalline silica on the APC activity of pulmonary macrophages, mice were exposed intranasally and changes in pulmonary macrophage populations were assessed using flow cytometry. Following intranasal instillation of silica, a significant increase in the APC activity of AM was observed, as well as a significant increase in a subset of IM expressing classic APC markers (MHC class II, CD11c). In addition, an in vitro system using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) was generated to assess the effects of silica on the APC activity of macrophages in vitro. Data using BMDM in the in vitro APC assay demonstrated a significant increase in APC activity following silica exposure, but not following exposure to saline or a control particle (TiO{sub 2}). Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro experiments, the current study describes a significant increase in an interstitial macrophage subset with an APC phenotype, as well as an increase in the APC activity of both AM and BMDM, as a direct result of exposure to crystalline silica. These studies suggest a specific mechanism, macrophage subset activation, by which crystalline silica exposure results in chronic pulmonary inflammation and, eventually, fibrosis.

  20. Adoptive transfer of pTRP2-specific CTLs expanding by bead-based artificial antigen-presenting cells mediates anti-melanoma response.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoling; Jiang, Xiaobing; Liu, Ruen; Zhao, Hongyang; Liang, Zhihui

    2008-11-18

    Cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells are key effectors in the immunotherapy of malignant and viral diseases. However, the lack of efficient methods for their in vitro priming and expansion has become a bottleneck to the development of vaccines and adoptive transfer strategies. Synthetic artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) are now emerging as an attractive tool for eliciting and expanding CTL responses. This study reported a novel approach for targeting malignant melanoma with pTRP2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) expanded from the C57BL/6 splenocytes by multiple stimulations with aAPCs made by coating H-2K(b)-Ig/pTRP2 dimeric complexes, anti-CD28 antibody, 4-1BBL molecules and CD83 molecules to cell-sized latex beads. The induced CTLs exhibited specific lysis against RMA-S cells pulsed with the peptide pTRP2 and H-2K(b+) melanoma cells expressing TRP2, while a murine Lewis lung carcinoma cell line 3LL could not be recognized by the CTLs. The peptide-specific activity was inhibited by anti-H-2K(b) monoclonal antibody Y3. Adoptive Transfer of CTLs specific for malignant melanoma expanding by the aAPCs can mediate effective anti-melanoma response. These results suggested the bead-based aAPCs coated with an MHC-Ig/peptide complex, anti-CD28 antibody, 4-1BBL and CD83 could provide a useful tool for the reproducible expansion of specific CTLs for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:18621475

  1. In vivo anti-melanoma efficacy of allo-restricted CTLs specific for melanoma expanded by artificial antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-ling; Jiang, Xiao-bing; Liu, Ru-en; Zhang, Sheng-min; Liang, Z-h

    2009-04-01

    Cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells are key effectors in the immunotherapy of malignant and viral diseases. However, autologous T cell responses to tumor antigens presented by self-MHC are usually weak and ineffective. Allo-restricted T cells represent a potent source of tumor-specific T cells for adoptive immunotherapy. This study reports in vivo anti-melanoma efficacy of the pTRP2-specific allo-restricted CTLs expanded from the BALB/c splenocytes by multiple stimulations with aAPCs made by coating H-2K(b)-Ig/pTRP2 dimeric complexes, anti-CD28 antibody, 4-1BBL molecules and CD83 molecules to cell-sized latex beads. The induced allo-restricted CTLs exhibited specific lysis against RMA-S cells pulsed with the peptide pTRP2 and H-2K(b+) melanoma cells expressing TRP2, while a murine Lewis lung carcinoma cell line 3LL could not be recognized by the CTLs. The peptide-specific activity was inhibited by anti-H-2K(b) monoclonal antibody Y3. Adoptive transfer of the allo-restricted CTLs specific for malignant melanoma expanded by the aAPCs can mediate effective anti-melanoma response in vivo. These results suggested that the specific allo-restricted CTLs expanded by aAPCs coated with an MHC-Ig/peptide complex, anti-CD28 antibody, 4-1BBL and CD83 could be a potential option of specific immunotherapy for patients with malignant melanoma. PMID:18682943

  2. Long-term androgen deprivation therapy improves survival in prostate cancer patients presenting with prostate-specific antigen levels >20 ng/mL

    SciTech Connect

    Berthelet, Eric . E-mail: eberthel@bccancer.bc.ca; Pickles, Tom; Lee, Kenny Won Jae; Liu, Mitchell; Truong, Pauline T.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the benefit of androgen deprivation (AD) and its optimal duration in patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy, who present with prostate-specific antigen levels >20 ng/mL. Methods and Materials: A total of 307 patients treated with external beam radiotherapy, AD, and presenting with a PSA level >20 ng/mL were identified from the Prostate Cancer Outcomes Initiative database of the British Columbia Cancer Agency. Androgen deprivation was defined as short term (ST-AD, <12 months) or long term (LT-AD, {>=}12 months). The endpoints analyzed were biochemical control (no evidence of disease) (bNED), overall survival, and cause-specific survival. Statistical analysis was conducted with Kaplan-Meier estimates, log-rank tests, and multivariate analyses with logistic and Cox regression models. Results: There were 151 patients in the ST-AD group and 156 in the LT-AD group. The distributions of Gleason score and stage were comparable in the two cohorts. Median follow-up times were 48 months for patients treated with ST-AD and 45 months for patients treated with LT-AD. The median durations of AD were 6 and 25.6 months for the ST-AD and LT-AD groups, respectively. The bNED rate was 37% for the ST-AD group and 62.5% for the LT-AD group (p < 0.0001). The 5-year overall survival rate was 75% in the ST-AD group vs. 87.5% for the LT-AD group (p = 0.0091). The 5-year cause-specific survival rate was 82% for the ST-AD group vs. 94% for the LT-AD group (p = 0.0072). Conclusions: Several randomized trials have demonstrated the benefit of LT-AD in high-risk patients with prostate cancer. In some reports, the survival advantage seems to be restricted to patients with high Gleason score. The present analysis supports the hypothesis that LT-AD improves bNED and survival rates in patients presenting with a PSA level >20, irrespective of Gleason score or T stage.

  3. Differential Impact of PD-1 and/or Interleukin-10 Blockade on HIV-1-Specific CD4 T Cell and Antigen-Presenting Cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Porichis, Filippos; Hart, Meghan G.; Zupkosky, Jennifer; Barblu, Lucie; Kwon, Douglas S.; McMullen, Ashley; Brennan, Thomas; Ahmed, Rafi; Freeman, Gordon J.; Kavanagh, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    that a population of white blood cells called CD4 T cells that targets the virus fails to work properly. At least part of this impairment is under the control of inhibitory mechanisms that can be blocked to improve the function of these CD4 T cells. In this report, we show that blocking one or two of the molecules involved, called PD-1 and IL-10, has different effects on the individual functions of these cells and that one is strongly improved. We investigate how these effects are caused by interactions between CD4 T cells and antigen-presenting cells. These observations can have implications for new therapeutic approaches in HIV infection. PMID:24352453

  4. Clinical Application of Sleeping Beauty and Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells to Genetically Modify T Cells from Peripheral and Umbilical Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Huls, M. Helen; Figliola, Matthew J.; Dawson, Margaret J.; Olivares, Simon; Kebriaei, Partow; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Champlin, Richard E.; Singh, Harjeet; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2013-01-01

    The potency of clinical-grade T cells can be improved by combining gene therapy with immunotherapy to engineer a biologic product with the potential for superior (i) recognition of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), (ii) persistence after infusion, (iii) potential for migration to tumor sites, and (iv) ability to recycle effector functions within the tumor microenvironment. Most approaches to genetic manipulation of T cells engineered for human application have used retrovirus and lentivirus for the stable expression of CAR1-3. This approach, although compliant with current good manufacturing practice (GMP), can be expensive as it relies on the manufacture and release of clinical-grade recombinant virus from a limited number of production facilities. The electro-transfer of nonviral plasmids is an appealing alternative to transduction since DNA species can be produced to clinical grade at approximately 1/10th the cost of recombinant GMP-grade virus. To improve the efficiency of integration we adapted Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon and transposase for human application4-8. Our SB system uses two DNA plasmids that consist of a transposon coding for a gene of interest (e.g. 2nd generation CD19-specific CAR transgene, designated CD19RCD28) and a transposase (e.g. SB11) which inserts the transgene into TA dinucleotide repeats9-11. To generate clinically-sufficient numbers of genetically modified T cells we use K562-derived artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) (clone #4) modified to express a TAA (e.g. CD19) as well as the T cell costimulatory molecules CD86, CD137L, a membrane-bound version of interleukin (IL)-15 (peptide fused to modified IgG4 Fc region) and CD64 (Fc-γ receptor 1) for the loading of monoclonal antibodies (mAb)12. In this report, we demonstrate the procedures that can be undertaken in compliance with cGMP to generate CD19-specific CAR+ T cells suitable for human application. This was achieved by the synchronous electro-transfer of two DNA

  5. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  6. A Neoglycoconjugate Containing the Human Milk Sugar LNFPIII Drives Anti-Inflammatory Activation of Antigen Presenting Cells in a CD14 Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tundup, Smanla; Srivastava, Leena; Norberg, Thomas; Watford, Wendy; Harn, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The milk pentasaccharide LNFPIII has therapeutic action for metabolic and autoimmune diseases and prolongs transplant survival in mice when presented as a neoglycoconjugate. Within LNFPIII is the Lewisx trisaccharide, expressed by many helminth parasites. In humans, LNFPIII is found in human milk and also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1. LNFPIII-NGC drives alternative activation of macrophages and dendritic cells via NFκB activation in a TLR4 dependent mechanism. However, the connection between LNFPIII-NGC activation of APCs, TLR4 signaling and subsequent MAP kinase signaling leading to anti-inflammatory activation of APCs remains unknown. In this study we determined that the innate receptor CD14 was essential for LNFPIII-NGC induction of both ERK and NFkB activation in APCs. Induction of ERK activation by LNFPIII-NGC was completely dependent on CD14/TLR4-Ras-Raf1/TPL2-MEK axis in bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). In addition, LNFPIII-NGC preferentially induced the production of Th2 “favoring” chemokines CCL22 and matrix metalloprotease protein-9 in a CD14 dependent manner in BMDCs. In contrast, LNFPIII-NGC induces significantly lower levels of Th1 “favoring” chemokines, MIP1α, MIP1β and MIP-2 compared to levels in LPS stimulated cells. Interestingly, NGC of the identical human milk sugar LNnT, minus the alpha 1–3 linked fucose, failed to activate APCs via TLR4/MD2/CD14 receptor complex, suggesting that the alpha 1–3 linked fucose in LNFPIII and not on LNnT, is required for this process. Using specific chemical inhibitors of the MAPK pathway, we found that LNFPIII-NGC induction of CCL22, MMP9 and IL-10 production was dependent on ERK activation. Over all, this study suggests that LNFPIII-NGC utilizes CD14/TLR4-MAPK (ERK) axis in modulating APC activation to produce anti-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines in a manner distinct from that seen for the pro-inflammatory PAMP LPS. These pathways may explain the in vivo therapeutic

  7. Inhibition by chloroquine of the class II major histocompatibility complex-restricted presentation of endogenous antigens varies according to the cellular origin of the antigen-presenting cells, the nature of the T-cell epitope, and the responding T cell.

    PubMed Central

    Lombard-Platlet, S; Bertolino, P; Deng, H; Gerlier, D; Rabourdin-Combe, C

    1993-01-01

    Chloroquine treatment of antigen-presenting cells (APC) was explored as a tool to investigate the processing pathway for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted presentation of the endogenous secreted hen egg lysozyme (HEL) and transmembrane measles virus haemagglutinin (HA). A 72-hr pretreatment of the APC with 25 microM chloroquine blocked the presentation of the HEL(52-61) T-cell epitope generated from endogenous HEL to the I-Ak-restricted 3A9 T-cell hybridoma by MHC class II-transfected L cells expressing the invariant chain (Ii). The presentation of exogenously added HEL peptides was not affected. Under the same conditions, no inhibition of the presentation of HEL(106-116) to the I-Ed-restricted G28 high-avidity T-cell hybridoma, nor of HA when synthesized by L cells, was observed. When B-lymphoid APC were used, inhibition was observed in every case with a low number of B APC pretreated for 48 hr with chloroquine prior to the T-cell stimulation test. Moreover, addition of chloroquine to untreated B APC during the T-cell stimulation assay was sufficient to inhibit completely the presentation of HEL(106-116) to the B10.D24.42 low avidity T-cell hybridoma. Altogether these studies suggest that an apparent resistance of endogenous Ag presentation to chloroquine inhibition may not necessarily indicate the existence of a non-endosomal pathway but may be due to the nature of the T-cell epitope, to the use of 'non-professional' APC such as L cells, to the use of T cells of high avidity, and to high amounts of pre-existing MHC class II-peptide complexes expressed by the APC. We demonstrate here that, at least in conventional APC such as B cells, class II-restricted presentation of both endogenous secreted HEL and transmembrane HA involves an endosomal pathway. PMID:7508420

  8. Immunoradiometric assay for examination and quantitation of Brucella abortus-specific antibodies reactive with the antigen(s) used in the indirect hemolysis test.

    PubMed Central

    Tedder, T F; Hoffmann, E M

    1981-01-01

    An immunoradiometric assay was designed to quantitate antibodies which bind to Brucella abortus antigens adsorbed to bovine erythrocytes. This allowed examination of antibodies specific for B. abortus antigens detectable in the indirect hemolysis test for bovine brucellosis. Assay parameters were optimized for measuring antigen-specific immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), IgG2, and IgM antibodies. The immunoradiometric assay allowed examination of binding interactions which occur during the indirect hemolysis test. Affinity-purified antibovine IgG1, IgG2, and IgM were used to detect specific bovine antibodies of these classes (and subclasses). The binding of the anti-immunoglobulins was linear as a function of immunoglobulin concentration. However, the binding of bovine antibodies of the different classes and subclasses to B. abortus antigen was nonlinear. Since B. abortus-specific antibodies of all classes and subclasses were present in the "standard serum" during the immunoradiometric assays, it is possible that the non-linearity was due to competition between antibodies for antigenic sites. IgG2 and IgM antibodies specific for B. abortus antigen(s) appeared to be capable of binding independently to antigen(s). However, the binding efficiencies of IgG1 antibodies changed as the ratio of antigenic sites to antibodies was increased. PMID:6793625

  9. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Krishnadas, Deepa Kolaseri; Bai, Fanqi; Lucas, Kenneth G

    2013-01-01

    The identification of cancer testis (CT) antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1), melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3), and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1) in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy.

  10. Hepatitis B virus core antigen epitopes presented by HLA-A2 single-chain trimers induce functional epitope-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in HLA-A2.1/Kb transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxia; Li, Shu; Shan, Ming; Pan, Xuwen; Zhuang, Ke; He, Lihua; Gould, Keith; Tien, Po

    2007-05-01

    The potency of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses toward core antigen has been shown to affect the outcomes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Since single-chain trimers (SCT) composed of peptide epitope beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I heavy chain covalently linked together in a single molecule have been shown to stimulate efficient CTL responses, we investigated the properties of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 SCTs encoding the HBV core antigen (HBcAg) epitopes C(18-27) and C(107-115). Transfection of NIH-3T3 cells with pcDNA3.0-SCT-C(18-27) and SCT-C(107-115) leads to stable presentation of HBcAg epitopes at the cell surface. HLA-A2.1/Kb transgenic mice vaccinated with the SCT constructs, either as a DNA vaccine alone or followed by a boost with recombinant vaccinia virus, were shown to generate HBcAg-specific CTL responses by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and in vitro interferon-gamma release experiments. HBcAg-specific CTLs from vaccinated HLA-A2.1/Kb transgenic mice were able to inhibit HBV surface and e antigen expression as indicated by HepG2.2.15 cells. Our data indicate that a DNA vaccine encoding a human HLA-A2 SCT with HBV epitopes can lead to stable, enhanced HBV core antigen presentation, and may be useful for the control of HBV infection in HLA-A2-positive HBV carriers. PMID:17244158

  11. A KALA-modified lipid nanoparticle containing CpG-free plasmid DNA as a potential DNA vaccine carrier for antigen presentation and as an immune-stimulative adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Naoya; Shaheen, Sharif M.; Akita, Hidetaka; Nakamura, Takashi; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Technologies that delivery antigen-encoded plasmid DNA (pDNA) to antigen presenting cell and their immune-activation are required for the success of DNA vaccines. Here we report on an artificial nanoparticle that can achieve these; a multifunctional envelope-type nanodevice modified with KALA, a peptide that forms α-helical structure at physiological pH (KALA-MEND). KALA modification and the removal of the CpG-motifs from the pDNA synergistically boosted transfection efficacy. In parallel, transfection with the KALA-MEND enhances the production of multiple cytokines and chemokines and co-stimulatory molecules via the Toll-like receptor 9-independent manner. Endosome-fusogenic lipid envelops and a long length of pDNA are essential for this immune stimulation. Furthermore, cytoplasmic dsDNA sensors that are related to the STING/TBK1 pathway and inflammasome are involved in IFN-β and IL-1β production, respectively. Consequently, the robust induction of antigen-specific cytotoxic T-lymphoma activity and the resulting prophylactic and therapeutic anti-tumor effect was observed in mice that had been immunized with bone marrow-derived dendritic cells ex vivo transfected with antigen-encoding pDNA. Collectively, the KALA-MEND possesses dual functions; gene transfection system and immune-stimulative adjuvant, those are both necessary for the successful DNA vaccine. PMID:25605799

  12. GMI Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strode, Sarah; Rodriguez, Jose; Steenrod, Steve; Liu, Junhua; Strahan, Susan; Nielsen, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We describe the capabilities of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical transport model (CTM) with a special focus on capabilities related to the Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom). Several science results based on GMI hindcast simulations and preliminary results from the ATom simulations are highlighted. We also discuss the relationship between GMI and GEOS-5.

  13. Synergy of TLR3 and 7 ligands significantly enhances function of DCs to present inactivated PRRSV antigen through TRIF/MyD88-NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Cong, Xiaoyan; Chen, Lei; Qi, Jing; Wu, Xiangju; Zhou, Mingming; Yoo, Dongwan; Li, Feng; Sun, Wenbo; Wu, Jiaqiang; Zhao, Xiaomin; Chen, Zhi; Yu, Jiang; Du, Yijun; Wang, Jinbao

    2016-01-01

    PRRS is one of the most important diseases in swine industry. Current PRRS inactivated vaccine provides only a limited protection and cannot induce sufficient cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we first found that the mRNA and protein levels of Th1-type cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-12) and Th2-type cytokines (IL-6, IL-10) were significantly increased through TRIF/MyD88-NF-κB signaling pathway when porcine peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) were treated with poly (I: C) of TLR3 ligand and imiquimod of TLR7 ligand, along with inactivated PRRSV antigen. Meanwhile, the ability of catching PRRSV antigen was also significantly enhanced. In mice experiment, it was found that the PRRSV-specific T lymphocyte proliferation, the percentages of CD4(+), CD8(+) T lymphocytes and PRRSV-specific CD3(+) T cells producing IFN-γ and IL-4, the levels of Th1- and Th2-type cytokines and the titers of neutralization antibody were significantly enhanced in poly (I: C), imiquimod along with inactivated PRRSV group. Taken together, results of our experiments described for the first time that synergy of TLR3 and 7 ligands could significantly enhance the function of DCs to present inactivated PRRSV antigen through TRIF/MyD88-NF-κB signaling pathway and be used as adjuvant candidate for the development of novel PRRS inactivated vaccine. PMID:27046485

  14. Synergy of TLR3 and 7 ligands significantly enhances function of DCs to present inactivated PRRSV antigen through TRIF/MyD88-NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yue; Cong, Xiaoyan; Chen, Lei; Qi, Jing; Wu, Xiangju; Zhou, Mingming; Yoo, Dongwan; Li, Feng; Sun, Wenbo; Wu, Jiaqiang; Zhao, Xiaomin; Chen, Zhi; Yu, Jiang; Du, Yijun; Wang, Jinbao

    2016-01-01

    PRRS is one of the most important diseases in swine industry. Current PRRS inactivated vaccine provides only a limited protection and cannot induce sufficient cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we first found that the mRNA and protein levels of Th1-type cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-12) and Th2-type cytokines (IL-6, IL-10) were significantly increased through TRIF/MyD88-NF-κB signaling pathway when porcine peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) were treated with poly (I: C) of TLR3 ligand and imiquimod of TLR7 ligand, along with inactivated PRRSV antigen. Meanwhile, the ability of catching PRRSV antigen was also significantly enhanced. In mice experiment, it was found that the PRRSV-specific T lymphocyte proliferation, the percentages of CD4+, CD8+ T lymphocytes and PRRSV-specific CD3+ T cells producing IFN-γ and IL-4, the levels of Th1- and Th2-type cytokines and the titers of neutralization antibody were significantly enhanced in poly (I: C), imiquimod along with inactivated PRRSV group. Taken together, results of our experiments described for the first time that synergy of TLR3 and 7 ligands could significantly enhance the function of DCs to present inactivated PRRSV antigen through TRIF/MyD88-NF-κB signaling pathway and be used as adjuvant candidate for the development of novel PRRS inactivated vaccine. PMID:27046485

  15. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Alysia M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells), are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ) or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer. PMID:27013447

  16. The serodominant secreted effector protein of Salmonella, SseB, is a strong CD4 antigen containing an immunodominant epitope presented by diverse HLA class II alleles

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Catherine J; Jones, Claire; Blohmke, Christoph J; Darton, Thomas C; Goudet, Amelie; Sergeant, Ruhena; Maillere, Bernard; Pollard, Andrew J; Altmann, Daniel M; Boyton, Rosemary J

    2014-01-01

    Detailed characterization of the protective T-cell response in salmonellosis is a pressing unmet need in light of the global burden of human Salmonella infections and the likely contribution of CD4 T cells to immunity against this intracellular infection. In previous studies screening patient sera against antigen arrays, SseB was noteworthy as a serodominant target of adaptive immunity, inducing significantly raised antibody responses in HIV-seronegative compared with seropositive patients. SseB is a secreted protein, part of the Espa superfamily, localized to the bacterial surface and forming part of the translocon of the type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity island 2. We demonstrate here that SseB is also a target of CD4 T-cell immunity, generating a substantial response after experimental infection in human volunteers, with around 0·1% of the peripheral repertoire responding to it. HLA-DR/peptide binding studies indicate that this protein encompasses a number of peptides with ability to bind to several different HLA-DR alleles. Of these, peptide 11 (p11) was shown in priming of both HLA-DR1 and HLA-DR4 transgenic mice to contain an immunodominant CD4 epitope. Analysis of responses in human donors showed immunity focused on p11 and another epitope in peptide 2. The high frequency of SseB-reactive CD4 T cells and the broad applicability to diverse HLA genotypes coupled with previous observations of serodominance and protective vaccination in mouse challenge experiments, make SseB a plausible candidate for next-generation Salmonella vaccines. PMID:24891088

  17. Limited Density of an Antigen Presented by RMA-S Cells Requires B7-1/CD28 Signaling to Enhance T-Cell Immunity at the Effector Phase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Lin; Sluijter, Marjolein; Doorduijn, Elien M.; Kale, Shubha P.; McFerrin, Harris; Liu, Yong-Yu; Li, Yan; Mottamal, Madhusoodanan; Yao, Xin; Du, Fengkun; Gu, Baihan; Hoang, Kim; Nguyen, Yen H.; Taylor, Nichelle; Stephens, Chelsea R.; van Hall, Thorbald; Zhang, Qian-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The association of B7-1/CD28 between antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T-cells provides a second signal to proliferate and activate T-cell immunity at the induction phase. Many reports indicate that tumor cells transfected with B7-1 induced augmented antitumor immunity at the induction phase by mimicking APC function; however, the function of B7-1 on antitumor immunity at the effector phase is unknown. Here, we report direct evidence of enhanced T-cell antitumor immunity at the effector phase by the B7-1 molecule. Our experiments in vivo and in vitro indicated that reactivity of antigen-specific monoclonal and polyclonal T-cell effectors against a Lass5 epitope presented by RMA-S cells is increased when the cells expressed B7-1. Use of either anti-B7-1 or anti-CD28 antibodies to block the B7-1/CD28 association reduced reactivity of the T effectors against B7-1 positive RMA-S cells. Transfection of Lass5 cDNA into or pulse of Lass5 peptide onto B7-1 positive RMA-S cells overcomes the requirement of the B7-1/CD28 signal for T effector response. To our knowledge, the data offers, for the first time, strong evidence that supports the requirement of B7-1/CD28 secondary signal at the effector phase of antitumor T-cell immunity being dependent on the density of an antigenic peptide. PMID:25383875

  18. Lipid antigens in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dowds, C. Marie; Kornell, Sabin-Christin

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are not only a central part of human metabolism but also play diverse and critical roles in the immune system. As such, they can act as ligands of lipid-activated nuclear receptors, control inflammatory signaling through bioactive lipids such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins, and modulate immunity as intracellular phospholipid- or sphingolipid-derived signaling mediators. In addition, lipids can serve as antigens and regulate immunity through the activation of lipid-reactive T cells, which is the topic of this review. We will provide an overview of the mechanisms of lipid antigen presentation, the biology of lipid-reactive T cells, and their contribution to immunity. PMID:23999493

  19. Pathways of Antigen Processing

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Janice S.; Wearsch, Pamela A.; Cresswell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    T cell recognition of antigen presenting cells depends on their expression of a spectrum of peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) and class II (MHC-II) molecules. Conversion of antigens from pathogens or transformed cells into MHC-I and MHC-II-bound peptides is critical for mounting protective T cell responses, and similar processing of self proteins is necessary to establish and maintain tolerance. Cells use a variety of mechanisms to acquire protein antigens, from translation in the cytosol to variations on the theme of endocytosis, and to degrade them once acquired. In this review we highlight the aspects of MHC-I and MHC-II biosynthesis and assembly that have evolved to intersect these pathways and sample the peptides that are produced. PMID:23298205

  20. Engineering Capabilities and Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulos, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the engineering capabilities at Johnson Space Center, The presentation also reviews the partnerships that have resulted in successfully designed and developed projects that involved commercial and educational institutions.

  1. An experimental subunit vaccine based on Bluetongue virus 4 VP2 protein fused to an antigen-presenting cells single chain antibody elicits cellular and humoral immune responses in cattle, guinea pigs and IFNAR(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Legisa, D M; Perez Aguirreburualde, M S; Gonzalez, F N; Marin-Lopez, A; Ruiz, V; Wigdorovitz, A; Martinez-Escribano, J A; Ortego, J; Dus Santos, M J

    2015-05-21

    Bluetongue virus (BTV), the causative agent of bluetongue disease (BT) in domestic and wild ruminants, is worldwide distributed. A total of 27 serotypes have been described so far, and several outbreaks have been reported. Vaccination is critical for controlling the spread of BTV. In the last years, subunit vaccines, viral vector vaccines and reverse genetic-based vaccines have emerged as new alternatives to conventional ones. In this study, we developed an experimental subunit vaccine against BTV4, with the benefit of targeting the recombinant protein to antigen-presenting cells. The VP2 protein from an Argentine BTV4 isolate was expressed alone or fused to the antigen presenting cell homing (APCH) molecule, in the baculovirus insect cell expression system. The immunogenicity of both proteins was evaluated in guinea pigs and cattle. Titers of specific neutralizing antibodies in guinea pigs and cattle immunized with VP2 or APCH-VP2 were high and similar to those induced by a conventional inactivated vaccine. The immunogenicity of recombinant proteins was further studied in the IFNAR(-/-) mouse model where the fusion of VP2 to APCH enhanced the cellular immune response and the neutralizing activity induced by VP2. PMID:25858859

  2. The Neck Region of the C-type Lectin DC-SIGN Regulates Its Surface Spatiotemporal Organization and Virus-binding Capacity on Antigen-presenting Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Carlo; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Joosten, Ben; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Gualda, Emilio J.; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Figdor, Carl G.; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.; Cambi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The C-type lectin DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) facilitates capture and internalization of a plethora of different pathogens. Although it is known that DC-SIGN organizes in nanoclusters at the surface of DCs, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this well defined nanopatterning and role in viral binding remain enigmatic. By combining biochemical and advanced biophysical techniques, including optical superresolution and single particle tracking, we demonstrate that DC-SIGN intrinsic nanoclustering strictly depends on its molecular structure. DC-SIGN nanoclusters exhibited free, Brownian diffusion on the cell membrane. Truncation of the extracellular neck region, known to abrogate tetramerization, significantly reduced nanoclustering and concomitantly increased lateral diffusion. Importantly, DC-SIGN nanocluster dissolution exclusively compromised binding to nanoscale size pathogens. Monte Carlo simulations revealed that heterogeneity on nanocluster density and spatial distribution confers broader binding capabilities to DC-SIGN. As such, our results underscore a direct relationship between spatial nanopatterning, driven by intermolecular interactions between the neck regions, and receptor diffusion to provide DC-SIGN with the exquisite ability to dock pathogens at the virus length scale. Insight into how virus receptors are organized prior to virus binding and how they assemble into functional platforms for virus docking is helpful to develop novel strategies to prevent virus entry and infection. PMID:23019323

  3. A review of atomic clock technology, the performance capability of present spaceborne and terrestrial atomic clocks, and a look toward the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, Robert F. C.

    1989-01-01

    Clocks have played a strong role in the development of general relativity. The concept of the proper clock is presently best realized by atomic clocks, whose development as precision instruments has evolved very rapidly in the last decades. To put a historical prospective on this progress since the year AD 1000, the time stability of various clocks expressed in terms of seconds of time error over one day of operation is shown. This stability of operation must not be confused with accuracy. Stability refers to the constancy of a clock operation as compared to that of some other clocks that serve as time references. Accuracy, on the other hand, is the ability to reproduce a previously defined frequency. The issues are outlined that must be considered when accuracy and stability of clocks and oscillators are studied. In general, the most widely used resonances result from the hyperfine interaction of the nuclear magnetic dipole moment and that of the outermost electron, which is characteristic of hydrogen and the alkali atoms. During the past decade hyperfine resonances of ions have also been used. The principal reason for both the accuracy and the stability of atomic clocks is the ability of obtaining very narrow hyperfine transition resonances by isolating the atom in some way so that only the applied stimulating microwave magnetic field is a significant source of perturbation. It is also important to make resonance transitions among hyperfine magnetic sublevels where separation is independent, at least to first order, of the magnetic field. In the case of ions stored in traps operating at high magnetic fields, one selects the trapping field to be consistent with a field-independent transition of the trapped atoms.

  4. CpG promotes cross-presentation of dead cell-associated antigens by pre-CD8α+ dendritic cells [corrected].

    PubMed

    de Brito, Christelle; Tomkowiak, Martine; Ghittoni, Raffaella; Caux, Christophe; Leverrier, Yann; Marvel, Jacqueline

    2011-02-01

    Cross-presentation of cell-associated Ags by dendritic cells (DC) plays an important role in immunity. DC in lymphoid tissues are short lived, being continuously replaced by precursors that proliferate and differentiate locally. Paradoxically, although TLR ligands promote immune responses and stimulate DC replenishment, they impair the cross-priming capacity of terminally differentiated splenic CD8α(+) DC, the major subset involved in cross-priming. In this study, we have investigated the cross-presentation capacity of newly generated murine DC and especially immediate precursors of CD8α(+) DC. We show that these DC do not cross-present Ag from dead cells unless stimulated by TLR ligands before Ag capture. TLR ligand CpG induced the expression of costimulatory molecules required for CD8 T cell activation but also regulated the intracellular mechanisms of cross-presentation such as Ag degradation rates without regulating Ag uptake. GM-CSF, an inflammatory cytokine associated with infections, also promoted cross-presentation acquisition by pre-CD8α(+) DC and synergized with TLR9 ligand. The concept that TLR ligands as well as inflammatory cytokines promote the acquisition of cross-presenting properties by pre-CD8α(+) DC has important implications during immune responses and when considering the use of these cells for vaccination. PMID:21187449

  5. XRCF Testing Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reily, Cary; Kegely, Jeff; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center's X-ray Calibration Facility has been recently modified to test Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) developmental mirrors at cryogenic temperatures (35 degrees Kelvin) while maintaining capability for performance testing of x-ray optics and detectors. The facility's current cryo-optical testing capability and potential modifications for future support of NGST will be presented.

  6. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  7. Selectively Reduced Intracellular Proliferation of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium within APCs Limits Antigen Presentation and Development of a Rapid CD8 T Cell Response1

    PubMed Central

    Albaghdadi, Homam; Robinson, Nirmal; Finlay, Brett; Krishnan, Lakshmi; Sad, Subash

    2014-01-01

    Ag presentation to CD8+ T cells commences immediately after infection, which facilitates their rapid expansion and control of pathogen. This paradigm is not followed during infection with virulent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (ST), an intracellular bacterium that causes mortality in susceptible C57BL/6J mice within 7 days and a chronic infection in resistant mice (129 × 1SvJ). Infection of mice with OVA-expressing ST results in the development of a CD8+ T cell response that is detectable only after the second week of infection despite the early detectable bacterial burden. The mechanism behind the delayed CD8+ T cell activation was evaluated, and it was found that dendritic cells/macrophages or mice infected with ST-OVA failed to present Ag to OVA-specific CD8+ T cells. Lack of early Ag presentation was not rescued when mice or dendritic cells/macrophages were infected with an attenuated aroA mutant of ST or with mutants having defective Salmonella pathogenicity island I/II genes. Although extracellular ST proliferated extensively, the replication of ST was highly muted once inside macrophages. This muted intracellular proliferation of ST resulted in the generation of poor levels of intracellular Ag and peptide-MHC complex on the surface of dendritic cells. Additional experiments revealed that ST did not actively inhibit Ag presentation, rather it inhibited the uptake of another intracellular pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, thereby causing inhibition of Ag presentation against L. monocytogenes. Taken together, this study reveals a dichotomy in the proliferation of ST and indicates that selectively reduced intra-cellular proliferation of virulent pathogens may be an important mechanism of immune evasion. PMID:19692639

  8. The central repeat domain 1 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latency associated-nuclear antigen 1 (LANA1) prevents cis MHC class I peptide presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwun, Hyun Jin; Ramos da Silva, Suzane; Qin Huilian; Ferris, Robert L.; Tan Rusung; Chang Yuan; Moore, Patrick S.

    2011-04-10

    KSHV LANA1, a latent protein expressed during chronic infection to maintain a viral genome, inhibits major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) peptide presentation in cis as a means of immune evasion. Through deletional cloning, we localized this function to the LANA1 central repeat 1 (CR1) subregion. Other CR subregions retard LANA1 translation and proteasomal processing but do not markedly inhibit LANA1 peptide processing by MHC I. Inhibition of proteasomal processing ablates LANA1 peptide presentation. Direct expression of LANA1 within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) overcomes CR1 inhibition suggesting that CR1 acts prior to translocation of cytoplasmic peptides into the ER. By physically separating CR1 from other subdomains, we show that LANA1 evades MHC I peptide processing by a mechanism distinct from other herpesviruses including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Although LANA1 and EBV EBNA1 are functionally similar, they appear to use different mechanisms to evade host cytotoxic T lymphocyte surveillance.

  9. Antigenic sites in carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Hammarstrom, S; Shively, J E; Paxton, R J; Beatty, B G; Larsson, A; Ghosh, R; Bormer, O; Buchegger, F; Mach, J P; Burtin, P

    1989-09-01

    The epitope reactivities of 52 well-characterized monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against carcinoembryonic antigen from 11 different research groups were studied using competitive solid-phase immunoassays. About 60% of all possible combinations of Mabs as inhibitors and as the primary binding antibody were investigated. The inhibition data were analyzed by a specially developed computer program "EPITOPES" which measures concordance and discordance in inhibition patterns between Mabs. The analysis showed that 43 of the 52 Mabs (83%) could be classified into one of five essentially noninteracting epitope groups (GOLD 1-5) containing between four and 15 Mabs each. The epitopes recognized by the Mabs belonging to groups 1 to 5 were peptide in nature. With one or two possible exceptions non-classifiable Mabs were either directed against carbohydrate epitopes (4 Mabs) or were inactive in the tests used. Within epitope groups GOLD 1, 4, and 5 two partially overlapping subgroups were distinguished. Mabs with a high degree of carcinoembryonic antigen specificity generally belonged to epitope groups GOLD 1 and 3. PMID:2474375

  10. Structural Illumination of Equine MHC Class I Molecules Highlights Unconventional Epitope Presentation Manner That Is Evolved in Equine Leukocyte Antigen Alleles.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shugang; Liu, Jun; Qi, Jianxun; Chen, Rong; Zhang, Nianzhi; Liu, Yanjie; Wang, Junya; Wu, Yanan; Gao, George Fu; Xia, Chun

    2016-02-15

    MHC class I (MHC I)-restricted virus-specific CTLs are implicated as critical components in the control of this naturally occurring lentivirus and in the protective immune response to the successfully applied attenuated equine infectious anemia virus vaccine in the horse. Nevertheless, the structural basis for how the equine MHC I presents epitope peptides remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the binding of several equine infectious anemia virus-derived epitope peptides by the ability to refold recombinant molecules and by thermal stability, and then by determining the x-ray structure of five peptide-MHC I complexes: equine MHC class I allele (Eqca)-N*00602/Env-RW12, Eqca-N*00602/Gag-GW12, Eqca-N*00602/Rev-QW11, Eqca-N*00602/Gag-CF9, and Eqca-N*00601/Gag-GW12. Although Eqca-N*00601 and Eqca-N*00602 differ by a single amino acid, Eqca-N*00601 exhibited a drastically different peptide presentation when binding a similar CTL epitope, Gag-GW12; the result makes the previously reported function clear to be non-cross-recognition between these two alleles. The structures plus Eqca-N*00602 complexed with a 9-mer peptide are particularly noteworthy in that we illuminated differences in apparent flexibility in the center of the epitope peptides for the complexes with Gag-GW12 as compared with Env-RW12, and a strict selection of epitope peptides with normal length. The featured preferences and unconventional presentations of long peptides by equine MHC I molecules provide structural bases to explain the exceptional anti-lentivirus immunity in the horse. We think that the beneficial reference points could serve as an initial platform for other human or animal lentiviruses. PMID:26764037

  11. Insulin-like growth factor I messenger RNA and protein are expressed in the human lymph node and distinctly confined to subtypes of macrophages, antigen-presenting cells, lymphocytes and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Oberlin, Dominique; Fellbaum, Christian; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2009-11-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a potent hormone that stimulates growth and differentiation and inhibits apoptosis in numerous tissues. Preliminary evidence suggests that IGF-I exerts differentiating, mitogenic and restoring activities in the immune system but the sites of synthesis of local IGF-I are unknown. Identification of these sites would allow the functional role of local IGF-I to be clarified. The presence of IGF-I in non-immune cells suggests that it acts as a trophic factor, while its occurrence in subtypes of lymphocytes or antigen-presenting cells indicates paracrine/autocrine direct regulatory involvement of IGF-I in the human immune response. The present study investigated the location of IGF-I messenger RNA and protein on archival human lymph node samples by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence staining using an IGF-I probe and antisera specific for human IGF-I and CD3 (T lymphocytes), CD20 (B lymphocytes), CD68 (macrophages), CD21 (follicular dendritic cells), S100 (interdigitating dendritic cells) and podoplanin (fibroblastic reticular cells). Numerous cells within the B- and T-cell compartments expressed the IGF-I gene, and the majority of these cells were identified as macrophages. Solitary follicular dendritic cells exhibited IGF-I. A few T lymphocytes, and no B lymphocytes, contained IGF-I immunoreactive material. Furthermore, IGF-I immunoreactive cells outside the follicles that did not react with CD3, CD20, S100 or podoplanin markers were identified as high-endothelial venule (HEV) cells. From this we conclude that the main task of IGF-I in human non-tumoral lymph node may be autocrine and paracrine regulation of the differentiation, stimulation and survival of lymphocytes, antigen-presenting cells and macrophages and the differentiation and maintenance of HEV cells. PMID:20067534

  12. Insulin-like growth factor I messenger RNA and protein are expressed in the human lymph node and distinctly confined to subtypes of macrophages, antigen-presenting cells, lymphocytes and endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Oberlin, Dominique; Fellbaum, Christian; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a potent hormone that stimulates growth and differentiation and inhibits apoptosis in numerous tissues. Preliminary evidence suggests that IGF-I exerts differentiating, mitogenic and restoring activities in the immune system but the sites of synthesis of local IGF-I are unknown. Identification of these sites would allow the functional role of local IGF-I to be clarified. The presence of IGF-I in non-immune cells suggests that it acts as a trophic factor, while its occurrence in subtypes of lymphocytes or antigen-presenting cells indicates paracrine/autocrine direct regulatory involvement of IGF-I in the human immune response. The present study investigated the location of IGF-I messenger RNA and protein on archival human lymph node samples by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence staining using an IGF-I probe and antisera specific for human IGF-I and CD3 (T lymphocytes), CD20 (B lymphocytes), CD68 (macrophages), CD21 (follicular dendritic cells), S100 (interdigitating dendritic cells) and podoplanin (fibroblastic reticular cells). Numerous cells within the B- and T-cell compartments expressed the IGF-I gene, and the majority of these cells were identified as macrophages. Solitary follicular dendritic cells exhibited IGF-I. A few T lymphocytes, and no B lymphocytes, contained IGF-I immunoreactive material. Furthermore, IGF-I immunoreactive cells outside the follicles that did not react with CD3, CD20, S100 or podoplanin markers were identified as high-endothelial venule (HEV) cells. From this we conclude that the main task of IGF-I in human non-tumoral lymph node may be autocrine and paracrine regulation of the differentiation, stimulation and survival of lymphocytes, antigen-presenting cells and macrophages and the differentiation and maintenance of HEV cells. PMID:20067534

  13. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide-Exposed Endothelial Cells Bias Antigen Presentation to CD4+ T Cells toward a Th17 Response.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wanhong; Stohl, Lori L; Xu, Linghui; Zhou, Xi K; Manni, Michela; Wagner, John A; Granstein, Richard D

    2016-03-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide with well-established immunomodulatory functions. CGRP-containing nerves innervate dermal blood vessels and lymph nodes. We examined whether CGRP regulates the outcome of Ag presentation by Langerhans cells (LCs) to T cells through actions on microvascular endothelial cells (ECs). Exposure of primary murine dermal microvascular ECs (pDMECs) to CGRP followed by coculture with LCs, responsive CD4(+) T cells and Ag resulted in increased production of IL-6 and IL-17A accompanied by inhibition of IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-22 compared with wells containing pDMECs treated with medium alone. Physical contact between ECs and LCs or T cells was not required for this effect and, except for IL-4, we demonstrated that IL-6 production by CGRP-treated pDMECs was involved in these effects. CD4(+) cells expressing cytoplasmic IL-17A were increased, whereas cells expressing cytoplasmic IFN-γ or IL-4 were decreased by the presence of CGRP-treated pDMECs. In addition, the level of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt mRNA was significantly increased, whereas T-bet and GATA3 expression was inhibited. Immunization at the site of intradermally administered CGRP led to a similar bias in CD4(+) T cells from draining lymph node cells toward IL-17A and away from IFN-γ. Actions of nerve-derived CGRP on ECs may have important regulatory effects on the outcome of Ag presentation with consequences for the expression of inflammatory skin disorders involving Th17 cells. PMID:26829986

  14. Involvement of a C-terminal motif in the interference of primate lentiviral Vpu proteins with CD1d-mediated antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bächle, Susanna M.; Sauter, Daniel; Sibitz, Sabrina; Sandberg, Johan K.; Kirchhoff, Frank; Moll, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu is emerging as a critical factor for viral evasion from innate immunity. We have previously shown that the Vpu proteins of two HIV-1 group M subtype B strains (NL4-3 and BaL) down-regulate CD1d from the surface of infected dendritic cells (DCs) and inhibit their crosstalk with the innate invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. In the present study, we have investigated the ability of a comprehensive set of primate lentiviral Vpu proteins to interfere with CD1d-mediated immunity. We found that CD1d down-regulation is a conserved function of Vpu proteins from HIV-1 groups M, O and P as well as their direct precursors SIVcpzPtt and SIVgor. At the group M subtype level, subtype C Vpu proteins were significantly weaker CD1d antagonists than subtype B Vpu proteins. Functional characterization of different mutants and chimeras derived from active subtype B and inactive subtype C Vpu proteins revealed that residues in the cytoplasmic domain are important for CD1d down-regulation. Specifically, we identified a C-terminal APW motif characteristic for group M subtype B Vpu proteins necessary for interference with CD1d surface expression. These findings support the notion that Vpu plays an important role in lentiviral evasion from innate immunity. PMID:25872908

  15. Phenotypic modulation and cytokine profiles of antigen presenting cells by European subtype 1 and 3 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strains in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Weesendorp, Eefke; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, Norbert; Popma-De Graaf, Ditta J; Fijten, Helmi; Rebel, Johanna M J

    2013-12-27

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes continuous problems in the pig industry, due to high costs of outbreaks and reduced welfare of diseased pigs. The severity of infection is, partly, dependent on the virus strain. Recently isolated Eastern-European subtype 3 strains are more pathogenic than the widespread subtype 1 strains. There is, however, almost no information available about the mechanisms involved in the pathogenicity of these subtype 3 strains. The objective of the present study was to characterize the in vitro and in vivo response of two European subtype 1 strains, Belgium A and Lelystad-Ter Huurne (LV), and a virulent subtype 3 strain, Lena, in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DC) (in vitro) and alveolar macrophages (in vitro and in vivo). It was shown that infection with the Lena strain resulted in a higher apoptosis of cells in vitro and a higher level of infectivity in vitro and in vivo than the other virus strains. Furthermore, infection with Lena resulted in a small downregulation of the immunologically relevant cell surface molecules SLA-I, SLA-II and CD80/86 in vitro, and SLA-II in vivo. In spite of these differences, in vitro cytokine responses did not differ significantly between strains, except for the absence of IL-10 production by Lena in BM-DC. The higher infectivity, apoptosis and downregulation of the cell surface molecules, may have contributed to the increased pathogenicity of Lena,