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Sample records for antigen psa failure

  1. PSA Nadir of <0.5 ng/mL Following Brachytherapy for Early-Stage Prostate Adenocarcinoma is Associated With Freedom From Prostate-Specific Antigen Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Eric C.; Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Because limited information exists regarding whether the rate or magnitude of PSA decline following brachytherapy predicts long-term clinical outcomes, we evaluated whether achieving a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir (nPSA) <0.5 ng/mL following brachytherapy is associated with decreased PSA failure and/or distant metastasis. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed our database of early-stage prostate adenocarcinoma patients who underwent brachytherapy, excluding those receiving androgen-deprivation therapy and those with <2 years follow-up. Median and mean pretreatment PSA were 6 ng/mL and 7.16 ng/mL, respectively. By clinical stage, 775 were low risk ({<=}T2a), 126 were intermediate risk (T2b), and 20 were high risk (>T2b). By Gleason score, 840 were low risk ({<=}6), 71 were intermediate risk (7), and 10 were high risk (>7). Patients were treated with brachytherapy only (I-125, n = 779, or Pd-103, n = 47), or brachytherapy + external-beam radiation therapy (n = 95). Median follow-up was 6.3 years. We noted whether nPSA <0.5 ng/mL was achieved and the time to achieve this nadir and tested for associations with pretreatment risk factors. We also determined whether this PSA endpoint was associated with decreased PSA failure or distant metastasis. Results: Absence of high-risk factors in clinical stage ({<=}T2b), Gleason score ({<=}7), and pretreatment PSA ({<=}20 ng/mL) was significantly associated with achieving nPSA <0.5 ng/mL. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, patients achieving nPSA <0.5 ng/mL had significantly higher long-term freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) than nonresponders (5-year FFBF: 95.2 {+-} 0.8% vs. 71.5 {+-} 6.7%; p < 0.0005). Among responders, those who achieved nPSA <0.5 ng/mL in {<=}5 years had higher FFBF than those requiring >5 years (5-year FFBF: 96.7 {+-} 0.7% vs. 80.8 {+-} 4.6%; p < 0.0005). On multivariate analysis, patients who achieved nPSA <0.5 ng/mL in {<=}5 years had significantly higher FFBF than other

  2. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate-specific antigen; Prostate cancer screening test ... special steps are needed to prepare for this test. ... Reasons for a PSA test: This test may be done to screen for prostate cancer. It is also used to follow people after prostate cancer ...

  3. Evaluating the Phoenix Definition of Biochemical Failure After {sup 125}I Prostate Brachytherapy: Can PSA Kinetics Distinguish PSA Failures From PSA Bounces?

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Anna; Keyes, Mira; Pickles, Tom

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics of PSA failure (PSAf) and PSA bounce (PSAb) after permanent {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy (PB). Methods and Materials: The study included 1,006 consecutive low and 'low tier' intermediate-risk patients treated with {sup 125}I PB, with a potential minimum follow-up of 4 years. Patients who met the Phoenix definition of biochemical failure (nadir + 2 ng/mL{sup -1}) were identified. If the PSA subsequently fell to {<=}0.5 ng/mL{sup -1}without intervention, this was considered a PSAb. All others were scored as true PSAf. Patient, tumor and dosimetric characteristics were compared between groups using the chi-square test and analysis of variance to evaluate factors associated with PSAf or PSAb. Results: Median follow-up was 54 months. Of the 1,006 men, 57 patients triggered the Phoenix definition of PSA failure, 32 (56%) were true PSAf, and 25 PSAb (44%). The median time to trigger nadir + 2 was 20.6 months (range, 6-36) vs. 49 mo (range, 12-83) for PSAb vs. PSAf groups (p < 0.001). The PSAb patients were significantly younger (p < 0.0001), had shorter time to reach the nadir (median 6 vs. 11.5 months, p = 0.001) and had a shorter PSA doubling time (p = 0.05). Men younger than age 70 who trigger nadir +2 PSA failure within 38 months of implant have an 80% likelihood of having PSAb and 20% chance of PSAf. Conclusions: With adequate follow-up, 44% of PSA failures by the Phoenix definition in our cohort were found to be benign PSA bounces. Our study reinforces the need for adequate follow-up when reporting PB PSA outcomes, to ensure accurate estimates of treatment efficacy and to avoid unnecessary secondary interventions.

  4. Predictors of mortality after prostate-specific antigen failure

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amico, Anthony V. . E-mail: adamico@lroc.harvard.edu; Kantoff, Phillip; Loffredo, Marian; Renshaw, Andrew A.; Loffredo, Brittany; Chen Minghui

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: We identified factors associated with the length of survival after prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 81 of 206 men enrolled on a randomized trial evaluating external-beam radiation therapy (RT) with or without androgen suppression therapy (AST) and who experienced PSA failure. Salvage AST was administered at a PSA level of {approx}10 ng/mL as per protocol. Cox regression was used to determine factors associated with length of survival after PSA failure. Results: A PSA DT (doubling time) <6 months (p = 0.04) and age at the time of PSA failure (p = 0.009) were significantly associated with length of survival. By 5 years, 35% and 65% of all-cause mortality was from prostate cancer in men whose age at PSA failure was 75 or higher vs. <75, respectively. Across all ages, 0%, 4%, as compared with 63% of men, were estimated to die of prostate cancer within 5 years after PSA failure if their PSA DT was >12, 6-12, or <6 months, respectively. Conclusions: Advanced age and a PSA DT <6 months at the time of PSA failure are associated with a significantly shorter survival.

  5. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... What are some of the limitations and potential harms of the PSA test for prostate cancer screening? ... has been learned about both the benefits and harms of prostate cancer screening, a number of organizations ...

  6. Molecular Form Differences Between Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Standards Create Quantitative Discordances in PSA ELISA Measurements

    PubMed Central

    McJimpsey, Erica L.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assays currently employed for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) lack the specificity needed to differentiate PCa from benign prostatic hyperplasia and have high false positive rates. The PSA calibrants used to create calibration curves in these assays are typically purified from seminal plasma and contain many molecular forms (intact PSA and cleaved subforms). The purpose of this study was to determine if the composition of the PSA molecular forms found in these PSA standards contribute to the lack of PSA test reliability. To this end, seminal plasma purified PSA standards from different commercial sources were investigated by western blot (WB) and in multiple research grade PSA ELISAs. The WB results revealed that all of the PSA standards contained different mass concentrations of intact and cleaved molecular forms. Increased mass concentrations of intact PSA yielded higher immunoassay absorbance values, even between lots from the same manufacturer. Standardization of seminal plasma derived PSA calibrant molecular form mass concentrations and purification methods will assist in closing the gaps in PCa testing measurements that require the use of PSA values, such as the % free PSA and Prostate Health Index by increasing the accuracy of the calibration curves. PMID:26911983

  7. Molecular Form Differences Between Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Standards Create Quantitative Discordances in PSA ELISA Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McJimpsey, Erica L.

    2016-02-01

    The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assays currently employed for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) lack the specificity needed to differentiate PCa from benign prostatic hyperplasia and have high false positive rates. The PSA calibrants used to create calibration curves in these assays are typically purified from seminal plasma and contain many molecular forms (intact PSA and cleaved subforms). The purpose of this study was to determine if the composition of the PSA molecular forms found in these PSA standards contribute to the lack of PSA test reliability. To this end, seminal plasma purified PSA standards from different commercial sources were investigated by western blot (WB) and in multiple research grade PSA ELISAs. The WB results revealed that all of the PSA standards contained different mass concentrations of intact and cleaved molecular forms. Increased mass concentrations of intact PSA yielded higher immunoassay absorbance values, even between lots from the same manufacturer. Standardization of seminal plasma derived PSA calibrant molecular form mass concentrations and purification methods will assist in closing the gaps in PCa testing measurements that require the use of PSA values, such as the % free PSA and Prostate Health Index by increasing the accuracy of the calibration curves.

  8. PSA nadir predicts biochemical and distant failures after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer: A multi-institutional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Michael E. . E-mail: mray@umich.edu; Thames, Howard D.; Levy, Larry B.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Shipley, William U.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the significance of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir (nPSA) and the time to nPSA (T{sub nPSA}) in predicting biochemical or clinical disease-free survival (PSA-DFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) in patients treated with definitive external beam radiotherapy (RT) for clinical Stage T1b-T2 prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Nine participating institutions submitted data on 4839 patients treated between 1986 and 1995 for Stage T1b-T2cN0-NxM0 prostate cancer. All patients were treated definitively with RT alone to doses {>=}60 Gy, without neoadjuvant or planned adjuvant androgen suppression. A total of 4833 patients with a median follow-up of 6.3 years met the criteria for analysis. Two endpoints were considered: (1) PSA-DFS, defined as freedom from PSA failure (American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition), initiation of androgen suppression after completion of RT, or documented local or distant failure; and (2) DMFS, defined as freedom from clinically apparent distant failure. In patients with failure, nPSA was defined as the lowest PSA measurement before any failure. In patients without failure, nPSA was the lowest PSA measurement during the entire follow-up period. T{sub nPSA} was calculated from the completion of RT to the nPSA date. Results: A greater nPSA level and shorter T{sub nPSA} were associated with decreased PSA-DFS and DMFS in all patients and in all risk categories (low [Stage T1b, T1c, or T2a, Gleason score {<=}6, and PSA level {<=}10 ng/mL], intermediate [Stage T1b, T1c, or T2a, Gleason score {<=}6, and PSA level >10 but {<=}20 ng/mL, or Stage T2b or T2c, Gleason score {<=}6, and PSA level {<=}20 ng/mL, or Gleason score 7 and PSA level {<=}20 ng/mL], and high [Gleason score 8-10 or PSA level >20 ng/mL]), regardless of RT dose. The 8-year PSA-DFS and DMFS rate for patients with nPSA <0.5 ng/mL was 75% and 97%; nPSA {>=}0.5 but <1.0 ng/mL, 52% and 96%; nPSA {>=}1.0 but <2.0 ng/mL, 40

  9. [Diagnosis and follow-up of prostate cancer patients using prostate specific antigen (PSA)].

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, M; Uno, H; Ueno, K; Yamamoto, N; Takahashi, Y; Shinoda, I; Ban, Y; Kawada, Y

    1997-06-01

    An international standard of prostate specific antigen (PSA) assays was constructed and prognosis of the patients with prostate cancers showing gray zone PSA was studied. For lower levels of serum PSA (< 50 ng/ml), the conversion formula to that of Tandem-R PSA from other assays was presented. Furthermore, based on the standards of Stanford Reference and Markit-MPA, conversion rates to this international standard from the conventional PSA assays were also obtained. Patients' cancer-specific survival was found to be significantly better in the gray zone group. Further studies to obtain higher specificity such as using free or complex rate in total PSA is necessary. PMID:9250498

  10. Arraying prostate specific antigen PSA and Fab anti-PSA using light-assisted molecular immobilization technology

    PubMed Central

    Parracino, Antonietta; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; di Gennaro, Ane Kold; Pettersson, Kim; Lövgren, Timo; Petersen, Steffen B

    2010-01-01

    We here report for the first time the creation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) and Fab anti-PSA biosensor arrays using UV light-assisted molecular immobilization (LAMI), aiming at the detection and quantification of PSA, a cancer marker. The technology involves formation of free, reactive thiol groups upon UV excitation of protein aromatic residues located in spatial proximity of disulphide bridges, a conserved structural feature in both PSA and Fab molecules. The created thiol groups bind onto thiol reactive surfaces leading to oriented covalent protein immobilization. Protein activity was confirmed carrying out immunoassays: immobilized PSA was recognized by Fab anti-PSA in solution and immobilized Fab anti-PSA cross-reacted with PSA in solution. LAMI technology proved successful in immobilizing biomedically relevant molecules while preserving their activity, highlighting that insight into how light interacts with biomolecules may lead to new biophotonic technologies. Our work focused on the application of our new engineering principles to the design, analysis, construction, and manipulation of biological systems, and on the discovery and application of new engineering principles inspired by the properties of biological systems. PMID:20665692

  11. Contribution of allelic variability in prostate specific antigen (PSA) & androgen receptor (AR) genes to serum PSA levels in men with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Sushant V.; Maitra, Anurupa; Roy, Nobhojit; Chavan, Padma R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Wide variability in serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels exists in malignant conditions of the prostate. PSA is expressed in normal range in 20 to 25 per cent of prostate cancer cases even in presence of high grade Gleason score. This study was aimed to assess the influence of genetic variants exhibited by PSA and androgen receptor (AR) genes towards the variable expression of PSA in prostate cancer. Methods: Pre-treatment serum PSA levels from 101 prostate cancer cases were retrieved from medical record. PSA genotype analysis in promoter region and AR gene microsatellite Cytosine/Adenine/Guanine (CAG) repeat analysis in exon 1 region was performed using DNA sequencing and fragment analysis techniques. Results: A total of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PSA promoter region were noted. Only two SNPs viz., 158G/A (P<0.001) in the proximal promoter region and -3845G/A (P<0.001) in enhancer region showed significant association with serum PSA levels. The carriers of homozygous GG genotype (P<0.001) at both of these polymorphic sites showed higher expression of PSA whereas homozygous AA genotype (P<0.001) carriers demonstrated lower PSA levels. The combination effect of PSA genotypes along with stratified AR CAG repeats lengths (long, intermediate and short) was also studied. The homozygous GG genotype along with AR long CAG repeats and homozygous AA genotype along with AR short CAG repeats at position -3845 and -158 showed strong interaction and thus influenced serum PSA levels. Interpretation & conclusions: The genetic variants exhibited by PSA gene at positions -3845G/A and -158G/A may be accountable towards wide variability of serum PSA levels in prostate cancer. Also the preferential binding of G and A alleles at these polymorphic sites along with AR long and short CAG repeats may contribute towards PSA expression. PMID:24820830

  12. Association of Polymorphisms in the Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Gene Promoter with Serum PSA Level and PSA Changes after Dutasteride Treatment in Korean Men with Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Woon; Kim, Chul Sung

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Studies of genetic variation in the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) gene have improved the diagnostic accuracy of PSA for diagnosing prostate diseases in Caucasians. However, the reference ranges and pharmacokinetics of PSA differ significantly according to race. Therefore, we evaluated the association between genetic variations in the PSA promoter area and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) phenotypes in Korean BPH patients. Materials and Methods One hundred twenty-one men were enrolled. The initial serum PSA level, prostate size, and PSA changes at 3 months after treatment with dutasteride were determined. We amplified the promoter region of the PSA gene (nucleotide positions -158 to -356 and -5217 to -5429) and sequenced the products. Results Three relatively well characterized single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs3760722, rs266867, and rs266868), six uncharacterized SNPs (rs17554958, rs266882, rs4802754, rs2739448, rs2569733, and rs17526278), and one novel SNP (nucleotide position -5402) were found. There were no statistically significant correlations between any of the SNPs of the PSA promoter area and age-adjusted prostate sizes, initial PSA levels, or PSA variations after 3 months of dutasteride treatment. Conclusions SNPs in the PSA promoter area were not associated with BPH phenotypes. We could not predict serum PSA changes after dutasteride treatment on the basis of PSA promoter genotype in Korean patients with BPH. PMID:21221201

  13. Twenty Years of PSA: From Prostate Antigen to Tumor Marker

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Gabriela; Rittenhouse, Harry G; Mikolajczyk, Stephen D; Blair Shamel, L; Semjonow, Axel

    2007-01-01

    The measurement of prostate-specific antigen in serum is credited with dramatic advances in the early detection of men with prostatic carcinoma. This report summarizes the history of biochemical research and the current understanding and application of prostate-specific antigen in prostate cancer diagnostics. PMID:17934568

  14. In Patients Experiencing Biochemical Failure After Radiotherapy, Pretreatment Risk Group and PSA Velocity Predict Differences in Overall Survival and Biochemical Failure-Free Interval

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Daniel E. Andridge, Rebecca R.; Pan, Charlie C.; Williams, Scott G.; Taylor, Jeremy M.G.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To characterize the demographics and survival outcomes of localized prostate cancer patients who developed biochemical failure (BF) according to a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/mL. Methods and Materials: We identified 375 prostate cancer patients who had undergone external beam radiotherapy without androgen deprivation therapy but with sufficient PSA data to study PSA kinetics. Of these patients, we identified 82 with BF. The pretreatment PSA velocity was calculated for each patient. Results: For the BF cohort, 26% were low-risk and 74% were intermediate- or high-risk patients. Of the 82 BF patients, 16 (20%) were noted to have both low-risk disease and a pretreatment low PSA velocity of {<=}2 ng/mL/y (termed 'low-risk low-velocity' [LRLV]). The remaining BF patients had either intermediate- or high-risk features or a high PSA velocity >2 ng/mL/y (termed 'higher risk' [HR]). For patients who had BF, the LRLV group had a delayed median time to BF of 55 months compared with 33 months for the HR patients (p = 0.04). With a median clinical follow-up of 112 months, the 5-year overall survival rate was 100% for the LRLV BF patients vs. 84% for the HR patients (p = 0.02). Conclusions: We observed that LRLV BF patients represent a sizeable proportion of all patients with treatment failure. However, when comparing LRLV BF with HR BF patients, the former had significantly better overall survival and a longer interval to BF. This suggests that not all BF events are equivalent and emphasizes the challenges associated with using BF alone as a surrogate for a survival endpoint.

  15. Biologically effective dose values for prostate brachytherapy: Effects on PSA failure and posttreatment biopsy results

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, Richard G. . E-mail: richard.stock@msnyuhealth.org; Stone, Nelson N.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of biologically effective dose (BED) values on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure and posttreatment biopsy. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2003, 1,377 patients had prostate brachytherapy alone (I-125 or Pd-103) (571), hormonal and brachytherapy (371), and trimodality therapy (hormonal, implant, and external beam) (435). Dose was defined as the D90 (dose delivered to 90% of the gland from the dose-volume histogram). Results: Freedom from PSA failure (FFPF) at 10 years was 87%. The 10-year FFPF for BED <100, >100-120, >120-140, >140-160, <160-180, >180-200, and >200 were 46%, 68%, 81%, 85.5%, 90%, 90%, and 92%, respectively (p < 0.0001). BED and Gleason score had the greatest effect, with p values of p < 0.0001 in multivariate analysis. Posttreatment positive biopsy rate was 7% (31/446). The positive biopsy rates for BED {<=}100, >100-120, >120-140, >140-160, >160-180, >180-200, and >200 were 24% (8/33), 15% (3/20), 6% (2/33), 6% (3/52), 7% (6/82), 1% (1/72), and 3% (4/131), respectively (p < 0.0001). BED was the most significant predictor of biopsy outcome in multivariate analysis (p = 0.006). Conclusions: Biologically effective dose equations provide a method of comparing different isotopes and combined therapies in the brachytherapy management of prostate cancer. The effects of BED on FFPF and posttreatment biopsy demonstrate a strong dose-response relationship.

  16. Body Mass Index and Prostate-Specific Antigen Failure Following Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Efstathiou, Jason A. Skowronski, Rafi Y.; Coen, John J.; Grocela, Joseph A.; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Increasing body mass index (BMI) is associated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure after radical prostatectomy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). We investigated whether BMI is associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analyses were conducted on 374 patients undergoing brachytherapy for stage T1c-T2cNXM0 prostate cancer from 1996-2001. Forty-nine patients (13%) received supplemental EBRT and 131 (35%) received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Height and weight data were available for 353 (94%). Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between BMI and PSA failure (nadir + 2 ng/ml definition). Covariates included age, race, preimplantation PSA, Gleason score, T category, percent of prescription dose to 90% of the prostate, use of supplemental EBRT, and ADT. Results: Median age, PSA, and BMI were 66 years (range, 42-80 years), 5.7 ng/ml (range, 0.4-22.6 ng/ml), and 27.1 kg/m{sup 2} (range, 18.2-53.6 kg/m{sup 2}), respectively. After a median follow-up of 6.0 years (range, 3.0-10.2 years), there were 76 PSA recurrences. The BMI was not associated with PSA failure. Six-year PSA failure rates were 30.2% for men with BMI less than 25 kg/m{sup 2}, 19.5% for BMI of 25 or greater to less than 30 kg/m{sup 2}, and 14.4% for BMI of 30 kg/m{sup 2} or greater (p = 0.19). Results were similar when BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable, using alternative definitions of PSA failure, and excluding patients treated with EBRT and/or ADT. In multivariate analyses, only baseline PSA was significantly associated with shorter time to PSA failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.20; p 0.0006). Conclusions: Unlike after surgery or EBRT, BMI is not associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for prostate cancer. This raises the possibility that brachytherapy may be a preferred treatment

  17. A lab-in-a-briefcase for rapid prostate specific antigen (PSA) screening from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Ana I; Castanheira, Ana P; Edwards, Alexander D; Reis, Nuno M

    2014-08-21

    We present a new concept for rapid and fully portable prostate specific antigen (PSA) measurements, termed "lab-in-a-briefcase", which integrates an affordable microfluidic ELISA platform utilising a melt-extruded fluoropolymer microcapillary film (MCF) containing an array of 10 200 μm internal diameter capillaries, a disposable multi-syringe aspirator (MSA), a sample tray pre-loaded with all of the required immunoassay reagents, and a portable film scanner for colorimetric signal digital quantification. Each MSA can perform 10 replicate microfluidic immunoassays on 8 samples, allowing 80 measurements to be made in less than 15 minutes based on semi-automated operation, without the need of additional fluid handling equipment. The assay was optimised for the measurement of a clinically relevant range of PSA of 0.9 to 60.0 ng ml(-1) in 15 minutes with CVs on the order of 5% based on intra-assay variability when read using a consumer flatbed film scanner. The PSA assay performance in the MSA remained robust in undiluted or 1 : 2 diluted human serum or whole blood, and the matrix effect could simply be overcome by extending sample incubation times. The PSA "lab-in-a-briefcase" is particularly suited to a low-resource health setting, where diagnostic labs and automated immunoassay systems are not accessible, by allowing PSA measurement outside the laboratory using affordable equipment. PMID:24989886

  18. PSA Bounce and Biochemical Failure After Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Study of 820 Patients With a Minimum of 3 Years of Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Caloglu, Murat; Ciezki, Jay P.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Angermeier, Kenneth; Ulchaker, James; Chehade, Nabil; Altman, Andrew; Magi-Galuzzi, Christina; Klein, Eric A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To determine clinical or dosimetric factors associated with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce, as well as an association between a PSA bounce and biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), in patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A variety of clinical and treatment factors were examined in 820 patients who had a minimum of 3 years of PSA follow-up with T1-T2cN0M0 prostate cancer. Four different PSA threshold values were used for defining a PSA bounce: a PSA rise of {>=}0.2, {>=}0.4, {>=}0.6, and {>=}0.8 ng/mL. Results: A PSA bounce of {>=}0.2, {>=}0.4, {>=}0.6, and {>=}0.8 ng/mL was noted in 247 patients (30.1%), 161 (19.6%), 105 (12.8%), and 78 (9.5%), respectively. The median time to the first PSA rise was 17.4, 16.25, 16.23, and 15.71 months, respectively, vs. 34.35 months for a biochemical failure (p < 0.0001). A PSA rise of {>=}0.2 ng/mL was the only definition for which there was a significant difference in bRFS between bounce and non-bounce patients. The 5-year bRFS rate of patients having a PSA bounce of {>=}0.2 was 97.7% vs. 91% for those who did not have a PSA bounce (p = 0.0011). On univariate analysis for biochemical failure, age, risk group, and PSAs per year had a statistically significant correlation with PSA bounce of {>=}0.2 ng/mL. On multivariate analysis, age and PSAs per year remained statistically significant (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0456, respectively). Conclusions: A bounce definition of a rise {>=}0.2 ng/mL is a reliable definition among several other definitions. The time to first PSA rise is the most valuable factor for distinguishing between a bounce and biochemical failure.

  19. Distinguishing prostate-specific antigen bounces from biochemical failure after low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Cian; Ghosh, Sunita; Sloboda, Ron; Martell, Kevin; Lan, Lanna; Pervez, Nadeem; Pedersen, John; Yee, Don; Murtha, Albert; Amanie, John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to characterize benign prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounces of at least 2.0 ng/mL and biochemical failure as defined by the Phoenix definition after prostate brachytherapy at our institution, and to investigate distinguishing features between three outcome groups: patients experiencing a benign PSA bounce, biochemical failure, or neither. Material and methods Five hundred and thirty consecutive men treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy with follow-up of at least 3 years were divided into outcome groups experiencing bounce, failure, or neither. A benign bounce was defined as a rise of at least 2.0 ng/mL over the pre-rise nadir followed by a decline to 0.5 ng/mL or below, without intervention. Patient and tumor characteristics, treatment variables, and PSA kinetics were analyzed between groups. Results Thirty-two (6.0%) men experienced benign bounces and 47 (8.9%) men experienced failure. Men experiencing a bounce were younger (p = 0.01), had a higher 6-month PSA level (p = 0.03), and took longer to reach a final nadir (p < 0.01). Compared to the failure group, men with bounce had a lower pre-treatment PSA level (p = 0.01) and experienced a rise of at least 2.0 ng/mL that occurred sooner after the implant (p < 0.01) with a faster PSA doubling time (p = 0.01). Only time to PSA rise independently differentiated between bounce and failure (p < 0.01), with a benign bounce not being seen after 36 months post-treatment. Prostate-specific antigen levels during a bounce reached levels as high as 12.6 ng/mL in this cohort, and in some cases took over 5 years to decline to below 0.5 ng/mL. Conclusions Although there is substantial overlap between the features of benign PSA bounces and failure, physicians may find it useful to evaluate the timing, absolute PSA level, initial response to treatment, and rate of rise when contemplating management for a PSA rise after low-dose-rate brachytherapy. PMID:25337125

  20. 3D label-free prostate specific antigen (PSA) immunosensor based on graphene-gold composites.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hee Dong; Kim, Sun Kyung; Chang, Hankwon; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2015-01-15

    Highly sensitive and label-free detection of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) remains a challenge in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Here, a novel three-dimensional (3D) electrochemical immunosensor capable of sensitive and label-free detection of PSA is reported. This unique immunosensor is equipped with a highly conductive graphene (GR)-based gold (Au) composite modified electrode. The GR-based Au composite is prepared using aerosol spray pyrolysis and the morphology of the composite is the shape of a crumpled GR ball decorated with Au nanoparticles. Unlike the previous research, this novel 3D immunosensor functions very well over a broad linear range of 0-10 ng/mL with a low detection limit of 0.59 ng/mL; furthermore, it exhibits a significantly increased electron transfer and high sensitivity toward PSA. The highest rate of current change with respect to the PSA concentration is 5 μA/(ng/mL). Satisfactory selectivity, reproducibility, and stability of the 3D immunosensor are also exhibited. PMID:25150936

  1. Extreme-Risk Prostate Adenocarcinoma Presenting With Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) >40 ng/ml: Prognostic Significance of the Preradiation PSA Nadir

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Abraham S.; Mydin, Aminudin; Jones, Stuart O.; Christie, Jennifer; Lim, Jan T.W.; Truong, Pauline T.; Ludgate, Charles M.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To examine the impact of patient, disease, and treatment characteristics on survival outcomes in patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and radical external-beam radiotherapy (RT) for clinically localized, extreme-risk prostate adenocarcinoma with a presenting prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration of >40 ng/ml. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review was conducted of 64 patients treated at a single institution between 1991 and 2000 with ADT and RT for prostate cancer with a presenting PSA level of >40 ng/ml. The effects of patient age, tumor (presenting PSA level, Gleason score, and T stage), and treatment (total ADT duration and pre-RT PSA level) characteristics on rates of biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS), prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS), and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: Median follow-up time was 6.45 years (range, 0.09-15.19 years). Actuarial bDFS, PCSS, and OS rates at 5 years were 39%, 87%, and 78%, respectively, and 17%, 64%, and 45%, respectively, at 10 years. On multivariate analysis, the pre-RT PSA level ({<=}0.1 versus >0.1 ng/ml) was the single most significant prognostic factor for bDFS (p = 0.033) and OS (p = 0.018) rates, whereas age, T stage, Gleason score, and ADT duration ({<=}6 versus >6 months) were not predictive of outcomes. Conclusion: In prostate cancer patients with high presenting PSA levels, >40 ng/ml, treated with combined modality, neoadjuvant ADT, and RT, the pre-RT PSA nadir, rather than ADT duration, was significantly associated with improved survival. This observation supports the use of neoadjuvant ADT to drive PSA levels to below 0.1 ng/ml before initiation of RT, to optimize outcomes for patients with extreme-risk disease.

  2. Postoperative Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity Independently Predicts for Failure of Salvage Radiotherapy After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Presti, Joseph C.; Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Spiotto, Michael T.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Identification of patients most likely to benefit from salvage radiotherapy (RT) using postoperative (postop) prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics. Methods and Materials: From 1984 to 2004, 81 patients who fit the following criteria formed the study population: undetectable PSA after radical prostatectomy (RP); pathologically negative nodes; biochemical relapse defined as a persistently detectable PSA; salvage RT; and two or more postop PSAs available before salvage RT. Salvage RT included the whole pelvic nodes in 55 patients and 4 months of total androgen suppression in 56 patients. The median follow-up was >5 years. All relapses were defined as a persistently detectable PSA. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards multivariable analysis were performed for all clinical, pathological, and treatment factors predicting for biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS). Results: There were 37 biochemical relapses observed after salvage RT. The 5-year bRFS after salvage RT for patients with postop prostate-specific antigen velocity {<=}1 vs. >1 ng/ml/yr was 59% vs. 29%, p = 0.002. In multivariate analysis, only postop PSAV (p = 0.0036), pre-RT PSA level {<=}1 (p = 0.037) and interval-to-relapse >10 months (p = 0.012) remained significant, whereas pelvic RT, hormone therapy, and RT dose showed a trend (p = {approx}0.06). PSAV, but not prostate-specific antigen doubling time, predicted successful salvage RT, suggesting an association of zero-order kinetics with locally recurrent disease. Conclusions: Postoperative PSA velocity independently predicts for the failure of salvage RT and can be considered in addition to high-risk features when selecting patients in need of systemic therapy following biochemical failure after RP. For well-selected patients, salvage RT can achieve high cure rates.

  3. Prostate-specific Antigen (PSA) Density and Free to Total PSA Ratio in Diagnosing Prostate Cancer with Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels of 4.0 ng/ml or Less

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Xin; TANG, Jie; FEI, Xiang; LI, Qiu-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background: We aimed to value the usefulness of free to total prostate-specific antigen and Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) density for prostate cancer in the patients with PSA levels of 4.0 ng/ml or less. Methods: A total of 343 subjects with PSA levels of 4.0 ng/ml or less were biopsied. All patients were divided into four groups according to the PSA levels: 0 to 1.0 ng/ml, 1.1 to 2.0 ng/ml, 2.1 to 3.0 ng/ml, and 3.1 to 4.0 ng/ml. The reliability of cancer detection in relation to the f/t PSA ratio and PSAD were estimated. Results: Overall, 65 people were diagnosed with prostate cancer. The detection rate was 16.28%、17.17%, 21.82%, 25.00% in subjects with PSA levels of 0 to 1.0 ng/ml, 1.1 to 2.0 ng/ml, 2.1 to 3.0 ng/ml, and 3.1 to 4.0 ng/ml, respectively. The f/t PSA ratio was significantly lower in patients with prostate cancer and PSA levels of 2.1 to 4.0 ng/ml (P<0.05). The PSAD had no statistical significance between the two groups. Conclusions: Routine prostate biopsy should be undertaken if the f/t PSA ratio less than 15% with /without abnormal DRE/TRUS findings. PMID:26744703

  4. Recombinant Forms of Leishmania amazonensis Excreted/Secreted Promastigote Surface Antigen (PSA) Induce Protective Immune Responses in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Petitdidier, Elodie; Pagniez, Julie; Papierok, Gérard; Vincendeau, Philippe; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Bras-Gonçalves, Rachel

    2016-05-01

    Preventive vaccination is a highly promising strategy for interrupting leishmaniasis transmission that can, additionally, contribute to elimination. A vaccine formulation based on naturally excreted secreted (ES) antigens was prepared from L. infantum promastigote culture supernatant. This vaccine achieved successful results in Phase III trials and was licensed and marketed as CaniLeish. We recently showed that newly identified ES promastigote surface antigen (PSA), from both viable promastigotes and axenically-grown amastigotes, represented the major constituent and the highly immunogenic antigen of L. infantum and L. amazonensis ES products. We report here that three immunizations with either the recombinant ES LaPSA-38S (rPSA) or its carboxy terminal part LaPSA-12S (Cter-rPSA), combined with QA-21 as adjuvant, confer high levels of protection in naive L. infantum-infected Beagle dogs, as checked by bone marrow parasite absence in respectively 78.8% and 80% of vaccinated dogs at 6 months post-challenge. The parasite burden in infected vaccinated dogs was significantly reduced compared to placebo group, as measured by q-PCR. Moreover, our results reveal humoral and cellular immune response clear-cut differences between vaccinated and control dogs. An early increase in specific IgG2 antibodies was observed in rPSA/QA-21- and Cter-rPSA/QA-21-immunized dogs only. They were found functionally active in vitro and were highly correlated with vaccine protection. In vaccinated protected dogs, IFN-γ and NO productions, as well as anti-leishmanial macrophage activity, were increased. These data strongly suggest that ES PSA or its carboxy-terminal part, in recombinant forms, induce protection in a canine model of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis by inducing a Th1-dominant immune response and an appropriate specific antibody response. These data suggest that they could be considered as important active components in vaccine candidates. PMID:27223609

  5. Recombinant Forms of Leishmania amazonensis Excreted/Secreted Promastigote Surface Antigen (PSA) Induce Protective Immune Responses in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Petitdidier, Elodie; Pagniez, Julie; Papierok, Gérard; Vincendeau, Philippe; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Bras-Gonçalves, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Preventive vaccination is a highly promising strategy for interrupting leishmaniasis transmission that can, additionally, contribute to elimination. A vaccine formulation based on naturally excreted secreted (ES) antigens was prepared from L. infantum promastigote culture supernatant. This vaccine achieved successful results in Phase III trials and was licensed and marketed as CaniLeish. We recently showed that newly identified ES promastigote surface antigen (PSA), from both viable promastigotes and axenically-grown amastigotes, represented the major constituent and the highly immunogenic antigen of L. infantum and L. amazonensis ES products. We report here that three immunizations with either the recombinant ES LaPSA-38S (rPSA) or its carboxy terminal part LaPSA-12S (Cter-rPSA), combined with QA-21 as adjuvant, confer high levels of protection in naive L. infantum-infected Beagle dogs, as checked by bone marrow parasite absence in respectively 78.8% and 80% of vaccinated dogs at 6 months post-challenge. The parasite burden in infected vaccinated dogs was significantly reduced compared to placebo group, as measured by q-PCR. Moreover, our results reveal humoral and cellular immune response clear-cut differences between vaccinated and control dogs. An early increase in specific IgG2 antibodies was observed in rPSA/QA-21- and Cter-rPSA/QA-21-immunized dogs only. They were found functionally active in vitro and were highly correlated with vaccine protection. In vaccinated protected dogs, IFN-γ and NO productions, as well as anti-leishmanial macrophage activity, were increased. These data strongly suggest that ES PSA or its carboxy-terminal part, in recombinant forms, induce protection in a canine model of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis by inducing a Th1-dominant immune response and an appropriate specific antibody response. These data suggest that they could be considered as important active components in vaccine candidates. PMID:27223609

  6. Portable smartphone quantitation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in a fluoropolymer microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Ana I; Gehlot, Poonam; Sidapra, Kalpita; Edwards, Alexander D; Reis, Nuno M

    2015-08-15

    We present a new, power-free and flexible detection system named MCFphone for portable colorimetric and fluorescence quantitative sandwich immunoassay detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA). The MCFphone is composed by a smartphone integrated with a magnifying lens, a simple light source and a miniaturised immunoassay platform, the Microcapillary Film (MCF). The excellent transparency and flat geometry of fluoropolymer MCF allowed quantitation of PSA in the range 0.9 to 60 ng/ml with<7% precision in 13 min using enzymatic amplification and a chromogenic substrate. The lower limit of detection was further improved from 0.4 to 0.08 ng/ml in whole blood samples with the use of a fluorescence substrate. The MCFphone has shown capable of performing rapid (13 to 22 min total assay time) colorimetric quantitative and highly sensitive fluorescence tests with good %Recovery, which represents a major step in the integration of a new generation of inexpensive and portable microfluidic devices with commercial immunoassay reagents and off-the-shelf smartphone technology. PMID:25775968

  7. [Usefulness of hyper sensitive PSA assay kits for determination on low range of prostate specific antigen in prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Akimoto, S; Akakura, K; Ohki, T; Shimazaki, J; Kuriyama, M; Kawada, Y

    1995-02-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels after total prostatectomy or radiation therapy to localized prostate cancer and also during endocrine therapy are within normal range. Therefore, it is necessary to use hyper sensitive PSA assay kits for early detection of relapse. The present study was undertaken to evaluate two hyper sensitive assay kits (Delfia kit, lower limit 0.1 ng/ml, Kabi Pharmacia Diagnostics Co. and Markit M kit, 0.5 ng/ml, Dainippon Pharmaceutical Co.) and to compare them with conventional PSA kit (Eiken Chemical Co., 1.0 ng/ml). Total of 291 sera were examined: patients consisted of 10 total prostatectomy+endocrine therapy, 9 radiation therapy+endocrine therapy, 5 radiation therapy alone and 44 endocrine therapy alone. Values of endocrine therapy alone were divided into two groups according to duration after start of treatment; more or less than 5 years. The following results were obtained. 1. In non-relapse patients after total prostatectomy+endocrine therapy and radiation+endocrine therapy, PSA showed under lower limit with hyper sensitive kit. On the contrary, conventional kit indicated more than 1.0 ng/ml. 2. Radiation therapy alone kept PSA in detectable range with hyper sensitive kit in spite of no sign of relapse. 3. In non-relapsed patients under endocrine therapy alone, long duration (more than 5 years after start of treatment) decreased PSA in non detectable values with hyper sensitive kits. In this case, conventional kit still showed PSA as more than 1 ng/ml. 4. Doubling time at relapse was estimated similar with Delfia kit and Markit M kit, and much longer with conventional kit. It is concluded that hyper sensitive kit is more useful to manage patients after therapy than conventional kit. PMID:7534843

  8. PSA kinetics after prostate brachytherapy: PSA bounce phenomenon and its implications for PSA doubling time

    SciTech Connect

    Ciezki, Jay P. . E-mail: ciezkij@ccf.org; Reddy, Chandana A.; Garcia, Jorge; Angermeier, Kenneth; Ulchaker, James; Mahadevan, Arul; Chehade, Nabil; Altman, Andrew; Klein, Eric A.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics in patients treated with prostate brachytherapy (PI) with a minimum of 5 years of PSA follow-up. Methods and Materials: The records of 162 patients treated with PI for localized prostate cancer with a minimum of 5 years of PSA follow-up were reviewed. A variety of pretreatment and posttreatment variables were examined. Patients were coded as having a PSA bounce if their PSA achieved a nadir, elevated at least 0.2 ng/mL greater than that nadir, and decreased to, or below, the initial nadir. Two definitions of biochemical failure (bF) or biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) were used: the classic American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition of three consecutive rises (bF3) and the nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition (bFn+2). Associations between a PSA bounce and the various pre- and posttreatment factors were assessed with logistic regression analysis, and the association between a PSA bounce and bF was examined with the log-rank test. The Mann-Whitney U test was applied to test for differences in the PSA doubling time (PSADT) and the time to a PSA rise between the PSA bounce patients and the bF patients. PSADT was calculated from the nadir to the time of the first PSA rise, because this point is known first in the clinical setting. Results: The 5-year overall bRFS rate was 87% for the bF3 definition and 96% for the bFn+2 definition. A PSA bounce was experienced by 75 patients (46.3%). Patients who experienced a PSA bounce were less likely to have a bF, regardless of the bRFS definition used (bF3: p = 0.0015; bFn+2: p = 0.0040). Among the pre- and posttreatment factors, only younger age predicted for a PSA bounce on multivariate analysis (p = 0.0018). The use of androgen deprivation had no effect on PSA bounce. No difference was found in the PSADT between patients who had a PSA bounce and those with bF. The median PSADT for those with a PSA bounce was 8.3 months vs. 10.3 months

  9. The Effect of Testosterone Replacement Therapy on Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Levels in Men Being Treated for Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Kang, De-Ying; Li, Hong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Testosterone replacement therapy is used for the treatment of age-related male hypogonadism, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a primary screening tool for prostate cancer. The systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on PSA levels. Medline, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until February 28, 2014, and inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trial; intervention group received testosterone/androgen replacement therapy; control group did not receive treatment; and no history of prostate cancer. The primary outcome was change of PSA level between before and after treatment. Secondary outcomes were elevated PSA level after treatment, and the number of patients who developed prostate cancer. After initially identifying 511 articles, 15 studies with a total of 739 patients that received testosterone replacement and 385 controls were included. The duration of treatment ranged from 3 to 12 months. Patients treated with testosterone tended to have higher PSA levels, and thus a greater change than those that received control treatments (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.154, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.069 to 0.238, P < 0.001). The difference in means of PSA levels were significant higher for patients that received testosterone intramuscularly (IM) than controls (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.271, 95% CI 0.117–0.425, P = 0.001). Elevated PSA levels after treatment were similar between patients that received treatment and controls (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02, 95% CI 0.48–2.20, P = 0.953). Only 3 studies provided data with respect to the development of prostate cancer, and rates were similar between those that received treatment and controls. Testosterone replacement therapy does not increase PSA levels in men being treated for hypogonadism, except when it is given IM and even the increase with IM administration

  10. Failure to Achieve a PSA Level {<=}1 ng/mL After Neoadjuvant LHRHA Therapy Predicts for Lower Biochemical Control Rate and Overall Survival in Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darren M. McAleese, Jonathan; Park, Richard M.; Stewart, David P.; Stranex, Stephen; Eakin, Ruth L.; Houston, Russell F.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether failure to suppress the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level to {<=}1 ng/mL after {>=}2 months of neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy in patients scheduled to undergo external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate carcinoma is associated with reduced biochemical failure-free survival. Methods and Materials: A retrospective case note review of consecutive patients with intermediate- or high-risk localized prostate cancer treated between January 2001 and December 2002 with neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy, followed by concurrent hormonal therapy and radiotherapy was performed. Patient data were divided for analysis according to whether the PSA level in Week 1 of radiotherapy was {<=}1.0 ng/mL. Biochemical failure was determined using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (Phoenix) definition. Results: A total of 119 patients were identified. The PSA level after neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy was {<=}1 ng/mL in 67 patients and >1 ng/mL in 52. At a median follow-up of 49 months, the 4-year actuarial biochemical failure-free survival rate was 84% vs. 60% (p = 0.0016) in favor of the patients with a PSA level after neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy of {<=}1 ng/mL. The overall survival rate was 94% vs. 77.5% (p = 0.0045), and the disease-specific survival rate at 4 years was 98.5% vs. 82.5%. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that patients with a PSA level >1 ng/mL at the beginning of external beam radiotherapy after {>=}2 months of neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy have a significantly greater rate of biochemical failure and lower survival rate compared with those with a PSA level of {<=}1 ng/mL. Patients without adequate PSA suppression should be considered a higher risk group and considered for dose escalation or the use of novel treatments.

  11. Physical Characterization of the Manganese-sensing Pneumococcal Surface Antigen Repressor (PsaR) from Streptococcus pneumoniae*

    PubMed Central

    Lisher, John P.; Higgins, Khadine A.; Maroney, Michael J.; Giedroc, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Transition metals, including manganese, are required for proper virulence and persistence of many pathogenic bacteria. In Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn), manganese homeostasis is controlled by a high affinity Mn(II) uptake complex, PsaBCA, and a constitutively expressed efflux transporter, MntE. PsaBCA expression is transcriptionally regulated by the DtxR/MntR family metalloregulatory protein pneumococcal surface antigen repressor (PsaR) in Spn. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the metal and DNA-binding properties of PsaR. PsaR is a homodimer in the absence and presence of metals and binds two manganese or zinc per protomer (four per dimer) in two pairs of structurally distinct sites, termed site 1 and site 2. Site 1 is likely filled with Zn(II) in vivo (KZn1≥1013 M−1; KMn1≈108 M−1). The Zn(II)-site 1 complex adopts a pentacoordinate geometry by x-ray absorption spectroscopy containing a single cysteine, and appears analogous to the Cd(II) site observed in S. gordonii ScaR. Site 1 is necessary but not sufficient for full positive allosteric activation of DNA operator binding by metals as measured by ΔGc, the allosteric coupling free energy, since mutants in site 1 show intermediate ΔGc. Site 2 is the primary regulatory site and governs specificity for Mn(II) over Zn(II) in PsaR, with ΔGcZn,Mn>>ΔGcZn,Zn despite the fact that Zn(II) binds site 2 with 40-fold higher affinity relative to Mn(II), i.e., KZn2>KMn2. Mutational studies reveal that Asp7 in site 2 is a critical ligand for Mn(II)-dependent allosteric activation of DNA binding. These findings are discussed in the context of other well-studied DtxR/MntR Mn(II)/Fe(II) metallorepressors. PMID:24067066

  12. PSA Kinetics and PSA Bounce Following Permanent Seed Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita Gillan, Caitlin B.Sc.; Yeung, Ivan Ph.D.; Austen, Lynette; McLean, Michael; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence, timing, and magnitude of the benign prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy and correlate the bounce with clinical and/or dosimetric factors. Methods and Materials: From March 1999 to August 2003, a total of 292 men received {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy without androgen deprivation or supplemental beam radiotherapy and have PSA follow-up >30 months. Implants were preplanned using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and performed under transrectal ultrasound/fluoroscopy guidance using preloaded needles. A PSA bounce is defined as an increase {>=}0.2 ng/ml with spontaneous return to prebounce level or lower. Results: Resolved PSA bounces were seen in 40% of men with follow-up >30 months. Median onset was 15 months, and median magnitude was 0.76 ng/ml. Magnitude >2 ng/ml was seen in 15%. The only clinical or dosimetric factor predictive of bounce in multivariate analysis was younger age. Median time to increasing PSA level indicative of failure was 30 months. Conclusions: Benign PSA bounces are common after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy, especially in younger men. An increase >2 ng/ml above the nadir was seen in 15%. Magnitude of increase does not distinguish bounce from failure. Time to the start of the PSA increase can be helpful, but is not absolute. The PSA bounce does not predict subsequent failure. Caution is advised in interpreting an early increasing PSA level in the first 30 months after {sup 125}I brachytherapy in favorable-risk patients.

  13. Electrochemical assay of active prostate-specific antigen (PSA) using ferrocene-functionalized peptide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Ning; He, Yuqing; Mao, Xun; Sun, Yuhan; Zhang, Xibao; Li, Chen-Zhong; Lin, Yuehe; Liu, Guodong

    2010-03-24

    This paper presents a novel approach to electrochemically determine enzymatically active PSA using ferrocene-functionalized helix peptide (CHSSLKQK). The principle of electrochemical measurement is based on the specific proteolytic cleavage events of the FC-peptide on the gold electrode surface in the presence of PSA, resulting the change of the current signal of the electrode. The percentage of the decreased current is linear with the concentration of active PSA at the range of 0.5-40 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.2 ng/mL. The direct transduction of peptide cleavage events into an electrical signal provides a simple, sensitive method for detecting the enzymatic activity of PSA and determining the active PSA concentration.

  14. Many young men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screen-detected prostate cancers may be candidates for active surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeri; Ebertowski, James; Janiga, Matthew; Arzola, Jorge; Gillespie, Gayle; Fountain, Michael; Soderdahl, Douglas; Canby-Hagino, Edith; Elsamanoudi, Sally; Gurski, Jennifer; Davis, John W.; Parker, Patricia A.; Boyd, Douglas D.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective To identify a population of young men (aged < 55 years at diagnosis) with very-low-risk prostate cancer (stage cT1c, with prostate-specific antigen [PSA] density of < 0.15 ng/mL/g, Gleason score ≤ 6, and ≤ 2 positive biopsy cores with < 50% tumour involvement) that may be candidates for active surveillance (AS). Patients and methods We queried a Department of Defense tumor registry and hard-copy records for servicemen diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1987 to 2010. Statistical analyses were undertaken using Fisher's exact and chi-square testing. Results From 1987–1991 and 2007–2010, PSA screen-detected tumours diagnosed in men aged ≤ 55 years > 30-fold. Data for a subset of men (174) with PSA screen-detected cancer were evaluable for disease risk assessment. Of the 174 men with screen-detected disease, 81 (47%) had very-low-risk disease. Of that group, 96% (78/81) selected treatment and, of 57 men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP), the tumours of 49 (86%) carried favourable pathology (organ confined, < 10% gland involvement, Gleason ≤ 6). Conclusions Nearly half of young men with PSA screen-detected prostate cancer are AS candidates but the overwhelming majority seek treatment. Considering that many tumours show favourable pathology at RP, there is a possibility that these patients may benefit from AS management. PMID:23350937

  15. Exposure to Agent Orange is a significant predictor of prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based recurrence and a rapid PSA doubling time after radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sagar R.; Freedland, Stephen J.; Aronson, William J.; Kane, Christopher J.; Presti, Joseph C.; Amling, Christopher L.; Terris, Martha K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate and report the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes after radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with prostate cancer and previous exposure to Agent Orange (AO), particularly in relationship to race. PATIENTS AND METHODS In 1495 veterans who had undergone RP the clinicopathological characteristics, biochemical progression rates, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) doubling time (DT) after recurrence between AO-exposed and unexposed men were compared using logistic and linear regression and Cox proportional hazards analyses, and stratified by race. RESULTS The 206 (14%) men with AO exposure were more likely to be black (P = 0.001), younger (P < 0.001), treated more recently (P < 0.001), have a higher body mass index (P = 0.001), have clinical stage T1 disease (P < 0.001), and have lower preoperative PSA levels (P = 0.001). After adjusting for several clinical characteristics, AO exposure was not significantly related to adverse pathological features but was significantly associated with biochemical progression risk (relative risk 1.55, 95% confidence interval 1.15–2.09, P = 0.004) and shorter PSADT (P < 0.001) after recurrence (8.2 vs 18.6 months). When stratified by race, these associations were present and similar in both races, with no significant interaction between race and AO exposure for predicting biochemical recurrence or mean adjusted PSADT (P interaction >0.20). CONCLUSIONS Patients with AO exposure and treated with RP were more likely to be black, present with lower risk features, have an increased risk of biochemical progression, and shorter PSADT after recurrence. When stratified by race, the association between AO exposure and poor outcomes was present in both races. These findings suggest that among selected men who choose RP, AO exposure might be associated with more aggressive prostate cancer. PMID:19298411

  16. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA)–Based Population Screening for Prostate Cancer: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pron, G

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (PC) is the most commonly diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in men and their second or third leading cause of cancer death. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing for PC has been in common practice for more than 20 years. Objectives A systematic review of the scientific literature was conducted to determine the effectiveness of PSA-based population screening programs for PC to inform policy decisions in a publicly funded health care system. Data Sources A systematic review of bibliographic databases was performed for systematic reviews or randomized controlled trials (RCT) of PSA-based population screening programs for PC. Review Methods A broad search strategy was employed to identify studies reporting on key outcomes of PC mortality and all-cause mortality. Results The search identified 5 systematic reviews and 6 RCTs. None of the systematic reviews found a statistically significant reduction in relative risk (RR) of PC mortality or overall mortality with PSA-based screening. PC mortality reductions were found to vary by country, by screening program, and by age of men at study entry. The European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer found a statistically significant reduction in RR in PC mortality at 11-year follow-up (0.79; 95% CI, 0.67–0.92), although the absolute risk reduction was small (1.0/10,000 person-years). However, the primary treatment for PCs differed significantly between countries and between trial arms. The American Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) found a statistically non-significant increase in RR for PC mortality with 13-year follow-up (1.09; 95% CI, 0.87–1.36). The degree of opportunistic screening in the control arm of the PLCO trial, however, was high. None of the RCTs found a reduction in all-cause mortality and all found a statistically significant increase in the detection of mainly low-risk, organ-confined PCs in the screening arm. Conclusions There was no

  17. Contribution of genetic variation rs266882 to prostate-specific antigen levels in healthy controls with serum PSA below 2.0 ng/ml.

    PubMed

    Song, Jaeman; Park, Heeyoon; Lee, Gilho

    2013-04-01

    We evaluated the impact of genetic variation in the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) gene (rs266882) on serum PSA levels in healthy men as well as risk factors for benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH) and prostate cancer. The study population comprised 91 men with PSA levels below 2.0 ng/ml as healthy controls, 78 men with PSA 2-10 ng/ml as a BPH group, and 128 prostate cancer patients, all in Korea. DNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and the product was sequenced. We found that PSA levels were associated with a G/A polymorphism only in healthy controls. The transition, however, was not associated with PSA levels of BPH and cancer patients, nor was it a risk factor. In conclusion, this genetic factor is important for determining serum PSA levels in the naive group, whereas the disruption of prostatic architecture in BPH or prostate cancer may be a major determining factor for PSA levels. PMID:23315126

  18. Identification and characterization of new Leishmania promastigote surface antigens, LaPSA-38S and LiPSA-50S, as major immunodominant excreted/secreted components of L. amazonensis and L. infantum.

    PubMed

    Bras-Gonçalves, Rachel; Petitdidier, Elodie; Pagniez, Julie; Veyrier, Renaud; Cibrelus, Prisca; Cavaleyra, Mireille; Maquaire, Sarah; Moreaux, Jérôme; Lemesre, Jean-Loup

    2014-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that sera from dogs vaccinated with excreted/secreted antigens (ESA) of Leishmania infantum promastigotes (LiESAp) mainly recognized an immunodominant antigen of 54 kDa. An anti-LiESAp-specific IgG2 humoral response was observed and associated to Th1-type response in vaccinated dogs. This response was highly correlated with a long-lasting and strong LiESAp-vaccine protection toward L. infantum experimental infection. In addition, it was also shown that dogs from the vaccinated group developed a selective IgG2 response against an immunodominant antigen of 45 kDa of Leishmania amazonensis ESA promastigotes (LaESAp). In order to identify and characterize these immunodominant antigens, a mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb F5) was produced by immunization against LaESAp. It was found to recognize the major antigenic targets of both LaESAp and LiESAp. Analysis with mAb F5 of L. amazonensis amastigote and promastigote cDNA expression libraries enabled the identification of clones encoding proteins with significant structural homology to the promastigote surface antigens named PSA-2/gp-46. Among them, one clone presented a full-length cDNA and encoded a novel L. amazonensis protein of 38.6 kDa calculated molecular mass (LaPSA-38S) sharing an amino acid sequence consistent with that of the PSA polymorphic family and a N-terminal signal peptide, characteristic of a secreted protein. We then screened a L. infantum promastigote DNA cosmid library using a cDNA probe derived from the LaPSA-38S gene and identified a full-length clone of a novel excreted/secreted protein of L. infantum with a calculated molecular mass of 49.2 kDa and named LiPSA-50S. The fact that a significant immunological reactivity was observed against PSA, suggests that these newly identified proteins could have an important immunoregulatory influence on the immune response. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that (i) these proteins were naturally excreted/secreted by viable

  19. Characterization of the Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Catalytic Mechanism: A Pre-Steady-State and Steady-State Study

    PubMed Central

    Tomao, Luigi; Sbardella, Diego; Gioia, Magda; Di Masi, Alessandra; Marini, Stefano; Ascenzi, Paolo; Coletta, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), an enzyme of 30 kDa grouped in the kallikrein family is synthesized to high levels by normal and malignant prostate epithelial cells. Therefore, it is the main biomarker currently used for early diagnosis of prostate cancer. Here, presteady-state and steady-state kinetics of the PSA-catalyzed hydrolysis of the fluorogenic substrate Mu-His-Ser-Ser-Lys-Leu-Gln-AMC (spanning from pH 6.5 to pH 9.0, at 37.0°C) are reported. Steady-state kinetics display at every pH value a peculiar feature, represented by an initial “burst” phase of the fluorescence signal before steady-state conditions are taking place. This behavior, which has been already observed in other members of the kallikrein family, suggests the occurrence of a proteolytic mechanism wherefore the acylation step is faster than the deacylation process. This feature allows to detect the acyl intermediate, where the newly formed C-terminal carboxylic acid of the cleaved substrate forms an ester bond with the -OH group of the Ser195 catalytic residue, whereas the AMC product has been already released. Therefore, the pH-dependence of the two enzymatic steps (i.e., acylation and deacylation) has been separately characterized, allowing the determination of pKa values. On this basis, possible residues are tentatively identified in PSA, which might regulate these two steps by interacting with the two portions of the substrate. PMID:25068395

  20. Genome-wide association study identified novel genetic variant on SLC45A3 gene associated with serum levels prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jielin; Tao, Sha; Gao, Yong; Peng, Tao; Tan, Aihua; Zhang, Haiying; Yang, Xiaobo; Qin, Xue; Hu, Yanling; Feng, Junjie; Kim, Seong-Tae; Lin, Xiaoling; Wu, Yongming; Zhang, Ju; Li, Zhixian; Li, Li; Mo, Linjian; Liang, Zhengjia; Shi, Deyi; Huang, Zhang; Huang, Xianghua; Liu, Ming; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Shijun; Lilly Zheng, S; Xu, Jianfeng; Mo, Zengnan

    2013-04-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a commonly used cancer biomarker for prostate cancer, and is often included as part of routine physical examinations in China. Serum levels of PSA may be influenced by genetic factors as well as other factors. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) conducted in a European population successfully identified six genetic loci that were significantly associated with PSA level. In this study, we aimed to identify common genetic variants that are associated with serum level of PSA in a Chinese population. We also evaluated the effects of those variants by creating personalized PSA cutoff values. A two-stage GWAS of PSA level was performed among men age 20-69 years and self-reported cancer-free participants that underwent routine physical examinations at several hospitals in Guangxi Province, China. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with PSA levels in the first stage of sample (N = 1,999) were confirmed in the second stage of sample (N = 1,496). Multivariate linear regression was used to assess the independent contribution of confirmed SNPs and known covariates, such as age, to the level of PSA. SNPs in three regions were significantly associated with levels of PSA in this two-stage GWAS, and had combined P values between 4.62 × 10(-17) and 6.45 × 10(-37). The three regions are located on 1q32.1 at SLC45A3, 10q11.23 at MSMB, and 19q13.33 at KLK3. The region 1q32.1 at SLC45A3 was identified as a novel locus. Genetic variants contributed significantly more to the variance of PSA level than known covariates such as age. Personalized cutoff values of serum PSA, calculated based on the inheritance of these associated SNPs, differ considerably among individuals. Identification of these genetic markers provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms of PSA. Taking individual variation into account, these genetic variants may improve the performance of PSA to predict prostate cancer. PMID:23269536

  1. PSA, PSA derivatives, proPSA and prostate health index in the diagnosis of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ayyıldız, Sema Nur; Ayyıldız, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Currently, prostate- specific antigen (PSA) is the most common oncological marker used for prostate cancer screening. However, high levels of PSA in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis decrease the specificity of PSA as a cancer marker. To increase the specificity of PSA, PSA derivatives and PSA kinetics have been used. However, these new techniques were not able to increase the diagnostic specificity for prostate cancer. Therefore, the search for new molecules and derivatives of PSA continues. With the aim of increasing the specificity of prostate cancer diagnosis, proPSA and the Prostate Health Index have been introduced. In this review, the roles of PSA, PSA derivatives, proPSA and the Prostate Health Index in Prostate Cancer diagnosis are examined. PMID:26328156

  2. Impact of Neoadjuvant Prostate-Specific Antigen Kinetics on Biochemical Failure and Prostate Cancer Mortality: Results From a Prospective Patient Database

    SciTech Connect

    Foo, Marcus; Lavieri, Mariel; Pickles, Tom

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To confirm findings from an earlier report showing that neoadjuvant (NA) prostate-specific antigen (PSA) halving time (PSAHT) impacts biochemical failure (BF) rates, and to examine its association with prostate cancer-specific survival (PCSS), in a large prospective cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 502 patients were selected from a prospective database, who had localized prostate adenocarcinoma treated with 2-12 months of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (N-ADT) followed by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) between 1994 and 2000, and had at least 2 NA PSA values. Seventy-four percent of patients had high-risk prostate cancer. Median initial PSA value, N-ADT duration, total ADT duration, and radiation therapy dose were 14 ng/mL, 6.9 months, 10.8 months, and 68 Gy, respectively. Results: At a median follow-up of 9.9 years, 210 patients have had a BF. Median PSAHT was 18 days. On univariate analysis, PSAHT was not shown to predict for BF (P=.69) or PCSS (P=.28). However, NA nadir PSA (nanPSA) and post-therapy nadir PSA (ptnPSA), when analyzed as continuous or categoric variables, predicted for BF (P<.001) and PCSS (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, nanPSA (P=.037) and ptnPSA (P<.001) continued to be significantly associated with BF. However, N-ADT duration lost significance (P=.67), and PSAHT remained a nonsignificant predictor (P=.97). For PCSS, multivariate analysis showed nanPSA (P=.049) and ptnPSA (P<.001) to be significant. Again PSAHT (P=.49) remained nonsignificant. Conclusions: In this large, prospective cohort of patients, NA PSA kinetics, expressed as PSAHT, did not predict BF or PCSS. However, nadir PSAs, in both the NA and post-therapy settings, were significant predictors of BF and PCSS. Optimization of therapy could potentially be based on early PSA response, with shorter durations of ADT for those predicted to do favorably, and intensification of therapy for those likely to have poorer outcomes.

  3. PSA blood test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a glycoprotein in the cytoplasm of prostatic epithelial cells. It can be detected in the blood of all adult men. The PSA level is increased in men with ... also be increased somewhat in other disorders of the prostate.

  4. The effect of testosterone replacement therapy on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in men being treated for hypogonadism: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, De-Ying; Li, Hong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy is used for the treatment of age-related male hypogonadism, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a primary screening tool for prostate cancer. The systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on PSA levels.Medline, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until February 28, 2014, and inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trial; intervention group received testosterone/androgen replacement therapy; control group did not receive treatment; and no history of prostate cancer. The primary outcome was change of PSA level between before and after treatment. Secondary outcomes were elevated PSA level after treatment, and the number of patients who developed prostate cancer.After initially identifying 511 articles, 15 studies with a total of 739 patients that received testosterone replacement and 385 controls were included. The duration of treatment ranged from 3 to 12 months. Patients treated with testosterone tended to have higher PSA levels, and thus a greater change than those that received control treatments (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.154, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.069 to 0.238, P < 0.001). The difference in means of PSA levels were significant higher for patients that received testosterone intramuscularly (IM) than controls (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.271, 95% CI 0.117-0.425, P = 0.001). Elevated PSA levels after treatment were similar between patients that received treatment and controls (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02, 95% CI 0.48-2.20, P = 0.953). Only 3 studies provided data with respect to the development of prostate cancer, and rates were similar between those that received treatment and controls.Testosterone replacement therapy does not increase PSA levels in men being treated for hypogonadism, except when it is given IM and even the increase with IM administration is minimal

  5. A multicenter study demonstrating discordant results from electronic prostate-specific antigen biochemical failure calculation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Scott G. . E-mail: scott.williams@petermac.org; Pickles, Tom; Kestin, Larry; Potters, Louis; Fearn, Paul; Smith, Ryan; Pratt, Gary

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the interobserver variation of four electronic biochemical failure (bF) calculators using three bF definitions. Methods and Materials: The data of 1200 men were analyzed using the electronic bF calculators of four institutions. Three bF definitions were examined for their concordance of bF identification across the centers: the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition (ACD), the lowest prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level to date plus 2 ng/mL (L2), and a threshold of 3 ng/mL (T3). Results: Unanimous agreement regarding bF status using the ACD, L2, and T3 definitions occurred in 87.3%, 96.4%, and 92.7% of cases, respectively. Using the ACD, 63% of the variation was from one institution, which allowed the bF status to be reversed if a PSA decline was seen after bF (PSA 'bounce'). A total of 270 men had an ACD bF time variation of >2 months across the calculators, and the 5-year freedom from bF rate was 49.8-60.9%. The L2 definition had a 20.5% rate of calculated bF times; which varied by >2 months (median, 6.4; range, 2.1-75.6) and a corresponding 5-year freedom from bF rate of 55.9-61.0%. The T3 definition had a 2.0% range in the 5-year freedom from bF. Fifteen definition interpretation variations were identified. Conclusion: Reported bF results vary not only because of bF definition differences, but because of variations in how those definitions are written into computer-based calculators, with multiple interpretations most prevalent for the ACD. An algorithm to avoid misinterpretations is proposed for the L2 definition. A verification system to guarantee consistent electronic bF results requires development.

  6. Comparison of biochemical failure definitions for permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuban, Deborah A. . E-mail: dakuban@mdanderson.org; Levy, Larry B.; Potters, Louis; Beyer, David C.; Blasko, John C.; Moran, Brian J.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Elshaikh, Mohamed; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To assess prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure definitions for patients with Stage T1-T2 prostate cancer treated by permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 2,693 patients treated with radioisotopic implant as solitary treatment for T1-T2 prostatic adenocarcinoma were studied. All patients had a pretreatment PSA, were treated at least 5 years before analysis, 1988 to 1998, and did not receive hormonal therapy before recurrence. Multiple PSA failure definitions were tested for their ability to predict clinical failure. Results: Definitions which determined failure by a certain increment of PSA rise above the lowest PSA level to date (nadir + x ng/mL) were more sensitive and specific than failure definitions based on PSA doubling time or a certain number of PSA rises. The sensitivity and specificity for the nadir + 2 definition were 72% and 83%, vs. 51% and 81% for 3 PSA rises. The surgical type definitions (PSA exceeding an absolute value) could match this sensitivity and specificity but only when failure was defined as exceeding a PSA level in the 1-3 ng/mL range and only when patients were allowed adequate time to nadir. When failure definitions were compared by time varying covariate regression analysis, nadir + 2 ng/mL retained the best fit. Conclusions: For patients treated by permanent radioisotopic implant for prostate cancer, the definition nadir + 2 ng/mL provides the best surrogate for failure throughout the entire follow-up period, similar to patients treated by external beam radiotherapy. Therefore, the same PSA failure definition could be used for both modalities. For brachytherapy patients with long-term follow-up, at least 6 years, defining failure as exceeding an absolute PSA level in the 0.5 ng/mL range may be reasonable.

  7. A Comparison of the Prognostic Value of Early PSA Test-Based Variables Following External Beam Radiotherapy, With or Without Preceding Androgen Deprivation: Analysis of Data From the TROG 96.01 Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, David S.; Denham, James W.; Joseph, David; Matthews, John; Atkinson, Chris; Spry, Nigel A.; Duchesne, Gillian; Ebert, Martin; Steigler, Allison; Delahunt, Brett; D'Este, Catherine

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: We sought to compare the prognostic value of early prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test-based variables for the 802 eligible patients treated in the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 96.01 randomized trial. Methods and Materials: Patients in this trial had T2b, T2c, T3, and T4 N0 prostate cancer and were randomized to 0, 3, or 6 months of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (NADT) prior to and during radiation treatment at 66 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles. The early PSA test-based variables evaluated were the pretreatment initial PSA (iPSA) value, PSA values at 2 and 4 months into NADT, the PSA nadir (nPSA) value after radiation in all patients, and PSA response signatures in men receiving radiation. Comparisons of endpoints were made using Cox models of local progression-free survival, distant failure-free survival, biochemical failure-free survival, and prostate cancer-specific survival. Results: The nPSA value was a powerful predictor of all endpoints regardless of whether NADT was given before radiation. PSA response signatures also predicted all endpoints in men treated by radiation alone. iPSA and PSA results at 2 and 4 months into NADT predicted biochemical failure-free survival but not any of the clinical endpoints. nPSA values correlated with those of iPSA, Gleason grade, and T stage and were significantly higher in men receiving radiation alone than in those receiving NADT. Conclusions: The postradiation nPSA value is the strongest prognostic indicator of all early PSA-based variables. However, its use as a surrogate endpoint needs to take into account its dependence on pretreatment variables and treatment method.

  8. [5ARI and PSA: open questions.

    PubMed

    Tubaro, Andrea; Puccini, Federica; De Nunzio, Cosimo

    2014-09-23

    No consensus has ever been reached on the predictive value of serum prostate specific antigen(PSA) for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Limitations of PSA testing in clinical practice have beenoften discussed in the peer-reviewed literature following data derived from clinical trials such as theProstate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) and the Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events(REDUCE) study that showed a linear rise in the risk of prostate cancer with increasing PSA levels.Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a known confounding factor for the use of PSA as a marker of prostatecancer. Increased prostate volume observed with ageing, urinary retention, acute and chronicinflammatory conditions of the prostate, sexual activity and digital rectal examination may all cause anincrease of PSA values. Both finasteride and dutasteride, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARI) used inthe treatment of BPH, are known to induce a significant decrease of serum PSA levels close to 50%.The observed change in PSA values following 5ARI treatment has raised questions about the accuracyof PSA testing for the early diagnosis of prostate cancer in patients on finasteride/dutasteride treatment.Careful analysis of data from various clinical trials on pharmacological treatment of LUTS due toBPH suggested that the accuracy of PSA testing is not just maintained but rather increased following5ARI use. Then, the question of PSA accuracy during 5ARI treatment can be considered closed. PMID:25350562

  9. PSA — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    KLK3, also known as PSA, or prostate specific antigen, a member of the kallikrein subgroup of serine proteases, is one of the fifteen kallikrein subfamily members located in a cluster on chromosome 19. Kallikreins are increasingly thought to be involved in carcinogenesis, and many act as cancer biomarkers. The product of the KLK3 gene is a protease present in seminal plasma. It is thought to function normally in the liquefaction of seminal coagulum. KLK3, or PSA, is well known for its role in diagnosing and monitoring prostate cancer. There are several isoforms of KLK3, generated by alternate splicing and transcript variants.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of PsaA, the adhesive pilin subunit that forms the pH 6 antigen on the surface of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Rui; Esser, Lothar; Sadhukhan, Annapurna; Nair, Manoj K M; Schifferli, Dieter M; Xia, Di

    2012-10-01

    Yersinia pestis has been responsible for a number of high-mortality epidemics throughout human history. Like all other bacterial infections, the pathogenesis of Y. pestis begins with the attachment of bacteria to the surface of host cells. At least five surface proteins from Y. pestis have been shown to interact with host cells. Psa, the pH 6 antigen, is one of them and is deployed on the surface of bacteria as thin flexible fibrils that are the result of the polymerization of a single PsaA pilin subunit. Here, the crystallization of recombinant donor-strand complemented PsaA by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method is reported. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected to 1.9 Å resolution from a native crystal and to 1.5 Å resolution from a bromide-derivatized crystal. These crystals displayed the symmetry of the orthorhombic space group P222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 26.3, b = 54.6, c = 102.1 Å. Initial phases were derived from single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering experiments, resulting in an electron-density map that showed a single molecule in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Sequence assignment was aided by residues binding to bromide ions of the heavy-atom derivative. PMID:23027758

  11. PSA Isoforms' Velocities for Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Isabel; Klocker, Helmut; Pichler, Renate; Horninger, Wolfgang; Bektic, Jasmin

    2015-06-01

    Free prostate-specific antigen (fPSA) and its molecular isoforms are suggested for enhancement of PSA testing in prostate cancer (PCa). In the present study we evaluated whether PSA isoforms' velocities might serve as a tool to improve early PCa diagnosis. Our study population included 381 men who had undergone at least one ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy whose pathologic examination yielded PCa or showed no evidence of prostatic malignancy. Serial PSA, fPSA, and proPSA measurements were performed on serum samples covering 7 years prior to biopsy using Beckmann Coulter Access immunoassays. Afterwards, velocities of PSA (PSAV), fPSA% (fPSA%V), proPSA% (proPSA%V) and the ratio proPSA/PSA/V were calculated and their ability to discriminate cancer from benign disease was evaluated. Among 381 men included in the study, 202 (53%) were diagnosed with PCa and underwent radical prostatectomy at our Department. PSAV, fPSA%V, proPSA%V as well as proPSA/PSA/V were able to differentiate significantly between PCa and non-cancerous prostate. The highest discriminatory power between cancer and benign disease has been observed two and one year prior to diagnosis with all measured parameters. Among all measured parameters, fPSA%V showed the best cancer specificity of 45.3% with 90% of sensitivity. In summary, our results highlight the value of PSA isoforms' velocity for early detection of PCa. Especially fPSA%V should be used in the clinical setting to increase cancer detection specificity. PMID:26026127

  12. Generation of Antigen Microarrays to Screen for Autoantibodies in Heart Failure and Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chruscinski, Andrzej; Huang, Flora Y. Y.; Nguyen, Albert; Lioe, Jocelyn; Tumiati, Laura C.; Kozuszko, Stella; Tinckam, Kathryn J.; Rao, Vivek; Dunn, Shannon E.; Persinger, Michael A.; Levy, Gary A.; Ross, Heather J.

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies directed against endogenous proteins including contractile proteins and endothelial antigens are frequently detected in patients with heart failure and after heart transplantation. There is evidence that these autoantibodies contribute to cardiac dysfunction and correlate with clinical outcomes. Currently, autoantibodies are detected in patient sera using individual ELISA assays (one for each antigen). Thus, screening for many individual autoantibodies is laborious and consumes a large amount of patient sample. To better capture the broad-scale antibody reactivities that occur in heart failure and post-transplant, we developed a custom antigen microarray technique that can simultaneously measure IgM and IgG reactivities against 64 unique antigens using just five microliters of patient serum. We first demonstrated that our antigen microarray technique displayed enhanced sensitivity to detect autoantibodies compared to the traditional ELISA method. We then piloted this technique using two sets of samples that were obtained at our institution. In the first retrospective study, we profiled pre-transplant sera from 24 heart failure patients who subsequently received heart transplants. We identified 8 antibody reactivities that were higher in patients who developed cellular rejection (2 or more episodes of grade 2R rejection in first year after transplant as defined by revised criteria from the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation) compared with those who did have not have rejection episodes. In a second retrospective study with 31 patients, we identified 7 IgM reactivities that were higher in heart transplant recipients who developed antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) compared with control recipients, and in time course studies, these reactivities appeared prior to overt graft dysfunction. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the autoantibody microarray technique outperforms traditional ELISAs as it uses less patient sample, has

  13. Clinical performance of serum [-2]proPSA derivatives, %p2PSA and PHI, in the detection and management of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Qiang; Sun, Tong; Zhong, Wei-De; Wu, Chin-Lee

    2014-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been widely used as a serum marker for prostate cancer (PCa) screening or progression monitoring, which dramatically increased rate of early detection while significantly reduced PCa-specific mortality. However, a number of limitations of PSA have been noticed. Low specificity of PSA may lead to overtreatment in men who presenting with a total PSA (tPSA) level of < 10 ng/mL. As a type of free PSA (fPSA), [-2]proPSA is differentially expressed in peripheral zone of prostate gland and found to be elevated in serum of men with PCa. Two p2PSA-based derivatives, prostate health index (PHI) and %p2PSA, which were defined as [(p2PSA/fPSA) × √ tPSA] and [(p2PSA/fPSA) × 100] respectively, have been suggested to be increased in PCa and can better distinguish PCa from benign prostatic diseases than tPSA or fPSA. We performed a systematic review of the available scientific evidences to evaluate the potentials of %p2PSA and PHI in clinical application. Mounting evidences suggested that both %p2PSA and PHI possess higher area under the ROC curve (AUC) and better specificity at a high sensitivity for PCa detection when compare with tPSA and %fPSA. It indicated that measurements of %p2PSA and PHI significantly improved the accuracy of PCa detection and diminished unnecessary biopsies. Furthermore, elevations of %p2PSA and PHI are related to more aggressive diseases. %p2PSA and PHI might be helpful in reducing overtreatment on indolent cases or assessing the progression of PCa in men who undergo active surveillance. Further studies are needed before being applied in routine clinical practice. PMID:25606581

  14. Prostate-specific antigen as a marker of disease activity in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Partin, Alan W; Hanks, Gerald E; Klein, Eric A; Moul, Judd W; Nelson, William G; Scher, Howard I

    2002-09-01

    Despite the impact of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing on the detection and management of prostate cancer, controversy about its usefulness as a marker of disease activity continues. This review, based on a recent roundtable discussion, examines whether PSA measurements can be used rationally in several clinical settings. Following radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy, prediction of survival by PSA level is most reliable in high-risk patients. PSA doubling time after radiation therapy is the strongest predictor of biochemical failure. PSA measurements have been associated with inconsistent results following hormonal treatment; reduced PSA levels may result from antiandrogen treatment, which decreases expression of the PSA gene, and therefore, the level of PSA production. In the setting of primary and secondary cancer prevention, PSA is important in risk stratification when selecting patients for studies. Part 2 of this two-part article, which began in the August issue, discusses the role of PSA in hormonal and drug therapies and in primary and secondary chemoprevention. PMID:12380948

  15. Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    An antigen is any substance that causes your immune system to produce antibodies against it. This means your immune ... and is trying to fight it off. An antigen may be a substance from the environment, such ...

  16. Prostate-Specific Antigen Bounce After High-Dose-Rate Monotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Niraj H.; Kamrava, Mitchell; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Steinberg, Michael; Demanes, Jeffrey

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To characterize the magnitude and kinetics of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounces after high-dose-rate (HDR) monotherapy and determine relationships between certain clinical factors and PSA bounce. Methods and Materials: Longitudinal PSA data and various clinical parameters were examined in 157 consecutive patients treated with HDR monotherapy between 1996 and 2005. We used the following definition for PSA bounce: rise in PSA ≥threshold, after which it returns to the prior level or lower. Prostate-specific antigen failure was defined per the Phoenix definition (nadir +2 ng/mL). Results: A PSA bounce was noted in 67 patients (43%). The number of bounces per patient was 1 in 45 cases (67%), 2 in 19 (28%), 3 in 2 (3%), 4 in 0, and 5 in 1 (1%). The median time to maximum PSA bounce was 1.3 years, its median magnitude was 0.7, and its median duration was 0.75 years. Three patients (2%) were noted to have PSA failure. None of the 3 patients who experienced biochemical failure exhibited PSA bounce. In the fully adjusted model for predicting each bounce, patients aged <55 years had a statistically significant higher likelihood of experiencing a bounce (odds ratio 2.22, 95% confidence interval 1.38-3.57, P=.001). There was also a statistically significant higher probability of experiencing a bounce for every unit decrease in Gleason score (odds ratio 1.52, 95% confidence interval 1.01-2.04, P=.045). Conclusions: A PSA bounce occurs in a significant percentage of patients treated with HDR monotherapy, with magnitudes varying from <1 in 28% of cases to ≥1 in 15%. The median duration of bounce is <1 year. More bounces were identified in patients with lower Gleason score and age <55 years. Further investigation using a model to correlate magnitude and frequency of bounces with clinical variables are under way.

  17. Prognostic Value of the Interaction between Galectin-3 and Antigen Carbohydrate 125 in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Julio; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Sandino, Justo; Mainar, Luis; Palau, Patricia; Santas, Enrique; Villanueva, Maria Pilar; Núñez, Eduardo; Bodí, Vicent; Chorro, Francisco J.; Miñana, Gema; Sanchis, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Aims Galectin-3 (Gal-3) and carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) have emerged as robust prognostic biomarkers in heart failure. Experimental data have also suggested a potential molecular interaction between CA125 and Gal-3; however, the biological and clinical relevance of this interaction is still uncertain. We sought to evaluate, in patients admitted for acute heart failure, the association between plasma Gal-3 with all-cause mortality and the risk for rehospitalizations among high and low levels of CA125. Methods and Results We included 264 consecutive patients admitted for acute heart failure to the Cardiology Department in a third-level center. Both biomarkers were measured on admission. Negative binomial and Cox regression models were used to evaluate the prognostic effect of the interaction between Gal-3 and CA125 (dichotomized by its median) with hospital readmission and all-cause mortality, respectively. During a median follow-up of 2 years (IQR = 1-2.8), 108 (40.9%) patients deaths and 365 rehospitalizations in 171 (69.5%) patients were registered. In a multivariable setting, the effect of Gal-3 on mortality and rehospitalization was differentially mediated by CA125 (p = 0.007 and p<0.001, respectively). Indeed, in patients with CA125 above median (>67 U/ml), values across the continuum of Gal-3 showed a positive and almost linear relationship with either the risk of death or rehospitalization. Conversely, when CA125 was below median (≤67 U/ml), Gal-3 lacked any prognostic effect on both endpoints. Conclusion In patients with acute heart failure, Gal-3 was strongly associated with higher risk of long-term mortality and repeated rehospitalizations, but only in those patients exhibiting higher values of CA125 (above 67 U/ml). PMID:25875367

  18. PSA Velocity Does Not Improve Prostate Cancer Detection

    Cancer.gov

    A rapid increase in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels is not grounds for automatically recommending a prostate biopsy, according to a study published online February 24, 2011, in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

  19. Achieving an Undetectable PSA After Radiotherapy for Biochemical Progression After Radical Prostatectomy Is an Independent Predictor of Biochemical Outcome-Results of a Retrospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegel, Thomas Lohm, Gunnar; Bottke, Dirk; Hoecht, Stefan; Miller, Kurt; Siegmann, Alessandra; Schostak, Martin; Neumann, Konrad; Hinkelbein, Wolfgang

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: Salvage radiotherapy (SRT) is commonly used to treat patients with biochemical failure after radical prostatectomy (RP). Retrospective series have demonstrated biochemical response in approximately 60-75% of patients, but only a significantly lower rate of patients achieves a response with a decrease of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) to a value below the limits of detectability. Therefore, long-term response at 10 years is only about 20-25% in all of these patients. The purpose of this study was to determine prognostic factors with impact on achieving the undetectable PSA range after SRT and to define the role of this end point. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2004, 162 patients received SRT at the Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin. No patient had hormonal treatment before SRT and 90% of the patients (143) had a SRT dose of 66 Gy. We analyzed the impact of nine potential risk factors on achieving an undetectable PSA after RT and on biochemical relapse-free survival (bNED) after SRT. Results: Median follow-up time was 41.5 months and median PSA pre-RT was 0.33 ng/mL. Calculated bNED for 3.5 years was 54%. A total of 60% of the patients achieved an undetectable PSA after SRT. Univariate analysis demonstrated statistically significant predictors of biochemical progression after SRT: Gleason score (p = 0.01), PSA pre-SRT (p = 0.031), tumor stage (p = 0.047), and persistent detectable PSA after RT (p < 0.00005). In multivariate analysis, margin status (p = 0.017) and PSA pre-SRT (p = 0.002) were significant predictors of an undetectable PSA after SRT. The most significant independent predictor of bNED was 'PSA undetectable after RT' (p < 0.0005) with a hazard ratio of 8.4, thus leading to a calculated bNED at 3.5 years of 75% compared with only 18% for those patients, who did not achieve an undetectable PSA after SRT. The rate of severe Grade 3-4 side effects was below 2.5%. Conclusions: The study represents one of the largest retrospective

  20. Single antigen flow beads for identification of human leukocyte antigen antibody specificities in hypersensitized patients with chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Kılıçaslan-Ayna, Tülay; Özkızılcık-Koçyiğit, Aslı; Güleç, Derya; Pirim, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Aims of this study Aims of this study were to identify class I and class II antibodies in highly sensitized patients by flow cytometry single antigen bead (FC-SAB) assay and to evaluate according to donor HLA type in order to increase their kidney transplantation chance. Material and methods We analyzed 60 hypersensitive patients of 351 individuals, who applied to our laboratory for PRA test in November 2013-December 2014. Flow cytometric PRA screening and single antigen bead commercial kits were used for these analyses. Results In our study group, 19 (31.7%) of these patients were male while 41 (68.3%) patients were female. The most common acceptable antigens were A*02 (10.11%), HLA-A*23 (10.11%), HLA-B*38 (8.79%) and HLA-DRB1*03 (7.83%) in hypersensitive patients. The highest antibody reactivity on SAB was observed against HLA-A*25, HLA-B*45, HLA-DRB1*04 and HLA-DRB1*08 antigens. Conclusions The determination of these acceptable and unacceptable antigens may increase their transplantation chance. Pre-transplant HLA antibody identifications provide prognostic information with respect to the determination of patients who are at increased risk of graft loss. PMID:27095928

  1. Determinants of Change in Prostate-Specific Antigen Over Time and Its Association With Recurrence After External Beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer in Five Large Cohorts

    SciTech Connect

    Proust-Lima, Cecile; Taylor, Jeremy M.G. Williams, Scott G.; Ankerst, Donna P.; Liu Ning; Kestin, Larry L.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Sandler, Howard M.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between prognostic factors, postradiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) dynamics, and clinical failure after prostate cancer radiation therapy using contemporary statistical models. Methods and Materials: Data from 4,247 patients with 40,324 PSA measurements treated with external beam radiation monotherapy in five cohorts were analyzed. Temporal change of PSA after treatment completion was described by a specially developed linear mixed model that included standard prognostic factors. These factors, along with predicted PSA evolution, were incorporated into a Cox model to establish their predictive value for the risk of clinical recurrence over time. Results: Consistent relationships were found across cohorts. The initial PSA decline after radiation therapy was associated with baseline PSA and T-stage (p < 0.001). The long-term PSA rise was associated with baseline PSA, T-stage, and Gleason score (p < 0.001). The risk of clinical recurrence increased with current level (p < 0.001) and current slope of PSA (p < 0.001). In a pooled analysis, higher doses of radiation were associated with a lower long-term PSA rise (p < 0.001) but not with the risk of recurrence after adjusting for PSA trajectory (p = 0.63). Conversely, after adjusting for other factors, increased age at diagnosis was not associated with long-term PSA rise (p = 0.85) but was directly associated with decreased risk of recurrence (p < 0.001). Conclusions: We conclude that a linear mixed model can be reliably used to construct typical patient PSA profiles after prostate cancer radiation therapy. Pretreatment factors along with PSA evolution and the associated risk of recurrence provide an efficient and quantitative way to assess the impact of risk factors on disease progression.

  2. Prognostic Significance of 5-Year PSA Value for Predicting Prostate Cancer Recurrence After Brachytherapy Alone and Combined With Hormonal Therapy and/or External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, Richard G. Klein, Thomas J.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Stone, Nelson N.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze the prognosis and outcomes of patients who remain free of biochemical failure during the first 5 years after treatment. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2002, 742 patients with prostate cancer were treated with brachytherapy alone (n = 306), brachytherapy and hormonal therapy (n = 212), or combined implantation and external beam radiotherapy (with or without hormonal therapy; n = 224). These patients were free of biochemical failure (American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology [ASTRO] definition) during the first 5 post-treatment years and had a documented 5-year prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value. The median follow-up was 6.93 years. Results: The actuarial 10-year freedom from PSA failure rate was 97% using the ASTRO definition and 95% using the Phoenix definition. The median 5-year PSA level was 0.03 ng/mL (range, 0-3.6). The 5-year PSA value was {<=}0.01 in 47.7%, >0.01-0.10 in 31.1%, >0.10-0.2 in 10.2%, >0.2-0.5 in 7.82%, and >0.5 in 3.10%. The 5-year PSA value had prognostic significance, with a PSA value of {<=}0.2 ng/mL (n = 661) corresponding to a 10-year freedom from PSA failure rate of 99% with the ASTRO definition and 98% with the Phoenix definition vs. 86% (ASTRO definition) and 81% (Phoenix definition) for a PSA value {>=}0.2 ng/mL (n = 81; p < .0001). The treatment regimen had no effect on biochemical failure. None of the 742 patients in this study developed metastatic disease or died of prostate cancer. Conclusion: The results of this study have shown that the prognosis for patients treated with brachytherapy and who remain biochemically free of disease for {>=}5 years is excellent and none developed metastatic disease during the first 10 years after treatment. The 5-year PSA value is prognostic, and patients with a PSA value <0.2 ng/mL are unlikely to develop subsequent biochemical relapse.

  3. PSA Response to Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Is a Strong Independent Predictor of Survival in High-Risk Prostate Cancer in the Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy Era

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.; Cerne, Jasmina Z.; Munsell, Mark F.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Choi, Seungtaek L.; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Frank, Steven J.; Corn, Paul G.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) prior to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) and long-term ADT in high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the charts of all patients diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer and treated with a combination of long-term ADT (median, 24 months) and dose-escalated (median, 75.6 Gy) RT between 1990 and 2007. The associations among patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics with biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT and their effects on failure-free survival (FFS), time to distant metastasis (TDM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: A total of 196 patients met criteria for inclusion. Median follow-up time for patients alive at last contact was 7.0 years (range, 0.5-18.1 years). Multivariate analysis identified the pre-RT PSA concentration (<0.5 vs {>=}0.5 ng/mL) as a significant independent predictor of FFS (P=.021), TDM (P=.009), PCSM (P=.039), and OS (P=.037). On multivariate analysis, pretreatment PSA (iPSA) and African-American race were significantly associated with failure to achieve a pre-RT PSA of <0.5 ng/mL. Conclusions: For high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with long-term ADT and dose-escalated RT, a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL after neoadjuvant ADT predicts for worse survival measures. Both elevated iPSA and African-American race are associated with increased risk of having a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL. These patients should be considered for clinical trials that test newer, more potent androgen-depleting therapies such as abiraterone and MDV3100 in combination with radiation.

  4. Rising prostate-specific antigen values during neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy: The importance of monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Niblock, Paddy; Pickles, Tom . E-mail: tpickles@bccancer.bc.ca

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level in patients receiving neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (N-ADT) before external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From prospectively collected data, we identified 182 patients who received between 3 and 12 months of N-ADT before definitive external beam radiotherapy and who had at least three PSA readings during the neoadjuvant period. One hundred fifty patients had PSA values that continued to fall (Non-Rise group), but 32 had a PSA value that started to rise (Rise group). The two groups were compared by Mann-Whitney U and Pearson chi-square tests. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank analyses were performed for time to treatment failure, cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: The median follow-up was 62.5 months for the Non-Rise group and 53 months for the Rise group. Patients who sustained a PSA rise during the N-ADT period had a shorter time to PSA relapse (p = 0.013), poorer CSS (p = 0.027), and poorer OS (p = 0.03). Multivariate analysis confirms the significance of a PSA rise during the N-ADT period for CSS (p = 0.035) and OS (p = 0.038). Conclusions:: A subset of patients treated with N-ADT develop a rising PSA profile that likely represents early androgen resistance. They have significantly worse outcome.

  5. Impact of Ultrahigh Baseline PSA Levels on Biochemical and Clinical Outcomes in Two Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Prostate Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, George; Bae, Kyounghwa; Roach, Mack; Lawton, Colleen; Donnelly, Bryan; Grignon, David; Hanks, Gerald; Porter, Arthur; Lepor, Herbert; Sandler, Howard

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To assess ultrahigh (UH; prostate-specific antigen [PSA]levels {>=}50 ng/ml) patient outcomes by comparison to other high-risk patient outcomes and to identify outcome predictors. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer patients (PCP) from two Phase III Radiation Therapy Oncology Group clinical trials (studies 9202 and 9413) were divided into two groups: high-risk patients with and without UH baseline PSA levels. Predictive variables included age, Gleason score, clinical T stage, Karnofsky performance score, and treatment arm. Outcomes included overall survival (OS), distant metastasis (DM), and biochemical failure (BF). Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using either the Cox or Fine and Gray's regression model with associated 95% confidence intervals (CI) and p values. Results: There were 401 patients in the UH PSA group and 1,792 patients in the non-UH PSA PCP group of a total of 2,193 high-risk PCP. PCP with UH PSA were found to have inferior OS (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.02-1.39, p = 0.02), DM (HR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.19-1.92; p = 0.0006), and BF (HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.29-1.73; p < 0.0001) compared to other high-risk PCP. In the UH cohort, PSA level was found to be a significant factor for the risk of DM (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.001-1.02) but not OS and BF. Gleason grades of 8 to 10 were found to consistently predict for poor OS, DM, and BF outcomes (with HR estimates ranging from 1.41-2.36) in both the high-risk cohort and the UH cohort multivariable analyses. Conclusions: UH PSA levels at diagnosis are related to detrimental changes in OS, DM, and BF. All three outcomes can be modeled by various combinations of all predictive variables tested.

  6. Genetic correction of PSA values using sequence variants associated with PSA levels

    PubMed Central

    Gudmundsson, Julius; Besenbacher, Soren; Sulem, Patrick; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Arinbjarnarson, Sturla; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R.; Isaksson, Helgi J.; Kostic, Jelena P.; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Stacey, Simon N.; Gylfason, Arnaldur; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Holm, Hilma; Bjornsdottir, Unnur S.; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I.; Navarrete, Sebastian; Fuertes, Fernando; Garcia-Prats, Maria D.; Polo, Eduardo; Checherita, Ionel A.; Jinga, Mariana; Badea, Paula; Aben, Katja K.; Schalken, Jack A.; van Oort, Inge M.; Sweep, Fred C.; Helfand, Brian T.; Davis, Michael; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Kristjansson, Kristleifur; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Masson, Gisli; Kong, Augustine; Catalona, William J.; Mayordomo, Jose I.; Geirsson, Gudmundur; Einarsson, Gudmundur V.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Jonsson, Eirikur; Jinga, Viorel; Mates, Dana; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Neal, David E.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Rafnar, Thorunn; Stefansson, Kari

    2013-01-01

    Measuring serum levels of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) is the most common screening method for prostate cancer. However, PSA levels are affected by a number of factors apart from neoplasia. Notably, around 40% of the variability of PSA levels in the general population is accounted for by inherited factors, suggesting that it may be possible to improve both sensitivity and specificity by adjusting test results for genetic effects. In order to search for sequence variants that associate with PSA levels, we performed a genome-wide association study and follow-up analysis using PSA information from 15,757 Icelandic and 454 British men not diagnosed with prostate cancer. Overall, we detected a genome-wide significant association between PSA levels and SNPs at six loci: 5p15.33 (rs2736098), 10q11 (rs10993994), 10q26 (rs10788160), 12q24 (rs11067228), 17q12 (rs4430796), and 19q13.33 (rs17632542 (KLK3: I179T), each with Pcombined < 3×10−10. Among 3,834 men who underwent a biopsy of the prostate, the 10q26, 12q24, and 19q13.33 alleles that associate with high PSA levels are associated with higher probability of a negative biopsy (OR between 1.15 and 1.27). Assessment of association between the 6 loci and prostate cancer risk in 5,325 cases and 41,417 controls from Iceland, the Netherlands, Spain, Romania, and the US showed that the SNPs at 10q26 and 12q24 were exclusively associated with PSA levels, whereas the other 4 loci also were associated with prostate cancer risk. We propose that a personalized PSA cutoff value, based on genotype, should be used when deciding to perform a prostate biopsy. PMID:21160077

  7. Changing the patterns of failure for high-risk prostate cancer patients by optimizing local control

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, Richard G. . E-mail: richard.stock@msnyuhealth.org; Ho, Alice; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Stone, Nelson N.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Standard therapies for high-risk prostate cancer have resulted in suboptimal outcomes with both local and distant failures. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and distant metastases rates as well as biopsy outcomes are reported after a regimen of trimodality therapy with hormonal, radioactive seed, and external beam radiation therapy to demonstrate how patterns of failure are changed when local control is optimized. Methods and Materials: From 1994 to 2003, a total of 360 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with trimodality therapy. Patients were defined as being at high risk if they possessed at least one of the following high-risk features: Gleason score 8 to 10, PSA >20, clinical stage t2c to t3, or two or more intermediate risk features: Gleason score 7, PSA >10 to 20, or stage t2b. Patients were followed for a median of 4.25 years (range, 2 to 10 years). Results: The actuarial 7-year freedom from PSA failure and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM) rates were 83% and 89% respectively. Patients (n = 51) developing PSA failure exhibited aggressive disease behavior with short PSA doubling times (median, 5 months) and a 7-year freedom from distant metastases rate of 48%. Local control was high. The last posttreatment biopsy results were negative in 97% of cases (68 of 70 patients). In multivariate analysis, only PSA >20 predicted biochemical failure (p = 0.04), and only seminal vesicle status predicted developing distant failure (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Trimodality therapy results in excellent local control that alters patterns of failure, resulting in similar actuarial biochemical and distant failure rates. Most failures appear to be distant and exhibit biologically aggressive behavior.

  8. [PSA bounce phenomenon after local treatment with radiation for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M A Cabeza; Escutia, M A Pérez; Antolín, A Rodríguez; Costoso, N Gascón; García, A Cascales; González, E Lanzós

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a curative treatment for localized prostate cancer in its modalities of brachytherapy (BT) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). A temporary increase in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values following a radiotherapy treatment coupled with a decrease without therapeutic intervention may happen in 30% of the patients. This phenomenon is known as PSA bounce and lacks prognostic effect in relation to tumor control. Additionally, it produces anxiety in the patient because of the fear of failure, and in the physicists due to the uncertainty about the state of the tumor. The etiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. Several factors associated with the tumor and the treatments have been evaluated in the studies which analyze this phenomenon, the age is the only observed factor with the highest consistency as a bounce predictor. The definition of biologic failure (BF)after EBRT or BT with or without androgenic deprivation (ADT) according to Phoenix criteria, which considers an increase of at least 2 ng/ml over PSA nadir, enables better taking the bounce phenomenon into account, although is not free from false BF that may affect to the relapse-free survival in patients with follow-up shorter than 3 years. PMID:22318175

  9. The Association between Human Leukocyte Antigens and Hypertensive End-Stage Renal Failure among Yemeni Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Mogahid Y.; Al-Shamahy, Hassan A.; Masood, Haitham A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Many studies have attempted to locate a connection between various genetic factors and the pathogenesis of certain diseases. A number of these have found human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) to be the most significant genetic factors affecting the susceptibility of an individual to a certain disease. The present case-control study aimed to determine the connection between class I and class II HLAs and cases of hypertensive end-stage renal failure (HESRF), as contrasted with healthy controls, in Yemen. Methods: The study was carried out between March 2013 and March 2014 and included 50 HESRF patients attending the Urology & Nephrology Center at Al-Thawra University Hospital in Sana’a, Yemen, and 50 healthy controls visiting the same centre for kidney donation. Among both patients and controls, HLA class I (A, B and C) and class II (DRB1) genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reactions. Results: There was an association (odds ratio: 4.0) with HLA-A9(24) and HESRF, although this was not statistically significant. A significant protective function was found for the HLA-CW3 and DRB1-8 genes against the development of HESRF. Although HLA-B14 was present in some patients (0.06) and not in the controls, this difference was not statistically significant enough to conclude that HLA-B14 plays a role in the genetic predisposition for end-stage renal disease development. There was a high frequency of HLA-A2, B5, CW6, DRB1-3, DRB1-4 and DRB1-13 in both patients and controls. Conclusion: Although no HLAs were found to play a highly significant role in genetic predisposition to HESRF, certain HLA genes could be considered as protective genes against HESRF development. PMID:26052458

  10. Prostate-specific antigen (Pasa) bounce and other fluctuations: Which biochemical relapse definition is least prone to PSA false calls? An analysis of 2030 men treated for prostate cancer with external beam or brachytherapy with or without adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pickles, Tom . E-mail: tpickles@bccancer.bc.ca

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the false call (FC) rate for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse according to nine different PSA relapse definitions after a PSA fluctuation (bounce) has occurred after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy, with or without adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. Methods and Materials: An analysis of a prospective database of 2030 patients was conducted. Prostate-specific antigen relapse was scored according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO), Vancouver, threshold + n, and nadir + n definitions for the complete data set and then compared against a truncated data set, with data subsequent to the height of the bounce deleted. The FC rate was calculated for each definition. Results: The bounce rate, with this very liberal definition of bounce, was 58% with EBRT and 84% with brachytherapy. The FC rate was lowest with nadir + 2 and + 3 definitions (2.2% and 1.6%, respectively) and greatest with low-threshold and ASTRO definitions (32% and 18%, respectively). The ASTRO definition was particularly susceptible to FC when androgen deprivation therapy was used with radiation (24%). Discussion: New definitions of biochemical non-evidence of disease that are more robust than the ASTRO definition have been identified. Those with the least FC rates are the nadir + 2 and nadir + 3 definitions, both of which are being considered to replace the ASTRO definition by the 2005 meeting of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-ASTRO consensus panel.

  11. Point-of-care PSA testing: an evaluation of PSAwatch.

    PubMed

    Karim, O; Rao, A; Emberton, M; Cochrane, D; Partridge, M; Edwards, P; Walker, I; Davidson, I

    2007-01-01

    We present a new quantitative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assay using a portable, point-of-care test (PSAwatch) and reader system (BioScan) for measuring PSA concentrations in the range from 0.5 to < or =25 microg/l. Blood samples from patients (n=199) were submitted for laboratory PSA and also evaluated using PSAwatch and the BioScan system. PSA concentrations in 188 men were < or =25 microg/l and studied. Correlation between the two methods was good (R(2)=0.88) with a standard error of 1.588. The regression line had a bias of -0.02 at the concentration of 4.00 microg/l. This is the first report of a quantitative, portable, point-of-care PSA test and reader system. PSAwatch may reduce the number of hospital visits for patients with prostate disease. PMID:17353914

  12. Prostate-Specific Antigen at 4 to 5 Years After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy Is a Strong Predictor of Disease-Free Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Andrea C.; Morris, W. James; Lapointe, Vincent; Hamm, Jeremy; Keyes, Mira; Pickles, Tom; McKenzie, Michael; Spadinger, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine (1) the prognostic utility of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration at 45 to 60 months (48mPSA) after low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB); (2) the predictors of 48mPSA; and (3) the prognostic utility of directional trends between PSA levels at 24, 36, and 48 months after LDR-PB. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2008, 2223 patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer received LDR-PB monotherapy. A cohort of 1434 of these patients was identified with a documented 48mPSA and no evidence of disease relapse prior to the 48mPSA. In addition, a subset of this cohort (n=585) was identified with ≥72 months of follow-up and documented PSA values at both 24 and 36 months after implantation. Results: Median follow-up time was 76 months. Eight-year Kaplan-Meier disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 100% vs 73.4% for patients with 48mPSA ≤0.2 vs those with >0.2 ng/mL; 99.1% versus 53.8% for a 48mPSA threshold of ≤0.4 versus >0.4 ng/mL, respectively; and 97.3% versus 0% for a threshold of ≤1.0 versus >1.0 ng/mL, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the only factor predictive of DFS was 48mPSA (P<.0001). On subset analysis (n=585), 29 patients had a PSA rise (defined as >0.2 ng/mL) between 24 and 36 months, 24 patients had a rise between 36 and 48 months, and 11 patients had rises over both intervals. Failure rates in these patients were 52%, 79%, and 100%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, initial PSA, androgen deprivation therapy, and dose to 90% of the prostate significantly correlated with 48mPSA but together accounted for only ∼5% of its total variance. Conclusions: The 48mPSA after LDR-PB is highly predictive of long-term DFS. Patients with 48mPSA ≤0.4 ng/mL had a <1% risk of disease relapse at 8 years, whereas all patients with 48mPSA >1.0 ng/mL relapsed. Consecutive PSA rises of >0.2 ng/mL from 24 to 36 months and from 36 to 48 months were also highly predictive of subsequent failure.

  13. Prognostic value of increased carbohydrate antigen in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Ana B; Ordoñez-Llanos, Jordi; Ferrero, Andreu; Noguero, Mariana; Mir, Teresa; Mora, Josefina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Mirabet, Sònia; Cinca, Juan; Roig, Eulàlia

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the prognostic value of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) and whether it adds prognostic information to N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in stable heart failure (HF) patients. METHODS: The predictive value of CA125 was retrospectively assessed in 156 patients with stable HF remitted to the outpatient HF unit for monitoring from 2009 to 2011. Patients were included in the study if they had a previous documented episode of HF and received HF treatment. CA125 and NT-proBNP concentrations were measured. The independent association between NT-proBNP or CA125 and mortality was assessed with Cox regression analysis, and their combined predictive ability was tested by the integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) index. RESULTS: The mean age of the 156 patients was 72 ± 12 years. During follow-up (17 ± 8 mo), 27 patients died, 1 received an urgent heart transplantation and 106 required hospitalization for HF. Higher CA125 values were correlated with outcomes: 58 ± 85 KU/L if hospitalized vs 34 ± 61 KU/L if not (P < 0.05), and 94 ± 121 KU/L in those who died or needed urgent heart transplantation vs 45 ± 78 KU/L in survivors (P < 0.01). After adjusting for propensity scores, the highest risk was observed when both biomarkers were elevated vs not elevated (HR = 8.95, 95%CI: 3.11-25.73; P < 0.001) and intermediate when only NT-proBNP was elevated vs not elevated (HR = 4.15, 95%CI: 1.41-12.24; P < 0.01). Moreover, when CA125 was added to the clinical model with NT-proBNP, a 4% (P < 0.05) improvement in the IDI was found. CONCLUSION: CA125 > 60 KU/L identified patients in stable HF with poor survival. Circulating CA125 level adds prognostic value to NT-proBNP level in predicting HF outcomes. PMID:24772260

  14. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test result cannot diagnose prostate cancer. Only a prostate biopsy can diagnose this cancer. Your provider will look ... infection Recent tests on your bladder (cystoscopy) or prostate (biopsy) Catheter tube recently placed into your bladder to ...

  15. [Clinical significance of prostate specific antigen and gamma-seminoprotein ratio for diagnosing prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Akino, H; Suzuki, Y; Okada, K

    1998-08-01

    It has been reported that prostate specific antigen and gamma-seminoprotein ratio (PSA/gamma-Sm ratio) is an useful means for distinguishing benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer if serum PSA is measured by Eiken-PSA method. We studied the clinical significance of PSA/gamma-Sm ratio when using Markit-M-PSA method. PSA/gamma-Sm ratio had no superiority over PSA alone for detecting prostate cancer. The present results suggest that the clinical significance of PSA/gamma-Sm ratio can be varied by various PSA-assay kits. PMID:9750496

  16. Antibacterial activity of essential oils mixture against PSA.

    PubMed

    Vavala, Elisabetta; Passariello, Claudio; Pepi, Federico; Colone, Marisa; Garzoli, Stefania; Ragno, Rino; Pirolli, Adele; Stringaro, Annarita; Angiolella, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (PSA) is the causal agent of bacterial canker of kiwifruit. It is very difficult to treat pandemic disease. The prolonged treatment with antibiotics, has resulted in failure and resistance and alternatives to conventional antimicrobial therapy are needed. The aim of our study was to analyse the phenotypic characteristics of PSA, identify new substances from natural source i.e. essential oils (EOs) able to contain the kiwifruit canker and investigate their potential use when utilised in combination. Specially, we investigated the morphological differences of PSA isolates by scanning electron microscope, and the synergic action of different EOs by time-kill and checkerboard methods. Our results demonstrated that PSA was able to produce extracellular polysaccharides when it was isolated from trunk, and, for the first time, that it was possible to kill PSA with a mixture of EOs after 1 h of exposition. We hypothesise on its potential use in agriculture. PMID:25782920

  17. PSA in America

    SciTech Connect

    Linn, M.A.; Cunningham, M.A.; Johnson, D.H.

    1996-12-31

    Although the concept of acceptable risk has always been the foundation of the nuclear industry design, the use of formal PSA (or PRA-probabilistic risk assessment) in the U.S. nuclear power industry has followed an unusual path in arriving at its current level of notability. Prior to 1975, probabilistic evaluations were limited to a few specific applications such as the evaluation of man-made (i.e., airplane crashes) and natural (i.e., earthquakes) hazards. In 1975, the industry was introduced to comprehensive PSA by the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400). However, the study languished in relative obscurity until the accident at Three Mile Island 2 (TMI-2) in 1979. This event significantly altered the industry`s view of severe accidents in the U.S. and worldwide. Investigative committees of TMI-2 recommended that PSA techniques be more widely used to augment the traditional deterministic methods of determining nuclear plant safety. This initiated an unprecedented effort by nuclear regulators and licensees worldwide to significantly improve the state of knowledge of severe accidents at nuclear power plants. In the U.S., use of PSA began to increase as evidenced by its application in the anticipated transient without scram and station blackout rulemakings, generic issue prioritization and resolution, risk-based inspection guidelines, backfit policy, and technical specification improvements. However, broad application of probabilistic techniques to the industry as a whole was initiated in 1986 with the publication of Safety Goals for the Operation of Nuclear Power Plant; Policy Statement. This put PSA front and center in the U.S. regulatory arena by {open_quotes}establish[ing] goals that broadly define an acceptable level of radiological risk that might be imposed on the public as a result of nuclear power plant operation.{close_quotes} Both qualitative safety goals and quantitative objectives were articulated in this policy statement.

  18. External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer: Clinical Significance of Nadir Prostate-Specific Antigen Value Within 12 Months

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Onishi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Araya, Masayuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka M.S.; Mitsumori, Michihide; Teshima, Teruki

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of external beam radiotherapy for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer and investigate the clinical significance of nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value within 12 months (nPSA12) as an early estimate of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-four patients with localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The total radiation doses ranged from 30 to 76 Gy (median, 66 Gy), and the median follow-up period for all 84 patients was 26.9 months (range, 2.7-77.3 months). Results: The 3-year actuarial overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates in all 84 patients after radiotherapy were 67%, 61%, and 93%, respectively. Although distant metastases and/or regional lymph node metastases developed in 34 patients (40%) after radiotherapy, local progression was observed in only 5 patients (6%). Of all 84 patients, the median nPSA12 in patients with clinical failure and in patients without clinical failure was 3.1 ng/mL and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. When dividing patients according to low (<0.5 ng/mL) and high ({>=}0.5 ng/mL) nPSA12 levels, the 3-year PFS rate in patients with low nPSA12 and in those with high nPSA12 was 96% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.0001). In univariate analysis, nPSA12 and pretreatment PSA value had a significant impact on PFS, and in multivariate analysis nPSA12 alone was an independent prognostic factor for PFS after radiotherapy. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy had an excellent local control rate for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer, and nPSA12 was predictive of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy.

  19. Lack of an Association between Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio and PSA Failure of Prostate Cancer Patients Who Underwent Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Yoko; Kawahara, Takashi; Koizumi, Mitsuyuki; Ito, Hiroki; Kumano, Yohei; Ohtaka, Mari; Kondo, Takuya; Mochizuki, Taku; Hattori, Yusuke; Teranishi, Jun-ichi; Yumura, Yasushi; Miyoshi, Yasuhide; Yao, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Uemura, Hiroji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), which can be easily calculated from routine complete blood counts of the peripheral blood, has been suggested to serve as a prognostic factor for some solid malignancies. In the present study, we aimed to determine the relationship between NLR in prostate cancer patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) and their prognosis. Materials and Methods. We assessed NLR in 73 men (patients) who received RP for their prostate cancer. We also performed immunohistochemistry for CD8 and CD66b in a separate set of RP specimens. Results. The median NLR in the 73 patients was 1.85. There were no significant correlations of NLR with tumor grade (p = 0.834), pathological T stage (p = 0.082), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.062), or resection margin status (p = 0.772). Based on the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUROC) to predict biochemical recurrence after RP, potential NLR cut-off point was determined to be 2.88 or 3.88. However, both of these cut-off points did not precisely predict the prognosis. There were no statistically significant differences in the number of CD66b-positive neutrophils or CD8-positive lymphocytes between stromal tissues adjacent to cancer glands and stromal tissues away from cancer glands and between different grades or stages of tumors. Conclusions. There was no association between NLR and biochemical failure after prostatectomy. PMID:27200375

  20. A Statistical Evaluation of Rules for Biochemical Failure After Radiotherapy in Men Treated for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bellera, Carine A.; Hanley, James A.; Joseph, Lawrence; Albertsen, Peter C.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: The 'PSA nadir + 2 rule,' defined as any rise of 2 ng/ml above the current prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir, has replaced the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) rule, defined as three consecutive PSA rises, to indicate biochemical failure (BF) after radiotherapy in patients treated for prostate cancer. We propose an original approach to evaluate BF rules based on the PSAdt as the gold standard rule and on a simulation process allowing us to evaluate the BF rules under multiple settings (different frequency, duration of follow-up, PSA doubling time [PSAdt]). Methods and Materials: We relied on a retrospective, population-based cohort of individuals identified by the Connecticut Tumor Registry and treated for localized prostate cancer with radiotherapy. We estimated the 470 underlying true PSA trajectories, including the PSAdt, using a Bayesian hierarchical changepoint model. Next, we simulated realistic, sophisticated data sets that accurately reflect the systematic and random variations observed in PSA series. We estimated the sensitivity and specificity by comparing the simulated PSA series to the underlying true PSAdt. Results: For follow-up of more than 3 years, the specificity of the PSA nadir + 2 rule was systematically greater than that of the ASTRO criterion. In few settings, the nadir + 2 rule had a lower sensitivity than the ASTRO. The PSA nadir + 2 rule appeared less dependent on the frequency and duration of follow-up than the ASTRO. Conclusions: Our results provide some refinements to earlier findings as the BF rules were evaluated according to various parameters. In most settings, the PSA nadir + 2 rule outperforms the ASTRO criterion.

  1. Immune impact induced by PROSTVAC (PSA-TRICOM), a therapeutic vaccine for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gulley, James L; Madan, Ravi A; Tsang, Kwong Y; Jochems, Caroline; Marté, Jennifer L; Farsaci, Benedetto; Tucker, Jo A; Hodge, James W; Liewehr, David J; Steinberg, Seth M; Heery, Christopher R; Schlom, Jeffrey

    2014-02-01

    PSA-TRICOM (PROSTVAC) is a novel vector-based vaccine designed to generate a robust immune response against prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-expressing tumor cells. The purpose of this report is to present an overview of both published studies and new data in the evaluation of immune responses to the PSA-TRICOM vaccine platform, currently in phase III testing. Of 104 patients tested for T-cell responses, 57% (59/104) demonstrated a ≥ 2-fold increase in PSA-specific T cells 4 weeks after vaccine (median 5-fold increase) compared with pre-vaccine, and 68% (19/28) of patients tested mounted post-vaccine immune responses to tumor-associated antigens not present in the vaccine (antigen spreading). The PSA-specific immune responses observed 28 days after vaccine (i.e., likely memory cells) are quantitatively similar to the levels of circulating T cells specific for influenza seen in the same patients. Measurements of systemic immune response to PSA may underestimate the true therapeutic immune response (as this does not account for cells that have trafficked to the tumor) and does not include antigen spreading. Furthermore, although the entire PSA gene is the vaccine, only one epitope of PSA is evaluated in the T-cell responses. Because this therapeutic vaccine is directed at generating a cellular/Th1 immune response (T-cell costimulatory molecules and use of a viral vector), it is not surprising that less than 0.6% of patients (2/349) tested have evidence of PSA antibody induction following vaccine. This suggests that post-vaccine PSA kinetics were not affected by PSA antibodies. An ongoing phase III study will evaluate the systemic immune responses and correlation with clinical outcomes. PMID:24778277

  2. Lifestyle and Clinical Health Behaviors and PSA Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Cynthia; McFall, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the association of lifestyle and clinical health behaviors with prostate specific antigen (PSA) tests. The study used cross-sectional data from the 2002 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). We used Stata 8.0 to take into account the complex sample design in analyses. Both lifestyle and clinical health behaviors…

  3. PSA Screening Has Led to Overtreatment of Many Prostate Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Screening for prostate cancer with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test has led to overtreatment of many prostate cancers, including aggressive treatments in older men considered to be at low risk for progression of the disease according to a study published in the July 26, 2010 Archives of Internal Medicine.

  4. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. PMID:27338097

  5. Development of the IPRO-zone for fire PSA and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, D. I.; Han, S. H.

    2012-07-01

    A PSA analyst has been manually determining fire-induced component failure modes and modeling them into the PSA logics. These can be difficult and time-consuming tasks as they need much information and many events are to be modeled. KAERI has been developing the IPRO-ZONE (interface program for constructing zone effect table) to facilitate fire PSA works for identifying and modeling fire-induced component failure modes, and to construct a one top fire event PSA model. With the output of the IPRO-ZONE, the AIMS-PSA, and internal event one top PSA model, one top fire events PSA model is automatically constructed. The outputs of the IPRO-ZONE include information on fire zones/fire scenarios, fire propagation areas, equipment failure modes affected by a fire, internal PSA basic events corresponding to fire-induced equipment failure modes, and fire events to be modeled. This paper introduces the IPRO-ZONE, and its application results to fire PSA of Ulchin Unit 3 and SMART(System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor). (authors)

  6. Nonprostatic sources of prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Diamandis, E P; Yu, H

    1997-05-01

    The name prostate-specific antigen has been given to a protein that now is known not to be prostate-specific; however, prostatic tissue does produces extremely high levels of PSA and secrets it into the seminal plasma. Seminal plasma contains about 1 million micrograms/L of PSA and is the richest source of PSA reported. The biologic fluid with the second highest PSA concentration, however, is nipple aspirate fluid from the female breast (up to about 5000 micrograms/L), and the third is milk from lactating women (up to 300 micrograms/L). Male serum PSA is usually less than 4 micrograms/L. In nonprostatic tissues, PSA exists mainly in its free molecular form, but PSA-ACT complex is also present in most of the fluids that contain PSA, such as breast secretions and amniotic fluid. The gene expression and protein production of PSA in nonprostatic tissues are under the regulation of steroid hormones via their receptors. Androgens, glucocorticoids, and progestins up-regulate the PSA gene expression, resulting in an increase of protein production. Estrogen by itself seems to have no effect on PSA regulation, but it can impair PSA production induced by androgen. It remains unknown whether PSA is enzymatically active and what is the physiologic role of PSA in nonprostatic tissues. It is speculated that PSA may be involved in the regulation of growth factors. Measuring PSA in breast cancer cytosol, breast-nipple aspirate fluid, and female serum may have potential clinical utilities, including breast cancer prognosis, breast cancer risk assessment, and evaluation of androgen excess. Further studies are needed to identify the exact function and regulation of PSA in nonprostatic tissues and to explore the clinical application of this protein. PMID:9126224

  7. Early detection, PSA screening, and management of overdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Borza, Tudor; Konijeti, Ramdev; Kibel, Adam S

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment rates have increased significantly since the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening. Although it was initially thought that most prostate cancers would lead to death or significant morbidity, recent randomized trials have demonstrated that many patients with screening-detected cancer will not die of their disease. Modifications to PSA screening, screening guideline statements, and novel screening markers have been developed to minimize the risk and morbidity associated with overdiagnosis and overtreatment. Less aggressive management strategies such as active surveillance may lead to lower treatment rates in men who are unlikely to benefit while maintaining cure rates. PMID:24188254

  8. Patients treated with radical prostatectomy with positive digital rectal examination findings in the intermediate-risk group are prone to PSA recurrence

    PubMed Central

    FURUBAYASHI, NOBUKI; NEGISHI, TAKAHITO; URA, SHINTARO; MUTAGUCHI, JUN; TAGUCHI, KENICHI; SHIMOKAWA, MOTOTSUGU; NAKAMURA, MOTONOBU

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the possibility of performing radical prostatectomy (RP) alone to achieve a radical cure for prostate cancer in the intermediate-risk group. Samples were collected from 638 Japanese patients who underwent antegrade RP between August 1998 and May 2013; subsequently, 157 patients were excluded. According to the D'Amico criteria, the low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups comprised 107, 222 and 152 patients, respectively. The 5-year prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure-free survival rates in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 96.5, 88.9 and 72.6%, respectively (P<0.001; degrees of freedom=2). In the intermediate-risk group, the difference in PSA failure-free survival between the 0PSA failure-free survival between the clinical tumor stage (cT)1c and cT2a/b groups was statistically significant based on the log-rank test (P<0.0001). The results of the multivariate analysis revealed that, of the preoperative characteristics, only the cT was a significant predictor in patients with and without PSA failure (P<0.001). Therefore, patients classified into the intermediate-risk group with cT2a/b stage, according to positive digital rectal examination findings, and are not considered to be likely to achieve a complete cure with RP surgery alone. In summary, for patients meeting these criteria in the intermediate-risk group, RP surgery alone is likely to be insufficient, and other additional treatments may be considered subsequent to RP. PMID:27313711

  9. Effect of Body mass index on the performance characteristics of PSA-related markers to detect prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yao; Han, Cheng-Tao; Zhang, Gui-Ming; Liu, Fang; Ding, Qiang; Xu, Jian-Feng; Vidal, Adriana C.; Freedland, Stephen J.; Ng, Chi-Fai; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2016-01-01

    To examine whether the predictive performance of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and PSA-related markers for prostate cancer (PCa) is modified by body mass index (BMI). Patients with a PSA 2–10 ng/mL who underwent multicore prostate biopsies were recruited from three tertiary centers. Serum markers measured included total PSA (tPSA), free-to-total PSA (f/tPSA), p2PSA, percentage of p2PSA (%p2PSA), and prostate health index (PHI). The association between serum markers and PCa risk was assessed by logistic regression. Predictive performance for each marker was quantified using the area under the receiver operator curves (AUC). Among 516 men, 18.2% had PCa at biopsy. For all tested markers, their predictive value on PCa risk was lower in obese patients compared to normal weight patients. We found statistically significant interactions between BMI and tPSA (P = 0.0026) and p2PSA (P = 0.038). PHI achieved an AUC of 0.872 in normal weight patients and 0.745 in obese patients, which outperformed the other predictors regardless of BMI category. In conclusion, PHI achieved the best predictive performance for detecting PCa and was not influenced by BMI. PMID:26754552

  10. Early Prediction of Therapy Response to Abiraterone Acetate Using PSA Subforms in Patients with Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schlack, Katrin; Krabbe, Laura-Maria; Fobker, Manfred; Schrader, Andres Jan; Semjonow, Axel; Boegemann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic ability of early changes of total prostate specific antigen (tPSA), free PSA (fPSA), [-2]proPSA and the Prostate Health Index (PHI) following initiation of Abiraterone-therapy in men with castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). In 25 patients, PSA-subforms were analyzed before and at 8-12 weeks under therapy as prognosticators of progression-free-survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Comparing patients with a PFS < vs. ≥12 months by using Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon Tests, the relative-median-change of tPSA (-0.1% vs. -86.8%; p = 0.02), fPSA (12.1% vs. -55.3%; p = 0.03) and [-2]proPSA (8.1% vs. -59.3%; p = 0.05) differed significantly. For men with ≤ vs. >15 months of OS there was a non-significant trend for a difference in the relative-median-change of fPSA (17.0% vs. -46.3%; p = 0.06). In Kaplan-Meier analyses, declining fPSA and [-2]proPSA were associated with a longer median PFS (13 months, 95% confidence interval (CI): 9.6-16.4 vs. 10 months, 95% CI: 3.5-16.5; p = 0.11), respectively. Correspondingly, decreasing fPSA and [-2]proPSA values indicated an OS of 32 months (95% CI: not reached (NR)) compared to 21 months in men with rising values (95% CI: 7.7-34.3; p = 0.14), respectively. We concluded that the addition of fPSA- and [-2]proPSA-changes to tPSA-information might be further studied as potential markers of early Abiraterone response in mCRPC patients. PMID:27618028

  11. Recognizing False Biochemical Failure Calls After Radiation With or Without Neo-Adjuvant Androgen Deprivation for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, James W. Kumar, Mahesh; Gleeson, Paul S.; Lamb, David S.; Joseph, David FRANZCR.; Atkinson, Chris FRANZCR.; Matthews, John FRANZCR.; Tai, K.-H.; Spry, Nigel A.; Christie, David; Turner, Sandra FRANZCR.; Greer, Peter B.; D'Este, Catherine; Steigler, Allison

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: We studied prostate-specific antigen (PSA) changes after radiation with or without neoadjuvant androgen deprivation to determine posttreatment PSA scenarios in which false-positive biochemical failures (FPBF) are most likely to occur. Methods and Materials: In the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology 96.01 Group trial, patients with T2b, 2c, 3, 4 N0 prostate cancer were randomized to 3 or 6 months goserelin and flutamide (STAD) before and during 66 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles (XRT) or to XRT alone. Piecewise longitudinal changes in PSA before relapse were characterized and quantified to determine which might cause FPBF calls. Results: Between 1996 and 2000, 802 eligible patients were randomized. Of these, 492 met the criteria for American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) failure and 467 for Phoenix failure. Seventy-seven ASTRO fails and 39 Phoenix fails were deemed false positives (FPs). The majority of FPBFs were associated with the 'plateauing' in PSA values that follow posttreatment nadir. FPBFs were particularly common in men treated with STAD, in whom small, consecutive PSA rises before or during this phenomenon triggered 56 FP ASTRO fail calls. In these men, the Phoenix fail criteria triggered only 15 FPBF calls. However, the Phoenix criteria were more vulnerable than ASTRO to short-term isolated PSA rises during plateau, which resulted in 15 Phoenix fail calls but only 3 FP ASTRO fails. Conclusions: The Phoenix definition avoided 50% of FPBF calls that occurred with the ASTRO definition. Failures should be confirmed by further PSA rises before investigation and treatment is considered.

  12. How Can Men Destined for Biochemical Failure After Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy Be Identified Earlier?

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ambrosio, David J.; Ruth, Karen; Horwitz, Eric M.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Pollack, Alan; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: The significance of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) increases during the recovery of androgen after androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and radiotherapy for prostate cancer is not well understood. This study sought to determine whether the initial PSA increase from undetectable after completion of all treatment predicts for eventual biochemical failure (BF). Methods and Materials: Between July 1992 and March 2004, 163 men with a Gleason score of 8-10 or initial PSA level >20 ng/mL, or Stage T3 prostate cancer were treated with radiotherapy (median dose, 76 Gy) and ADT and achieved an undetectable PSA level. The first detectable PSA level after the cessation of ADT was defined as the PSA sentinel rise (SR). A PSA-SR of >0.25, >0.5, >0.75, and >1.0 ng/mL was studied as predictors of BF (nadir plus 2 ng/mL). Cox proportional hazards models were used for univariate and multivariate analyses for BF adjusting for pretreatment differences in Gleason score, stage, PSA level (continuous), dose (continuous), and ADT duration (<12 vs. {>=}12 months). Results: Of the 163 men, 41 had BF after therapy. The median time to BF was 25 months (range, 4-96). The 5-year BF rate stratified by a PSA-SR of {<=}0.25 vs. >0.25 ng/mL was 28% vs. 43% (p = 0.02), {<=}0.5 vs. >0.5 ng/mL was 30% vs. 56% (p = 0.0003), {<=}0.75 vs. >0.75 ng/mL was 29% vs. 66% (p < 0.0001), and {<=}1.0 vs. >1.0 ng/mL was 29% vs. 75% (p < 0.0001). All four PSA-SRs were independently predictive of BF on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The PSA-SR predicts for BF. A PSA-SR of >0.5 ng/mL can be used for early identification of men at greater risk of BF.

  13. Prostate-specific antigen response rate of sequential chemotherapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer: the results of real life practice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Geehyun; Lee, Chunwoo; You, Dalsan; Jeong, In Gab; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Ahn, Hanjong; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response rate (>50% PSA decline in pretreatment PSA following chemotherapy) carries a significant survival advantage in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We compared PSA response rates in first-, second- and third-line chemotherapy after failure of previous chemotherapy according to chemotherapeutic agents. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the oncological outcomes and PSA response rates of 384 patients with CRPC, who were treated with chemotherapy and had histologically proven adenocarcinoma of the prostate with failure after androgen ablation therapy between 1991 and 2012, at Asan Medical Center. Results: In 384 eligible patients, the median age was 67.5 years. The median pretreatment PSA and initial Gleason scores at baseline were 92.4 ng/mL (range, 2.0 to 6,370 ng/mL) and 9 (range, 6 to 10), respectively. The time from first diagnosis of prostate cancer to CRPC was 23 months (range, 1 to 164 months). As first-line chemotherapy, 245 patients (63.8%) received estramustine, 91 (23.7%) received docetaxel, and 39 (10.2%) received mitoxantrone. The PSA response rates were 39.6%, 51.6%, and 46.2%, respectively. Of 169 patients with second-line chemotherapy, estramustine was 15 (8.9%), docetaxel was 84 (49.7%), and mitoxantrone was 52 (30.8%). PSA response rates were 57.1%, 52%, and 28.0%, respectively. Of 81 patients with third-line chemotherapy, estramustine was 18 (22.2%), docetaxel was 16 (19.8%), and mitoxantrone was 28 (34.6%). The PSA response rates were 41.2%, 53.8%, and 11.1%, respectively. Declines in serum PSA levels of at least 50% occurred more frequently after treatment with docetaxel than with other chemo-agents regardless of second-and third-line chemotherapy. Even in third-line chemothrapy, docetaxel maintained the PSA response rate, whereas the PSA response rate of other agents, including mitoxantrone, decreased in patients in whom prior therapy failed. Conclusions: Docetacel was the most

  14. PSA and beyond: alternative prostate cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of biomarkers for prostate cancer screening, diagnosis and prognosis has the potential to improve the clinical management of the patients. Owing to inherent limitations of the biomarker prostate-specific antigen (PSA), intensive efforts are currently directed towards a search for alternative prostate cancer biomarkers, particularly those that can predict disease aggressiveness and drive better treatment decisions. Methods A literature search of Medline articles focused on recent and emerging advances in prostate cancer biomarkers was performed. The most promising biomarkers that have the potential to meet the unmet clinical needs in prostate cancer patient management and/or that are clinically implemented were selected. Conclusions With the advent of advanced genomic and proteomic technologies, we have in recent years seen an enormous spurt in prostate cancer biomarker research with several promising alternative biomarkers being discovered that show an improved sensitivity and specificity over PSA. The new generation of biomarkers can be tested via serum, urine, or tissue-based assays that have either received regulatory approval by the US Food and Drug Administration or are available as Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-based laboratory developed tests. Additional emerging novel biomarkers for prostate cancer, including circulating tumor cells, microRNAs and exosomes, are still in their infancy. Together, these biomarkers provide actionable guidance for prostate cancer risk assessment, and are expected to lead to an era of personalized medicine. PMID:26790878

  15. Interval to Biochemical Failure Highly Prognostic for Distant Metastasis and Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality After Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Buyyounouski, Mark K. Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Pollack, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Few biochemical parameters have been related to mortality. The present study examined the clinical utility of the interval to biochemical failure (IBF) as a prognostic factor for distant metastasis (DM) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 211 T1c-T3Nx-N0M0 patients who had experienced BF among 1,174 men treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy alone. Biochemical failure was defined as a post-treatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of at, or greater than, the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify independent predictors of DM and PCSM on multivariate analysis. Results: An IBF of <18 months was independently predictive for DM (p = 0.008), as was a Gleason score of 7-10 (p = 0.0005), PSA nadir {>=}2 ng/mL (p = 0.04), and decreasing radiation dose (p = 0.02) on multivariate analysis, including increasing pretreatment PSA level, PSA nadir {>=}2.5 ng/mL, PSA doubling time of <3 months, and Stage T3 disease. An IBF of <18 months was the only predictor of PCSM (p = 0.0003) in the same model. The actuarial 5-year DM rate for an IBF of <18 vs. {>=}18 months was 52% vs. 20% (p < 0.0001), and the actuarial PCSM rate was 36% vs. 6%, respectively (p = 0.0001). Conclusions: The IBF is an important descriptor of the PSA kinetics after radiotherapy to identify men at high risk of clinical failure and death. A IBF of <18 months could aid in selecting men for early, aggressive salvage therapy or participation in a clinical trial.

  16. Incorporating Known Genetic Variants Does Not Improve the Accuracy of PSA Testing to Identify High Risk Prostate Cancer on Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Rebecca; Martin, Richard M.; Evans, David M.; Tilling, Kate; Davey Smith, George; Kemp, John P.; Lane, J. Athene; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Metcalfe, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing is a widely accepted screening method for prostate cancer, but with low specificity at thresholds giving good sensitivity. Previous research identified four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) principally associated with circulating PSA levels rather than with prostate cancer risk (TERT rs2736098, FGFR2 rs10788160, TBX3 rs11067228, KLK3 rs17632542). Removing the genetic contribution to PSA levels may improve the ability of the remaining biologically-determined variation in PSA to discriminate between high and low risk of progression within men with identified prostate cancer. We investigate whether incorporating information on the PSA-SNPs improves the discrimination achieved by a single PSA threshold in men with raised PSA levels. Materials and Methods Men with PSA between 3-10ng/mL and histologically-confirmed prostate cancer were categorised as high or low risk of progression (Low risk: Gleason score≤6 and stage T1-T2a; High risk: Gleason score 7–10 or stage T2C). We used the combined genetic effect of the four PSA-SNPs to calculate a genetically corrected PSA risk score. We calculated the Area under the Curve (AUC) to determine how well genetically corrected PSA risk scores distinguished men at high risk of progression from low risk men. Results The analysis includes 868 men with prostate cancer (Low risk: 684 (78.8%); High risk: 184 (21.2%)). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicate that including the 4 PSA-SNPs does not improve the performance of measured PSA as a screening tool for high/low risk prostate cancer (measured PSA level AU C = 59.5% (95% CI: 54.7,64.2) vs additionally including information from the 4 PSA-SNPs AUC = 59.8% (95% CI: 55.2,64.5) (p-value = 0.40)). Conclusion We demonstrate that genetically correcting PSA for the combined genetic effect of four PSA-SNPs, did not improve discrimination between high and low risk prostate cancer in men with raised PSA levels (3-10ng

  17. Active surveillance in patients with a PSA >10 ng/mL

    PubMed Central

    Toren, Paul; Wong, Lih-Ming; Timilshina, Narhari; Alibhai, Shabbir; Trachtenberg, John; Fleshner, Neil; Finelli, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in active surveillance (AS) for prostate cancer is controversial. Some consider it an unreliable marker and others as sufficient evidence to exclude patients from AS. We analyzed our cohort of AS patients with a PSA over 10 ng/mL. Methods: We included patients who had clinical T1c–T2a Gleason ≤6 disease, and ≤3 positive cores with ≤50% core involvement at diagnostic biopsy and ≥2 total biopsies. Patients were divided into 3 groups: (1) those with baseline PSA >10 ng/mL, (2) those with a PSA rise >10 ng/mL during follow-up; and (3) those with a PSA <10 ng/mL throughout AS. Adverse histology was defined as biopsy parameters exceeding the entry criteria limits. We further compared this cohort to a concurrent institutional cohort with equal biopsy parameters treated with immediate radical prostatectomy. Results: Our cohort included 698 patients with a median follow-up of 46.2 months. In total, 82 patients had a baseline PSA >10 ng/mL and 157 had a PSA rise >10 ng/mL during surveillance. No difference in adverse histology incidence was detected between groups (p = 0.3). Patients with a PSA greater than 10 were older and had higher prostate volumes. Hazard ratios for groups with a PSA >10 were protective against adverse histology. Larger prostate volume and minimal core involvement appear as factors related to this successful selection of patients to be treated with AS. Conclusion: These results suggest that a strict cut-off PSA value for all AS patients is unwarranted and may result in overtreatment. Though lacking long-term data and validation, AS appears safe in select patients with a PSA >10 ng/mL and low volume Gleason 6 disease. PMID:25408810

  18. PSA Decrease During Combined-Modality Radiotherapy Predicts for Treatment Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Kubicek, Gregory J.; Naguib, Marco; Redfield, Sandy; Grayback, Nola; Olszanski, Arthur; Dawson, George; Brown, Sam I.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the well-used marker in the diagnosis, prognosis, and follow-up for prostate cancer patients. Although reports have focused on the importance of pretreatment PSA levels, doubling time, and posttreatment nadirs, there is little information on the value of PSA during the course of radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of PSA values obtained midway through a course of radiotherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Patients had a PSA (midPSA) measured after a course of external beam radiation (EBRT) before planned transperineal low-dose-rate brachytherapy implant (LDR). Results: A total of 717 patients were analyzed with a median follow-up of 5.8 years, all censored patients had a minimum follow-up of 2 years. A total of 277 patients had low-risk disease, 267 patients had intermediate risk, and 173 patients had high-risk disease. Androgen blockade was used in 512 patients. A total of 653 patients had a midPSA decrease after EBRT, the median decrease was 6.2 ng/mL. Patients who had a midPSA decrease {>=}25% compared with pretreatment PSA had improved overall survival of 10.0 vs. 7.4 years (p < 0.0004) and improved disease-free survival of 9.8 vs. 7.3 years (p < 0.01). When stratified by use of androgen blockade, midPSA remained significant for both androgen and non-androgen patients. Conclusions: PSA response after EBRT before brachytherapy predicts for long-term outcome; this may allow for risk stratification and intervention with higher LDR doses to improve outcomes.

  19. [Value of serum PSA and PAP measurement with newly developed latex turbidimetric immunoassay].

    PubMed

    Akino, H; Tsuka, H; Okada, K; Tsuchiya, Y; Matsubara, M; Arimura, K

    1995-06-01

    Serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) and prostatic acid-phosphatase (PAP) levels in normal controls, and patients with prostate cancer, benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH) and other urological diseases were examined with a newly developed latex turbidimetric immunoassay (LPIA ACE PSA, LPIA ACE PAP, IATRON LABORATORIES, INC., Tokyo, Japan). The advantageous characteristics of this method are small amount (10 microliters) of serum required and short time (about 20 min.) for performing this assay. There was a high linear correlation between LPIA ACE PSA and MARKIT-F PA (r2 = 0.953), between LPIA ACE PSA and TANDEM-E PSA (r2 = 0.881) and between LPIA ACE PAP and ABBOTT-PAP EIA (r2 = 0.946). When the BPH patients (n = 110) were used as negative controls, the cut-off value of PSA was determined to be 4.3 ng/ml. Using this level as the cut-off value, the sensitivity was 78% (42 positive/54 untreated prostate cancer patients), specificity (negative rate in BPH patients) was 95% and efficiency was 89%. In a follow-up study of prostate cancer, the PSA value was elevated above the cut-off value in 68% at the time of clinical progression. These findings suggest that LPIA ACE PSA is a useful tool for serum PSA measurement. The cut-off value of PAP measured with LPIA ACE PAP was 9.0 ng/ml, which was determined by the same method as PSA. The sensitivity, specificity and efficiency ware 39%, 96% and 77%, respectively. These findings indicate that PAP is less useful than PSA in the diagnosis of prostate cancer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7544063

  20. Determining Interactions in PSA models: Application to a Space PSA

    SciTech Connect

    C. Smith; E. Borgonovo

    2010-06-01

    This paper addresses use of an importance measure interaction study of a probabilistic risk analysis (PSA) performed for a hypothetical aerospace lunar mission. The PSA methods used in this study follow the general guidance provided in the NASA Probabilistic Risk Assessment Procedures Guide for NASA Managers and Practitioners. For the PSA portion, we used phased-based event tree and fault tree logic structures are used to model a lunar mission, including multiple phases (from launch to return to the Earth surface) and multiple critical systems. Details of the analysis results are not provided in this paper – instead specific basic events are denoted by number (e.g., the first event is 1, the second is 2, and so on). However, in the model, we used approximately 150 fault trees and over 800 basic events. Following analysis and truncation of cut sets, we were left with about 400 basic events to evaluate. We used this model to explore interactions between different basic events and systems. These sensitivity studies provide high-level insights into features of the PSA for the hypothetical lunar mission.

  1. The PSA: Planetary Science Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelemy, Maud; Metselaar, Harold; Martinez, Santa; Heather, David; Vazquez, Jose Luis; Manaud, Nicolas; Ortiz, Iñaki; Arviset, Christophe; Osuna, Pedro

    2010-05-01

    Scientific and engineering data from ESA's planetary missions are made accessible to the world-wide scientific community via the Planetary Science Archive (PSA). The PSA consists of online services incorporating search, preview, download, notification and delivery basket functionality. Besides data from the GIOTTO spacecraft and several ground-based cometary observations, the PSA contains data from the Mars Express, Venus Express, Rosetta, and Huygens missions. Preparation for the release of data from the SMART-1 spacecraft is ongoing. The focus of the PSA activities is on the long-term preservation of data and knowledge from ESA's planetary missions. Scientific users can access the data online using several interfaces: - The Classical Interface allows complex parameter based queries, providing the end user with a facility to complete very specific searches on meta-data and geometrical parameters. By nature, this interface requires careful use and heavy interaction with the end-user to input and control the relevant search parameters. - The Map-based Interface is currently operational only for Mars Express HRCS and OMEGA data. This interface allows an end-user to specify a region-of-interest by dragging a box onto a base map of Mars. From this interface, it is possible to directly visualize query results. The Map-based and Classical interfaces are linked and cross-compatible. If a user defines a region-of-interest in the Map-based interface, the results can be refined by entering more detailed search parameters in the Classical interface. - The Dataset Browser Interface is designed for more experienced users, and allows for direct browsing and access of the data set content through ftp-tree search. Each dataset contains documentation and calibration information in addition to the scientific or engineering data. All data are prepared by the corresponding instrument teams, mostly located in Europe. PSA staff supports the instrument teams in the full archiving process

  2. The PSA: Planetary Science Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelemy, M.; Metselaar, H.; Martinez, S.; Heather, D.; Vazquez, J. L.; Wirth, K.; Manaud, N.; Ortiz, I.; Arviset, C.; Fernandez, M.

    2009-04-01

    Scientific and engineering data from ESA's planetary missions are made accessible to the world-wide scientific community via the Planetary Science Archive (PSA). The PSA consists of online services incorporating search, preview, download, notification and delivery basket functionality. Besides data from the GIOTTO spacecraft and several ground-based cometary observations, the PSA contains data from the Mars Express, Venus Express, Rosetta, and Huygens missions. Preparation for the release of data from the SMART-1 spacecraft is ongoing. The focus of the PSA activities is on the long-term preservation of data and knowledge from ESA's planetary missions. Scientific users can access the data online using several interfaces: The Classical Interface allows complex parameter based queries, providing the end user with a facility to complete very specific searches on meta-data and geometrical parameters. By nature, this interface requires careful use and heavy interaction with the end-user to input and control the relevant search parameters. The Map-based Interface is currently operational only for Mars Express HRCS and OMEGA data. This interface allows an end-user to specify a region-of-interest by dragging a box onto a base map of Mars. From this interface, it is possible to directly visualize query results. The Map-based and Classical interfaces are linked and cross-compatible. If a user defines a region-of-interest in the Map-based interface, the results can be refined by entering more detailed search parameters in the Classical interface. The Dataset Browser Interface is designed for more experienced users, and allows for direct browsing and access of the data set content through ftp-tree search. Each dataset contains documentation and calibration information in addition to the scientific or engineering data. All data are prepared by the corresponding instrument teams, mostly located in Europe. PSA staff supports the instrument teams in the full archiving process

  3. Prostate Specific Antigen Bounce Is Related to Overall Survival in Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hinnen, Karel A.; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Battermann, Jan J.; Roermund, Joep G.H. van; Frank, Steven J.; Vulpen, Marco van

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between prostate specific antigen (PSA) bounce and disease outcome after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 975 patients treated with {sup 125}I implantation monotherapy between 1992 and 2006. All patients had tumor Stage {<=}2c, Gleason score {<=}7 prostate cancer, a minimum follow-up of 2 years with at least four PSA measurements, and no biochemical failure in the first 2 years. Median follow-up was 6 years. Bounce was defined as a PSA elevation of +0.2 ng/mL with subsequent decrease to previous nadir. We used the Phoenix +2 ng/mL definition for biochemical failure. Additional endpoints were disease-specific and overall survival. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to adjust for potential confounding factors. Results: Bounce occurred in 32% of patients, with a median time to bounce of 1.6 years. More than 90% of bounces took place in the first 3 years after treatment and had disappeared within 2 years of onset. Ten-year freedom from biochemical failure, disease-specific survival, and overall survival rates were, respectively, 90%, 99%, and 88% for the bounce group and 70%, 93%, and 82% for the no-bounce group. Only 1 patient (0.3%) died of prostate cancer in the bounce group, compared with 40 patients (6.1%) in the no-bounce group. Adjusted for confounding, a 70% biochemical failure risk reduction was observed for patients experiencing a bounce (hazard ratio 0.31; 95% confidence interval 0.20-0.48). Conclusions: A PSA bounce after prostate brachytherapy is strongly related to better outcome in terms of biochemical failure, disease-specific survival, and overall survival.

  4. Evaluation of postradiotherapy PSA patterns and correlation with 10-year disease free survival outcomes for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, Michael J. . E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org; Ben-Porat, Leah; Chan, Heather M.; Fearn, Paul A.; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To describe the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) pattern profiles observed after external beam radiotherapy with and without short-term neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ST-ADT) and to report the association of established posttreatment PSA patterns with long-term disease-free survival outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,665 patients were treated with conformal external beam radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Of 570 patients who had the requisite >10 consecutive PSA measurements for statistical analysis, 194 patients received a median of 3 months of ADT before radiotherapy and 376 were treated with radiotherapy alone. The median follow up was 103 months. Results: In the group treated with ST-ADT, three distinct postradiotherapy PSA patterns were identified: a stable trend (44%), an increasing trend followed by stabilization of the PSA (25%), and an increasing trend (31%). Among the subgroup that demonstrated a rising and subsequent stabilizing patterns, PSA levels had gradually risen to a median value of 0.9 ng/mL after therapy, stabilized, and remained durably suppressed. The only identified trends among patients treated with external beam radiotherapy without ST-ADT were declining PSA levels followed by stable PSA trends or declining patterns followed by rising levels. Patients whose PSA levels stabilized after an initial rise or those with slowly rising PSA profiles had a lower incidence of distant metastasis compared to those with accelerated rises after therapy. Conclusions: For those treated with external beam radiotherapy in conjunction with ST-ADT, a significant percentage who develop a rising PSA after treatment are expected to manifest subsequent stabilization at plateaued levels of approximately 1.0 ng/mL, which can remain durably suppressed. The likelihood of distant metastasis in these patients is low despite the PSA stabilization at levels 1.0 ng/mL or higher and comparable to outcomes observed for those

  5. Effect of ejaculation on Serum Prostate-Specific Antigen concentration

    PubMed Central

    Tarhan, Fatih; Demir, Kadir; Orçun, Asuman; Madenci, Ozlem Cakır

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Abstract Purpose:To evaluate the effect of ejaculation on serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentrations in patients with lower urinary tract symptom (LUTS). Materials and Methods Our study includes 98 men (62 study and 36 control). After three days of sexual abstinence, blood samples were drawn for the measurement of baseline PSA levels. Then the patients were told to ejaculate. One, 5, 24 and 72 hours after ejaculation, serum total (tPSA), free (fPSA) and complexed PSA (cPSA) levels were measured. Serum PSA sampling was performed at the same intervals in the control group without ejaculation. Results The mean age in study and control groups patients were 59.03±0.99 years, 61.14±1.30 years, respectively. In the study group, changes in tPSA and fPSA levels after ejaculation were found statistically significant while changes in cPSA levels and f/tPSA ratios were not significant (p=0.016, p=0.0003, p=0.176, and p=0.173, respectively). Baseline values showed significant differences with 1st and 5th hours. No significant changes in tPSA, fPSA, cPSA levels and f/tPSA values were found in control group (p=0.223, p=0.224, p=0.444, and p=0.718, respectively). The changes in the number of patients exceeding the cutoff values after ejaculation were not statistically significant for tPSA, cPSA, and f/tPSA ratio. Conclusions In this study, ejaculation increased tPSA and fPSA concentrations but it didn’t have a significant effect on serum cPSA levels and f/tPSA ratios. However, recent ejaculation may affect the biopsy indication at least near cut off PSA values. Further studies are needed to explain the mechanisms of alterations in the concentration of PSA. PMID:27286109

  6. First-year PSA kinetics and minima after prostate cancer radiotherapy are predictive of overall survival

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Rex . E-mail: mrcheung@mdanderson.org; Tucker, Susan L.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: We analyzed whether first-year prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics and minima are predictive of overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: The data set contained 1,174 patients treated with external beam radiotherapy (RT) from 1987 to 2001. The relative rate of change ({lambda}) in post-RT PSA values during the first year (13.5 months) was computed using regression analysis of ln(PSA) vs. time. We also computed the PSA minimum (mPSA) reached during the same period. Recursive partitioning analysis was used to identify the relevant cutpoints for the factors being investigated for its association with survival: age, pretreatment PSA, radiation dose, relative rate of change in PSA post-RT, and 1-year PSA minimum. For each of the other factors stage, Gleason score and risk group, all possible cutpoints were considered in the multivariate analyses. Significant factors were considered in the multivariate analyses to identify independent predictors for overall survival. Results: The median value of {lambda} was -1.0 years{sup -1} (range, -11.0-5.1 years{sup -1}). The 1-year minimum had a median of 0.8 ng/mL (range, 0.01-30.9 ng/mL). Recursive partitioning analysis and Cox proportional hazards analyses identified the following pretreatment or treatment factors adversely related to OS: age, Gleason score, stage, and dose. First-year mPSA {>=} 4 ng/mL and {lambda} > 0 were post-RT independent prognostic factors for worse OS. Conclusion: First-year post-RT PSA kinetics and minima are early response parameters predictive of overall survival for prostate cancer patients. These factors may be useful in selecting patients for early salvage therapy.

  7. Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity Before and After Elimination of Factors That Can Confound the Prostate-Specific Antigen Level

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jessica J.; Chen, Ming-Hui; Loffredo, Marian; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) velocity, like PSA level, can be confounded. In this study, we estimated the impact that confounding factors could have on correctly identifying a patient with a PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y. Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2010, a total of 50 men with newly diagnosed PC comprised the study cohort. We calculated and compared the false-positive and false-negative PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y rates for all men and those with low-risk disease using two approaches to calculate PSA velocity. First, we used PSA values obtained within 18 months of diagnosis; second, we used values within 18 months of diagnosis, substituting the prebiopsy PSA for a repeat, nonconfounded PSA that was obtained using the same assay and without confounders. Results: Using PSA levels pre-biopsy, 46% of all men had a PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y; whereas this value declined to 32% when substituting the last prebiopsy PSA for a repeat, nonconfounded PSA using the same assay and without confounders. The false-positive rate for PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y was 43% as compared with a false-negative rate of PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y of 11% (p = 0.0008) in the overall cohort. These respective values in the low-risk subgroup were 60% and 16.7% (p = 0.09). Conclusion: This study provides evidence to explain the discordance in cancer-specific outcomes among groups investigating the prognostic significance of PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y, and highlights the importance of patient education on potential confounders of the PSA test before obtaining PSA levels.

  8. The PSA: Planetary Science Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelemy, M.; Martinez, S.; Heather, D.; Vazquez, J. L.; Arviset, C.; Osuna, P.; PSA development Team

    2012-04-01

    Scientific and engineering data from ESA's planetary missions are made accessible to the world-wide scientific community via the Planetary Science Archive (PSA). The PSA consists of online services incorporating search, preview, download, notification and delivery basket functionality. Besides data from the GIOTTO spacecraft and several ground-based cometary observations, the PSA contains data from the Mars Express, Venus Express, Rosetta, SMART-1 and Huygens missions. The focus of the PSA activities is on the long-term preservation of data and knowledge from ESA's planetary missions. Scientific users can access the data online using several interfaces: - The Advanced Search Interface allows complex parameter based queries, providing the end user with a facility to complete very specific searches on meta-data and geometrical parameters. By nature, this interface requires careful use and heavy interaction with the end-user to input and control the relevant search parameters. - The Map-based Interface is currently operational only for Mars Express HRCS and OMEGA data. This interface allows an end-user to specify a region-of-interest by dragging a box onto a base map of Mars. From this interface, it is possible to directly visualize query results. The Map-based and Advanced interfaces are linked and cross-compatible. If a user defines a region-of-interest in the Map-based interface, the results can be refined by entering more detailed search parameters in the Advanced interface. - The FTP Browser Interface is designed for more experienced users, and allows for direct browsing and access of the data set content through ftp-tree search. Each dataset contains documentation and calibration information in addition to the scientific or engineering data. All data are prepared by the corresponding instrument teams, mostly located in Europe. PSA supports the instrument teams in the full archiving process, from the definition of the data products, meta-data and product labels

  9. High-sensitivity detection of PSA by time-resolved fluorometry with Europium chelate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahm, Kie B.; Jeong, Jin H.; Kim, Byoung C.; Kim, Jae H.; Kim, Young M.; Jeong, Dong S.; Oh, Sang W.; Choi, Eui Y.; Ko, Dong S.

    2006-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an androgen-dependent glycoprotein protease (M.W. 33 kDa) and a member of kallikrein super-family of serine protease, and has chymotrypsin-like enzymatic activity. It is synthesized by the prostate epithelial cells and found in the prostate gland and seminal plasma as a major protein. It is widely used as a clinical marker for diagnosis, screening, monitoring and prognosis of prostate cancer. In normal male adults, the concentration of PSA in the blood is below 4 ng/ml and this value increases in patients with the prostate cancer or the benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) due to its leakage into the circulatory system. As such, systematic monitoring of the PSA level in the blood can provide critical information about the progress of the prostatic disease. We have fabricated a bread-board time resolved fluorescence system that could detect a concentration of Prostate Specific Antigen t-PSA) at clinically meaningful level in plasma as well as in whole blood sample. We chose Europium chelates as the fluorescence markers to attach to the PSA for its long decay lifetime and relative photostability. We have simplified the electronic circuits considerably by employing a MCS. With this setup, we have successfully proved that PSA concentration of 4pg/mL can be detected with acceptable reliability.

  10. PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer: Why Saying No is a High-Value Health Care Choice.

    PubMed

    Wilt, Timothy J; Dahm, Philipp

    2015-12-01

    Enthusiasm for cancer screening and treatment of screen-detected cancer has led to widespread prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, a marked increase in prostate cancer incidence, and high use of surgical, radiation, and androgen deprivation treatment for screen-detected disease. This has occurred in advance of a full understanding of the clinical and financial tradeoffs. Although questions remain whether lifetime benefits outweigh harms and costs, data indicate that this balance is not favorable through at least 15 years. This article outlines a conceptual framework for determining the value of screening strategies according to screening and treatment intensity. We describe 4 main cancer screening goals and examine whether PSA screening and treatment achieve these goals and thus provide high-value care. Available evidence demonstrates that PSA screening provides at best a small reduction in prostate cancer mortality, and no reduction in all-cause mortality. High-intensity PSA screening and treatment currently practiced in the United States result in substantial harms and large health care expenditures-it is low-value care. The health importance of prostate cancer and the financial costs to patients and society require improved detection and treatment strategies that produce greater value to patients. We propose lower-intensity, higher-value options. However, until evidence supports a higher-value alternative to current PSA screening strategies, physicians should recommend against PSA screening, policymakers should encourage reduced screening, and most men should say no to the PSA test. PMID:26656523

  11. Prostate-specific antigen nadir after high-dose-rate brachytherapy predicts long-term survival outcomes in high-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Takefumi; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Komori, Shouko; Sekiguchi, Akane; Ikeda, Masaomi; Kurosaka, Shinji; Fujita, Tetsuo; Kitano, Masashi; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prognostic value of prostate-specific antigen nadir (nPSA) after high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in clinically non-metastatic high-risk prostate cancer patients. Material and methods Data from 216 patients with high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer who underwent HDR brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy with long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) between 2003 and 2008 were analyzed. The median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at diagnosis was 24 ng/ml (range: 3-338 ng/ml). The clinical stage was T1c-2a in 55 cases (26%), T2b-2c in 48 (22%), T3a in 75 (35%), and T3b-4 in 38 (17%). The mean dose to 90% of the planning target volume was 6.3 Gy/fraction of HDR brachytherapy. After 5 fractions, external beam radiation therapy with 10 fractions of 3 Gy was administered. All patients initially underwent neoadjuvant ADT for at least 6 months, and adjuvant ADT was continued for 36 months. The median follow-up was 7 years from the start of radiotherapy. Results The 7-year PSA relapse-free rate among patients with a post-radiotherapy nPSA level of ≤ 0.02 ng/ml was 94%, compared with 23% for patients with higher nPSA values (HR = 28.57; 95% CI: 12.04-66.66; p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the nPSA value after radiotherapy was a significant independent predictor of biochemical failure, whereas pretreatment predictive values for worse biochemical control including higher level of initial PSA, Gleason score ≥ 8, positive biopsy core rate ≥ 67%, and T3b-T4, failed to reach independent predictor status. The 7-year cancer-specific survival rate among patients with a post-radiotherapy nPSA level of ≤ 0.02 ng/ml was 99%, compared with 82% for patients with higher nPSA values (HR = 32.25; 95% CI: 3.401-333.3; p = 0.002). Conclusions A post-radiotherapy nPSA value of ≤ 0.02 ng/ml was associated with better long-term biochemical tumor control even if patients had pretreatment predictive values for worse

  12. Free Prostate-Specific Antigen Provides More Precise Data on Benign Prostate Volume Than Total Prostate-Specific Antigen in Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon; Park, Jae Young; Shim, Ji Sung; Kim, Jae Heon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy of total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA) and free prostate-specific antigen (fPSA) for the estimation of prostate volume (PV) in pathologically-proven benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients. Methods From January 2010 to March 2013, 165 Korean men with a PSA less than 10 ng/mL who were diagnosed without prostate cancer by prostate biopsy were enrolled. Patients were classified into three age groups: ≤60, 61-70, and >70 years old. The results were organized to estimate and compare the ability of serum tPSA and fPSA to assess the PV. Results Enrolled patients had a median age of 63.5 years (44 to 80), a median tPSA of 5.72 ng/mL, a median fPSA of 0.98 ng/mL and a median PV of 53.68 mL, respectively. Among the associations between tPSA, fPSA, age, and PV, the highest correlation was verified between fPSA and PV (r=0.377, P<0.0001); the correlation coefficient between tPSA and PV was much lower (r=0.262, P<0.001). All stratified age cohorts showed the same findings. The ROC curves (for PV greater than 30, 40, and 50 mL) showed that fPSA (area under the curve [AUC]=0.781, 0.718, and 0.700) outperformed tPSA (AUC=0.657, 0.583, and 0.67) in its ability to predict clinically significant PV enlargement. Conclusion Both tPSA and fPSA significantly correlated with PV in Korean men, while the correlation efficiency between fPSA and PV was more powerful. fPSA may be a useful tool in making therapeutic decisions and follow-up management in BPH patients. PMID:23869271

  13. Percent free prostate-specific antigen is effective to predict prostate biopsy outcome in Chinese men with prostate-specific antigen between 10.1 and 20.0 ng ml−1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Zhou, Li-Qun; Cai, Xiao-Bing; Xie, Li-Ping; Huang, Yi-Ran; He, Da-Lin; Gao, Xu; Xu, Chuan-Liang; Ding, Qiang; Wei, Qiang; Yin, Chang-Jun; Ren, Shan-Cheng; Wang, Fu-Bo; Tian, Ye; Sun, Zhong-Quan; Fu, Qiang; Ma, Lu-Lin; Zheng, Jun-Hua; Ye, Zhang-Qun; Ye, Ding-Wei; Xu, Dan-Feng; Hou, Jian-Quan; Xu, Ke-Xin; Yuan, Jian-Lin; Gao, Xin; Liu, Chun-Xiao; Pan, Tie-Jun; Sun, Ying-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Percent free prostatic-specific antigen (%fPSA) has been introduced as a tool to avoid unnecessary biopsies in patients with a serum PSA level of 4.0–10.0 ng ml−1, however, it remains controversial whether %fPSA is effective in PSA range of 10.1–20.0 ng ml−1 in both Chinese and Western population. In this study, the diagnostic performance of %fPSA and serum PSA in predicting prostate cancer (PCa) and high-grade PCa (HGPCa) was analyzed in a multi-center biopsy cohort of 5915 consecutive Chinese patients who underwent prostate biopsy in 22 hospitals across China from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2013. The indication for biopsy was PSA>4.0 ng ml−1 or/and suspicious digital rectal examination. Total and free serum PSA determinations were performed by three types of electrochemiluminescence immunoassays with recalibration to the World Health Organization standards. The diagnostics accuracy of PSA, %fPSA and %fPSA in combination with PSA (%fPSA + PSA) was determined by the area under the receivers operating characteristic curve (AUC). %fPSA was more effective than PSA in men aged ≥60 years old. The AUC was 0.584 and 0.635 in men aged ≥60 years old with a PSA of 4.0–10.0 ng ml−1 and 10.1–20.0 ng ml−1, respectively. The AUC of %fPSA was superior to that of PSA in predicting HGPCa in patients ≥60 years old in these two PSA range. Our results indicated that %fPSA is both statistically effective and clinical applicable to predict prostate biopsy outcome in Chinese patients aged ≥60 years old with a PSA of 4.0–10.0 ng ml−1 and 10.1–20.0 ng ml−1. PMID:25926603

  14. Predicting Post-External Beam Radiation Therapy PSA Relapse of Prostate Cancer Using Pretreatment MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchsjaeger, Michael H.; Pucar, Darko; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Zhang Zhigang; Mo Qianxing; Ben-Porat, Leah S.; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Wang Liang; Reuter, Victor E.; Hricak, Hedvig

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether pretreatment endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings can predict biochemical relapse in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and January 2002, 224 patients (median age, 69 years; age range, 45-82 years) with biopsy-proven prostate cancer underwent endorectal MRI before high-dose ({>=}81Gy) EBRT. The value of multiple clinical and MRI variables in predicting prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse at 5 years was determined by use of univariate and multivariate stepwise Cox regression. Clinical variables included pretreatment PSA, clinical T stage, Gleason score, use of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, and radiation dose. Magnetic resonance imaging variables, derived from retrospective consensus readings by two radiologists, were used to measure intraprostatic and extraprostatic tumor burden. Results: After a median follow-up of 67 months, PSA relapse developed in 37 patients (16.5%). The significant predictors of PSA relapse on univariate analysis were pretreatment PSA, clinical T stage, and multiple MRI variables, including MRI TN stage score; extracapsular extension (ECE) status; number of sextants involved by ECE, all lesions, or index (dominant) lesion; apical involvement; and diameter and volume of index lesion. Pretreatment PSA and ECE status were the only significant independent predictors on multivariate analysis (p < 0.05 for both). Extracapsular extension status was associated with the highest hazard ratio, 3.04; 5-year PSA relapse rates were 7% for no ECE, 20% for unilateral ECE, and 48% for bilateral ECE. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging findings can be used to predict post-EBRT PSA relapse, with ECE status on MRI and pretreatment PSA being significant independent predictors of this endpoint.

  15. Efficacy of Salvage Radiotherapy Plus 2-Year Androgen Suppression for Postradical Prostatectomy Patients With PSA Relapse

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, Richard; Danjoux, Cyril; Gardner, Sandra; Morton, Gerard; Szumacher, Ewa; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Cheung, Patrick; Pearse, Maria

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a combined approach of radiotherapy (RT) plus 2-year androgen suppression (AS) as salvage treatment for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: Seventy-five patients with PSA relapse after RP were treated with salvage RT plus 2-year AS, as per a pilot, prospective study. AS started within 1 month after completion of salvage RT and consisted of nilutamide for 4 weeks and buserelin acetate depot subcutaneously every 2 months for 2 years. Relapse-free rate including freedom from PSA relapse was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. PSA relapse was defined as a PSA rise above 0.2 ng/mL with two consecutive increases over a minimum of 3 months. A Cox regression analysis was performed to evaluate prognostic factors for relapse. Results: Median age of the cohort was 63 years at the time of salvage RT. Median follow-up from salvage RT was 6.4 years. All achieved initially complete PSA response (< 0.2) with the protocol treatment. Relapse-free rate including the freedom from PSA relapse was 91.5% at 5 years and 78.6% at 7 years. Overall survival rate was 93.2% at both 5 and 7 years. On Cox regression analysis, pT3 stage and PSA relapse less than 2 years after RP were significant prognostic factors for relapse. Conclusion: The combined treatment of salvage RT plus 2-year AS yielded an encouraging result for patients with PSA relapse after RP and needs a confirmatory study.

  16. PSA Velocity Does Not Improve Prostate Cancer Detection | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    A rapid increase in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels is not grounds for automatically recommending a prostate biopsy, according to a study published online February 24 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. |

  17. Infographic: Benefits and Harms of PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    As more has been learned about the benefits and harms of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, organizations have begun to recommend against routine screening. Screening is a personal decision that, according to most experts, a man should make in consultation with his doctor, after he has been informed in detail about the potential benefits and harms. |

  18. Urine TMPRSS2:ERG fusion transcript stratifies prostate cancer risk in men with elevated serum PSA

    PubMed Central

    Tomlins, Scott A.; Aubin, Sheila M. J.; Siddiqui, Javed; Lonigro, Robert J.; Sefton-Miller, Laurie; Miick, Siobhan; Williamsen, Sarah; Hodge, Petrea; Meinke, Jessica; Blase, Amy; Penabella, Yvonne; Day, John R.; Varambally, Radhika; Han, Bo; Wood, David; Wang, Lei; Sanda, Martin G.; Rubin, Mark A.; Rhodes, Daniel R.; Hollenbeck, Brent; Sakamoto, Kyoko; Silberstein, Jonathan L.; Fradet, Yves; Amberson, James B.; Meyers, Stephanie; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Rittenhouse, Harry; Wei, John T.; Groskopf, Jack; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2011-01-01

    More than 1,000,000 men undergo prostate biopsy each year in the United States, most for “elevated” serum prostate specific antigen (PSA). Given the lack of specificity and unclear mortality benefit of PSA testing, methods to individualize management of elevated PSA are needed. Greater than 50% of PSA-screened prostate cancers harbor fusions between the transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2) and v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (avian) (ERG) genes. Here, we report a clinical-grade, transcription-mediated amplification assay to risk stratify and detect prostate cancer noninvasively in urine. The TMPRSS2:ERG fusion transcript was quantitatively measured in prospectively collected whole urine from 1312 men at multiple centers. Urine TMPRSS2:ERG was associated with indicators of clinically significant cancer at biopsy and prostatectomy, including tumor size, high Gleason score at prostatectomy, and upgrading of Gleason grade at prostatectomy. TMPRSS2:ERG, in combination with urine prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3), improved the performance of the multivariate Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial risk calculator in predicting cancer on biopsy. In the biopsy cohorts, men in the highest and lowest of three TMPRSS2:ERG+PCA3 score groups had markedly different rates of cancer, clinically significant cancer by Epstein criteria, and high-grade cancer on biopsy. Our results demonstrate that urine TMPRSS2:ERG, in combination with urine PCA3, enhances the utility of serum PSA for predicting prostate cancer risk and clinically relevant cancer on biopsy. PMID:21813756

  19. Tumour and immune cell dynamics explain the PSA bounce after prostate cancer brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Offord, Chetan P; Kimura, Go; Kuribayashi, Shigehiko; Takeda, Hayato; Tsuchiya, Shinichi; Shimojo, Hisashi; Kanno, Hiroyuki; Bozic, Ivana; Nowak, Martin A; Bajzer, Željko; Dingli, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interstitial brachytherapy for localised prostate cancer may be followed by transient increases in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) that resolve without therapy. Such PSA bounces may be associated with an improved outcome but often cause alarm in the patient and physician, and have defied explanation. Methods: We developed a mathematical model to capture the interactions between the tumour, radiation and anti-tumour immune response. The model was fitted to data from a large cohort of patients treated exclusively with interstitial brachytherapy. Immunohistological analysis for T-cell infiltration within the same tumours was also performed. Results: Our minimal model captures well the dynamics of the tumour after therapy, and suggests that a strong anti-tumour immune response coupled with the therapeutic effect of radiation on the tumour is responsible for the PSA bounce. Patients who experience a PSA bounce had a higher density of CD3 and CD8 cells within the tumour that likely contribute to the PSA bounce and the overall better outcomes observed. Conclusions: Our observations provide a novel and unifying explanation for the PSA bounce in patients with early prostate cancer and also have implications for the use of immune-based therapies in such patients to improve outcomes. PMID:27404586

  20. PSA doubling time kinetics during prostate cancer biochemical relapse after external beam radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Andrew Tom . E-mail: andrew.bates@doctors.org.uk; Pickles, Tom; Paltiel, Chuck

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether prostate-specific antigen PSA doubling time (PSADT) is constant in men with biochemical prostate cancer relapse after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 513 men treated radically with EBRT, with or without androgen ablation (AA), between 1993 and 2000, developed biochemical relapse. The slope of the ln (PSA) vs. time graph is calculated for the first two values after PSA nadir (first slope), the last two recorded PSAs (last slope), and all values excluding the first and final PSA (mid slope). Differences in these slopes were compared statistically with subgroup analysis for AA and secondary intervention. Results: For men treated with EBRT and AA first slope was faster than either mid slope (p = 0.031) or last slope (p < 0.001). Men treated with EBRT alone had no change in PSADT over time unless they subsequently received secondary intervention. This group had a more rapid last slope compared with mid slope (p < 0.001). Conclusions: PSA initially rises more rapidly after AA cessation, probably because of testosterone recovery. A subgroup of patients, who received secondary intervention after treatment with radiotherapy alone, showed a change in PSADT, to a faster velocity. This greater than constant exponential PSA growth is presumably the catalyst for secondary intervention. Otherwise, PSADT did not change during prostate cancer biochemical relapse.

  1. Outcome After Conformal Salvage Radiotherapy in Patients With Rising Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels After Radical Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Geinitz, Hans; Riegel, Martina G.; Thamm, Reinhard; Astner, Sabrina T.; Lewerenz, Carolin; Zimmermann, Frank; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: This study attempts to improve our understanding of the role of salvage radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse after radical prostatectomy with regard to biochemical control, rate of distant metastasis, and survival. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of 96 men treated with conformal prostate bed SRT (median, 64.8 Gy) at a single institution (median follow-up, 70 months). The majority had intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. Fifty-four percent underwent a resection with positive margins (R1 resection). The median time interval between surgery and SRT was 22 months. Results: After SRT, 66% of patients reached a PSA nadir of less than 0.2 ng/mL. However, the 5-year biochemical no evidence of disease rate was 35%. Seminal vesicle involvement was predictive for a significantly lower biochemical no evidence of disease rate. All patients with a preoperative PSA level greater than 50 ng/mL relapsed biochemically within 2 years. The 5-year distant metastasis rate was 18%, the 5-year prostate cancer-specific survival rate was 90%, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 88%. Significantly more distant metastases developed in patients with a PSA nadir greater than 0.05 ng/mL after SRT, and they had significantly inferior prostate cancer-specific and overall survival rates. Resection status (R1 vs. R0) was not predictive for any of the endpoints. Conclusions: Men with postoperative PSA relapse can undergo salvage treatment by prostate bed radiotherapy, but durable PSA control is maintained only in about one-third of the patients. Despite a high biochemical failure rate after SRT, prostate cancer-specific survival does not decrease rapidly.

  2. Exosome targeting of tumor antigens expressed by cancer vaccines can improve antigen immunogenicity and therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rountree, Ryan B; Mandl, Stefanie J; Nachtwey, James M; Dalpozzo, Katie; Do, Lisa; Lombardo, John R; Schoonmaker, Peter L; Brinkmann, Kay; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Laus, Reiner; Delcayre, Alain

    2011-08-01

    MVA-BN-PRO (BN ImmunoTherapeutics) is a candidate immunotherapy product for the treatment of prostate cancer. It encodes 2 tumor-associated antigens, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), and is derived from the highly attenuated modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus stock known as MVA-BN. Past work has shown that the immunogenicity of antigens can be improved by targeting their localization to exosomes, which are small, 50- to 100-nm diameter vesicles secreted by most cell types. Exosome targeting is achieved by fusing the antigen to the C1C2 domain of the lactadherin protein. To test whether exosome targeting would improve the immunogenicity of PSA and PAP, 2 additional versions of MVA-BN-PRO were produced, targeting either PSA (MVA-BN-PSA-C1C2) or PAP (MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2) to exosomes, while leaving the second transgene untargeted. Treatment of mice with MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2 led to a striking increase in the immune response against PAP. Anti-PAP antibody titers developed more rapidly and reached levels that were 10- to 100-fold higher than those for mice treated with MVA-BN-PRO. Furthermore, treatment with MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2 increased the frequency of PAP-specific T cells 5-fold compared with mice treated with MVA-BN-PRO. These improvements translated into a greater frequency of tumor rejection in a PAP-expressing solid tumor model. Likewise, treatment with MVA-BN-PSA-C1C2 increased the antigenicity of PSA compared with treatment with MVA-BN-PRO and resulted in a trend of improved antitumor efficacy in a PSA-expressing tumor model. These experiments confirm that targeting antigen localization to exosomes is a viable approach for improving the therapeutic potential of MVA-BN-PRO in humans. PMID:21670078

  3. Prostate-Specific Antigen and Perfluoroalkyl Acids in the C8 Health Study Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianjun; Fan, Hongmin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To inform questions raised by inconsistent findings regarding an association between perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and prostate cancer by assessing the relationship of PFAAs in human serum to prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Materials and Methods: Using 2005 to 2006 survey data from a large survey population, we compared serum PFAA concentrations in adult males with PSA concentrations adjusted for risk factors including age, body mass index, smoking status, and socioeconomic status. Results: Perfluoroalkyl acids are not consistently associated with PSA concentration in general, or with PSA more than 4.0. Discussion: These findings do not provide evidence that PFAA exposure is associated with PSA. PMID:25563548

  4. Cutting edge: Failure of antigen-specific CD4+ T cell recruitment to the kidney during systemic candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Rebecca A; Wallace, Carol; Reid, Delyth M; Way, Sing Sing; Kaplan, Daniel H; Brown, Gordon D

    2014-12-01

    Candida albicans is the leading cause of systemic candidiasis, a fungal disease associated with high mortality and poor treatment options. The kidney is the target organ during infection and whose control is largely dependent on innate immunity, because lymphocytes appear redundant for protection. In this article, we show that this apparent redundancy stems from a failure of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells to migrate into infected kidneys. In contrast, Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells are recruited normally. Using Ag-loaded immunoliposomes to artificially reverse this defective migration, we show that recruited Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells polarize toward a Th17 phenotype in the kidney and are protective during fungal infection. Therefore, our data explain the redundancy of CD4(+) T cells for defense against systemic infection with C. albicans and have important implications for our understanding of antifungal immunity and the control of renal infections. PMID:25344471

  5. Clinical outcomes of anti-androgen withdrawal and subsequent alternative anti-androgen therapy for advanced prostate cancer following failure of initial maximum androgen blockade

    PubMed Central

    MOMOZONO, HIROYUKI; MIYAKE, HIDEAKI; TEI, HIROMOTO; HARADA, KEN-ICHI; FUJISAWA, MASATO

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the significance of anti-androgen withdrawal and/or subsequent alternative anti-androgen therapy in patients with advanced prostate cancer (PC) who relapsed after initial maximum androgen blockade (MAB). The present study evaluated the clinical outcomes of 272 consecutive advanced PC patients undergoing anti-androgen withdrawal and/or subsequent alternative anti-androgen therapy with flutamide following the failure of initial MAB using bicalutamide. With the exception of 41 patients (15.1%) who did not undergo anti-androgen withdrawal due to the characteristics of PC suggesting aggressive diseases, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) declined from the baseline value in 83 patients (35.9%), including 18 (7.8%) with PSA decline >50%, but not in the remaining 148 (64.1%). No significant difference in the overall survival (OS) or cancer-specific survival (CSS) among the three groups was observed based on the response to anti-androgen withdrawal. Following the introduction of alternative anti-androgen therapy with flutamide, PSA decline was observed in 185 patients (68.0%), including 103 (37.9%) who achieved a PSA reduction of >50%; however, the PSA level continued to elevate in the remaining 87 (32.0%). Furthermore, of the numerous factors examined, only the duration of the initial MAB therapy was shown to be significantly correlated with the PSA decline following alternative anti-androgen therapy. Multivariate analysis of several factors identified revealed that only PSA decline following alternative anti-androgen therapy was an independent predictor of CSS and OS. If initial MAB is effective, the introduction of alternative anti-androgen therapy may be considered; however, anti-androgen withdrawal should be omitted, irrespective of the characteristics of advanced PC. PMID:27123292

  6. HOXB13 overexpression is an independent predictor of early PSA recurrence in prostate cancer treated by radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zabalza, Cristina Villares; Adam, Meike; Burdelski, Christoph; Wilczak, Waldemar; Wittmer, Corina; Kraft, Stefan; Krech, Till; Steurer, Stefan; Koop, Christina; Hube-Magg, Claudia; Graefen, Markus; Heinzer, Hans; Minner, Sarah; Simon, Ronald; Sauter, Guido; Schlomm, Thorsten; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina

    2015-01-01

    HOXB13 is a prostate cancer susceptibility gene which shows a cancer predisposing (G84E) mutation in 0.1–0.6% of males. We analyzed the prognostic impact of HOXB13 expression by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing more than 12,400 prostate cancers. Results were compared to tumor phenotype, biochemical recurrence, androgen receptor (AR) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) as well as molecular subtypes defined by ERG status and genomic deletions of 3p, 5q, 6q, and PTEN. HOXB13 immunostaining was detectable in 51.7% of 10,216 interpretable cancers and considered strong in 9.6%, moderate in 19.7% and weak in 22.3% of cases. HOXB13 expression was linked to advanced pT stage, high Gleason grade, positive lymph node status (p < 0.0001 each), high pre-operative PSA levels (p = 0.01), TMPRSS2:ERG fusion, PTEN deletions, AR expression, cell proliferation, reduced PSA expression and early PSA recurrence (p < 0.0001 each). The prognostic value of HOXB13 was independent from established parameters including Gleason, stage, nodal stage and PSA. Co-expression analysis identified a subset of tumors with high HOXB13 and AR but low PSA expression that had a particularly poor prognosis. HOXB13 appears to be a promising candidate for clinical routine tests either alone or in combination with other markers, including AR and PSA. PMID:25825985

  7. Antibodies to variant surface antigens of Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes associated with protection from treatment failure and development of anaemia in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Gaoqian; Aitken, Elizabeth; Yosaatmadja, Francisca; Kalilani, Linda; Meshnick, Steven R; Jaworowski, Anthony; Simpson, Julie A; Rogerson, Stephen J

    2009-01-01

    Background In pregnancy associated malaria (PAM), Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes (IEs) express variant surface antigens (VSA-PAM) that evade existing immunity and mediate placental sequestration. Antibodies to VSA-PAM develop with gravidity and block placental adhesion or opsonise IEs for phagocytic clearance, protecting women from anemia and low birth weight Methods and findings Using sera from 141 parasitemic pregnant Malawian women enrolled in a randomized trial of antimalarials and VSA-PAM-expressing CS2 IEs, we quantitated levels of IgG to VSA-PAM by flow cytometry and opsonizing antibodies by measuring uptake of IEs by THP1 promonocytes. After controlling for gravidity and antimalarial treatment, IgG against VSA-PAM was associated with decreased anemia at delivery (OR=0.66, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.46, 0.93; P=0.018) and weakly associated with decreased parasitological failure (OR=0.78; 95% CI, 0.60, 1.03; P=0.075), especially re-infection (OR=0.73; CI, 0.53,1.01; P=0.057). Opsonizing antibodies to CS2 IE were associated with less maternal anemia. (OR=0.31, 95% CI, 0.13, 0.74; P=0.008) and treatment failure (OR=0.48; 95% CI, 0.25, 0.90; P=0.023), primarily due to recrudescent infection (OR=0.49; 95% CI, 0.21, 1.12; P=0.089). Conclusion Both IgG antibody to VSA-PAM and opsonizing antibody, a functional measure of immunity correlate with parasite clearance and less anemia in pregnancy malaria. PMID:19500037

  8. Expression of PCA3 and PSA genes as a biomarker for differential diagnosis of nodular hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Coelho, F Fonseca; Guimarães, F Loli; Cabral, W L Ribeiro; Salles, P G Oliveira; Mateo, E Cueva; Nogueira e Nogueira, L Mendes; Fonseca, C E Corradi; Gomes, K Braga

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the expression of the PCA3 gene in urine from patients with nodular hyperplasia/benign prostatic hyperplasia (PNH) or adenocarcinoma type prostate cancer (PCa).The study included 59 men: 22 with PCa, 26 with PNH, and 11 with no alterations (controls). Patients' urine was collected following prostatic massage and quantified by quantitative real-time PCR for prostate cancer antigen 3 gene (PCA3) and prostate-specific antigen gene (PSA) expression with the ACTB gene for normalization. PCA3 gene expression was detected in 16 patients with PCa and 4 with PNH; in the control group, there was no expression of the gene. No significant difference was observed in the mean levels of PCA3 and PSA expression, the PCA3/PSA ratio, and the total PSA levels when the groups of patients with PCa and PNH were compared. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.625, 0.596, 0.559, and 0.503 for PCA3 and PSA expression, the PCA3/PSA ratio, and total PSA levels, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the PCA3 test were 73 and 85%, respectively. Considering the estimated cutoff values (0.2219 and 0.5007 for PCA3 and PCA3/PSA, respectively), we observed a significant difference between the frequency of individuals with values above in the PCa group compared with the PNH group (P < 0.001). We conclude that the qualitative PCA3 test could be applied to initial screening for differentiation between individuals with PCa or PNH and those without prostate changes. PMID:26535666

  9. Intermittent androgen ablation in patients with biochemical failure after pelvic radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cury, Fabio L.B.; Souhami, Luis . E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca; Rajan, Raghu; Tanguay, Simon; Gagnon, Bruno; Duclos, Marie; Shenouda, George; Faria, Sergio L.; David, Marc; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of intermittent androgen ablation (IAA) in patients with biochemical failure after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-nine patients received a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog every 2 months for a total of 4 doses. IAA was then discontinued if serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) fell to a normal level with a castrate level of testosterone. Therapy was restarted when the serum PSA level reached {>=}10 ng/mL and was discontinued if hormone resistance or unacceptable toxicity occurred. Results: Median PSA was 9.1 ng/mL at the time of first IAA. The median time between the first and the second cycles was 20.1 months, decreasing to 15.5 months between the third and fourth cycles. Two patients discontinued the treatment because of severe hot flushes. Four patients developed hormone resistance. With a median follow-up of 56.4 months, 5-year survival is 92.3%. Three patients died of unrelated causes. The incidence of distant metastasis is 6.8%. Conclusions: The use of IAA seems to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with biochemical failure post radiotherapy and no evidence of metastatic disease. The use of IAA limits hormone-related side effects and health care costs without an apparent increase in the risk for the development of metastatic disease.

  10. Long-term follow-up of {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan as pretreatment assessment in patients who undergo salvage radiotherapy for rising prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagda, Suneel N. . E-mail: snagda@gmail.com; Mohideen, Najeeb; Lo, Simon S.; Khan, Usman B.S.; Dillehay, Gary; Wagner, Robert; Campbell, Steven; Flanigan, Robert

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term failure patterns in patients who underwent an {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan as part of their pretreatment assessment for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level after prostatectomy and subsequently received local radiotherapy (RT) to the prostate bed. Methods: Fifty-eight patients were referred for evaluation of a rising PSA level after radical prostatectomy. All patients had negative findings for metastatic disease after abdominal/pelvis imaging with CT and isotope bone scans. All patients underwent a capromab pendetide scan, and the sites of uptake were noted. All patients were treated with local prostate bed RT (median dose 66.6 Gy). Results: Of the 58 patients, 20 had biochemical failure (post-RT PSA level >0.2 ng/mL or a rise to greater than the nadir PSA), including 6 patients with positive uptake outside the bed (positive elsewhere). The 4-year biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rates for patients with negative (53%), positive in the prostate bed alone (45%), or positive elsewhere (74%) scan findings did not differ significantly (p = 0.51). The positive predictive value of the capromab pendetide scan in detecting disease outside the bed was 27%. The capromab pendetide scan status had no effect on bRFS. Those with a pre-RT PSA level of <1 ng/mL had improved bRFS (p = 0.003). Conclusion: The capromab pendetide scan has a low positive predictive value in patients with positive elsewhere uptake and the 4-year bRFS was similar to that for those who did not exhibit positive elsewhere uptake. Therefore, patients with a postprostatectomy rising PSA level should considered for local RT on the basis of clinicopathologic factors.

  11. Development of glycan specific lectin based immunoassay for detection of prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Bhanushali, Paresh B; Badgujar, Shamkant B; Tripathi, Mukesh M; Gupta, Sanjeev; Murthy, Vedang; Krishnasastry, Musti V; Puri, Chander P

    2016-05-01

    We describe an analytical approach for the detection and verification of glycosylation patterns of prostate specific antigen (PSA), a key biomarker currently used for understanding the onset and prognosis of prostate cancer. PSA has been purified from the human seminal plasma and total PSA from prostate cancer sera. PSA is a monomeric glycoprotein with an apparent molecular mass 28040.467Da, which exhibits a characteristic protease activity against casein and gelatin. Its optimal protease activity is centered on neutral pH. Peptide mass fingerprint analysis of the purified PSA has yielded peptides that partially match with known database sequences (Uniprot ID P07288). Tryptic digestion profile of isolated PSA, infer the exclusive nature of PSA and may be additive molecule in the dictionary of seminal proteins. Surface plasmon resonance and lectin immunoassay revealed direct interaction between a newly developed anti-PSA monoclonal antibody (C4E6) and PSA. A lectin based immunoassay is reported here which was achieved with the C4E6 anti-PSA antibody and biotinylated plant lectins. This investigation provides an alternative method to isolate and quantify PSA with altered glycosylation which might be seen in the prostate cancer and developing a lectin based immunoassay to detect PSA in serum of prostate cancer patients. PMID:26840176

  12. The ESA Planetary Science Archive User Group (PSA-UG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pio Rossi, Angelo; Cecconi, Baptiste; Fraenz, Markus; Hagermann, Axel; Heather, David; Rosenblatt, Pascal; Svedhem, Hakan; Widemann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    ESA has established a Planetary Science Archive User Group (PSA-UG), with the task of offering independent advice to ESA's Planetary Science Archive (e.g. Heather et al., 2013). The PSA-UG is an official and independent body that continuously evaluates services and tools provided by the PSA to the community of planetary data scientific users. The group has been tasked with the following top level objectives: a) Advise ESA on future development of the PSA. b) Act as a focus for the interests of the scientific community. c) Act as an advocate for the PSA. d) Monitor the PSA activities. Based on this, the PSA-UG will report through the official ESA channels. Disciplines and subjects represented by PSA-UG members include: Remote Sensing of both Atmosphere and Solid Surfaces, Magnetospheres, Plasmas, Radio Science and Auxilliary data. The composition of the group covers ESA missions populating the PSA both now and in the near future. The first members of the PSA-UG were selected in 2013 and will serve for 3 years, until 2016. The PSA-UG will address the community through workshops, conferences and the internet. Written recommendations will be made to the PSA coordinator, and an annual report on PSA and the PSA-UG activities will be sent to the Solar System Exploration Working Group (SSEWG). Any member of the community and planetary data user can get in touch with individual members of the PSA-UG or with the group as a whole via the contacts provided on the official PSA-UG web-page: http://archives.esac.esa.int/psa/psa-ug. The PSA is accessible via: http://archives.esac.esa.int/psa References: Heather, D., Barthelemy, M., Manaud, N., Martinez, S., Szumlas, M., Vazquez, J. L., Osuna, P. and the PSA Development Team (2013) ESA's Planetary Science Archive: Status, Activities and Plans. EuroPlanet Sci. Congr. #EPSC2013-626

  13. Association of GPs’ risk attitudes, level of empathy, and burnout status with PSA testing in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Anette F; Carlsen, Anders H; Vedsted, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Rates of prostate specific antigen (PSA) test ordering vary among GPs. Aim To examine whether GPs’ risk attitude, level of empathy, and burnout status are associated with PSA testing. Design and setting Register and questionnaire study including 129 solo GPs (active in the Central Denmark Region) and 76 672 of their adult male patients with no history of or current prostate cancer diagnosis. Method PSA tests from 2012 were retrieved from a register and classified as incident (that is, the first PSA test within 24 months), repeated normal, or repeated raised tests. This was merged with information on GPs’ risk attitudes, empathy, and burnout status from a 2012 survey. Results Patients registered with a GP with a high score on anxiety caused by uncertainty (odds ratio [OR] 1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.00 to 1.06, P = 0.025) or concern about bad outcomes (OR 1.04; 95% CI = 1.00 to 1.08, P = 0.034) were more likely to have an incident PSA test, whereas those registered with a GP with increased tolerance for ambiguity were less likely (OR 0.98, 95% CI = 0.96 to 1.00, P = 0.025). Patients registered with a GP reporting high tolerance for ambiguity (OR 0.96, 95% CI = 0.94 to 0.99, P = 0.009) or high propensity to risk-taking (OR 0.97, 95% CI = 0.93 to 1.00, P = 0.047) were less likely to have a repeated normal PSA test. Conclusion Various aspects of GPs’ risk-taking attitudes were associated with patients’ probability of having an incident and a repeated normal PSA test. The probability of having a repeated raised PSA test was not influenced by any of the psychological factors. Burnout and empathy were not associated with PSA testing. PMID:26541183

  14. The ESA Planetary Science Archive User Group (PSA-UG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, A. P.; Cecconi, B.; Fraenz, M.; Hagermann, A.; Heather, D.; Rosenblatt, P.; Svedhem, H.; Widemann, T.

    2014-04-01

    ESA has established a Planetary Science Archive User Group (PSA-UG), with the task of offering independent advice to ESA's Planetary Science Archive (e.g. Heather et al., 2013). The PSA-UG is an official and independent body that continuously evaluates services and tools provided by the PSA to the community of planetary data scientific users. The group has been tasked with the following top level objectives: a) Advise ESA on future development of the PSA. b) Act as a focus for the interests of the scientific community. c) Act as an advocate for the PSA. d) Monitor the PSA activities. Based on this, the PSA-UG will report through the official ESA channels. Disciplines and subjects represented by PSA-UG members include: Remote Sensing of both Atmosphere and Solid Surfaces, Magnetospheres, Plasmas, Radio Science and Auxilliary data. The composition of the group covers ESA missions populating the PSA both now and in the near future. The first members of the PSA-UG were selected in 2013 and will serve for 3 years, until 2016. The PSA-UG will address the community through workshops, conferences and the internet. Written recommendations will be made to the PSA coordinator, and an annual report on PSA and the PSA-UG activities will be sent to the Solar System Exploration Working Group (SSEWG). Any member of the community and planetary data user can get in touch with individual members of the PSA-UG or with the group as a whole via the contacts provided on the official PSA-UG web-page: http://archives.esac.esa.int/psa/psa-ug The PSA is accessible via: http://archives.esac.esa.int/psa

  15. Anti-tumor effect of the alphavirus-based virus-like particle vector expressing prostate-specific antigen in a HLA-DR transgenic mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Riabov, V; Tretyakova, I; Alexander, R B; Pushko, P; Klyushnenkova, E N

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if an alphavirus-based vaccine encoding human Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) could generate an effective anti-tumor immune response in a stringent mouse model of prostate cancer. DR2bxPSA F1 male mice expressing human PSA and HLA-DRB1(*)1501 transgenes were vaccinated with virus-like particle vector encoding PSA (VLPV-PSA) followed by the challenge with Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate cells engineered to express PSA (TRAMP-PSA). PSA-specific cellular and humoral immune responses were measured before and after tumor challenge. PSA and CD8 reactivity in the tumors was detected by immunohistochemistry. Tumor growth was compared in vaccinated and control groups. We found that VLPV-PSA could infect mouse dendritic cells in vitro and induce a robust PSA-specific immune response in vivo. A substantial proportion of splenic CD8 T cells (19.6 ± 7.4%) produced IFNγ in response to the immunodominant peptide PSA(65-73). In the blood of vaccinated mice, 18.4 ± 4.1% of CD8 T cells were PSA-specific as determined by the staining with H-2D(b)/PSA(65-73) dextramers. VLPV-PSA vaccination also strongly stimulated production of IgG2a/b anti-PSA antibodies. Tumors in vaccinated mice showed low levels of PSA expression and significant CD8+ T cell infiltration. Tumor growth in VLPV-PSA vaccinated mice was significantly delayed at early time points (p=0.002, Gehan-Breslow test). Our data suggest that TC-83-based VLPV-PSA vaccine can efficiently overcome immune tolerance to PSA, mediate rapid clearance of PSA-expressing tumor cells and delay tumor growth. The VLPV-PSA vaccine will undergo further testing for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer. PMID:26319744

  16. Imprinted gold 2D nanoarray for highly sensitive and convenient PSA detection via plasmon excited quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Song, Hong Yan; Wong, Ten It; Sadovoy, Anton; Wu, Lin; Bai, Ping; Deng, Jie; Guo, Shifeng; Wang, Yi; Knoll, Wolfgang; Zhou, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    We designed and fabricated two new nanostructured biosensing chips, with which the sensitive detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) as low as 100 pg ml(-1) can be achieved, by measuring the plasmon enhanced fluorescence through a conventional dark field microscope. The gold nanostructure arrays, one with gold nanopillars of 140 nm, the other with gold nanoholes of 140 nm, were fabricated via nanoimprinting onto glass substrate, as localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) generators to enhance the fluorescent emission of fluorophore, e.g. quantum dot (QD). A sandwich bioassay of capture anti-PSA antibody (cAb)/PSA/detection anti-PSA (dAb) labeled by QD-655 was established on the nanostructures, and the perfect LSPR excitation distance (10-15 nm) between the nanostructure and QD-655 was simulated and controlled by a cleft cAb fragment and streptavidin modified QD. QD was chosen in this study due to its photo stability, broad Stokes shift, and long lifetime. As far as we know, this is the first time that QD is applied for PSA detection on the uniform nanostructured sensing chips based on the LSPR enhanced fluorescence. Due to the miniaturized nanoarray sensing chip (1.8 mm × 1.8 mm), the convenience and specificity for the detection of PSA via the sandwich assay, and the high optical detection sensitivity, the platform has great potential for the development of a portable point-of-care (POC) system for outpatient diagnosis and treatment monitoring. PMID:25360665

  17. Effect of Histological Inflammation on Total and Free Serum Prostate-Specific Antigen Values in Patients Without Clinically Detectable Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spajic, Borislav; Reljic, Ante; Katusic, Josip; Popovic, Alek; Grubisic, Igor; Tomas, Davor

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We are often confronted with patients in the "gray zone" (prostate-specific antigen [PSA]<10 ng/mL) whose biopsies reveal no malignancy but only inflammation. We investigated the relationship between histological inflammation and total PSA (tPSA), free PSA (fPSA), and percentage of free PSA (f/tPSA) levels in patients without prostate cancer (PC). Materials and Methods We studied 106 men with tPSA<10 ng/mL who had undergone biopsy that was negative for PC and who had no clinical prostatitis. Inflammation observed at biopsies was scored for inflammation type in each biopsy core by use of a four-point scale and was then correlated with tPSA, fPSA, and f/tPSA. Results Different patterns of inflammation were found in each set of biopsies. Regression factor analysis was used to form two groups according to inflammation type: more chronic and more acute. Median tPSA, fPSA, and f/tPSA levels in the more chronic and more acute inflammation groups were 6.4 ng/mL, 1.09 ng/mL, and 15%, and 7.3 ng/mL, 0.79 ng/mL, and l2%, respectively. A significant difference was found in fPSA (p=0.003) and f/tPSA (p<0.001), whereas the difference in tPSA was not significant (p=0.200). Total PSA correlated with fPSA (r=0.4, p<0.001) but not with inflammation type (r=0.12, p>0.010). A correlation existed between inflammation type and fPSA (r=-0.31, p=0.001) and f/tPSA (r=-0.43, p<0.001) in that the fPSA and f/tPSA were lower in the group with more acute inflammation. Conclusions Subclinical inflammation has a significant influence on fPSA in patients with tPSA<10 ng/mL but without PC or clinical prostatitis. Subclinical inflammation is not characterized by elevated tPSA alone but also by a decreased fPSA, a tendency similar to that in PC. PMID:25132947

  18. Long-Term Outcome and Toxicity of Salvage Brachytherapy for Local Failure After Initial Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Burri, Ryan J.; Stone, Nelson N.; Unger, Pam; Stock, Richard G.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To describe long-term outcomes and toxicity after salvage brachytherapy (BT) for local failure after initial radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2008, 37 men with local failure after initial prostate radiotherapy (32 external-beam radiation therapy [EBRT] and 5 BT) underwent salvage BT with {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I. Estimates of freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF, Phoenix definition) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicities were graded using CTCv3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 86 months (range, 2-156). The median dose to 90% of the prostate volume was 122 Gy (range, 67-166). The 10-year FFbF and CSS were 54% and 96%, respectively. On univariate analysis, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >10 ng/mL at initial diagnosis was significantly associated with FFbF (p = 0.01), and there were trends for both age <70 years (p = 0.08) and PSA <6 ng/mL (p = 0.08) at the time of salvage BT. On multivariate analysis, only presalvage PSA <6 ng/mL (p = 0.046) was significantly associated with improved FFbF. There were three Grade 3 toxicities and one Grade 4 toxicity. Pelvic lymph node dissection before salvage BT was the only variable significantly associated with Grade {>=}2 toxicity (p = 0.03). Conclusion: With a median follow-up of 86 months, salvage prostate BT was associated with a 10-year FFbF of 54% and CSS of 96%. Improved FFbF was associated with a presalvage PSA <6 ng/mL. Toxicity was worse in patients who had undergone pelvic lymph node dissection before salvage BT. Careful patient selection for salvage BT may result in improved outcomes and reduced toxicity.

  19. Prostate-Specific Antigen Bounce After Permanent Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy-An Australian Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zwahlen, Daniel R.; Smith, Ryan; Andrianopoulos, Nick; Matheson, Bronwyn; Royce, Peter; Millar, Jeremy L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 'bounces' after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy to review the relationship to biochemical control and correlate both clinical and dosimetric variables. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 194 hormone-naive patients with a follow-up of {>=}3 years. Four bounce definitions were applied: an increase of {>=}0.2 ng/mL (definition I), {>=}0.4 ng/mL (definition II), {>=}15% (definition III), and {>=}35% (definition IV) of a previous value with spontaneous return to the prebounce level or lower. Results: Using definition I, II, III, and IV, a bounce was detected in 50%, 34%, 11%, and 9% of patients, respectively. The median time to onset was 14-16 months, the duration was 12-21.5 months, and the magnitude of the increase was 0.5-2 ng/mL. A magnitude of >2 ng/mL, fulfilling the criteria for biochemical failure (BF) according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Phoenix definition, was detected in 11.3%, 16.9%, 47.6%, and 50% using definitions I, II, III, and IV, respectively; 11 patients (5.7%) had true BF. The PSA bounces occurred earlier than BF (p < 0.001). The prediction of BF remains controversial and is probably unrelated to biochemical control. The only statistically significant factor predictive of a PSA bounce was younger age (definitions I and II). Conclusion: PSA bounces are common after brachytherapy. All definitions resulted in a high number of false-positive calls for BF during the first 2 years. The definition of an increase of {>=}0.2 ng/mL should be preferred because of the lowest number of false-positive results for BF. Patients experiencing a PSA bounce during the first 2 years after brachytherapy should undergo surveillance every 3-6 months. Additional investigations are recommended for elevated postimplant PSA levels that have not corrected by 3 years of follow-up.

  20. Organization of photosystem I polypeptides. Identification of PsaB domains that may interact with PsaD.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Q; Chitnis, P R

    1995-01-01

    PsaA and PsaB are homologous integral membrane-proteins that form the heterodimeric core of photosystem i (PSI). We used subunit-deficient PSI complexes from the mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 to examine interactions between PsaB and other PSI subunits. Incubation of the wild-type PSI with thermolysin yielded 22-kD C-terminal fragments of PsaB that were resistant to further proteolysis. Modification of the wild-type PSI with N-hydroxysuccinimidobiotin and subsequent cleavage by thermolysin showed that the lysyl residues in the 22-kD C-terminal domain were inaccessible to modification by N-hydroxysuccinimidobiotin. The absence of PsaE, PsaF, PsaI, PsaJ, or PsaL facilitated accumulation of 22-kD C-terminal fragments of PsaB but did not alter their resistance to further proteolysis. When the PsaD-less PSI was treated with thermolysin, the 22-kD C-terminal fragments of PsaB were rapidly cleaved, with concomitant accumulation of a 16-kD fragment and then a 3.4-kD one. We mapped the N termini of these fragments by N-terminal amino acid sequencing and the C termini from their positive reaction with an antibody against the C-terminal peptide of PsaB. The cleavage sites were proposed to be in the extramembrane loops on the cytoplasmic side. Western blot analyses showed resistance of PsaC and PsaI to proteolysis prior to cleavage of the 22-kD fragments. Therefore, we propose that PsaD shields two extramembrane loops of PsaB and protects the C-terminal domain of PsaB from in vitro proteolysis. PMID:7630936

  1. Rosetta Planetary Science Archive (PSA) Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Kristin R.; Cardesin, A.; Barthelemy, M.; Diaz del Rio, J.; Zender, J.; Arviset, C.

    2006-09-01

    The Planetary Science Archive (PSA) is an online database (accessible via http://www.rssd.esa.int/PSA) implemented by ESA/RSSD. Currently the PSA contains the science data from the Giotto (Halley), Mars Express and SMART-1 (Moon) missions, and the Rosetta Supplementary Archive (Wirtanen). The PSA user is offered a broad range of search possibilities. Search queries can be combined without restrictions and are executed across the whole database. The PSA utilizes the Planetary Data System (PDS) standard. In spring 2007 the PSA will provide the first science and engineering data collected by Rosetta. In preparation for the initial Peer Review to be performed before publication of these data, an Internal Review was held in March 2006, executed by staff internal to the organizations responsible for the Rosetta archiving (ESA, PDS, CNES). The Internal Reviewers identified shortcomings in documentation, data structures, and completeness of the data delivery. They recommended the usage of unified conventions and formats across different instruments. Work is ongoing to include standardized geometry information in the datasets. Rosetta was launched in March 2004 to rendezvous with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (C-G) in May 2014. After having placed a lander on the comet's surface, the Rosetta orbiter will continue to orbit C-G and accompany the comet through perihelion. Rosetta makes use of three Earth swingbys and one Mars swingby in order to reach C-G. Rosetta will also perform close flybys at two asteroids, namely 2867 Steins in September 2008 and 21 Lutetia in July 2010. In addition, Rosetta makes scientific observations of targets of opportunity, e.g. lightcurves of the flyby asteroids to study the rotation, and plasma measurements when passing through cometary ion tails or meteoroid streams. Rosetta continuously monitored the encounter of the Deep Impact probe with comet 9P/Tempel 1 over an extended period of 16 days around the impact on 4 July 2005.

  2. Long-Term Follow-Up and Risk of Cancer Death After Radiation for Post-Prostatectomy Rising Prostate-Specific Antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Gregory P.; Du, Fei; Michalek, Joel E.; Hermans, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: The results of salvage radiation therapy for rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels after radical prostatectomy appear favorable, but the ultimate outcome is uncertain, given the relatively short follow-up in most studies. We report on a group of patients at a median follow-up of 13.9 years after salvage radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 1995, 92 patients were referred postoperatively for radiation for a rising PSA level. PSA level at the time of referral ranged from 0.1 to 30.5 ng/ml (median, 1.5 ng/ml). The median time from surgery to radiation was 2.1 years (range,, 0.3-7.4 years). Radiation was directed to the prostatic fossa only with a median dose of 6,500 cGy (range, 6,000-7,000 cGy). Results: Eighty-five patients experienced a PSA drop after radiation, as predicted by Gleason score and PSA level at the start of radiation. Five- and 10-year biochemical failure free survival (BFFS) was 35% and 26%, respectively, and overall survival was 86% and 67%, respectively. Median survival was 12.0 years, and median BFF was 2.3 years. The presurgery PSA level was not predictive, but the PSA level at the start of radiation predicted a response. Patients with Gleason 8 to 9 cancers had a significantly higher progression rate than those with lower Gleason scores. There were no significant differences in outcomes based on pathology findings (none vs. positive margins vs. positive seminal vesicles). Overall, 22 (24%) patients died directly from prostate cancer, resulting in a 10-year cancer-specific survival rate of 82%. Multivariate analysis risk factors for dying of cancer were Gleason's score (8 to 9) and PSA at the start of radiation therapy (>1.0 ng/ml). Conclusions: Patients have a good response to salvage radiation therapy. A small but durable subgroup appears to have permanent control. In those for whom therapy fails, radiation delays the need for other salvage therapy, indicating at least a transient benefit to most patients.

  3. Prostate-specific antigen testing accuracy in community practice

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Richard M; Gilliland, Frank D; Adams-Cameron, Meg; Hunt, William C; Key, Charles R

    2002-01-01

    Background Most data on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing come from urologic cohorts comprised of volunteers for screening programs. We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of PSA testing for detecting prostate cancer in community practice. Methods PSA testing results were compared with a reference standard of prostate biopsy. Subjects were 2,620 men 40 years and older undergoing (PSA) testing and biopsy from 1/1/95 through 12/31/98 in the Albuquerque, New Mexico metropolitan area. Diagnostic measures included the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios. Results Cancer was detected in 930 subjects (35%). The area under the ROC curve was 0.67 and the PSA cutpoint of 4 ng/ml had a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 33%. The likelihood ratio for a positive test (LR+) was 1.28 and 0.42 for a negative test (LR-). PSA testing was most sensitive (90%) but least specific (27%) in older men. Age-specific reference ranges improved specificity in older men (49%) but decreased sensitivity (70%), with an LR+ of 1.38. Lowering the PSA cutpoint to 2 ng/ml resulted in a sensitivity of 95%, a specificity of 20%, and an LR+ of 1.19. Conclusions PSA testing had fair discriminating power for detecting prostate cancer in community practice. The PSA cutpoint of 4 ng/ml was sensitive but relatively non-specific and associated likelihood ratios only moderately revised probabilities for cancer. Using age-specific reference ranges and a PSA cutpoint below 4 ng/ml improved test specificity and sensitivity, respectively, but did not improve the overall accuracy of PSA testing. PMID:12398793

  4. A Microfluidic Love-Wave Biosensing Device for PSA Detection Based on an Aptamer Beacon Probe

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Li, Shuangming; Cao, Kang; Wang, Pengjuan; Su, Yan; Zhu, Xinhua; Wan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A label-free and selective aptamer beacon-based Love-wave biosensing device was developed for prostate specific antigen (PSA) detection. The device consists of the following parts: LiTaO3 substrate with SiO2 film as wave guide layer, two set of inter-digital transducers (IDT), gold film for immobilization of the biorecongniton layer and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels. DNA aptamer, or “artificial antibody”, was used as the specific biorecognition probe for PSA capture. Some nucleotides were added to the 3'-end of the aptamer to form a duplex with the 3'-end, turning the aptamer into an aptamer-beacon. Taking advantage of the selective target-induced assembly changes arising from the “aptamer beacon”, highly selective and specific detection of PSA was achieved. Furthermore, PDMS microfluidic channels were designed and fabricated to realize automated quantitative sample injection. After optimization of the experimental conditions, the established device showed good performance for PSA detection between 10 ng/mL to 1 μg/mL, with a detection limit of 10 ng/mL. The proposed sensor might be a promising alternative for point of care diagnostics. PMID:26110408

  5. A Microfluidic Love-Wave Biosensing Device for PSA Detection Based on an Aptamer Beacon Probe.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Li, Shuangming; Cao, Kang; Wang, Pengjuan; Su, Yan; Zhu, Xinhua; Wan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A label-free and selective aptamer beacon-based Love-wave biosensing device was developed for prostate specific antigen (PSA) detection. The device consists of the following parts: LiTaO3 substrate with SiO2 film as wave guide layer, two set of inter-digital transducers (IDT), gold film for immobilization of the biorecongniton layer and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels. DNA aptamer, or "artificial antibody", was used as the specific biorecognition probe for PSA capture. Some nucleotides were added to the 3'-end of the aptamer to form a duplex with the 3'-end, turning the aptamer into an aptamer-beacon. Taking advantage of the selective target-induced assembly changes arising from the "aptamer beacon", highly selective and specific detection of PSA was achieved. Furthermore, PDMS microfluidic channels were designed and fabricated to realize automated quantitative sample injection. After optimization of the experimental conditions, the established device showed good performance for PSA detection between 10 ng/mL to 1 μg/mL, with a detection limit of 10 ng/mL. The proposed sensor might be a promising alternative for point of care diagnostics. PMID:26110408

  6. Electrostatic influence of PsaC protein binding to the PsaA/PsaB heterodimer in photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Stehlik, Dietmar; Golbeck, John H; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2006-02-01

    The absence of the PsaC subunit in the photosystem I (PSI) complex (native PSI complex) by mutagenesis or chemical manipulation yields a PSI core (P700-F(X) core) that also lacks subunits PsaD and PsaE and the two iron-sulfur clusters F(A) and F(B), which constitute an integral part of PsaC. In this P700-F(X) core, the redox potentials (E(m)) of the two quinones A(1A/B) and the iron-sulfur cluster F(X) as well as the corresponding protonation patterns are investigated by evaluating the electrostatic energies from the solution of the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The B-side specific Asp-B558 changes its protonation state significantly upon isolating the P700-F(X) core, being mainly protonated in the native PSI complex but ionized in the P700-F(X) core. In the P700-F(X) core, E(m)(A(1A/B)) remains practically unchanged, whereas E(m)(F(X)) is upshifted by 42 mV. With these calculated E(m) values, the electron transfer rate from A(1) to F(X) in the P700-F(X) core is estimated to be slightly faster on the A(1A) side than that of the wild type, which is consistent with kinetic measurements. PMID:16258043

  7. Isotope and Patient Age Predict for PSA Spikes After Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bostancic, Chelsea; Merrick, Gregory S. . E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Allen, Zachariah; Galbreath, Robert; Lief, Jonathan; Gutman, Sarah E.

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prostate-specific antigen (PSA) spikes after permanent prostate brachytherapy in low-risk patients. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 164 prostate cancer patients who were part of a prospective randomized trial comparing {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I for low-risk disease. Of the 164 patients, 61 (37.2%) received short-course androgen deprivation therapy. The median follow-up was 5.4 years. On average, 11.1 post-treatment PSA measurements were obtained per patient. Biochemical disease-free survival was defined as a PSA level of {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. A PSA spike was defined as an increase of {>=}0.2 ng/mL, followed by a durable decline to prespike levels. Multiple parameters were evaluated as predictors for a PSA spike. Results: Of the 164 patients, 44 (26.9%) developed a PSA spike. Of the 46 hormone-naive {sup 125}I patients and 57 hormone-naive {sup 103}Pd patients, 21 (45.7%) and 8 (14.0%) developed a PSA spike. In the hormone-naive patients, the mean time between implantation and the spike was 22.6 months and 18.7 months for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd, respectively. In patients receiving neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy, the incidence of spikes was comparable between isotopes ({sup 125}I 28.1% and {sup 103}Pd 20.7%). The incidence of spikes was substantially different in patients <65 years vs. {>=}65 years old (38.5% vs. 16.3%). On multivariate Cox regression analysis, patient age (p < 0.001) and isotope (p = 0.002) were significant predictors for spike. Conclusion: In low-risk prostate cancer, PSA spikes are most common in patients implanted with {sup 125}I and/or <65 years of age. Differences in isotope-related spikes are most pronounced in hormone-naive patients.

  8. False positives observed on the Seratec® PSA SemiQuant Cassette Test with condom lubricants.

    PubMed

    Bitner, Sara E

    2012-11-01

    In the course of the validation of a new component of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) SemiQuant Cassette Test marketed by Seratec(®) , a false-positive reaction was observed when testing samples collected from the surface of unused, lubricated condoms. A variety of personal lubricants and condoms were tested to determine the frequency of the false positive, as well as its potential source. Samples were extracted in both water and the manufacturer-provided buffer, and the test was performed according to the manufacturer's suggested protocol. The false positive was observed intermittently, but occurred consistently with samples containing nonoxynol-9, a strong detergent utilized as a spermicide. The reaction may be attributable to the combination of latex and nonoxynol-9. Because of the unreliability of the test to confirm the presence of PSA in samples collected from condoms, the PSA cassette is an unsuitable method for confirming the presence of seminal fluid in condoms. PMID:22494324

  9. The routine use of prostate-specific antigen for early detection of cancer prostate in India: Is it justified?

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Deepak

    2009-01-01

    Background: The use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for early detection of prostate cancer is a widely debated issue. The average Indian urologist is faced with the dilemma of whether PSA testing should be routinely offered to men over 50 years of age. The Urological Society of India is yet to issue any guidelines on PSA testing. This article attempts to explore scientific evidence dealing with this controversial subject. Materials and Methods: A MEDLINE search was performed using the words ‘PSA screening’, ‘prostate cancer statistics’, and ‘PSA screening guidelines’. The relevant articles were then analysed for evidence regarding the utility of PSA screening. Results: Prostate cancer does not qualify to be categorized as a major health problem in India. The natural history of screen-detected cancer is not known. Prostate-specific antigen testing for early detection of prostate cancer has questionable benefits and has a potential to cause harm to asymptomatic individuals. There is no consensus amongst learned medical societies as to what should be the best approach for PSA testing. Most organizations caution against widespread PSA screening and emphasize on informed consent and patient counseling with regard to PSA testing. Randomized prospective trials are ongoing to assess to the true impact of screening on prostate cancer mortality. Conclusions: There is no scientific rationale to advocate routine use of PSA for early detection of prostate cancer in Indian males. Results of randomized screening trials are awaited to clarify on this issue. PMID:19672341

  10. Predictive simulations and optimization of nanowire field-effect PSA sensors including screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Stefan; Heitzinger, Clemens; Vacic, Aleksandar; Reed, Mark A.

    2013-06-01

    We apply our self-consistent PDE model for the electrical response of field-effect sensors to the 3D simulation of nanowire PSA (prostate-specific antigen) sensors. The charge concentration in the biofunctionalized boundary layer at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface is calculated using the propka algorithm, and the screening of the biomolecules by the free ions in the liquid is modeled by a sensitivity factor. This comprehensive approach yields excellent agreement with experimental current-voltage characteristics without any fitting parameters. Having verified the numerical model in this manner, we study the sensitivity of nanowire PSA sensors by changing device parameters, making it possible to optimize the devices and revealing the attributes of the optimal field-effect sensor.

  11. Expression System Based on an MTIIa Promoter to Produce hPSA in Mammalian Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Santos, Anderson K; Parreira, Ricardo C; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2016-01-01

    Because of the limitations of standard culture techniques, the development of new recombinant protein expression systems with biotechnological potential is a key challenge. Ideally, such systems should be able to effectively and accurately synthesize a protein of interest with intrinsic metabolic capacity. Here, we describe such a system that was designed based on a plasmid vector containing promoter elements derived from the metallothionein MTIIa promoter, as well as processing and purification elements. This promoter can be induced by heavy metals in a culture medium to induce the synthesis of human prostate-specific antigen (hPSA), which has been modified to insert elements for purification, proteolysis, and secretion. We optimized hPSA production in this system by comparing the effects and contributions of ZnCl2, CdCl2, and CuSO4 in HEK293FT, HeLa, BHK-21, and CHO-K1 cells. We also compared the effectiveness of three different transfection agents: multi-walled carbon nanotubes, Lipofectamine 2000, and X-tremeGENE HP Reagent. hPSA production was confirmed via the detection of enhanced green fluorescent protein fluorescence, and cell viability was determined. The expression of hPSA was compared with that of the native protein produced by LNCaP cells, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. X-tremeGENE reagent, the BHK-21 cell line, and CuSO4 showed the highest hPSA production rates. Furthermore, BHK-21 cells were more resistant to the oxidative stress caused by 100 μM CuSO4. These results suggest that the proposed optimized inducible expression system can effectively produce recombinant proteins with desired characteristics for a wide range of applications in molecular biology. PMID:27582737

  12. Expression System Based on an MTIIa Promoter to Produce hPSA in Mammalian Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Anderson K.; Parreira, Ricardo C.; Resende, Rodrigo R.

    2016-01-01

    Because of the limitations of standard culture techniques, the development of new recombinant protein expression systems with biotechnological potential is a key challenge. Ideally, such systems should be able to effectively and accurately synthesize a protein of interest with intrinsic metabolic capacity. Here, we describe such a system that was designed based on a plasmid vector containing promoter elements derived from the metallothionein MTIIa promoter, as well as processing and purification elements. This promoter can be induced by heavy metals in a culture medium to induce the synthesis of human prostate-specific antigen (hPSA), which has been modified to insert elements for purification, proteolysis, and secretion. We optimized hPSA production in this system by comparing the effects and contributions of ZnCl2, CdCl2, and CuSO4 in HEK293FT, HeLa, BHK-21, and CHO-K1 cells. We also compared the effectiveness of three different transfection agents: multi-walled carbon nanotubes, Lipofectamine 2000, and X-tremeGENE HP Reagent. hPSA production was confirmed via the detection of enhanced green fluorescent protein fluorescence, and cell viability was determined. The expression of hPSA was compared with that of the native protein produced by LNCaP cells, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. X-tremeGENE reagent, the BHK-21 cell line, and CuSO4 showed the highest hPSA production rates. Furthermore, BHK-21 cells were more resistant to the oxidative stress caused by 100 μM CuSO4. These results suggest that the proposed optimized inducible expression system can effectively produce recombinant proteins with desired characteristics for a wide range of applications in molecular biology. PMID:27582737

  13. Clinical variables associated with PSA response to abiraterone acetate in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leibowitz-Amit, R.; Templeton, A. J.; Omlin, A.; Pezaro, C.; Atenafu, E. G.; Keizman, D.; Vera-Badillo, F.; Seah, J.-A.; Attard, G.; Knox, J. J.; Sridhar, S. S.; Tannock, I. F.; de Bono, J. S.; Joshua, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Abiraterone acetate (abiraterone) prolongs overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). This study's objective was to retrospectively identify factors associated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to abiraterone and validate them in an independent cohort. We hypothesized that the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), thought to be an indirect manifestation of tumor-promoting inflammation, may be associated with response to abiraterone. Patients and methods All patients receiving abiraterone at the Princess Margaret (PM) Cancer Centre up to March 2013 were reviewed. The primary end point was confirmed PSA response defined as PSA decline ≥50% below baseline maintained for ≥3 weeks. Potential factors associated with PSA response were analyzed using univariate and multivariable analyses to generate a score, which was then evaluated in an independent cohort from Royal Marsden (RM) NHS foundation. Results A confirmed PSA response was observed in 44 out of 108 assessable patients (41%, 95% confidence interval 31%–50%). In univariate analysis, lower pre-abiraterone baseline levels of lactate dehydrogenase, an NLR ≤ 5 and restricted metastatic spread to either bone or lymph nodes were each associated with PSA response. In multivariable analysis, only low NLR and restricted metastatic spread remained statistically significant. A score derived as the sum of these two categorical variables was associated with response to abiraterone (P = 0.007). Logistic regression analysis on an independent validation cohort of 245 patients verified that this score was associated with response to abiraterone (P = 0.003). It was also associated with OS in an exploratory analysis. Conclusions A composite score of baseline NLR and extent of metastatic spread is associated with PSA response to abiraterone and OS. Our data may help understand the role of systemic inflammation in mCRPC and warrant further research. PMID

  14. Analysis of Serum Total and Free PSA Using Immunoaffinity Depletion Coupled to SRM: Correlation with Clinical Immunoassay Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Hossain, Mahmud; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Sokoll, Lori J.; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Izmirlian, Grant; Shi, Tujin; Qian, Weijun; Leach, Robin; Thompson, Ian M.; Chan, Daniel W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kagan, Jacob; Srinivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.; Camp, David G.

    2012-08-03

    Sandwich immunoassay is the standard technique used in clinical labs for quantifying protein biomarkers for disease detection, monitoring and therapeutic intervention. Albeit highly sensitive, the development of a specific immunoassay is rather time-consuming and associated with extremely high cost due to the requirement for paired immunoaffinity reagents of high specificity. Recently, mass spectrometry-based methods, specifically selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SRM-MS), have been increasingly applied to measure low abundance biomarker candidates in tissue and biofluids, owing to high sensitivity and specificity, simplicity of assay configuration, and great multiplexing capability. In this study, we report for the first time the development of immunoaffinity depletion-based workflows and SRM-MS assays that enable sensitive and accurate quantification of total and free prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in serum without the requirement for specific PSA antibodies. With stable isotope dilution and external calibration, low ng/mL level detection of both total and free PSA was consistently achieved in both PSA-spiked female serum samples and actual patient serum samples. Moreover, comparison of the results obtained when SRM PSA assays and conventional immunoassays were applied to the same samples showed very good correlation (R2 values ranging from 0.90 to 0.99) in several independent clinical serum sample sets, including a set of 33 samples assayed in a blinded test. These results demonstrate that the workflows and SRM assays developed here provide an attractive alternative for reliably measuring total and free PSA in human blood. Furthermore, simultaneous measurement of free and total PSA and many other biomarkers can be performed in a single analysis using high-resolution liquid chromatographic separation coupled with SRM-MS.

  15. Analysis of postoperative PSA changes after ultrasound-guided permanent [125I] seed implantation for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bian, X L; Wang, C Z; Wang, Y; Li, Y N; Zhang, L Z; Liu, L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore postoperative changes in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and risk factors that influence the clinical effects of ultrasound-guided permanent [(125)I] seed implantation in the treatment of prostate cancer. From July 2009 to December 2012, 41 prostate cancer patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided [(125)I] seed implantation were followed up for 3-56 months. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to their results: group A, benign rebound group, 31 cases; and group B, biochemical relapse group, 10 cases. A blood analysis of group A showed that the initial PSA rise after a nadir occurred postoperatively at 16.8 ± 1.2 months, and in 65.8% (27/41) patients the rise occurred during 15-27 weeks. For group B, the initial PSA rise after a nadir occurred postoperatively at 30.2 ± 2.1 months, and the difference in the time parameter of the initial PSA rise after the nadir was statistically significant between the 2 groups (P < 0.01). During treatment, age was shown to be a risk factor for group A (P = 0.0027, P < 0.01). Postoperative changes in PSA levels after ultrasound-guided permanent [(125)I] seed implantation contributed to the assessment of the clinical treatment effects. PMID:26125925

  16. [Comparison of Tandem-R PSA and Markit-M PA in the diagnosis of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Okegawa, T; Kato, M; Miyata, A; Murata, A; Miura, I; Yoneda, T; Nutahara, K; Higashihara, E

    1999-03-01

    The Tandem-R PSA (TR) assay was compared with the Markit-M PA (MM) assay in the diagnosis of the prostate cancer. In patients with a serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) level higher than the cut-off values measured by either the TR assay or the MM assay (4.1 ng/ml and 3.7 ng/ml, respectively), or a suspicious digital rectal examination, sextant biopsy of the prostate was performed. Among 227 patients undergoing biopsy, 64 patients were diagnosed as having prostate cancer. There was a significant difference of serum PSA values between patients with and without prostate cancer in either assay. There was no significant difference between the assays with respect to diagnosing according to prostate cancer using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The correlation between TR and MM in 150 men with a serum Tandem-R PSA below 10 ng/ml was Y = 1.12X + 3.745 (R = 0.68, p < 0.001). The correlation coefficient for the relationship between TR and MM was only 0.68, indicating a poor correlation. Four of the 15 patients with MM values below 4.0 ng/ml calculated by transformation from MM to TR values had prostate cancer. This suggested that conversion of MM values to TR values in the low PSA range presents problems. PMID:10331169

  17. Luminescence energy transfer detection of PSA in red region based on Mn2+-enhanced NaYF4:Yb, Er upconversion nanorods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianguo; Wang, Shaozhen; Gao, Ni; Feng, Dexiang; Wang, Lun; Chen, Hongqi

    2015-10-15

    A new turn-on luminescence energy transfer (LET) system has been designed for the detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA, a cancer marker) that utilizes Mn(2+)-enhanced long wavelength luminescence NaYF4:Yb, Er upconversion nanorods as the donor and gold nanorods as the acceptor. The Mn(2+)-doped NaYF4:Yb,Er upconversion luminescence nanorods with an emission peak located in the red region were synthesized. The presence of Mn(2+) markedly increased the luminescence intensity over that of the NaYF4:Yb, Er upconversion nanomaterials (excited by a 980 nm continuous wavelength laser). The surfaces of Mn(2+)-doped NaYF4:Yb, Er upconversion nanorods were modified with poly(acrylic acid). Antibodies against prostate specific antigen were bound to the surface of the carboxyl-functionalized upconversion nanorods, which acted as the energy donor in this LET system. Gold nanorods with an absorption band at ~666 nm were synthesized by the seed growth method, acted as the energy acceptor. The emission band of the upconversion nanorods overlapped well with the absorption band of the gold nanorods. The luminescence was quenched because of the electrostatic interactions that shortened the distance between the donor (negatively charged) and the accepter (positively charged).When the PSA antigen was added into the system, the energy acceptor and the energy donors were separated because the binding affinity between PSA and anti-PSA was greater than the electrostatic interactions, and thereby the luminescence was recovered. The linear range of detecting PSA was from 0.1172 to 18.75 ng/mL (R=0.995), with a limit of detection for PSA as low as 0.1129 ng/mL. The method was successfully applied to the sensing of PSA in human serum samples. PMID:25996781

  18. Circulating testosterone and prostate-specific antigen in nipple aspirate fluid and tissue are associated with breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Edward R; Tichansky, David S; Chervoneva, Inna; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2002-01-01

    Preliminary evidence has associated testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) with breast cancer. Our objective was to determine whether a) testosterone levels in nipple aspirate fluid (NAF), serum, or breast tissue are associated with breast cancer; b) testosterone levels in serum are associated with levels in NAF; c) PSA in NAF, serum, or breast tissue is associated with breast cancer; and d) serum PSA is associated with NAF PSA levels. We obtained 342 NAF specimens from 171 women by means of a modified breast pump. Additionally, we collected 201 blood samples from 99 women and 51 tissue samples from 41 subjects who underwent surgical resection for suspected disease. Women currently using birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy were excluded from the study. Controlling for age and menopausal status, serum testosterone was significantly increased in women with breast cancer (p = 0.002). NAF and serum testosterone levels were not associated. Neither NAF nor tissue testosterone was associated with breast cancer. Controlling for menopausal status and age, NAF PSA was significantly decreased in women with breast cancer (p < 0.001). We did not find serum PSA to be associated with breast cancer, although we found an indication that, in postmenopausal women, its levels were lower in women with cancer. Serum PSA was associated with NAF PSA in postmenopausal women (p < 0.001). PSA levels in cancerous tissue were significantly lower than in benign breast specimens from subjects without cancer (p = 0.011), whereas levels of PSA in histologically benign specimens from subjects with cancer were intermediate. Our results suggest that serum testosterone is increased and NAF PSA is decreased in women with breast cancer, with PSA expression being higher in normal than in cancerous breast tissues. NAF and serum PSA levels in postmenopausal women are correlated, suggesting that as laboratory assessment of PSA becomes more sensitive, serum PSA may become useful in

  19. Updated Results and Patterns of Failure in a Randomized Hypofractionation Trial for High-risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, Stefano; Strigari, Lidia; Gomellini, Sara; Saracino, Biancamaria; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Pinnaro, Paola; Pinzi, Valentina; Arcangeli, Giorgio

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results and patterns of failure after conventional and hypofractionated radiation therapy in high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This randomized phase III trial compared conventional fractionation (80 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction in 8 weeks) vs hypofractionation (62 Gy at 3.1 Gy per fraction in 5 weeks) in combination with 9-month androgen deprivation therapy in 168 patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), freedom from local failure (FFLF), and freedom from distant failure (FFDF) were analyzed. Results: In a median follow-up of 70 months, biochemical failure (BF) occurred in 35 of the 168 patients (21%) in the study. Among these 35 patients, local failure (LF) only was detected in 11 (31%), distant failure (DF) only in 16 (46%), and both LF and DF in 6 (17%). In 2 patients (6%) BF has not yet been clinically detected. The risk reduction by hypofractionation was significant in BF (10.3%) but not in LF and DF. We found that hypofractionation, with respect to conventional fractionation, determined only an insignificant increase in the actuarial FFBF but no difference in FFLF and FFDF, when considering the entire group of patients. However, an increase in the 5-year rates in all 3 endpoints-FFBF, FFLF, and FFDF-was observed in the subgroup of patients with a pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (iPSA) level of 20 ng/mL or less. On multivariate analysis, the type of fractionation, iPSA level, Gleason score of 4+3 or higher, and T stage of 2c or higher have been confirmed as independent prognostic factors for BF. High iPSA levels and Gleason score of 4+3 or higher were also significantly associated with an increased risk of DF, whereas T stage of 2c or higher was the only independent variable for LF. Conclusion: Our results confirm the isoeffectiveness of the 2 fractionation schedules used in this study, although a benefit in favor of hypofractionation cannot be excluded in the subgroup of

  20. Structural investigation of the alpha-1-antichymotrypsin: prostate-specific antigen complex by comparative model building.

    PubMed Central

    Villoutreix, B. O.; Lilja, H.; Pettersson, K.; Lövgren, T.; Teleman, O.

    1996-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), produced by prostate cells, provides an excellent serum marker for prostate cancer. It belongs to the human kallikrein family of enzymes, a second prostate-derived member of which is human glandular kallikrein-1 (hK2). Active PSA and hK2 are both 237-residue kallikrein-like proteases, based on sequence homology. An hK2 model structure based on the serine protease fold is presented and compared to PSA and six other serine proteases in order to analyze in depth the role of the surface-accessible loops surrounding the active site. The results show that PSA and hK2 share extensive structural similarity and that most amino acid replacements are centered on the loops surrounding the active site. Furthermore, the electrostatic potential surfaces are very similar for PSA and hK2. PSA interacts with at least two serine protease inhibitors (serpins): alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) and protein C inhibitor (PCI). Three-dimensional model structures of the uncleaved ACT molecule were developed based upon the recent X-ray structure of uncleaved antithrombin. The serpin was docked both to PSA and hK2. Amino acid replacements and electrostatic complementarities indicate that the overall orientation of the proteins in these complexes is reasonable. In order to investigate PSA's heparin interaction sites, electrostatic computations were carried out on PSA, hK2, protein C, ACT, and PCI. Two heparin binding sites are suggested on the PSA surface and could explain the enhanced complex formation between PSA and PCI, while inhibiting the formation of the ACT-PSA complex, PSA, hK2, and their preliminary complexes with ACT should facilitate the understanding and prediction of structural and functional properties for these important proteins also with respect to prostate diseases. PMID:8732755

  1. 3D MR-Spectroscopic Imaging Assessment of Metabolic Activity in the Prostate During the PSA 'Bounce' Following {sup 125}Iodine Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kirilova, Anna; Damyanovich, Andrei; Crook, Juanita; Jezioranski, John; Wallace, Kris; Pintilie, Melania

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: A temporary increase in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values is observed in 30%-40% of men following {sup 125} I brachytherapy (BT) for prostate cancer. We present the results of a study to characterize prostate metabolic activity during the PSA 'bounce' and to correlate metabolic changes with PSA levels using three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (3D-MRSI). Methods and Materials: 3D-MRSI was performed in 24 patients during the PSA bounce. Eight of these had also had a baseline 3D-MRSI scan before BT for the purpose of tumor mapping. The 3D-MRSI was repeated at 6- and 12-month intervals, and PSA levels were monitored every 3 months. Twenty-one of the patients had favorable-risk prostate cancer, and 3 had intermediate risk. Results: The choline+creatine signal intensity, although markedly reduced, was observable following BT. Diffuse activity not corresponding to original biopsy-positive sites was observed in 22 cases, and 2 cases were documented to have local recurrence. No statistically significant correlation between metabolic activity and PSA levels at each interval was found. Conclusion: Post-BT prostate 3D-MRSI shows evidence of diffuse metabolic activity unrelated to residual malignancy. This supports the benign nature of the PSA bounce and suggests an inflammatory etiology. In the situation of a rising PSA, observation of focal activity on MRI/3D-MRSI could be a useful adjunct to suggest local recurrence at an earlier interval after brachytherapy when prostate biopsies would still be unhelpful. Longer follow-up is necessary to confirm the complex relationship between metabolic activity and PSA levels.

  2. On the use of prostate-specific antigen for screening of prostate cancer in European Randomised Study for Screening of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bangma, Chris H; van Schaik, Ron H; Blijenberg, Bert G; Roobol, Monique J; Lilja, Hans; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan

    2010-11-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been the main drive for early detection of prostate cancer (PCa), including in population-based screening as in the European Randomised Study for Screening of Prostate Cancer (ERSPC). The specificity of PSA to indicate men with biopsy detectable prostate cancer can be improved by adding information obtained by new biomarkers, such as PSA isoforms. This improvement is needed to increase the efficacy of the screening procedure for the population-based as well as the individual screening. Various PSA isoforms, kallikreins and molecular markers have been validated in various cohorts from ERSPC of men with and without PCa in order to design the optimal diagnostic procedure for screening asymptomatic men. So far, most promising results have been obtained from the analysis of free PSA, proPSA, nicked PSA and hK2. The use of free PSA in addition to total PSA reduces the number of negative sextant biopsies at a PSA cut-off level of 3 ng/ml at initial screening with 30%, at the cost of losing 10% of detectable cancers that are predominantly well differentiated on histology. Further addition of PSA isoforms and hK2 only improve ROC curves in selected samples by a maximum of 5%. Molecular markers like PCA3 and TMPRSS2 in urine do not appear to be useful but they have been assessed insufficiently so far. The level of PSA at initial screening is highly predictive for the chance of being diagnosed with PCa later on in life. The changes in PSA over time after initial screening (like PSA-velocity and PSA-doubling time) are statistically different between men with detectable cancers versus those without (PSA-doubling time 5.1 versus 6.1 years), but this does not contribute significantly to population-based screening overall. Changes in specificity need to be related to a cost efficacy evaluation in the final analysis of ERSPC. PMID:21047594

  3. The impact of hypoxemia on serum total and free prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ozge, Cengiz; Bozlu, Murat; Ozgur, Eylem Sercan; Tek, Mesut; Tunckiran, Ahmet; Muslu, Necati; Ilvan, Ahmet

    2015-05-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the most important biochemical marker in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with prostate cancer. In recent years, a relationship between PSA levels and hypoxic conditions has been described. However, no study has investigated the PSA levels in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of hypoxemia on serum total (tPSA) and free PSA (fPSA) levels in patients with COPD. Between January 2010 and January 2014, 95 male patients who hospitalized for acute exacerbations of COPD and 80 control subjects were enrolled in the study. Serum tPSA and fPSA levels and f/tPSA ratios were determined in all patients on the first day of hospitalization (exacerbation) and 7 days after the treatment (stable state). Statistical analysis included paired t test and Mann-Whitney U test. No statistically significant differences were found between COPD and control groups with regard to the baseline characteristics, except for smoking status. The levels of serum tPSA and fPSA during exacerbation of COPD were significantly higher than the levels of the stable period (p < 0.01), whereas f/tPSA ratio did not change (p > 0.05). Hypoxemia during acute exacerbation of COPD can cause a rise in serum tPSA and fPSA levels, but f/tPSA ratio is not affected. Acute exacerbation of COPD may be added to list of the events in which PSA measurements must be interpreted with caution. PMID:25837435

  4. Medications and surgical interventions for benign prostatic hyperplasia are potential confounders of prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Modi, Parth; Helfand, Brian T; McVary, Kevin T

    2010-07-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the most widely used marker for prostate cancer (CaP) screening and monitoring benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) progression. However, lack of an established abnormal threshold and the presence of other benign processes confound the interpretation of PSA levels. Many factors besides inflammation, trauma, and instrumentation can influence PSA levels; specifically, BPH and its associated medical and surgical therapies frequently complicate the interpretation of this serum blood test. For example, the commonly used 5 alpha reductase inhibitor (5ARI) medications directly affect PSA levels by decreasing prostate volume. The amount of time and potentially even the 5ARI formulary a patient is administered has been implicated to directly impact the degree of reduction in PSA (a proxy for prostate volume). In addition, each of the currently available surgical procedures for BPH appears to remove varying amounts of prostatic adenoma. This directly confounds CaP screening because each procedure is associated with a relatively specific postoperative nadir PSA level, and PSA kinetics are not well described in the literature. Taken together, it is important for clinicians to comprehend that BPH and its associated medical and surgical interventions should directly influence their interpretation of PSA and PSA velocity when screening for CaP or following BPH progression. PMID:20467844

  5. Comparison of various assay systems for prostate-specific antigen standardization.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, M; Akimoto, S; Akaza, H; Arai, Y; Usami, M; Imai, K; Tanaka, Y; Yamazaki, H; Kawada, Y; Koiso, K

    1992-12-01

    To avoid confusion between serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values among various assay systems, clinical studies on the possibility of conversion among detection values were performed. The assay kits used for the PSA comparisons were MARKIT-F PA, MARKIT-M PA, EIKEN PA, PA test WAKO, Ball ELSA PSA, E-Test Tosoh II PA, PROS-CHECK PSA, DELFIA PSA and TANDEM-R PSA. Using each kit, the standards attached to each assay system were detected, and 142 sera samples from benign hypertrophies or prostate cancers were assayed for serum PSA values. By detecting the standards for each kit, slopes were obtained which were almost identical to those obtained from original assay system. The coefficients of correlation among the PSA detection systems, using patients' sera, were very high, and linear regression lines were also obtained. The results suggest that almost identical serum PSA values may be detected either by multiplying by a coefficient to bring it to the standard or using the conversion formula. PMID:1283993

  6. Relationship between prostate-specific antigen levels and ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohwaki, Kazuhiro; Endo, Fumiyasu; Hattori, Kazunori; Muraishi, Osamu

    2013-05-01

    We examined the association between prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and daily mean ambient temperature on the day of the test in healthy men who had three annual checkups. We investigated 9,694 men who visited a hospital for routine health checkups in 2007, 2008, and 2009. Although the means and medians of ambient temperature for the three years were similar, the mode in 2008 (15.8 °C) was very different from those in 2007 and 2009 (22.4 °C and 23.2 °C). After controlling for age, body mass index, and hematocrit, a multiple regression analysis revealed a U-shaped relationship between ambient temperature and PSA in 2007 and 2009 (P < 0.001 and P = 0.004, respectively), but not in 2008 (P = 0.779). In 2007, PSA was 13.5 % higher at 5 °C and 10.0 % higher at 30 °C than that at 18.4 °C (nadir). In 2009, PSA was 7.3 % higher at 5 °C and 6.8 % at 30 °C compared with the level at 17.7 °C (nadir). In logistic regression analysis, a U-shaped relationship was found for the prevalence of a higher PSA (> 2.5 ng/mL) by ambient temperature, with the lowest likelihood of having a high PSA at 17.8 °C in 2007 (P = 0.038) and 15.5 °C in 2009 (P = 0.033). When tested at 30 °C, there was a 57 % excess risk of having a high PSA in 2007 and a 61 % higher risk in 2009 compared with those at each nadir temperature. We found a U-shaped relationship between PSA and ambient temperature with the lowest level of PSA at 15-20 °C.

  7. Relationship between prostate-specific antigen levels and ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohwaki, Kazuhiro; Endo, Fumiyasu; Hattori, Kazunori; Muraishi, Osamu

    2014-07-01

    We examined the association between prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and daily mean ambient temperature on the day of the test in healthy men who had three annual checkups. We investigated 9,694 men who visited a hospital for routine health checkups in 2007, 2008, and 2009. Although the means and medians of ambient temperature for the three years were similar, the mode in 2008 (15.8 °C) was very different from those in 2007 and 2009 (22.4 °C and 23.2 °C). After controlling for age, body mass index, and hematocrit, a multiple regression analysis revealed a U-shaped relationship between ambient temperature and PSA in 2007 and 2009 ( P < 0.001 and P = 0.004, respectively), but not in 2008 ( P = 0.779). In 2007, PSA was 13.5 % higher at 5 °C and 10.0 % higher at 30 °C than that at 18.4 °C (nadir). In 2009, PSA was 7.3 % higher at 5 °C and 6.8 % at 30 °C compared with the level at 17.7 °C (nadir). In logistic regression analysis, a U-shaped relationship was found for the prevalence of a higher PSA (> 2.5 ng/mL) by ambient temperature, with the lowest likelihood of having a high PSA at 17.8 °C in 2007 ( P = 0.038) and 15.5 °C in 2009 ( P = 0.033). When tested at 30 °C, there was a 57 % excess risk of having a high PSA in 2007 and a 61 % higher risk in 2009 compared with those at each nadir temperature. We found a U-shaped relationship between PSA and ambient temperature with the lowest level of PSA at 15-20 °C.

  8. Highly specific expression of luciferase gene in lungs of naive nude mice directed by prostate-specific antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongwei; Li Jinzhong; Helm, Gregory A.; Pan Dongfeng . E-mail: Dongfeng_pan@yahoo.com

    2005-09-09

    PSA promoter has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy in prostate cancer models. Characterization of foreign gene overexpression in normal animals elicited by PSA promoter should help evaluate therapy safety. Here we constructed an adenovirus vector (AdPSA-Luc), containing firefly luciferase gene under the control of the 5837 bp long prostate-specific antigen promoter. A charge coupled device video camera was used to non-invasively image expression of firefly luciferase in nude mice on days 3, 7, 11 after injection of 2 x 10{sup 9} PFU of AdPSA-Luc virus via tail vein. The result showed highly specific expression of the luciferase gene in lungs of mice from day 7. The finding indicates the potential limitations of the suicide gene therapy of prostate cancer based on selectivity of PSA promoter. By contrary, it has encouraging implications for further development of vectors via PSA promoter to enable gene therapy for pulmonary diseases.

  9. Prostate specific antigen density for discriminating prostate cancer from benign prostatic hyperplasia in the gray zone of prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Uno, H; Koide, T; Kuriyama, M; Ban, Y; Deguchi, T; Kawada, Y

    1999-07-01

    Serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) is currently the best blood marker for prostate cancer. However, low specificity for detection of prostate cancer, especially in the gray zone of PSA, is a problem. We evaluated the clinical significance of PSA density (PSAD) in gray zone PSA cases with conversion of serum PSA to a Stanford reference value. In a series of histologically confirmed 63 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients and 234 prostate cancer patients, 36 BPH patients and 25 prostate cancer patients had gray zone PSA levels. Serum PSA was measured with the Markit-F or Markit-M PA assay. All data were converted to Stanford reference values. We used transabdominal ultrasound to determine prostate volume. PSAD was determined as the serum PSA/prostate volume ratio. The mean PSA values for BPH and prostate cancer were 6.42 +/- 1.80 and 7.80 +/- 2.15 ng/ml (p = 0.0116), respectively, and prostate volume was 33.4 +/- 14.1 ml and 17.1 +/- 8.2 ml, respectively (p < 0.0001). The mean PSAD for prostate cancer was 0.572 +/- 0.363 while that for BPH was 0.218 +/- 0.085 (p = 0.0001). Cut-off values with sensitivity > 90% were 0.218 for PSAD and 30 ml for prostate volume. At these cut-off values, specificity reached 56% for each marker. In discriminating prostate cancer from BPH in the gray zone of PSA, PSAD demonstrated better performance than PSA. PMID:10466060

  10. Prostate specific antigen detection using AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, B. S.; Wang, H. T.; Lele, T. P.; Tseng, Y.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Johnson, J. W.; Rajagopal, P.; Roberts, J. C.; Piner, E. L.; Linthicum, K. J.

    2007-09-01

    Antibody-functionalized Au-gated AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA). The PSA antibody was anchored to the gate area through the formation of carboxylate succinimdyl ester bonds with immobilized thioglycolic acid. The AlGaN /GaN HEMT drain-source current showed a rapid response of less than 5s when target PSA in a buffer at clinical concentrations was added to the antibody-immobilized surface. The authors could detect a wide range of concentrations from 10pg/mlto1μg/ml. The lowest detectable concentration was two orders of magnitude lower than the cutoff value of PSA measurements for clinical detection of prostate cancer. These results clearly demonstrate the promise of portable electronic biological sensors based on AlGaN /GaN HEMTs for PSA screening.

  11. A Community Jury on PSA screening: what do well-informed men want the government to do about prostate cancer screening—a qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rychetnik, Lucie; Doust, Jenny; Thomas, Rae; Gardiner, Robert; MacKenzie, Geraldine; Glasziou, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cancer screening policies and programmes should take account of public values and concerns. This study sought to determine the priorities, values and concerns of men who were ‘fully informed’ about the benefits and harms of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening; and empirically examine the value of a community jury in eliciting public values on PSA screening. Setting Community jury was convened on the Gold Coast, Queensland (Australia) to consider PSA screening benefits and harms, and whether government campaigns on PSA screening should be conducted. Participants 27 men (volunteers) aged 50–70 with no personal history of prostate cancer and willing to attend jury 6–7 April 2013: 12 were randomly allocated to jury (11 attended). Outcome measures A qualitative analysis was conducted of the jury deliberations (audio-recorded and transcribed) to elicit the jury's views and recommendations. A survey determined the impact of the jury process on participants’ individual testing decisions compared with control group. Results The jury concluded governments should not invest in programmes focused on PSA screening directed at the public because the PSA test did not offer sufficient reassurance or benefit and could raise unnecessary alarm. It recommended an alternative programme to support general practitioners to provide patients with better quality and more consistent information about PSA screening. After the jury, participants were less likely to be tested in the future compared with the controls, but around half said they would still consider doing so. Conclusions The jury's unanimous verdict about government programmes was notable in the light of their divergent views on whether or not they would be screened themselves in the future. Community juries provide valuable insights into the priorities and concerns of men weighing up the benefits and harms of PSA screening. It will be important to assess the degree to which the findings are generalisable

  12. Can Urinary PCA3 Supplement PSA in the Early Detection of Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Wei, John T.; Feng, Ziding; Partin, Alan W.; Brown, Elissa; Thompson, Ian; Sokoll, Lori; Chan, Daniel W.; Lotan, Yair; Kibel, Adam S.; Busby, J. Erik; Bidair, Mohamed; Lin, Daniel W.; Taneja, Samir S.; Viterbo, Rosalia; Joon, Aron Y.; Dahlgren, Jackie; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Sanda, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Given the limited sensitivity and specificity of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), its widespread use as a screening tool has raised concerns for the overdiagnosis of low-risk and the underdiagnosis of high-grade prostate cancer. To improve early-detection biopsy decisions, the National Cancer Institute conducted a prospective validation trial to assess the diagnostic performance of the prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) urinary assay for the detection of prostate cancer among men screened with PSA. Patients and Methods In all, 859 men (mean age, 62 years) from 11 centers scheduled for a diagnostic prostate biopsy between December 2009 and June 2011 were enrolled. The primary outcomes were to assess whether PCA3 could improve the positive predictive value (PPV) for an initial biopsy (at a score > 60) and the negative predictive value (NPV) for a repeat biopsy (at a score < 20). Results For the detection of any cancer, PPV was 80% (95% CI, 72% to 86%) in the initial biopsy group, and NPV was 88% (95% CI, 81% to 93%) in the repeat biopsy group. The addition of PCA3 to individual risk estimation models (which included age, race/ethnicity, prior biopsy, PSA, and digital rectal examination) improved the stratification of cancer and of high-grade cancer. Conclusion These data independently support the role of PCA3 in reducing the burden of prostate biopsies among men undergoing a repeat prostate biopsy. For biopsy-naive patients, a high PCA3 score (> 60) significantly increases the probability that an initial prostate biopsy will identify cancer. PMID:25385735

  13. Long-Term Failure Patterns and Survival in a Randomized Dose-Escalation Trial for Prostate Cancer. Who Dies of Disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Kuban, Deborah A.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Cheung, M. Rex; Lee, Andrew K.; Choi, Seungtaek; Frank, Steven; Pollack, Alan

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To report long-term failure patterns and survival in a randomized radiotherapy dose escalation trial for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: A total of 301 patients with Stage T1b-T3 prostate cancer treated to 70 Gy versus 78 Gy now have a median follow-up of 9 years. Failure patterns and survival were compared between dose levels. The cumulative incidence of death from prostate cancer versus other causes was examined and regression analysis was used to establish predictive factors. Results: Patients with pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >10 ng/mL or high-risk disease had higher biochemical and clinical failures rates when treated to 70 Gy. These patients also had a significantly higher risk of dying of prostate cancer. Patients <70 years old at treatment died of prostate cancer nearly three times more frequently than of other causes when they were radiated to 70 Gy, whereas those treated to 78 Gy died of other causes more frequently. Patients age 70 or older treated to 70 Gy died of prostate cancer as often as other causes, and those receiving 78 Gy never died of prostate cancer within 10 years of follow-up. In regression analysis, factors predicting for death from prostate cancer were pretreatment PSA >10.5 ng/mL, Gleason score 9 and 10, recurrence within 2.6 years of radiation, and doubling time of <3.6 months at the time of recurrence. Conclusions: Moderate dose escalation (78 Gy) decreases biochemical and clinical failure as well as prostate cancer death in patients with pretreatment PSA >10 ng/mL or high-risk disease.

  14. Very Early PSA Response to Abiraterone in mCRPC Patients: A Novel Prognostic Factor Predicting Overall Survival

    PubMed Central

    Facchini, Gaetano; Caffo, Orazio; Ortega, Cinzia; D'Aniello, Carmine; Di Napoli, Marilena; Cecere, Sabrina C.; Della Pepa, Chiara; Crispo, Anna; Maines, Francesca; Ruatta, Fiorella; Iovane, Gelsomina; Pisconti, Salvatore; Montella, Maurizio; Berretta, Massimiliano; Pignata, Sandro; Cavaliere, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abiraterone Acetate (AA) is approved for the treatment of mCRPC after failure of androgen deprivation therapy in whom chemotherapy is not yet clinically indicated and for treatment of mCRPC progressed during or after docetaxel-based chemotherapy regimen. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of early PSA decline for detection of therapy success or failure in mCRPC patients treated with AA in post chemotherapy setting. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 87 patients with mCRPC treated with AA. Serum PSA levels were evaluated after 15, 90 days and then monthly. The PSA flare phenomenon was evaluated, according to a confirmation value at least 1 week apart. The primary endpoint was to demonstrate that an early PSA decline correlates with a longer progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). The secondary endpoind was to demonstrate a correlation between better outcome and demographic and clinical patient characteristics. Results: We have collected data of 87 patients between Sep 2011 and Sep 2014. Early PSA response (≥50% from baseline at 15 days) was found in 56% evaluated patients and confirmed in 29 patients after 90 days. The median PFS was 5.5 months (4.6–6.5) and the median OS was 17.1 months (8.8–25.2). In early responders patients (PSA RR ≥ 50% at 15 days), we found a significant statistical advantage in terms of PFS at 1 year, HR 0.28, 95%CI 0.12–0.65, p = 0.003, and OS, HR 0.21 95% CI 0.06–0.72, p = 0.01. The results in PFS at 1 years and OS reached statistical significance also in the evaluation at 90 days. Conclusion: A significant proportion (78.6%) of patients achieved a rapid response in terms of PSA decline. Early PSA RR (≥50% at 15 days after start of AA) can provide clinically meaningful information and can be considered a surrogate of longer PFS and OS. PMID:27242530

  15. Joint enhancement strategy applied in ECL biosensor based on closed bipolar electrodes for the detection of PSA.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hai-Wei; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Xi-Cheng; Wu, Mei-Sheng; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    A highly sensitive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor was developed on the basis of a closed bipolar electrode (BPE) apparatus for the analysis of prostate specific antigen (PSA). Bipolar modifications bring up two different stages of enhancement on the same electrode. Anodic enhancement was conducted by modifying gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) to catalyze the anodic ECL reaction between luminol and hydrogen peroxide. Cathodic introduction of thionine tagged PSA antibody led to a further pertinently enhancement synchronized with the PSA amount variation, because the existence of thionine greatly increased the rate of electron gains on cathode, leading to the corresponding acceleration of anodic ECL reaction. The more thionine modified target molecules were introduced, the faster luminol was oxidized, the higher faraday current approached, and sensitive quantification was realized in correlation with the responsive ECL intensity differences. The quantification resulted in a good determination range between 0.1pg/mL and 0.1µg/mL. This strategy mainly took advantage of the special structure of closed BPE to realize a simultaneous amplification on both ends of BPE. Moreover, the platform had a potential of providing a multi-functional strategy for the realization of other bio-detections by simply substituting the PSA sandwich structure with other bio-structures. PMID:27154662

  16. Label-free electrochemical aptasensing of the human prostate-specific antigen using gold nanospears.

    PubMed

    Rahi, A; Sattarahmady, N; Heli, H

    2016-08-15

    Gold nanospears were electrodeposited with the assistance of arginine as a soft template and precise selection of experimental parameters. The nanospears were then employed as a transducer to immobilize an aptamer of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and fabrication of a label-free electrochemical aptasensor. The aptasensor was employed for the detection of PSA with a linear concentration range of 0.125-200ngmL(-1) and a limit of detection of 50pgmL(-1). The aptasensor was successfully applied to detect PSA in blood serum samples of healthy and patient persons. PMID:27260456

  17. Predictors of survival in prostate cancer patients with bone metastasis and extremely high prostate-specific antigen levels

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Kyo Chul; Park, Sang Un; Kim, Ki Hong; Rha, Koon Ho; Hong, Sung Joon; Yang, Seung Choul; Chung, Byung Ha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a surrogate marker of disease progression; however, its predictive ability in the extreme ranges is unknown. We determined the predictors of survival in patients with bone metastatic prostate cancer (BMPCa) and with extremely high PSA levels. Methods Treatment-naïve patients (n = 248) diagnosed with BMPCa between December 2002 and June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Clinicopathological features at diagnosis, namely age, body mass index, serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and PSA levels, PSA nadir, time to PSA nadir and its maintenance period, PSA declining velocity, Gleason grade, clinical T stage, pain score, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score (ECOG PS), and the number of bone metastases were assessed. The patients were stratified according to PSA ranges of <20 ng/mL, 20–100 ng/mL, 100–1000 ng/mL, and 1000–10,000 ng/mL. Study endpoints were castration-resistant PCa (CRPC)-free survival and cancer-specific survival (CSS). Results Patients with higher PSA and ALP levels showed more bone lesions (P < 0.001). During the follow-up period (median, 39.9 months; interquartile range, 21.5–65.9 months), there were no differences between the groups in terms of the survival endpoints. High ALP levels, shorter time to PSA nadir, and pain were associated with an increased risk of progression to CRPC, and high ALP levels, ECOG PS ≥ 1, and higher PSA nadir independently predicted CSS. Conclusions PSA response to androgen deprivation therapy and serum ALP are reliable predictors of survival in patients with BMPCa presenting with extremely high PSA levels. These patients should not be deterred from active treatment based on baseline PSA values. PMID:26157761

  18. PROSTATE-SPECIFIC ANTIGEN IS A “CHYMOTRYPSIN-LIKE” SERINE PROTEASE WITH UNIQUE P1 SUBSTRATE SPECIFICITY

    PubMed Central

    LeBeau, Aaron M.; Singh, Pratap; Isaacs, John T.; Denmeade, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA), a serine protease belonging to the human kallikrein family, is best known as a prostate cancer biomarker. Emerging evidence suggests that PSA may also play a salient role in prostate cancer development and progression. With large amounts of enzymatically active PSA continuously and selectively produced by all stages of prostate cancer, PSA is an attractive target. PSA inhibitors, therefore, may represent a promising class of therapeutics and/or imaging agents. PSA displays chymotrypsin-like specificity, cleaving after hydrophobic residues, in addition to possessing a unique ability to cleave after glutamine in the P1 position. In this study, we investigated the structural motifs of the PSA S1 pocket that give it a distinct architecture and specificity when compared to the S1 pocket of chymotrypsin. Using the previously described PSA substrate Ser-Ser-Lys-Leu-Gln (SSKLQ) as a template, peptide aldehyde based inhibitors containing novel P1 aldehydes were made and tested against both proteases. Glutamine derivative aldehydes were highly specific for PSA while inhibitors with hydrophobic P1 aldehydes were potent inhibitors of both proteases with Ki values < 500 nM. The crystal structure of PSA was used to generate a model that allowed GOLD docking studies to be performed to further understand the critical interactions required for inhibitor binding to the S1 pockets of PSA and chymotrypsin. In conclusion, these results provide experimental and structural evidence that the S1 specificity pocket of PSA is distinctly different from that of chymotrypsin and that the development of highly specific PSA inhibitors is feasible. PMID:19281249

  19. Changes in antigenicity of porcine serum albumin in gamma-irradiated sausage extract by treatment with pepsin and trypsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Koth-Bong-Woo-Ri; Song, Eu-Jin; Lee, So-Young; Park, Jin-Gyu; Lee, Ju-Woon; Byun, Myung-Woo; Ahn, Dong-Hyun

    2011-11-01

    Pork is known as an allergenic food with porcine serum albumin (PSA, 66 kDa) representing the major allergen. This study was conducted to investigate the change in antigenicity of PSA in gamma-irradiated sausage extract treated with pepsin and trypsin. Sausage products (A and B) were irradiated at 1, 3, 10, and 20 kGy. After irradiation, sausage proteins were extracted and digested with pepsin (1:200, 30 min) and trypsin (1:300, 5, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min). The binding ability of PSA in extracts of the irradiated sausages (A and B) decreased by over 3 kGy relative to the binding ability of PSA in extracts of intact sausages and showed no notable differences when the dose of radiation ranged from 3 to 20 kGy. After treatment with pepsin and trypsin, the binding ability of PSA in extracts of the irradiated sausages was decreased more relative to that of intact sausages and showed no significant differences when the period of trypsin treatment is increased or when the dose of irradiation is increased. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) results indicated that there was no visible change in the intensity of the PSA band in extracts of the irradiated sausages. After pepsin and trypsin treatment, the intensity of PSA band faded with increasing doses of irradiation. In conclusion, antigenicity of PSA in pork sausages could be reduced by gamma irradiation.

  20. Association of prostate specific antigen concentration with lifestyle characteristics in Korean men.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hee-Yeon; Park, Hyosoon; Kwon, Min-Jung; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the relationships between demographics, lifestyle characteristics, and serum total prostate specific antigen (PSA) concentration and examined the population-based distribution of total PSA by age among 2,246 Korean men with a median age of 45 years. We obtained data about demographic and lifestyle characteristics based on self-reporting using a questionnaire. We also performed physical examinations, anthropometric measurements, and biochemical measurements. The PSA concentration increased with age and there was a significant difference in total PSA concentration between the age groups of 21-60 years and >60 years. Age>60 years, height≥1.8 m, a low frequency of alcohol consumption, and taking nutritional supplements showed a significantly increased odds ratio for increased PSA when 3.0 ng/ mL was chosen as the PSA cut-off level. Smoking status, BMI, percent body fat, diabetes mellitus, fatty liver, herbal medicine use, vitamin use, and diet were not significantly associated with total PSA regardless of the cut-off level. When interpreting a single PSA test, height, alcohol consumption, and nutritional supplement use should be considered, in addition to age. PMID:23317241

  1. Prospective investigation of change in the prostate-specific antigens after various urologic procedures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Chol; Shin, Yu Seob; Zhang, Li Tao; Kim, Dal Sik; Kim, Sung Zoo; Park, Nam Cheol; Ahn, Tai Young; Kim, Je Jong; Lee, Sung Won; So, Insuk; Park, Jong Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the most important marker in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with prostate cancer. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of various urologic procedures in prostatic area on serum free and total PSA levels. Subjects and methods A series of 62 patients (8 after digital rectal examination [DRE], 12 after transrectal ultrasonography [TRUS], 11 after rigid cystoscopy, 13 after prostatic massage, 8 after TRUS-guided prostate biopsy, and 10 after transurethral resection of prostate [TURP]) were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were taken from each patient before procedure and at 10, 30, 60, and 120 minutes after procedures. Results Prostate massage, rigid cystoscopy, TURP, and TRUS-guided prostate biopsy caused statistically significant rise in total and free PSA levels in the serum. There was no significant increase in total and free PSA levels in the serum after DRE and TRUS. The mean differences were greater for free PSA level in the serum for TURP, TRUS-guided prostate biopsy, prostate massage, and rigid cystoscopy. Conclusion Total and free PSA levels in the serum are altered by prostate massage, rigid cystoscopy, TRUS-guided prostate biopsy, and TURP. The PSA rises were related to the stimulation strength of the procedures. The total and free PSA levels were increased significantly from 10 minutes after procedures, except DRE and TRUS, and were increased to maximal level at 60 minutes after procedures. PMID:26251583

  2. Presentation of hepatocellular antigens

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, Arash; Crispe, Ian Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The liver is an organ in which antigen-specific T-cell responses manifest a bias toward immune tolerance. This is clearly seen in the rejection of allogeneic liver transplants, and multiple other phenomena suggest that this effect is more general. These include tolerance toward antigens introduced via the portal vein, immune failure to several hepatotropic viruses, the lack of natural liver-stage immunity to malaria parasites, and the frequent metastasis of cancers to the liver. Here we review the mechanisms by which T cells engage with hepatocellular antigens, the context in which such encounters occur, and the mechanisms that act to suppress a full T-cell response. While many mechanisms play a role, we will argue that two important processes are the constraints on the cross-presentation of hepatocellular antigens, and the induction of negative feedback inhibition driven by interferons. The constant exposure of the liver to microbial products from the intestine may drive innate immunity, rendering the local environment unfavorable for specific T-cell responses through this mechanism. Nevertheless, tolerance toward hepatocellular antigens is not monolithic and under specific circumstances allows both effective immunity and immunopathology. PMID:26924525

  3. Time-resolved fluorescence imaging (TRFI) for direct immunofluorescence of PSA and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin in prostatic tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Bjartell, A; Siivola, P; Hulkko, S; Pettersson, K; Rundt, K; Lilja, H; Lövgren, T

    1999-05-01

    We have developed a direct immunofluorescence technique utilising chelates of the lanthanide ions europium and terbium conjugated to monoclonal IgGs (Mabs) against prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) for the detection and quantification on the same tissue section. Strong signals without disturbance from tissue autofluorescence were demonstrated in paraffin sections of ten benign and six malignant prostate tissue specimens. The signal intensity increased linearly with the amount of labelled Mab until epitope saturation began. The highest concentrations of bound IgG in tissue sections were 27.3 fmol/pixel for ACT and 7.2 for PSA. Time-resolved fluorescence imaging (TRFI) offers an attractive method for histochemical studies based on specific and quantitative detection of fluorescent lanthanide chelates. PMID:12496823

  4. Measurement of GSTP1 promoter methylation in body fluids may complement PSA screening: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T; Giovannucci, E; Welge, J; Mallick, P; Tang, W-Y; Ho, S-M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening has low specificity. Assessment of methylation status in body fluids may complement PSA screening if the test has high specificity. Method: The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis of the sensitivity and specificity for prostate cancer detection of glutathione-s-transferase–π (GSTP1) methylation in body fluids (plasma, serum, whole blood, urine, ejaculate, and prostatic secretions). We conducted a comprehensive literature search on Medline (Pubmed). We included studies if they met all four of the following criteria: (1) measurement of DNA methylation in body fluids; (2) a case-control or case-only design; (3) publication in an English journal; and (4) adult subjects. Reviewers conducted data extraction independently using a standardised protocol. Twenty-two studies were finally included in this paper. Primer sequences and methylation method in each study were summarised and evaluated using meta-analyses. This paper represents a unique cross-disciplinary approach to molecular epidemiology. Results: The pooled specificity of GSTP1 promoter methylation measured in plasma, serum, and urine samples from negative-biopsy controls was 0.89 (95% CI, 0.80–0.95). Stratified analyses consistently showed a high specificity across different sample types and methylation methods (include both primer sequences and location). The pooled sensitivity was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.40–0.64). Conclusions: The pooled specificity of GSTP1 promoter methylation measures in plasma, serum, and urine was excellent and much higher than the specificity of PSA. The sensitivity of GSTP1 was modest, no higher than that of PSA. These results suggest that measurement of GSTP1 promoter methylation in plasma, serum, or urine samples may complement PSA screening for prostate cancer diagnosis. PMID:21654682

  5. An Eight-Year Experience of HDR Brachytherapy Boost for Localized Prostate Cancer: Biopsy and PSA Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Bachand, Francois; Martin, Andre-Guy; Beaulieu, Luc; Harel, Francois M.Sc.; Vigneault, Eric

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biochemical recurrence-free survival (bRFS), the 2-year biopsy outcome and the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce in patients with localized prostate cancer treated with an inversely planned high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost. Materials and methods: Data were collected from 153 patients treated between 1999 and 2006 with external beam pelvic radiation followed by an HDR Ir-192 prostate boost. These patients were given a boost of 18 to 20 Gy using inverse-planning with simulated annealing (IPSA).We reviewed and analyzed all prostate-specific antigen levels and control biopsies. Results: The median follow-up was 44 months (18-95 months). When categorized by risk of progression, 74.5% of patients presented an intermediate risk and 14.4% a high one. Prostate biopsies at 2 years posttreatment were negative in 86 of 94 patients (91.5%), whereas two biopsies were inconclusive. Biochemical control at 60 months was at 96% according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and the Phoenix consensus definitions. A PSA bounce (PSA values of 2 ng/mL or more above nadir) was observed in 15 patients of 123 (9.8%). The median time to bounce was 15.2 months (interquartile range, 11.0-17.7) and the median bounce duration 18.7 months (interquartile range, 12.1-29). The estimate of overall survival at 60 months was 97.1% (95% CI, 91.6-103%). Conclusions: Considering that inverse planned HDR brachytherapy prostate boosts led to an excellent biochemical response, with a 2-year negative biopsy rate, we recommend a conservative approach in face of a PSA bounce even though it was observed in 10% of patients.

  6. Detection of Local, Regional, and Distant Recurrence in Patients With PSA Relapse After External-Beam Radiotherapy Using {sup 11}C-Choline Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Breeuwsma, Anthonius J.; Pruim, Jan; Bergh, Alphons C.M. van den; Leliveld, Anna M.; Nijman, Rien J.M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Jong, Igle J. de

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: An elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level cannot distinguish between local-regional recurrences and the presence of distant metastases after treatment with curative intent for prostate cancer. With the advent of salvage treatment such as cryotherapy, it has become important to localize the site of recurrence (local or distant). In this study, the potential of {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET) to identify site of recurrence was investigated in patients with rising PSA after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy patients with histologically proven prostate cancer treated with EBRT and showing biochemical recurrence as defined by American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus statement and 10 patients without recurrence underwent a PET scan using 400 MBq {sup 11}C-choline intravenously. Biopsy-proven histology from the site of suspicion, findings with other imaging modalities, clinical follow-up and/or response to adjuvant therapy were used as comparative references. Results: None of the 10 patients without biochemical recurrence had a positive PET scan. Fifty-seven of 70 patients with biochemical recurrence (median PSA 9.1 ng/mL; mean PSA 12.3 ng/mL) showed an abnormal uptake pattern (sensitivity 81%). The site of recurrence was only local in 41 of 57 patients (mean PSA 11.1 ng/mL at scan), locoregionally and/or distant in 16 of 57 patients (mean PSA 17.7 ng/mL). Overall the positive predictive value and negative predictive value for {sup 11}C-choline PET scan were 1.0 and 0.44 respectively. Accuracy was 84%. Conclusions: {sup 11}C-choline PET scan is a sensitive technique to identify the site of recurrence in patients with PSA relapse after EBRT for prostate cancer.

  7. High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Gleason Score 8-10 and PSA Level {<=}15 ng/ mL Treated With Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, L. Christine; Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Murray, Brian C.; Reed, Joshua L.; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: With widespread prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, there has been an increase in men diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer defined by a Gleason score (GS) {>=}8 coupled with a relatively low PSA level. The optimal management of these patients has not been defined. Cause-specific survival (CSS), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated in brachytherapy patients with a GS {>=}8 and a PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL with or without androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to October 2005, 174 patients with GS {>=}8 and a PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL underwent permanent interstitial brachytherapy. Of the patients, 159 (91%) received supplemental external beam radiation, and 113 (64.9%) received ADT. The median follow-up was 6.6 years. The median postimplant Day 0 minimum percentage of the dose covering 90% of the target volume was 121.1% of prescription dose. Biochemical control was defined as a PSA level {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on survival. Results: Ten-year outcomes for patients without and with ADT were 95.2% and 92.5%, respectively, for CSS (p = 0.562); 86.5% and 92.6%, respectively, for bPFS (p = 0.204); and 75.2% and 66.0%, respectively, for OS (p = 0.179). The median post-treatment PSA level for biochemically controlled patients was <0.02 ng/mL. Multivariate analysis failed to identify any predictors for CSS, whereas bPFS and OS were most closely related to patient age. Conclusions: Patients with GS {>=}8 and PSA level {<=}15 ng/mL have excellent bPFS and CSS after brachytherapy with supplemental external beam radiotherapy. The use of ADT did not significantly impact bPFS, CSS, or OS.

  8. Salvage Radiotherapy for Rising Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels After Radical Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer: Dose-Response Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Johnny Ray; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Ko, Stephen J.; Macdonald, Orlan K.; Schild, Steven E.; Pisansky, Thomas M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) dose and biochemical failure (BcF) of prostate cancer in patients who received salvage prostate bed EBRT for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: We evaluated patients with a rising PSA level after prostatectomy who received salvage EBRT between July 1987 and October 2007. Patients receiving pre-EBRT androgen suppression were excluded. Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate the association between EBRT dose and BcF. Dose was considered as a numeric variable and as a categoric variable (low, <64.8 Gy; moderate, 64.8-66.6 Gy; high, >66.6 Gy). Results: A total of 364 men met study selection criteria and were followed up for a median of 6.0 years (range, 0.1-19.3 years). Median pre-EBRT PSA level was 0.6 ng/mL. The estimated cumulative rate of BcF at 5 years after EBRT was 50% overall and 57%, 46%, and 39% for the low-, moderate-, and high-dose groups, respectively. In multivariable analysis adjusting for potentially confounding variables, there was evidence of a linear trend between dose and BcF, with risk of BcF decreasing as dose increased (relative risk [RR], 0.77 [5.0-Gy increase]; p = 0.05). Compared with the low-dose group, there was evidence of a decreased risk of BcF for the high-dose group (RR, 0.60; p = 0.04), but no difference for the moderate-dose group (RR, 0.85; p = 0.41). Conclusions: Our results suggest a dose response for salvage EBRT. Doses higher than 66.6 Gy result in decreased risk of BcF.

  9. Mutational analysis of photosystem I polypeptides in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Targeted inactivation of psaI reveals the function of psaI in the structural organization of psaL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Q.; Hoppe, D.; Chitnis, V. P.; Odom, W. R.; Guikema, J. A.; Chitnis, P. R.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We cloned, characterized, and inactivated the psaI gene encoding a 4-kDa hydrophobic subunit of photosystem I from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The psaI gene is located 90 base pairs downstream from psaL, and is transcribed on 0.94- and 0.32-kilobase transcripts. To identify the function of PsaI, we generated a cyanobacterial strain in which psaI has been interrupted by a gene for chloramphenicol resistance. The wild-type and the mutant cells showed comparable rates of photoautotrophic growth at 25 degrees C. However, the mutant cells grew slower and contained less chlorophyll than the wild-type cells, when grown at 40 degrees C. The PsaI-less membranes from cells grown at either temperature showed a small decrease in NADP+ photoreduction rate when compared to the wild-type membranes. Inactivation of psaI led to an 80% decrease in the PsaL level in the photosynthetic membranes and to a complete loss of PsaL in the purified photosystem I preparations, but had little effect on the accumulation of other photosystem I subunits. Upon solubilization with nonionic detergents, photosystem I trimers could be obtained from the wild-type, but not from the PsaI-less membranes. The PsaI-less photosystem I monomers did not contain detectable levels of PsaL. Therefore, a structural interaction between PsaL and PsaI may stabilize the association of PsaL with the photosystem I core. PsaL in the wild-type and PsaI-less membranes showed equal resistance to removal by chaotropic agents. However, PsaL in the PsaI-less strain exhibited an increased susceptibility to proteolysis. From these data, we conclude that PsaI has a crucial role in aiding normal structural organization of PsaL within the photosystem I complex and the absence of PsaI alters PsaL organization, leading to a small, but physiologically significant, defect in photosystem I function.

  10. Risk of Pathologic Upgrading or Locally Advanced Disease in Early Prostate Cancer Patients Based on Biopsy Gleason Score and PSA: A Population-Based Study of Modern Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Caster, Joseph M.; Falchook, Aaron D.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Chen, Ronald C.

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncologists rely on available clinical information (biopsy Gleason score and prostate-specific antigen [PSA]) to determine the optimal treatment regimen for each prostate cancer patient. Existing published nomograms correlating clinical to pathologic extent of disease were based on patients treated in the 1980s and 1990s at select academic institutions. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database to examine pathologic outcomes (Gleason score and cancer stage) in early prostate cancer patients based on biopsy Gleason score and PSA concentration. Methods and Materials: This analysis included 25,858 patients whose cancer was diagnosed between 2010 and 2011, with biopsy Gleason scores of 6 to 7 and clinical stage T1 to T2 disease, who underwent radical prostatectomy. In subgroups based on biopsy Gleason score and PSA level, we report the proportion of patients with pathologically advanced disease (positive surgical margin or pT3-T4 disease) or whose Gleason score was upgraded. Logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with pathologic outcomes. Results: For patients with biopsy Gleason score 6 cancers, 84% of those with PSA <10 ng/mL had surgical T2 disease with negative margins; this decreased to 61% in patients with PSA of 20 to 29.9 ng/mL. Gleason score upgrading was seen in 43% (PSA: <10 ng/mL) to 61% (PSA: 20-29.9 ng/mL) of biopsy Gleason 6 patients. Patients with biopsy Gleason 7 cancers had a one-third (Gleason 3 + 4; PSA: <10 ng/mL) to two-thirds (Gleason 4 + 3; PSA: 20-29.9 ng/mL) probability of having pathologically advanced disease. Gleason score upgrading was seen in 11% to 19% of patients with biopsy Gleason 4 + 3 cancers. Multivariable analysis showed that higher PSA and older age were associated with Gleason score upgrading and pathologically advanced disease. Conclusions: This is the first population-based study to examine pathologic extent of disease and pathologic Gleason score

  11. Age-specific Serum Prostate Specific Antigen Ranges Among Apparently Healthy Nigerian Men Without Clinical Evidence of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ikuerowo, SO; Ajala, MO; Abolarinwa, AA; Omisanjo, OA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels increase with age and varies among different races and communities. The study was aimed at defining the age-specific reference ranges of serum PSA in our environment. Methods: We evaluated the relationship between age and serum PSA levels and the age-specific reference ranges of serum PSA among civil servants in Lagos, who underwent routine medical checkups. Criteria for inclusion were men who have no lower urinary tract symptoms, normal digital rectal examination and serum PSA ≤ 20 ng/ml. SPSS Statistic 21 was used for data evaluation and the mean, median, 95th percentile PSA levels were estimated. Pearson's correlation was used to examine the relationship, and P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: 4032 men met the criteria for inclusion in the evaluation. The mean age was 51.6 (range 40–70) years, and there was a strong correlation between serum PSA levels and age (r = 0.097, P < 0.001). PSA ranges of 0–2.5, >2.5–4.0, >4.0–10, and >10 ng/ml were found in 3218 (80%), 481 (12%), 284 (7%), and 52 (1%) men, respectively. The mean, median and the 95th percentile PSA for the overall group were 1.84, 1.33, and 5.2 ng/ml respectively. However the 95th percentile PSA levels for men aged 40–49, 50–59, and 60–70 years were 4.78, 5.47, and 8.93 ng/ml respectively. Conclusion: The age-specific PSA levels among Nigerian men for each age group is higher than what was described for men in the Western world. These reference ranges of serum PSA should be considered for men aged ≥40 years in our environment. PMID:27013850

  12. Ultrasensitive immunoassay for prostate specific antigen using scanning tunneling microscopy-based electrical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeong-Woo; Oh, Byung-Keun; Jang, Yong-Hark; Kang, Da-Yeon

    2008-07-01

    We characterized a vertically configured electrical detection system that used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to detect antigen-antibody binding. This technique could be used to easily construct a multiple measurement system in a protein chip. We utilized immunocomplexes comprised of our model protein, prostate specific antigen (PSA), corresponding antibody fragments, and gold nanoparticle-antibody conjugates. The electrical tunneling current between the STM tip and these complexes exhibited a peaklike pulse, the frequency of which depended on the surface density of the bound complexes. We could therefore quantitatively measure PSA concentrations as low as 10fg/mL using periodogram analysis of this peak frequency.

  13. Minimally Informative Prior Distributions for PSA

    SciTech Connect

    Dana L. Kelly; Robert W. Youngblood; Kurt G. Vedros

    2010-06-01

    A salient feature of Bayesian inference is its ability to incorporate information from a variety of sources into the inference model, via the prior distribution (hereafter simply “the prior”). However, over-reliance on old information can lead to priors that dominate new data. Some analysts seek to avoid this by trying to work with a minimally informative prior distribution. Another reason for choosing a minimally informative prior is to avoid the often-voiced criticism of subjectivity in the choice of prior. Minimally informative priors fall into two broad classes: 1) so-called noninformative priors, which attempt to be completely objective, in that the posterior distribution is determined as completely as possible by the observed data, the most well known example in this class being the Jeffreys prior, and 2) priors that are diffuse over the region where the likelihood function is nonnegligible, but that incorporate some information about the parameters being estimated, such as a mean value. In this paper, we compare four approaches in the second class, with respect to their practical implications for Bayesian inference in Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). The most commonly used such prior, the so-called constrained noninformative prior, is a special case of the maximum entropy prior. This is formulated as a conjugate distribution for the most commonly encountered aleatory models in PSA, and is correspondingly mathematically convenient; however, it has a relatively light tail and this can cause the posterior mean to be overly influenced by the prior in updates with sparse data. A more informative prior that is capable, in principle, of dealing more effectively with sparse data is a mixture of conjugate priors. A particular diffuse nonconjugate prior, the logistic-normal, is shown to behave similarly for some purposes. Finally, we review the so-called robust prior. Rather than relying on the mathematical abstraction of entropy, as does the constrained

  14. The current state of prostate-specific antigen testing.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ryan; Hornberger, Brad

    2016-09-01

    Since prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing was approved in 1994, the incidence of metastasis and mortality from prostate cancer have significantly decreased. However, PSA screening for prostate cancer has limitations and few large randomized controlled trials have been conducted to determine the mortality benefit of PSA screening. Two studies that have been conducted are the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) screening trial and the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC). These were the two main studies the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) used in its recommendation against prostate cancer screening in 2012. However, new evidence has demonstrated that the PLCO trial had significant limitations and the results of the ERSPC trial were more significant than previously thought. This article describes the strengths and weaknesses of the USPSTF's recommendation, along with current guidelines for prostate cancer screening. PMID:27575906

  15. Prostate-specific antigen kinetics following hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy boost as post-external beam radiotherapy versus conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phak, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Hun Jung; Kim, Woo Chul

    2015-01-01

    Background Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to compare the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics between conventionally fractionated external beam radiotherapy (CF-EBRT) and SBRT boost after whole pelvis EBRT (WP-EBRT) in localized prostate cancer. Methods A total of 77 patients with localized prostate cancer [T-stage, T1–T3; Gleason score (GS) 5–9; PSA < 20 ng/mL] were enrolled. A total of 35 patients were treated with SBRT boost (21 Gy in 3 fractions) after WP-EBRT and 42 patients were treated with CF-EBRT (45 Gy WP-EBRT and boost of 25.2–30.6 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions). PSA nadir and rate of change in PSA (slope) were calculated and compared. Results With a median follow-up of 52.4 months (range, 14–74 months), the median PSA nadir and slope for SBRT boost were 0.29 ng/mL and −0.506, −0.235, −0.129, and −0.092 ng/mL/mo, respectively, for durations of 1 year, 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years postradiotherapy. Similarly, for CF-EBRT, the median PSA nadir and slopes were 0.39 ng/mL and −0.720 ng/mL/mo, −0.204 ng/mL/mo, −0.121 ng/mL/mo, and −0.067 ng/mL/mo, respectively. The slope of CF-EBRT was significantly different with a greater median rate of change for 1 year postradiotherapy than that of SBRT boost (P = 0.018). Contrastively, the slopes of SBRT boost for durations of 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years tended to be continuously greater than that of CF-EBRT. The significantly lower PSA nadir was observed in SBRT boost (median nadir 0.29 ng/mL) compared with CF-EBRT (median nadir 0.35 ng/mL, P = 0.025). Five-year biochemical failure (BCF) free survival was 94.3% for SBRT boost and 78.6% for CF-EBRT (P = 0.012). Conclusion Patients treated with SBRT boost after WP-EBRT experienced a lower PSA nadir and there tended to be a continuously greater rate of decline of PSA for durations of 2 years, 3 years, and

  16. Cancer detection rates of different prostate biopsy regimens in patients with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Hoşcan, Mustafa Burak; Özorak, Alper; Oksay, Taylan; Perk, Hakkı; Armağan, Abdullah; Soyupek, Sedat; Serel, Tekin Ahmet; Koşar, Alim

    2014-07-01

    We aimed to evaluate the cancer detection rates of 6-, 10-, 12-core biopsy regimens and the optimal biopsy protocol for prostate cancer diagnosis in patients with renal failure. A total of 122 consecutive patients with renal failure underwent biopsy with age-specific prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels up to 20 ng/mL. The 12-core biopsy technique (sextant biopsy + lateral base, lateral mid-zone, lateral apex, bilaterally) performed to all patients. Pathology results were examined separately for each sextant, 10-core that exclude parasagittal mid-zones from 12-cores (10a), 10-core that exclude apex zones from 12-cores (10b) and 12-core biopsy regimens. Of 122 patients, 37 (30.3%) were positive for prostate cancer. The cancer detection rates for sextant, 10a, 10b and 12 cores were 17.2%, 29%, 23.7% and 30.7%, respectively. Biopsy techniques of 10a, 10b and 12 cores increased the cancer detection rates by 40%, 27.5% and 43.2% among the sextant technique, respectively. Biopsy techniques of 10a and 12 cores increased the cancer detection rates by 17.1% and 21.6% among 10b biopsy technique, respectively. There were no statistical differences between 12 core and 10a core about cancer detection rate. Adding lateral cores to sextant biopsy improves the cancer detection rates. In our study, 12-core biopsy technique increases the cancer detection rate by 5.4% among 10a core but that was not statistically different. On the other hand, 12-core biopsy technique includes all biopsy regimens. We therefore suggest 12-core biopsy or minimum 10-core strategy incorporating six peripheral biopsies with elevated age- specific PSA levels up to 20 ng/mL in patients with renal failure. PMID:24797801

  17. Elecsys CEA, PSA and AFP. Clinical results of a multicentre evaluation.

    PubMed

    Uhl, W; Chan, D W; Jones, K; Kelley, C; Assmann, G; von Eckardstein, A; Sägers, A; Yvert, J P; Schneider, A M; Torralba, A; Fuentes-Arderiu, X; Gonzalez de la Presa, B; Vives, M; Greiling, H; Eberle, A; Niederau, C M; Cremer, P; Reiter, W; Vogeser, M; Neumeier, D; Luppa, P; Huber, U

    1998-01-01

    Three tumormarker assays, Elecsys CEA, PSA and AFP, have been evaluated in an international multicentre study to characterize their clinical performance and to verify the comparability with the corresponding tests of the Enzymun-Test product line and other methods. For each of the markers results were obtained from four laboratories. On the basis of 314 and 199 specimens respectively, (preliminary) reference ranges could be established for CEA and PSA. For the prostate marker, the age dependence of the antigen level could be clearly confirmed. Mean concentrations range between 0.51 ng/ml (< 40 years) and 3.57 ng/ml (> 70 years). Referring to CEA, 95th percentiles of 4.31 ng/ml and 2.69 ng/ml were elaborated for smokers and nonsmokers. In general, good to excellent correlations (r > 0.98) were found between the Elecsys and Enzymun-Tests. Regarding the systematic comparability of both systems, most of the slopes derived from the individual method comparison studies are within the +/- 10% range of the respective standardization results. The specific distribution pattern of the individual tumormarker values elaborated with sample material of known clinical background, reflects the well established categorization of different benign and malignant diseases according to their characteristic marker levels. Of utmost importance, however, is the excellent comparability of the Elecsys assays with the corresponding Enzymun-Tests and the FDA approved AIA 1200 tests from TOSOH in follow-up studies. Almost superimposable concentration curves guarantee that identical diagnostic information is derived from all three methods. Especially for PSA, a series of measurements on sera of prostatectomized patients proved the usability and clinical value of the test also for this particular indication. For either one of the Elecsys tests, the feasibility of using plasma as sample material was verified. PMID:9677672

  18. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Prostate Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Ghods, Roya; Shabani, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Yeganeh, Omid; Hassannia, Hadi; Sadeghitabar, Ali; Balay-Goli, Leila; Noutash-Haghighat, Farzaneh; Sarrafzadeh, Ali reza; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) is an important laboratory marker for diagnosis of prostatic cancer. Thus, development of diagnostic tools specific for PSA plays an important role in screening, monitoring and early diagnosis of prostate cancer. In this paper, the production and characterization of a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against PSA have been presented. Methods Balb/c mice were immunized with PSA, which was purified from seminal plasma. Splenocytes of hyperimmunized mice were extracted and fused with Sp2/0 cells. By adding selective HAT medium, hybridoma cells were established and positive clones were selected by ELISA after four times of cloning. The isotypes of produced mAbs were determined by ELISA and then purified from ascitic fluids using Hi-Trap protein G column. The reactivities of the mAbs were examined with the purified PSA and seminal plasma by ELISA and western blot techniques. Furthermore, the reactivities of the mAbs were assessed in Prostate Cancer (PCa), Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) and brain cancer tissues by Immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results Five anti-PSA mAbs (clones: 2G2-B2, 2F9-F4, 2D6-E8, IgG1/К) and clones (2C8-E9, 2G3-E2, IgG2a/К) were produced and characterized. All mAbs, except 2F9-F4 detected the expression of PSA in PCa and BPH tissues and none of them reacted with PSA in brain cancer tissue in IHC. Besides, all mAbs could detect a protein band around 33 kDa in human seminal plasma in western blot. Conclusion These mAbs can specifically recognize PSA and may serve as a component of PSA diagnostic kit in various biological fluids. PMID:25926946

  19. Review of APR+ Level 2 PSA. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lehner, John R.; Mubayi, Vinod; Pratt, W. Trevor; Kim, Do Sam; Cho, Yong Jin; Cho, Sang Jin; Kim, In Goo

    2012-02-17

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) assisted the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) in reviewing the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of the APR+ Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) prepared by the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co., Ltd (KHNP) and KEPCO Engineering & Construction Co., Inc. (KEPCO-E&C). The work described in this report involves a review of the APR+ Level 2 PSA submittal [Ref. 1]. The PSA and, therefore, the review is limited to consideration of accidents initiated by internal events. As part of the review process, the review team also developed three sets of Requests for Additional Information (RAIs). These RAIs were provided to KHNP and KEPCO-E&C for their evaluation and response. This final detailed report documents the review findings for each technical element of the PSA and includes consideration of all of the RAIs made by the reviewers as well as the associated responses. This final report was preceded by an interim report [Ref. 2] that focused on identifying important issues regarding the PSA. In addition, a final meeting on the project was held at BNL on November 21-22, 2011, where BNL and KINS reviewers discussed their preliminary review findings with KHNP and KEPCO-E&C staffs. Additional information obtained during this final meeting was also used to inform the review findings of this final report. The review focused not only on the robustness of the APR+ design to withstand severe accidents, but also on the capability and acceptability of the Level 2 PSA in terms of level of detail and completeness. The Korean nuclear regulatory authorities will decide whether the PSA is acceptable and the BNL review team is providing its comments for KINS consideration. Section 2.0 provides the basis for the BNL review. Section 3.0 presents the review of each technical element of the PSA. Conclusions and a summary are presented in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 contains the references.

  20. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  1. Prostate-Specific Antigen: Nonspecific in Deceased Organ Donors.

    PubMed

    Pabisiak, K; Ostrowski, M; Kram, A; Safranow, K; Myślak, M; Sieńko, J; Sulikowski, T; Ciechanowski, K

    2016-06-01

    Currently, there is no clear position regarding the donation of organs from donors with prostate carcinoma (CaP) in European countries, except Italy. The lengthening of life expectancy increases the probability of prostate cancer among potential organ donors. The concentration of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >2 ng/mL at 60 years of age is related to the increasing possibility of identifying an advanced form of CaP. In recent years in Poland, the recommendation has been to determine tumor markers in potential donors. In the first year of the recommendation, 10% of potential male cadaveric donors were disqualified in West Pomerania, Poland, on the basis of elevated PSA levels (>10 ng/mL). To avoid reduction of the actual donor pool, each potential male donor reported to the center since January 2010 undergoes a routine histologic evaluation of the whole prostate, regardless of the PSA level, before organ implantation. In the study group (N = 52), histopathologic evaluation revealed 6 cases of CaP (12%). In CaP positive group Gleason score range from 2+2 to 3+4. In CaP donors PSA level have been noticed in range 1.79 ng/mL - 7.66 ng/mL. There was no correlation between histologically confirmed CaP and the PSA level. PMID:27496408

  2. A phase I trial of DNA vaccination with a plasmid expressing prostate-specific antigen in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pavlenko, M; Roos, A-K; Lundqvist, A; Palmborg, A; Miller, A M; Ozenci, V; Bergman, B; Egevad, L; Hellström, M; Kiessling, R; Masucci, G; Wersäll, P; Nilsson, S; Pisa, P

    2004-08-16

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a serine protease secreted at low levels by normal luminal epithelial cells of the prostate and in significantly higher levels by prostate cancer cells. Therefore, PSA is a potential target for various immunotherapeutical approaches against prostate cancer. DNA vaccination has been investigated as immunotherapy for infectious diseases in patients and for specific treatment of cancer in certain animal models. In animal studies, we have demonstrated that vaccination with plasmid vector pVAX/PSA results in PSA-specific cellular response and protection against tumour challenge. The purpose of the trial was to evaluate the safety, feasibility and biological efficacy of pVAX/PSA vaccine in the clinic. A phase I trial of pVAX/PSA, together with cytokine granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (Molgramostim) and IL-2 (Aldesleukin) as vaccine adjuvants, was carried out in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer. To evaluate the biologically active dose, the vaccine was administered during five cycles in doses of 100, 300 and 900 microg, with three patients in each cohort. Eight patients were evaluable. A PSA-specific cellular immune response, measured by IFN-gamma production against recombinant PSA protein, and a rise in anti-PSA IgG were detected in two of three patients after vaccination in the highest dose cohort. A decrease in the slope of PSA was observed in the two patients exhibiting IFN-gamma production to PSA. No adverse effects (WHO grade >2) were observed in any dose cohort. We demonstrate that DNA vaccination with a PSA-coding plasmid vector, given with GM-CSF and IL-2 to patients with prostate cancer, is safe and in doses of 900 microg the vaccine can induce cellular and humoral immune responses against PSA protein. PMID:15280930

  3. Nanoporous gold as a solid support for protein immobilization and development of an electrochemical immunoassay for prostate specific antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Binod; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Stine, Keith J.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoporous gold (NPG) was utilized as a support for immobilizing alkaline phosphatase (ALP) conjugated to monoclonal antibodies against either prostate specific antigen (PSA) or carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The antibody-ALP conjugates were coupled to self-assembled monolayers of lipoic acid and used in direct kinetic assays. Using the enzyme substrate p-aminophenylphosphate, the product p-aminophenol was detected by its oxidation near 0.1 V (vs. Ag|AgCl) using square wave voltammetry. The difference in peak current arising from oxidation of p-aminophenol before and after incubation with biomarker increased with biomarker concentration. The response to these two biomarkers was linear up to 10 ng mL-1 for CEA and up to 30 ng mL-1 for PSA. The effect of interference on the PSA assay was studied using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model albumin protein. The effect of interference from a serum matrix was examined for the PSA assay using newborn calf serum. A competitive version of the immunoassay using antigen immobilized onto the NPG surface was highly sensitive at lower antigen concentration. Estimates of the surface coverage of the antibody-ALP conjugates on the NPG surface are presented. PMID:23935216

  4. Discoveries and application of prostate-specific antigen, and some proposals to optimize prostate cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Tokudome, Shinkan; Ando, Ryosuke; Koda, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    The discoveries and application of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) have been much appreciated because PSA-based screening has saved millions of lives of prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Historically speaking, Flocks et al first identified antigenic properties in prostate tissue in 1960. Then, Barnes et al detected immunologic characteristics in prostatic fluid in 1963. Hara et al characterized γ-semino-protein in semen in 1966, and it has been proven to be identical to PSA. Subsequently, Ablin et al independently reported the presence of precipitation antigens in the prostate in 1970. Wang et al purified the PSA in 1979, and Kuriyama et al first applied an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for PSA in 1980. However, the positive predictive value with a cutoff figure of 4.0 ng/mL appeared substantially low (∼30%). There are overdiagnoses and overtreatments for latent/low-risk PCa. Controversies exist in the PCa mortality-reducing effects of PSA screening between the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) and the US Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. For optimizing PCa screening, PSA-related items may require the following: 1) adjustment of the cutoff values according to age, as well as setting limits to age and screening intervals; 2) improving test performance using doubling time, density, and ratio of free: total PSA; and 3) fostering active surveillance for low-risk PCa with monitoring by PSA value. Other items needing consideration may include the following: 1) examinations of cell proliferation and cell cycle markers in biopsy specimens; 2) independent quantification of Gleason grading; 3) developing ethnicity-specific staging nomograms based on tumor stage, PSA value, and Gleason score; 4) delineation of the natural history; 5) revisiting the significance of the androgen/testosterone hypothesis; and 6) devoting special attention to individuals with a certain genetic predisposition. Finally

  5. Discoveries and application of prostate-specific antigen, and some proposals to optimize prostate cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Shinkan; Ando, Ryosuke; Koda, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    The discoveries and application of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) have been much appreciated because PSA-based screening has saved millions of lives of prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Historically speaking, Flocks et al first identified antigenic properties in prostate tissue in 1960. Then, Barnes et al detected immunologic characteristics in prostatic fluid in 1963. Hara et al characterized γ-semino-protein in semen in 1966, and it has been proven to be identical to PSA. Subsequently, Ablin et al independently reported the presence of precipitation antigens in the prostate in 1970. Wang et al purified the PSA in 1979, and Kuriyama et al first applied an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for PSA in 1980. However, the positive predictive value with a cutoff figure of 4.0 ng/mL appeared substantially low (∼30%). There are overdiagnoses and overtreatments for latent/low-risk PCa. Controversies exist in the PCa mortality-reducing effects of PSA screening between the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) and the US Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. For optimizing PCa screening, PSA-related items may require the following: 1) adjustment of the cutoff values according to age, as well as setting limits to age and screening intervals; 2) improving test performance using doubling time, density, and ratio of free: total PSA; and 3) fostering active surveillance for low-risk PCa with monitoring by PSA value. Other items needing consideration may include the following: 1) examinations of cell proliferation and cell cycle markers in biopsy specimens; 2) independent quantification of Gleason grading; 3) developing ethnicity-specific staging nomograms based on tumor stage, PSA value, and Gleason score; 4) delineation of the natural history; 5) revisiting the significance of the androgen/testosterone hypothesis; and 6) devoting special attention to individuals with a certain genetic predisposition. Finally

  6. Aptamer-MIP hybrid receptor for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Pawan; Tamboli, Vibha; Harniman, Robert L; Estrela, Pedro; Allender, Chris J; Bowen, Jenna L

    2016-01-15

    This study reports the design and evaluation of a new synthetic receptor sensor based on the amalgamation of biomolecular recognition elements and molecular imprinting to overcome some of the challenges faced by conventional protein imprinting. A thiolated DNA aptamer with established affinity for prostate specific antigen (PSA) was complexed with PSA prior to being immobilised on the surface of a gold electrode. Controlled electropolymerisation of dopamine around the complex served to both entrap the complex, holding the aptamer in, or near to, it's binding conformation, and to localise the PSA binding sites at the sensor surface. Following removal of PSA, it was proposed that the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) cavity would act synergistically with the embedded aptamer to form a hybrid receptor (apta-MIP), displaying recognition properties superior to that of aptamer alone. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to evaluate subsequent rebinding of PSA to the apta-MIP surface. The apta-MIP sensor showed high sensitivity with a linear response from 100pg/ml to 100ng/ml of PSA and a limit of detection of 1pg/ml, which was three-fold higher than aptamer alone sensor for PSA. Furthermore, the sensor demonstrated low cross-reactivity with a homologous protein (human Kallikrein 2) and low response to human serum albumin (HSA), suggesting possible resilience to the non-specific binding of serum proteins. PMID:26318788

  7. The Different Reduction Rate of Prostate-Specific Antigen in Dutasteride and Finasteride

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong Hyeuk; Cho, Sung Yong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare and analyze the therapeutic effects and changes in the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level with treatment with finasteride or dutasteride for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) for 1 year. Materials and Methods We retrospectively investigated patients who suffered from BPH for 1 year between January 2005 and December 2008. For treatment groups, we divided the patients into two groups: one was treated with alfuzosin and finasteride and the other was treated with alfuzosin and dutasteride. At the beginning of treatment, the patients underwent transrectal ultrasonography and measurement of urine flow rate, residual urine volume, PSA, and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Patients with diseases affecting urinary function were excluded. We not only analyzed the data at the time of initial treatment, but also after 1 year of treatment. A total of 219 patients were able to be evaluated for 1 year. Results Both finasteride and dutasteride reduced PSA and prostate volume significantly. The comparison between groups showed a more significant reduction of PSA (p=0.020) and prostate volume (p=0.052) in the dutasteride group. Other parameters did not differ significantly between the groups. Conclusions 5-α Reductase inhibitors for BPH treatment reduced PSA and prostate volume significantly when the patients were treated for 1 year. Administration of dutasteride is considered to be more effective in reducing PSA and prostate volume. Therefore, dutasteride should not be considered equivalent to finasteride in the reduction rate of PSA. The intensity of dutasteride must be reevaluated in comparison with finasteride. PMID:21031091

  8. Use of a new hypersensitive assay for the detection of prostate specific antigen in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Arai, Y; Onishi, H; Oishi, K; Takeuchi, H; Yoshida, O

    1993-04-01

    We have developed a new hypersensitive enzyme immunoassay for prostate specific antigen (PSA) based on the (MARKIT-M PA) assay but employing a two-hour incubation of the primary monoclonal antibody. The analytical sensitivity has been determined at 0.2 ng/ml, calculated as the mean+three standard deviations of the zero calibrator. Serum PSA was measured at least one month after radical prostatectomy (nine patients) or cystoprostatectomy (six patients). Based on the PSA levels of these patients, the recommended PSA cut-off level indicative of residual disease after radical prostatectomy was 0.4 ng/ml. Increasing (> 0.4 ng/ml) PSA levels preceded recurrence by eight months in a patient who developed bone metastasis after radical prostatectomy. In two patients treated with endocrine therapy, increasing PSA levels also preceded clinical evidence of progression by between eight and nine months. The study suggests that the newly developed sensitive PSA assay allows for the identification of patients with disease progression and the early commencement of adjuvant treatment. PMID:7685834

  9. Extended use of Prostate Health Index and percentage of [-2]pro-prostate-specific antigen in Chinese men with prostate specific antigen 10–20 ng/mL and normal digital rectal examination

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Peter Ka-Fung; Teoh, Jeremy Yuen-Chun; Lee, Wai-Man; Yee, Chi-Hang; Chan, Eddie Shu-Yin; Hou, See-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the extended use of Prostate Health Index (PHI) and percentage of [-2]pro-prostate-specific antigen (%p2PSA) in Chinese men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 10–20 ng/mL and normal digital rectal examination (DRE). Materials and Methods All consecutive Chinese men with PSA 10–20 ng/mL and normal DRE who agreed for transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided 10-core prostate biopsy were recruited. Blood samples were taken immediately before TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. The performances of total PSA (tPSA), %free-to-total PSA (%fPSA), %p2PSA, and PHI were compared using logistic regression, receiver operating characteristic, and decision curve analyses (DCA). Results From 2008 to 2015, 312 consecutive Chinese men were included. Among them, 53 out of 312 (17.0%) men were diagnosed to have prostate cancer on biopsy. The proportions of men with positive biopsies were 6.7% in PHI<35, 22.8% in PHI 35–55, and 54.5% in PHI>55 (chi-square test, p<0.001). The area under curves (AUC) of the base model including age, tPSA and status of initial/repeated biopsy was 0.64. Adding %p2PSA and PHI to the base model improved the AUC to 0.79 (p<0.001) and 0.78 (p<0.001), respectively, and provided net clinical benefit in DCA. The positive biopsy rates of Gleason 7 or above prostate cancers were 2.2% for PHI<35, 7.9% for PHI 35–55, and 36.4% for PHI>55 (chi-square test, p<0.001). By utilizing the PHI cutoff of 35 to men with PSA 10–20 ng/mL and normal DRE, 57.1% (178 of 312) biopsies could be avoided. Conclusions Both PHI and %p2PSA performed well in predicting prostate cancer and high grade prostate cancer. The use of PHI and %p2PSA should be extended to Chinese men with PSA 10–20 ng/mL and normal DRE.

  10. Label electrochemical immunosensor for prostate-specific antigen based on graphene and silver hybridized mesoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueyun; Han, Jian; Chen, Runhai; Ren, Xiang; Wei, Qin

    2015-01-15

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), as the specificity of prostate cancer markers, has been widely used in prostate cancer diagnosis and screening. In this study, we fabricated an electrochemical immunosensor for PSA detection using the amino-functionalized graphene sheet-ferrocenecarboxaldehyde composite materials (NH2-GS@FCA) and silver hybridized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (Ag@NH2-MCM48). Under optimal conditions, the fabricated immunosensor showed a wide linear range with PSA concentration (0.01-10.0ng·ml(-1)). Low detection limit (2pg·ml(-1)) proved the high sensitivity. In addition, the immunosensor possessed good stability and reproducibility. Moreover, the application to PSA analysis in serum samples yielded satisfactory results. PMID:25448622

  11. Assay-specific artificial neural networks for five different PSA assays and populations with PSA 2-10 ng/ml in 4,480 men.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carsten; Xu, Chuanliang; Cammann, Henning; Graefen, Markus; Haese, Alexander; Huland, Hartwig; Semjonow, Axel; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Remzi, Mesut; Djavan, Bob; Wildhagen, Mark F; Blijenberg, Bert G; Finne, Patrik; Stenman, Ulf-Hakan; Jung, Klaus; Meyer, Hellmuth-Alexander

    2007-03-01

    Use of percent free PSA (%fPSA) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) can eliminate unnecessary prostate biopsies. In a total of 4,480 patients from five centers with PSA concentrations in the range of 2-10 ng/ml an IMMULITE PSA-based ANN (iANN) was compared with other PSA assay-adapted ANNs (nANNs) to investigate the impact of different PSA assays. ANN data were generated with PSA, fPSA (assays from Abbott, Beckman, DPC, Roche or Wallac), age, prostate volume, and DRE status. In 15 different ROC analyses, the area under the curve (AUC) in the PSA ranges 2-4, 2-10, and 4-10 ng/ml for the nANN was always significantly larger than the AUC for %fPSA or PSA. The nANN and logistic regression models mostly also performed better than the iANN. Therefore, for each patient population, PSA assay-specific ANNs should be used to optimize the ANN outcome in order to reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies. PMID:17333205

  12. Long Distance Bicycle Riding Causes Prostate-Specific Antigen to Increase in Men Aged 50 Years and Over

    PubMed Central

    Mejak, Sandra L.; Bayliss, Julianne; Hanks, Shayne D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether bicycle riding alters total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA) serum concentrations in healthy older men. Methods 129 male participants, ranging in age from 50 to 71 years (mean 55 years), rode in a recreational group bicycle ride of between 55 and 160 kilometers. Blood samples for tPSA analysis were drawn within 60 minutes before starting, and within 5 minutes after completing the ride. The pre-cycling and post-cycling tPSA values were log transformed for normality and compared using paired t-tests. Linear regression was used to assess the relationship between changes in tPSA with age and distance cycled. Results Bicycle riding caused tPSA to increase by an average of 9.5% (95% CI = 6.1–12.9; p<0.001) or 0.23 ng/ml. The number of participants with an elevated tPSA (using the standard PSA normal range cut-off of 4.0 ng/ml) increased from two pre-cycle to six post-cycle (or from five to eight when using age-based normal ranges). Univariate linear regression analysis revealed that the change in tPSA was positively correlated with age and the distance cycled. Conclusions Cycling causes an average 9.5% increase in tPSA, in healthy male cyclists ≥50 years old, when measured within 5 minutes post cycling. We considered the increase clinically significant as the number of participants with an elevated PSA, according to established cut-offs, increased post-ride. Based on the research published to date, the authors suggest a 24–48 hour period of abstinence from cycling and ejaculation before a PSA test, to avoid spurious results. PMID:23418500

  13. Immunoaffinity chromatographic isolation of prostate-specific antigen from seminal plasma for capillary electrophoresis analysis of its isoforms.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Medina, Raul; Farina-Gomez, Noemi; Diez-Masa, Jose Carlos; de Frutos, Mercedes

    2014-04-11

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration in serum has been the biomarker employed for prostate cancer diagnosis in the last two decades. However, new more specific biomarkers allowing a better differentiation of cancer from non-malignant prostate diseases are necessary. Glycosylation of PSA gives rise to different forms of the protein which can be separated into several isoforms by analytical techniques, such as CE. Because PSA glycosylation is influenced by pathological conditions, the CE pattern of PSA isoforms could be different in prostate cancer than in non-malignant prostate diseases. To study this CE pattern of PSA, prior purification of the protein from the biological fluid is mandatory. In this study an immunoaffinity chromatography method which allows PSA purification without altering the CE pattern is developed. An in-house prepared column produced with commercial anti-PSA antibodies is employed. The use of 1 M propionic acid as elution agent provides higher than 40% recovery of high purity PSA. CE analysis of PSA immunopurified from seminal plasma of a healthy individual shows the same 8 peaks as the commercially available PSA standard. Sample preparation only requires dilution with phosphate buffered saline prior to immunoaffinity purification. High repeatability for the sample preparation step was achieved (RSD% for percentage of corrected peak area in the range 0.6-5.3 for CE analysis of three independently purified seminal plasma aliquots compared to range 0.8-4.9 for a given aliquot analyzed three times by CE). IAC of five microliters seminal plasma provided enough PSA to achieve signal/noise ratio larger than 5 for the smallest CE isoforms. PMID:24745737

  14. Quantitative Time-Resolved Fluorescence Imaging of Androgen Receptor and Prostate-Specific Antigen in Prostate Tissue Sections.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, Agnieszka; Lippolis, Giuseppe; Helczynski, Leszek; Anand, Aseem; Peltola, Mari; Pettersson, Kim; Lilja, Hans; Bjartell, Anders

    2016-05-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) are expressed in the prostate and are involved in prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this study was to develop reliable protocols for reproducible quantification of AR and PSA in benign and malignant prostate tissue using time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) imaging techniques. AR and PSA were detected with TRF in tissue microarrays from 91 PCa patients. p63/ alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR) staining on consecutive sections was used to categorize tissue areas as benign or cancerous. Automated image analysis was used to quantify staining intensity. AR intensity was significantly higher in AMACR+ and lower in AMACR- cancer areas as compared with benign epithelium. The PSA intensity was significantly lower in cancer areas, particularly in AMACR- glands. The AR/PSA ratio varied significantly in the AMACR+ tumor cells as compared with benign glands. There was a trend of more rapid disease progression in patients with higher AR/PSA ratios in the AMACR- areas. This study demonstrates the feasibility of developing reproducible protocols for TRF imaging and automated image analysis to study the expression of AR and PSA in benign and malignant prostate. It also highlighted the differences in AR and PSA protein expression within AMACR- and AMACR+ cancer regions. PMID:27026295

  15. Diversity of viral photosystem-I psaA genes

    PubMed Central

    Hevroni, Gur; Enav, Hagay; Rohwer, Forest; Béjà, Oded

    2015-01-01

    Marine photosynthesis is one of the major contributors to the global carbon cycle and the world's oxygen supply. This process is largely driven by cyanobacteria, namely Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus. Genes encoding photosystem-II (PSII) reaction center proteins are found in many cyanophage genomes, and are expressed during the infection of their hosts. On the basis of metagenomics, cyanophage photosystem-I (PSI) gene cassettes were recently discovered with two gene arrangements psaJF→C→A→B→K→E→D and psaD→C→A→B. It was suggested that the horizontal transfer of PSII and PSI genes is increasing phage fitness. To better understand their diversity, we designed degenerate primers to cover a wide diversity of organisms, and using PCR we targeted the psaC→A arrangement, which is unique to cyanophages cassettes. We examined viral concentrates from four islands in the Pacific Ocean and found samples containing the psaC→A arrangement. Analyses of the amplified viral psaA gene revealed six subgroups varying in their level of similarity and %G+C content, suggesting that the diversity of cyanophage PSI genes is greater than originally thought. PMID:25535938

  16. Early Salvage Hormonal Therapy for Biochemical Failure Improved Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients After Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Plus Radiation Therapy-A Secondary Analysis of Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01

    SciTech Connect

    Mydin, Aminudin R.; Dunne, Mary T.; Finn, Marie A.; Armstrong, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the survival benefit of early vs late salvage hormonal therapy (HT), we performed a secondary analysis on patients who developed recurrence from Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01, a randomized trial comparing 4 vs 8 months neoadjuvant HT plus radiation therapy (RT) in intermediate- and high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 patients from the trial who recurred were analyzed at a median follow-up of 8.5 years. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on the timing of salvage HT: 57 patients had prostate-specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases (group 1, early), 21 patients had PSA >10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases (group 2, late), and 24 patients had distant metastases (group 3, late). The endpoint analyzed was overall survival (OS) calculated from 2 different time points: date of enrolment in the trial (OS1) and date of initiation of salvage HT (OS2). Survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves and a Cox regression model. Results: The OS1 differed significantly between groups (P<.0005): OS1 at 10 years was 78% in group 1, 42% in group 2, and 29% in group 3. The OS2 also differed significantly between groups (P<.0005): OS2 at 6 years was 70% in group 1, 47% in group 2, and 22% in group 3. Group 1 had the longest median time from end of RT to biochemical failure compared with groups 2 and 3 (3.3, 0.9, and 1.7 years, respectively; P<.0005). Group 1 also had the longest median PSA doubling time compared with groups 2 and 3 (9.9, 3.6, and 2.4 months, respectively; P<.0005). On multivariate analysis, timing of salvage HT, time from end of RT to biochemical failure, and PSA nadir on salvage HT were significant predictors of survival. Conclusion: Early salvage HT based on PSA {<=}10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases improved survival in patients with prostate cancer after failure of initial treatment with neoadjuvant HT plus RT.

  17. A prostate MRI atlas of biochemical failures following cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Mirabela; Kurhanewicz, John; Tewari, Ashutosh; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-03-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP) and radiation therapy (RT) are the most common treatment options for prostate cancer (PCa). Despite advancements in radiation delivery and surgical procedures, RP and RT can result in failure rates as high as 40% and >25%, respectively. Treatment failure is characterized by biochemical recurrence (BcR), which is defined in terms of prostate specific antigen (PSA) concentrations and its variation following treatment. PSA is expected to decrease following treatment, thereby its presence in even small concentrations (e.g 0.2 ng/ml for surgery or 2 ng/ml over the nadir PSA for radiation therapy) is indicative of treatment failure. Early identification of treatment failure may enable the use of more aggressive or neo-adjuvant therapies. Moreover, predicting failure prior to treatment may spare the patient from a procedure that is unlikely to be successful. Our goal is to identify differences on pre-treatment MRI between patients who have BcR and those who remain disease-free at 5 years post-treatment. Specifically, we focus on (1) identifying statistically significant differences in MRI intensities, (2) establishing morphological differences in prostatic anatomic structures, and (3) comparing these differences with the natural variability of prostatic structures. In order to attain these objectives, we use an anatomically constrained registration framework to construct BcR and non-BcR statistical atlases based on the pre-treatment magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the prostate. The patients included in the atlas either underwent RP or RT and were followed up for at least 5 years. The BcR atlas was constructed from a combined population of 12 pre-RT 1.5 Tesla (T) MRI and 33 pre-RP 3T MRI from patients with BcR within 5 years of treatment. Similarly, the non-BcR atlas was built based on a combined cohort of 20 pre-RT 1.5T MRI and 41 pre-RP 3T MRI from patients who remain disease-free 5 years post treatment. We chose the atlas framework as it

  18. Prostate-Specific Antigen Bounce Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Charles C.; Haas, Jonathan A.; Katz, Aaron E.; Witten, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce after brachytherapy has been well-documented. This phenomenon has also been identified in patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). While the parameters that predict PSA bounce have been extensively studied in prostate brachytherapy patients, this study is the first to analyze the clinical and pathologic predictors of PSA bounce in prostate SBRT patients. Materials and Methods: Our institution has maintained a prospective database of patients undergoing SBRT for prostate cancer since 2006. Our study population includes patients between May 2006 and November 2011 who have at least 18 months of follow-up. All patients were treated using the CyberKnife treatment system. The prescription dose was 35–36.25 Gy in five fractions. Results: One hundred twenty patients were included in our study. Median PSA follow-up was 24 months (range 18–78 months). Thirty-four (28%) patients had a PSA bounce. The median time to PSA bounce was 9 months, and the median bounce size was 0.50 ng/mL. On univariate analysis, only younger age (p = 0.011) was shown to be associated with an increased incidence of PSA bounce. Other patient factors, including race, prostate size, prior treatment by hormones, and family history of prostate cancer, did not predict PSA bounces. None of the tumor characteristics studied, including Gleason score, pre-treatment PSA, T-stage, or risk classification by NCCN guidelines, were associated with increased incidence of PSA bounces. Younger age was the only statistically significant predictor of PSA bounce on multivariate analysis (OR = 0.937, p = 0.009). Conclusion: PSA bounce, which has been reported after prostate brachytherapy, is also seen in a significant percentage of patients after CyberKnife SBRT. Close observation rather than biopsy can be considered for these patients. Younger age was the only factor that predicted PSA bounce. PMID:24478988

  19. Intranasal Immunization with the Cholera Toxin B Subunit-Pneumococcal Surface Antigen A Fusion Protein Induces Protection against Colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Has Negligible Impact on the Nasopharyngeal and Oral Microbiota of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, F. C.; Miyaji, E. N.; Arêas, A. P. M.; Oliveira, M. L. S.; de Andrade, A. L. S. S.; Ho, P. L.; Hollingshead, S. K.; Leite, L. C. C.

    2006-01-01

    One of the candidate proteins for a mucosal vaccine antigen against Streptococcus pneumoniae is PsaA (pneumococcal surface antigen A). Vaccines targeting mucosal immunity may raise concerns as to possible alterations in the normal microbiota, especially in the case of PsaA, which was shown to have homologs with elevated sequence identity in other viridans group streptococci. In this work, we demonstrate that intranasal immunization with a cholera toxin B subunit-PsaA fusion protein is able to protect mice against colonization with S. pneumoniae but does not significantly alter the natural oral or nasopharyngeal microbiota of mice. PMID:16861686

  20. Aberrant sialylation of a prostate-specific antigen: Electrochemical label-free glycoprofiling in prostate cancer serum samples.

    PubMed

    Pihikova, Dominika; Kasak, Peter; Kubanikova, Petra; Sokol, Roman; Tkac, Jan

    2016-08-31

    Electrochemical detection method allowing to detect prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a biomarker of prostate cancer (PCa), with PSA glycoprofiling was applied in an analysis of PCa serum samples for the first time. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a label-free method with immobilized anti-PSA was applied for PSA detection and lectins to glycoprofile captured PSA on the same surface. A proper choice of blocking agent providing high selectivity of biosensor detection with the immobilized anti-PSA antibody was done. The biosensor could detect PSA down to 100 ag/mL with a linear concentration working range from 100 ag/mL up to 1 μg/mL, i.e. 10 orders of concentration magnitude and the sensitivity of (5.5 ± 0.2)%/decade. The results showed that a commercial carbo-free blocking solution was the best one, reducing non-specific binding 55-fold when compared to the immunosensor surface without any blocking agent applied, while allowing to detect PSA. The biosensor response obtained after addition of lectin (i.e. proportional to the amount of a particular glycan on PSA) divided by the biosensor response obtained after incubation with a sample (i.e. proportional to the PSA level in the sample) was applied to distinguish serum samples of PCa patients from those of healthy individuals. The results showed that Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA) recognizing α-2,3-terminal sialic acid can be applied to distinguish between these two sets of samples since the MAA/PSA response obtained from the analysis of the PCa samples was significantly higher (5.3-fold) compared to the MAA/PSA response obtained by the analysis of samples from healthy individuals. Thus, combined analysis of serological PSA levels together with PSA glycoprofiling of aberrant glycosylation of PSA (i.e. increase in the level of α-2,3-terminal sialic acid) has a potential to improve detection of PCa. PMID:27506346

  1. Ni2+-Dependent and PsaR-Mediated Regulation of the Virulence Genes pcpA, psaBCA, and prtA in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Manzoor, Irfan; Shafeeq, Sulman; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the transcriptional regulator PsaR regulates the expression of the PsaR regulon consisting of genes encoding choline binding protein (PcpA), the extracellular serine protease (PrtA), and the Mn2+-uptake system (PsaBCA), in the presence of manganese (Mn2+), zinc (Zn2+), and cobalt (Co2+). In this study, we explore the Ni2+-dependent regulation of the PsaR regulon. We have demonstrated by qRT-PCR analysis, metal accumulation assays, β-galactosidase assays, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays that an elevated concentration of Ni2+ leads to strong induction of the PsaR regulon. Our ICP-MS data show that the Ni2+-dependent expression of the PsaR regulon is directly linked to high, cell-associated, concentration of Ni2+, which reduces the cell-associated concentration of Mn2+. In vitro studies with the purified PsaR protein showed that Ni2+ diminishes the Mn2+-dependent interaction of PsaR to the promoter regions of its target genes, confirming an opposite effect of Mn2+ and Ni2+ in the regulation of the PsaR regulon. Additionally, the Ni2+-dependent role of PsaR in the regulation of the PsaR regulon was studied by transcriptome analysis. PMID:26562538

  2. Genomic Prostate Cancer Classifier Predicts Biochemical Failure and Metastases in Patients After Postoperative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Den, Robert B.; Feng, Felix Y.; Showalter, Timothy N.; Mishra, Mark V.; Trabulsi, Edouard J.; Lallas, Costas D.; Gomella, Leonard G.; Kelly, W. Kevin; Birbe, Ruth C.; McCue, Peter A.; Ghadessi, Mercedeh; Yousefi, Kasra; Davicioni, Elai; Knudsen, Karen E.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that a genomic classifier (GC) would predict biochemical failure (BF) and distant metastasis (DM) in men receiving radiation therapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Methods and Materials: Among patients who underwent post-RP RT, 139 were identified for pT3 or positive margin, who did not receive neoadjuvant hormones and had paraffin-embedded specimens. Ribonucleic acid was extracted from the highest Gleason grade focus and applied to a high-density-oligonucleotide microarray. Receiver operating characteristic, calibration, cumulative incidence, and Cox regression analyses were performed to assess GC performance for predicting BF and DM after post-RP RT in comparison with clinical nomograms. Results: The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the Stephenson model was 0.70 for both BF and DM, with addition of GC significantly improving area under the receiver operating characteristic curve to 0.78 and 0.80, respectively. Stratified by GC risk groups, 8-year cumulative incidence was 21%, 48%, and 81% for BF (P<.0001) and for DM was 0, 12%, and 17% (P=.032) for low, intermediate, and high GC, respectively. In multivariable analysis, patients with high GC had a hazard ratio of 8.1 and 14.3 for BF and DM. In patients with intermediate or high GC, those irradiated with undetectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA ≤0.2 ng/mL) had median BF survival of >8 years, compared with <4 years for patients with detectable PSA (>0.2 ng/mL) before initiation of RT. At 8 years, the DM cumulative incidence for patients with high GC and RT with undetectable PSA was 3%, compared with 23% with detectable PSA (P=.03). No outcome differences were observed for low GC between the treatment groups. Conclusion: The GC predicted BF and metastasis after post-RP irradiation. Patients with lower GC risk may benefit from delayed RT, as opposed to those with higher GC; however, this needs prospective validation. Genomic-based models

  3. Evaluation of prostatic cancer prevalence in patients with prostatic-specific antigen between 4 and 10 and normal digital rectal examination

    PubMed Central

    Tadayon, Farhad; Arezegar, Hamid Reza; Khorrami, Mohammad Hatef; Hashemi Juzdani, Rasoul; Shahdoost, Amir Abbas; Mellat, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer is one of the most common male cancers. The prevalence of prostate cancer is different due to genetic and environmental factors. Diagnosis of prostate cancer is by biopsy due to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and Digital Rectal Examination (DRE). Controversy about decision making for prostate biopsy in PSA between 4 and 10 and normal DRE, is one of the problems in this time. In this study we evaluated the prevalence of prostate cancer in males with PSA between 4 and 10 and normal DRE. We also evaluated the PSA density and percent of free PSA in patients with prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: A total of 121 males with PSA between 4 and 10 and normal DRE, were evaluated. Then, transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) andprostate biopsy from 12 points of peripheral zone, was done. These data were analyzed by Chi-square, t-test and ANOVA and Roc curve. Results: In this study, the prevalence of prostate cancer in PSA between 4 and 10 and normal DRE, was evaluated, 29.8%. With use of Roc curve, PSA density cutoff point was calculated 0.12 and percent of free PSA cutoff point, was calculated, 18%. Conclusion: In males with PSA between 4 and 10 and normal DRE, PSA density smaller than 0.12-0.15, and percent of free PSA greater than 18%, the prevalence of prostate cancer is very few and we can safely ignore the TRUS and prostate biopsy in these males and eliminate its costs and side effects. PMID:27403407

  4. An international multicenter study evaluating the impact of an alternative biochemical failure definition on the judgment of prostate cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Scott G. . E-mail: scott.williams@petermac.org; Duchesne, Gillian M.; Gogna, N. Kumar; Millar, Jeremy L.; Pickles, Tom; Pratt, Gary R.; Turner, Sandra

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of an alternative biochemical failure (bF) definition on the performance of existing plus de novo prognostic models. Methods and Materials: The outcomes data of 1,458 Australian and 703 Canadian men treated with external-beam radiation monotherapy between 1993 and 1997 were analyzed using a lowest prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level to date plus 2 ng/mL (L + 2) bF definition. Two existing prognostic models were scrutinized using discrimination (Somers Dxy [SDxy]) and calibration indices. Alternative prognostic models were also created using recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) and multivariate nomogram methods for comparison. Results: Discrimination of bF was improved using the L + 2 definition compared with the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition using both the three-level risk model (SDxy 0.30 and 0.22, respectively) or the nomogram (SDxy 0.35 and 0.27, respectively). Both existing prognostic models showed only modest calibration accuracy. Using RPA, five distinct risk groups were identified based primarily on Gleason score (GS) and all subsequent divisions based on PSA. All GS 7-10 tumors were intermediate or high risk. This model and the developed nomogram showed improved discrimination over the existing models as well as accurate calibration against the Canadian data, apart from the 30-50% failure region. Conclusions: The L + 2 definition of bF provides improved capacity for discrimination of failure risk. New prognostic models based on this endpoint have overall statistical performance superior to those based on the ASTRO consensus definition but continue to have unreliable discrimination in the intermediate-risk region.

  5. Daily, monthly and seasonal variation in PSA levels and the association with weather parameters.

    PubMed

    Connolly, D; van Leeuwen, P J; Bailie, J; Black, A; Murray, L J; Keane, P F; Gavin, A

    2011-03-01

    PSA levels have shown daily and seasonal variation, although data are conflicting regarding the season with higher PSA levels and the clinical relevance of this. We assessed the correlation of total PSA levels with meteorological data on a daily, weekly, monthly and seasonal basis. Data from 53,224 men aged 45-74 years, with an initial PSA <10.0 ng ml(-1) were correlated with temperature (°C), duration of bright sunshine (hours) and rainfall (mm). There was seasonal variation in PSA levels, with median PSA being higher in spring compared with other seasons (1.18 vs 1.10 ng ml(-1), P = 0.004). Seasonal variation was not apparent when PSA levels were age-adjusted (P = 0.112). Total PSA was not correlated with daily, weekly or monthly hours of sunshine, rainfall or mean temperature. In contrast, age-adjusted PSA varied with weekday, with higher PSA levels on Thursday and Friday compared with other days (1.16 vs 1.10 ng ml(-1), respectively). On multivariate analysis, only age predicted for PSA levels >3.0 ng ml(-1). In conclusion, PSA levels did show seasonal variation, although there was no direct correlation between PSA and any meteorological parameter. The degree of seasonal variation is small and the decision to proceed to prostate biopsy should be independent of season or weather parameters. PMID:20975738

  6. Age and Prostate-Specific Antigen Level Prior to Diagnosis Predict Risk of Death from Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    MacKintosh, F. Roy; Sprenkle, Preston C.; Walter, Louise C.; Rawson, Lori; Karnes, R. Jeffrey; Morrell, Christopher H.; Kattan, Michael W.; Nawaf, Cayce B.; Neville, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    A single early prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level has been correlated with a higher likelihood of prostate cancer diagnosis and death in younger men. PSA testing in older men has been considered of limited utility. We evaluated prostate cancer death in relation to age and PSA level immediately prior to prostate cancer diagnosis. Using the Veterans Affairs database, we identified 230,081 men aged 50–89 years diagnosed with prostate cancer and at least one prior PSA test between 1999 and 2009. Prostate cancer-specific death over time was calculated for patients stratified by age group (e.g., 50–59 years, through 80–89 years) and PSA range at diagnosis (10 ranges) using Kaplan–Meier methods. Risk of 10-year prostate cancer mortality across age and PSA was compared using log-rank tests with a Bonferroni adjustment for multiple testing. 10.5% of men diagnosed with prostate cancer died of cancer during the 10-year study period (mean follow-up = 3.7 years). Higher PSA values prior to diagnosis predict a higher risk of death in all age groups (p < 0.0001). Within the same PSA range, older age groups are at increased risk for death from prostate cancer (p < 0.0001). For PSA of 7–10 ng/mL, cancer-specific death, 10 years after diagnosis, increased from 7% for age 50–59 years to 51% for age 80–89 years. Men older than 70 years are more likely to die of prostate cancer at any PSA level than younger men, suggesting prostate cancer remains a significant problem among older men (even those aged 80+) and deserves additional study. PMID:27446803

  7. A portable chemiluminescence imaging immunoassay for simultaneous detection of different isoforms of prostate specific antigen in serum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Anran; Zhao, Fang; Zhao, Yuewu; Shangguan, Li; Liu, Songqin

    2016-07-15

    A multianalyte chemiluminescence (CL) imaging immunoassay strategy for sensitive detection of different isoforms of prostate specific antigen (PSA) was developed. The microtiter plates were fabricated by simultaneously immobilizing of free-PSA (f-PSA) and total-PSA (t-PSA) capture antibody on nitrocellulose (NC) membrane. Each of the array were spotted in replicates of six spots within a spacing of 2mm. 16 or 48 detection wells were integrated on a single NC membrane and each well could be used as a microreactor and microanalysis chamber. Under a sandwiched immunoassay, the CL signals on each sensing site were collected by a charge-coupled device (CCD), presenting an array-based chemiluminescence imaging. Soybean peroxidase (SBP) was used to label f-PSA or t-PSA monoclonal antibody. With the amplification effects of two enhancers, 3-(10'-phenothiazinyl) propane-1-sulfonate (SPTZ) and 4-morpholinopyridine (MORP), the CL intensity could significantly enhanced, which improved the sensing sensitivity and detection limit. Under the optimal conditions, the linear response to the analyte concentration ranged from 0.01-36.7ng/mL and 0.02-125ng/mL for f-PSA and t-PSA, respectively. The results for the detection of forty serum samples from prostate cancer patients and cancer-free patients showed good agreement with the clinical data, suggesting that the proposed assay had acceptable accuracy. The proposed CL imaging immunoassay possess high throughput and acceptable reproducibility, stability and accuracy, which made it great potential to available to distinguish different isoforms of PSA in serum samples. PMID:26922048

  8. Investigation of contactless detection using a giant magnetoresistance sensor for detecting prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuecheng; Zhi, Shaotao; Lei, Chong; Zhou, Yong

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a contactless detection method for detecting prostate specific antigen with a giant magnetoresistance sensor. In contactless detection case, the prostate specific antigen sample preparation was separated from the sensor that prevented the sensor from being immersed in chemical solvents, and made the sensor implementing in immediately reuse without wash. Experimental results showed that applied an external magnetic field in a range of 50 Oe to 90 Oe, Dynabeads with a concentration as low as 0.1 μg/mL can be detected by this system and could give an approximate quantitation to the logarithmic of Dynabeads concentration. Sandwich immunoassay was employed for preparing PSA samples. The PSA capture was implemented on a gold film modified with a self-assembled monolayer and using biotinylated secondary antibody against PSA and streptavidinylated Dynabeads. With DC magnetic field in the range of 50 to 90 Oe, PSA can be detected with a detection limit as low as 0.1 ng/mL. Samples spiked with different concentrations of PSA can be distinguished clearly. Due to the contactless detection method, the detection system exhibited advantages such as convenient manipulation, reusable, inexpensive, small weight. So, this detection method was a promising candidate in biomarker detection, especially in point of care detection. PMID:27379844

  9. Bayesian Inference for Time Trends in Parameter Values: Case Study for the Ageing PSA Network of the European Commission

    SciTech Connect

    Dana L. Kelly; Albert Malkhasyan

    2010-06-01

    There is a nearly ubiquitous assumption in PSA that parameter values are at least piecewise-constant in time. As a result, Bayesian inference tends to incorporate many years of plant operation, over which there have been significant changes in plant operational and maintenance practices, plant management, etc. These changes can cause significant changes in parameter values over time; however, failure to perform Bayesian inference in the proper time-dependent framework can mask these changes. Failure to question the assumption of constant parameter values, and failure to perform Bayesian inference in the proper time-dependent framework were noted as important issues in NUREG/CR-6813, performed for the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards in 2003. That report noted that “industry lacks tools to perform time-trend analysis with Bayesian updating.” This paper describes an application of time-dependent Bayesian inference methods developed for the European Commission Ageing PSA Network. These methods utilize open-source software, implementing Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. The paper also illustrates the development of a generic prior distribution, which incorporates multiple sources of generic data via weighting factors that address differences in key influences, such as vendor, component boundaries, conditions of the operating environment, etc.

  10. Prostate specific antigen levels after definitive irradiation for carcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Schellhammer, P.F.; Schlossberg, S.M.; el-Mahdi, A.M.; Wright, G.L.; Brassil, D.N. )

    1991-05-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels were determined in 78 patients judged clinically to be free of disease at intervals of 36 or more months (range 38 to 186 months, median 87 months) after completion of irradiation therapy by 125-iodine implantation or external beam radiation. Of this select group of patients 38% had undetectable serum PSA levels (0.5 ng./ml. or less) and 38% had PSA levels that were within normal limits (4.0 ng./ml. or less). All stages and grades were represented. Undetectable PSA levels were only rarely found (3%) in patients with carcinoma of the prostate before treatment. In 24 of these 78 patients a negative biopsy of the irradiated prostate had been obtained 18 to 42 months after treatment. When the PSA level was drawn, which ranged from 7 to 16 years after treatment, an equal percentage of these biopsied patients had either an undetectable, normal or elevated level. Irradiation is able to decrease PSA to undetectable levels in some patients with prostatic carcinoma. Whether this reflects suppression of marker production alone or, more importantly, ablation of prostate cancer producing that marker remains to be determined.

  11. Fluorescence of prostate-specific antigen as measured with a portable 1D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeong C.; Jeong, Jin H.; Jeong, Dong S.; Kim, Young M.; Oh, Sang W.; Choi, Eui Y.; Kim, Jae H.; Nahm, Kie B.

    2005-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an androgen-dependent glycoprotein protease (M.W. 33 kDa) and a member of kallikrein super-family of serine protease, and has chymotrypsin-like enzymatic activity. It is synthesized by the prostate epithelial cells and found in the prostate gland and seminal plasma as a major protein. It is widely used as a clinical marker for diagnosis, screening, monitoring and prognosis of prostate cancer. In normal male adults, the concentration of PSA in the blood is below 4 ng/ml and this value increases in patients with the prostate cancer or the benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) due to its leakage into the circulatory system. As such, systematic monitoring of the PSA level in the blood can provide critical information about the progress of the prostatic disease. We have developed a compact integral system that can quantitatively measure the concentration of total PSA in human blood. This system utilizes the fluorescence emitted from the dye molecules attached to PSA molecules after appropriate immunoassay-based processing. Developed for the purpose of providing an affordable means of fast point-of-care testing of the prostate cancer, this system proved to be able to detect the presence of the PSA at the level of 0.18 ng/ml in less than 12 minutes, with the actual measurement taking less than 2 minutes. The design concept for this system is presented together with the result for a few representative samples.

  12. [The role of prostate specific antigen in diagnosis of localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Nara Uro-Oncology Research Group].

    PubMed

    Hirao, Y; Ozono, S; Kagebayashi, Y; Yoshi, M; Tani, Y; Uemura, H; Momose, H; Okajima, E

    1996-10-01

    The number of cases of prostate carcinoma (PCA) is steadily inceasing in Japan. The clinical application of a reliable tumor marker, prostate specific antigen (PSA) for the diagnosis, as well as the increasing elderly population in Japan may account for this increase. The subjects were patients at the Nara Medical University and its affiliated hospitals; 1) 687 cases without PCA were evaluated for age-specific PSA and the incidence of abnormal PSA following urological manipulations, 2) 135 cases with histological proven BPH by transurethral resection of prostate (TUR-P) were examined for PSA density (PSAD) and positive PSA rate in BPH, 3) 135 cases receiving a needle biopsy with suspicion of PCA were examined for the efficacy of PSA and PSAD and other parameters, and 4) 459 PCA cases treated between 1988 and 1994, were examined for specific PSA and PSAD values by stage and degree of cell differentiation. The PSA assay used in this study was MARKIT-M PA (normal range < or = 3.6 ng/ml). The PSA was decreased gradually with age in non-PCA patients, and abnormal PSA was found in 5.5% of these patients following manipulations. The average PSA was 2.95 +/- 2.03 ng/ml in 130 BPH patients (mean age: 71.1 +/- 7.0 years old. and average prostate volume: 32.9 +/- 16.1 ml). And abnormal PSA level (more than 3.61 ng/ml) was found in 22.3%. The mean PSAD was 0.1.0 +/- 0.06, and PSAD was below 0.15 in 86.1% of these BPH cases. Among the 135 cases receiving a needle biopsy, 33 cases had PSA values between 3.61 and 10.0 ng/ml. Of these cases, PCA was found in 18.5% of the 27 cases with a PSAD below 1.5, and in 33.3% of the 6 cases with a PSAD over 1.5. PSA and PSAD were proportionally increased with stage, and a significant difference in the PSA value was observed between stage B1 and B2, and stage C and D (P < 0.05). However, PSA and PSAD values were not significantly correlated with the cell differentiation in PCA stage A2-C. In total, PSA was 18.1 ng/ml in well, 23.9 ng/ml in

  13. GIS Technologies For The New Planetary Science Archive (PSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Docasal, R.; Barbarisi, I.; Rios, C.; Macfarlane, A. J.; Gonzalez, J.; Arviset, C.; De Marchi, G.; Martinez, S.; Grotheer, E.; Lim, T.; Besse, S.; Heather, D.; Fraga, D.; Barthelemy, M.

    2015-12-01

    Geographical information system (GIS) is becoming increasingly used for planetary science. GIS are computerised systems for the storage, retrieval, manipulation, analysis, and display of geographically referenced data. Some data stored in the Planetary Science Archive (PSA), for instance, a set of Mars Express/Venus Express data, have spatial metadata associated to them. To facilitate users in handling and visualising spatial data in GIS applications, the new PSA should support interoperability with interfaces implementing the standards approved by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). These standards are followed in order to develop open interfaces and encodings that allow data to be exchanged with GIS Client Applications, well-known examples of which are Google Earth and NASA World Wind as well as open source tools such as Openlayers. The technology already exists within PostgreSQL databases to store searchable geometrical data in the form of the PostGIS extension. An existing open source maps server is GeoServer, an instance of which has been deployed for the new PSA, uses the OGC standards to allow, among others, the sharing, processing and editing of data and spatial data through the Web Feature Service (WFS) standard as well as serving georeferenced map images through the Web Map Service (WMS). The final goal of the new PSA, being developed by the European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC) Science Data Centre (ESDC), is to create an archive which enables science exploitation of ESA's planetary missions datasets. This can be facilitated through the GIS framework, offering interfaces (both web GUI and scriptable APIs) that can be used more easily and scientifically by the community, and that will also enable the community to build added value services on top of the PSA.

  14. Predictors of time to biochemical recurrence in a radical prostatectomy cohort within the PSA-era

    PubMed Central

    Shahabi, Ahva; Satkunasivam, Raj; Gill, Inderbir S.; Lieskovsky, Gary; Daneshmand, Sia; Pinski, Jacek K.; Stern, Mariana C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to determine predictors for early and late biochemical recurrence following radical prostatectomy among localized prostate cancer patients. Methods: The study included localized prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) at the University of Southern California from 1988 to 2008. Competing risks regression models were used to determine risk factors associated with earlier or late biochemical recurrence, defined using the median time to biochemical recurrence in this population (2.9 years after radical prostatectomy). Results: The cohort for this study included 2262 localized prostate cancer (pT2-3N0M0) patients who did not receive neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapies. Of these patients, 188 experienced biochemical recurrence and a subset continued to clinical recurrence, either within (n=19, 10%) or following (n=13, 7%) 2.9 years after RP. Multivariable stepwise competing risks analysis showed Gleason score ≥7, positive surgical margin status, and ≥pT3a stage to be associated with biochemical recurrence within 2.9 years following surgery. Predictors of biochemical recurrence after 2.9 years were Gleason score 7 (4+3), preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, and ≥pT3a stage. Conclusions: Higher stage was associated with biochemical recurrence at any time following radical prostatectomy. Particular attention may need to be made to patients with stage ≥pT3a, higher preoperative PSA, and Gleason 7 prostate cancer with primary high-grade patterns when considering longer followup after RP. PMID:26858782

  15. Screening Prostate-specific Antigen Concentration and Prostate Cancer Mortality: The Korean Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Yejin; Kimm, Heejin; Shin, Sang Yop; Jee, Sun Ha; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the association between serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration from a screening test and prostate cancer mortality in an Asian population. METHODS We included 118,665 men in the Korean Heart Study, a large prospective cohort study of participants who voluntarily underwent private health examinations that included PSA-based prostate cancer screening. The baseline visit occurred between January 1994 and December 2004, and follow-up was through December 2011. Deaths from prostate cancer were ascertained from the underlying cause of death from a computerized search of death certificate data from the National Statistical Office in Korea. We used the Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate the association between serum PSA and risk of prostate cancer death adjusting the baseline age, cigarette smoking status, and body mass index. RESULTS During 1,381,901 person-years of follow-up, 6036 men died of any cause, and of these, 56 men died of prostate cancer. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio for prostate cancer death statistically significantly increased across PSA concentrations (P trend <.0001). The hazard ratio increased 7% per 1-ng/mL increase in PSA. The association between PSA concentration and death from prostate cancer was stronger in younger than in older men and in heavier than leaner men. CONCLUSION In conclusion, an increased screening PSA level is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer death in Korean men. Our findings may have implications for the development of targeted PSA cutpoints for biopsy recommendation. PMID:25917733

  16. Confirmation of a Low {alpha}/{beta} Ratio for Prostate Cancer Treated by External Beam Radiation Therapy Alone Using a Post-Treatment Repeated-Measures Model for PSA Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Proust-Lima, Cecile; Taylor, Jeremy M.G.; Secher, Solene; Sandler, Howard; Kestin, Larry; Pickles, Tom; Bae, Kyoungwha; Allison, Roger; Williams, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation only by use of a model of long-term prostate-specific antigen (PSA) dynamics. Methods and Materials: Repeated measures of PSA from 5,093 patients from 6 institutions treated for localized prostate cancer by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) without planned androgen deprivation were analyzed. A biphasic linear mixed model described the post-treatment evolution of PSA, rather than a conventional model of time to biochemical recurrence. The model was adjusted for standard prognostic factors (T stage, initial PSA level, and Gleason score) and cohort-specific effects. The radiation dose fractionation effect was estimated from the long-term rate of rise of PSA level. Results: Adjusted for other factors, total dose of EBRT and sum of squared doses per fraction were associated with long-term rate of change of PSA level (p = 0.0017 and p = 0.0003, respectively), an increase of each being associated with a lower rate of rise. The {alpha}/{beta} ratio was estimated at 1.55 Gy (95% confidence band, 0.46-4.52 Gy). This estimate was robust to adjustment of the linear mixed model. Conclusions: By analysis of a large EBRT-only cohort along with a method that uses all the repeated measures of PSA after the end of treatment, a low and precise {alpha}/{beta} was estimated. These data support the use of hypofractionation at fractional doses up to 2.8 Gy but cannot presently be assumed to accurately represent higher doses per fraction.

  17. Antigenic sites in carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Hammarstrom, S; Shively, J E; Paxton, R J; Beatty, B G; Larsson, A; Ghosh, R; Bormer, O; Buchegger, F; Mach, J P; Burtin, P

    1989-09-01

    The epitope reactivities of 52 well-characterized monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against carcinoembryonic antigen from 11 different research groups were studied using competitive solid-phase immunoassays. About 60% of all possible combinations of Mabs as inhibitors and as the primary binding antibody were investigated. The inhibition data were analyzed by a specially developed computer program "EPITOPES" which measures concordance and discordance in inhibition patterns between Mabs. The analysis showed that 43 of the 52 Mabs (83%) could be classified into one of five essentially noninteracting epitope groups (GOLD 1-5) containing between four and 15 Mabs each. The epitopes recognized by the Mabs belonging to groups 1 to 5 were peptide in nature. With one or two possible exceptions non-classifiable Mabs were either directed against carbohydrate epitopes (4 Mabs) or were inactive in the tests used. Within epitope groups GOLD 1, 4, and 5 two partially overlapping subgroups were distinguished. Mabs with a high degree of carcinoembryonic antigen specificity generally belonged to epitope groups GOLD 1 and 3. PMID:2474375

  18. A Summary of Taxonomies of Digital System Failure Modes Provided by the DigRel Task Group

    SciTech Connect

    Chu T. L.; Yue M.; Postma, W.

    2012-06-25

    Recently, the CSNI directed WGRisk to set up a task group called DIGREL to initiate a new task on developing a taxonomy of failure modes of digital components for the purposes of PSA. It is an important step towards standardized digital I&C reliability assessment techniques for PSA. The objective of this paper is to provide a comparison of the failure mode taxonomies provided by the participants. The failure modes are classified in terms of their levels of detail. Software and hardware failure modes are discussed separately.

  19. Novel antigen delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Trovato, Maria; De Berardinis, Piergiuseppe

    2015-08-12

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the "E2 scaffold" of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  20. Level 2 PSA insights relative to filtered vent system

    SciTech Connect

    Deremer, R.K.; Fleming, K.N.; Landolt, J.

    1996-07-01

    A full-scope Level 2 probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) of the Goesgen Nuclear Power Plant was completed early in 1994. During the PSA, a containment filtered vent system was installed at the plant to meet requirements of the Swiss safety authorities. The purpose of the vent system is to provide a mechanism to depressurize the containment atmosphere in a controlled manner during the late phase of a severe accident in order to preclude gradual over pressurization of the containment and filter any release of radioactive materials to the environment. To ensure a high degree of reliability, it was required to include a design feature to open the vent passively via the use of a rupture disc whose opening is highly reliable and independent of operator actions. The PSA addressed two issues associated with the vent system: (1) What is the optimum pressure to select for the rupture disc setpoint? and (2) What is the best strategy for the use of the rupture disc isolation valves (i.e., should they be left open normally to ensure the opening of the vent at the rupture disc setpoint or should they be left closed and opened by the operator only during a severe accident)? Based on the results generated by the PSA, which indicated that the downside risk of inadvertent opening in the early phase of an accident was greater than the upside benefit of a passively actuated vent in the late phase of an accident, it was concluded that it is prudent to have the rupture disc normally isolated from the containment.

  1. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... if You Have Kidney Disease Kidney Failure Expand Dialysis Kidney Transplant Preparing for Kidney Failure Treatment Choosing Not to Treat with Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact ...

  2. An Inexpensive, Fast and Sensitive Quantitative Lateral Flow Magneto-Immunoassay for Total Prostate Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Jacqueline M.; Wraith, Patrick; Kiely, Janice; Persad, Raj; Hurley, Katrina; Hawkins, Peter; Luxton, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We describe the detection characteristics of a device the Resonant Coil Magnetometer (RCM) to quantify paramagnetic particles (PMPs) in immunochromatographic (lateral flow) assays. Lateral flow assays were developed using PMPs for the measurement of total prostate specific antigen (PSA) in serum samples. A detection limit of 0.8 ng/mL was achieved for total PSA using the RCM and is at clinically significant concentrations. Comparison of data obtained in a pilot study from the analysis of serum samples with commercially available immunoassays shows good agreement. The development of a quantitative magneto-immunoassay in lateral flow format for total PSA suggests the potential of the RCM to operate with many immunoassay formats. The RCM has the potential to be modified to quantify multiple analytes in this format. This research shows promise for the development of an inexpensive device capable of quantifying multiple analytes at the point-of-care using a magneto-immunoassay in lateral flow format. PMID:25587419

  3. Prostate involvement during sexually transmitted infections as measured by prostate-specific antigen concentration

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, S; Nevin, R L; Pakpahan, R; Elliott, D J; Cole, S R; De Marzo, A M; Gaydos, C A; Isaacs, W B; Nelson, W G; Sokoll, L J; Zenilman, J M; Cersovsky, S B; Platz, E A

    2011-01-01

    Background: We investigated prostate involvement during sexually transmitted infections by measuring serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a marker of prostate infection, inflammation, and/or cell damage in young, male US military members. Methods: We measured PSA before and during infection for 299 chlamydia, 112 gonorrhoea, and 59 non-chlamydial, non-gonococcal urethritis (NCNGU) cases, and 256 controls. Results: Chlamydia and gonorrhoea, but not NCNGU, cases were more likely to have a large rise (⩾40%) in PSA than controls (33.6%, 19.1%, and 8.2% vs 8.8%, P<0.0001, 0.021, and 0.92, respectively). Conclusion: Chlamydia and gonorrhoea may infect the prostate of some infected men. PMID:21792196

  4. Long-Term PSA Control with Repeated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy in a Patient with Oligometastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pasqualetti, Francesco; Cocuzza, Paola; Coraggio, Gabriele; Ferrazza, Patrizia; Derosa, Lisa; Galli, Luca; Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Locantore, Luisa; Boni, Roberto; Fabrini, Maria G; Erba, Paola A

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common malignancies and main causes of cancer death in Western countries. In the presence of metastatic disease, systemic treatment remains the main clinical option. However, since the introduction of highly sensitive imaging techniques, a new clinical 'entity' of metastatic patients with a limited number of lesions has been defined: oligometastatic patients. In this patient group, the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) or other local therapies against all active sites of disease revealed by 18F-choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) could achieve sufficient prostate-specific antigen (PSA) control. However, a clear benefit of this procedure in terms of significant endpoints is yet to be demonstrated. This case report describes our experience with treating a castration-resistant PCa patient with 18F-choline PET/CT-guided SBRT. Because of the occurrence of 5 metachronous lesions over 4 years, the pattern of recurrence was defined by the local multidisciplinary team as oligometastatic disease, and the patient was treated with 5 courses of SBRT which yielded good PSA control. He started systemic therapy with abiraterone acetate almost 5 years after the diagnosis of recurrent PCa. PMID:27160394

  5. Insights from the WGRISK workshop on the PSA of advanced and new reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Georgescu, G.; Ahn, K. I.; Amri, A.

    2012-07-01

    Probabilistic Safety Assessment /Probabilistic Risk Assessment for new and advanced reactors is recognized as an essential complement of the deterministic approaches to achieve improved safety and performances of new nuclear power plants, comparing to the operating plants. However, the development of PSA to these reactors is encountered to concurrent challenges, mainly due to the limited available design information, as well as due to potentially new initiating events, accident sequences and phenomena. The use of PSA in the decision making process is also challenging since the resulting PSA may not sufficiently reflect the future as-built, as-operated plant information. In order to address these aspects, the OECD/NEA/WGRISK initiated two coordinated tasks on 'PSA for Advanced Reactors' and 'PSA in the frame of Design and Commissioning of New NPPs'. In this context, a joint workshop was organized by OECD, during which related subjects were presented and discussed, including PSA for generation IV reactors, PSA for evolutionary reactors, PSA for small modular reactors, severe accidents and Level 2 PSA, Level 3 PSA and consequences analysis, digital I and C modeling, passive systems reliability, safety-security interface, as well as the results of the surveys performed in the frame of theses WGRISK tasks. (authors)

  6. Superstructure-based optimal design of PSA cycles for post-combustion CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.; Biegler, L.; Zitney, S.

    2009-07-01

    Recent developments have shown pressure/vacuum swing adsorption (PSA/VSA) to be a promising option to effectively capture CO2 from flue gas streams. In most commercial PSA cycles, the weakly adsorbed component in the mixture is the desired product, and enriching the strongly adsorbed CO2 is not a concern. Thus, it is necessary to develop PSA processes specifically targeted to obtain pure strongly adsorbed component. So far, no systematic methodology has been suggested in the literature to design PSA cycles for high purity CO2 capture. This study addresses this need and presents a systematic optimization-based formulation to synthesize PSA cycles. In particular, a novel PSA superstructure is presented to design optimal PSA cycle configurations and evaluate CO2 capture strategies. The superstructure is rich enough to predict a number of different PSA operating steps. The bed connections in the superstructure are governed by timedependent control variables, which can be varied to realize most PSA operating steps. An optimal sequence of operating steps is achieved through the formulation of an optimal control problem with the partial differential and algebraic equations of the PSA system and the cyclic steady state condition. The superstructure approach is demonstrated for case studies related to post-combustion CO2 capture. In particular, optimal PSA cycles were synthesized which maximize CO2 recovery for a given purity, and minimize overall power consumption. The results show the potential of the superstructure to predict PSA cycles with up to 98% purity and recovery of CO2. Moreover, for recovery of around 85% and purity of over 90%, these cycles can recover CO2 from atmospheric flue gas with a low power consumption of 465 kWh/tonne CO2. The approach presented is, therefore, very promising and quite useful for evaluating the suitability of different adsorbents, feedstocks and operating strategies for PSA, and assessing its usefulness for CO2 capture.

  7. Prostate specific antigen testing in family practice: a cross sectional survey of self-reported rates of and reasons for testing participation and risk disclosure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite controversy about the benefits of routine prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, rates of participation continue to rise. It is important to ensure that men are fully informed about the potential risks associated with this test. Little is known about the processes of shared decision making for PSA testing in the family practice setting. This study aimed to explore men’s experiences of PSA testing participation and risk disclosure for PSA testing. Methods A cross-sectional survey of male family practice attendees aged 40 years or older, with no previous history of prostate cancer, between June 2010 and November 2011. Questions related to whether participants had undertaken PSA testing or discussed this with their doctor over the past 5 years, whether the patient or doctor had initiated the discussion, reasons for undergoing testing, and whether their doctor had discussed particular risks associated with PSA testing. Results Sixty-seven percent (215/320) of men recalled having a PSA test in the past five years. Of the respondents who reported not having a test, 14% had discussed it with their doctor. The main reasons for having a PSA test were doctor recommendation and wanting to keep up to date with health tests. Thirty-eight percent or fewer respondents reported being advised of each potential risk. Conclusions Despite debate over the benefits of routine PSA testing, a high proportion of male family practice attendees report undertaking this test. Risks associated with testing appear to be poorly disclosed by general practitioners. These results suggest the need to improve the quality of informed consent for PSA testing in the family practice setting. PMID:24321004

  8. Body mass index in relation to serum prostate-specific antigen levels and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Bonn, Stephanie E; Sjölander, Arvid; Tillander, Annika; Wiklund, Fredrik; Grönberg, Henrik; Bälter, Katarina

    2016-07-01

    High Body mass index (BMI) has been directly associated with risk of aggressive or fatal prostate cancer. One possible explanation may be an effect of BMI on serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). To study the association between BMI and serum PSA as well as prostate cancer risk, a large cohort of men without prostate cancer at baseline was followed prospectively for prostate cancer diagnoses until 2015. Serum PSA and BMI were assessed among 15,827 men at baseline in 2010-2012. During follow-up, 735 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer with 282 (38.4%) classified as high-grade cancers. Multivariable linear regression models and natural cubic linear regression splines were fitted for analyses of BMI and log-PSA. For risk analysis, Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and natural cubic Cox regression splines producing standardized cancer-free probabilities were fitted. Results showed that baseline Serum PSA decreased by 1.6% (95% CI: -2.1 to -1.1) with every one unit increase in BMI. Statistically significant decreases of 3.7, 11.7 and 32.3% were seen for increasing BMI-categories of 25 < 30, 30 < 35 and ≥35 kg/m(2) , respectively, compared to the reference (18.5 < 25 kg/m(2) ). No statistically significant associations were seen between BMI and prostate cancer risk although results were indicative of a positive association to incidence rates of high-grade disease and an inverse association to incidence of low-grade disease. However, findings regarding risk are limited by the short follow-up time. In conclusion, BMI was inversely associated to PSA-levels. BMI should be taken into consideration when referring men to a prostate biopsy based on serum PSA-levels. PMID:26914149

  9. ASSOCIATION OF OBESITY AND DIABETES WITH SERUM PROSTATE-SPECIFIC ANTIGEN LEVELS IN JAPANESE MALES

    PubMed Central

    NAITO, MARIKO; ASAI, YATAMI; MORI, ATSUYOSHI; FUKADA, YUKO; KUWABARA, MAYUMI; KATASE, SHIRO; HISHIDA, ASAHI; MORITA, EMI; KAWAI, SAYO; OKADA, RIEKO; NISHIO, KAZUKO; TAMAKOSHI, AKIKO; WAKAI, KENJI; HAMAJIMA, NOBUYUKI

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Patients with diabetes have been reported to be at an increased risk for cancers of the pancreas, liver, and colon; however, recent studies have suggested that men with diabetes are at a decreased risk for prostate cancer. Previous studies have found that obese men have lower serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentrations than do non-obese men. Further understanding of how obesity and diabetes affect the PSA concentration may improve our ability to detect clinically relevant prostate tumors. This study examined the relationships among serum PSA level, obesity, and diabetes in apparently healthy Japanese males. We analyzed the baseline data from 2,172 Japanese males (age, 56.8 ± 6.1 years [mean ± SD]) who participated in the Japan Multi-Institutional Collaborative Cohort Study. Diabetes was defined as the presence of both a hemoglobin A1c (JDS) of ≥6.1% and a fasting plasma glucose level of ≥126 mg/dL, or a positive medical history. After adjusting for age, the PSA levels were elevated among males with a higher normal BMI (ranging from 23.0 to 24.9) and lowered among men with a BMI of ≥25.0. In the stratified analysis, these significant differences in BMI categories were absent among diabetics. The mean PSA levels were significantly lower in diabetics than in non-diabetics among subjects aged 60 and over. Our findings suggest that the pre-overweight men had increased PSA levels, and the diabetes was associated with a reduction of PSA levels in elderly. PMID:23092101

  10. Treatment Outcomes in Non-Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients With Ultra-High Prostate-Specific Antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Patricia; Tonita, Jon; Woitas, Carla; Zhu Tong; Joseph, Kurian; Skarsgard, David

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: It is commonly believed that prostate cancer patients with very high prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels are unlikely to benefit from definitive local treatment, and patients with very high PSA are often underrepresented in, or excluded from, randomized clinical trials. Consequently, little is known about their optimal treatment or prognosis. We performed a registry-based analysis of management and outcome in this population of patients. Methods and Materials: Our provincial Cancer Registry was used to identify all men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1990 to 2001. A retrospective chart review provided information on stage, Gleason score, PSA at diagnosis, and treatment. In this study, ultra-high PSA was defined as PSA of {>=}50 ng/ml. For a more complete perspective, treatment outcomes of patients with PSA of 20 to 49.9 ng/ml were also studied. Results: Of the 8378 men diagnosed with prostate cancer during this period, 6,449 had no known nodal or distant metastatic disease. The median follow-up of this group was 67.2 months (range, 0-192 months). A total of 1534 patients had PSA of {>=}20 ng/ml. Among the 995 patients with PSA 20 to 49.9 ng/ml, 85 had radical prostatectomy (RP), and their 5- and 10-year cause-specific survivals (CSS) were 95% and 84%, respectively. The 497 patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) had 5- and 10-year CSS of 92% and 71%. For the 332 patients with PSA 50-99.9 ng/ml, RT was associated with 5- and 10-year CSS of 81% and 55%. For the 207 patients with PSA of {>=}100 ng/ml, RT was associated with 5- and 10-year CSS of 80% and 54%. Conclusions: This is the largest series in the world on non metastatic cancer patients with ultra-high PSA at diagnosis. Even in the setting of a very high presenting PSA level, prostatectomy and radiotherapy are often associated with prolonged survival.