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Sample records for antimalarial drug quality

  1. ANTIMALARIAL DRUG QUALITY IN AFRICA

    PubMed Central

    Amin, AA; Kokwaro, GO

    2009-01-01

    Background and objective There are several reports of sub-standard and counterfeit antimalarial drugs circulating in the markets of developing countries; we aimed to review the literature for the African continent. Methods A search was conducted in PubMED in English using the medical subject headings (MeSH) terms: “Antimalarials/analysis”[MeSH] OR “Antimalarials/standards”[MeSH] AND “Africa”[MeSH]” to include articles published up to and including 26/02/07. Data were augmented with reports on the quality of antimalarial drugs in Africa obtained from colleagues in the World Health Organization. We summarised the data under the following themes: content and dissolution; relative bioavalability of antimalarial products; antimalarial stability and shelf life; general tests on pharmaceutical dosage forms; and the presence of degradation or unidentifiable impurities in formulations. Results and discussion The search yielded 21 relevant peer-reviewed articles and three reports on the quality of antimalarial drugs in Africa. The literature was varied in the quality and breadth of data presented, with most bioavailability studies poorly designed and executed. The review highlights the common finding in drug quality studies that 1) most antimalarial products pass the basic tests for pharmaceutical dosage forms, such as the uniformity of weight for tablets 2) most antimalarial drugs pass the content test 3) in vitro product dissolution is the main problem area where most drugs fail to meet required pharmacopoeial specifications, especially with regard to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine products. In addition, there are worryingly high quality failure rates for artemisinin monotherapies such as dihydroartemisin (DHA); for instance all five DHA sampled products in one study in Nairobi, Kenya, were reported to have failed the requisite tests. Conclusions There is an urgent need to strengthen pharmaceutical management systems such as post-marketing surveillance and the

  2. Quality of Antimalarials at the Epicenter of Antimalarial Drug Resistance: Results from an Overt and Mystery Client Survey in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Shunmay; Lawford, Harriet L. S.; Tabernero, Patricia; Nguon, Chea; van Wyk, Albert; Malik, Naiela; DeSousa, Mikhael; Rada, Ouk; Boravann, Mam; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hostetler, Dana M.; Swamidoss, Isabel; Green, Michael D.; Fernandez, Facundo M.; Kaur, Harparkash

    2015-01-01

    Widespread availability of monotherapies and falsified antimalarials is thought to have contributed to the historical development of multidrug-resistant malaria in Cambodia. This study aimed to document the quality of artemisinin-containing antimalarials (ACAs) and to compare two methods of collecting antimalarials from drug outlets: through open surveyors and mystery clients (MCs). Few oral artemisinin-based monotherapies and no suspected falsified medicines were found. All 291 samples contained the stated active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of which 69% were considered good quality by chemical analysis. Overall, medicine quality did not differ by collection method, although open surveyors were less likely to obtain oral artemisinin-based monotherapies than MCs. The results are an encouraging indication of the positive impact of the country's efforts to tackle falsified antimalarials and artemisinin-based monotherapies. However, poor-quality medicines remain an ongoing challenge that demands sustained political will and investment of human and financial resources. PMID:25897063

  3. Quality of antimalarials at the epicenter of antimalarial drug resistance: results from an overt and mystery client survey in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Shunmay; Lawford, Harriet L S; Tabernero, Patricia; Nguon, Chea; van Wyk, Albert; Malik, Naiela; DeSousa, Mikhael; Rada, Ouk; Boravann, Mam; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hostetler, Dana M; Swamidoss, Isabel; Green, Michael D; Fernandez, Facundo M; Kaur, Harparkash

    2015-06-01

    Widespread availability of monotherapies and falsified antimalarials is thought to have contributed to the historical development of multidrug-resistant malaria in Cambodia. This study aimed to document the quality of artemisinin-containing antimalarials (ACAs) and to compare two methods of collecting antimalarials from drug outlets: through open surveyors and mystery clients (MCs). Few oral artemisinin-based monotherapies and no suspected falsified medicines were found. All 291 samples contained the stated active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of which 69% were considered good quality by chemical analysis. Overall, medicine quality did not differ by collection method, although open surveyors were less likely to obtain oral artemisinin-based monotherapies than MCs. The results are an encouraging indication of the positive impact of the country's efforts to tackle falsified antimalarials and artemisinin-based monotherapies. However, poor-quality medicines remain an ongoing challenge that demands sustained political will and investment of human and financial resources. PMID:25897063

  4. Use and quality of antimalarial drugs in the private sector in Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Cong, L D; Yen, P T; Nhu, T V; Binh, L N

    1998-01-01

    This study examines the use and quality of antimalarial drugs in the growing private sector of Viet Nam. The practices of drug vendors (called alternative treatment providers (ATPs)) as well as their stocks and the quality of drugs sold by them, and the local production and distribution of antimalarials were investigated. Antimalarials were sold by the vast majority of ATPs, almost all the common antimalarials being available for sale. The practices and indications for sale, however, varied. Underdosing for malaria was frequent in all three provinces studied, and lack of knowledge of the appropriate regimen for cure was common among the drug-sellers. Samples of antimalarials were collected from ATP outlets in the three provinces, and the drugs were assessed for their contents and expiry date by the Institute of Drug Quality Control in Hanoi. Of the 218 samples of drugs examined by the Institute, over 96% met the quality requirements. However, a 10% sample of these drugs were independently assessed by WHO and revealed a different picture: 70% of them failed to meet the standard specifications required. There is therefore an urgent need to improve the capability and monitoring procedures of bodies involved in assessing and regulating drugs in Viet Nam. PMID:9763723

  5. Antimalarial drug resistance: An overview.

    PubMed

    Antony, Hiasindh Ashmi; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health burden throughout the world. Resistance to the antimalarial drugs has increased the mortality and morbidity rate that is achieved so far through the malaria control program. Monitoring the drug resistance to the available antimalarial drugs helps to implement effective drug policy, through the in vivo efficacy studies, in vitro drug susceptibility tests and detection of molecular markers. It is important to understand the mechanism of the antimalarial drugs, as it is one of the key factors in the emergence and spread of drug resistance. This review summarizes the commonly used antimalarial drugs, their mechanism of action and the genetic markers validated so far for the detection of drug-resistant parasites. PMID:26998432

  6. Antimalarial drug resistance: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Hiasindh Ashmi; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health burden throughout the world. Resistance to the antimalarial drugs has increased the mortality and morbidity rate that is achieved so far through the malaria control program. Monitoring the drug resistance to the available antimalarial drugs helps to implement effective drug policy, through the in vivo efficacy studies, in vitro drug susceptibility tests and detection of molecular markers. It is important to understand the mechanism of the antimalarial drugs, as it is one of the key factors in the emergence and spread of drug resistance. This review summarizes the commonly used antimalarial drugs, their mechanism of action and the genetic markers validated so far for the detection of drug-resistant parasites. PMID:26998432

  7. [Resistance to the antimalarial drugs].

    PubMed

    Venanzi, E; López-Vélez, R

    2016-09-01

    Malaria is one of the most widespread infectious diseases around the world with 214 million cases and 438,000 deaths in 2015. In the early twentieth century it was described for the first time the resistance to quinine and, since then, drug resistance to antimalarial drugs has spread up to represent a global challenge in the fight and control of malaria. Understanding the mechanisms, geography and monitoring tools that we can act against resistance to antimalarial drugs is critical to prevent its expansion. PMID:27608319

  8. Quality of anti-malarial drugs provided by public and private healthcare providers in south-east Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Onwujekwe, Obinna; Kaur, Harparkash; Dike, Nkem; Shu, Elvis; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Hanson, Kara; Okoye, Viola; Okonkwo, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background There is little existing knowledge about actual quality of drugs provided by different providers in Nigeria and in many sub-Saharan African countries. Such information is important for improving malaria treatment that will help in the development and implementation of actions designed to improve the quality of treatment. The objective of the study was to determine the quality of drugs used for the treatment of malaria in a broad spectrum of public and private healthcare providers. Methods The study was undertaken in six towns (three urban and three rural) in Anambra state, south-east Nigeria. Anti-malarials (225 samples), which included artesunate, dihydroartemisinin, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), quinine, and chloroquine, were either purchased or collected from randomly selected providers. The quality of these drugs was assessed by laboratory analysis of the dissolution profile using published pharmacopoeial monograms and measuring the amount of active ingredient using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Findings It was found that 60 (37%) of the anti-malarials tested did not meet the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) specifications for the amount of active ingredients, with the suspect drugs either lacking the active ingredients or containing suboptimal quantities of the active ingredients. Quinine (46%) and SP formulations (39%) were among drugs that did not satisfy the tolerance limits published in USP monograms. A total of 78% of the suspect drugs were from private facilities, mostly low-level providers, such as patent medicine dealers (vendors). Conclusion This study found that there was a high prevalence of poor quality drugs. The findings provide areas for public intervention to improve the quality of malaria treatment services. There should be enforced checks and regulation of drug supply management as well as stiffer penalties for people stocking substandard and counterfeit drugs. PMID:19208221

  9. Substandard antimalarials available in Afghanistan: a case for assessing the quality of drugs in resource poor settings.

    PubMed

    Lalani, Mirza; Kaur, Harparkash; Mohammed, Nader; Mailk, Naiela; van Wyk, Albert; Jan, Sakhi; Kakar, Rishtya Meena; Mojadidi, Mohammed Khalid; Leslie, Toby

    2015-06-01

    Good-quality antimalarials are crucial for the effective treatment and control of malaria. A total of 7,740 individual and packaged tablets, ampoules, and syrups were obtained from 60 randomly selected public (N = 35) and private outlets (N = 25) in Afghanistan. Of these, 134 samples were screened using the Global Pharma Health Fund (GPHF) MiniLab® in Kabul with 33/126 (26%) samples failing the MiniLab® disintegration test. The quality of a subsample (N = 37) of cholorquine, quinine, and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine tablets was assessed by in vitro dissolution testing following U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP) monographs at a bioanalytical laboratory in London, United Kingdom. Overall, 12/32 (32%) samples of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine and quinine were found not to comply with the USP tolerance limits. Substandard antimalarials were available in Afghanistan demonstrating that continuous monitoring of drug quality is warranted. However, in Afghanistan as in many low-income countries, capacity to determine and monitor drug quality using methods such as dissolution testing needs to be established to empower national authorities to take appropriate action in setting up legislation and regulation. PMID:25897070

  10. Quality of Antimalarial Drugs and Antibiotics in Papua New Guinea: A Survey of the Health Facility Supply Chain

    PubMed Central

    Hetzel, Manuel W.; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Bala, Nancy; Pulford, Justin; Betuela, Inoni; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Lavu, Evelyn K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor-quality life-saving medicines are a major public health threat, particularly in settings with a weak regulatory environment. Insufficient amounts of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) endanger patient safety and may contribute to the development of drug resistance. In the case of malaria, concerns relate to implications for the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT). In Papua New Guinea (PNG), Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax are both endemic and health facilities are the main source of treatment. ACT has been introduced as first-line treatment but other drugs, such as primaquine for the treatment of P. vivax hypnozoites, are widely available. This study investigated the quality of antimalarial drugs and selected antibiotics at all levels of the health facility supply chain in PNG. Methods and Findings Medicines were obtained from randomly sampled health facilities and selected warehouses and hospitals across PNG and analysed for API content using validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Of 360 tablet/capsule samples from 60 providers, 9.7% (95% CI 6.9, 13.3) contained less, and 0.6% more, API than pharmacopoeial reference ranges, including 29/37 (78.4%) primaquine, 3/70 (4.3%) amodiaquine, and one sample each of quinine, artemether, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and amoxicillin. According to the package label, 86.5% of poor-quality samples originated from India. Poor-quality medicines were found in 48.3% of providers at all levels of the supply chain. Drug quality was unrelated to storage conditions. Conclusions This study documents the presence of poor-quality medicines, particularly primaquine, throughout PNG. Primaquine is the only available transmission-blocking antimalarial, likely to become important to prevent the spread of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum and eliminating P. vivax hypnozoites. The availability of poor-quality medicines reflects the lack of adequate quality control and regulatory

  11. Trioxaferroquines as new hybrid antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Bellot, François; Coslédan, Frédéric; Vendier, Laure; Brocard, Jacques; Meunier, Bernard; Robert, Anne

    2010-05-27

    The synthesis, characterization, and antimalarial evaluation of a new series of potential antimalarial molecules, named trioxaferroquines, are reported. Trioxaferroquines are hybrid antimalarial drugs containing a 1,2,4-trioxane covalently linked to ferroquine (Fq), a synthetic ferrocenylquinoline derivative currently under clinical development. The aim was to combine, within a single structure, an iron(II) species, a 1,2,4-trioxane, as in artemisinin, and a substituted quinoline, as in chloroquine. PMID:20443628

  12. Emerging targets for antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Padmanaban, Govinarajan; Rangarajan, Pundi N

    2001-08-01

    The absence of an effective vaccine against malaria and the ability of the parasite to develop resistance to known antimalarial drugs makes it mandatory to unravel newer drug targets with a view to developing newer pharmacophores. While conventional targets such as the purine, pyrimidine and folate pathways are still being investigated in the light of newer knowledge, a new opportunity has emerged from an understanding of certain unique features of the parasite biology. These include the food vacuole, haemoglobin catabolism, haeme biosynthesis, apicoplasts and their metabolism as well as macromolecular transactions, import of host proteins, parasite induced alterations in the red cell surface and transport phenomena. This review seeks to emphasise the new and emerging targets, while giving a brief account of the targets that have already been exploited. PMID:12540258

  13. Hemozoin and antimalarial drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Kim Y; Wright, David W

    2014-01-01

    Recent initiatives to develop more effective and affordable drugs, controlling mosquitoes and development of a preventative vaccine have been launched with the goal of completely eradicating malaria. To this end, Novartis (Surrey, UK) and GlaxoSmithKline (Middlesex, UK) screened their chemical libraries of approximately two million small molecules for antimalarial properties, which resulted in a set of over 20,000 ‘highly druggable’ initial hits. Efforts in academia are centered on specific pathway targets. One such high-throughput screening effort has been focused on hemozoin formation, a unique heme detoxification pathway found in the malaria parasite. This review discusses the current approaches and limitations of high-throughput screening discovery of hemozoin inhibitors. In the future, new methods must be developed to validate the mechanism of action of these hit compounds within the parasite. PMID:23919553

  14. World Antimalarial Resistance Network (WARN) II: in vitro antimalarial drug susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bacon, David J; Jambou, Ronan; Fandeur, Thierry; Le Bras, Jacques; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda; Fukuda, Mark M; Ringwald, Pascal; Sibley, Carol Hopkins; Kyle, Dennis E

    2007-01-01

    Intrinsic resistance of Plasmodium falciparum is clearly a major determinant of the clinical failure of antimalarial drugs. However, complex interactions between the host, the parasite and the drug obscure the ability to define parasite drug resistance in vivo. The in vitro antimalarial drug susceptibility assay determines ex-vivo growth of parasite in the presence of serial drug concentrations and, thus, eliminates host effects, such as drug metabolism and immunity. Although the sensitivity of the parasite to various antimalarials provided by such a test provides an important indicator of intrinsic parasite susceptibility, there are fundamental methodological issues that undermine comparison of in vitro susceptibility both between laboratories and within a single laboratory over time. A network of laboratories is proposed that will agree on the basic parameters of the in vitro test and associated measures of quality control. The aim of the network would be to establish baseline values of sensitivity to commonly used antimalarial agents from key regions of the world, and create a global database, linked to clinical, molecular and pharmacology databases, to support active surveillance to monitor temporal trends in parasite susceptibility. Such a network would facilitate the rapid detection of strains with novel antimalarial resistance profiles and investigate suitable alternative treatments with retained efficacy. PMID:17822533

  15. The Tragedy Caused by Fake Antimalarial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ambroise-Thomas, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Counterfeit antimalarials (mainly artemisinin derivatives) is a crucial health problem in developing countries, particularly in Africa. The illegal production, sale and distribution of fake drugs is a huge market evaluated to several billion of dollars and represents more than 50% of the pharmaceutical market in several African countries. Fake drugs have led to a very great number of deaths from untreated malaria or fatality provoked by toxic ingredients. These fake medicines increase the risk of artemisinin resistance developed by the use of sub therapeutic dosages of antimalarials. Tackling this criminal traffic is the objective of an international program created by WHO and involves the international police and custom organizations like INTERPOL. Several very important and encouraging results have been obtained, but the problem will be completely solved if genuine antimalarials, free-of-charge, are handed-over to populations in sub Sahara African countries. PMID:22708042

  16. Pricing, distribution, and use of antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Foster, S D

    1991-01-01

    Prices of new antimalarial drugs are targeted at the "travellers' market" in developed countries, which makes them unaffordable in malaria-endemic countries where the per capita annual drug expenditures are US$ 5 or less. Antimalarials are distributed through a variety of channels in both public and private sectors, the official malaria control programmes accounting for 25-30% of chloroquine distribution. The unofficial drug sellers in markets, streets, and village shops account for as much as half of antimalarials distributed in many developing countries. Use of antimalarials through the health services is often poor; drug shortages are common and overprescription and overuse of injections are significant problems. Anxiety over drug costs may prevent patients from getting the necessary treatment for malaria, especially because of the seasonal appearance of this disease when people's cash reserves are very low. The high costs may lead them to unofficial sources, which will sell a single tablet instead of a complete course of treatment, and subsequently to increased, often irrational demand for more drugs and more injections. Increasingly people are resorting to self-medication for malaria, which may cause delays in seeking proper treatment in cases of failure, especially in areas where chloroquine resistance has increased rapidly. Self-medication is now widespread, and measures to restrict the illicit sale of drugs have been unsuccessful. The "unofficial" channels thus represent an unacknowledged extension of the health services in many countries; suggestions are advanced to encourage better self-medication by increasing the knowledge base among the population at large (mothers, schoolchildren, market sellers, and shopkeepers), with an emphasis on correct dosing and on the importance of seeking further treatment without delay, if necessary. PMID:1893512

  17. Economic prospects for a new antimalarial drug.

    PubMed

    Foster, S

    1994-06-01

    The market for antimalarial drugs consists of the 2.8 billion (2.8 x 10(9) people living in malaria endemic areas and about 20-30 million people, mainly Europeans and North Americans, who travel or live in malarious areas, and the wealthy elite of malarious developing countries. Some of the largest markets include China, India, and Indonesia with a total of 1.9 billion people exposed; Latin America, with 119 million; and sub-Saharan Africa with 400 million. An estimated 200 million clinical cases occur each year, with around 2 million deaths annually, primarily in African children. Antimalarial drugs are distributed through several different networks and are purchased by governments and private individuals. At present the world market is dominated by chloroquine by virtue of its safety, wide availability and low price. Approximately 20% of the total production of chloroquine was distributed through national control programmes and 80% through other channels; chloroquine is probably the second or third most widely consumed drug in the world. The global market for antimalarial drugs is likely to be of the order of US$100-120 million, with chloroquine making up about US$64-80 m, sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine about US$20 m, and other drugs making up US$10-20 m. Chloroquine is rapidly losing its effectiveness against the malaria parasite, and a safe, effective, cheap replacement is urgently needed. Another product which was found to be safe and effective against malaria, with a price per treatment held at or near the present price of chloroquine, could quickly replace chloroquine as the first-line treatment against malaria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8053030

  18. Anticancer Properties of Distinct Antimalarial Drug Classes

    PubMed Central

    Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob; Guy, R. Kiplin; Chibale, Kelly; Haynes, Richard K.; Peitz, Ingmar; Kelter, Gerhard; Phillips, Margaret A.; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L.; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Wells, Timothy N. C.

    2013-01-01

    We have tested five distinct classes of established and experimental antimalarial drugs for their anticancer potential, using a panel of 91 human cancer lines. Three classes of drugs: artemisinins, synthetic peroxides and DHFR (dihydrofolate reductase) inhibitors effected potent inhibition of proliferation with IC50s in the nM- low µM range, whereas a DHODH (dihydroorotate dehydrogenase) and a putative kinase inhibitor displayed no activity. Furthermore, significant synergies were identified with erlotinib, imatinib, cisplatin, dasatinib and vincristine. Cluster analysis of the antimalarials based on their differential inhibition of the various cancer lines clearly segregated the synthetic peroxides OZ277 and OZ439 from the artemisinin cluster that included artesunate, dihydroartemisinin and artemisone, and from the DHFR inhibitors pyrimethamine and P218 (a parasite DHFR inhibitor), emphasizing their shared mode of action. In order to further understand the basis of the selectivity of these compounds against different cancers, microarray-based gene expression data for 85 of the used cell lines were generated. For each compound, distinct sets of genes were identified whose expression significantly correlated with compound sensitivity. Several of the antimalarials tested in this study have well-established and excellent safety profiles with a plasma exposure, when conservatively used in malaria, that is well above the IC50s that we identified in this study. Given their unique mode of action and potential for unique synergies with established anticancer drugs, our results provide a strong basis to further explore the potential application of these compounds in cancer in pre-clinical or and clinical settings. PMID:24391728

  19. Coupling laser ablation/desorption electrospray ionization to atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility spectrometry for the screening of antimalarial drug quality.

    PubMed

    Harris, Glenn A; Graf, Stephan; Knochenmuss, Richard; Fernández, Facundo M

    2012-07-01

    Significant developments in the field of ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MS) have led to high-throughput direct analysis and imaging capabilities. However, advances in coupling ambient ionization techniques with standalone drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS) have been comparatively slower, despite the attractive ruggedness and simplicity of IMS. In this study, we have developed and characterized a laser ablation/desorption electrospray ionization (LADESI) DTIMS platform, and applied it to the detection of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in antimalarial tablets collected in developing countries. The overarching goal of this work was to perform an initial evaluation of LADESI DTIMS as a technique with the potential for constituting the core of a portable drug quality-testing platform. The set-up consisted of an IR laser for desorption and an electrospray ionizer for capturing the ablated plume coupled to a high-resolution monolithic resistive glass drift tube ion mobility spectrometer. For more confident API identification, tablet extracts were also investigated via electrospray IM MS to correlate LADESI DTIMS reduced mobility (K(0)) values to m/z values. Overall, it was found that the IR LADESI DTIMS platform provided distinct ion mobility spectral fingerprints that could be used to detect the presence of the expected APIs, helping to distinguish counterfeit drugs from their genuine counterparts. PMID:22606690

  20. Ophthalmologic safety profile of antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Rynes, R I; Bernstein, H N

    1993-02-01

    The ophthalmologic safety of antimalarial drugs is well established, but absolute safety cannot be assured. Three types of side effects may develop. Corneal deposits and neuromuscular-associated blurred vision are always reversible and therefore benign. Visual loss has occurred in patients with retinopathy. Retinopathy may be divided into true retinopathy and premaculopathy. It is true retinopathy that may be associated with visual loss, while premaculopathy consists of subtle visual field and funduscopic abnormalities. These premaculopathic changes are generally completely reversible with drug discontinuation and have not been shown to progress. Hydroxychloroquine appears safer than chloroquine when currently accepted equivalent doses are used. Fewer than 20 patients with true retinopathy caused by hydroxychloroquine have been reported; more patients have developed true retinopathy when taking chloroquine. The safety profile is most dependent on low daily dose and regular ophthalmologic monitoring. The optimal strategy of ophthalmologic testing has not yet been determined, but visual acuity, funduscopic examination and visual field examination should be monitored. Self-administered ophthalmologic testing with Amsler grids may contribute additional safety but is not a replacement for physician testing. PMID:8485566

  1. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Avinaba; Sadhukhan, Gobinda Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug resistance. PMID

  2. Ecotoxicological evaluation of the antimalarial drug chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Jorge L; Jos, Angeles; del Peso, Ana; Salguero, Manuel; López-Artíguez, Miguel; Repetto, Guillermo

    2005-10-15

    There is limited information available about the potential environmental effects of chloroquine (CQ), a widely used antimalarial agent and a promising inexpensive drug in the management of HIV disease. The acute effects of CQ were studied using four ecotoxicological model systems. The most sensitive bioindicator was the immobilization of the cladoceran Daphnia magna, with an EC50 of 12 microM CQ at 72 h and a non-observed adverse effect level of 2.5 microM CQ, followed very closely by the decrease of the uptake of neutral red and the reduction of the lysosomal function in the fish cell line PLHC-1 derived from the top minnow Poeciliopsis lucida, probably due to the selective accumulation of the drug into the lysosomes. There was significant cellular stress as indicated by the increases on metallothionein and glucose-6P dehydrogenase levels after 24 h of exposure and succinate dehydrogenase activity mainly after 48 h. No changes were observed for ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity. The least sensitive model was the inhibition of bioluminescence in the bacterium Vibrio fischeri. An increase of more than five-fold in the toxicity from 24 to 72 h of exposure was observed for the inhibition of the growth in the alga Chlorella vulgaris and the content of total protein and MTS tetrazolium salt metabolization in PLHC-1 cells. At the morphological level, the most evident alterations in PLHC-1 cultures were hydropic degeneration from 25 microM CQ after 24h of exposure and the presence of many cells with pyknotic nuclei, condensed cytoplasm and apoptosis with concentrations higher than 50 microM CQ after 48 h of exposure. In conclusion, CQ should be classified as harmful to aquatic organisms. PMID:16153718

  3. Antimalarial drug policy in India: Past, present & future

    PubMed Central

    Anvikar, Anupkumar R.; Arora, Usha; Sonal, G.S.; Mishra, Neelima; Shahi, Bharatendu; Savargaonkar, Deepali; Kumar, Navin; Shah, Naman K.; Valecha, Neena

    2014-01-01

    The use of antimalarial drugs in India has evolved since the introduction of quinine in the 17th century. Since the formal establishment of a malaria control programme in 1953, shortly after independence, treatments provided by the public sector ranged from chloroquine, the mainstay drug for many decades, to the newer, recently introduced artemisinin based combination therapy. The complexity of considerations in antimalarial treatment led to the formulation of a National Antimalarial Drug Policy to guide procurement as well as communicate best practices to both public and private healthcare providers. Challenges addressed in the policy include the use of presumptive treatment, the introduction of alternate treatments for drug-resistant malaria, the duration of primaquine therapy to prevent relapses of vivax malaria, the treatment of malaria in pregnancy, and the choice of drugs for chemoprophylaxis. While data on antimalarial drug resistance and both public and private sector treatment practices have been recently reviewed, the policy process of setting national standards has not. In this perspective on antimalarial drug policy, this review highlights its relevant history, analyzes the current policy, and examines future directions. PMID:24718394

  4. Antimalarial Drug Discovery: From Quinine to the Dream of Eradication

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The search for antimalarial remedies predates modern medicine and the concept of small molecule chemotherapy, yet has played a central role in the development of both. This history is reviewed in the context of the current renaissance in antimalarial drug discovery, which is seeing modern drug discovery approaches applied to the problem for the first time. Great strides have been made in the past decade, but further innovations from the drug discovery community will be required if the ultimate dream of eradication is to be achieved. PMID:24790706

  5. Drug resistance genomics of the antimalarial drug artemisinin.

    PubMed

    Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Manary, Micah J

    2014-01-01

    Across the globe, over 200 million annual malaria infections result in up to 660,000 deaths, 77% of which occur in children under the age of five years. Although prevention is important, malaria deaths are typically prevented by using antimalarial drugs that eliminate symptoms and clear parasites from the blood. Artemisinins are one of the few remaining compound classes that can be used to cure multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum infections. Unfortunately, clinical trials from Southeast Asia are showing that artemisinin-based treatments are beginning to lose their effectiveness, adding renewed urgency to the search for the genetic determinants of parasite resistance to this important drug class. We review the genetic and genomic approaches that have led to an improved understanding of artemisinin resistance, including the identification of resistance-conferring mutations in the P. falciparum kelch13 gene. PMID:25470531

  6. From hybrid compounds to targeted drug delivery in antimalarial therapy.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rudi; Miranda, Daniela; Magalhães, Joana; Capela, Rita; Perry, Maria J; O'Neill, Paul M; Moreira, Rui; Lopes, Francisca

    2015-08-15

    The discovery of new drugs to treat malaria is a continuous effort for medicinal chemists due to the emergence and spread of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum to nearly all used antimalarials. The rapid adaptation of the malaria parasite remains a major limitation to disease control. Development of hybrid antimalarial agents has been actively pursued as a promising strategy to overcome the emergence of resistant parasite strains. This review presents the journey that started with simple combinations of two active moieties into one chemical entity and progressed into a delivery/targeted system based on major antimalarial classes of drugs. The rationale for providing different mechanisms of action against a single or additional targets involved in the multiple stages of the parasite's life-cycle is highlighted. Finally, a perspective for this polypharmacologic approach is presented. PMID:25913864

  7. Phenotypic Screens in Antimalarial Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Hovlid, Marisa L; Winzeler, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    Phenotypic high-throughput screens are a valuable tool for identifying new chemical compounds with antimalarial activity. Traditionally, these screens have focused solely on the symptomatic asexual blood stage of the parasite life cycle; however, to discover new medicines for malaria treatment and prevention, robust screening technologies against other parasite life-cycle stages are required. This review highlights recent advances and progress toward phenotypic screening methodologies over the past several years, with a focus on exoerythrocytic stage screens. PMID:27247245

  8. Miniaturized Cultivation of Microbiota for Antimalarial Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Carrie; Calcul, Laurent; Beau, Jeremy; Ma, Wai Sheung; Lebar, Matthew D; von Salm, Jacqueline L; Harter, Charles; Mutka, Tina; Morton, Lindsay C; Maignan, Patrick; Barisic, Betty; van Olphen, Alberto; Kyle, Dennis E; Vrijmoed, Lilian; Pang, Ka-Lai; Pearce, Cedric J; Baker, Bill J

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing search for effective antiplasmodial agents remains essential in the fight against malaria worldwide. Emerging parasitic drug resistance places an urgent need to explore chemotherapies with novel structures and mechanisms of action. Natural products have historically provided effective antimalarial drug scaffolds. In an effort to search nature's chemical potential for antiplasmodial agents, unconventionally sourced organisms coupled with innovative cultivation techniques were utilized. Approximately 60,000 niche microbes from various habitats (slow-growing terrestrial fungi, Antarctic microbes, and mangrove endophytes) were cultivated on a small-scale, extracted, and used in high-throughput screening to determine antimalarial activity. About 1% of crude extracts were considered active and 6% partially active (≥ 67% inhibition at 5 and 50 μg/mL, respectively). Active extracts (685) were cultivated on a large-scale, fractionated, and screened for both antimalarial activity and cytotoxicity. High interest fractions (397) with an IC50 < 1.11 μg/mL were identified and subjected to chromatographic separation for compound characterization and dereplication. Identifying active compounds with nanomolar antimalarial activity coupled with a selectivity index tenfold higher was accomplished with two of the 52 compounds isolated. This microscale, high-throughput screening project for antiplasmodial agents is discussed in the context of current natural product drug discovery efforts. PMID:25545963

  9. A Nationwide Survey of the Quality of Antimalarials in Retail Outlets in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harparkash; Goodman, Catherine; Thompson, Eloise; Thompson, Katy-Anne; Masanja, Irene; Kachur, S. Patrick; Abdulla, Salim

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Retail pharmaceutical products are commonly used to treat fever and malaria in sub-Saharan African countries. Small scale studies have suggested that poor quality antimalarials are widespread throughout the region, but nationwide data are not available that could lead to generalizable conclusions about the extent to which poor quality drugs are available in African communities. This study aimed to assess the quality of antimalarials available from retail outlets across mainland Tanzania. Methods and Findings We systematically purchased samples of oral antimalarial tablets from retail outlets across 21 districts in mainland Tanzania in 2005. A total of 1080 antimalarial formulations were collected including 679 antifol antimalarial samples (394 sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine and 285 sulfamethoxypyrazine/pyrimethamine), 260 amodiaquine samples, 63 quinine samples, and 51 artemisinin derivative samples. A systematic subsample of 304 products was assessed for quality by laboratory based analysis to determine the amount of the active ingredient and dissolution profile by following the published United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) monogram for the particular tablet being tested. Products for which a published analytical monogram did not exist were assessed on amount of active ingredient alone. Overall 38 or 12.2% of the samples were found to be of poor quality. Of the antifolate antimalarial drugs tested 13.4% were found to be of poor quality by dissolution and content analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Nearly one quarter (23.8%) of quinine tablets did not comply within the tolerance limits of the dissolution and quantification analysis. Quality of amodiaquine drugs was relatively better but still unacceptable as 7.5% did not comply within the tolerance limits of the dissolution analysis. Formulations of the artemisinin derivatives all contained the stated amount of active ingredient when analysed using HPLC alone. Conclusions Substandard

  10. Artemisinin anti-malarial drugs in China

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zongru

    2016-01-01

    Discovered by Youyou Tu, one of the 2015 Nobel Prize winners in Physiology or Medicine, together with many other Chinese scientists, artemisinin, artemether and artesunate, as well as other artemisinins, have brought the global anti-malarial treatment to a new era, saving millions of lives all around the world for the past 40 years. The discoveries of artemisinins were carried out beginning from the 1970s, a special period in China, by hundreds of scientists all together under the “whole nation” system. This article focusing on medicinal chemistry research, briefly introduced the discovery and invention course of the scientists according to the published papers, and highlighted their academic contribution and achievements. PMID:27006895

  11. Artemisinin anti-malarial drugs in China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zongru

    2016-03-01

    Discovered by Youyou Tu, one of the 2015 Nobel Prize winners in Physiology or Medicine, together with many other Chinese scientists, artemisinin, artemether and artesunate, as well as other artemisinins, have brought the global anti-malarial treatment to a new era, saving millions of lives all around the world for the past 40 years. The discoveries of artemisinins were carried out beginning from the 1970s, a special period in China, by hundreds of scientists all together under the "whole nation" system. This article focusing on medicinal chemistry research, briefly introduced the discovery and invention course of the scientists according to the published papers, and highlighted their academic contribution and achievements. PMID:27006895

  12. Evolution from double to triple-antimalarial drug combinations.

    PubMed

    Shanks, G Dennis; Edstein, Michael D; Jacobus, David

    2015-03-01

    Drug combinations are used to treat multiple-drug resistant malaria parasites and to attempt to further delay the evolution of drug resistance. Most current antimalarial combinations are binary but it is likely that new triple drug combinations will be required in the future. A review of previous triple combinations of antimalarial drugs was done to focus attention on past problems and possible future combinations. The advantages of such triple drug combinations include greater efficacy against multiple-drug resistant strains, synergistic action between the different medications and simplification of the regimen so that it could be administered under direct observation and possibly as single-dose therapy. The disadvantages of poly-pharmacy include increased cost of medication, difficulty preparing robust regulatory packages and problems constructing combined formulations due to drug-drug interactions. Given the arrival of artemisinin tolerance/resistance in Southeast Asia, it is likely that new drugs introduced for malaria treatment will be in triple drug combinations. PMID:25549631

  13. Antimicrobial peptides: a new class of antimalarial drugs?

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Nuno; Aguiar, Luísa; Gomes, Paula

    2014-01-01

    A range of antimicrobial peptides (AMP) exhibit activity on malaria parasites, Plasmodium spp., in their blood or mosquito stages, or both. These peptides include a diverse array of both natural and synthetic molecules varying greatly in size, charge, hydrophobicity, and secondary structure features. Along with an overview of relevant literature reports regarding AMP that display antiplasmodial activity, this review makes a few considerations about those molecules as a potential new class of antimalarial drugs. PMID:25566072

  14. Resistance to antimalarial drugs: molecular, pharmacological and clinical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Travassos, Mark A.; Laufer, Miriam K.

    2009-01-01

    One of the greatest obstacles to the control of malaria has been the spread of resistance to drugs used on a large scale. This review provides an update of the current understanding of the molecular basis for antimalarial drug resistance. Parasite intrinsic resistance is just one component that determines the in vivo efficacy of a drug. Human immune responses and pharmacological properties play important roles in determining the clinical outcome of treatment. The emergence and spread of resistance also results from an interplay of these factors. Current efforts to characterize and deter resistance to new combination therapy are also discussed. PMID:19918214

  15. Fighting fire with fire: mass antimalarial drug administrations in an era of antimalarial resistance.

    PubMed

    von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dondorp, Arjen

    2015-06-01

    The emergence and spread of antimalarial resistance has been a major liability for malaria control. The spread of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains had catastrophic consequences for people in malaria-endemic regions, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. The recent emergence of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum strains is of highest concern. Current efforts to contain artemisinin resistance have yet to show success. In the absence of more promising plans, it has been suggested to eliminate falciparum malaria from foci of artemisinin resistance using a multipronged approach, including mass drug administrations. The use of mass drug administrations is controversial as it increases drug pressure. Based on current knowledge it is difficult to conceptualize how targeted malaria elimination could contribute to artemisinin resistance, provided a full treatment course is ensured. PMID:25831482

  16. Quantifying the pharmacology of antimalarial drug combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Ian M; Hodel, Eva Maria; Kay, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Most current antimalarial drugs are combinations of an artemisinin plus a 'partner' drug from another class, and are known as artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). They are the frontline drugs in treating human malaria infections. They also have a public-health role as an essential component of recent, comprehensive scale-ups of malaria interventions and containment efforts conceived as part of longer term malaria elimination efforts. Recent reports that resistance has arisen to artemisinins has caused considerable concern. We investigate the likely impact of artemisinin resistance by quantifying the contribution artemisinins make to the overall therapeutic capacity of ACTs. We achieve this using a simple, easily understood, algebraic approach and by more sophisticated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses of drug action; the two approaches gave consistent results. Surprisingly, the artemisinin component typically makes a negligible contribution (≪0.0001%) to the therapeutic capacity of the most widely used ACTs and only starts to make a significant contribution to therapeutic outcome once resistance has started to evolve to the partner drugs. The main threat to antimalarial drug effectiveness and control comes from resistance evolving to the partner drugs. We therefore argue that public health policies be re-focussed to maximise the likely long-term effectiveness of the partner drugs. PMID:27604175

  17. Searching for new antimalarial therapeutics amongst known drugs.

    PubMed

    Weisman, Jennifer L; Liou, Ally P; Shelat, Anang A; Cohen, Fred E; Guy, R Kiplin; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2006-06-01

    The need to discover and develop new antimalarial therapeutics is overwhelming. The annual mortality attributed to malaria, currently approximately 2.5 million, is increasing due primarily to widespread resistance to currently used drugs. One strategy to identify new treatment alternatives for malaria is to examine libraries of diverse compounds for the possible identification of novel scaffolds. Beginning with libraries of drug or drug-like compounds is an ideal starting point because, in the case of approved drugs, substantial pharmacokinetic and toxicologic data should be available for each compound series. We have employed a high-throughput screen of the MicroSource Spectrum and Killer Collections, a library of known drugs, bioactive compounds, and natural products. Our screening assay identifies compounds that inhibit growth of Plasmodium falciparum cultured in human erythrocytes. We have identified 36 novel inhibitors of P. falciparum, of which 19 are therapeutics, and five of these drugs exhibit effective 50% inhibitory concentrations within similar ranges to therapeutic serum concentrations for their recently indicated uses: propafenone, thioridazine, chlorprothixene, perhexiline, and azlocillin. The findings we report here indicate that this is an effective strategy to identify novel scaffolds and therefore aid in antimalarial drug discovery efforts. PMID:16882315

  18. Searching for New Antimalarial Therapeutics amongst Known Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Weisman, Jennifer L.; Liou, Ally P.; Shelat, Anang A.; Cohen, Fred E.; Guy, R. Kiplin; DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2006-01-01

    The need to discover and develop new antimalarial therapeutics is severe. The annual mortality attributed to malaria, currently approximately 2.5 million, is increasing due primarily to widespread resistance to currently used drugs. One strategy to identify new treatment alternatives for malaria is to examine libraries of diverse compounds for the possible identification of novel scaffolds. Beginning with libraries of drug or drug-like compounds is an ideal starting point because, in the case of approved drugs, substantial pharmacokinetic and toxicologic data should be available for each compound series. We have employed a high throughput screen of the MicroSource Spectrum and Killer collections, a library of known drugs, bioactive compounds, and natural products. Our screening assay identifies compounds that inhibit growth of Plasmodium falciparum cultured in human erythrocytes. We have identified 36 novel inhibitors of P. falciparum, of which 19 are therapeutics, and five of these drugs exhibit effective 50% inhibitory concentrations within similar ranges to therapeutic serum concentrations for their currently indicated uses: propafenone, thioridazine, chlorprothixene, perhexiline and azlocillin. The findings we report here indicate that this is an effective strategy to identify novel scaffolds and therefore aid in antimalarial drug discovery efforts. PMID:16882315

  19. High-throughput matrix screening identifies synergistic and antagonistic antimalarial drug combinations.

    PubMed

    Mott, Bryan T; Eastman, Richard T; Guha, Rajarshi; Sherlach, Katy S; Siriwardana, Amila; Shinn, Paul; McKnight, Crystal; Michael, Sam; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Patel, Paresma R; Khine, Pwint; Sun, Hongmao; Kasbekar, Monica; Aghdam, Nima; Fontaine, Shaun D; Liu, Dongbo; Mierzwa, Tim; Mathews-Griner, Lesley A; Ferrer, Marc; Renslo, Adam R; Inglese, James; Yuan, Jing; Roepe, Paul D; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Thomas, Craig J

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in Plasmodium parasites is a constant threat. Novel therapeutics, especially new drug combinations, must be identified at a faster rate. In response to the urgent need for new antimalarial drug combinations we screened a large collection of approved and investigational drugs, tested 13,910 drug pairs, and identified many promising antimalarial drug combinations. The activity of known antimalarial drug regimens was confirmed and a myriad of new classes of positively interacting drug pairings were discovered. Network and clustering analyses reinforced established mechanistic relationships for known drug combinations and identified several novel mechanistic hypotheses. From eleven screens comprising >4,600 combinations per parasite strain (including duplicates) we further investigated interactions between approved antimalarials, calcium homeostasis modulators, and inhibitors of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). These studies highlight important targets and pathways and provide promising leads for clinically actionable antimalarial therapy. PMID:26403635

  20. High-throughput matrix screening identifies synergistic and antagonistic antimalarial drug combinations

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Bryan T.; Eastman, Richard T.; Guha, Rajarshi; Sherlach, Katy S.; Siriwardana, Amila; Shinn, Paul; McKnight, Crystal; Michael, Sam; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Patel, Paresma R.; Khine, Pwint; Sun, Hongmao; Kasbekar, Monica; Aghdam, Nima; Fontaine, Shaun D.; Liu, Dongbo; Mierzwa, Tim; Mathews-Griner, Lesley A.; Ferrer, Marc; Renslo, Adam R.; Inglese, James; Yuan, Jing; Roepe, Paul D.; Su, Xin-zhuan; Thomas, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in Plasmodium parasites is a constant threat. Novel therapeutics, especially new drug combinations, must be identified at a faster rate. In response to the urgent need for new antimalarial drug combinations we screened a large collection of approved and investigational drugs, tested 13,910 drug pairs, and identified many promising antimalarial drug combinations. The activity of known antimalarial drug regimens was confirmed and a myriad of new classes of positively interacting drug pairings were discovered. Network and clustering analyses reinforced established mechanistic relationships for known drug combinations and identified several novel mechanistic hypotheses. From eleven screens comprising >4,600 combinations per parasite strain (including duplicates) we further investigated interactions between approved antimalarials, calcium homeostasis modulators, and inhibitors of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). These studies highlight important targets and pathways and provide promising leads for clinically actionable antimalarial therapy. PMID:26403635

  1. Antimalarial mass drug administration: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Phaik Yeong; White, Nicholas J

    2016-07-01

    Falciparum malaria is a major cause of death and illness in tropical countries, particularly in childhood. In endemic countries, a significant proportion of the community is infected with malaria asymptomatically. One promising way to eliminate malaria is to give the entire population malaria treatment. This is called mass drug administration (MDA) and it raises a number of ethical issues, as possible long-term benefits are uncertain. The effectiveness of MDA is critically dependent on level of participation, so the promised benefits to the community can be annulled by non-participation of a small number of individuals. These potential benefits range a wide spectrum, from the permanent elimination of malaria (success) to a transient reduction in the prevalence of infection and the incidence of illness (failure). The drawbacks of MDA are: inconvenience, potential toxicity, loss of confidence in the elimination campaign, possible drug resistance (though highly unlikely), and the potential for a rebound of malaria illness (if immunity is lost and malaria is reintroduced later). Other ethical issues are related to balancing individual and public health interests, and potentially limiting individual autonomy by making MDA compulsory. PMID:27481834

  2. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Luis; Martínez-García, Marta; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, José Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa; Gamarro, Francisco; Pérez-Victoria, José M

    2015-10-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca(2+), and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. PMID:26195527

  3. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Luis; Martínez-García, Marta; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, José Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca2+, and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. PMID:26195527

  4. Poor quality vital anti-malarials in Africa - an urgent neglected public health priority

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a major public health problem. A vital component of malaria control rests on the availability of good quality artemisinin-derivative based combination therapy (ACT) at the correct dose. However, there are increasing reports of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Methods Seven collections of artemisinin derivative monotherapies, ACT and halofantrine anti-malarials of suspicious quality were collected in 2002/10 in eleven African countries and in Asia en route to Africa. Packaging, chemical composition (high performance liquid chromatography, direct ionization mass spectrometry, X-ray diffractometry, stable isotope analysis) and botanical investigations were performed. Results Counterfeit artesunate containing chloroquine, counterfeit dihydroartemisinin (DHA) containing paracetamol (acetaminophen), counterfeit DHA-piperaquine containing sildenafil, counterfeit artemether-lumefantrine containing pyrimethamine, counterfeit halofantrine containing artemisinin, and substandard/counterfeit or degraded artesunate and artesunate+amodiaquine in eight countries are described. Pollen analysis was consistent with manufacture of counterfeits in eastern Asia. These data do not allow estimation of the frequency of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Conclusions Criminals are producing diverse harmful anti-malarial counterfeits with important public health consequences. The presence of artesunate monotherapy, substandard and/or degraded and counterfeit medicines containing sub-therapeutic amounts of unexpected anti-malarials will engender drug resistance. With the threatening spread of artemisinin resistance to Africa, much greater investment is required to ensure the quality of ACTs and removal of artemisinin monotherapies. The International Health Regulations may need to be invoked to counter these serious public health problems. PMID:22152094

  5. Selection of a trioxaquine as an antimalarial drug candidate

    PubMed Central

    Coslédan, Frédéric; Fraisse, Laurent; Pellet, Alain; Guillou, François; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Kremsner, Peter G.; Moreno, Alicia; Mazier, Dominique; Maffrand, Jean-Pierre; Meunier, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Trioxaquines are antimalarial agents based on hybrid structures with a dual mode of action. One of these molecules, PA1103/SAR116242, is highly active in vitro on several sensitive and resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum at nanomolar concentrations (e.g., IC50 value = 10 nM with FcM29, a chloroquine-resistant strain) and also on multidrug-resistant strains obtained from fresh patient isolates in Gabon. This molecule is very efficient by oral route with a complete cure of mice infected with chloroquine-sensitive or chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodia at 26–32 mg/kg. This compound is also highly effective in humanized mice infected with P. falciparum. Combined with a good drug profile (preliminary absorption, metabolism, and safety parameters), these data were favorable for the selection of this particular trioxaquine for development as drug candidate among 120 other active hybrid molecules. PMID:18987321

  6. Paper Test Cards for Presumptive Testing of Very Low Quality Antimalarial Medications

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Abigail A.; Lieberman, Marya

    2015-01-01

    Carrying out chemical analysis of antimalarials to detect low-quality medications before they reach a patient is a costly venture. Here, we show that a library of chemical color tests embedded on a paper card can presumptively identify formulations corresponding to very low quality antimalarial drugs. The presence or absence of chloroquine (CQ), doxycycline (DOX), quinine, sulfadoxine, pyrimethamine, and primaquine antimalarial medications, in addition to fillers used in low-quality pharmaceuticals, are indicated by patterns of colors that are generated on the test cards. Test card sensitivity for detection of these pure components ranges from 90% to 100% with no false positives in the absence of pharmaceutical. The color intensities from reactions characteristic of CQ or DOX allowed visual detection of formulations of these medications cut with 60% or 100% filler, although samples cut with 30% filler could not be reliably detected colorimetrically. However, the addition of unexpected fillers, even in 30% quantities, or substitute pharmaceuticals, could sometimes be detected by other color reactions on the test cards. Tests are simple and inexpensive enough to be carried out in clinics, pharmacies, and ports of entry and could provide a screening method to presumptively indicate very low quality medicines throughout the supply chain. PMID:25897064

  7. Paper test cards for presumptive testing of very low quality antimalarial medications.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Abigail A; Lieberman, Marya

    2015-06-01

    Carrying out chemical analysis of antimalarials to detect low-quality medications before they reach a patient is a costly venture. Here, we show that a library of chemical color tests embedded on a paper card can presumptively identify formulations corresponding to very low quality antimalarial drugs. The presence or absence of chloroquine (CQ), doxycycline (DOX), quinine, sulfadoxine, pyrimethamine, and primaquine antimalarial medications, in addition to fillers used in low-quality pharmaceuticals, are indicated by patterns of colors that are generated on the test cards. Test card sensitivity for detection of these pure components ranges from 90% to 100% with no false positives in the absence of pharmaceutical. The color intensities from reactions characteristic of CQ or DOX allowed visual detection of formulations of these medications cut with 60% or 100% filler, although samples cut with 30% filler could not be reliably detected colorimetrically. However, the addition of unexpected fillers, even in 30% quantities, or substitute pharmaceuticals, could sometimes be detected by other color reactions on the test cards. Tests are simple and inexpensive enough to be carried out in clinics, pharmacies, and ports of entry and could provide a screening method to presumptively indicate very low quality medicines throughout the supply chain. PMID:25897064

  8. Coartemether (artemether and lumefantrine): an oral antimalarial drug.

    PubMed

    Wernsdorfer, Walther H

    2004-04-01

    Coartemether (Riamet, Coartem, Novartis), a tablet formulation of artemether and lumefantrine, is a well-tolerated, fast-acting and effective blood schizontocidal drug that serves primarily in the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria that is resistant to other antimalarials. Initial clinical-parasitological response relies mainly on the artemether component, while lumefantrine effects radical cure. The absorption of lumefantrine is poor during the fasting state, the normal condition in acutely ill malaria patients, but with return to normal diet it becomes adequate. This highlights the need for an appropriate adjustment of the dose regimen. In the area where Plasmodium falciparum shows the highest degree of multidrug resistance worldwide, the best results (99% cure) were obtained with a six-dose regimen given over 5 days. Extensive cardiological investigations have demonstrated the high cardiac safety of coartemether. PMID:15482185

  9. Modulation of PF10_0355 (MSPDBL2) Alters Plasmodium falciparum Response to Antimalarial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Van Tyne, Daria; Uboldi, Alessandro D.; Healer, Julie; Cowman, Alan F.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria's ability to rapidly adapt to new drugs has allowed it to remain one of the most devastating infectious diseases of humans. Understanding and tracking the genetic basis of these adaptations are critical to the success of treatment and intervention strategies. The novel antimalarial resistance locus PF10_0355 (Pfmspdbl2) was previously associated with the parasite response to halofantrine, and functional validation confirmed that overexpression of this gene lowered parasite sensitivity to both halofantrine and the structurally related antimalarials mefloquine and lumefantrine, predominantly through copy number variation. Here we further characterize the role of Pfmspdbl2 in mediating the antimalarial drug response of Plasmodium falciparum. Knockout of Pfmspdbl2 increased parasite sensitivity to halofantrine, mefloquine, and lumefantrine but not to unrelated antimalarials, further suggesting that this gene mediates the parasite response to a specific class of antimalarial drugs. A single nucleotide polymorphism encoding a C591S mutation within Pfmspdbl2 had the strongest association with halofantrine sensitivity and showed a high derived allele frequency among Senegalese parasites. Transgenic parasites expressing the ancestral Pfmspdbl2 allele were more sensitive to halofantrine and structurally related antimalarials than were parasites expressing the derived allele, revealing an allele-specific effect on drug sensitivity in the absence of copy number effects. Finally, growth competition experiments showed that under drug pressure, parasites expressing the derived allele of Pfmspdbl2 outcompeted parasites expressing the ancestral allele within a few generations. Together, these experiments demonstrate that modulation of Pfmspdbl2 affects malaria parasite responses to antimalarial drugs. PMID:23587962

  10. Modulation of PF10_0355 (MSPDBL2) alters Plasmodium falciparum response to antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Van Tyne, Daria; Uboldi, Alessandro D; Healer, Julie; Cowman, Alan F; Wirth, Dyann F

    2013-07-01

    Malaria's ability to rapidly adapt to new drugs has allowed it to remain one of the most devastating infectious diseases of humans. Understanding and tracking the genetic basis of these adaptations are critical to the success of treatment and intervention strategies. The novel antimalarial resistance locus PF10_0355 (Pfmspdbl2) was previously associated with the parasite response to halofantrine, and functional validation confirmed that overexpression of this gene lowered parasite sensitivity to both halofantrine and the structurally related antimalarials mefloquine and lumefantrine, predominantly through copy number variation. Here we further characterize the role of Pfmspdbl2 in mediating the antimalarial drug response of Plasmodium falciparum. Knockout of Pfmspdbl2 increased parasite sensitivity to halofantrine, mefloquine, and lumefantrine but not to unrelated antimalarials, further suggesting that this gene mediates the parasite response to a specific class of antimalarial drugs. A single nucleotide polymorphism encoding a C591S mutation within Pfmspdbl2 had the strongest association with halofantrine sensitivity and showed a high derived allele frequency among Senegalese parasites. Transgenic parasites expressing the ancestral Pfmspdbl2 allele were more sensitive to halofantrine and structurally related antimalarials than were parasites expressing the derived allele, revealing an allele-specific effect on drug sensitivity in the absence of copy number effects. Finally, growth competition experiments showed that under drug pressure, parasites expressing the derived allele of Pfmspdbl2 outcompeted parasites expressing the ancestral allele within a few generations. Together, these experiments demonstrate that modulation of Pfmspdbl2 affects malaria parasite responses to antimalarial drugs. PMID:23587962

  11. Antimalarial Drug Resistance: Literature Review and Activities and Findings of the ICEMR Network.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liwang; Mharakurwa, Sungano; Ndiaye, Daouda; Rathod, Pradipsinh K; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2015-09-01

    Antimalarial drugs are key tools for the control and elimination of malaria. Recent decreases in the global malaria burden are likely due, in part, to the deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapies. Therefore, the emergence and potential spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites in southeast Asia and changes in sensitivities to artemisinin partner drugs have raised concerns. In recognition of this urgent threat, the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMRs) are closely monitoring antimalarial drug efficacy and studying the mechanisms underlying drug resistance. At multiple sentinel sites of the global ICEMR network, research activities include clinical studies to track the efficacies of antimalarial drugs, ex vivo/in vitro assays to measure drug susceptibilities of parasite isolates, and characterization of resistance-mediating parasite polymorphisms. Taken together, these efforts offer an increasingly comprehensive assessment of the efficacies of antimalarial therapies, and enable us to predict the emergence of drug resistance and to guide local antimalarial drug policies. Here we briefly review worldwide antimalarial drug resistance concerns, summarize research activities of the ICEMRs related to drug resistance, and assess the global impacts of the ICEMR programs. PMID:26259943

  12. Antimalarial Drug Resistance: Literature Review and Activities and Findings of the ICEMR Network

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liwang; Mharakurwa, Sungano; Ndiaye, Daouda; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Rosenthal, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs are key tools for the control and elimination of malaria. Recent decreases in the global malaria burden are likely due, in part, to the deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapies. Therefore, the emergence and potential spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites in southeast Asia and changes in sensitivities to artemisinin partner drugs have raised concerns. In recognition of this urgent threat, the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMRs) are closely monitoring antimalarial drug efficacy and studying the mechanisms underlying drug resistance. At multiple sentinel sites of the global ICEMR network, research activities include clinical studies to track the efficacies of antimalarial drugs, ex vivo/in vitro assays to measure drug susceptibilities of parasite isolates, and characterization of resistance-mediating parasite polymorphisms. Taken together, these efforts offer an increasingly comprehensive assessment of the efficacies of antimalarial therapies, and enable us to predict the emergence of drug resistance and to guide local antimalarial drug policies. Here we briefly review worldwide antimalarial drug resistance concerns, summarize research activities of the ICEMRs related to drug resistance, and assess the global impacts of the ICEMR programs. PMID:26259943

  13. Assessment of urinary excretion of antimalarial drugs in large-scale chemotherapeutic eradication projects.

    PubMed

    BRUCE-CHWATT, L J

    1959-01-01

    Assessment of the urinary excretion of an antimalarial drug is a useful means of checking the amount of drug administered and the regularity of intake. The author describes the various methods available for the qualitative and quantitative estimation of antimalarial drugs in urine and discusses their relative merits, with special reference to their suitability for use in the field. He points out the difficulties involved in estimating the urinary excretion of antimalarials in large-scale chemotherapeutic eradication projects and stress the importance of simplifying testing techniques as far as possible. PMID:13805135

  14. Superinfection and the evolution of resistance to antimalarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Eili Y.; Smith, David L.; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Levin, Simon

    2012-01-01

    A major issue in the control of malaria is the evolution of drug resistance. Ecological theory has demonstrated that pathogen superinfection and the resulting within-host competition influences the evolution of specific traits. Individuals infected with Plasmodium falciparum are consistently infected by multiple parasites; however, while this probably alters the dynamics of resistance evolution, there are few robust mathematical models examining this issue. We developed a general theory for modelling the evolution of resistance with host superinfection and examine: (i) the effect of transmission intensity on the rate of resistance evolution; (ii) the importance of different biological costs of resistance; and (iii) the best measure of the frequency of resistance. We find that within-host competition retards the ability and slows the rate at which drug-resistant parasites invade, particularly as the transmission rate increases. We also find that biological costs of resistance that reduce transmission are less important than reductions in the duration of drug-resistant infections. Lastly, we find that random sampling of the population for resistant parasites is likely to significantly underestimate the frequency of resistance. Considering superinfection in mathematical models of antimalarial drug resistance may thus be important for generating accurate predictions of interventions to contain resistance. PMID:22787024

  15. Targeting Plasmodium Metabolism to Improve Antimalarial Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Avitia-Domínguez, Claudia; Sierra-Campos, Erick; Betancourt-Conde, Irene; Aguirre-Raudry, Miriam; Vázquez-Raygoza, Alejandra; Luevano-De la Cruz, Artemisa; Favela-Candia, Alejandro; Sarabia-Sanchez, Marie; Ríos-Soto, Lluvia; Méndez-Hernández, Edna; Cisneros-Martínez, Jorge; Palacio-Gastélum, Marcelo Gómez; Valdez-Solana, Mónica; Hernández-Rivera, Jessica; De Lira-Sánchez, Jaime; Campos-Almazán, Mara; Téllez-Valencia, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the main infectious diseases in tropical developing countries and represents high morbidity and mortality rates nowadays. The principal etiological agent P. falciparum is transmitted through the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito. The issue has escalated due to the emergence of resistant strains to most of the antimalarials used for the treatment including Chloroquine, Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, and recently Artemisinin derivatives, which has led to diminished effectiveness and by consequence increased the severity of epidemic outbreaks. Due to the lack of effective compounds to treat these drug-resistant strains, the discovery or development of novel anti-malaria drugs is important. In this context, one strategy has been to find inhibitors of enzymes, which play an important role for parasite survival. Today, promising results have been obtained in this regard, involving the entire P. falciparum metabolism. These inhibitors could serve as leads in the search of a new chemotherapy against malaria. This review focuses on the achievements in recent years with regard to inhibition of enzymes used as targets for drug design against malaria. PMID:26983887

  16. Estimated under-five deaths associated with poor-quality antimalarials in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Renschler, John P; Walters, Kelsey M; Newton, Paul N; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2015-06-01

    Many antimalarials sold in sub-Saharan Africa are poor-quality (falsified, substandard, or degraded), and the burden of disease caused by this problem is inadequately quantified. In this article, we estimate the number of under-five deaths caused by ineffective treatment of malaria associated with consumption of poor-quality antimalarials in 39 sub-Saharan countries. Using Latin hypercube sampling our estimates were calculated as the product of the number of private sector antimalarials consumed by malaria-positive children in 2013; the proportion of private sector antimalarials consumed that were of poor-quality; and the case fatality rate (CFR) of under-five malaria-positive children who did not receive appropriate treatment. An estimated 122,350 (interquartile range [IQR]: 91,577-154,736) under-five malaria deaths were associated with consumption of poor-quality antimalarials, representing 3.75% (IQR: 2.81-4.75%) of all under-five deaths in our sample of 39 countries. There is considerable uncertainty surrounding our results because of gaps in data on case fatality rates and prevalence of poor-quality antimalarials. Our analysis highlights the need for further investigation into the distribution of poor-quality antimalarials and the need for stronger surveillance and regulatory efforts to prevent the sale of poor-quality antimalarials. PMID:25897068

  17. Estimated Under-Five Deaths Associated with Poor-Quality Antimalarials in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Renschler, John P.; Walters, Kelsey M.; Newton, Paul N.; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2015-01-01

    Many antimalarials sold in sub-Saharan Africa are poor-quality (falsified, substandard, or degraded), and the burden of disease caused by this problem is inadequately quantified. In this article, we estimate the number of under-five deaths caused by ineffective treatment of malaria associated with consumption of poor-quality antimalarials in 39 sub-Saharan countries. Using Latin hypercube sampling our estimates were calculated as the product of the number of private sector antimalarials consumed by malaria-positive children in 2013; the proportion of private sector antimalarials consumed that were of poor-quality; and the case fatality rate (CFR) of under-five malaria-positive children who did not receive appropriate treatment. An estimated 122,350 (interquartile range [IQR]: 91,577–154,736) under-five malaria deaths were associated with consumption of poor-quality antimalarials, representing 3.75% (IQR: 2.81–4.75%) of all under-five deaths in our sample of 39 countries. There is considerable uncertainty surrounding our results because of gaps in data on case fatality rates and prevalence of poor-quality antimalarials. Our analysis highlights the need for further investigation into the distribution of poor-quality antimalarials and the need for stronger surveillance and regulatory efforts to prevent the sale of poor-quality antimalarials. PMID:25897068

  18. Simple Field Assays to Check Quality of Current Artemisinin-Based Antimalarial Combination Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Ioset, Jean-Robert; Kaur, Harparkash

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Malaria continues to be one of the major public health problems in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Artemisinin derivatives (ARTs; artesunate, artemether, and dihydroartemisinin) derived from the herb, Artemisia annua, are the most effective antimalarial drugs available providing rapid cures. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has recommended that all antimalarials must be combined with an artemisinin component (artemisinin-based combination therapy; ACT) for use as first line treatment against malaria. This class of drugs is now first-line policy in most malaria-endemic countries. Reports of ad hoc surveys from South East Asia show that up to 50% of the artesunate currently sold is counterfeit. Drug quality is rarely assessed in resource poor countries in part due to lack of dedicated laboratory facilities which are expensive to build, equip and maintain. With a view to address this unmet need we developed two novel colour reaction assays that can be used in the field to check the quality of ARTs. Methods and Findings Our assays utilise thin layer chromatography silica gel sheets and 2, 4 dinitrophenylhydrazine or 4-Benzoylamino-2, 5-dimethoxybenzenediazonium chloride hemi (zinc chloride) salt as the reagents showing a pink or blue product respectively only in the presence ARTs. We are able to detect as low as 10% of ARTs in ACTs (WINTHROP - artesunate/amodiaquine, Coartem®-artemether/lumefantrine and Duocortexcin - dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine). The assays have been validated extensively by testing eighty readily accessible and widely used drugs in malaria endemic countries. None of the other antimalarial drugs or a range of commonly used excipients, antiretroviral drugs or other frequently used drugs from the WHO essential drugs list such as analgesics or antibiotics are detected with our assays. Conclusions Our two independent assays requiring no specialist training are specific, simple to use, rapid, robust, reproducible, inexpensive and, have

  19. Collaborative Health and Enforcement Operations on the Quality of Antimalarials and Antibiotics in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Yuk Lin; Plançon, Aline; Lau, Yen Hui; Hostetler, Dana M.; Fernández, Facundo M.; Green, Michael D.; Sounvoravong, Sourisak; Nara, Suon; Boravann, Mam; Dumrong, Thitikornkovit; Bangsawan, Nurjaya; Low, Min Yong; Lim, Chin-Chin; Ai, Ruth Lee Choo; Newton, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    Counterfeit (or falsified) and substandard medicines pose a major public health risk. We describe the findings of Operation Storm I and II conducted in 2008–2009 to combat counterfeit medicines through partnership between national customs, Drug Regulatory Agencies (DRAs), and police in Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. Samples were obtained from seizures and market surveillance by national DRAs. Laboratory analysis using spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques and examination of packaging were performed. Ninety-three suspect antibiotics and 95 antimalarial samples were collected. Of the 93 antibiotics, 29 (31%) had % active pharmaceutical ingredient content (%API) < 85% or > 115% (including one counterfeit). Of the 95 antimalarials, 30 (32%) had %API < 85 > 115% API (including one counterfeit). A significant minority of samples, antimalarials (13%) and antibiotics (15%), were collected in plastic bags with minimal or no labeling. Of 20 ampicillin samples, 13 (65%) contained < 85% API (with one counterfeit containing additional amoxicillin). Of 34 oral artesunate samples, 7 (21%) contained %API out of the 85–115% range. Coordinated and synergistic partnership adopted by the participating countries, International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL), World Health Organization (WHO), and laboratories facilitated a platform for discussions and intelligence sharing, helping to improve each participating country's capacity to combat poor-quality medicines. PMID:25897069

  20. Collaborative health and enforcement operations on the quality of antimalarials and antibiotics in southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yuk Lin; Plançon, Aline; Lau, Yen Hui; Hostetler, Dana M; Fernández, Facundo M; Green, Michael D; Sounvoravong, Sourisak; Nara, Suon; Boravann, Mam; Dumrong, Thitikornkovit; Bangsawan, Nurjaya; Low, Min Yong; Lim, Chin-Chin; Ai, Ruth Lee Choo; Newton, Paul N

    2015-06-01

    Counterfeit (or falsified) and substandard medicines pose a major public health risk. We describe the findings of Operation Storm I and II conducted in 2008-2009 to combat counterfeit medicines through partnership between national customs, Drug Regulatory Agencies (DRAs), and police in Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. Samples were obtained from seizures and market surveillance by national DRAs. Laboratory analysis using spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques and examination of packaging were performed. Ninety-three suspect antibiotics and 95 antimalarial samples were collected. Of the 93 antibiotics, 29 (31%) had % active pharmaceutical ingredient content (%API) < 85% or > 115% (including one counterfeit). Of the 95 antimalarials, 30 (32%) had %API < 85 > 115% API (including one counterfeit). A significant minority of samples, antimalarials (13%) and antibiotics (15%), were collected in plastic bags with minimal or no labeling. Of 20 ampicillin samples, 13 (65%) contained < 85% API (with one counterfeit containing additional amoxicillin). Of 34 oral artesunate samples, 7 (21%) contained %API out of the 85-115% range. Coordinated and synergistic partnership adopted by the participating countries, International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL), World Health Organization (WHO), and laboratories facilitated a platform for discussions and intelligence sharing, helping to improve each participating country's capacity to combat poor-quality medicines. PMID:25897069

  1. Targeting protein kinases in the malaria parasite: update of an antimalarial drug target.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Veronica M; Chavchich, Marina; Waters, Norman C

    2012-01-01

    Millions of deaths each year are attributed to malaria worldwide. Transmitted through the bite of an Anopheles mosquito, infection and subsequent death from the Plasmodium species, most notably P. falciparum, can readily spread through a susceptible population. A malaria vaccine does not exist and resistance to virtually every antimalarial drug predicts that mortality and morbidity associated with this disease will increase. With only a few antimalarial drugs currently in the pipeline, new therapeutic options and novel chemotypes are desperately needed. Hit-to-Lead diversity may successfully provide novel inhibitory scaffolds when essential enzymes are targeted, for example, the plasmodial protein kinases. Throughout the entire life cycle of the malaria parasite, protein kinases are essential for growth and development. Ongoing efforts continue to characterize these kinases, while simultaneously pursuing them as antimalarial drug targets. A collection of structural data, inhibitory profiles and target validation has set the foundation and support for targeting the malarial kinome. Pursuing protein kinases as cancer drug targets has generated a wealth of information on the inhibitory strategies that can be useful for antimalarial drug discovery. In this review, progress on selected protein kinases is described. As the search for novel antimalarials continues, an understanding of the phosphor-regulatory pathways will not only validate protein kinase targets, but also will identify novel chemotypes to thwart malaria drug resistance. PMID:22242850

  2. Inclusion of gametocyte parameters in anti-malarial drug efficacy studies: filling a neglected gap needed for malaria elimination.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Basco, Leonardo K; Beier, John C; Mahdy, Mohammed A K

    2015-01-01

    Standard anti-malarial drug efficacy and drug resistance assessments neglect the gametocyte parameters in their protocols. With the spread of drug resistance and the absence of clinically proven vaccines, the use of gametocytocidal drugs or drug combinations with transmission-blocking activity is a high priority for malaria control and elimination. However, the limited repertoire of gametocytocidal drugs and induction of gametocytogenesis after treatment with certain anti-malarial drugs necessitate both regular monitoring of gametocytocidal activities of anti-malarial drugs in clinical use and the effectiveness of candidate gametocytocidal agents. Therefore, updating current protocols of anti-malarial drug efficacy is needed to reflect the effects of anti-malarial drugs or drug combinations on gametocyte carriage and gametocyte density along with asexual parasite density. Developing protocols of anti-malarial drug efficacy that include gametocyte parameters related to both microscopic and submicroscopic gametocytaemias is important if drugs or drug combinations are to be strategically used in transmission-blocking interventions in the context of malaria elimination. The present piece of opinion highlights the challenges in gametocyte detection and follow-up and discuss the need for including the gametocyte parameter in anti-malarial efficacy studies. PMID:26481312

  3. Retinal toxicity induced by antimalarial drugs: literature review and case report.

    PubMed

    Garza-Leon, Manuel; Flores-Alvarado, Diana Elsa; Muñoz-Bravo, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs are widely used in several countries for control of rheumatologic diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. They are still used in Mexico because of their low cost and few secondary effects, most of which are mild and reversible. Even so, at an ophthalmological level, they could produce irreversible visual damage, which is why it is important to have ophthalmological evaluation and proper follow up. We present a clinical case as an example of characteristic ophthalmological findings as well as risk factors for retinal toxicity. We then discuss guidelines for diagnosis and follow up of patients who use antimalarial drugs for the treatment of rheumatologic illnesses. PMID:27391903

  4. Rational Design of Proteasome Inhibitors as Antimalarial Drugs.

    PubMed

    Le Chapelain, Camille; Groll, Michael

    2016-05-23

    One life, two strategies: Crucial structural differences between the human and the Plasmodium falciparum proteasomes were recently identified. A combination of cryo-EM and functional characterization enabled the design of a selective antimalarial proteasome inhibitor that shows low toxicity in the host. When used with artemisinin, this ligand offers a new approach for the efficient treatment of malaria at all stages of the parasite lifecycle. PMID:27079849

  5. Development of antimalarial drugs and their application in China: a historical review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This historical review covers antimalarials developed in China, which include artemisinin, artemether, artesunate, and dihydroartemisinin, as well as other synthetic drugs such as piperaquine, pyronaridine, benflumetol (lumefantrine), and naphthoquine. The curative effects of these antimalarials in the treatment of falciparum malaria, including chloroquine-resistant strain, are especially discussed. Following the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), different combinations of artemisinin, or its derivative, along with another antimalarial drug were orally used to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections. The recrudescence rates were low, gametocyte carriers lessened, and the curative rate increased remarkably. The combination therapy effectively deferred the emergence of drug resistance in the parasite. The regulation “The guidelines and regimens for the use of antimalarial drugs in China” was issued to guide rational application and standardize malaria treatment in the country. As the recommended first-line drug to treat falciparum malaria in the world, ACT was adopted in the regulation. In response to the global initiative of malaria eradication proposed by the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the Chinese government has set a target to eliminate malaria by 2020. PMID:24650735

  6. Peroxide bond strength of antimalarial drugs containing an endoperoxide cycle. Relation with biological activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Israel; Robert, Anne

    2011-06-01

    Several endoperoxide compounds are very efficient antimalarial analogues of the natural drug artemisinin. Quantum chemical calculations have been used to correlate the computed free energies of the O-O bond with respect to the total number of oxygen atoms contained in the cycle, and with the size/strain of the cycle (5- or 6-membered cycles). The gas-phase homolysis of the O-O bond has been studied for five- and six-membered oxygenated cycles which are models of the "real" drugs. Our results indicate that, in 6-membered cycles, the stability order is the following: 1,2-dioxane > 1,2,4-trioxane > 1,2,4,5-tetraoxane. In cycles containing 3 oxygen atoms, the 5-membered cycle 1,2,4-trioxolane was found much less stable than its 6-membered counterpart 1,2,4-trioxane. This feature indicates the possible role of the cycle strain for the O-O bond stability, and may also explain the high antimalarial activity of some trioxolane derivatives. Similar trends in the O-O bond strength have been found for the real antimalarial drugs. However, the O-O bond stability is not in itself a decisive argument to anticipate the antimalarial activity of drugs. PMID:21487624

  7. Synthesis of the antimalarial drug FR900098 utilizing the nitroso-ene reaction.

    PubMed

    Fokin, Andrey A; Yurchenko, Alexander G; Rodionov, Vladimir N; Gunchenko, Pavel A; Yurchenko, Raisa I; Reichenberg, Armin; Wiesner, Jochen; Hintz, Martin; Jomaa, Hassan; Schreiner, Peter R

    2007-10-11

    The antimalarial drug FR900098 was prepared from diethyl allylphosphonate involving the nitroso-ene reaction with nitrosocarbonyl methane as the key step followed by hydrogenation and dealkylation. The utilization of dibenzyl allylphosphonate as the starting compound allows one-step hydrogenation with dealkylation, which simplifies the preparative scheme further. PMID:17887769

  8. Serine Proteases of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum: Potential as Antimalarial Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a major global parasitic disease and a cause of enormous mortality and morbidity. Widespread drug resistance against currently available antimalarials warrants the identification of novel drug targets and development of new drugs. Malarial proteases are a group of molecules that serve as potential drug targets because of their essentiality for parasite life cycle stages and feasibility of designing specific inhibitors against them. Proteases belonging to various mechanistic classes are found in P. falciparum, of which serine proteases are of particular interest due to their involvement in parasite-specific processes of egress and invasion. In P. falciparum, a number of serine proteases belonging to chymotrypsin, subtilisin, and rhomboid clans are found. This review focuses on the potential of P. falciparum serine proteases as antimalarial drug targets. PMID:24799897

  9. Amphiphilic dendritic derivatives as nanocarriers for the targeted delivery of antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Movellan, Julie; Urbán, Patricia; Moles, Ernest; de la Fuente, Jesús M; Sierra, Teresa; Serrano, José Luis; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    It can be foreseen that in a future scenario of malaria eradication, a varied armamentarium will be required, including strategies for the targeted administration of antimalarial compounds. The development of nanovectors capable of encapsulating drugs and of delivering them to Plasmodium-infected cells with high specificity and efficacy and at an affordable cost is of particular interest. With this objective, dendritic derivatives based on 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)propionic acid (bis-MPA) and Pluronic(®) polymers have been herein explored. Four different dendritic derivatives have been tested for their capacity to encapsulate the antimalarial drugs chloroquine (CQ) and primaquine (PQ), their specific targeting to Plasmodium-infected red blood cells (pRBCs), and their antimalarial activity in vitro against the human pathogen Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo against the rodent malaria species Plasmodium yoelii. The results obtained have allowed the identification of two dendritic derivatives exhibiting specific targeting to pRBCs vs. non-infected RBCs, which reduce the in vitro IC50 of CQ and PQ by ca. 3- and 4-fold down to 4.0 nm and 1.1 μm, respectively. This work on the application of dendritic derivatives to antimalarial targeted drug delivery opens the way for the use of this new type of chemicals in future malaria eradication programs. PMID:24930847

  10. Irrational use of antimalarial drugs in rural areas of eastern Pakistan: a random field study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prescription of antimalarial drugs in the absence of malarial disease is a common practice in countries where malaria is endemic. However, unwarranted use of such drugs can cause side effects in some people and is a financial drain on local economies. In this study, we surveyed the prevalence of malaria parasites in humans, and the prevalence of the malaria transmitting mosquito vectors in the study area. We also investigated the use of antimalarial drugs in the local people. We focused on randomly selected rural areas of eastern Pakistan where no malaria cases had been reported since May 2004. Methods Mass blood surveys, active case detection, passive case detection, and vector density surveys were carried out in selected areas of Sargodha district from September 2008 to August 2009. Data pertaining to the quantities and types of antimalarial drugs used in these areas were collected from health centers, pharmacies, and the district CDC program of the Health Department of the Government of the Punjab. Results Seven hundred and forty four blood samples were examined, resulting in a Blood Examination Rate (BER) of 3.18; microscopic analysis of blood smears showed that none of the samples were positive for malaria parasites. Investigation of the mosquito vector density in 43 living rooms (bedrooms or rooms used for sleeping), 23 stores, and 32 animal sheds, revealed no vectors capable of transmitting malaria in these locations. In contrast, the density of Culex mosquitoes was high. Substantial consumption of a variety of antimalarial tablets, syrups, capsules and injections costing around 1000 US$, was documented for the region. Conclusion Use of antimalarial drugs in the absence of malarial infection or the vectors that transmit the disease was common in the study area. Continuous use of such drugs, not only in Pakistan, but in other parts of the world, may lead to drug-induced side effects amongst users. Better training of health care professionals is

  11. Metabolic Dysregulation Induced in Plasmodium falciparum by Dihydroartemisinin and Other Front-Line Antimalarial Drugs.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, Simon A; Chua, Hwa H; Nijagal, Brunda; Creek, Darren J; Ralph, Stuart A; McConville, Malcolm J

    2016-01-15

    Detailed information on the mode of action of antimalarial drugs can be used to improve existing drugs, identify new drug targets, and understand the basis of drug resistance. In this study we describe the use of a time-resolved, mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolite profiling approach to map the metabolic perturbations induced by a panel of clinical antimalarial drugs and inhibitors on Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood stages. Drug-induced changes in metabolite levels in P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes were monitored over time using gas chromatography-MS and liquid chromatography-MS and changes in specific metabolic fluxes confirmed by nonstationary [(13)C]-glucose labeling. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) was found to disrupt hemoglobin catabolism within 1 hour of exposure, resulting in a transient decrease in hemoglobin-derived peptides. Unexpectedly, it also disrupted pyrimidine biosynthesis, resulting in increased [(13)C]-glucose flux toward malate production, potentially explaining the susceptibility of P. falciparum to DHA during early blood-stage development. Unique metabolic signatures were also found for atovaquone, chloroquine, proguanil, cycloguanil and methylene blue. We also show that this approach can be used to identify the mode of action of novel antimalarials, such as the compound Torin 2, which inhibits hemoglobin catabolism. PMID:26150544

  12. Lead Clinical and Preclinical Antimalarial Drugs Can Significantly Reduce Sporozoite Transmission to Vertebrate Populations

    PubMed Central

    Upton, L. M.; Brock, P. M.; Churcher, T. S.; Ghani, A. C.; Gething, P. W.; Delves, M. J.; Sala, K. A.; Leroy, D.; Sinden, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    To achieve malarial elimination, we must employ interventions that reduce the exposure of human populations to infectious mosquitoes. To this end, numerous antimalarial drugs are under assessment in a variety of transmission-blocking assays which fail to measure the single crucial criteria of a successful intervention, namely impact on case incidence within a vertebrate population (reduction in reproductive number/effect size). Consequently, any reduction in new infections due to drug treatment (and how this may be influenced by differing transmission settings) is not currently examined, limiting the translation of any findings. We describe the use of a laboratory population model to assess how individual antimalarial drugs can impact the number of secondary Plasmodium berghei infections over a cycle of transmission. We examine the impact of multiple clinical and preclinical drugs on both insect and vertebrate populations at multiple transmission settings. Both primaquine (>6 mg/kg of body weight) and NITD609 (8.1 mg/kg) have significant impacts across multiple transmission settings, but artemether and lumefantrine (57 and 11.8 mg/kg), OZ439 (6.5 mg/kg), and primaquine (<1.25 mg/kg) demonstrated potent efficacy only at lower-transmission settings. While directly demonstrating the impact of antimalarial drug treatment on vertebrate populations, we additionally calculate effect size for each treatment, allowing for head-to-head comparison of the potential impact of individual drugs within epidemiologically relevant settings, supporting their usage within elimination campaigns. PMID:25385107

  13. Validation of ELISA for Quantitation of Artemisinin-Based Antimalarial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Cui, Yongliang; Zhou, Guofa; Yan, Guiyun; Cui, Liwang; Wang, Baomin

    2013-01-01

    The circulation of counterfeit or substandard artemisinins (ARTs) in malaria-endemic areas poses a serious threat to the long-term use of these drugs. Here, we validated an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) for quantification of ARTs and found that 50% of inhibitory concentrations of dihydroartemisinin, artemether, and artesunate were 8.1, 207.0, and 4.7 ng/mL, respectively. We compared the icELISA with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for quantifying ART and its derivatives in 22 convenience samples of commercial antimalarial drugs. Paired t tests showed a borderline significant difference between the two methods (mean = 0.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.00–0.07, P = 0.074) and the icELISA results were more variable than those of the HPLC analysis (P < 0.001), suggesting that further improvement is needed to enhance the performance of the icELISA. Our results showed that the icELISA has the potential to be improved for quality assurance of ARTs at the point of care in endemic settings. PMID:24080636

  14. Mechanisms of hematin crystallization and inhibition by the antimalarial drug chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Olafson, Katy N; Ketchum, Megan A; Rimer, Jeffrey D; Vekilov, Peter G

    2015-04-21

    Hematin crystallization is the primary mechanism of heme detoxification in malaria parasites and the target of the quinoline class of antimalarials. Despite numerous studies of malaria pathophysiology, fundamental questions regarding hematin growth and inhibition remain. Among them are the identity of the crystallization medium in vivo, aqueous or organic; the mechanism of crystallization, classical or nonclassical; and whether quinoline antimalarials inhibit crystallization by sequestering hematin in the solution, or by blocking surface sites crucial for growth. Here we use time-resolved in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and show that the lipid subphase in the parasite may be a preferred growth medium. We provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence of the molecular mechanisms of hematin crystallization and inhibition by chloroquine, a common quinoline antimalarial drug. AFM observations demonstrate that crystallization strictly follows a classical mechanism wherein new crystal layers are generated by 2D nucleation and grow by the attachment of solute molecules. We identify four classes of surface sites available for binding of potential drugs and propose respective mechanisms of drug action. Further studies reveal that chloroquine inhibits hematin crystallization by binding to molecularly flat {100} surfaces. A 2-μM concentration of chloroquine fully arrests layer generation and step advancement, which is ∼10(4)× less than hematin's physiological concentration. Our results suggest that adsorption at specific growth sites may be a general mode of hemozoin growth inhibition for the quinoline antimalarials. Because the atomic structures of the identified sites are known, this insight could advance the future design and/or optimization of new antimalarials. PMID:25831526

  15. Impact of prepackaging antimalarial drugs on cost to patients and compliance with treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Yeboah-Antwi, K.; Gyapong, J. O.; Asare, I. K.; Barnish, G.; Evans, D. B.; Adjei, S.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the extent to which district health teams could reduce the burden of malaria, a continuing major cause of mortality and morbidity, in a situation where severe resource constraints existed and integrated care was provided. METHODS: Antimalarial drugs were prepackaged into unit doses in an attempt to improve compliance with full courses of chemotherapy. FINDINGS: Compliance improved by approximately 20% in both adults and children. There were 50% reductions in cost to patients, waiting time at dispensaries and drug wastage at facilities. The intervention, which tended to improve both case and drug management at facilities, was well accepted by health staff and did not involve them in additional working time. CONCLUSION: The prepackaging of antimalarials at the district level offers the prospect of improved compliance and a reduction in the spread of resistance. PMID:11417034

  16. To kill or not to kill, that is the question: cytocidal antimalarial drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Roepe, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating mechanisms of antimalarial drug resistance accelerates development of improved diagnostics and the design of new, effective malaria therapy. Recently, several studies have emphasized that chloroquine (CQ) resistance (CQR) can be quantified in two very distinct ways, depending on whether sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effects or parasite – kill effects of the drug are being measured. It is now clear that these cytostatic and cytocidal CQR phenotypes are not equivalent, and recent genetic, cell biological, and biophysical evidence suggests how the molecular mechanisms may overlap. These conclusions have important implications for elucidating other drug resistance phenomena and emphasize new concepts that are essential for the development of new drug therapy. PMID:24530127

  17. Interspecies Allometric Scaling of Antimalarial Drugs and Potential Application to Pediatric Dosing

    PubMed Central

    Senarathna, S. M. D. K. Ganga

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacopeial recommendations for administration of antimalarial drugs are the same weight-based (mg/kg of body weight) doses for children and adults. However, linear calculations are known to underestimate pediatric doses; therefore, interspecies allometric scaling data may have a role in predicting doses in children. We investigated the allometric scaling relationships of antimalarial drugs using data from pharmacokinetic studies in mammalian species. Simple allometry (Y = a × Wb) was utilized and compared to maximum life span potential (MLP) correction. All drugs showed a strong correlation with clearance (CL) in healthy controls. Insufficient data from malaria-infected species other than humans were available for allometric scaling. The allometric exponents (b) for CL of artesunate, dihydroartemisinin (from intravenous artesunate), artemether, artemisinin, clindamycin, piperaquine, mefloquine, and quinine were 0.71, 0.85, 0.66, 0.83, 0.62, 0.96, 0.52, and 0.40, respectively. Clearance was significantly lower in malaria infection than in healthy (adult) humans for quinine (0.07 versus 0.17 liter/h/kg; P = 0.0002) and dihydroartemisinin (0.81 versus 1.11 liters/h/kg; P = 0.04; power = 0.6). Interpolation of simple allometry provided better estimates of CL for children than MLP correction, which generally underestimated CL values. Pediatric dose calculations based on simple allometric exponents were 10 to 70% higher than pharmacopeial (mg/kg) recommendations. Interpolation of interspecies allometric scaling could provide better estimates than linear scaling of adult to pediatric doses of antimalarial drugs; however, the use of a fixed exponent for CL was not supported in the present study. The variability in allometric exponents for antimalarial drugs also has implications for scaling of fixed-dose combinations. PMID:25092696

  18. CRIMALDDI: a prioritized research agenda to expedite the discovery of new anti-malarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The CRIMALDDI Consortium has been a three-year project funded by the EU Framework Seven Programme. It aimed to develop a prioritized set of recommendations to speed up anti-malarial drug discovery research and contribute to the setting of the global research agenda. It has attempted to align thinking on the high priority issues and then to develop action plans and strategies to address these issues. Through a series of facilitated and interactive workshops, it has concluded that these priorities can be grouped under five key themes: attacking artemisinin resistance; creating and sharing community resources; delivering enabling technologies; exploiting high throughput screening hits quickly; and, identifying novel targets. Recommendations have been prioritized into one of four levels: quick wins; removing key roadblocks to future progress; speeding-up drug discovery; and, nice to have (but not essential). Use of this prioritization allows efforts and resources to be focused on the lines of work that will contribute most to expediting anti-malarial drug discovery. Estimates of the time and finances required to implement the recommendations have also been made, along with indications of when recommendations within each theme will make an impact. All of this has been collected into an indicative roadmap that, it is hoped, will guide decisions about the direction and focus of European anti-malarial drug discovery research and contribute to the setting of the global research agenda. PMID:24191947

  19. Antimalarial natural products: a review

    PubMed Central

    Mojab, Faraz

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Malaria is an infectious disease commonplace in tropical countries. For many years, major antimalarial drugs consisted of natural products, but since 1930s these drugs have been largely replaced with a series of synthetic drugs. This article tries to briefly indicate that some plants which previously were used to treat malaria, as a result of deficiencies of synthetic drugs, have revived into useful products once more. It also attempts to describe some tests which can be used to evaluate plant extracts for antimalarial activity. Materials and Methods: By referring to some recent literatures, data were collected about plants used for the treatment of malaria, evaluation of plant extracts for antimalarial activity, modes of action of natural antimalarial agents, and recent research on antimalarial plants in Iran and other countries. Results and Conclusion: There is an urgent need for the development of new treatments for malaria. Many countries have a vast precedence in the use of medicinal plants and the required knowledge spans many centuries. Although malaria is controlled in Iran, some researchers tend to study malaria and related subjects. In vitro biological tests for the detection of antimalarial activities in plant extracts are currently available. It is vital that the efficacy and safety of traditional medicines be validated and their active constituents be identified in order to establish reliable quality control measures. PMID:25050231

  20. Evaluating the Pharmacodynamic Effect of Antimalarial Drugs in Clinical Trials by Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Marquart, Louise; Baker, Mark; O'Rourke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing development of new antimalarial drugs and the increasing use of controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) studies to investigate their activity in early-stage clinical trials require the development of methods to analyze their pharmacodynamic effect. This is especially so for studies where quantitative PCR (qPCR) is becoming the preferred method for assessing parasite clearance as the study endpoint. We report the development and validation of an analytic approach for qPCR-determined parasite clearance data. First, in a clinical trial with the licensed antimalarial combination sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (S/P), qPCR data were collected from 12 subjects and used to determine qPCR replicate variability and to identify outliers. Then, an iterative analytic approach based on modeling the log-linear decay of parasitemia following drug treatment was developed to determine the parasite reduction ratio (PRR) and parasite clearance half-life, both measures of parasite clearance. This analytic approach was then validated with data from 8 subjects enrolled in a second study with the licensed antimalarial drug mefloquine. By this method, the PRR and parasite clearance half-lives for S/P and Mefloquine were determined to be 38,878 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 17,396 to 86,889) at 3.15 (95% CI, 2.93 to 3.41) days and 157 (95% CI, 130 to 189) at 6.58 (95% CI, 6.35 to 6.83) days for the respective studies. No serious adverse events occurred in the two trials, and pharmacokinetic values were within expected ranges for sulfadoxine and pyrimethamine. The robust statistical method that we have developed to analyze qPCR-derived pharmacodynamic data from CHMI studies will facilitate the assessment of the activity of a range of experimental antimalarial drugs now entering clinical trials. (This trial was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry under registration numbers ACTRN12611001203943 and ACTRN12612000323820.) PMID:25963983

  1. Molecular surveillance of antimalarial drug resistance related genes in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Eritrea.

    PubMed

    Menegon, Michela; Nurahmed, Abduselam M; Talha, Albadawi A; Nour, Bakri Y M; Severini, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    The introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy has led to extraordinary results in malaria control, however the recent emergence of partial resistance to artemisinin therapy in Southeast Asia jeopardizes these successes. This study aimed at investigating resistance to the antimalarial drugs by evaluating the polymorphisms in the PfK13, Pfcrt and Pfmdr1 genes in Plasmodium falciparum isolates obtained from patients in Eritrea. PMID:26875763

  2. Mind the gaps - the epidemiology of poor-quality anti-malarials in the malarious world - analysis of the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network database

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor quality medicines threaten the lives of millions of patients and are alarmingly common in many parts of the world. Nevertheless, the global extent of the problem remains unknown. Accurate estimates of the epidemiology of poor quality medicines are sparse and are influenced by sampling methodology and diverse chemical analysis techniques. In order to understand the existing data, the Antimalarial Quality Scientific Group at WWARN built a comprehensive, open-access, global database and linked Antimalarial Quality Surveyor, an online visualization tool. Analysis of the database is described here, the limitations of the studies and data reported, and their public health implications discussed. Methods The database collates customized summaries of 251 published anti-malarial quality reports in English, French and Spanish by time and location since 1946. It also includes information on assays to determine quality, sampling and medicine regulation. Results No publicly available reports for 60.6% (63) of the 104 malaria-endemic countries were found. Out of 9,348 anti-malarials sampled, 30.1% (2,813) failed chemical/packaging quality tests with 39.3% classified as falsified, 2.3% as substandard and 58.3% as poor quality without evidence available to categorize them as either substandard or falsified. Only 32.3% of the reports explicitly described their definitions of medicine quality and just 9.1% (855) of the samples collected in 4.6% (six) surveys were conducted using random sampling techniques. Packaging analysis was only described in 21.5% of publications and up to twenty wrong active ingredients were found in falsified anti-malarials. Conclusions There are severe neglected problems with anti-malarial quality but there are important caveats to accurately estimate the prevalence and distribution of poor quality anti-malarials. The lack of reports in many malaria-endemic areas, inadequate sampling techniques and inadequate chemical analytical methods and

  3. Production of the antimalarial drug precursor artemisinic acid in engineered yeast.

    PubMed

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Paradise, Eric M; Ouellet, Mario; Fisher, Karl J; Newman, Karyn L; Ndungu, John M; Ho, Kimberly A; Eachus, Rachel A; Ham, Timothy S; Kirby, James; Chang, Michelle C Y; Withers, Sydnor T; Shiba, Yoichiro; Sarpong, Richmond; Keasling, Jay D

    2006-04-13

    Malaria is a global health problem that threatens 300-500 million people and kills more than one million people annually. Disease control is hampered by the occurrence of multi-drug-resistant strains of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Synthetic antimalarial drugs and malarial vaccines are currently being developed, but their efficacy against malaria awaits rigorous clinical testing. Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide extracted from Artemisia annua L (family Asteraceae; commonly known as sweet wormwood), is highly effective against multi-drug-resistant Plasmodium spp., but is in short supply and unaffordable to most malaria sufferers. Although total synthesis of artemisinin is difficult and costly, the semi-synthesis of artemisinin or any derivative from microbially sourced artemisinic acid, its immediate precursor, could be a cost-effective, environmentally friendly, high-quality and reliable source of artemisinin. Here we report the engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high titres (up to 100 mg l(-1)) of artemisinic acid using an engineered mevalonate pathway, amorphadiene synthase, and a novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP71AV1) from A. annua that performs a three-step oxidation of amorpha-4,11-diene to artemisinic acid. The synthesized artemisinic acid is transported out and retained on the outside of the engineered yeast, meaning that a simple and inexpensive purification process can be used to obtain the desired product. Although the engineered yeast is already capable of producing artemisinic acid at a significantly higher specific productivity than A. annua, yield optimization and industrial scale-up will be required to raise artemisinic acid production to a level high enough to reduce artemisinin combination therapies to significantly below their current prices. PMID:16612385

  4. Linking Murine and Human Plasmodium falciparum Challenge Models in a Translational Path for Antimalarial Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, James S.; Marquart, Louise; Sekuloski, Silvana; Trenholme, Katharine; Elliott, Suzanne; Griffin, Paul; Rockett, Rebecca; O'Rourke, Peter; Sloots, Theo; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Martínez, María-Santos; Duparc, Stephan; Leroy, Didier; Wells, Timothy N. C.; Baker, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Effective progression of candidate antimalarials is dependent on optimal dosing in clinical studies, which is determined by a sound understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD). Recently, two important translational models for antimalarials have been developed: the NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ−/− (NSG) model, whereby mice are engrafted with noninfected and Plasmodium falciparum-infected human erythrocytes, and the induced blood-stage malaria (IBSM) model in human volunteers. The antimalarial mefloquine was used to directly measure the PK/PD in both models, which were compared to previously published trial data for malaria patients. The clinical part was a single-center, controlled study using a blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum challenge inoculum in volunteers to characterize the effectiveness of mefloquine against early malaria. The study was conducted in three cohorts (n = 8 each) using different doses of mefloquine. The characteristic delay in onset of action of about 24 h was seen in both NSG and IBSM systems. In vivo 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were estimated at 2.0 μg/ml and 1.8 μg/ml in the NSG and IBSM models, respectively, aligning with 1.8 μg/ml reported previously for patients. In the IBSM model, the parasite reduction ratios were 157 and 195 for the 10- and 15-mg/kg doses, within the range of previously reported clinical data for patients but significantly lower than observed in the mouse model. Linking mouse and human challenge models to clinical trial data can accelerate the accrual of critical data on antimalarial drug activity. Such data can guide large clinical trials required for development of urgently needed novel antimalarial combinations. (This trial was registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry [http://anzctr.org.au] under registration number ACTRN12612000323820.) PMID:27044554

  5. Linking Murine and Human Plasmodium falciparum Challenge Models in a Translational Path for Antimalarial Drug Development.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, James S; Marquart, Louise; Sekuloski, Silvana; Trenholme, Katharine; Elliott, Suzanne; Griffin, Paul; Rockett, Rebecca; O'Rourke, Peter; Sloots, Theo; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Martínez, María-Santos; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob; Duparc, Stephan; Leroy, Didier; Wells, Timothy N C; Baker, Mark; Möhrle, Jörg J

    2016-06-01

    Effective progression of candidate antimalarials is dependent on optimal dosing in clinical studies, which is determined by a sound understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD). Recently, two important translational models for antimalarials have been developed: the NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ(-/-) (NSG) model, whereby mice are engrafted with noninfected and Plasmodium falciparum-infected human erythrocytes, and the induced blood-stage malaria (IBSM) model in human volunteers. The antimalarial mefloquine was used to directly measure the PK/PD in both models, which were compared to previously published trial data for malaria patients. The clinical part was a single-center, controlled study using a blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum challenge inoculum in volunteers to characterize the effectiveness of mefloquine against early malaria. The study was conducted in three cohorts (n = 8 each) using different doses of mefloquine. The characteristic delay in onset of action of about 24 h was seen in both NSG and IBSM systems. In vivo 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were estimated at 2.0 μg/ml and 1.8 μg/ml in the NSG and IBSM models, respectively, aligning with 1.8 μg/ml reported previously for patients. In the IBSM model, the parasite reduction ratios were 157 and 195 for the 10- and 15-mg/kg doses, within the range of previously reported clinical data for patients but significantly lower than observed in the mouse model. Linking mouse and human challenge models to clinical trial data can accelerate the accrual of critical data on antimalarial drug activity. Such data can guide large clinical trials required for development of urgently needed novel antimalarial combinations. (This trial was registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry [http://anzctr.org.au] under registration number ACTRN12612000323820.). PMID:27044554

  6. Altering Antimalarial Drug Regimens May Dramatically Enhance and Restore Drug Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kay, Katherine; Hodel, Eva Maria; Hastings, Ian M

    2015-10-01

    There is considerable concern that malaria parasites are starting to evolve resistance to the current generation of antimalarial drugs, the artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). We use pharmacological modeling to investigate changes in ACT effectiveness likely to occur if current regimens are extended from 3 to 5 days or, alternatively, given twice daily over 3 days. We show that the pharmacology of artemisinins allows both regimen changes to substantially increase the artemisinin killing rate. Malaria patients rarely contain more than 10(12) parasites, while the standard dosing regimens allow approximately 1 in 10(10) parasites to survive artemisinin treatment. Parasite survival falls dramatically, to around 1 in 10(17) parasites if the dose is extended or split; theoretically, this increase in drug killing appears to be more than sufficient to restore failing ACT efficacy. One of the most widely used dosing regimens, artemether-lumefantrine, already successfully employs a twice-daily dosing regimen, and we argue that twice-daily dosing should be incorporated into all ACT regimen design considerations as a simple and effective way of ensuring the continued long-term effectiveness of ACTs. PMID:26239993

  7. Altering Antimalarial Drug Regimens May Dramatically Enhance and Restore Drug Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Hodel, Eva Maria; Hastings, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable concern that malaria parasites are starting to evolve resistance to the current generation of antimalarial drugs, the artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). We use pharmacological modeling to investigate changes in ACT effectiveness likely to occur if current regimens are extended from 3 to 5 days or, alternatively, given twice daily over 3 days. We show that the pharmacology of artemisinins allows both regimen changes to substantially increase the artemisinin killing rate. Malaria patients rarely contain more than 1012 parasites, while the standard dosing regimens allow approximately 1 in 1010 parasites to survive artemisinin treatment. Parasite survival falls dramatically, to around 1 in 1017 parasites if the dose is extended or split; theoretically, this increase in drug killing appears to be more than sufficient to restore failing ACT efficacy. One of the most widely used dosing regimens, artemether-lumefantrine, already successfully employs a twice-daily dosing regimen, and we argue that twice-daily dosing should be incorporated into all ACT regimen design considerations as a simple and effective way of ensuring the continued long-term effectiveness of ACTs. PMID:26239993

  8. Development of a generic micellar electrokinetic chromatography method for the separation of 15 antimalarial drugs as a tool to detect medicine counterfeiting.

    PubMed

    Lamalle, Caroline; Djang'Eing'A Marini, Roland; Debrus, Benjamin; Lebrun, Pierre; Crommen, Jacques; Hubert, Philippe; Servais, Anne-Catherine; Fillet, Marianne

    2012-06-01

    Since antimalarial drugs counterfeiting is dramatically present on the African market, the development of simple analytical methods for their quality control is of great importance. This work consists in the CE analysis of 15 antimalarials (artesunate, artemether, amodiaquine, chloroquine, piperaquine, primaquine, quinine, cinchonine, mefloquine, halofantrine, sulfadoxine, sulfalen, atovaquone, proguanil, and pyrimethamine). Since all these molecules cannot be ionized at the same pH, MEKC was preferred because it also allows separation of neutral compounds. Preliminary experiments were first carried out to select the most crucial factors affecting the antimalarials separation. Several conditions were tested and four parameters as well as their investigation domain were chosen: pH (5-10), SDS concentration (20-90 mM), ACN proportion (10-40%), and temperature (20-35°C). Then, the experimental design methodology was used and a central composite design was selected. Mathematical modeling of the migration times allowed the prediction of optimal conditions (29°C, pH 6.6, 29 mM SDS, 36% ACN) regarding analyte separation. The prediction at this optimum was verified experimentally and led to the separation of 13 compounds within 8 min. Finally, the method was successfully applied to the quality control of African antimalarial medicines for their qualitative and quantitative content. PMID:22887081

  9. Investigation of some medicinal plants traditionally used for treatment of malaria in Kenya as potential sources of antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Muthaura, C N; Keriko, J M; Derese, S; Yenesew, A; Rukunga, G M

    2011-03-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem in many tropical and subtropical countries and the burden of this disease is getting worse, mainly due to the increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum against the widely available antimalarial drugs. There is an urgent need for discovery of new antimalarial agents. Herbal medicines for the treatment of various diseases including malaria are an important part of the cultural diversity and traditions of which Kenya's biodiversity has been an integral part. Two major antimalarial drugs widely used today came originally from indigenous medical systems, that is quinine and artemisinin, from Peruvian and Chinese ancestral treatments, respectively. Thus ethnopharmacology is a very important resource in which new therapies may be discovered. The present review is an analysis of ethnopharmacological publications on antimalarial therapies from some Kenyan medicinal plants. PMID:21095187

  10. Factors determining anti-malarial drug use in a peri-urban population from malaria holoendemic region of western kenya

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Interventions to reverse trends in malaria-related morbidity and mortality in Kenya focus on preventive strategies and drug efficacy. However, the pattern of use of anti-malarials in malaria-endemic populations, such as in western Kenya, is still poorly understood. It is critical to understand the patterns of anti-malarial drug use to ascertain that the currently applied new combination therapy to malaria treatment, will achieve sustained cure rates and protection against parasite resistance. Therefore, this cross-sectional study was designed to determine the patterns of use of anti-malarial drugs in households (n = 397) in peri-urban location of Manyatta-B sub-location in Kisumu in western Kenya. Methods Household factors, associated with the pattern of anti-malarials use, were evaluated. Using clusters, questionnaire was administered to a particular household member who had the most recent malaria episode (within <2 weeks) and used an anti-malarial for cure. Mothers/caretakers provided information for children aged <13 years. Results Stratification of the type of anti-malarial drugs taken revealed that 37.0% used sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP), 32.0% artemisinin-based combined therapy (ACT), 11.1% anti-pyretics, 7.3% chloroquine (CQ), 7.1% quinine, 2.5% amodiaquine (AQ), while 3.0% used others which were perceived as anti-malarials (cough syrups and antibiotics). In a regression model, it was demonstrated that age (P = 0.050), household size (P = 0.047), household head (P = 0.049), household source of income (P = 0.015), monthly income (P = 0.020), duration of use (P = 0.029), dosage of drugs taken (P = 0.036), and source of drugs (P = 0.005) significantly influenced anti-malarial drug use. Overall, 38.8% of respondents used drugs as recommended by the Ministry of Health. Conclusion This study demonstrates that consumers require access to correct and comprehensible information associated with use of drugs, including self-prescription. There is

  11. How Patients Take Malaria Treatment: A Systematic Review of the Literature on Adherence to Antimalarial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bruxvoort, Katia; Goodman, Catherine; Kachur, S. Patrick; Schellenberg, David

    2014-01-01

    Background High levels of patient adherence to antimalarial treatment are important in ensuring drug effectiveness. To achieve this goal, it is important to understand levels of patient adherence, and the range of study designs and methodological challenges involved in measuring adherence and interpreting results. Since antimalarial adherence was reviewed in 2004, there has been a major expansion in the use of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) in the public sector, as well as initiatives to make them more widely accessible through community health workers and private retailers. These changes and the large number of recent adherence studies raise the need for an updated review on this topic. Objective We conducted a systematic review of studies reporting quantitative results on patient adherence to antimalarials obtained for treatment. Results The 55 studies identified reported extensive variation in patient adherence to antimalarials, with many studies reporting very high adherence (90–100%) and others finding adherence of less than 50%. We identified five overarching approaches to assessing adherence based on the definition of adherence and the methods used to measure it. Overall, there was no clear pattern in adherence results by approach. However, adherence tended to be higher among studies where informed consent was collected at the time of obtaining the drug, where patient consultations were directly observed by research staff, and where a diagnostic test was obtained. Conclusion Variations in reported adherence may reflect factors related to patient characteristics and the nature of their consultation with the provider, as well as methodological variations such as interaction between the research team and patients before and during the treatment. Future studies can benefit from an awareness of the impact of study procedures on adherence outcomes, and the identification of improved measurement methods less dependent on self-report. PMID:24465418

  12. Stated preferences for anti-malarial drug characteristics in Zomba, a malaria endemic area of Malawi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The evidence on determinants of individuals’ choices for anti-malarial drug treatments is scarce. This study sought to measure the strength of preference for adult antimalarial drug treatment attributes of heads of urban, rural and peri-urban households in a resource-limited malaria-endemic area of sub-Saharan Africa. Methods Discrete choice experiments were conducted with 508 heads of household interviewed face-to-face for a household population survey of health-seeking behavior in Zomba District, Malawi. The interviews were held in Chichewa and the choice experiment questions were presented with cartoon aids. The anti-malarial drug attributes included in the stated preference experiment were: speed of fever resolution, side effects (pruritus) risk, protection (duration of prophylactic effect), price, duration of treatment course and recommendation by a health professional. Sixteen treatment profiles from a fractional factorial design by orthogonal array were paired into choice scenarios, and scenarios were randomly assigned to participants so that each participant was presented with a series of eight pairwise choice scenarios. Respondents had the option to state indifference between the two profiles or decline to choose. Data were analysed in a mixed logit model, with normally distributed coefficients for all six attributes. Results The sex ratio was balanced in urban areas, whereas 63% of participants in rural areas were male. The proportion of individuals with no education was considerably higher in the rural group (25%) than in the urban (5%) and peri-urban (6%) groups. All attributes investigated had the expected influence, and traded-off in most respondents’ choices. There were heterogeneous effects of price, pruritus risk, treatment recommendation by a professional, and duration of prophylaxis across respondents, only partly explained by their differences in education, household per capita expenditure, sex and age. Individuals´ demand

  13. Current issues for anti-malarial drugs to control P. falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, D; Abdulla, S; Roper, C

    2006-03-01

    Successful malaria control depends heavily on efficacious anti-malarial drugs for the treatment of malaria. Artesunate-containing Combination Treatments (ACT) are increasingly recommended as first line malaria treatment in endemic countries, but implementation of this recommendation is limited by the small number of available and affordable co-formulated anti-malarial drugs. In recent years Intermittent Preventive Treatment has been recommended for malaria control in pregnancy and has been shown to be of potential public health importance in the prevention of malaria and anaemia in children. The use of drugs for malaria treatment or prevention is associated with the development of resistance and recent advances in molecular biology facilitate the evaluation of the impact on drug resistance of new drug-based strategies. This review concentrates on the challenges surrounding the use of ACT, the current understanding of IPT in infants and the use of molecular approaches to enhance our understanding of the effects of interventions on the spread of drug resistance. PMID:16515515

  14. Study of the efficacy of antimalarial drugs delivered inside targeted immunoliposomal nanovectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbán, Patricia; Estelrich, Joan; Adeva, Alberto; Cortés, Alfred; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2011-12-01

    Paul Ehrlich's dream of a 'magic bullet' that would specifically destroy invading microbes is now a major aspect of clinical medicine. However, a century later, the implementation of this medical holy grail continues being a challenge in three main fronts: identifying the right molecular or cellular targets for a particular disease, having a drug that is effective against it, and finding a strategy for the efficient delivery of sufficient amounts of the drug in an active state exclusively to the selected targets. In a previous work, we engineered an immunoliposomal nanovector for the targeted delivery of its contents exclusively to Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells [pRBCs]. In preliminary assays, the antimalarial drug chloroquine showed improved efficacy when delivered inside immunoliposomes targeted with the pRBC-specific monoclonal antibody BM1234. Because difficulties in determining the exact concentration of the drug due to its low amounts prevented an accurate estimation of the nanovector performance, here, we have developed an HPLC-based method for the precise determination of the concentrations in the liposomal preparations of chloroquine and of a second antimalarial drug, fosmidomycin. The results obtained indicate that immunoliposome encapsulation of chloroquine and fosmidomycin improves by tenfold the efficacy of antimalarial drugs. The targeting antibody used binds preferentially to pRBCs containing late maturation stages of the parasite. In accordance with this observation, the best performing immunoliposomes are those added to Plasmodium cultures having a larger number of late form-containing pRBCs. An average of five antibody molecules per liposome significantly improves in cell cultures the performance of immunoliposomes over non-functionalized liposomes as drug delivery vessels. Increasing the number of antibodies on the liposome surface correspondingly increases performance, with a reduction of 50% parasitemia achieved with

  15. Antimalarial Drug Discovery: Approaches and Progress towards New Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Erika L.; Chatterjee, Arnab K.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria elimination has recently been reinstated as a global health priority but current therapies seem to be insufficient for the task. Elimination efforts require new drug classes that alleviate symptoms, prevent transmission and provide a radical cure. To develop these next generation medicines, public-private partnerships are funding innovative approaches to identify compounds that target multiple parasite species at multiple stages of the parasite lifecycle. Here, we review the cell-, chemistry- and target-based approaches used to discover new drug candidates that are currently in clinical trials or undergoing preclinical testing. PMID:24217412

  16. Heme as trigger and target for trioxane-containing antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Bernard; Robert, Anne

    2010-11-16

    Heme is not only just the binding site responsible for oxygen transport by hemoglobin, but it is also the prosthetic group of many different heme-containing enzymes, such as cytochromes P450, peroxidases, catalase, and several proteins involved in electron transfer. Heme plays a key role in the mechanism of action of many different antimalarial drugs. In degrading the host's hemoglobin, the malaria parasite Plasmodium and several other heme-eating parasites are faced with this redox-active metal complex. Heme is able to induce the toxic reductive cascade of molecular oxygen, which leads to the production of destructive hydroxyl radicals. Plasmodium detoxifies heme by converting it into a redox-inactive iron(III) polymer called hemozoin. Artemisinin, a natural drug containing a biologically important 1,2,4-trioxane structure, is now the first-line treatment for multidrug-resistant malaria. The peroxide moiety in artemisinin reacts in the presence of the flat, achiral iron(II)-heme; the mechanism does not reflect the classical "key and lock" paradigm for drugs. Instead, the reductive activation of the peroxide function generates a short-lived alkoxy radical, which quickly rearranges to a C-centered primary radical. This radical alkylates heme via an intramolecular process to produce covalent heme-drug adducts. The accumulation of non-polymerizable redox-active heme derivatives, a consequence of heme alkylation, is thought to be toxic for the parasite. The alkylation of heme by artemisinin has been demonstrated in malaria-infected mice, indicating that heme is acting as the trigger and target of artemisinin. The alkylation of heme by artemisinin is not limited to this natural compound: the mechanism is invoked for a large number of antimalarial semisynthetic derivatives. Synthetic trioxanes or trioxolanes also alkylate heme, and their alkylation ability correlates well with their antimalarial efficacy. In addition, several reports have demonstrated the cytotoxicity of

  17. Sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum to Antimalarial Drugs in Hainan Island, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Qing; Wang, Guang-Ze; Li, Yu-Chun; Meng, Feng; Lin, Shi-Gan; Zhu, Zhen-Hu; Sun, Ding-Wei; He, Chang-Hua; Hu, Xi-Min; Du, Jian-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Pyronaridine and artesunate have been shown to be effective in falciparum malaria treatment. However, pyronaridine is rarely used in Hainan Island clinically, and artesunate is not widely used as a therapeutic agent. Instead, conventional antimalarial drugs, chloroquine and piperaquine, are used, explaining the emergence of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. In this article, we investigated the sensitivity of P. falciparum to antimalarial drugs used in Hainan Island for rational drug therapy. We performed in vivo (28 days) and in vitro tests to determine the sensitivity of P. falciparum to antimalarial drugs. Total 46 patients with falciparum malaria were treated with dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine phosphate (DUO-COTECXIN) and followed up for 28 day. The cure rate was 97.8%. The mean fever clearance time (22.5±10.6 hr) and the mean parasite clearance time (27.3±12.2 hr) showed no statistical significance with different genders, ages, temperatures, or parasite density (P>0.05). The resistance rates of chloroquine, piperaquine, pyronarididine, and artesunate detected in vitro were 71.9%, 40.6%, 12.5%, and 0%, respectively (P<0.0001). The resistance intensities decreased as follows: chloroquine>piperaquine>pyronarididine>artesunate. The inhibitory dose 50 (IC50) was 3.77×10-6 mol/L, 2.09×10-6 mol/L, 0.09×10-6 mol/L, and 0.05×10-6 mol/L, and the mean concentrations for complete inhibition (CIMC) of schizont formation were 5.60×10-6 mol/L, 9.26×10-6 mol/L, 0.55×10-6 mol/L, and 0.07×10-6 mol/L, respectively. Dihydroartemisinin showed a strong therapeutic effect against falciparum malaria with a low toxicity. PMID:25748707

  18. Atorvastatin Is a Promising Partner for Antimalarial Drugs in Treatment of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria▿

    PubMed Central

    Parquet, Véronique; Briolant, Sébastien; Torrentino-Madamet, Marylin; Henry, Maud; Almeras, Lionel; Amalvict, Rémy; Baret, Eric; Fusaï, Thierry; Rogier, Christophe; Pradines, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Atorvastatin (AVA) is a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor. AVA exposure resulted in the reduced in vitro growth of 22 Plasmodium falciparum strains, with the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) ranging from 2.5 μM to 10.8 μM. A significant positive correlation was found between the strains’ responses to AVA and mefloquine (r = 0.553; P = 0.008). We found no correlation between the responses to AVA and to chloroquine, quinine, monodesethylamodiaquine, lumefantrine, dihydroartemisinin, atovaquone, or doxycycline. These data could suggest that the mechanism of AVA uptake and/or the mode of action of AVA is different from those for other antimalarial drugs. The IC50s for AVA were unrelated to the occurrence of mutations in the transport protein genes involved in quinoline antimalarial drug resistance, such as the P. falciparum crt, mdr1, mrp, and nhe-1 genes. Therefore, AVA can be ruled out as a substrate for the transport proteins (CRT, Pgh1, and MRP) and is not subject to the pH modification induced by the P. falciparum NHE-1 protein. The absence of in vitro cross-resistance between AVA and chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine, monodesethylamodiaquine, lumefantrine, dihydroartemisinin, atovaquone, and doxycycline argues that these antimalarial drugs could potentially be paired with AVA as a treatment for malaria. In conclusion, the present observations suggest that AVA is a good candidate for further studies on the use of statins in association with drugs known to have activities against the malaria parasite. PMID:19307369

  19. The Interactions of P-Glycoprotein with Antimalarial Drugs, Including Substrate Affinity, Inhibition and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Senarathna, S M D K Ganga; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Crowe, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The combination of passive drug permeability, affinity for uptake and efflux transporters as well as gastrointestinal metabolism defines net drug absorption. Efflux mechanisms are often overlooked when examining the absorption phase of drug bioavailability. Knowing the affinity of antimalarials for efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) may assist in the determination of drug absorption and pharmacokinetic drug interactions during oral absorption in drug combination therapies. Concurrent administration of P-gp inhibitors and P-gp substrate drugs may also result in alterations in the bioavailability of some antimalarials. In-vitro Caco-2 cell monolayers were used here as a model for potential drug absorption related problems and P-gp mediated transport of drugs. Artemisone had the highest permeability at around 50 x 10−6 cm/sec, followed by amodiaquine around 20 x 10−6 cm/sec; both mefloquine and artesunate were around 10 x 10−6 cm/sec. Methylene blue was between 2 and 6 x 10−6 cm/sec depending on the direction of transport. This 3 fold difference was able to be halved by use of P-gp inhibition. MRP inhibition also assisted the consolidation of the methylene blue transport. Mefloquine was shown to be a P-gp inhibitor affecting our P-gp substrate, Rhodamine 123, although none of the other drugs impacted upon rhodamine123 transport rates. In conclusion, mefloquine is a P-gp inhibitor and methylene blue is a partial substrate; methylene blue may have increased absorption if co-administered with such P-gp inhibitors. An upregulation of P-gp was observed when artemisone and dihydroartemisinin were co-incubated with mefloquine and amodiaquine. PMID:27045516

  20. The Interactions of P-Glycoprotein with Antimalarial Drugs, Including Substrate Affinity, Inhibition and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Senarathna, S M D K Ganga; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Crowe, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The combination of passive drug permeability, affinity for uptake and efflux transporters as well as gastrointestinal metabolism defines net drug absorption. Efflux mechanisms are often overlooked when examining the absorption phase of drug bioavailability. Knowing the affinity of antimalarials for efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) may assist in the determination of drug absorption and pharmacokinetic drug interactions during oral absorption in drug combination therapies. Concurrent administration of P-gp inhibitors and P-gp substrate drugs may also result in alterations in the bioavailability of some antimalarials. In-vitro Caco-2 cell monolayers were used here as a model for potential drug absorption related problems and P-gp mediated transport of drugs. Artemisone had the highest permeability at around 50 x 10(-6) cm/sec, followed by amodiaquine around 20 x 10(-6) cm/sec; both mefloquine and artesunate were around 10 x 10(-6) cm/sec. Methylene blue was between 2 and 6 x 10(-6) cm/sec depending on the direction of transport. This 3 fold difference was able to be halved by use of P-gp inhibition. MRP inhibition also assisted the consolidation of the methylene blue transport. Mefloquine was shown to be a P-gp inhibitor affecting our P-gp substrate, Rhodamine 123, although none of the other drugs impacted upon rhodamine123 transport rates. In conclusion, mefloquine is a P-gp inhibitor and methylene blue is a partial substrate; methylene blue may have increased absorption if co-administered with such P-gp inhibitors. An upregulation of P-gp was observed when artemisone and dihydroartemisinin were co-incubated with mefloquine and amodiaquine. PMID:27045516

  1. Policy options for deploying anti-malarial drugs in endemic countries: a population genetics approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anti-malarial drugs are constantly exposed to the threat of evolving drug resistance so good stewardship of existing therapy is an essential component of public health policy. However, the widespread availability of numerous different drugs through informal providers could undermine official drug deployment policies. A policy of multiple first-line therapy (MFT) is compared with the conventional policy of sequential drug deployment, i.e., where one drug is used until resistance evolves and then replaced by the next drug in the sequence. Methods Population genetic models of drug resistance are used to make the comparison; this methodology explicitly tracks the genetics of drug resistance (including, importantly, recombination in the sexual stage, intrahost dynamics, and direction of linkage disequilibrium). Results A policy of MFT outlasts sequential application providing drug usages are low to moderate, and appears not to drive widespread multi-drug resistance. Inadequate dosing is an even more potent driver of drug resistance than the MFT/sequential policy decision. Conclusions The provision of MFT as a deliberate policy can be encouraged provided overall treatment rates are low or moderate (less than around half of malaria infections are treated) and the ad hoc provision of MFT through the private sector may be tolerated. This must be fully supported by education to ensure people take adequate doses of each of the drugs. PMID:23244624

  2. Antimalarial drug resistance: a review of the biology and strategies to delay emergence and spread

    PubMed Central

    Klein, E.Y.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to former first-line antimalarial drugs has been an unmitigated disaster. In recent years, artemisinin class drugs have become standard and they are considered an essential tool for helping to eradicate the disease. However, their ability to reduce morbidity and mortality and to slow transmission requires the maintenance of effectiveness. Recently, an artemisinin delayed-clearance phenotype was described. This is believed to be the precursor to resistance and threatens local elimination and global eradication plans. Understanding how resistance emerges and spreads is important for developing strategies to contain its spread. Resistance is the result of two processes: (i) drug selection of resistant parasites; and (ii) the spread of resistance. In this review, we examine the factors that lead to both drug selection and the spread of resistance. We then examine strategies for controlling the spread of resistance, pointing out the complexities and deficiencies in predicting how resistance will spread. PMID:23394809

  3. Targeting the Plasmodium vivax equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (PvENT1) for antimalarial drug development.

    PubMed

    Deniskin, Roman; Frame, I J; Sosa, Yvett; Akabas, Myles H

    2016-04-01

    Infection with Plasmodium falciparum and vivax cause most cases of malaria. Emerging resistance to current antimalarial medications makes new drug development imperative. Ideally a new antimalarial drug should treat both falciparum and vivax malaria. Because malaria parasites are purine auxotrophic, they rely on purines imported from the host erythrocyte via Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters (ENTs). Thus, the purine import transporters represent a potential target for antimalarial drug development. For falciparum parasites the primary purine transporter is the P. falciparum Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter Type 1 (PfENT1). Recently we identified potent PfENT1 inhibitors with nanomolar IC50 values using a robust, yeast-based high throughput screening assay. In the current work we characterized the Plasmodium vivax ENT1 (PvENT1) homologue and its sensitivity to the PfENT1 inhibitors. We expressed a yeast codon-optimized PvENT1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PvENT1-expressing yeast imported both purines ([(3)H]adenosine) and pyrimidines ([(3)H]uridine), whereas wild type (fui1Δ) yeast did not. Based on radiolabel substrate uptake inhibition experiments, inosine had the lowest IC50 (3.8 μM), compared to guanosine (14.9 μM) and adenosine (142 μM). For pyrimidines, thymidine had an IC50 of 183 μM (vs. cytidine and uridine; mM range). IC50 values were higher for nucleobases compared to the corresponding nucleosides; hypoxanthine had a 25-fold higher IC50 than inosine. The archetypal human ENT1 inhibitor 4-nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR) had no effect on PvENT1, whereas dipyridamole inhibited PvENT1, albeit with a 40 μM IC50, a 1000-fold less sensitive than human ENT1 (hENT1). The PfENT1 inhibitors blocked transport activity of PvENT1 and the five known naturally occurring non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with similar IC50 values. Thus, the PfENT1 inhibitors also target PvENT1. This implies that development of novel antimalarial

  4. Targeting the Plasmodium vivax equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (PvENT1) for antimalarial drug development

    PubMed Central

    Deniskin, Roman; Frame, I.J.; Sosa, Yvett; Akabas, Myles H.

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Plasmodium falciparum and vivax cause most cases of malaria. Emerging resistance to current antimalarial medications makes new drug development imperative. Ideally a new antimalarial drug should treat both falciparum and vivax malaria. Because malaria parasites are purine auxotrophic, they rely on purines imported from the host erythrocyte via Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters (ENTs). Thus, the purine import transporters represent a potential target for antimalarial drug development. For falciparum parasites the primary purine transporter is the P. falciparum Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter Type 1 (PfENT1). Recently we identified potent PfENT1 inhibitors with nanomolar IC50 values using a robust, yeast-based high throughput screening assay. In the current work we characterized the Plasmodium vivax ENT1 (PvENT1) homologue and its sensitivity to the PfENT1 inhibitors. We expressed a yeast codon-optimized PvENT1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PvENT1-expressing yeast imported both purines ([3H]adenosine) and pyrimidines ([3H]uridine), whereas wild type (fui1Δ) yeast did not. Based on radiolabel substrate uptake inhibition experiments, inosine had the lowest IC50 (3.8 μM), compared to guanosine (14.9 μM) and adenosine (142 μM). For pyrimidines, thymidine had an IC50 of 183 μM (vs. cytidine and uridine; mM range). IC50 values were higher for nucleobases compared to the corresponding nucleosides; hypoxanthine had a 25-fold higher IC50 than inosine. The archetypal human ENT1 inhibitor 4-nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR) had no effect on PvENT1, whereas dipyridamole inhibited PvENT1, albeit with a 40 μM IC50, a 1000-fold less sensitive than human ENT1 (hENT1). The PfENT1 inhibitors blocked transport activity of PvENT1 and the five known naturally occurring non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with similar IC50 values. Thus, the PfENT1 inhibitors also target PvENT1. This implies that development of novel antimalarial drugs

  5. Resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to antimalarial drugs in Equatorial Guinea.

    PubMed

    Roche, J; Benito, A; Ayecaba, S; Amela, C; Molina, R; Alvar, J

    1993-10-01

    One hundred and sixty-six children from Equatorial Guinea, all under 10 years of age and with acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria, were randomly allocated to four groups and treated with one of the following regimens: chloroquine or amodiaquine (25 mg base/kg body weight over 3 days), quinine (8 mg/kg every 8 h for 3 or 5 days), and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (25-1.25 mg/kg, in one dose). The parasite clearance rates up to day 14 were 28% with chloroquine, 74% with amodiaquine, and 95% with quinine or sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. The times required to clear asexual blood forms of Plasmodium falciparum in sensitive cases were 64, 70, 73 and 65 h, respectively. Although quinine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine are equally effective, quinine is recommended for treatment of multidrug-resistant malaria in paediatric patients, essentially because of the risk of serious reactions to sulpha drugs. Health providers are, however, encouraged to keep supplies of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine as an option and to refer patients quickly, if required. PMID:8311568

  6. Antimalarial drug targets in Plasmodium falciparum predicted by stage-specific metabolic network analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite enormous efforts to combat malaria the disease still afflicts up to half a billion people each year of which more than one million die. Currently no approved vaccine is available and resistances to antimalarials are widely spread. Hence, new antimalarial drugs are urgently needed. Results Here, we present a computational analysis of the metabolism of Plasmodium falciparum, the deadliest malaria pathogen. We assembled a compartmentalized metabolic model and predicted life cycle stage specific metabolism with the help of a flux balance approach that integrates gene expression data. Predicted metabolite exchanges between parasite and host were found to be in good accordance with experimental findings when the parasite's metabolic network was embedded into that of its host (erythrocyte). Knock-out simulations identified 307 indispensable metabolic reactions within the parasite. 35 out of 57 experimentally demonstrated essential enzymes were recovered and another 16 enzymes, if additionally the assumption was made that nutrient uptake from the host cell is limited and all reactions catalyzed by the inhibited enzyme are blocked. This predicted set of putative drug targets, shown to be enriched with true targets by a factor of at least 2.75, was further analyzed with respect to homology to human enzymes, functional similarity to therapeutic targets in other organisms and their predicted potency for prophylaxis and disease treatment. Conclusions The results suggest that the set of essential enzymes predicted by our flux balance approach represents a promising starting point for further drug development. PMID:20807400

  7. Quality of Artemisinin-Containing Antimalarials in Tanzania's Private Sector—Results from a Nationally Representative Outlet Survey

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ensuring that artemisinin-containing antimalarials (ACAs) are of good quality is a key component of effective malaria treatment. There are concerns that a high proportion of ACAs are falsified or substandard, though estimates are rarely based on representative data. During a nationally representative survey in Tanzania, ACAs were purchased from private retail drug outlets, and the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) was measured. All 1,737 ACAs contained the labeled artemisinin derivative, with 4.1% being outside the 85–115% artemisinin API range defined as acceptable quality. World Health Organization (WHO) prequalified drugs had 0.1 times the odds of being poor quality compared with non-prequalified ACAs for the artemisinin component. When partner components of combination therapies were also considered, 12.1% were outside the acceptable API range, and WHO prequalified ACAs had 0.04 times the odds of being poor quality. Although the prevalence of poor quality ACAs was lower than reported elsewhere, the minority of samples found to be substandard is a cause for concern. Improvements in quality could be achieved by increasing the predominance of WHO prequalified products in the market. Continued monitoring of quality standards is essential. PMID:25897065

  8. Chemogenomic profiling of Plasmodium falciparum as a tool to aid antimalarial drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Anupam; Siwo, Geoffrey H.; Singh, Naresh; Martens, Brian; Balu, Bharath; Button-Simons, Katrina A.; Tan, Asako; Zhang, Min; Udenze, Kenneth O.; Jiang, Rays H.Y.; Ferdig, Michael T.; Adams, John H.; Kyle, Dennis E.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance highlights the urgency to discover new targets and chemical scaffolds. Unfortunately, lack of experimentally validated functional information about most P. falciparum genes remains a strategic hurdle. Chemogenomic profiling is an established tool for classification of drugs with similar mechanisms of action by comparing drug fitness profiles in a collection of mutants. Inferences of drug mechanisms of action and targets can be obtained by associations between shifts in drug fitness and specific genetic changes in the mutants. In this screen, P. falciparum, piggyBac single insertion mutants were profiled for altered responses to antimalarial drugs and metabolic inhibitors to create chemogenomic profiles. Drugs targeting the same pathway shared similar response profiles and multiple pairwise correlations of the chemogenomic profiles revealed novel insights into drugs’ mechanisms of action. A mutant of the artemisinin resistance candidate gene - “K13-propeller” gene (PF3D7_1343700) exhibited increased susceptibility to artemisinin drugs and identified a cluster of 7 mutants based on similar enhanced responses to the drugs tested. Our approach of chemogenomic profiling reveals artemisinin functional activity, linked by the unexpected drug-gene relationships of these mutants, to signal transduction and cell cycle regulation pathways. PMID:26541648

  9. 2D Inorganic-Antimalarial Drug-Polymer Hybrid with pH-Responsive Solubility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yeong; Yang, Jae-Hun; Lee, Ji-Hee; Choi, Goeun; Park, Dae-Hwan; Jo, Mi-Rea; Choi, Soo-Jin; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2015-10-01

    Artesunic acid (ASH), an antimalarial drug, has low oral bioavailability due to its low aqueous solubility. To overcome this problem, artesunate (AS) was intercalated into zinc basic salt (ZBS) via co-precipitation. AS was immobilized with a tilted double layer arrangement, which was also confirmed by XRD and 1-D electron density mapping. In order to decrease the release rate of AS under gastrointestinal conditions and to simultaneously increase the release rate of AS under intestinal conditions, ZBS-AS was coated with EUDRAGIT L100 (ZBS-AS-L100). Finally, we performed an in-vivo pharmacokinetic study to compare the oral bioavailability of AS of ZBS-AS-L100 with that of ASH. Surprisingly, it was found that the former is 5.5 times greater than the latter due to an enhanced solubility of AS thanks to the ternary hybridization with ZBS and EUDRAGIT L100. Therefore, the present ZBS-AS-L100 system has a great potential as a novel antimalarial drug formulation with pH selectivity and enhanced bioavailability. PMID:25965188

  10. Purine import into malaria parasites as a target for antimalarial drug development

    PubMed Central

    Frame, I.J.; Deniskin, Roman; Arora, Avish; Akabas, Myles H.

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Plasmodium species parasites causes malaria. Plasmodium parasites are purine auxotrophs. In all life cycle stages, they require purines for RNA and DNA synthesis and other cellular metabolic processes. Purines are imported from the host erythrocyte by equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). They are processed via purine salvage–pathway enzymes to form the required purine nucleotides. The P. falciparum genome encodes four putative ENTs (PfENT1–4). Genetic, biochemical, and physiologic evidence suggest that PfENT1 is the primary purine transporter supplying the purine-salvage pathway. Protein mass spectrometry shows that PfENT1 is expressed in all parasite stages. PfENT1 knockout parasites are not viable in culture at purine concentrations found in human blood (< 10 µM). Thus, PfENT1 is a potential target for novel antimalarial drugs, but no PfENT1 inhibitors have been identified to test the hypothesis. Identifying inhibitors of PfENT1 is an essential step to validate PfENT1 as a potential antimalarial drug target. PMID:25424653

  11. Purine import into malaria parasites as a target for antimalarial drug development.

    PubMed

    Frame, I J; Deniskin, Roman; Arora, Avish; Akabas, Myles H

    2015-04-01

    Infection with Plasmodium species parasites causes malaria. Plasmodium parasites are purine auxotrophs. In all life cycle stages, they require purines for RNA and DNA synthesis and other cellular metabolic processes. Purines are imported from the host erythrocyte by equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). They are processed via purine salvage pathway enzymes to form the required purine nucleotides. The Plasmodium falciparum genome encodes four putative ENTs (PfENT1-4). Genetic, biochemical, and physiologic evidence suggest that PfENT1 is the primary purine transporter supplying the purine salvage pathway. Protein mass spectrometry shows that PfENT1 is expressed in all parasite stages. PfENT1 knockout parasites are not viable in culture at purine concentrations found in human blood (<10 μM). Thus, PfENT1 is a potential target for novel antimalarial drugs, but no PfENT1 inhibitors have been identified to test the hypothesis. Identifying inhibitors of PfENT1 is an essential step to validate PfENT1 as a potential antimalarial drug target. PMID:25424653

  12. CRIMALDDI: a co-ordinated, rational, and integrated effort to set logical priorities in anti-malarial drug discovery initiatives

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Despite increasing efforts and support for anti-malarial drug R&D, globally anti-malarial drug discovery and development remains largely uncoordinated and fragmented. The current window of opportunity for large scale funding of R&D into malaria is likely to narrow in the coming decade due to a contraction in available resources caused by the current economic difficulties and new priorities (e.g. climate change). It is, therefore, essential that stakeholders are given well-articulated action plans and priorities to guide judgments on where resources can be best targeted. The CRIMALDDI Consortium (a European Union funded initiative) has been set up to develop, through a process of stakeholder and expert consultations, such priorities and recommendations to address them. It is hoped that the recommendations will help to guide the priorities of the European anti-malarial research as well as the wider global discovery agenda in the coming decade. PMID:20626844

  13. Molecular Farming in Artemisia annua, a Promising Approach to Improve Anti-malarial Drug Production

    PubMed Central

    Pulice, Giuseppe; Pelaz, Soraya; Matías-Hernández, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a parasite infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Even though progress has been made in prevention and treatment of the disease; an estimated 214 million cases of malaria occurred in 2015, resulting in 438,000 estimated deaths; most of them occurring in Africa among children under the age of five. This article aims to review the epidemiology, future risk factors and current treatments of malaria, with particular focus on the promising potential of molecular farming that uses metabolic engineering in plants as an effective anti-malarial solution. Malaria represents an example of how a health problem may, on one hand, influence the proper development of a country, due to its burden of the disease. On the other hand, it constitutes an opportunity for lucrative business of diverse stakeholders. In contrast, plant biofarming is proposed here as a sustainable, promising, alternative for the production, not only of natural herbal repellents for malaria prevention but also for the production of sustainable anti-malarial drugs, like artemisinin (AN), used for primary parasite infection treatments. AN, a sesquiterpene lactone, is a natural anti-malarial compound that can be found in Artemisia annua. However, the low concentration of AN in the plant makes this molecule relatively expensive and difficult to produce in order to meet the current worldwide demand of Artemisinin Combination Therapies (ACTs), especially for economically disadvantaged people in developing countries. The biosynthetic pathway of AN, a process that takes place only in glandular secretory trichomes of A. annua, is relatively well elucidated. Significant efforts have been made using plant genetic engineering to increase production of this compound. These include diverse genetic manipulation approaches, such as studies on diverse transcription factors which have been shown to regulate the AN genetic pathway and other biological processes. Results look promising; however, further

  14. Treatment of Murine Cerebral Malaria by Artemisone in Combination with Conventional Antimalarial Drugs: Antiplasmodial Effects and Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Guiguemde, W. Armand; Hunt, Nicholas H.; Guo, Jintao; Marciano, Annael; Haynes, Richard K.; Clark, Julie; Guy, R. Kiplin

    2014-01-01

    The decreasing effectiveness of antimalarial therapy due to drug resistance necessitates constant efforts to develop new drugs. Artemisinin derivatives are the most recent drugs that have been introduced and are considered the first line of treatment, but there are already indications of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinins. Consequently, drug combinations are recommended for prevention of the induction of resistance. The research here demonstrates the effects of novel combinations of the new artemisinin derivative, artemisone, a recently described 10-alkylamino artemisinin derivative with improved antimalarial activity and reduced neurotoxicity. We here investigate its ability to kill P. falciparum in a high-throughput in vitro assay and to protect mice against lethal cerebral malaria caused by Plasmodium berghei ANKA when used alone or in combination with established antimalarial drugs. Artemisone effects against P. falciparum in vitro were synergistic with halofantrine and mefloquine, and additive with 25 other drugs, including chloroquine and doxycycline. The concentrations of artemisone combinations that were toxic against THP-1 cells in vitro were much higher than their effective antimalarial concentration. Artemisone, mefloquine, chloroquine, or piperaquine given individually mostly protected mice against cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA but did not prevent parasite recrudescence. Combinations of artemisone with any of the other three drugs did completely cure most mice of malaria. The combination of artemisone and chloroquine decreased the ratio of proinflammatory (gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor) to anti-inflammatory (interleukin 10 [IL-10], IL-4) cytokines in the plasma of P. berghei-infected mice. Thus, artemisone in combinations with other antimalarial drugs might have a dual action, both killing parasites and limiting the potentially deleterious host inflammatory response. PMID:24913162

  15. Psychiatric effects of malaria and anti-malarial drugs: historical and modern perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Remington L; Croft, Ashley M

    2016-01-01

    The modern medical literature implicates malaria, and particularly the potentially fatal form of cerebral malaria, with a risk of neurocognitive impairment. Yet historically, even milder forms of malaria were associated in the literature with a broad range of psychiatric effects, including disorders of personality, mood, memory, attention, thought, and behaviour. In this article, the history of psychiatric effects attributed to malaria and post-malaria syndromes is reviewed, and insights from the historical practice of malariotherapy in contributing to understanding of these effects are considered. This review concludes with a discussion of the potentially confounding role of the adverse effects of anti-malarial drugs, particularly of the quinoline class, in the unique attribution of certain psychiatric effects to malaria, and of the need for a critical reevaluation of the literature in light of emerging evidence of the chronic nature of these adverse drug effects. PMID:27335053

  16. Holographic analysis on deformation and restoration of malaria-infected red blood cells by antimalarial drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Hyeokjun; Ha, Young-Ran; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-11-01

    Malaria parasites induce morphological, biochemical, and mechanical changes in red blood cells (RBCs). Mechanical variations are closely related to the deformability of individual RBCs. The deformation of various RBCs, including healthy and malaria-infected RBCs (iRBCs), can be directly observed through quantitative phase imaging (QPI). The effects of chloroquine treatment on the mechanical property variation of iRBCs were investigated using time-resolved holographic QPI of single live cells on a millisecond time scale. The deformabilities of healthy RBCs, iRBCs, and drug-treated iRBCs were compared, and the effect of chloroquine on iRBC restoration was experimentally examined. The present results are beneficial to elucidate the dynamic characteristics of iRBCs and the effect of the antimalarial drug on iRBCs.

  17. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as an antimalarial drug target using an integrated chemical biology approach.

    PubMed

    Wright, Megan H; Clough, Barbara; Rackham, Mark D; Rangachari, Kaveri; Brannigan, James A; Grainger, Munira; Moss, David K; Bottrill, Andrew R; Heal, William P; Broncel, Malgorzata; Serwa, Remigiusz A; Brady, Declan; Mann, David J; Leatherbarrow, Robin J; Tewari, Rita; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Holder, Anthony A; Tate, Edward W

    2014-02-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium, which leads to approximately one million deaths per annum worldwide. Chemical validation of new antimalarial targets is urgently required in view of rising resistance to current drugs. One such putative target is the enzyme N-myristoyltransferase, which catalyses the attachment of the fatty acid myristate to protein substrates (N-myristoylation). Here, we report an integrated chemical biology approach to explore protein myristoylation in the major human parasite P. falciparum, combining chemical proteomic tools for identification of the myristoylated and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteome with selective small-molecule N-myristoyltransferase inhibitors. We demonstrate that N-myristoyltransferase is an essential and chemically tractable target in malaria parasites both in vitro and in vivo, and show that selective inhibition of N-myristoylation leads to catastrophic and irreversible failure to assemble the inner membrane complex, a critical subcellular organelle in the parasite life cycle. Our studies provide the basis for the development of new antimalarials targeting N-myristoyltransferase. PMID:24451586

  18. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as an antimalarial drug target using an integrated chemical biology approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Megan H.; Clough, Barbara; Rackham, Mark D.; Rangachari, Kaveri; Brannigan, James A.; Grainger, Munira; Moss, David K.; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Heal, William P.; Broncel, Malgorzata; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Brady, Declan; Mann, David J.; Leatherbarrow, Robin J.; Tewari, Rita; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Holder, Anthony A.; Tate, Edward W.

    2014-02-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium, which leads to approximately one million deaths per annum worldwide. Chemical validation of new antimalarial targets is urgently required in view of rising resistance to current drugs. One such putative target is the enzyme N-myristoyltransferase, which catalyses the attachment of the fatty acid myristate to protein substrates (N-myristoylation). Here, we report an integrated chemical biology approach to explore protein myristoylation in the major human parasite P. falciparum, combining chemical proteomic tools for identification of the myristoylated and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteome with selective small-molecule N-myristoyltransferase inhibitors. We demonstrate that N-myristoyltransferase is an essential and chemically tractable target in malaria parasites both in vitro and in vivo, and show that selective inhibition of N-myristoylation leads to catastrophic and irreversible failure to assemble the inner membrane complex, a critical subcellular organelle in the parasite life cycle. Our studies provide the basis for the development of new antimalarials targeting N-myristoyltransferase.

  19. Validating a Firefly Luciferase-Based High-Throughput Screening Assay for Antimalarial Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Che, Pulin; Cui, Long; Kutsch, Olaf; Cui, Liwang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and recent detection of potential artemisinin-resistant strains in Southeast Asia highlight the importance of developing novel antimalarial therapies. Using a previously generated stable transgenic P. falciparum line with high-level firefly luciferase expression, we report the adaptation, miniaturization, optimization, and validation of a high-throughput screening assay in 384-well plates. Assay conditions, including the percentage of parasitemia and hematocrit, were optimized. Parameters of assay robustness, including Z′-value, coefficient variation (CV), and signal-to-background (S/B) ratio, were determined. The LOPAC1280 small-compound library was used to validate this assay. Our results demonstrated that this assay is robust and reliable, with an average Z′-value of >0.7 and CV of <10%. Moreover, this assay showed a very low background, with the S/B ratio up to 71. Further, identified hits were selected and confirmed using a SYBR Green I-based confirmatory assay. It is evident that this assay is suitable for large-scale screening of chemical libraries for antimalarial drug discovery. PMID:22050430

  20. Quality of anti-malarials collected in the private and informal sectors in Guyana and Suriname

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite a significant reduction in the number of malaria cases in Guyana and Suriname, this disease remains a major problem in the interior of both countries, especially in areas with gold mining and logging operations, where malaria is endemic. National malaria control programmes in these countries provide treatment to patients with medicines that are procured and distributed through regulated processes in the public sector. However, availability to medicines in licensed facilities (private sector) and unlicensed facilities (informal sector) is common, posing the risk of access to and use of non-recommended treatments and/or poor quality products. Methods To assess the quality of circulating anti-malarial medicines, samples were purchased in the private and informal sectors of Guyana and Suriname in 2009. The sampling sites were selected based on epidemiological data and/or distance from health facilities. Samples were analysed for identity, content, dissolution or disintegration, impurities, and uniformity of dosage units or weight variation according to manufacturer, pharmacopeial, or other validated method. Results Quality issues were observed in 45 of 77 (58%) anti-malarial medicines sampled in Guyana of which 30 failed visual & physical inspection and 18 failed quality control tests. The proportion of monotherapy and ACT medicines failing quality control tests was 43% (13/30) and 11% (5/47) respectively. A higher proportion of medicines sampled from the private sector 34% (11/32) failed quality control tests versus 16% (7/45) in the informal sector. In Suriname, 58 medicines were sampled, of which 50 (86%) were Artecom®, the fixed-dose combination of piperaquine-dihydroartemisinin-trimethoprim co-blistered with a primaquine phosphate tablet. All Artecom samples were found to lack a label claim for primaquine, thus failing visual and physical inspection. Conclusions The findings of the studies in both countries point to significant problems with

  1. Availability of Antimalarial Drugs and Evaluation of the Attitude and Practices for the Treatment of Uncomplicated Malaria in Bangui, Central African Republic

    PubMed Central

    Manirakiza, Alexandre; Njuimo, Siméon Pierre; Le Faou, Alain; Malvy, Denis; Millet, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    National malaria management policy is based upon the availability of effective and affordable antimalarial drugs. This study was undertaken to evaluate the quality of the treatment of uncomplicated malaria cases in Bangui, an area with multidrug-resistant parasites, at a time preceding implementation of a new therapeutic policy relying on the artemisinin derivative combined treatment artemether-lumefantrine. A cross-sectional study was carried out in Bangui city to assess availability of antimalarial drugs and the performances of health workers in the management of uncomplicated malaria. Availability of drugs was recorded in all drugs wholesalers (n = 3), all pharmacies in health facilities (n = 14), private drugstores (n = 15), and in 60 non-official drug shops randomly chosen in the city. Despite a limited efficacy at the time of the survey, chloroquine remained widely available in the official and nonofficial markets. Artemisinin derivatives used in monotherapy or in combination were commonly sold. In health care facilities, 93% of the uncomplicated malaria cases were treated in the absence of any laboratory confirmation and the officially recommended treatment, amodiaquine-sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, was seldom prescribed. Thus, the national guidelines for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria are not followed by health professionals in Bangui. Its use should be implemented while a control of importation of drug has to be reinforced. PMID:20339579

  2. Understanding the biology of the Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast; an excellent target for antimalarial drug development.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arnish

    2016-08-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening tropical disease, caused by the intracellular parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The World Health Organization counts malaria as one of the top ten causes of worldwide death. The unavailability of a successful malaria vaccine and the ever-increasing instances of drug resistance in the malaria parasite demand the discovery of new targets within P. falciparum for the development of next generation antimalarials. Fortunately, all apicomplexan parasites, including P. falciparum harbor a relict, non-photosynthetic plastid known as the apicoplast. The apicoplast is a semi-autonomous organelle within P. falciparum containing a 35kb circular genome. Despite a genome of its own, majority of the apicoplast proteins are encoded by the parasite nucleus and imported into the apicoplast. The organelle has been shown to be essential to P. falciparum survival and the loss the apicoplast manifests as a 'delayed death' response in the parasite. The apicoplast has evolved out of cyanobacteria in a complex, two step endosymbiotic event. As a result the architecture and the gene expression machinery of the apicoplast is quite bacteria-like and is susceptible to a wide range of antibiotics such as fosmidomycin, tetracycline, azithromycin, clindamycin and triclosan. The biosynthetic pathways for isoprenoids, fatty acids and heme operate within the malaria apicoplast, making the organelle an excellent target for drug development. The review focuses on the evolution, biology and the essentiality of the apicoplast within the malaria parasite and discusses some of the recent achievements towards the design and discovery of apicoplast targeted antimalarial compounds. PMID:27381078

  3. Evaluation of bioluminescence-based assays of anti-malarial drug activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transgenic Plasmodium falciparum expressing luciferase offers an attractive bioluminescence-based assay platform for the investigation of the pharmacological properties of anti-malarial drugs. Here a side-by-side comparison of bioluminescence and fluorescence-based assays, utilizing a luciferase reporter cassette that confers a strong temporal pattern of luciferase expression during the S-phase of intraerythrocytic development, is reported. Methods Key assay parameters for a range of commercially available luminogenic substrates are determined and compared to those measured using a Malaria Sybr Green I fluorescence assay. In addition, the short-term temporal effects of anti-malarial compounds are evaluated using both bioluminescent and fluorescent assay platforms. Results The Z’, % coefficient of variation and 50% inhibition concentrations are essentially the same for bioluminescent and fluorescent assays in transgenic parasites generated in both chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant genetic backgrounds. Bioluminescent assays, irrespective of the luminogenic agent employed, do, however, offer significantly enhanced signal-to-noise ratios. Moreover, the bioluminescent assay is more dynamic in terms of determining temporal effects immediately following drug perturbation. Conclusion This study suggests that opportunities for bioluminescence-based assays lie not in the measurement of 50% inhibition concentrations, where the cheaper fluorescence assay performs excellently and is not restricted by the need to genetically modify the parasite clone under investigation. Instead, assays that use the dynamic response of the luciferase reporter for semi-automated screening of additional pharmacological properties, such as relative rate-of-kill and lethal dose estimation, are a more attractive development opportunity. PMID:23394077

  4. Stability of the Antimalarial Drug Dihydroartemisinin under Physiologically Relevant Conditions: Implications for Clinical Treatment and Pharmacokinetic and In Vitro Assays

    PubMed Central

    Parapini, Silvia; Olliaro, Piero; Navaratnam, Visweswaran; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinins are peroxidic antimalarial drugs known to be very potent but highly chemically unstable; they degrade in the presence of ferrous iron, Fe(II)-heme, or biological reductants. Less documented is how this translates into chemical stability and antimalarial activity across a range of conditions applying to in vitro testing and clinical situations. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is studied here because it is an antimalarial drug on its own and the main metabolite of other artemisinins. The behaviors of DHA in phosphate-buffered saline, plasma, or erythrocyte lysate at different temperatures and pH ranges were examined. The antimalarial activity of the residual drug was evaluated using the chemosensitivity assay on Plasmodium falciparum, and the extent of decomposition of DHA was established through use of high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection analysis. The role of the Fe(II)-heme was investigated by blocking its reactivity using carbon monoxide (CO). A significant reduction in the antimalarial activity of DHA was seen after incubation in plasma and to a lesser extent in erythrocyte lysate. Activity was reduced by half after 3 h and almost completely abolished after 24 h. Serum-enriched media also affected DHA activity. Effects were temperature and pH dependent and paralleled the increased rate of decomposition of DHA from pH 7 upwards and in plasma. These results suggest that particular care should be taken in conducting and interpreting in vitro studies, prone as their results are to experimental and drug storage conditions. Disorders such as fever, hemolysis, or acidosis associated with malaria severity may contribute to artemisinin instability and reduce their clinical efficacy. PMID:25918150

  5. Mass administration of the antimalarial drug mefloquine to Guantánamo detainees: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Remington L

    2012-10-01

    Recently, evidence has emerged from an unusual form of mass drug administration practised among detainees held at US Naval Station Guantánamo Bay, Cuba ('Guantánamo'), ostensibly as a public health measure. Mefloquine, an antimalarial drug originally developed by the US military, whose use is associated with a range of severe neuropsychiatric adverse effects, was administered at treatment doses to detainees immediately upon their arrival at Guantánamo, prior to laboratory testing for malaria and irrespective of symptoms of disease. In this analysis, the history of mefloquine's development is reviewed and the indications for its administration at treatment doses are discussed. The stated rationale for the use of mefloquine among Guantánamo detainees is then evaluated in the context of accepted forms of population-based malaria control. It is concluded that there was no plausible public health indication for the use of mefloquine at Guantánamo and that based on prevailing standards of care, the clinical indications for its use are decidedly unclear. This analysis suggests the troubling possibility that the use of mefloquine at Guantánamo may have been motivated in part by knowledge of the drug's adverse effects, and points to a critical need for further investigation to resolve unanswered questions regarding the drug's potentially inappropriate use. PMID:22882560

  6. Practical aspects of in vivo antimalarial drug efficacy testing in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Ruebush, Trenton K; Marquiño, Wilmer; Zegarra, Jorge; Neyra, Daniel; Villaroel, Rodolfo; Avila, Juan Carlos; Díaz, César; Beltrán, Efraín

    2003-04-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed guidelines for in vivo antimalarial drug efficacy testing for Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax in areas with low-to-moderate transmission, such as the Americas. These guidelines are used widely by ministries of health and national malaria control programs to assess the efficacy of their first-line and second-line drugs for the treatment of malaria and to provide the information necessary to update national malaria treatment policies. Following the WHO guidelines, we have conducted in vivo efficacy trials with a variety of drugs and drug combinations against P. falciparum and P. vivax at 13 sites in Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador. Based on these experiences, we have identified several modifications that we believe should be made in the WHO recommendations to make them more suitable to the relatively low levels of P. falciparum transmission in the Americas and to the logistic challenges of carrying out such studies in sparsely populated areas, such as the Amazon Basin. These include changes in inclusion and exclusion criteria, in enrollment and follow-up procedures, and in the measurement of study outcomes. PMID:12875285

  7. Peptide deformylase: a new target in antibacterial, antimalarial and anticancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Sangshetti, Jaiprakash N; Khan, Firoz A Kalam; Shinde, Devanand B

    2015-01-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is a class of metalloenzyme responsible for catalyzing the removal of the N-formyl group from N-terminal methionine following translation. PDF inhibitors are moving into new phase of drug development. Initially, PDF was considered as an important target in antibacterial drug discovery; however genome database searches have revealed PDF-like sequences in parasites (P. falciparum) and human, widening the utility of this target in antimalarial and anticancer drug discovery along with antibacterial. Using structural and mechanistic information together with high throughput screening, several types of chemical classes of PDF inhibitors with improved efficacy and specificity have been identified. Various drugs like, GSK-1322322 (Phase II), BB-83698 (Phase I), and LBM-415 (Phase I) have entered into clinical developments. Developments in the field have prompted us to review the current aspects of PDFs, especially their structures, different classes of PDF inhibitors, and molecular modeling studies. In nut shell, this review enlightens PDF as a versatile target along with its inhibitors and future perspectives of different PDF inhibitors. PMID:25174923

  8. Evaluation of the Quality of Artemisinin-Based Antimalarial Medicines Distributed in Ghana and Togo

    PubMed Central

    Agbonon, Amegnona; Konadu, Daniel Yeboah; Edoh, Mamadou; Gordon, Andrew; Gbeassor, Messanvi; Addae-Mensah, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    This study, conducted as part of our overall goal of regular pharmacovigilance of antimalarial medicines, reports on the quality of 132 artemisinin-based antimalarial medicines distributed in Ghana and Togo. Three methods were employed in the quality evaluation—basic (colorimetric) tests for establishing the identity of the requisite active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), semi-quantitative TLC assay for the identification and estimation of API content, and HPLC assay for a more accurate quantification of API content. From the basic tests, only one sample totally lacked API. The HPLC assay, however, showed that 83.7% of the ACTs and 57.9% of the artemisinin-based monotherapies failed to comply with international pharmacopoeia requirements due to insufficient API content. In most of the ACTs, the artemisinin component was usually the insufficient API. Generally, there was a good correlation between the HPLC and SQ-TLC assays. The overall failure rates for both locally manufactured (77.3%) and imported medicines (77.5%) were comparable. Similarly the unregistered medicines recorded a slightly higher overall failure rate (84.7%) than registered medicines (70.8%). Only two instances of possible cross-border exchange of medicines were observed and there was little difference between the medicine quality of collections from border towns and those from inland parts of both countries. PMID:25400975

  9. Combating poor-quality anti-malarial medicines: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Bassat, Quique; Tanner, Marcel; Guerin, Philippe J; Stricker, Kirstin; Hamed, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    The circulation of poor-quality medicines continues to undermine the fight against many life-threatening diseases. Anti-malarial medicines appear to have been particularly compromised and present a major public health threat in malaria-endemic countries, negatively affecting individuals and their communities. Concerted collaborative efforts are required from global, regional and national organizations, involving the public and private sectors, to address the problem. While many initiatives are underway, a number of unmet needs deserve urgent and increased multisector attention. At the global level, there is a need for an international public health legal framework or treaty on poor-quality medicines, with statutes suitable for integration into national laws. In addition, increased international efforts are required to strengthen the governance of global supply chains and enhance cooperation between national medicine regulation authorities and law enforcement bodies. Increased investment is needed in innovative technologies that will enable healthcare teams to detect poor-quality medicines at all levels of the supply chain. At the regional level, a number of initiatives would be beneficial-key areas are standardization, simplification, and reciprocal recognition of registration processes and development of quality control capacity in regional centres of excellence that are better aligned with public health needs; improved surveillance methods and creation of a framework for compulsory and transparent reporting of poor-quality medicines; additional support for national medicine regulation authorities and other national partner authorities; and an increase in support for regional laboratories to boost their capabilities in detecting poor-quality medicines. It is vital that all stakeholders involved in efforts against poor-quality anti-malarial medicines extend and strengthen their actions in these critical areas and thus effectively support global health development

  10. Interactions between artemisinins and other antimalarial drugs in relation to the cofactor model--a unifying proposal for drug action.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Richard K; Cheu, Kwan-Wing; Chan, Ho-Wai; Wong, Ho-Ning; Li, Ka-Yan; Tang, Maggie Mei-Ki; Chen, Min-Jiao; Guo, Zu-Feng; Guo, Zhi-Hong; Sinniah, Kumar; Witte, Amanda B; Coghi, Paolo; Monti, Diego

    2012-12-01

    Artemisinins are proposed to act in the malaria parasite cytosol by oxidizing dihydroflavin cofactors of redox-active flavoenzymes, and under aerobic conditions by inducing their autoxidation. Perturbation of redox homeostasis coupled with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) ensues. Ascorbic acid-methylene blue (MB), N-benzyl-1,4-dihydronicotinamide (BNAH)-MB, BNAH-lumiflavine, BNAH-riboflavin (RF), and NADPH-FAD-E. coli flavin reductase (Fre) systems at pH 7.4 generate leucomethylene blue (LMB) and reduced flavins that are rapidly oxidized in situ by artemisinins. These oxidations are inhibited by the 4-aminoquinolines piperaquine (PPQ), chloroquine (CQ), and others. In contrast, the arylmethanols lumefantrine, mefloquine (MFQ), and quinine (QN) have little or no effect. Inhibition correlates with the antagonism exerted by 4-aminoquinolines on the antimalarial activities of MB, RF, and artemisinins. Lack of inhibition correlates with the additivity/synergism between the arylmethanols and artemisinins. We propose association via π complex formation between the 4-aminoquinolines and LMB or the dihydroflavins; this hinders hydride transfer from the reduced conjugates to the artemisinins. The arylmethanols have a decreased tendency to form π complexes, and so exert no effect. The parallel between chemical reactivity and antagonism or additivity/synergism draws attention to the mechanism of action of all drugs described herein. CQ and QN inhibit the formation of hemozoin in the parasite digestive vacuole (DV). The buildup of heme-Fe(III) results in an enhanced efflux from the DV into the cytosol. In addition, the lipophilic heme-Fe(III) complexes of CQ and QN that form in the DV are proposed to diffuse across the DV membrane. At the higher pH of the cytosol, the complexes decompose to liberate heme-Fe(III) . The quinoline or arylmethanol reenters the DV, and so transfers more heme-Fe(III) out of the DV. In this way, the 4-aminoquinolines and arylmethanols

  11. Salinomycin and Other Ionophores as a New Class of Antimalarial Drugs with Transmission-Blocking Activity

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessandro, Sarah; Corbett, Yolanda; Ilboudo, Denise P.; Misiano, Paola; Dahiya, Nisha; Abay, Solomon M.; Habluetzel, Annette; Grande, Romualdo; Gismondo, Maria R.; Dechering, Koen J.; Koolen, Karin M. J.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Taramelli, Donatella; Parapini, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The drug target profile proposed by the Medicines for Malaria Venture for a malaria elimination/eradication policy focuses on molecules active on both asexual and sexual stages of Plasmodium, thus with both curative and transmission-blocking activities. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether the class of monovalent ionophores, which includes drugs used in veterinary medicine and that were recently proposed as human anticancer agents, meets these requirements. The activity of salinomycin, monensin, and nigericin on Plasmodium falciparum asexual and sexual erythrocytic stages and on the development of the Plasmodium berghei and P. falciparum mosquito stages is reported here. Gametocytogenesis of the P. falciparum strain 3D7 was induced in vitro, and gametocytes at stage II and III or stage IV and V of development were treated for different lengths of time with the ionophores and their viability measured with the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay. The monovalent ionophores efficiently killed both asexual parasites and gametocytes with a nanomolar 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50). Salinomycin showed a fast speed of kill compared to that of standard drugs, and the potency was higher on stage IV and V than on stage II and III gametocytes. The ionophores inhibited ookinete development and subsequent oocyst formation in the mosquito midgut, confirming their transmission-blocking activity. Potential toxicity due to hemolysis was excluded, since only infected and not normal erythrocytes were damaged by ionophores. Our data strongly support the downstream exploration of monovalent ionophores for repositioning as new antimalarial and transmission-blocking leads. PMID:26055362

  12. Antimalarial drug utilization by women in Ethiopia: a knowledge-attitudes-practice study.

    PubMed Central

    Yeneneh, H.; Gyorkos, T. W.; Joseph, L.; Pickering, J.; Tedla, S.

    1993-01-01

    A survey was undertaken between December 1991 and February 1992 to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practices with respect to malaria of 300 women from six randomly selected rural communities in central Ethiopia. A total of 85% were able to recognize one or more of the common symptoms of the disease; however, the modes of transmission were generally misunderstood and only 23% believed that transmission could be prevented. More women preferred to obtain antimalarials from government clinics rather than from private drug shops, mission clinics, unofficial suppliers of injections, open markets, or from leftover sources. Under-5-year-olds were identified as the most malaria-vulnerable group and given priority for treatment; severity of illness was the principal determinant in seeking treatment. Decisions about treatment were generally made jointly by both parents. Knowledge about the transmissibility of malaria decreased with increasing distance from a health unit (odds ratio: 0.48; 95% confidence interval: 0.27, 0.86). A logistic regression analysis indicated that literacy and village were the most important variables associated with knowledge about preventing malaria. PMID:8313494

  13. Hemin potentiates the anti-hepatitis C virus activity of the antimalarial drug artemisinin

    SciTech Connect

    Paeshuyse, Jan; Coelmont, Lotte; Vliegen, Inge; Hemel, Johan van; Vandenkerckhove, Jan; Peys, Eric; Sas, Benedikt; Clercq, Erik De; Neyts, Johan . E-mail: johan.neyts@rega.kuleuven.be

    2006-09-15

    We report that the antimalarial drug artemisinin inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicon replication in a dose-dependent manner in two replicon constructs at concentrations that have no effect on the proliferation of the exponentially growing host cells. The 50% effective concentration (EC{sub 5}) for inhibition of HCV subgenomic replicon replication in Huh 5-2 cells (luciferase assay) by artemisinin was 78 {+-} 21 {mu}M. Hemin, an iron donor, was recently reported to inhibit HCV replicon replication [mediated by inhibition of the viral polymerase (C. Fillebeen, A.M. Rivas-Estilla, M. Bisaillon, P. Ponka, M. Muckenthaler, M.W. Hentze, A.E. Koromilas, K. Pantopoulos, Iron inactivates the RNA polymerase NS5B and suppresses subgenomic replication of hepatitis C virus, J. Biol. Chem. 280 (2005) 9049-9057.)] at a concentration that had no adverse effect on the host cells. When combined, artemisinin and hemin resulted, over a broad concentration range, in a pronounced synergistic antiviral activity. Also at a concentration (2 {mu}M) that alone had no effect on HCV replication, hemin still potentiated the anti-HCV activity of artemisinin.

  14. Structural mapping of the ClpB ATPases of Plasmodium falciparum: Targeting protein folding and secretion for antimalarial drug design.

    PubMed

    AhYoung, Andrew P; Koehl, Antoine; Cascio, Duilio; Egea, Pascal F

    2015-09-01

    Caseinolytic chaperones and proteases (Clp) belong to the AAA+ protein superfamily and are part of the protein quality control machinery in cells. The eukaryotic parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of malaria, has evolved an elaborate network of Clp proteins including two distinct ClpB ATPases. ClpB1 and ClpB2 are involved in different aspects of parasitic proteostasis. ClpB1 is present in the apicoplast, a parasite-specific and plastid-like organelle hosting various metabolic pathways necessary for parasite growth. ClpB2 localizes to the parasitophorous vacuole membrane where it drives protein export as core subunit of a parasite-derived protein secretion complex, the Plasmodium Translocon of Exported proteins (PTEX); this process is central to parasite virulence and survival in the human host. The functional associations of these two chaperones with parasite-specific metabolism and protein secretion make them prime drug targets. ClpB proteins function as unfoldases and disaggregases and share a common architecture consisting of four domains-a variable N-terminal domain that binds different protein substrates, followed by two highly conserved catalytic ATPase domains, and a C-terminal domain. Here, we report and compare the first crystal structures of the N terminal domains of ClpB1 and ClpB2 from Plasmodium and analyze their molecular surfaces. Solution scattering analysis of the N domain of ClpB2 shows that the average solution conformation is similar to the crystalline structure. These structures represent the first step towards the characterization of these two malarial chaperones and the reconstitution of the entire PTEX to aid structure-based design of novel anti-malarial drugs. PMID:26130467

  15. Assessing the utility of an anti-malarial pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for aiding drug clinical development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mechanistic within-host models relating blood anti-malarial drug concentrations with the parasite-time profile help in assessing dosing schedules and partner drugs for new anti-malarial treatments. A comprehensive simulation study to assess the utility of a stage-specific pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model for predicting within-host parasite response was performed. Methods Three anti-malarial combination therapies were selected: artesunate-mefloquine, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, and artemether-lumefantrine. The PK-PD model included parameters to represent the concentration-time profiles of both drugs, the initial parasite burden and distribution across the parasite life cycle, and the parasite multiplication factor due to asexual reproduction. The model also included the maximal killing rate of each drug, and the blood drug concentration associated with half of that killing effect (in vivo EC50), derived from the in vitro IC50, the extent of binding to 0.5% Albumax present in the in vitro testing media, and the drugs plasma protein binding and whole blood to plasma partitioning ratio. All stochastic simulations were performed using a Latin-Hypercube-Sampling approach. Results The simulations demonstrated that the proportion of patients cured was highly sensitive to the in vivo EC50 and the maximal killing rate of the partner drug co-administered with the artemisinin derivative. The in vivo EC50 values that corresponded to on average 95% of patients cured were much higher than the adjusted values derived from the in vitro IC50. The proportion clinically cured was not strongly influenced by changes in the parameters defining the age distribution of the initial parasite burden (mean age of 4 to 16 hours) and the parasite multiplication factor every life cycle (ranging from 8 to 12 fold/cycle). The median parasite clearance times, however, lengthened as the standard deviation of the initial parasite burden increased (i.e. the infection became

  16. Incorporating Stage-Specific Drug Action into Pharmacological Modeling of Antimalarial Drug Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological modeling of antiparasitic treatment based on a drug's pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties plays an increasingly important role in identifying optimal drug dosing regimens and predicting their potential impact on control and elimination programs. Conventional modeling of treatment relies on methods that do not distinguish between parasites at different developmental stages. This is problematic for malaria parasites, as their sensitivity to drugs varies substantially during their 48-h developmental cycle. We investigated four drug types (short or long half-lives with or without stage-specific killing) to quantify the accuracy of the standard methodology. The treatment dynamics of three drug types were well characterized with standard modeling. The exception were short-half-life drugs with stage-specific killing (i.e., artemisinins) because, depending on time of treatment, parasites might be in highly drug-sensitive stages or in much less sensitive stages. We describe how to bring such drugs into pharmacological modeling by including additional variation into the drug's maximal killing rate. Finally, we show that artemisinin kill rates may have been substantially overestimated in previous modeling studies because (i) the parasite reduction ratio (PRR) (generally estimated to be 104) is based on observed changes in circulating parasite numbers, which generally overestimate the “true” PRR, which should include both circulating and sequestered parasites, and (ii) the third dose of artemisinin at 48 h targets exactly those stages initially hit at time zero, so it is incorrect to extrapolate the PRR measured over 48 h to predict the impact of doses at 48 h and later. PMID:26902760

  17. Incorporating Stage-Specific Drug Action into Pharmacological Modeling of Antimalarial Drug Treatment.

    PubMed

    Hodel, Eva Maria; Kay, Katherine; Hastings, Ian M

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacological modeling of antiparasitic treatment based on a drug's pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties plays an increasingly important role in identifying optimal drug dosing regimens and predicting their potential impact on control and elimination programs. Conventional modeling of treatment relies on methods that do not distinguish between parasites at different developmental stages. This is problematic for malaria parasites, as their sensitivity to drugs varies substantially during their 48-h developmental cycle. We investigated four drug types (short or long half-lives with or without stage-specific killing) to quantify the accuracy of the standard methodology. The treatment dynamics of three drug types were well characterized with standard modeling. The exception were short-half-life drugs with stage-specific killing (i.e., artemisinins) because, depending on time of treatment, parasites might be in highly drug-sensitive stages or in much less sensitive stages. We describe how to bring such drugs into pharmacological modeling by including additional variation into the drug's maximal killing rate. Finally, we show that artemisinin kill rates may have been substantially overestimated in previous modeling studies because (i) the parasite reduction ratio (PRR) (generally estimated to be 10(4)) is based on observed changes in circulating parasite numbers, which generally overestimate the "true" PRR, which should include both circulating and sequestered parasites, and (ii) the third dose of artemisinin at 48 h targets exactly those stages initially hit at time zero, so it is incorrect to extrapolate the PRR measured over 48 h to predict the impact of doses at 48 h and later. PMID:26902760

  18. A New Set of Chemical Starting Points with Plasmodium falciparum Transmission-Blocking Potential for Antimalarial Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Almela, Maria Jesus; Lozano, Sonia; Lelièvre, Joël; Colmenarejo, Gonzalo; Coterón, José Miguel; Rodrigues, Janneth; Gonzalez, Carolina; Herreros, Esperanza

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of new antimalarials with transmission blocking activity remains a key issue in efforts to control malaria and eventually eradicate the disease. Recently, high-throughput screening (HTS) assays have been successfully applied to Plasmodium falciparum asexual stages to screen millions of compounds, with the identification of thousands of new active molecules, some of which are already in clinical phases. The same approach has now been applied to identify compounds that are active against P. falciparum gametocytes, the parasite stage responsible for transmission. This study reports screening results for the Tres Cantos Antimalarial Set (TCAMS), of approximately 13,533 molecules, against P. falciparum stage V gametocytes. Secondary confirmation and cytotoxicity assays led to the identification of 98 selective molecules with dual activity against gametocytes and asexual stages. Hit compounds were chemically clustered and analyzed for appropriate physicochemical properties. The TCAMS chemical space around the prioritized hits was also studied. A selection of hit compounds was assessed ex vivo in the standard membrane feeding assay and demonstrated complete block in transmission. As a result of this effort, new chemical structures not connected to previously described antimalarials have been identified. This new set of compounds may serve as starting points for future drug discovery programs as well as tool compounds for identifying new modes of action involved in malaria transmission. PMID:26317851

  19. Blocking Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Transmission with Drugs: The Gametocytocidal and Sporontocidal Properties of Current and Prospective Antimalarials

    PubMed Central

    Kiszewski, Anthony E.

    2011-01-01

    Drugs that kill or inhibit the sexual stages of Plasmodium could potentially amplify or synergize the impact of other interventions by blocking transmission to mosquitoes. Primaquine and other 8-aminoquinolines have long offered such potential, but safety and other concerns have limited their use. Although transmission-blocking properties are not often a priority of drug discovery efforts, a number of interesting gametocytocidal and/or sporontocidal drug candidates have emerged in recent years. Some still bear significant technical and safety concerns, while others have passed clinical trials and are on the verge of entering the antimalarial armamentarium. Recent advances in our knowledge of gametocyte differentiation, gametogenesis and sporogony have also led to the identification of a large array of potential new targets for drugs that might interfere with malaria transmission. This review examines the properties of existing and prospective drugs, mechanisms of action, counter-indications and their potential role in regional malaria elimination efforts.

  20. Molecular Mechanism of Renal Tubular Secretion of the Antimalarial Drug Chloroquine ▿

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Fabian; König, Jörg; Glaeser, Hartmut; Schmidt, Ingrid; Zolk, Oliver; Fromm, Martin F.; Maas, Renke

    2011-01-01

    The antimalarial drug chloroquine is eliminated to a significant extent by renal tubular secretion. The molecular mechanism of renal chloroquine secretion remains unknown. We hypothesized that organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) and multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (MATE1), localized in the basolateral and luminal membranes of proximal tubule cells, respectively, are involved in chloroquine transport. The interaction of chloroquine with both transporters was investigated using single-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293)-MATE1 cells in uptake experiments and single-transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCK)-OCT2 and MDCK-MATE1 cells as well as double-transfected MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells grown as polarized monolayers on transwell filters. In HEK293-MATE1 cells, chloroquine competitively inhibited MATE1-mediated metformin uptake (Ki = 2.8 μM). Cellular accumulation of chloroquine was significantly lower (P < 0.001) and transcellular chloroquine transport was significantly increased (P < 0.001) in MDCK-MATE1 and MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells compared to vector control cells after basal addition of chloroquine (0.1 to 10 μM). In contrast, no difference in cellular accumulation or transcellular transport of chloroquine was observed between MDCK-OCT2 and vector control cells. In line with an oppositely directed proton gradient acting as a driving force for MATE1, basal-to-apical transport of chloroquine by MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells increased with decreasing apical pH from 7.8 to 6.0. Transcellular transport of chloroquine by MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells was inhibited by cimetidine, trimethoprim, and amitriptyline. Our data demonstrate that chloroquine is a substrate and potent competitive inhibitor of MATE1, whereas OCT2 seems to play no role in chloroquine uptake. Concomitantly administered MATE1 inhibitors are likely to modify the renal secretion of chloroquine. PMID:21518836

  1. Concomitant efavirenz reduces pharmacokinetic exposure to the antimalarial drug artemether-lumefantrine in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liusheng; Parikh, Sunil; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Lizak, Patricia; Marzan, Florence; Dorsey, Grant; Havlir, Diane; Aweeka, Francesca T.

    2012-01-01

    Background The antiretroviral drug efavirenz (EFV) and the antimalarial artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) artemether-lumefantrine (AL) are commonly co-administered to treat HIV and malaria. EFV is a known inducer of cytochrome P450 3A4, which converts artemether to dihydroartemisinin (DHA) that is also active and metabolizes longer acting lumefantrine (LR). A study in healthy volunteers was completed to address the concern that EFV impacts AL pharmacokinetics (PK). Methods Adults received AL (80/480 mg BID) for 3-days prior to and during EFV co-administration (600 mg daily for 26-days) with intensive PK for artemether, DHA, and LR conducted after the last AL dose for each period. EFV PK was evaluated with and without AL. PK parameters were estimated using non-compartmental methods. Results Twelve subjects completed the two-period study. PK exposure for artemether, DHA, and LR [as estimated by the area under the concentration time curve (AUClast)] decreased or trended toward decrease with EFV, compared to when administered alone [−51% (p=0.084), −46% (p=0.005), and −21% (p=0.102), respectively]. Day 7 LR levels, previously deemed predictive of treatment success, were 46% lower (p=0.002) with EFV, but the LR half-life was unchanged. EFV PK exposure was minimally altered following AL co-administration [AUC0–24h decreased by 17% (p=0.034)]. Conclusions Exposure to DHA, but not LR, was significantly lower during EFV-AL co-administration compared to that during administration of AL alone. These findings may have implications for the treatment efficacy of AL, particularly in children. However, the observed modest changes probably do not warrant dosage adjustment during co-administration of AL with EFV. PMID:22918158

  2. The antimalarial drug primaquine targets Fe–S cluster proteins and yeast respiratory growth

    PubMed Central

    Lalève, Anaïs; Vallières, Cindy; Golinelli-Cohen, Marie-Pierre; Bouton, Cécile; Song, Zehua; Pawlik, Grzegorz; Tindall, Sarah M.; Avery, Simon V.; Clain, Jérôme; Meunier, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a major health burden in tropical and subtropical countries. The antimalarial drug primaquine is extremely useful for killing the transmissible gametocyte forms of Plasmodium falciparum and the hepatic quiescent forms of P. vivax. Yet its mechanism of action is still poorly understood. In this study, we used the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model to help uncover the mode of action of primaquine. We found that the growth inhibitory effect of primaquine was restricted to cells that relied on respiratory function to proliferate and that deletion of SOD2 encoding the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase severely increased its effect, which can be countered by the overexpression of AIM32 and MCR1 encoding mitochondrial enzymes involved in the response to oxidative stress. This indicated that ROS produced by respiratory activity had a key role in primaquine-induced growth defect. We observed that Δsod2 cells treated with primaquine displayed a severely decreased activity of aconitase that contains a Fe–S cluster notoriously sensitive to oxidative damage. We also showed that in vitro exposure to primaquine impaired the activity of purified aconitase and accelerated the turnover of the Fe–S cluster of the essential protein Rli1. It is suggested that ROS-labile Fe–S groups are the primary targets of primaquine. Aconitase activity is known to be essential at certain life-cycle stages of the malaria parasite. Thus primaquine-induced damage of its labile Fe–S cluster – and of other ROS-sensitive enzymes – could inhibit parasite development. PMID:26629948

  3. The antimalarial drug primaquine targets Fe-S cluster proteins and yeast respiratory growth.

    PubMed

    Lalève, Anaïs; Vallières, Cindy; Golinelli-Cohen, Marie-Pierre; Bouton, Cécile; Song, Zehua; Pawlik, Grzegorz; Tindall, Sarah M; Avery, Simon V; Clain, Jérôme; Meunier, Brigitte

    2016-04-01

    Malaria is a major health burden in tropical and subtropical countries. The antimalarial drug primaquine is extremely useful for killing the transmissible gametocyte forms of Plasmodium falciparum and the hepatic quiescent forms of P. vivax. Yet its mechanism of action is still poorly understood. In this study, we used the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model to help uncover the mode of action of primaquine. We found that the growth inhibitory effect of primaquine was restricted to cells that relied on respiratory function to proliferate and that deletion of SOD2 encoding the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase severely increased its effect, which can be countered by the overexpression of AIM32 and MCR1 encoding mitochondrial enzymes involved in the response to oxidative stress. This indicated that ROS produced by respiratory activity had a key role in primaquine-induced growth defect. We observed that Δsod2 cells treated with primaquine displayed a severely decreased activity of aconitase that contains a Fe-S cluster notoriously sensitive to oxidative damage. We also showed that in vitro exposure to primaquine impaired the activity of purified aconitase and accelerated the turnover of the Fe-S cluster of the essential protein Rli1. It is suggested that ROS-labile Fe-S groups are the primary targets of primaquine. Aconitase activity is known to be essential at certain life-cycle stages of the malaria parasite. Thus primaquine-induced damage of its labile Fe-S cluster - and of other ROS-sensitive enzymes - could inhibit parasite development. PMID:26629948

  4. Quinine, an old anti-malarial drug in a modern world: role in the treatment of malaria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Quinine remains an important anti-malarial drug almost 400 years after its effectiveness was first documented. However, its continued use is challenged by its poor tolerability, poor compliance with complex dosing regimens, and the availability of more efficacious anti-malarial drugs. This article reviews the historical role of quinine, considers its current usage and provides insight into its appropriate future use in the treatment of malaria. In light of recent research findings intravenous artesunate should be the first-line drug for severe malaria, with quinine as an alternative. The role of rectal quinine as pre-referral treatment for severe malaria has not been fully explored, but it remains a promising intervention. In pregnancy, quinine continues to play a critical role in the management of malaria, especially in the first trimester, and it will remain a mainstay of treatment until safer alternatives become available. For uncomplicated malaria, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) offers a better option than quinine though the difficulty of maintaining a steady supply of ACT in resource-limited settings renders the rapid withdrawal of quinine for uncomplicated malaria cases risky. The best approach would be to identify solutions to ACT stock-outs, maintain quinine in case of ACT stock-outs, and evaluate strategies for improving quinine treatment outcomes by combining it with antibiotics. In HIV and TB infected populations, concerns about potential interactions between quinine and antiretroviral and anti-tuberculosis drugs exist, and these will need further research and pharmacovigilance. PMID:21609473

  5. In vitro studies on the sensitivity pattern of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs and local herbal extracts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The resistance of human malaria parasites to anti-malarial compounds has become considerable concern, particularly in view of the shortage of novel classes of anti-malarial drugs. One way to prevent resistance is by using new compounds that are not based on existing synthetic antimicrobial agents. Results Sensitivity of 100 Plasmodium falciparum isolates to chloroquine, quinine, amodiaquine, mefloquine, sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine, artemisinin, Momordica charantia (‘Ejirin’) Diospyros monbuttensis (‘Egun eja’) and Morinda lucida (‘Oruwo’) was determined using the in vitro microtest (Mark III) technique to determine the IC50 of the drugs. All the isolates tested were sensitive to quinine, mefloquine and artesunate. Fifty-one percent of the isolates were resistant to chloroquine, 13% to amodiaquine and 5% to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine. Highest resistance to chloroquine (68.9%) was recorded among isolates from Yewa zone while highest resistance to amodiaquine (30%) was observed in Ijebu zone. Highest resistance to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine was recorded in Yewa and Egba zones, respectively. A positive correlation was observed between the responses to artemisinin and mefloquine (P<0.05), artemisinin and quinine (P<0.05) and quinine and mefloquine (P<0.05). A negative correlation was observed between the responses to chloroquine and mefloquine (P>0.05). Highest anti-plasmodial activity was obtained with the ethanolic extract of D. monbuttensis (IC50 = 3.2nM) while the lowest was obtained from M. lucida (IC50 =25nM). Conclusions Natural products isolated from plants used in traditional medicine, which have potent anti-plasmodial action in vitro, represent potential sources of new anti-malarial drugs. PMID:24555525

  6. An amphiphilic graft copolymer-based nanoparticle platform for reduction-responsive anticancer and antimalarial drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najer, Adrian; Wu, Dalin; Nussbaumer, Martin G.; Schwertz, Geoffrey; Schwab, Anatol; Witschel, Matthias C.; Schäfer, Anja; Diederich, François; Rottmann, Matthias; Palivan, Cornelia G.; Beck, Hans-Peter; Meier, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    Medical applications of anticancer and antimalarial drugs often suffer from low aqueous solubility, high systemic toxicity, and metabolic instability. Smart nanocarrier-based drug delivery systems provide means of solving these problems at once. Herein, we present such a smart nanoparticle platform based on self-assembled, reduction-responsive amphiphilic graft copolymers, which were successfully synthesized through thiol-disulfide exchange reaction between thiolated hydrophilic block and pyridyl disulfide functionalized hydrophobic block. These amphiphilic graft copolymers self-assembled into nanoparticles with mean diameters of about 30-50 nm and readily incorporated hydrophobic guest molecules. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was used to study nanoparticle stability and triggered release of a model compound in detail. Long-term colloidal stability and model compound retention within the nanoparticles was found when analyzed in cell media at body temperature. In contrast, rapid, complete reduction-triggered disassembly and model compound release was achieved within a physiological reducing environment. The synthesized copolymers revealed no intrinsic cellular toxicity up to 1 mg mL-1. Drug-loaded reduction-sensitive nanoparticles delivered a hydrophobic model anticancer drug (doxorubicin, DOX) to cancer cells (HeLa cells) and an experimental, metabolically unstable antimalarial drug (the serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) inhibitor (+/-)-1) to Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs), with higher efficacy compared to similar, non-sensitive drug-loaded nanoparticles. These responsive copolymer-based nanoparticles represent a promising candidate as smart nanocarrier platform for various drugs to be applied to different diseases, due to the biocompatibility and biodegradability of the hydrophobic block, and the protein-repellent hydrophilic block.Medical applications of anticancer and antimalarial drugs often suffer from low aqueous

  7. An amphiphilic graft copolymer-based nanoparticle platform for reduction-responsive anticancer and antimalarial drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Najer, Adrian; Wu, Dalin; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Schwertz, Geoffrey; Schwab, Anatol; Witschel, Matthias C; Schäfer, Anja; Diederich, François; Rottmann, Matthias; Palivan, Cornelia G; Beck, Hans-Peter; Meier, Wolfgang

    2016-08-21

    Medical applications of anticancer and antimalarial drugs often suffer from low aqueous solubility, high systemic toxicity, and metabolic instability. Smart nanocarrier-based drug delivery systems provide means of solving these problems at once. Herein, we present such a smart nanoparticle platform based on self-assembled, reduction-responsive amphiphilic graft copolymers, which were successfully synthesized through thiol-disulfide exchange reaction between thiolated hydrophilic block and pyridyl disulfide functionalized hydrophobic block. These amphiphilic graft copolymers self-assembled into nanoparticles with mean diameters of about 30-50 nm and readily incorporated hydrophobic guest molecules. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was used to study nanoparticle stability and triggered release of a model compound in detail. Long-term colloidal stability and model compound retention within the nanoparticles was found when analyzed in cell media at body temperature. In contrast, rapid, complete reduction-triggered disassembly and model compound release was achieved within a physiological reducing environment. The synthesized copolymers revealed no intrinsic cellular toxicity up to 1 mg mL(-1). Drug-loaded reduction-sensitive nanoparticles delivered a hydrophobic model anticancer drug (doxorubicin, DOX) to cancer cells (HeLa cells) and an experimental, metabolically unstable antimalarial drug (the serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) inhibitor (±)-1) to Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs), with higher efficacy compared to similar, non-sensitive drug-loaded nanoparticles. These responsive copolymer-based nanoparticles represent a promising candidate as smart nanocarrier platform for various drugs to be applied to different diseases, due to the biocompatibility and biodegradability of the hydrophobic block, and the protein-repellent hydrophilic block. PMID:27452350

  8. Ex vivo susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Dakar, Senegal, to seven standard anti-malarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As a result of widespread chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) (which includes artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine) has been recommended as a first-line anti-malarial regimen in Senegal since 2006. Since then, there have been very few reports on the ex vivo susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. To examine whether parasite susceptibility has been affected by the widespread use of ACT, the ex vivo susceptibility of local isolates was assessed at the military hospital of Dakar. Methods The ex vivo susceptibility of 93 P. falciparum isolates from Dakar was successfully determined using the Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) ELISA for the following drugs: chloroquine (CQ), quinine (QN), mefloquine (MQ), monodesethylamodiaquine (MDAQ), lumefantrine (LMF), dihydroartemisinin (DHA) and doxycycline (DOX). Results After transformation of the isolate IC50 in ratio of IC50 according to the susceptibility of the 3D7 reference strain (isolate IC50/3D7 IC50), the prevalence of the in vitro resistant isolates with reduced susceptibility was 50% for MQ, 22% for CQ, 12% for DOX, 6% for both QN and MDAQ and 1% for the drugs LMF and DHA. The highest significant positive correlations were shown between responses to CQ and MDAQ (r = 0.569; P < 0.0001), LMF and QN (r = 0.511; P < 0.0001), LMF and DHA (r = 0.428; P = 0.0001), LMF and MQ (r = 0.413; P = 0.0002), QN and DHA (r = 0.402; P = 0.0003) and QN and MQ (r = 0.421; P = 0.0001). Conclusions The introduction of ACT in 2002 has not induced a decrease in P. falciparum susceptibility to the drugs DHA, MDAQ and LMF, which are common ACT components. However, the prevalence of P. falciparum isolates with reduced susceptibility has increased for both MQ and DOX. Taken together, these data suggest that intensive surveillance of the P. falciparum in vitro susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs in Senegal is required. PMID

  9. Assessment of global reporting of adverse drug reactions for anti-malarials, including artemisinin-based combination therapy, to the WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In spite of enhanced control efforts, malaria remains a major public health problem causing close to a million deaths annually. With support from several donors, large amounts of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) are being deployed in endemic countries raising safety concerns as little is known about the use of ACT in several of the settings where they are deployed. This project was undertaken to profile the provenance of the pharmacovigilance reporting of all anti-malarials, including ACT to the WHO adverse drug reaction (ADR) database (Vigibase™) over the past 40 years. Methods The WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring, the Uppsala Monitoring Centre (UMC) provided anonymized extracts of Vigibase™ covering the period 1968-2008. All countries in the programme were clustered according to their malaria control phase and income status. The number of individual case safety reports (ICSRs) of anti-malarials was analyzed according to those clusters. Results From 1968 to 2008, 21,312 ICSRs suspecting anti-malarials were received from 64 countries. Low-income countries, that are also malaria-endemic (categorized as priority 1 countries) submitted only 1.2% of the ICSRs. Only 60 out of 21,312 ICSRs were related to ACT, 51 of which were coming from four sub-Saharan African countries. Although very few ICSRs involved artemisinin-based compounds, many of the adverse events reported were potentially serious. Conclusions This paper illustrates the low reporting of ADRs to anti-malarials in general and ACT in particular. Most reports were submitted by non-endemic and/or high-income countries. Given the current mix of large donor funding, the insufficient information on safety of these drugs, increasing availability of ACT and artemisinin-based monotherapies in public and private sector channels, associated potential for inappropriate use and finally a pipeline of more than 10 new novel anti-malarials in various stages of development, the

  10. Modulation of Anopheles stephensi Gene Expression by Nitroquine, an Antimalarial Drug against Plasmodium yoelii Infection in the Mosquito

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Shuguang; Wang, Yanyan; Xu, Wenyue; Zhang, Jingru; Jiang, Haobo; Huang, Fusheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Antimalarial drugs may impact mosquito’s defense against Plasmodium parasites. Our previous study showed nitroquine significantly reduced infection of Anopheles stephensi by Plasmodium yoelii, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In order to understand how transmission capacity of An. stephensi was affected by nitroquine, we explored the transcriptome of adult females after different treatments, examined changes in gene expression profiles, and identified transcripts affected by the drug and parasite. Methodology/Principal Findings We extended massively parallel sequencing and data analysis (including gene discovery, expression profiling, and function prediction) to An. stephensi before and after Plasmodium infection with or without nitroquine treatment. Using numbers of reads assembled into specific contigs to calculate relative abundances (RAs), we categorized the assembled contigs into four groups according to the differences in RA values infection induced, infection suppressed, drug induced, and drug suppressed. We found both nitroquine in the blood meal and Plasmodium infection altered transcription of mosquito genes implicated in diverse processes, including pathogen recognition, signal transduction, prophenoloxidase activation, cytoskeleton assembling, cell adhesion, and oxidative stress. The differential gene expression may have promoted certain defense responses of An. stephensi against the parasite and decreased its infectivity. Conclusions/Significance Our study indicated that nitroquine may regulate several immune mechanisms at the level of gene transcription in the mosquito against Plasmodium infection. This highlights the need for better understanding of antimalarial drug’s impact on parasite survival and transmission. In addition, our data largely enriched the existing sequence information of An. stephensi, an epidemiologically important vector species. PMID:24586804

  11. Antimalarial Preclinical Drug Development: A Single Oral Dose of A 5-Carbon-linked Trioxane Dimer Plus Mefloquine Cures Malaria-Infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Moon, Deuk Kyu; Singhal, Vandana; Kumar, Nirbhay; Shapiro, Theresa A; Posner, Gary H

    2009-01-01

    Three new 5-carbon-linked trioxane dimer carboxylate esters have been prepared from the natural trioxane, artemisinin in only 3-steps and 40-50% overall yields. Each one of these new chemical entities is at least as efficacious as the clinically used trioxane antimalarial drug artemether when combined with mefloquine hydrochloride in a low single oral dose cure. PMID:20686674

  12. Plasmodium falciparum susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs in Dakar, Senegal, in 2010: an ex vivo and drug resistance molecular markers study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2006, the Senegalese National Malaria Control Programme recommended artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) as the first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria. Since the introduction of ACT, there have been very few reports on the level of resistance of P. falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. To determine whether parasite susceptibility has been affected by the new anti-malarial policies, an ex vivo susceptibility and drug resistance molecular marker study was conducted on local isolates obtained from the Centre de santé Elizabeth Diouf (Médina, Dakar, Senegal). Methods The prevalence of genetic polymorphisms in genes associated with anti-malarial drug resistance, i.e., pfcrt, pfdhfr, pfdhps and pfmdr1, were evaluated for a panel of 165 isolates collected from patients recruited from 17 August 2010 to 6 January 2011. The malaria isolates were assessed for susceptibility to chloroquine (CQ); quinine (QN); monodesethylamodiaquine (MDAQ), the active metabolite of amodiaquine; mefloquine (MQ); lumefantrine (LMF); dihydroartemisinin (DHA), the active metabolite of artemisinin derivatives; and doxycycline (DOX) using the Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) ELISA. Results The prevalence of the in vitro resistant isolates, or isolates with reduced susceptibility, was 62.1% for MQ, 24.2% for CQ, 10.3% for DOX, 11.8% MDAQ, 9.7% for QN, 2.9% for LMF and 0% for DHA. The Pfcrt 76T mutation was identified in 43.6% of the samples. The pfmdr1 86Y, 184F and 1246Y mutations were found in 16.2%, 50.0% and 1.6% of the samples, respectively. The pfdhfr 108N, 51I and 59R mutations were identified in 81.9%, 77.4% and 79.4% of the samples, respectively. The double mutant (108N and 51I) was detected in 75.5% of the isolates, and the triple mutant (108N, 51I and 59R) was detected in 73.6% of the isolates. The pfdhps 437G, 436A and 613S mutations were found in 54.4%, 38.6% and 1.2% of the samples, respectively. There was only one double mutant, 437G and 540E, and one

  13. Epidemic of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Involving Substandard Antimalarial Drugs, Pakistan, 2003

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harpakash; Mohammed, Nasir; Kolaczinski, Kate; Ord, Rosalynn L.; Rowland, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Because of instability in eastern Afghanistan, new refugees crossed into the federally administered tribal areas of northwestern Pakistan in 2002. In 2003, we investigated an epidemic of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in 1 of the camps. Incidence was 100.4 cases/1,000 person-years; in other nearby camps it was only 2.1/1,000 person-years. Anopheline mosquitoes were found despite an earlier spray campaign. Documented clinical failures at the basic health unit prompted a drug resistance survey of locally manufactured sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine used for routine treatment. The in vivo failure rate was 28.5%. PCR analysis of the P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase and dihyropteroate synthase genes showed no mutations associated with clinical failure. However, chemical analysis of the drug showed that it was substandard. As global incidence decreases and epidemics become more of a threat, enhanced quality assurance of control interventions is essential. PMID:19891862

  14. Natural polyhydroxyalkanoate-gold nanocomposite based biosensor for detection of antimalarial drug artemisinin.

    PubMed

    Phukon, Pinkee; Radhapyari, Keisham; Konwar, Bolin Kumar; Khan, Raju

    2014-04-01

    The worrisome trend of antimalarial resistance has already highlighted the importance of artemisinin as a potent antimalarial agent. The current investigation aimed at fabricating a biosensor based on natural polymer polyhydroxyalkanoate-gold nanoparticle composite mounting on an indium-tin oxide glass plate for the analysis of artemisinin. The biosensor was fabricated using an adsorbing horse-radish peroxidase enzyme on the electrode surface for which cyclic voltammetry was used to monitor the electro-catalytic reduction of artemisinin under diffusion controlled conditions. Electrochemical interfacial properties and immobilization of enzyme onto a polyhydroxyalkanoate-gold nanoparticle film were evaluated, and confirmed by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The differential pulse voltammetric peak current for artemisinin was increased linearly (concentration range of 0.01-0.08μg mL(-1)) with sensitivity of 0.26μAμg mL(-1). The greater sensitivity of the fabricated biosensor to artemisinin (optimum limits of detection were 0.0035μg mL(-1) and 0.0036μg mL(-1) in bulk and spiked human serum, respectively) could be of much aid in medical diagnosis. PMID:24582254

  15. Clinical development of new prophylactic antimalarial drugs after the 5th Amendment to the Declaration of Helsinki

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Geoffrey S; Magill, Alan J; Ohrt, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Malaria is of continuing concern in nonimmune traveling populations. Traditionally, antimalarial drugs have been developed as agents for dual indications (treatment and prophylaxis). However, since 2000, when the 5th Amendment to the Declaration of Helsinki (DH2000) was adopted, development of new malaria prophylaxis drugs in this manner has ceased. As a consequence, there may not be any new drugs licensed for this indication in the foreseeable future. Major pharmaceutical companies have interpreted DH2000 to mean that the traditional development paradigm may be considered unethical because of doubt over the likelihood of benefit to endemic populations participating in clinical studies, the use of placebo, and the sustainability of post-trial access to study medications. In this article, we explore the basis of these concerns and suggest that the traditional development paradigm remains ethical under certain circumstances. We also consider alternative approaches that may be more attractive to sponsors as they either do not use placebo, or utilize populations in endemic countries who may unambiguously benefit. These approaches represent the way forward in the future, but are at present unproven in clinical practice, and face numerous regulatory, logistical and technical challenges. Consequently, in the short term, we argue that the traditional clinical development paradigm remains the most feasible approach and is ethical and consistent with the spirit of DH2000 under the appropriate circumstances. PMID:19209263

  16. Temporal trends in prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance alleles over two decades of changing antimalarial policy in coastal Kenya.

    PubMed

    Okombo, John; Kamau, Alice W; Marsh, Kevin; Sutherland, Colin J; Ochola-Oyier, Lynette Isabella

    2014-12-01

    Molecular surveillance of drug resistance markers through time provides crucial information on genomic adaptations, especially in parasite populations exposed to changing drug pressures. To assess temporal trends of established genotypes associated with tolerance to clinically important antimalarials used in Kenya over the last two decades, we sequenced a region of the pfcrt locus encompassing codons 72-76 of the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, full-length pfmdr1 - encoding multi-drug resistance protein, P-glycoprotein homolog (Pgh1) and pfdhfr encoding dihydrofolate reductase, in 485 archived Plasmodium falciparum positive blood samples collected in coastal Kenya at four different time points between 1995 and 2013. Microsatellite loci were also analyzed to compare the genetic backgrounds of parasite populations circulating before and after the withdrawal of chloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine. Our results reveal a significant increase in the prevalence of the pfcrt K76 wild-type allele between 1995 and 2013 from 38% to 81.7% (p < 0.0001). In contrast, we noted a significant decline in wild-type pfdhfr S108 allele (p < 0.0001) culminating in complete absence of this allele in 2013. We also observed a significant increase in the prevalence of the wild-type pfmdr1 N86/Y184/D1246 haplotype from 14.6% in 1995 to 66.0% in 2013 (p < 0.0001) and a corresponding decline of the mutant pfmdr1 86Y/184Y/1246Y allele from 36.4% to 0% in 19 years (p < 0.0001). We also show extensive genetic heterogeneity among the chloroquine-sensitive parasites before and after the withdrawal of the drug in contrast to a selective sweep around the triple mutant pfdhfr allele, leading to a mono-allelic population at this locus. These findings highlight the importance of continual surveillance and characterization of parasite genotypes as indicators of the therapeutic efficacy of antimalarials, particularly in the context of changes in malaria treatment

  17. A SYBR Green 1-based in vitro test of susceptibility of Ghanaian Plasmodium falciparum clinical isolates to a panel of anti-malarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Based on report of declining efficacy of chloroquine, Ghana shifted to the use of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in 2005 as the first-line anti-malarial drug. Since then, there has not been any major evaluation of the efficacy of anti-malarial drugs in Ghana in vitro. The sensitivity of Ghanaian Plasmodium falciparum isolates to anti-malarial drugs was, therefore, assessed and the data compared with that obtained prior to the change in the malaria treatment policy. Methods A SYBR Green 1 fluorescent-based in vitro drug sensitivity assay was used to assess the susceptibility of clinical isolates of P. falciparum to a panel of 12 anti-malarial drugs in three distinct eco-epidemiological zones in Ghana. The isolates were obtained from children visiting health facilities in sentinel sites located in Hohoe, Navrongo and Cape Coast municipalities. The concentration of anti-malarial drug inhibiting parasite growth by 50% (IC50) for each drug was estimated using the online program, ICEstimator. Results Pooled results from all the sentinel sites indicated geometric mean IC50 values of 1.60, 3.80, 4.00, 4.56, 5.20, 6.11, 10.12, 28.32, 31.56, 93.60, 107.20, and 8952.50 nM for atovaquone, artesunate, dihydroartemisin, artemether, lumefantrine, amodiaquine, mefloquine, piperaquine, chloroquine, tafenoquine, quinine, and doxycycline, respectively. With reference to the literature threshold value indicative of resistance, the parasites showed resistance to all the test drugs except the artemisinin derivatives, atovaquone and to a lesser extent, lumefantrine. There was nearly a two-fold decrease in the IC50 value determined for chloroquine in this study compared to that determined in 2004 (57.56 nM). This observation is important, since it suggests a significant improvement in the efficacy of chloroquine, probably as a direct consequence of reduced drug pressure after cessation of its use. Compared to that measured prior to the change in treatment policy

  18. Assessment of Markers of Antimalarial Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Pregnant Women in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Agomo, Chimere Obiora; Oyibo, Wellington Aghoghovwia; Sutherland, Colin; Hallet, Rachael; Oguike, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of antimalarial drugs for prevention and treatment is a major strategy in the prevention of malaria in pregnancy. Although sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is currently recommended for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy in Nigeria, previously used drugs for prophylaxis such as chloroquine (CQ) and pyrimethamine are accessible as they are purchased over the counter. This study describes the markers of absence or presence of resistance to quinoline (Pfcrt and Pfmdr 1) and type 1 antifolate antimalarial medicines (Pfdhfr). Methods Plasmodium falciparum-positive dried blood spots from pregnant women attending antenatal clinics for the first time during current pregnancy were investigated for the presence of mutations at codons 72–76 of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (Pfcrt) gene by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using haplotype-specific probes. PCR followed by sequence analysis was used to identify mutations at codons 86, 184, 1034, 1042 and 1246 of P. falciparum multi-drug resistance-1 (Pfmdr1) gene; and codons 16, 50, 51, 59, 108, 140 and 164 of Pfdhfr gene. Results Two haplotypes of Pfcrt (n = 54) were observed: CVMNK 13(24.2%) and CVIET 41 (75.9%) of the samples. The SVMNT haplotype was absent in this population. The Pfmdr1 (n = 28) haplotypes were NYSND 15(53.6%), YYSND 5(17.9%), NFSND 6(21.4%) and YFSND 2(7.1%). The Pfdhfr (n = 15) were ACNCSVI 4(26.7%), and ACICNSVI 1(6.7%) and ACIRNVI 10 (66.7%). The rate of occurrence of Pfcrt 76T, Pfdhfr108N, Pfmdr186Yand184F were 75.9%, 73.3%, 25% and 28.1% respectively. The Pfmdr1 86Y was associated with low parasitaemia (median = 71 parasites/μl, P = 0.024) while Pfcrt 76T was associated with young maternal age (mean 24.1 ± 4.5 years; P = 0.006). The median parasitaemia were similar (P>0.05) in wild and mutant strains of Pfcrt 76, Pfmdr1 184 and Pfdhfr 108. There was no association between gravidity or gestational age of the women and

  19. In Vitro and Molecular Surveillance for Antimalarial Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites in Western Kenya Reveals Sustained Artemisinin Sensitivity and Increased Chloroquine Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Komino, Franklin; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Goldman, Ira; Onyona, Philip; Wiegand, Ryan E.; Juma, Elizabeth; Shi, Ya Ping; Barnwell, John W.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Kariuki, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Malaria control is hindered by the evolution and spread of resistance to antimalarials, necessitating multiple changes to drug policies over time. A comprehensive antimalarial drug resistance surveillance program is vital for detecting the potential emergence of resistance to antimalarials, including current artemisinin-based combination therapies. An antimalarial drug resistance surveillance study involving 203 Plasmodium falciparum malaria-positive children was conducted in western Kenya between 2010 and 2013. Specimens from enrolled children were analyzed in vitro for sensitivity to chloroquine (CQ), amodiaquine (AQ), mefloquine (MQ), lumefantrine, and artemisinin derivatives (artesunate and dihydroartemisinin) and for drug resistance allele polymorphisms in P. falciparum crt (Pfcrt), Pfmdr-1, and the K13 propeller domain (K13). We observed a significant increase in the proportion of samples with the Pfcrt wild-type (CVMNK) genotype, from 61.2% in 2010 to 93.0% in 2013 (P < 0.0001), and higher proportions of parasites with elevated sensitivity to CQ in vitro. The majority of isolates harbored the wild-type N allele in Pfmdr-1 codon 86 (93.5%), with only 7 (3.50%) samples with the N86Y mutant allele (the mutant nucleotide is underlined). Likewise, most isolates harbored the wild-type Pfmdr-1 D1246 allele (79.8%), with only 12 (6.38%) specimens with the D1246Y mutant allele and 26 (13.8%) with mixed alleles. All the samples had a single copy of the Pfmdr-1 gene (mean of 0.907 ± 0.141 copies). None of the sequenced parasites had mutations in K13. Our results suggest that artemisinin is likely to remain highly efficacious and that CQ sensitivity appears to be on the rise in western Kenya. PMID:26392510

  20. In Vitro and Molecular Surveillance for Antimalarial Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites in Western Kenya Reveals Sustained Artemisinin Sensitivity and Increased Chloroquine Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lucchi, Naomi W; Komino, Franklin; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Goldman, Ira; Onyona, Philip; Wiegand, Ryan E; Juma, Elizabeth; Shi, Ya Ping; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Kariuki, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Malaria control is hindered by the evolution and spread of resistance to antimalarials, necessitating multiple changes to drug policies over time. A comprehensive antimalarial drug resistance surveillance program is vital for detecting the potential emergence of resistance to antimalarials, including current artemisinin-based combination therapies. An antimalarial drug resistance surveillance study involving 203 Plasmodium falciparum malaria-positive children was conducted in western Kenya between 2010 and 2013. Specimens from enrolled children were analyzed in vitro for sensitivity to chloroquine (CQ), amodiaquine (AQ), mefloquine (MQ), lumefantrine, and artemisinin derivatives (artesunate and dihydroartemisinin) and for drug resistance allele polymorphisms in P. falciparum crt (Pfcrt), Pfmdr-1, and the K13 propeller domain (K13). We observed a significant increase in the proportion of samples with the Pfcrt wild-type (CVMNK) genotype, from 61.2% in 2010 to 93.0% in 2013 (P < 0.0001), and higher proportions of parasites with elevated sensitivity to CQ in vitro. The majority of isolates harbored the wild-type N allele in Pfmdr-1 codon 86 (93.5%), with only 7 (3.50%) samples with the N86Y mutant allele (the mutant nucleotide is underlined). Likewise, most isolates harbored the wild-type Pfmdr-1 D1246 allele (79.8%), with only 12 (6.38%) specimens with the D1246Y mutant allele and 26 (13.8%) with mixed alleles. All the samples had a single copy of the Pfmdr-1 gene (mean of 0.907 ± 0.141 copies). None of the sequenced parasites had mutations in K13. Our results suggest that artemisinin is likely to remain highly efficacious and that CQ sensitivity appears to be on the rise in western Kenya. PMID:26392510

  1. The Activities of Current Antimalarial Drugs on the Life Cycle Stages of Plasmodium: A Comparative Study with Human and Rodent Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Delves, Michael; Plouffe, David; Scheurer, Christian; Meister, Stephan; Wittlin, Sergio; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Sinden, Robert E.; Leroy, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Background Malaria remains a disease of devastating global impact, killing more than 800,000 people every year—the vast majority being children under the age of 5. While effective therapies are available, if malaria is to be eradicated a broader range of small molecule therapeutics that are able to target the liver and the transmissible sexual stages are required. These new medicines are needed both to meet the challenge of malaria eradication and to circumvent resistance. Methods and Findings Little is known about the wider stage-specific activities of current antimalarials that were primarily designed to alleviate symptoms of malaria in the blood stage. To overcome this critical gap, we developed assays to measure activity of antimalarials against all life stages of malaria parasites, using a diverse set of human and nonhuman parasite species, including male gamete production (exflagellation) in Plasmodium falciparum, ookinete development in P. berghei, oocyst development in P. berghei and P. falciparum, and the liver stage of P. yoelii. We then compared 50 current and experimental antimalarials in these assays. We show that endoperoxides such as OZ439, a stable synthetic molecule currently in clinical phase IIa trials, are strong inhibitors of gametocyte maturation/gamete formation and impact sporogony; lumefantrine impairs development in the vector; and NPC-1161B, a new 8-aminoquinoline, inhibits sporogony. Conclusions These data enable objective comparisons of the strengths and weaknesses of each chemical class at targeting each stage of the lifecycle. Noting that the activities of many compounds lie within achievable blood concentrations, these results offer an invaluable guide to decisions regarding which drugs to combine in the next-generation of antimalarial drugs. This study might reveal the potential of life-cycle–wide analyses of drugs for other pathogens with complex life cycles. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID

  2. Pharmacokinetics of a novel sublingual spray formulation of the antimalarial drug artemether in African children with malaria.

    PubMed

    Salman, Sam; Bendel, Daryl; Lee, Toong C; Templeton, David; Davis, Timothy M E

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of sublingual artemether (ArTiMist) was investigated in 91 young African children with severe malaria or who could not tolerate oral antimalarial therapy. Each received 3.0 mg/kg of body weight of artemether at 0, 8, 24, 36, 48, and 60 h or until the initiation of oral treatment. Few blood samples were drawn postdose. Plasma artemether and dihydroartemisinin (DHA) levels were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the data were analyzed using established population compartmental pharmacokinetic models. Parasite clearance was prompt (median parasite clearance time, 24 h), and there were no serious adverse events. Consistent with studies in healthy adults (S. Salman, D. Bendel, T. C. Lee, D. Templeton, and T. M. E. Davis, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 59:3197-3207, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.05013-14), the absorption of sublingual artemether was biphasic, and multiple dosing was associated with the autoinduction of the metabolism of artemether to DHA (which itself has potent antimalarial activity). In contrast to studies using healthy volunteers, pharmacokinetic modeling indicated that the first absorption phase did not avoid first-pass metabolism, suggesting that the drug is transferred to the upper intestine through postdose fluid/food intake. Simulations using the present data and those from an earlier study in older Melanesian children with uncomplicated malaria treated with artemether-lumefantrine tablets suggested that the bioavailability of sublingual artemether was at least equivalent to that after conventional oral artemether-lumefantrine (median [interquartile range] areas under the concentration-time curve for artemether, 3,403 [2,471 to 4,771] versus 3,063 [2,358 to 4,514] μg · h/liter, respectively; and for DHA, 2,958 [2,146 to 4,278] versus 2,839 [1,812 to 3,488] μg · h/liter, respectively; P ≥ 0.42). These findings suggest that sublingual artemether could be used as prereferral treatment for sick

  3. Pharmacokinetics of a Novel Sublingual Spray Formulation of the Antimalarial Drug Artemether in African Children with Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Sam; Bendel, Daryl; Lee, Toong C.; Templeton, David

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of sublingual artemether (ArTiMist) was investigated in 91 young African children with severe malaria or who could not tolerate oral antimalarial therapy. Each received 3.0 mg/kg of body weight of artemether at 0, 8, 24, 36, 48, and 60 h or until the initiation of oral treatment. Few blood samples were drawn postdose. Plasma artemether and dihydroartemisinin (DHA) levels were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the data were analyzed using established population compartmental pharmacokinetic models. Parasite clearance was prompt (median parasite clearance time, 24 h), and there were no serious adverse events. Consistent with studies in healthy adults (S. Salman, D. Bendel, T. C. Lee, D. Templeton, and T. M. E. Davis, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 59:3197–3207, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.05013-14), the absorption of sublingual artemether was biphasic, and multiple dosing was associated with the autoinduction of the metabolism of artemether to DHA (which itself has potent antimalarial activity). In contrast to studies using healthy volunteers, pharmacokinetic modeling indicated that the first absorption phase did not avoid first-pass metabolism, suggesting that the drug is transferred to the upper intestine through postdose fluid/food intake. Simulations using the present data and those from an earlier study in older Melanesian children with uncomplicated malaria treated with artemether-lumefantrine tablets suggested that the bioavailability of sublingual artemether was at least equivalent to that after conventional oral artemether-lumefantrine (median [interquartile range] areas under the concentration-time curve for artemether, 3,403 [2,471 to 4,771] versus 3,063 [2,358 to 4,514] μg · h/liter, respectively; and for DHA, 2,958 [2,146 to 4,278] versus 2,839 [1,812 to 3,488] μg · h/liter, respectively; P ≥ 0.42). These findings suggest that sublingual artemether could be used as prereferral treatment for sick

  4. How can we identify parasite genes that underlie antimalarial drug resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Tim; Nkhoma, Standwell; Ecker, Andrea; Fidock, David

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines genome-scale approaches that can be used to identify mutations in malaria (Plasmodium) parasites that underlie drug resistance and contribute to treatment failure. These approaches include genetic mapping by linkage or genome-wide association studies, drug selection and characterization of resistant mutants, and the identification of genome regions under strong recent selection. While these genomic approaches can identify candidate resistance loci, genetic manipulation is needed to demonstrate causality. We therefore also describe the growing arsenal of available transfection approaches for direct incrimination of mutations suspected to play a role in resistance. Our intention is both to review past progress and highlight promising approaches for future investigations. PMID:21174623

  5. Are transporter genes other than the chloroquine resistance locus (pfcrt) and multidrug resistance gene (pfmdr) associated with antimalarial drug resistance?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Timothy J C; Nair, Shalini; Qin, Huang; Singlam, Sittaporn; Brockman, Alan; Paiphun, Lucy; Nosten, François

    2005-06-01

    response to eight different antimalarial drugs. However, the consistent association observed between a 3-bp indel in G7 and AS response merits further investigation. PMID:15917511

  6. Inhibitors of the nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis as antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Jomaa, H; Wiesner, J; Sanderbrand, S; Altincicek, B; Weidemeyer, C; Hintz, M; Türbachova, I; Eberl, M; Zeidler, J; Lichtenthaler, H K; Soldati, D; Beck, E

    1999-09-01

    A mevalonate-independent pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis present in Plasmodium falciparum was shown to represent an effective target for chemotherapy of malaria. This pathway includes 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DOXP) as a key metabolite. The presence of two genes encoding the enzymes DOXP synthase and DOXP reductoisomerase suggests that isoprenoid biosynthesis in P. falciparum depends on the DOXP pathway. This pathway is probably located in the apicoplast. The recombinant P. falciparum DOXP reductoisomerase was inhibited by fosmidomycin and its derivative, FR-900098. Both drugs suppressed the in vitro growth of multidrug-resistant P. falciparum strains. After therapy with these drugs, mice infected with the rodent malaria parasite P. vinckei were cured. PMID:10477522

  7. Inhibition of native 5-HT3 receptor-evoked contractions in guinea pig and mouse ileum by antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Stephen P; Walsh, Jacqueline; Kelly, Mark C; Muhdar, Simerjyot; Adel-Aziz, Mohammed; Barrett, Iain D; Wildman, Scott S

    2014-09-01

    Quinine, chloroquine and mefloquine are commonly used to treat malaria, however, with associated gastrointestinal (GI) side-effects. These drugs act as antagonists at recombinant 5-HT3 receptors and modulate gut peristalsis. These gastrointestinal side effects may be the result of antagonism at intestinal 5-HT3 receptors. Ileum from male C57BL/6 mice and guinea pigs was mounted longitudinally in organ baths. The concentration-response curves for 5-HT and the selective 5-HT3 agonist 2-Me-5-HT were obtained with 5-HT (pEC50 = 7.57 ± 0.33, 12) more potent (P = 0.004) than 2-Me-5-HT (pEC50 = 5.45 ± 0.58, n = 5) in mouse ileum. There was no difference in potency of 5-HT (pEC50 = 5.42 ± 0.15, n = 8) and 2-Me-5-HT (pIC50 = 5.01 ± 0.55, n = 11) in guinea pig ileum (P > 0.05). Quinine, chloroquine or mefloquine was applied for 10 min and inhibitions prior to submaximal agonist application. In mouse ileum, quinine, chloroquine and mefloquine antagonised 5-HT-induced contractions (pIC50 = 4.9 ± 0.17, n = 7; 4.76 ± 0.14, n = 5; 6.21 ± 0.2, n = 4, correspondingly) with mefloquine most potent (P < 0.05). Quinine, chloroquine and mefloquine antagonised 2-me-5-HT-induced contractions (pIC50 = 6.35 ± 0.11, n = 8; 4.64 ± 0.2, n = 7; 5.11 ± 0.22, n = 6, correspondingly) with quinine most potent (P < 0.05). In guinea-pig ileum, quinine, chloroquine and mefloquine antagonised 5-HT-induced contractions (pIC50 = 5.02 ± 0.15, n = 6; 4.54 ± 0.1, n = 7; 5.32 ± 0.13, n = 5) and 2-me-5-HT-induced contractions (pIC50 = 4.62 ± 0.25, n = 5; 4.56 ± 0.14, n = 6; 5.67 ± 0.12, n = 4) with chloroquine least potent against 5-HT and mefloquine most potent against 2-me-5-HT (P < 0.05). These results support previous studies identifying anti-malarial drugs as antagonists at recombinant 5-HT3 receptors and may also demonstrate the ability of these drugs to influence native 5-HT3 receptor-evoked contractile responses which may account for their associated GI side-effects. PMID:24886883

  8. Malaria Related Perceptions, Care Seeking after Onset of Fever and Anti-Malarial Drug Use in Malaria Endemic Settings of Southwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Birhanu, Zewdie; Abebe, Lakew; Sudhakar, Morankar; Dissanayake, Gunawardena; Yihdego, Yemane Ye-ebiyo; Alemayehu, Guda; Yewhalaw, Delenasaw

    2016-01-01

    Background Prompt care seeking and appropriate use of anti-malarial drugs are critical components of malaria prevention and control. This study assessed malaria related perceptions, care seeking behavior and anti-malarial drug use in malaria endemic settings of Ethiopia. Methods Data were generated from a community based cross-sectional study conducted among 798 households during January 2014 as part of a larger household behavioral study in three malaria endemic districts of Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed using SPSS 17.0 and STATA 12.0. Results In this study, only 76.1% of the respondents associated malaria to mosquito bite, and incorrect beliefs and perceptions were noted. Despite moderate level of knowledge (estimated mean = 62.2, Std Err = 0.7, 95% CI: 60.6–63.8%), quite high favorable attitude (overall estimated mean = 91.5, Std Err = 0.6, 95% CI: 90.1–92.9%) were recorded towards malaria preventive measures. The mean attitude score for prompt care seeking, appropriate use of anti-malarial drugs, LLIN use and Indoor Residual Spray acceptance was 98.5 (Std Err = 0.4, 95% CI:97.5–99.4), 92.7 (Std Err = 0.6 95% CI:91.5–93.9), 88.8 (Std Err = 0.5, 95% CI:85.5–92.1) and 86.5 (Std Err = 1.2, 95% CI: 83.9–89.1), respectively. The prevalence of fever was 2.9% (116/4107) and of the study participants with fever, 71.9% (95% CI: 65.5–78.3%) sought care and all of them consulted formal health care system. However, only 17 (19.8%) sought care within 24 hours after onset of fever. The frequency of care seeking was higher (77.8%, n = 21/27) and more prompt (28.6%, 6/21) for children under five as compared to old age groups despite it was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). However, higher median time of seeking first care was observed among Muslims and people who did not attend school (p < 0.05). Of those who used anti-malarial drugs, 9.1% indicated that they used it inappropriately

  9. Plasmodial sugar transporters as anti-malarial drug targets and comparisons with other protozoa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy and a key substrate for most cells. Inhibition of cellular glucose uptake (the first step in its utilization) has, therefore, received attention as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat various unrelated diseases including malaria and cancers. For malaria, blood forms of parasites rely almost entirely on glycolysis for energy production and, without energy stores, they are dependent on the constant uptake of glucose. Plasmodium falciparum is the most dangerous human malarial parasite and its hexose transporter has been identified as being the major glucose transporter. In this review, recent progress regarding the validation and development of the P. falciparum hexose transporter as a drug target is described, highlighting the importance of robust target validation through both chemical and genetic methods. Therapeutic targeting potential of hexose transporters of other protozoan pathogens is also reviewed and discussed. PMID:21676209

  10. Effects of the antimalarial drugs ferroquine and artesunate on Plasmodium yoelii yoelii gametocytegenesis and vectorial transmission.

    PubMed

    Mustfa, Kamla; Landau, Irène; Chabaud, Alain-Gabriel; Chavatte, Jean-Marc; Chandenier, Jacques; Duong, Thanh Hai; Richard-Lenoble, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Chemistry still has a role in the management of malaria, alongside the mosquito netting soaked in insecticide that is used increasingly, as we continue to await the long anticipated vaccine. During its cycle, the hematozoon parasite develops through three major periods. The first, malarial infection, corresponds to the intrahepatic development of infective forms from the mosquito vector; this period is not sensitive to treatment and is often asymptomatic. The period of erythrocytic schizogony is the most urgent, and treatment activity is primordial. Finally, the phase of sexual reproduction, when gametocytes develop within the erythrocytes ensures the perpetuation of the species when these reach the blood-feeding female anopheles mosquitoes. The aim of our work was to study the effect on gametocytes of drugs known to be effective on the asexual blood forms of the protozoan and thus the potential repercussions on malaria transmission. This experimental study was conducted with an animal model whose parasite cycle and modes of transmission are close to those of human malaria: Plasmodium yoelii, maintained on Swiss mice, with the Anopheles stephensi vector (maintained in an animal facility at the National Museum of Natural History in Paris). Two drugs were tested: ferroquine (a chloroquine derivative with a ferrocene molecule at the lateral carbon chain that restores its efficacy against chloroquine-resistant strains) and artesunate (a derivative of artemisinin, from ginghao, a Chinese plant also known as artemisia annua, or sweet wormwood), a treatment of choice in the combined therapies recommended by WHO. The efficacy of these drugs, prescribed at doses subcurative for the asexual forms, were tested against gametocyte production, quantitatively by counting them in the blood and qualitatively by counting the quantity of oocysts developed on the mosquito's midgut, which are indicators of gametocyte activity. The mice that were parasite-infected and then treated

  11. Assessment of causal prophylactic activity in Plasmodium berghei yoelii and its value for the development of new antimalarial drugs*

    PubMed Central

    Fink, E.

    1974-01-01

    The causal prophylactic activity of several reference and experimental antimalarial compounds was assessed in sporozoite-induced infections of NMRI mice with Plasmodium berghei yoelii (strain 17X). The animals were inoculated with 10 000 sporozoites per mouse and treated once 2-4 hours later. The test system has proved to be very suitable in experiments involving more than 3 000 mice. The infection rate in 448 untreated controls was 97.3%. Lowering the sporozoite content of the inoculum to 1 000 or 100 sporozoites markedly reduced the rate (65.1% and 32.7%). In experiments with primaquine the causal prophylactic activity was also influenced by the time of drug administration before or after sporozoite inoculation. No causal prophylactic effect was demonstrable with quinine, chloroquine, amodiaquine, amopyroquine, RC-12, or B 505. Primaquine was active, but pamaquine and pentaquine were only sporadically active. The pre-erythrocytic stages of P. b. yoelii were only slightly sensitive to dapsone, sulfadiazine, and sulformethoxine; they were 10-100 times more susceptible to proguanil, cycloguanil, and pyrimethamine. The experimental 6-aminoquinolines NI 147/36, NI 187/82, and BA 138/111 and the 7-chlorolincomycin derivative U 24729 were also studied. Experiments in which curative activity against blood-induced infections of P. b. yoelii was evaluated showed that the causal prophylactics act more specifically against the pre-erythrocytic than against the erythrocytic forms. This specificity was most pronounced among the DHFR-inhibitors, whose outstanding activity may be explained by the fact that the rate of multiplication of the pre-erythrocytic forms of P. b. yoelii is greater than that of other plasmodia used hitherto; it is also greater than the rate shown by the malaria parasites of man and that of the erythrocytic forms of P. b. yoelii itself. We believe that this feature will render P. b. yoelii very useful for determination of the causal prophylactic activity

  12. Photoreactivity of biologically active compounds. XIX: excited states and free radicals from the antimalarial drug primaquine.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Solveig; Edge, Ruth; Tønnesen, Hanne Hjorth; Bisby, Roger Hugh; Navaratnam, Suppiah

    2009-03-01

    The formation and reactivity of excited states and free radicals from primaquine, a drug used in the treatment of malaria, was studied in order to evaluate the primary photochemical reaction mechanisms. The excited primaquine triplet was not detected, but is likely to be formed with a short lifetime (<50 ns) and with a triplet energy <250 kJ/mol as the drug is an efficient quencher of the fenbufen triplet and the biphenyl triplet, and forms (1)O(2) by laser flash photolysis ((PQ)Phi(Delta)=0.025). Primaquine (PQ) exists as the monocation (PQH(+)) in aqueous solution at physiological pH. PQH(+) photoionises by a biphotonic process and also forms the monoprotonated cation radical (PQH(2+)*) by one electron oxidation by HO* (k(q)=6.6 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)) and Br*(2)(-) (k(q)=4.7 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)) at physiological pH, detected as a long-lived transient decaying essentially by a second order process (k(2)=7.4 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)). PQH(2+)* is scavenged by O(2), although at a limited rate (k(q)=1.0 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)). The reduction potential (E degrees) of PQH(2+)*/PQH(+) is < +1015 mV, as measured versus tryptophan (TRP*/TRPH). Primaquine also forms PQH(2+)* at pH 2.4, by one electron oxidation by Br*(2)(-) and proton loss (k(q)=2.7 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)). The non-protonated cation radical (PQ(+)*) is formed during one electron oxidation with Br*(2)(-) at alkaline conditions (k(q)=4.2 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 10.8). The estimated pK(a)-value of PQH(2+)*/PQ(+)* is pK(a) approximately 7-8. Primaquine is not a scavenger of O*(2)(-) at physiological pH. Thus self-sensitization by O*(2)(-) is eliminated as a degradation pathway in the photochemical reactions. Impurities in the raw material and photochemical degradation products initiate photosensitized degradation of primaquine in deuterium oxide, prevented by addition of the (1)O(2) quencher sodium azide. Photosensitized degradation by formation of (1)O(2) is thus important for the initial photochemical decomposition of

  13. The effect of E. coli STa enterotoxin on the absorption of weakly dissociable anti-malarial drugs from rat intestine in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, J. M.; Lynch, J.; Lucas, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effect of E. coli heat stable (STa) enterotoxin on the absorption of radiolabelled anti-malarial weak bases and their appearance in peripheral blood was assessed in vivo by a recirculation procedure in rat intestinal loops. 2. Enterotoxin increased the jejunal disappearance of quinine (P less than 0.05), trimethoprim (P less than 0.05), proguanil (P less than 0.05) and chloroquine (P less than 0.001) and left pyrimethamine disappearance unaltered. Peripheral blood levels of trimethoprim (P less than 0.02) and proguanil (P less than 0.05) were higher after STa exposure. 3. In the ileum, enterotoxin increased the luminal disappearance (P less than 0.05) and peripheral blood appearance (P less than 0.001) of chloroquine. The luminal disappearance rate of trimethoprim was reduced (P less than 0.05) and that of pyrimethamine unchanged. 4. The increased jejunal absorption of the anti-malarial drugs occurred despite STa causing a reduction in the amount of net fluid absorption. It seems likely that the enhanced absorption with STa exposure is related to the effect of STa on the microclimate pH. An elevation in the microclimate pH would increase the amount of undissociated weak base available for non-ionic diffusion. 5. The favourable elevation of microclimate pH by STa seemed to be outweighted by the reduced fluid absorption in the ileum. Only chloroquine still showed enhanced absorption in the ileum and this may have been because unlike the other antimalarial drugs, chloroquine has two dissociable groups likely to be affected by the mucosal surface pH changes. PMID:1878755

  14. Research influence on antimalarial drug policy change in Tanzania: case study of replacing chloroquine with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine as the first-line drug

    PubMed Central

    Mubyazi, Godfrey M; Gonzalez-Block, Miguel A

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Research is an essential tool in facing the challenges of scaling up interventions and improving access to services. As in many other countries, the translation of research evidence into drug policy action in Tanzania is often constrained by poor communication between researchers and policy decision-makers, individual perceptions or attitudes towards the drug and hesitation by some policy decision-makers to approve change when they anticipate possible undesirable repercussions should the policy change as proposed. Internationally, literature on the role of researchers on national antimalarial drug policy change is limited. Objectives To describe the (a) role of researchers in producing evidence that influenced the Tanzanian government replace chloroquine (CQ) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) as the first-line drug and the challenges faced in convincing policy-makers, general practitioners, pharmaceutical industry and the general public on the need for change (b) challenges ahead before a new drug combination treatment policy is introduced in Tanzania. Methods In-depth interviews were held with national-level policy-makers, malaria control programme managers, pharmaceutical officers, general medical practitioners, medical research library and publications officers, university academicians, heads of medical research institutions and district and regional medical officers. Additional data were obtained through a review of malaria drug policy documents and participant observations were also done. Results In year 2001, the Tanzanian Government officially changed its malaria treatment policy guidelines whereby CQ – the first-line drug for a long time was replaced with SP. This policy decision was supported by research evidence indicating parasite resistance to CQ and clinical CQ treatment failure rates to have reached intolerable levels as compared to SP and amodiaquine (AQ). Research also indicated that since SP was also facing rising resistance trend

  15. Prevalence of In Vitro Resistance to Eleven Standard or New Antimalarial Drugs among Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Pointe-Noire, Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Pradines, Bruno; Hovette, Philippe; Fusai, Thierry; Atanda, Henri Léonard; Baret, Eric; Cheval, Philippe; Mosnier, Joel; Callec, Alain; Cren, Julien; Amalvict, Rémy; Gardair, Jean Pierre; Rogier, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    We determined the level of in vitro resistance of Plasmodium falciparum parasites to standard antimalarial drugs, such as chloroquine, quinine, amodiaquine, halofantrine, mefloquine, cycloguanil, and pyrimethamine, and to new compounds, such as dihydroartemisinin, doxycycline, atovaquone, and lumefantrine. The in vitro resistance to chloroquine reached 75.5%. Twenty-eight percent of the isolates were intermediate or had reduced susceptibility to quinine. Seventy-six percent and 96% of the tested isolates showed in vitro resistance or intermediate susceptibilities to cycloguanil and pyrimethamine, respectively. Only 2% of the parasites demonstrated in vitro resistance to monodesethylamodiaquine. No resistance was shown with halofantrine, lumefantrine, dihydroartemisinin, or atovaquone. Halofantrine, mefloquine, and lumefantrine demonstrated high correlation. No cross-resistance was identified between responses to monodesethyl-amodiaquine, dihydroartemisinin, atovaquone, and cycloguanil. Since the level of chloroquine resistance in vitro exceed an unacceptable upper limit, high rates of in vitro resistance to pyrimethamine and cycloguanil and diminution of the susceptibility to quinine, antimalarial drugs used in combination, such as amodiaquine, artemisinin derivatives, mefloquine, lumefantrine, or atovaquone, seem to be appropriate alternatives for the first line of treatment of acute, uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. PMID:16825356

  16. Induction of multiple pleiotropic drug resistance genes in yeast engineered to produce an increased level of anti-malarial drug precursor, artemisinic acid

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Ouellet, Mario; Paradise, Eric M; Burd, Helcio; Eng, Diana; Paddon, Chris J; Newman, Jack D; Keasling, Jay D

    2008-01-01

    Background Due to the global occurrence of multi-drug-resistant malarial parasites (Plasmodium falciparum), the anti-malarial drug most effective against malaria is artemisinin, a natural product (sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide) extracted from sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua). However, artemisinin is in short supply and unaffordable to most malaria patients. Artemisinin can be semi-synthesized from its precursor artemisinic acid, which can be synthesized from simple sugars using microorganisms genetically engineered with genes from A. annua. In order to develop an industrially competent yeast strain, detailed analyses of microbial physiology and development of gene expression strategies are required. Results Three plant genes coding for amorphadiene synthase, amorphadiene oxidase (AMO or CYP71AV1), and cytochrome P450 reductase, which in concert divert carbon flux from farnesyl diphosphate to artemisinic acid, were expressed from a single plasmid. The artemisinic acid production in the engineered yeast reached 250 μg mL-1 in shake-flask cultures and 1 g L-1 in bio-reactors with the use of Leu2d selection marker and appropriate medium formulation. When plasmid stability was measured, the yeast strain synthesizing amorphadiene alone maintained the plasmid in 84% of the cells, whereas the yeast strain synthesizing artemisinic acid showed poor plasmid stability. Inactivation of AMO by a point-mutation restored the high plasmid stability, indicating that the low plasmid stability is not caused by production of the AMO protein but by artemisinic acid synthesis or accumulation. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and quantitative real time-PCR consistently showed that pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) genes, belonging to the family of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter, were massively induced in the yeast strain producing artemisinic acid, relative to the yeast strain producing the hydrocarbon amorphadiene alone. Global transcriptional analysis by

  17. New Antimalarial Hits from Dacryodes edulis (Burseraceae) - Part I: Isolation, In Vitro Activity, In Silico “drug-likeness” and Pharmacokinetic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zofou, Denis; Tematio, Esther Laure; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Tene, Mathieu; Ngemenya, Moses N.; Tane, Pierre; Titanji, Vincent P. K.

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to identify the compounds responsible for the anti-malarial activity of Dacryoedes edulis (Burseraceae) and to investigate their suitability as leads for the treatment of drug resistant malaria. Five compounds were isolated from ethyl acetate and hexane extracts of D. edulis stem bark and tested against 3D7 (chloroquine-susceptible) and Dd2 (multidrug-resistant) strains of Plasmodium falciparum, using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase method. Cytotoxicity studies were carried out on LLC-MK2 monkey kidney epithelial cell-line. In silico analysis was conducted by calculating molecular descriptors using the MOE software running on a Linux workstation. The “drug-likeness” of the isolated compounds was assessed using Lipinski criteria, from computed molecular properties of the geometry optimized structures. Computed descriptors often used to predict absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination and toxicity (ADMET) were used to assess the pharmacokinetic profiles of the isolated compounds. Antiplasmodial activity was demonstrated for the first time in five major natural products previously identified in D. edulis, but not tested against malaria parasites. The most active compound identified was termed DES4. It had IC50 values of 0.37 and 0.55 µg/mL, against 3D7 and Dd2 respectively. In addition, this compound was shown to act in synergy with quinine, satisfied all criteria of “Drug-likeness” and showed considerable probability of providing an antimalarial lead. The remaining four compounds also showed antiplasmodial activity, but were less effective than DES4. None of the tested compounds was cytotoxicity against LLC-MK2 cells, suggesting their selective activities on malaria parasites. Based on the high in vitro activity, low toxicity and predicted “Drug-likeness” DES4 merits further investigation as a possible drug lead for the treatment of malaria. PMID:24282507

  18. Recent developments in naturally derived antimalarials: cryptolepine analogues.

    PubMed

    Wright, Colin W

    2007-06-01

    Increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to commonly used antimalarial drugs has made the need for new agents increasingly urgent. In this paper, the potential of cryptolepine, an alkaloid from the West African shrub Cryptolepis sanguinolenta, as a lead towards new antimalarial agents is discussed. Several cryptolepine analogues have been synthesized that have promising in-vitro and in-vivo antimalarial activity. Studies on the antimalarial modes of action of these analogues indicate that they may have different or additional modes of action to the parent compound. Elucidation of the mode of action may facilitate the development of more potent antimalarial cryptolepine analogues. PMID:17637183

  19. High School Students Are a Target Group for Fight against Self-Medication with Antimalarial Drugs: A Pilot Study in University of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Kabongo Kamitalu, Ramsès; Aloni, Michel Ntetani

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess the self-medication against malaria infection in population of Congolese students in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out in University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Medical records of all students with malaria admitted to Centre de Santé Universitaire of University of Kinshasa from January 1, 2008, to April 30, 2008, were reviewed retrospectively. Results. The median age of the patients was 25.4 years (range: from 18 to 36 years). The majority of them were male (67.9%). Artemisinin-based combination treatments (ACTs) was the most used self-prescribed antimalarial drugs. However, self-medication was associated with the ingestion of quinine in 19.9% of cases. No case of ingestion of artesunate/artemether in monotherapy was found. All the medicines taken were registered in DRC. In this series, self-prescribed antimalarial was very irrational in terms of dose and duration of treatment. Conclusion. This paper highlights self-medication by a group who should be aware of malaria treatment protocols. The level of self-prescribing quinine is relatively high among students and is disturbing for a molecule reserved for severe disease in Congolese health care policy in management of malaria. PMID:27340411

  20. Comparative protein modeling of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase enzyme from Plasmodium falciparum: a potential target for antimalarial drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nidhi; Chevé, Gwénaël; Avery, Mitchell A; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2006-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (Pf-DXR) is a potential target for antimalarial chemotherapy. The three-dimensional model (3D) of this enzyme was determined by means of comparative modeling through multiple alignment followed by intensive optimization, minimization, and validation. The resulting model demonstrates a reasonable topology as gauged from the Ramachandran plot and acceptable three-dimensional structure compatibility as assessed by the Profiles-3D score. The modeled monomeric subunit consists of three domains: (1) N-terminal NADPH binding domain, (2) connective or linker domain (with most of the active site residues located in this domain), and (3) a C-terminal domain. This structure proved to be consistent with known DXR crystal structures from other species. The predicted active site compared favorably with those of the templates and appears to have an active site with a highly conserved architecture. Additionally, the model explains several site-directed mutagenesis data. Besides using several protein structure-checking programs to validate the model, a set of known inhibitors of DXR were also docked into the active site of the modeled Pf-DXR. The docked scores correlated reasonably well with experimental pIC50 values with a regression coefficient (R2) equal to 0.84. Results of the current study should prove useful in the early design and development of inhibitors by either de novo drug design or virtual screening of large small-molecule databases leading to development of new antimalarial agents. PMID:16711755

  1. High School Students Are a Target Group for Fight against Self-Medication with Antimalarial Drugs: A Pilot Study in University of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Kabongo Kamitalu, Ramsès; Aloni, Michel Ntetani

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess the self-medication against malaria infection in population of Congolese students in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out in University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Medical records of all students with malaria admitted to Centre de Santé Universitaire of University of Kinshasa from January 1, 2008, to April 30, 2008, were reviewed retrospectively. Results. The median age of the patients was 25.4 years (range: from 18 to 36 years). The majority of them were male (67.9%). Artemisinin-based combination treatments (ACTs) was the most used self-prescribed antimalarial drugs. However, self-medication was associated with the ingestion of quinine in 19.9% of cases. No case of ingestion of artesunate/artemether in monotherapy was found. All the medicines taken were registered in DRC. In this series, self-prescribed antimalarial was very irrational in terms of dose and duration of treatment. Conclusion. This paper highlights self-medication by a group who should be aware of malaria treatment protocols. The level of self-prescribing quinine is relatively high among students and is disturbing for a molecule reserved for severe disease in Congolese health care policy in management of malaria. PMID:27340411

  2. Absence of Association between Polymorphisms in the RING E3 Ubiquitin Protein Ligase Gene and Ex Vivo Susceptibility to Conventional Antimalarial Drugs in Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Dakar, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Gendrot, Mathieu; Fall, Bécaye; Madamet, Marylin; Fall, Mansour; Wade, Khalifa Ababacar; Amalvict, Rémy; Nakoulima, Aminata; Benoit, Nicolas; Diawara, Silman; Diémé, Yaya; Diatta, Bakary; Wade, Boubacar; Pradines, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    The RING E3 ubiquitin protein ligase is crucial for facilitating the transfer of ubiquitin. The only polymorphism identified in the E3 ubiquitin protein ligase gene was the D113N mutation (62.5%) but was not significantly associated with the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of conventional antimalarial drugs. However, some mutated isolates (D113N) present a trend of reduced susceptibility to piperaquine (P = 0.0938). To evaluate the association of D113N polymorphism with susceptibility to antimalarials, more isolates are necessary. PMID:27185795

  3. Use of the atmospheric generators for capnophilic bacteria Genbag-CO2 for the evaluation of in vitro Plasmodium falciparum susceptibility to standard anti-malarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the cultivation system in which the proper atmospheric conditions for growing Plasmodium falciparum parasites were maintained in a sealed bag. The Genbag® system associated with the atmospheric generators for capnophilic bacteria Genbag CO2® was used for in vitro susceptibility test of nine standard anti-malarial drugs and compared to standard incubator conditions. Methods The susceptibility of 36 pre-identified parasite strains from a wide panel of countries was assessed for nine standard anti-malarial drugs (chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine, monodesethylamodiaquine, lumefantrine, dihydroartemisinin, atovaquone and pyrimethamine) by the standard 42-hour 3H-hypoxanthine uptake inhibition method using the Genbag CO2® system and compared to controlled incubator conditions (5% CO2 and 10% O2). Results The counts per minute values in the control wells in incubator atmospheric conditions (5% CO2 and 10% O2) were significantly higher than those of Genbag® conditions (2738 cpm vs 2282 cpm, p < 0.0001). The geometric mean IC50 estimated under the incubator atmospheric conditions was significantly lower for atovaquone (1.2 vs 2.1 nM, p = 0.0011) and higher for the quinolines: chloroquine (127 vs 94 nM, p < 0.0001), quinine (580 vs 439 nM, p < 0.0001), monodesethylamodiaquine (41.4 vs 31.8 nM, p < 0.0001), mefloquine (57.5 vs 49.7 nM, p = 0.0011) and lumefantrine (23.8 vs 21.2 nM, p = 0.0044). There was no significant difference of IC50 between the 2 conditions for dihydroartemisinin, doxycycline and pyrimethamine. To reduce this difference in term of anti-malarial susceptibility, a specific cut-off was estimated for each drug under Genbag® conditions by regression. The cut-off was estimated at 77 nM for chloroquine (vs 100 nM in 10% O2), 611 nM for quinine (vs 800 nM), 30 nM for mefloquine (vs 30 nM), 61 nM for monodesethylamodiaquine (vs 80 nM) and 1729 nM for pyrimethamine (vs 2000 nM). Conclusions The atmospheric

  4. Use of bacterial surrogates as a tool to explore antimalarial drug interaction: Synergism between inhibitors of malarial dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthase.

    PubMed

    Talawanich, Yuwadee; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Sirawaraporn, Worachart; Yuthavong, Yongyuth

    2015-09-01

    Interaction between antimalarial drugs is important in determining the outcome of chemotherapy using drug combinations. Inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) such as pyrimethamine and of dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) such as sulfa drugs are known to have synergistic interactions. However, studies of the synergism are complicated by the fact that the malaria parasite can also salvage exogenous folates, and the salvage may also be affected by the drugs. It is desirable to have a convenient system to study interaction of DHFR and DHPS inhibitors without such complications. Here, we describe the use of Escherichia coli transformed with malarial DHFR and DHPS, while its own corresponding genes have been inactivated by optimal concentration of trimethoprim and genetic knockout, respectively, to study the interaction of the inhibitors. Marked synergistic effects are observed for all combinations of pyrimethamine and sulfa inhibitors in the presence of trimethoprim. At 0.05μM trimethoprim, sum of fractional inhibitory concentrations, ΣFIC of pyrimethamine with sulfadoxine, pyrimethamine with sulfathiazole, pyrimethamine with sulfamethoxazole, and pyrimethamine with dapsone are in the range of 0.24-0.41. These results show synergism between inhibitors of the two enzymes even in the absence of folate transport and uptake. This bacterial surrogate system should be useful as a tool for assessing the interactions of drug combinations between the DHFR and DHPS inhibitors. PMID:25997881

  5. Progress in the understanding of the key pharmacophoric features of the antimalarial drug dihydroartemisinin: an experimental and theoretical charge density study.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Gabriele; Soave, Raffaella; Lo Presti, Leonardo; Destro, Riccardo

    2013-03-01

    The accurate, experimental charge density distribution, ρ(r), of the potent antimalarial drug dihydroartemisinin (DHA) has been derived for the first time from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data at T=100(2) K. Gas-phase and solid-state DFT simulations have also been performed to provide a firm basis of comparison with experimental results. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) has been employed to analyse the ρ(r) scalar field, with the aim of classifying and quantifying the key real-space elements responsible for the known pharmacophoric features of DHA. From the conformational perspective, the bicyclo[3.2.2]nonane system fixes the three-dimensional arrangement of the 1,2,4-trioxane bearing the active O-O redox centre. This is the most nucleophilic function in DHA and acts as an important CH⋅⋅⋅O acceptor. On the contrary, the rest of the molecular backbone is almost neutral, in accordance with the lipophilic character of the compound. Another remarkable feature is the C-O bond length alternation along the O-C-O-C polyether chain, due to correlations between pairs of adjacent C-O bonds. These bonding features have been related with possible reactivity routes of the α- and β-DHA epimers, namely 1) the base-catalysed hemiacetal breakdown and 2) the peroxide reduction. As a general conclusion, the base-driven proton transfer has significant non-local effects on the whole polyether chain, whereas DHA reduction is thermodynamically favourable and invariably leads to a significant weakening (or even breaking) of the O-O bond. The influence of the hemiacetal stereochemistry on the electronic properties of the system has also been considered. Such findings are discussed in the context of the known chemical reactivity of this class of important antimalarial drugs. PMID:23355355

  6. Traditionally-used antimalarials from the Meliaceae.

    PubMed

    Omar, S; Zhang, J; MacKinnon, S; Leaman, D; Durst, T; Philogene, B J R; Arnason, J T; Sanchez-Vindas, P E; Poveda, L; Tamez, P A; Pezzuto, J M

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative ethnobotanical approach to antimalarial drug discovery led to the identification of Lansium domesticum Corr. Ser. (Meliaceae) as an important antimalarial used by Kenyah Dyak healers in Indonesian Borneo. Triterpenoid lansiolides with antimalarial activity were isolated from the bark and shown to have activity in both in vitro bioassays with Plasmodium falciparum, and in mice infected with P. berghei. A survey of African and tropical American Meliaceae led to further development of the limonoid gedunin from the traditionally used medicinal plants, tropical cedar, Cedrela odorata L., and neem, Azadirachta indica A. Juss. Gedunin has significant in vitro activity but initially showed poor in vivo activity. In vivo activity was improved by (1) incorporation into an easy to absorb suspension, (2) preparation of a more stable compound, 7-methoxygedunin; and (3) synergism with dillapiol, a cytochrome P450 3A4 inhibitor. The results show the potential for both antimalarial drug and phytomedicine development from traditionally used plants. PMID:12570769

  7. Capillary electrophoresis methods for the analysis of antimalarials. Part I. Chiral separation methods.

    PubMed

    Amin, N'cho Christophe; Blanchin, Marie-Dominique; Aké, Michèle; Fabre, Huguette

    2012-11-16

    This paper presents an overview on the current status of enantiomeric and diastereomeric separations of chiral antimalarials and derivatives by capillary electrophoresis (CE). The wide variety of chiral selectors which have been employed to resolve successfully antimalarial enantiomers: oligosaccharides (cyclodextrins, oligomaltodextrins), neutral (amylose, dextrin and dextran) and charged (chondroitin sulfate, heparin, dextran sulfate) polysaccharides and proteins are reviewed. Cyclodextrins were the most employed. Chiral additives added to the background electrolyte often facilitated separations of quinine/quinidine and cinchonine/cinchonidine diastereomers. However, in a few cases, using micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography or non aqueous CE, resolution of diastereomers could be achieved without additives. Quantitative applications of CE to the quality control of antimalarial drugs and their analysis in biological and food matrices are presented. PMID:23063793

  8. Antimalarials in dermatology: mechanism of action, indications, and side effects.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Caruncho, C; Bielsa Marsol, I

    2014-04-01

    Antimalarial drugs have been in common use in dermatology since the 1950s. Their mechanism of action is complex, and it is now known that they act through various pathways. We review the indications for antimalarials in dermatology, their adverse effects, and some less well-known effects, such as their antithrombotic and hypolipidemic action. The most recent recommendations concerning ophthalmological screening in patients on antimalarials are also reviewed. PMID:24656224

  9. Quinoline-based antimalarial hybrid compounds.

    PubMed

    Vandekerckhove, Stéphanie; D'hooghe, Matthias

    2015-08-15

    Quinoline-containing compounds, such as quinine and chloroquine, have a long-standing history as potent antimalarial agents. However, the increasing resistance of the Plasmodium parasite against these drugs and the lack of licensed malaria vaccines have forced chemists to develop synthetic strategies toward novel biologically active molecules. A strategy that has attracted considerable attention in current medicinal chemistry is based on the conjugation of two biologically active molecules into one hybrid compound. Since quinolines are considered to be privileged antimalarial building blocks, the synthesis of quinoline-containing antimalarial hybrids has been elaborated extensively in recent years. This review provides a literature overview of antimalarial hybrid molecules containing a quinoline core, covering publications between 2009 and 2014. PMID:25593097

  10. Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harparkash; Clarke, Siȃn; Lalani, Mirza; Phanouvong, Souly; Guérin, Philippe; McLoughlin, Andrew; Wilson, Benjamin K; Deats, Michael; Plançon, Aline; Hopkins, Heidi; Miranda, Debora; Schellenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    This meeting report presents the key findings and discussion points of a 1-day meeting entitled 'Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts' held on 28th May 2015, in Geneva, Switzerland, to disseminate the findings of the artemisinin combination therapy consortium's drug quality programme. The teams purchased over 10,000 samples, using representative sampling approaches, from six malaria endemic countries: Equatorial Guinea (Bioko Island), Cambodia, Ghana, Nigeria, Rwanda and Tanzania. Laboratory analyses of these samples showed that falsified anti-malarials (<8 %) were found in just two of the countries, whilst substandard artemisinin-based combinations were present in all six countries and, artemisinin-based monotherapy tablets are still available in some places despite the fact that the WHO has urged regulatory authorities in malaria-endemic countries to take measures to halt the production and marketing of these oral monotherapies since 2007. This report summarizes the presentations that reviewed the public health impact of falsified and substandard drugs, sampling strategies, techniques for drug quality analysis, approaches to strengthen health systems capacity for the surveillance of drug quality, and the ensuing discussion points from the dissemination meeting. PMID:26873700

  11. Time Course of the Changes in Novel Trioxane Antimalarial 99/411 Pharmacokinetics upon Antiepileptic Drugs Co-Administration in SD Rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yeshwant; Kushwaha, Hari Narayan; Misra, Anamika; Hidau, Mahendra Kumar; Singh, Shio Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The study aimed to evaluate the influences of coadministration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on an antimalarial candidate 99/411 pharmacokinetic (PK) profile. Method. For this, single oral dose PK drug interaction studies were conducted between 99/411 and FDA approved AEDs, namely, Phenytoin (PHT), Carbamazepine (CBZ), and Gabapentin (GB) in both male and female SD rats, to assess the coadministered and intersexual influences on 99/411 PK profile. Results. Studies revealed that there were no significant alterations in the PK profile of 99/411 upon PHT and CBZ coadministration in both male and female rats, while systemic exposure of 99/411 was significantly increased by about 80% in female rats upon GB coadministration. In terms of AUC, there was an increase from 2471 ± 586 to 4560 ± 1396 ng·h/mL. Overall, it was concluded that simultaneous administration of AEDs with 99/411 excludes the requirements for dose adjustment, additional therapeutic monitoring, contraindication to concomitant use, and/or other measures to mitigate risk, except for GB coadministration in females. These findings are further helpful to predict such interactions in humans, when potentially applied through proper allometric scaling to extrapolate the data. PMID:25383231

  12. Finding parasites and finding challenges: improved diagnostic access and trends in reported malaria and anti-malarial drug use in Livingstone district, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the impact of malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) use on management of acute febrile disease at a community level, and on the consumption of anti-malarial medicines, is critical to the planning and success of scale-up to universal parasite-based diagnosis by health systems in malaria-endemic countries. Methods A retrospective study of district-wide community-level RDT introduction was conducted in Livingstone District, Zambia, to assess the impact of this programmed on malaria reporting, incidence of mortality and on district anti-malarial consumption. Results Reported malaria declined from 12,186 cases in the quarter prior to RDT introduction in 2007 to an average of 12.25 confirmed and 294 unconfirmed malaria cases per quarter over the year to September 2009. Reported malaria-like fever also declined, with only 4,381 RDTs being consumed per quarter over the same year. Reported malaria mortality declined to zero in the year to September 2009, and all-cause mortality declined. Consumption of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) dropped dramatically, but remained above reported malaria, declining from 12,550 courses dispensed by the district office in the quarter prior to RDT implementation to an average of 822 per quarter over the last year. Quinine consumption in health centres also declined, with the district office ceasing to supply due to low usage, but requests for sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) rose to well above previous levels, suggesting substitution of ACT with this drug in RDT-negative cases. Conclusions RDT introduction led to a large decline in reported malaria cases and in ACT consumption in Livingstone district. Reported malaria mortality declined to zero, indicating safety of the new diagnostic regime, although adherence and/or use of RDTs was still incomplete. However, a deficiency is apparent in management of non-malarial fever, with inappropriate use of a low-cost single dose drug, SP, replacing ACT. While large

  13. Structural modifications of quinoline-based antimalarial agents: Recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Bawa, Sandhya; Kumar, Suresh; Drabu, Sushma; Kumar, Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs constitute a major part of antiprotozoal drugs and have been in practice for a long time. Antimalarial agents generally belong to the class of quinoline which acts by interfering with heme metabolism. The recent increase in development of chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum and failure of vaccination program against malaria have fuelled the drug discovery program against this old and widespread disease. Quinoline and its related derivative comprise a class of heterocycles, which has been exploited immensely than any other nucleus for the development of potent antimalarial agents. Various chemical modifications of quinoline have been attempted to achieve analogs with potent antimalarial properties against sensitive as well as resistant strains of Plasmodium sp., together with minimal potential undesirable side effects. This review outlines essentially some of the recent chemical modifications undertaken for the development of potent antimalarial agents based on quinoline. PMID:21814435

  14. Evaluation of aminohydantoins as a novel class of antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Marvin J; Tortorella, Micky D; Xu, Jing; Qin, Limei; He, Zhengxiang; Lang, Xingfen; Zeng, Wentian; Xu, Wanwan; Qin, Li; Prinsen, Michael J; Sverdrup, Francis M; Eickhoff, Christopher S; Griggs, David W; Oliva, Jonathan; Ruminski, Peter G; Jacobsen, E Jon; Campbell, Mary A; Wood, David C; Goldberg, Daniel E; Liu, Xiaorong; Lu, Yongzhi; Lu, Xin; Tu, Zhengchao; Lu, Xiaoyun; Ding, Ke; Chen, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Given the threat of drug resistance, there is an acute need for new classes of antimalarial agents that act via a unique mechanism of action relative to currently used drugs. We have identified a set of druglike compounds within the Tres Cantos Anti-Malarial Set (TCAMS) which likely act via inhibition of a Plasmodium aspartic protease. Structure-activity relationship analysis and optimization of these aminohydantoins demonstrate that these compounds are potent nanomolar inhibitors of the Plasmodium aspartic proteases PM-II and PM-IV and likely one or more other Plasmodium aspartic proteases. Incorporation of a bulky group, such as a cyclohexyl group, on the aminohydantion N-3 position gives enhanced antimalarial potency while reducing inhibition of human aspartic proteases such as BACE. We have identified compound 8p (CWHM-117) as a promising lead for optimization as an antimalarial drug with a low molecular weight, modest lipophilicity, oral bioavailability, and in vivo antimalarial activity in mice. PMID:24900778

  15. [Animal drugs quality status and reason analysis].

    PubMed

    Ding, Qing; Qiu, Ya-jing; Fang, Ke-hui; Hu, Hao-bin; Wu, Yue

    2015-11-01

    In order to reaction the quality present situation, problems on the current quality of animal sources of drugs are summed up by using test data analysis, literature search and marketing research. This paper can also help the improvement of the quality management, the revision of the relevant department policy system and the improvement of standards. PMID:27071276

  16. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors: New class of antimalarials on the horizon?

    PubMed

    Pathak, Vrushali; Colah, Roshan; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-08-01

    Development of the antimalarial drug resistant strains has currently become a major public health challenge. There is an urgent need to develop new antimalarial drugs. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are receiving increasing attention as anticancer therapy. It has revolutionarised the management of CML to say the least. TKIs are also increasingly being implicated in complicated but vital life cycle of malaria parasite. Hence we tested two commonly used but different classes of TKIs (imatinib and sorafenib) in-vitro for their antimalarial activity and possible synergistic activity with existing antimalarial drug. Antimalarial activity was tested with the help of modified WHO microtest technique in-vitro for five different Plasmodium falciparum laboratory strains (3D7, Dd2, 7G8, MRC2, PKL9). Imatinib and sorafenib showed a promising antimalarial activity with all the strains. These compounds caused dose dependent inhibition of parasite maturation. The isobologram analysis of the interactions of these TKIs with standard antimalarial drug, artesunate revealed distinct patterns of synergism, additivity and antagonism at different ratios. Imatinib showed worthwhile synergism with artesunate indicating imatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors may have significant antimalarial activity and can be used in combination therapy. PMID:26142327

  17. Assessment of the efficacy of antimalarial drugs recommended by the National Malaria Control Programme in Madagascar: Up-dated baseline data from randomized and multi-site clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Didier; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Rabarijaona, Léon-Paul; Raharimalala, Lucie; Domarle, Olivier; Randrianasolo, Laurence; Randriamanantena, Arthur; Jahevitra, Martial; Andriantsoanirina, Valérie; Rason, Marie-Ange; Raherinjafy, Rogelin; Rakotomalala, Emma; Tuseo, Luciano; Raveloson, Andrianirina

    2008-01-01

    Background In order to improve the monitoring of the antimalarial drug resistance in Madagascar, a new national network based on eight sentinel sites was set up. In 2006/2007, a multi-site randomized clinical trial was designed to assess the therapeutic efficacy of chloroquine (CQ), sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), amodiaquine (AQ) and artesunate plus amodiaquine combination (ASAQ), the antimalarial therapies recommended by the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP). Methods Children between six months and 15 years of age, with uncomplicated falciparum malaria, were enrolled. Primary endpoints were the day-14 and day-28 risks of parasitological failure, either unadjusted or adjusted by genotyping. Risks of clinical and parasitological treatment failure after adjustment by genotyping were estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Secondary outcomes included fever clearance, parasite clearance, change in haemoglobin levels between Day 0 and the last day of follow-up, and the incidence of adverse events. Results A total of 1,347 of 1,434 patients (93.9%) completed treatment and follow-up to day 28. All treatment regimens, except for the chloroquine (CQ) treatment group, resulted in clinical cure rates above 97.6% by day-14 and 96.7% by day-28 (adjusted by genotyping). Parasite and fever clearance was more rapid with artesunate plus amodiaquine, but the extent of haematological recovery on day-28 did not differ significantly between the four groups. No severe side-effects were observed during the follow-up period. Conclusion These findings (i) constitute an up-dated baseline data on the efficacy of antimalarial drugs recommended by the NMCP, (ii) show that antimalarial drug resistance remains low in Madagascar, except for CQ, compared to the bordering countries in the Indian Ocean region such as the Comoros Archipelago and (iii) support the current policy of ASAQ as the first-line treatment in uncomplicated falciparum malaria. PMID:18394169

  18. Genotoxic effects of the antimalarial drug lumefantrine in human lymphocytes in vitro and computational prediction of the mechanism associated with its interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    de Lucca, Renato M R; Batista Júnior, João; Fontes, Cor J Fernandes; Bahia, Marcelo de Oliveira; Bassi-Branco, Carmen L

    2015-07-01

    Lumefantrine (LF) is an aryl-amino alcohol antimalarial drug used in artemisinin-based combination therapies against malaria worldwide. In this study, we investigated the genotoxic effects of LF in human lymphocytes in vitro, and the potential noncovalent interaction of LF with DNA using a 3D DNA-docking model. The number of DNA breaks and the frequency of nuclear buds (NBUDS) was significantly increased (P < 0.01 and P < 0. 05, respectively) at LF concentrations of 60, 80, and 100 µg/mL (LF60, LF80, and LF100, respectively). Frequency (‰) of micronuclei (MN) formation also increased after LF treatments. However, this was only significant for LF100 (P = 0.01) and LF80 (P = 0.001). LF did not affect the frequency of nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) (P = 0.12) or the nuclear division index (NDI) (P = 0.32). Computational analysis suggests that LF may interact noncovalently with DNA via the DNA minor groove surface with a predicted binding affinity energy of -7.2 kcal/mol and showing a favorable shape complementary to this groove. Our results suggest that LF has clastogenic effects in human lymphocytes in vitro due to noncovalent interaction with the minor groove of DNA. PMID:25821123

  19. Ex vivo anti-malarial drugs sensitivity profile of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from Burkina Faso five years after the national policy change

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent reports on the decreasing susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to artemisinin derivatives along the Thailand and Myanmar border are worrying. Indeed it may spread to India and then Africa, repeating the same pattern observed for chloroquine resistance. Therefore, it is essential to start monitoring P. falciparum sensitivity to artemisinin derivatives and its partner drugs in Africa. Efficacy of AL and ASAQ were tested by carrying out an in vivo drug efficacy test, with an ex vivo study against six anti-malarial drugs nested into it. Results of the latter are reported here. Methods Plasmodium falciparum ex-vivo susceptibility to chloroquine (CQ), quinine (Q), lumefantrine (Lum), monodesethylamodiaquine (MDA), piperaquine (PPQ) and dihydroartemisinin (DHA) was investigated in children (6 months – 15 years) with a parasitaemia of at least ≥4,000/μl. The modified isotopic microtest technique was used. The results of cellular proliferation were analysed using ICEstimator software to determine the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values. Results DHA was the most potent among the 6 drugs tested, with IC50 values ranging from 0.8 nM to 0.9 nM (Geometric mean IC50 = 0.8 nM; 95% CI [0.8 - 0.9]). High IC50 values ranged between 0.8 nM to 166.1 nM were reported for lumefantrine (Geometric mean IC50 = 25.1 nM; 95% CI [22.4 - 28.2]). MDA and Q IC50s were significantly higher in CQ-resistant than in CQ-sensitive isolates (P = 0.0001). However, the opposite occurred for Lum and DHA (P < 0.001). No difference was observed for PPQ. Conclusion Artemisinin derivatives are still very efficacious in Burkina Faso and DHA-PPQ seems a valuable alternative ACT. The high lumefantrine IC50 found in this study is worrying as it may indicate a decreasing efficacy of one of the first-line treatments. This should be further investigated and monitored over time with large in vivo and ex vivo studies that will include also plasma drug measurements

  20. Immunoliposome-mediated drug delivery to Plasmodium-infected and non-infected red blood cells as a dual therapeutic/prophylactic antimalarial strategy.

    PubMed

    Moles, Ernest; Urbán, Patricia; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Viera-Morilla, Sara; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Busquets, Maria Antònia; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2015-07-28

    One of the most important factors behind resistance evolution in malaria is the failure to deliver sufficiently high amounts of drugs to early stages of Plasmodium-infected red blood cells (pRBCs). Despite having been considered for decades as a promising approach, the delivery of antimalarials encapsulated in immunoliposomes targeted to pRBCs has not progressed towards clinical applications, whereas in vitro assays rarely reach drug efficacy improvements above 10-fold. Here we show that encapsulation efficiencies reaching >96% are achieved for the weak basic drugs chloroquine (CQ) and primaquine using the pH gradient loading method in liposomes containing neutral saturated phospholipids. Targeting antibodies are best conjugated through their primary amino groups, adjusting chemical crosslinker concentration to retain significant antigen recognition. Antigens from non-parasitized RBCs have also been considered as targets for the delivery to the cell of drugs not affecting the erythrocytic metabolism. Using this strategy, we have achieved unprecedented complete nanocarrier targeting to early intraerythrocytic stages of the malaria parasite for which there is a lack of specific extracellular molecular tags. Immunoliposomes studded with monoclonal antibodies raised against the erythrocyte surface protein glycophorin A were capable of targeting 100% RBCs and pRBCs at the low concentration of 0.5μM total lipid in the culture, with >95% of added liposomes retained on cell surfaces. When exposed for only 15min to Plasmodium falciparum in vitro cultures of early stages, free CQ had no significant effect on the viability of the parasite up to 200nM, whereas immunoliposomal 50nM CQ completely arrested its growth. In vivo assays in mice showed that immunoliposomes cleared the pathogen below detectable levels at a CQ dose of 0.5mg/kg, whereas free CQ administered at 1.75mg/kg was, at most, 40-fold less efficient. Our data suggest that this significant improvement is in part

  1. Antimalarial Activity of Cupredoxins

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Donaire, Antonio; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Curd, Rachel D.; Rangachari, Kaveri; Birdsall, Berry; Ramos, Andres; Holder, Anthony A.; De la Rosa, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of effective new antimalarial agents is urgently needed. One of the most frequently studied molecules anchored to the parasite surface is the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP1). At red blood cell invasion MSP1 is proteolytically processed, and the 19-kDa C-terminal fragment (MSP119) remains on the surface and is taken into the red blood cell, where it is transferred to the food vacuole and persists until the end of the intracellular cycle. Because a number of specific antibodies inhibit erythrocyte invasion and parasite growth, MSP119 is therefore a promising target against malaria. Given the structural homology of cupredoxins with the Fab domain of monoclonal antibodies, an approach combining NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements with docking calculations based on BiGGER is employed on MSP119-cupredoxin complexes. Among the cupredoxins tested, rusticyanin forms a well defined complex with MSP119 at a site that overlaps with the surface recognized by the inhibitory antibodies. The addition of holo-rusticyanin to infected cells results in parasitemia inhibition, but negligible effects on parasite growth can be observed for apo-rusticyanin and other proteins of the cupredoxin family. These findings point to rusticyanin as an excellent therapeutic tool for malaria treatment and provide valuable information for drug design. PMID:23749994

  2. Repurposing the anti-malarial drug artesunate as a novel therapeutic agent for metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to its attenuation of tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sharon; Lee, Se Jeong; Lim, Joung Eun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Seong Soo; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hye Won

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of molecularly targeted therapies, metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is still incurable. Artesunate (ART), a well-known anti-malarial drug with low toxicity, exhibits highly selective anti-tumor actions against various tumors through generation of cytotoxic carbon-centered free radical in the presence of free iron. However, the therapeutic efficacy of ART against metastatic RCC has not yet been fully elucidated. In the analysis on a dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n = 469) and a tissue microarray set from Samsung Medical Center (n = 119) from a cohort of patients with clear cell RCC (ccRCC), up-regulation of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), which is a well-known predictive marker for ART, was correlated with the presence of distant metastasis and an unfavorable prognosis. Moreover, ART exerted potent selective cytotoxicity against human RCC cell lines (Caki-1, 786-O, and SN12C-GFP-SRLu2) and sensitized these cells to sorafenib in vitro, and the extent of ART cytotoxicity correlated with TfR1 expression. ART-mediated growth inhibition of human RCC cell lines was shown to result from the induction of cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and oncosis-like cell death. Furthermore, ART inhibited cell clonogenicity and invasion of human RCC cells and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with these in vitro data, anti-tumor, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects of ART were also validated in human 786-O xenografts. Taken together, ART is a promising novel candidate for treating human RCC, either alone or in combination with other therapies. PMID:26426994

  3. Investigations of the effects of the antimalarial drug dihydroartemisinin (DHA) using the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX).

    PubMed

    Longo, Monica; Zanoncelli, Sara; Della Torre, Paola; Rosa, Francesco; Giusti, AnnaMaria; Colombo, Paolo; Brughera, Marco; Mazué, Guy; Olliaro, Piero

    2008-08-01

    Artemisinin derivatives are effective and safe drugs for treating malaria, but they are not recommended during the first trimester of pregnancy because of resorptions and abnormalities observed in animal reproduction studies. Previous studies in rats showed that artemisinin embryotoxicity derives from the depletion of primitive red blood cells (RBCs) over a narrow critical time window (gestation Days 9-14). In order to further investigate the susceptibility of primitive RBCs to artemisinins and to establish whether this susceptibility is species-specific or inherent to the compound, we studied dihydroartemisinin (DHA), both a drug in its own right and the main metabolite of current artemisinin derivatives in use, in the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX). This model readily allows investigation and monitoring of primitive and definitive RBCs. Effects on frog larvae exposed to DHA for 48 h during early embryonic development, starting from 24 h post fertilization, were similar to those on rat embryos in terms of reduction in the number of primitive RBCs (clonally produced within the ventral blood island). In contrast, RBCs of older larvae (stage 47, produced at the definitive sites of hematopoiesis) were affected minimally and subsequently recovered. Compared to rat embryos, the frog larvae had no areas of necrosis but they shared similar heart defects. The mitochondrion appeared to be the main subcellular target, similar to observations in Plasmodium. These results implicate artemisinin-induced embryotoxicity through perturbation of metabolically active RBCs; whereas this mode of action does not appear to be species-specific, the stages of susceptibility varied between different species. The window of susceptibility and duration of exposure must be considered to evaluate the clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:18394862

  4. A combined within-host and between-hosts modelling framework for the evolution of resistance to antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Legros, Mathieu; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The spread of drug resistance represents a significant challenge to many disease control efforts. The evolution of resistance is a complex process influenced by transmission dynamics between hosts as well as infection dynamics within these hosts. This study aims to investigate how these two processes combine to impact the evolution of resistance in malaria parasites. We introduce a stochastic modelling framework combining an epidemiological model of Plasmodium transmission and an explicit within-human infection model for two competing strains. Immunity, treatment and resistance costs are included in the within-host model. We show that the spread of resistance is generally less likely in areas of intense transmission, and therefore of increased competition between strains, an effect exacerbated when costs of resistance are higher. We also illustrate how treatment influences the spread of resistance, with a trade-off between slowing resistance and curbing disease incidence. We show that treatment coverage has a stronger impact on disease prevalence, whereas treatment efficacy primarily affects resistance spread, suggesting that coverage should constitute the primary focus of control efforts. Finally, we illustrate the importance of feedbacks between modelling scales. Overall, our results underline the importance of concomitantly modelling the evolution of resistance within and between hosts. PMID:27075004

  5. A combined within-host and between-hosts modelling framework for the evolution of resistance to antimalarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The spread of drug resistance represents a significant challenge to many disease control efforts. The evolution of resistance is a complex process influenced by transmission dynamics between hosts as well as infection dynamics within these hosts. This study aims to investigate how these two processes combine to impact the evolution of resistance in malaria parasites. We introduce a stochastic modelling framework combining an epidemiological model of Plasmodium transmission and an explicit within-human infection model for two competing strains. Immunity, treatment and resistance costs are included in the within-host model. We show that the spread of resistance is generally less likely in areas of intense transmission, and therefore of increased competition between strains, an effect exacerbated when costs of resistance are higher. We also illustrate how treatment influences the spread of resistance, with a trade-off between slowing resistance and curbing disease incidence. We show that treatment coverage has a stronger impact on disease prevalence, whereas treatment efficacy primarily affects resistance spread, suggesting that coverage should constitute the primary focus of control efforts. Finally, we illustrate the importance of feedbacks between modelling scales. Overall, our results underline the importance of concomitantly modelling the evolution of resistance within and between hosts. PMID:27075004

  6. The malaria parasite cation ATPase PfATP4 and its role in the mechanism of action of a new arsenal of antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Spillman, Natalie Jane; Kirk, Kiaran

    2015-12-01

    The intraerythrocytic malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, maintains a low cytosolic Na(+) concentration and the plasma membrane P-type cation translocating ATPase 'PfATP4' has been implicated as playing a key role in this process. PfATP4 has been the subject of significant attention in recent years as mutations in this protein confer resistance to a growing number of new antimalarial compounds, including the spiroindolones, the pyrazoles, the dihydroisoquinolones, and a number of the antimalarial agents in the Medicines for Malaria Venture's 'Malaria Box'. On exposure of parasites to these compounds there is a rapid disruption of cytosolic Na(+). Whether, and if so how, such chemically distinct compounds interact with PfATP4, and how such interactions lead to parasite death, is not yet clear. The fact that multiple different chemical classes have converged upon PfATP4 highlights its significance as a potential target for new generation antimalarial agents. A spiroindolone (KAE609, now known as cipargamin) has progressed through Phase I and IIa clinical trials with favourable results. In this review we consider the physiological role of PfATP4, summarise the current repertoire of antimalarial compounds for which PfATP4 is implicated in their mechanism of action, and provide an outlook on translation from target identification in the laboratory to patient treatment in the field. PMID:26401486

  7. The malaria parasite cation ATPase PfATP4 and its role in the mechanism of action of a new arsenal of antimalarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    Spillman, Natalie Jane; Kirk, Kiaran

    2015-01-01

    The intraerythrocytic malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, maintains a low cytosolic Na+ concentration and the plasma membrane P-type cation translocating ATPase ‘PfATP4’ has been implicated as playing a key role in this process. PfATP4 has been the subject of significant attention in recent years as mutations in this protein confer resistance to a growing number of new antimalarial compounds, including the spiroindolones, the pyrazoles, the dihydroisoquinolones, and a number of the antimalarial agents in the Medicines for Malaria Venture's ‘Malaria Box’. On exposure of parasites to these compounds there is a rapid disruption of cytosolic Na+. Whether, and if so how, such chemically distinct compounds interact with PfATP4, and how such interactions lead to parasite death, is not yet clear. The fact that multiple different chemical classes have converged upon PfATP4 highlights its significance as a potential target for new generation antimalarial agents. A spiroindolone (KAE609, now known as cipargamin) has progressed through Phase I and IIa clinical trials with favourable results. In this review we consider the physiological role of PfATP4, summarise the current repertoire of antimalarial compounds for which PfATP4 is implicated in their mechanism of action, and provide an outlook on translation from target identification in the laboratory to patient treatment in the field. PMID:26401486

  8. Selection of antimalarial drug resistance after intermittent preventive treatment of infants and children (IPTi/c) in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Magatte; Tine, Roger; Faye, Babacar; Ndiaye, Jean L; Diouf, Ibrahima; Lo, Aminata C; Sylla, Khadime; Dieng, Yemou; Hallett, Rachel; Alifrangis, Michael; Gaye, Oumar

    2013-01-01

    Senegal has since 2003 used sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPT) of malaria in risk groups. However, the large-scale IPT strategy may result in increasing drug resistance. Our study investigated the possible impact of SP-IPT given to infants and children on the prevalence of SP-resistant haplotypes in the Plasmodium falciparum genes Pfdhfr and Pfdhps, comparing sites with and without IPTi/c. P. falciparum positives samples (n=352) were collected from children under 5years of age during two cross-sectional surveys in 2010 and 2011 in three health districts (two on IPTi/c and one without IPTi/c intervention) located in the southern part of Senegal. The prevalence of SP-resistance-related haplotypes in Pfdhfr and Pfdhps was determined by nested PCR followed by sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe (SSOP)-ELISA. The prevalence of the Pfdhfr double mutant haplotypes (CNRN and CICN) was stable between years at<10% in the control group (P=0.69), while it rose significantly in the IPTi/c group from 2% in 2010 to 20% in 2011 (P=0.008). The prevalence of the Pfdhfr triple mutant haplotype (CIRN) increased in both groups, but only significantly in the IPTi/c group from 41% to 65% in 2011 (P=0.005). Conversely, the Pfdhps 437G mutation decreased in both groups from 44.6% to 28.6% (P=0.07) and from 66.7% to 47.5% (P=0.02) between 2010 and 2011 in the control and the IPTi/c groups, respectively. Combined with Pfdhfr, there was a weak trend for decreasing prevalence of quadruple mutants (triple Pfdhfr+Pfdhps 437G) in both groups (P=0.15 and P=0.34). During the two cross-sectional surveys, some significant changes were observed in the SP-resistance-related genes. However, since these changes were observed in the two groups, the IPTi/c strategy does only seem to have limited impact on resistance development and other factors as well. However, continuous monitoring will be needed, due to the up-scaling of the IPTi/c strategy in Senegal

  9. Adverse drug events resulting from use of drugs with sulphonamide-containing anti-malarials and artemisinin-based ingredients: findings on incidence and household costs from three districts with routine demographic surveillance systems in rural Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anti-malarial regimens containing sulphonamide or artemisinin ingredients are widely used in malaria-endemic countries. However, evidence of the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADR) to these drugs is limited, especially in Africa, and there is a complete absence of information on the economic burden such ADR place on patients. This study aimed to document ADR incidence and associated household costs in three high malaria transmission districts in rural Tanzania covered by demographic surveillance systems. Methods Active and passive surveillance methods were used to identify ADR from sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and artemisinin (AS) use. ADR were identified by trained clinicians at health facilities (passive surveillance) and through cross-sectional household surveys (active surveillance). Potential cases were followed up at home, where a complete history and physical examination was undertaken, and household cost data collected. Patients were classified as having ‘possible’ or ‘probable’ ADR by a physician. Results A total of 95 suspected ADR were identified during a two-year period, of which 79 were traced, and 67 reported use of SP and/or AS prior to ADR onset. Thirty-four cases were classified as ‘probable’ and 33 as ‘possible’ ADRs. Most (53) cases were associated with SP monotherapy, 13 with the AS/SP combination (available in one of the two areas only), and one with AS monotherapy. Annual ADR incidence per 100,000 exposures was estimated based on ‘probable’ ADR only at 5.6 for AS/SP in combination, and 25.0 and 11.6 for SP monotherapy. Median ADR treatment costs per episode ranged from US$2.23 for those making a single provider visit to US$146.93 for patients with four visits. Seventy-three per cent of patients used out-of-pocket funds or sold part of their farm harvests to pay for treatment, and 19% borrowed money. Conclusion Both passive and active surveillance methods proved feasible methods for anti-malarial ADR

  10. Counterfeit and Substandard Antimalarial Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... a CDC Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  11. In Silico Mining for Antimalarial Structure-Activity Knowledge and Discovery of Novel Antimalarial Curcuminoids.

    PubMed

    Viira, Birgit; Gendron, Thibault; Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Cojean, Sandrine; Horvath, Dragos; Marcou, Gilles; Varnek, Alexandre; Maes, Louis; Maran, Uko; Loiseau, Philippe M; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a parasitic tropical disease that kills around 600,000 patients every year. The emergence of resistant Plasmodium falciparum parasites to artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) represents a significant public health threat, indicating the urgent need for new effective compounds to reverse ACT resistance and cure the disease. For this, extensive curation and homogenization of experimental anti-Plasmodium screening data from both in-house and ChEMBL sources were conducted. As a result, a coherent strategy was established that allowed compiling coherent training sets that associate compound structures to the respective antimalarial activity measurements. Seventeen of these training sets led to the successful generation of classification models discriminating whether a compound has a significant probability to be active under the specific conditions of the antimalarial test associated with each set. These models were used in consensus prediction of the most likely active from a series of curcuminoids available in-house. Positive predictions together with a few predicted as inactive were then submitted to experimental in vitro antimalarial testing. A large majority from predicted compounds showed antimalarial activity, but not those predicted as inactive, thus experimentally validating the in silico screening approach. The herein proposed consensus machine learning approach showed its potential to reduce the cost and duration of antimalarial drug discovery. PMID:27367660

  12. A “reverse pharmacology” approach for developing an anti-malarial phytomedicine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A “reverse pharmacology” approach to developing an anti-malarial phytomedicine was designed and implemented in Mali, resulting in a new standardized herbal anti-malarial after six years of research. The first step was to select a remedy for development, through a retrospective treatment-outcome study. The second step was a dose-escalating clinical trial that showed a dose-response phenomenon and helped select the safest and most efficacious dose. The third step was a randomized controlled trial to compare the phytomedicine to the standard first-line treatment. The last step was to identify active compounds which can be used as markers for standardization and quality control. This example of “reverse pharmacology” shows that a standardized phytomedicine can be developed faster and more cheaply than conventional drugs. Even if both approaches are not fully comparable, their efficiency in terms of public health and their complementarity should be thoroughly considered. PMID:21411019

  13. Screening for antimalarial maculopathy in rheumatology clinics.

    PubMed Central

    Fleck, B W; Bell, A L; Mitchell, J D; Thomson, B J; Hurst, N P; Nuki, G

    1985-01-01

    Ophthalmoscopy and three tests of visual function were undertaken in 39 patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving treatment with antimalarial drugs and in a control group of 16 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were not receiving such treatment. Visual contrast sensitivity, macular threshold to red light, and central visual fields to red targets were not significantly different in treated patients and controls. There were no abnormalities in visual acuity, but 11 of 76 eyes of treated patients showed minor macular abnormalities on ophthalmoscopy that were not seen in control patients, suggesting that ophthalmoscopy may be the most sensitive measure of early drug toxicity. Five rheumatologists were able to identify 52 of 65 minor changes detected by an ophthalmologist. These studies, and a critical review of published reports, suggest that in clinical practice antimalarial drugs can be administered safely to patients with rheumatoid arthritis without the need for repetitive routine examination by an ophthalmologist or the use of complicated physiological tests. Recording of visual acuity in each eye and ophthalmoscopy by the prescribing doctor may be all that are required to detect early antimalarial maculopathy. PMID:3929938

  14. Antimalarial properties of imipramine and amitriptyline

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.; Siegel, L.; Pinto, J.; Meshnick, S.

    1986-03-01

    This laboratory has previously demonstrated that imipramine (IM) and amitriptyline (AM), inhibit the conversion of riboflavin to its coenzymic derivatives. Several other laboratories have shown that dietary riboflavin deficiency is protective against malarial infection. In the present investigation, the authors determined whether IM and AM exert antimalarial effects similar to that of riboflavin deficiency, as they have hypothesized. In addition, they evaluated whether these drugs, like other antimalarial agents, increase the hemolytic response to ferriprotoporphyrin IX (FP). The growth of P. falciparum (FCR3) in the absence or presence of these drugs (80 ..mu..M) was measured by incubating parasitized erythrocytes for 48 h in RPMI 1640 medium. Parasitemia was determined by counting erythrocyte smears and monitoring (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine uptake. With no drug, parasitemia was 20.3 +/- 5.3%, whereas in the presence of IM and AM, parasitemia was reduced to 7.3 +/- 0.8% and 13.6 +/- 2.8%, respectively. The uptake of (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine was reduced to 47 +/- 3.6% and 54 +/- 2.9% of control by IM and AM, respectively. Assays of hemolysis were conducted by incubating 0.5% RBC suspension in NaCl-Tris buffer for 3 h at 37/sup 0/C with variable concentrations of drugs and/or FP (1-7 ..mu..M). Both drugs at 10 to 100 ..mu..M significantly enhanced hemolysis induced by FP. No hemolysis by these drugs was detected in the absence of FP. It is concluded that the tricyclic antidepressants, IM and AM, possess substantial antimalarial properties, thereby supporting the hypothesis that drugs which interfere with riboflavin metabolism should also provide protection against malaria.

  15. [Historical overview of antimalarials used in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Zerpa de Artiles, N

    1993-06-01

    A historical review of antimalarials used in Venezuela is presented from the time when the bark of quina was used until the massive distribution of quinine and metoquine by the Dirección de Malariología y Saneamiento Ambiental. The utility of chloroquine and primaquine against sensible parasite isolates and of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and quinine, currently used against P. falciparum resistant strains, is thoroughly discussed. The author suggests use of artemisimine and its derivatives as a very promising antimalarial drug. She also stresses the possibility of the application of new antimalaria vaccine against P. falciparum blood states, presently assayed in the country as an additional tool in malaria control programs. PMID:11640680

  16. Synthesis and antimalarial activity of chain substituted pivaloyloxymethyl ester analogues of Fosmidomycin and FR900098.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Thomas; Schlüter, Katrin; Kaula, Uwe; Bergmann, Bärbel; Walter, Rolf D; Geffken, Detlef

    2006-08-01

    Fosmidomycin is a promising antimalarial drug candidate with a unique chemical structure and a novel mode of action. Chain substituted pivaloyloxymethyl ester derivatives of Fosmidomycin and its acetyl analogue FR900098 have been synthesized and their in vitro antimalarial activity versus the Chloroquine sensitive strain 3D7 of Plasmodium falciparum has been determined. PMID:16679022

  17. Improving the drug quality and safety net.

    PubMed

    Carter, Alan

    2014-07-01

    When large quantities of contaminated, subpotent, or superpotent drugs are introduced into the medical supply pipeline, injury or death of hundreds or thousands of patients can occur. Tracing the origin of substandard and dangerous products and tracking across regions and countries where shipped is quite costly in both money and time. From patients' perspective, timely access to quality product is paramount. Receiving deficient product threatens their survival and creates huge sums of financial cost to both them and the medical system. With the passage of HR 3204 the FDA must now find a way to be proactive in policing the global medical product supply line without restricting market availability. Without a comprehensive, world-focused implementation plan these new regulations will fail to protect the public. PMID:24876419

  18. Antimalarial activity of extracts of Malaysian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Najib Nik A Rahman, N; Furuta, T; Kojima, S; Takane, K; Ali Mohd, M

    1999-03-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies revealed that Malaysian medicinal plants, Piper sarmentosum, Andrographis paniculata and Tinospora crispa produced considerable antimalarial effects. Chloroform extract in vitro did show better effect than the methanol extract. The chloroform extract showed complete parasite growth inhibition as low as 0.05 mg/ml drug dose within 24 h incubation period (Andrographis paniculata) as compared to methanol extract of drug dose of 2.5 mg/ml but under incubation time of 48 h of the same plant spesies. In vivo activity of Andrographis paniculata also demonstrated higher antimalarial effect than other two plant species. PMID:10363840

  19. Chitosan-based nanocarriers for antimalarials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreve, Simina; Kacso, Iren; Popa, Adriana; Raita, Oana; Bende, A.; Borodi, Gh.; Bratu, I.

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this research was to synthesize and characterize chitosan-based liquid and solid materials with unique absorptive and mechanical properties as carriers for quinine - one of the most used antimalarial drug. The use of chitosan (CTS) as base in polyelectrolyte complex systems, to prepare solid release systems as sponges is presented. The preparation by double emulsification of CTS hydrogels carrying quinine as anti-malarial drug is reported. The concentration of quinine in the CTS hydrogel was 0.08 mmol. Chitosan - drug loaded hydrogel was used to generate solid sponges by freeze-drying at -610°C and 0.09 atm. Structural investigations of the solid formulations were done by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS), spectrofluorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffractometry. The results indicated that the drug molecule is forming temporary chelates in CTS hydrogels and sponges. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) demonstrates the presence of free radicals in a wide range and the antioxidant activity for chitosan - drug supramolecular cross-linked assemblies.

  20. Antimalarial properties of SAABMAL®: an ethnomedicinal polyherbal formulation for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria infection in the tropics

    PubMed Central

    Obidike, I.C.; Amodu, B.; Emeje, M.O.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Malaria is a serious problem in the countries of the developing world. As the malaria parasite has become resistant to most of the antimalaria drugs available currently, there is a need to search for newer drugs. This study reports the pharmaceutical quality and in vivo antimalarial activities of a polyherbal formulation (SAABMAL®) used as malarial remedy in Nigeria. Methods: The antiplasmodial activity of SAABMAL® was determined by using the 4-day suppressive test in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. The formulation was tried on three different experimental animal models for in vivo antimalarial activities, which are prophylactic, suppressive and curative in mice. Chloroquine and pyrimethamine were used as standard drugs for comparison. Results: The suppressive study showed that, SAABMAL® (200 and 400 mg/kg/bw) significantly (P<0.01) produced a suppression (29.39 - 100%) of parasitaemia in a dose-dependent manner, while the curative study showed that SAABMAL® at 400 mg significantly (P<0.01) reduced (95.80%) parasitaemia compared with controls. The mean survival time of SAABMAL®-treated groups (100 and 200 mg/kg) was higher than that of the chloroquine-treated group. Histopathologically, no changes were found in the spleen of both untreated and treated groups. SAABMAL® capsules were of good mechanical properties with low weight variation and high degree of content mass uniformity. Interpretation & conclusions: The results obtained in this study showed the efficacy of SAABMAL®, a herbal antimalarial formulation against chloroquine sensitive malaria and its potential use in the treatment of uncomplicated malaria infection. Further studies need to be done in humans to test its efficacy and safety for its potential use as an antimalarial drug. PMID:25900958

  1. Reaction of antimalarial endoperoxides with specific parasite proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Asawamahasakda, W; Ittarat, I; Pu, Y M; Ziffer, H; Meshnick, S R

    1994-01-01

    The endoperoxides are a new class of antimalarial agents, of which artemisinin (qinghaosu) is the prototype. We have previously shown that artemisinin is capable of alkylating proteins in model reactions. In the present study, we showed that when Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes are treated with a radiolabeled antimalarial endoperoxide, either arteether, dihydroartemisinin, or Ro 42-1611 (arteflene), the radioactivity is largely coverted into a form which can be extracted with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Autoradiograms of SDS-polyacrylamide gels showed that six malarial proteins are radioactively labeled by the three endoperoxides. This labeling occurs at physiological concentrations of drug and is not stage nor strain specific. The labeled proteins were not the most abundant proteins seen on Coomassie-stained gels. No proteins were labeled when uninfected erythrocytes were treated with these drugs, nor when infected erythrocytes were treated with the inactive analog deoxyarteether. Thus, the antimalarial endoperoxides appear to react with specific malarial proteins. Images PMID:7986020

  2. Antimalarial plants of northeast India: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Rama; Deb, Sourabh; Sharma, B K

    2012-01-01

    The need for an alternative drug for malaria initiated intensive efforts for developing new antimalarials from indigenous plants. The information from different tribal communities of northeast India along with research papers, including books, journals and documents of different universities and institutes of northeast India was collected for information on botanical therapies and plant species used for malaria. Sixty-eight plant species belonging to 33 families are used by the people of northeast India for the treatment of malaria. Six plant species, namely, Alstonia scholaris, Coptis teeta, Crotolaria occulta, Ocimum sanctum, Polygala persicariaefolia, Vitex peduncularis, have been reported by more than one worker from different parts of northeast India. The species reported to be used for the treatment of malaria were either found around the vicinity of their habitation or in the forest area of northeast India. The most frequently used plant parts were leaves (33%), roots (31%), and bark and whole plant (12%). The present study has compiled and enlisted the antimalarial plants of northeast India, which would help future workers to find out the suitable antimalarial plants by thorough study. PMID:22529674

  3. On the molecular basis of the activity of the antimalarial drug chloroquine: EXAFS-assisted DFT evidence of a direct Fe-N bond with free heme in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macetti, Giovanni; Rizzato, Silvia; Beghi, Fabio; Silvestrini, Lucia; Lo Presti, Leonardo

    2016-02-01

    4-aminoquinoline antiplasmodials interfere with the biocrystallization of the malaria pigment, a key step of the malaria parasite metabolism. It is commonly believed that these drugs set stacking π···π interactions with the Fe-protoporphyrin scaffold of the free heme, even though the details of the heme:drug recognition process remain elusive. In this work, the local coordination of Fe(III) ions in acidic solutions of hematin at room temperature was investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy in the 4.0-5.5 pH range, both in the presence and in the absence of the antimalarial drug chloroquine. EXAFS results were complemented by DFT simulations in polarizable continuum media to model solvent effects. We found evidence that a complex where the drug quinoline nitrogen is coordinated with the iron center might coexist with formerly proposed adduct geometries, based on stacking interactions. Charge-assisted hydrogen bonds among lateral chains of the two molecules play a crucial role in stabilizing this complex, whose formation is favored by the presence of lipid micelles. The direct Fe-N bond could reversibly block the axial position in the Fe 1st coordination shell in free heme, acting as an inhibitor for the crystallization of the malaria pigment without permanently hampering the catalytic activity of the redox center. These findings are discussed in the light of possible implications on the engineering of drugs able to thwart the adaptability of the malaria parasite against classical aminoquinoline-based therapies.

  4. [Quality management systems in drugs regulatory authorities: social impact].

    PubMed

    Frías-Ferreiro, G; Ysa-Sánchez, A M; García-Gutiérrez, B; García-García, V

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to illustrate the social impact of drugs regulatory authorities' procedures, viewed from the perspective of the implementation of a quality management system. A review of drug regulations and their influence on quality and health systems is described. PMID:19857983

  5. In Vitro Susceptibility of Plasmodium vivax to Antimalarials in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Diana; Segura, César; Arboleda, Margarita; Garavito, Giovanny; Blair, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 30 isolates of Plasmodium vivax to a number of antimalarials (chloroquine [CQ], mefloquine, amodiaquine, quinine, and artesunate [AS]) were evaluated. The isolates came from the region of Urabá in Colombia, in which malaria is endemic, and were evaluated by the schizont maturation test. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was 0.6 nM (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3 to 1.0 nM) for artesunate, 8.5 nM (95% CI, 5.6 to 13.0 nM) for amodiaquine, 23.3 nM (95% CI, 12.4 to 44.1 nM) for chloroquine, 55.6 nM (95% CI, 36.8 to 84.1 nM) for mefloquine, and 115.3 nM (95% CI, 57.7 to 230.5 nM) for quinine. The isolates were classified according to whether the initial parasites were mature or immature trophozoites (Tfz). It was found that the IC50s for chloroquine and artesunate were significantly different in the two aforementioned groups (P < 0.001). The IC50s of CQ and AS were higher in the isolates from mature Tfz (CQ, 39.3 nM versus 17 nM; AS, 1.4 nM versus 0.3 nM), and 10% of the isolates showed lower susceptibilities to one of the antimalarial drugs, 13.3% to two antimalarial drugs, and 3.3% to more than three antimalarial drugs. It should be highlighted that despite the extensive use of chloroquine in Colombia, P. vivax continues to be susceptible to antimalarials. This is the first report, to our knowledge, showing in vitro susceptibilities of P. vivax isolates to antimalarials in Colombia. PMID:25114141

  6. Drug safety and efficacy impaired by quality failure.

    PubMed

    Ekiert, R J

    2011-06-01

    The three main pillars of drug evaluation are quality, safety and efficacy. Each marketing authorization dossier has to demonstrate conformity with quality, safety and efficacy requirements separately. While this is justifiable, it may nevertheless lead to some important problems being overlooked. The relationship between these three aspects of a medicinal product can be of great importance. Little is said about how quality can affect safety or even efficacy. It is worth discussing these connections in order to assess side-effects appropriately and to distinguish between quality failures and real pharmacovigilance problems. Not every side-effect is a result of the drug's pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic properties or other therapy-related issues such as interactions. Sometimes a patient complaint is caused by substandard quality of the drug. This possibility should never be ignored in any assessment of side-effects. This paper presents a useful check-list of quality failures that can endanger drug safety. PMID:21699091

  7. Detecting Counterfeit Antimalarial Tablets by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Counterfeit antimalarial drugs are found in many developing countries, but it is challenging to differentiate between genuine and fakes due to their increasing sophistication. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a powerful tool in pharmaceutical forensics, and we tested this technique for discrim...

  8. 4-aminoquinoline based molecular hybrids as antimalarials: an overview.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Sunny; Tripathi, Mohit; Rawat, Diwan S

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, the novel concept of generating hybrid molecules by pharmacophoric hybridisation approach is fast becoming an alternative to other existing strategies of drug development. These hybrids also known as 'dual drugs' or 'double drugs' are especially found to be effective in overcoming drug resistance problems. Towards this end, a lot of effort has been put for generating 4-aminoquinoline based hybrid molecules as next generation antimalarial drugs effective in malarial chemotherapy. This short review deals about the recent advances carried in the field of 4-aminoquinoline based molecular hybrids as potential antimalarial agents. It also presents a brief and simplified story on the development of 4-aminoquinolines as a mainstay in malarial research programmes. PMID:25116580

  9. Potent Plasmodium falciparum gametocytocidal activity of diaminonaphthoquinones, lead antimalarial chemotypes identified in an antimalarial compound screen.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takeshi Q; Guiguemde, W Armand; Barnett, David S; Maron, Maxim I; Min, Jaeki; Connelly, Michele C; Suryadevara, Praveen Kumar; Guy, R Kiplin; Williamson, Kim C

    2015-03-01

    Forty percent of the world's population is threatened by malaria, which is caused by Plasmodium parasites and results in an estimated 200 million clinical cases and 650,000 deaths each year. Drug resistance has been reported for all commonly used antimalarials and has prompted screens to identify new drug candidates. However, many of these new candidates have not been evaluated against the parasite stage responsible for transmission, gametocytes. If Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes are not eliminated, patients continue to spread malaria for weeks after asexual parasite clearance. Asymptomatic individuals can also harbor gametocyte burdens sufficient for transmission, and a safe, effective gametocytocidal agent could also be used in community-wide malaria control programs. Here, we identify 15 small molecules with nanomolar activity against late-stage gametocytes. Fourteen are diaminonaphthoquinones (DANQs), and one is a 2-imino-benzo[d]imidazole (IBI). One of the DANQs identified, SJ000030570, is a lead antimalarial candidate. In contrast, 94% of the 650 compounds tested are inactive against late-stage gametocytes. Consistent with the ineffectiveness of most approved antimalarials against gametocytes, of the 19 novel compounds with activity against known anti-asexual-stage targets, only 3 had any strong effect on gametocyte viability. These data demonstrate the distinct biology of the transmission stages and emphasize the importance of screening for gametocytocidal activity. The potent gametocytocidal activity of DANQ and IBI coupled with their efficacy against asexual parasites provides leads for the development of antimalarials with the potential to prevent both the symptoms and the spread of malaria. PMID:25512421

  10. Potent Plasmodium falciparum Gametocytocidal Activity of Diaminonaphthoquinones, Lead Antimalarial Chemotypes Identified in an Antimalarial Compound Screen

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takeshi Q; Guiguemde, W. Armand; Barnett, David S.; Maron, Maxim I.; Min, Jaeki; Connelly, Michele C.; Suryadevara, Praveen Kumar; Guy, R. Kiplin

    2014-01-01

    Forty percent of the world's population is threatened by malaria, which is caused by Plasmodium parasites and results in an estimated 200 million clinical cases and 650,000 deaths each year. Drug resistance has been reported for all commonly used antimalarials and has prompted screens to identify new drug candidates. However, many of these new candidates have not been evaluated against the parasite stage responsible for transmission, gametocytes. If Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes are not eliminated, patients continue to spread malaria for weeks after asexual parasite clearance. Asymptomatic individuals can also harbor gametocyte burdens sufficient for transmission, and a safe, effective gametocytocidal agent could also be used in community-wide malaria control programs. Here, we identify 15 small molecules with nanomolar activity against late-stage gametocytes. Fourteen are diaminonaphthoquinones (DANQs), and one is a 2-imino-benzo[d]imidazole (IBI). One of the DANQs identified, SJ000030570, is a lead antimalarial candidate. In contrast, 94% of the 650 compounds tested are inactive against late-stage gametocytes. Consistent with the ineffectiveness of most approved antimalarials against gametocytes, of the 19 novel compounds with activity against known anti-asexual-stage targets, only 3 had any strong effect on gametocyte viability. These data demonstrate the distinct biology of the transmission stages and emphasize the importance of screening for gametocytocidal activity. The potent gametocytocidal activity of DANQ and IBI coupled with their efficacy against asexual parasites provides leads for the development of antimalarials with the potential to prevent both the symptoms and the spread of malaria. PMID:25512421

  11. Artemisinin and the antimalarial endoperoxides: from herbal remedy to targeted chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Meshnick, S R; Taylor, T E; Kamchonwongpaisan, S

    1996-01-01

    Artemisinin and its derivatives are endoperoxide-containing compounds which represent a promising new class of antimalarial drugs. In the presence of intraparasitic iron, these drugs are converted into free radicals and other electrophilic intermediates which then alkylate specific malaria target proteins. Combinations of available derivatives and other antimalarial agents show promise both as first-line agents and in the treatment of severe disease. PMID:8801435

  12. QSAR and pharmacophore modeling of natural and synthetic antimalarial prodiginines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Baljinder; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Bharate, Sandip B

    2013-09-01

    Prodiginines are a family of linear and cyclic oligopyrrole red-pigmented compounds possessing antibacterial, anticancer and immunosuppressive activities and are produced by actinomycetes and other eubacteria. Recently, prodiginines have been reported to possess potent in vitro as well as in vivo antimalarial activity against chloroquine sensitive D6 and multi-drug resistant Dd2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum. In the present paper, a QSAR and pharmacophore modeling for a series of natural and synthetic prodiginines was performed to find out structural features which are crucial for antimalarial activity against these D6 and Dd2 Plasmodium strains. The study indicated that inertia moment 2 length, Kier Chi6 (path) index, kappa 3 index and Wiener topological index plays important role in antimalarial activity against D6 strain whereas descriptors inertia moment 2 length, ADME H-bond donors, VAMP polarization XX component and VAMP quadpole XZ component play important role in antimalarial activity against Dd2 strain. Furthermore, a five-point pharmacophore (ADHRR) model with one H-bond acceptor (A), one H-bond donor (D), one hydrophobic group (H) and two aromatic rings (R) as pharmacophore features was developed for D6 strain by PHASE module of Schrodinger suite. Similarly a six-point pharmacophore AADDRR was developed for Dd2 strain activity. All developed QSAR models showed good correlation coefficient (r² > 0.7), higher F value (F >20) and excellent predictive power (Q² > 0.6). Developed models will be highly useful for predicting antimalarial activity of new compounds and could help in designing better molecules with enhanced antimalarial activity. Furthermore, calculated ADME properties indicated drug-likeness of prodiginines. PMID:24010933

  13. Quality of Artemisinin-Based Combination Formulations for Malaria Treatment: Prevalence and Risk Factors for Poor Quality Medicines in Public Facilities and Private Sector Drug Outlets in Enugu, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harparkash; Allan, Elizabeth Louise; Mamadu, Ibrahim; Hall, Zoe; Ibe, Ogochukwu; El Sherbiny, Mohamed; van Wyk, Albert; Yeung, Shunmay; Swamidoss, Isabel; Green, Michael D.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Culzoni, Maria Julia; Clarke, Siân; Schellenberg, David; Fernández, Facundo M.; Onwujekwe, Obinna

    2015-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-based combination therapies are recommended by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria, yet medication must be of good quality for efficacious treatment. A recent meta-analysis reported 35% (796/2,296) of antimalarial drug samples from 21 Sub-Saharan African countries, purchased from outlets predominantly using convenience sampling, failed chemical content analysis. We used three sampling strategies to purchase artemisinin-containing antimalarials (ACAs) in Enugu metropolis, Nigeria, and compared the resulting quality estimates. Methods ACAs were purchased using three sampling approaches - convenience, mystery clients and overt, within a defined area and sampling frame in Enugu metropolis. The active pharmaceutical ingredients were assessed using high-performance liquid chromatography and confirmed by mass spectrometry at three independent laboratories. Results were expressed as percentage of APIs stated on the packaging and used to categorise each sample as acceptable quality, substandard, degraded, or falsified. Results Content analysis of 3024 samples purchased from 421 outlets using convenience (n=200), mystery (n=1,919) and overt (n=905) approaches, showed overall 90.8% ACAs to be of acceptable quality, 6.8% substandard, 1.3% degraded and 1.2% falsified. Convenience sampling yielded a significantly higher prevalence of poor quality ACAs, but was not evident by the mystery and overt sampling strategies both of which yielded results that were comparable between each other. Artesunate (n=135; 4 falsified) and dihydroartemisinin (n=14) monotherapy tablets, not recommended by WHO, were also identified. Conclusion Randomised sampling identified fewer falsified ACAs than previously reported by convenience approaches. Our findings emphasise the need for specific consideration to be given to sampling frame and sampling approach if representative information on drug quality is to be obtained

  14. In vitro antimalarial activity of novel semisynthetic nocathiacin I antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Indu; Sullivan, Margery; McCutchan, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    Presently, the arsenal of antimalarial drugs is limited and needs to be replenished. We evaluated the potential antimalarial activity of two water-soluble derivatives of nocathiacin (BMS461996 and BMS411886) against the asexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Nocathiacins are a thiazolyl peptide group of antibiotics, are structurally related to thiostrepton, have potent activity against a wide spectrum of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, and inhibit protein synthesis. The in vitro growth inhibition assay was done using three laboratory strains of P. falciparum displaying various levels of chloroquine (CQ) susceptibility. Our results indicate that BMS461996 has potent antimalarial activity and inhibits parasite growth with mean 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of 51.55 nM for P. falciparum 3D7 (CQ susceptible), 85.67 nM for P. falciparum Dd2 (accelerated resistance to multiple drugs [ARMD]), and 99.44 nM for P. falciparum K1 (resistant to CQ, pyrimethamine, and sulfadoxine). Similar results at approximately 7-fold higher IC50s were obtained with BMS411886 than with BMS461996. We also tested the effect of BMS491996 on gametocytes; our results show that at a 20-fold excess of the mean IC50, gametocytes were deformed with a pyknotic nucleus and growth of stage I to IV gametocytes was arrested. This preliminary study shows a significant potential for nocathiacin analogues to be developed as antimalarial drug candidates and to warrant further investigation. PMID:25779576

  15. Antimalarial activity of HIV-1 protease inhibitor in chromone series.

    PubMed

    Lerdsirisuk, Pradith; Maicheen, Chirattikan; Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn

    2014-12-01

    Increasing parasite resistance to nearly all available antimalarial drugs becomes a serious problem to human health and necessitates the need to continue the search for new effective drugs. Recent studies have shown that clinically utilized HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) inhibitors can inhibit the in vitro and in vivo growth of Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, a series of chromone derivatives possessing HIV-1 PR inhibitory activity has been tested for antimalarial activity against P. falciparum (K1 multi-drug resistant strain). Chromone 15, the potent HIV-1 PR inhibitor (IC50=0.65μM), was found to be the most potent antimalarial compound with IC50=0.95μM while primaquine and tafenoquine showed IC50=2.41 and 1.95μM, respectively. Molecular docking study of chromone compounds against plasmepsin II, an aspartic protease enzyme important in hemoglobin degradation, revealed that chromone 15 exhibited the higher binding affinity (binding energy=-13.24kcal/mol) than the known PM II inhibitors. Thus, HIV-1 PR inhibitor in chromone series has the potential to be a new class of antimalarial agent. PMID:25462990

  16. Screening of Thai medicinal plant extracts and their active constituents for in vitro antimalarial activity.

    PubMed

    Ichino, C; Soonthornchareonnon, N; Chuakul, W; Kiyohara, H; Ishiyama, A; Sekiguchi, H; Namatame, M; Otoguro, K; Omura, S; Yamada, H

    2006-04-01

    To discover antimalarial substances from plants cultivated in Thailand 80%-EtOH extracts from selected plants were screened for in vitro antimalarial activity against the drug resistant K1 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. In total, 86 Thai medicinal plant samples representing 48 species from 35 genera in 16 families were screened and two species (Polyalthia viridis and Goniothalamus marcanii) were found to show notable antimalarial activity (IC50: 10.0 and 6.3 microg/mL). Marcanine A and 16-hydroxycleroda-3,13(14)Z-dien-15,16-olide were identified as the respective major active constituents in P. viridis and G. marcanii, respectively. PMID:16557615

  17. Artemisinin Antimalarials: Preserving the “Magic Bullet”

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Richard J; Woodrow, Charles J; White, Lisa J

    2010-01-01

    The artemisinins are the most effective antimalarial drugs known. They possess a remarkably wide therapeutic index. These agents have been used in traditional Chinese herbal medicine for more than 2,000 years but were not subjected to scientific scrutiny until the 1970s. The first formal clinical trials of the artemisinins, and the development of methods for their industrial scale production, followed rapidly. A decade later, Chinese scientists shared their findings with the rest of the world; since then, a significant body of international trial evidence has confirmed these drugs to be far superior to any available alternatives. In particular, they have the ability to rapidly kill a broad range of asexual parasite stages at safe concentrations that are consistently achievable via standard dosing regimens. As their half-life is very short, there was also thought to be a low risk of resistance. These discoveries coincided with the appearance and spread of resistance to all the other major classes of antimalarials. As a result, the artemisinins now form an essential element of recommended first-line antimalarial treatment regimens worldwide. To minimize the risk of artemisinin resistance, they are recommended to be used to treat uncomplicated malaria in combination with other antimalarials as artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs). Their rollout has resulted in documented reductions in malaria prevalence in a number of African and Asian countries. Unfortunately, there are already worrisome early signs of artemisinin resistance appearing in western Cambodia. If this resistance were to spread, it would be disastrous for malaria control efforts worldwide. The enormous challenge for the international community is how to avert this catastrophe and preserve the effectiveness of this antimalarial “magic bullet”. Drug Dev Res 71: 12–19, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21399699

  18. Evaluation of anti-malarial drugs’ use in Fitche Hospital, North Shoa, Oromia Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Getachew, Rosa; Amelo, Wote; Bobasa, Eshetu Mulisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Retrospective evaluation of anti-malarial drugs’ use in Fitche Hospital, North Shoa, Oromia Region, Ethiopia. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study design was conducted using selected patients cards of 1-year (January 2012–January 2013 G.C) with anti-malarial agents from January 18 to 30, 2013. The sample size was calculated by using Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Health care Organization criteria and sampling was done by using a systematic random sampling technique. Results: One hundred and twenty-five patient cards with anti-malarial drugs were reviewed of which 32.8%, 21.6%, 15.2% belongs to age range of 20–29, 10–19, and 30–39, respectively. Chloroquine prescription accounts for 50.4% from total anti-malarial drugs. 71.2% and 78.4% of patients received antibiotics and analgesics, respectively, with anti-malarial drugs. 77.6% of drugs were prescribed by generic name while the brand name was 22.39%. Conclusions: The study done in Fitche Hospital revealed that the use of anti-malarial agent was not in complete agreement with the current guideline of Ethiopia despite good practice. PMID:26957867

  19. New Analytical Monographs on TCM Herbal Drugs for Quality Proof.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Hildebert; Bauer, Rudolf; Melchart, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Regardless of specific national drug regulations there is an international consensus that all TCM drugs must meet stipulated high quality standards focusing on authentication, identification and chemical composition. In addition, safety of all TCM drugs prescribed by physicians has to be guaranteed. During the 25 years history of the TCM hospital Bad Kötzting, 171 TCM drugs underwent an analytical quality proof including thin layer as well as high pressure liquid chromatography. As from now mass spectroscopy will also be available as analytical tool. The findings are compiled and already published in three volumes of analytical monographs. One more volume will be published shortly, and a fifth volume is in preparation. The main issues of the analytical procedure in TCM drugs like authenticity, botanical nomenclature, variability of plant species and parts as well as processing are pointed out and possible ways to overcome them are sketched. PMID:27271998

  20. Community management of anti-malarials in Africa and iatrogenic risk.

    PubMed

    Orostegui, Lupé; Balu, Laurent; Chevret, Laurent; Habes, Dalila; Pussard, Eric

    2011-06-01

    Distribution of anti-malarials at the community level is one of the interventions recommended to reduce mortality from febrile illnesses. Inappropriate treatment of fever with anti-malarials may result in missed diagnosis and delays in appropriate treatments including consideration of other illnesses than malaria. We report the case of an 8-year-old black girl receiving prophylaxis with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine from the caretaker of the community during her holidays in Ivory Coast. A persistent fever suspected to be due to malaria was treated inappropriately with atovaquone-proguanil and then with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine again. Cumulative toxicity of anti-malarials leads to irreversible hepatic damages requiring hepatic transplantation. Community caretakers must be aware of the potential side effects and the contraindications of anti-malarials. Early identification of drug-induced toxicity and immediate discontinuation of the drug are the more effective tools to limit the progression of tissue damage. PMID:20807830

  1. Crystal and molecular structure of the antimalarial agent enpiroline.

    PubMed

    Karle, J M; Karle, I L

    1989-07-01

    To identify common spatial and structural features of amino alcohol antimalarial agents with the eventual goal of designing more effective drugs and a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this class of antimalarial agents, the three-dimensional crystal and molecular structure of enpiroline, a new antimalarial agent active against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum, was determined by X-ray crystallography and compared with the crystal structures of the cinchona alkaloids and of the new antimalarial agent WR 194,965. The aromatic rings of the phenyl-pyridine ring system of enpiroline are twisted from each other by approximately 18 degrees. The intramolecular aliphatic N-O distance in enpiroline was 2.80 A (1 A = 0.1 nm), which is close to the N-O distance found in the antimalarial cinchona alkaloids. Enpiroline contains both an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the aliphatic nitrogen and oxygen atoms and an intermolecular hydrogen bond between the aliphatic nitrogen and oxygen atoms of two neighboring molecules. One enantiomer of enpiroline superimposed best with quinine, and the other enantiomer of enpiroline superimposed best with quinidine, suggesting that both enantiomers of enpiroline possess antimalarial activity. Since a common feature of the crystal structures of the amino alcohol antimalarial agents is the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, the common spatial direction of hydrogen bond formation indicates the potential ability of these antimalarial agents to bind to a common receptor site. The crystallographic parameters were as follows: C19H18F6N5O; Mr = 404.3; symmetry of unit cell, monoclinic; space group, P2(1)/a; parameters of unit cell---a = 9.454 +/- 0.004 A, b = 18.908 +/- 0.008 A, c = 10.300 +/- 0.004 A, and beta = 96.55 +/- 0.03 degrees: V (volume of unit cell) = 1829.2 A3; Z (number of molecules per unit cell) = 4; Dchi (calculated density) = 1.46 g cm-3; source of radiation, CuK alpha (lambda = 1.54178 A); mu

  2. [Generic drugs: we must cut pharmaceutical spending but undertaking drug quality].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Norte, Juan Antonio; Postigo Mota, Salvador

    2012-02-01

    The World Health Organization and all drug regulatory agencies (DRA) support the commercialization of generic medicines because they control costs and are irreplaceable therapeutic options in countries lacking the innovator product. Generic drugs are widely considered to be cost-efficient substitutes for brand-name medications. They make up about 20% of the total number of prescriptions in Spain, a figure that is still far from the use of generic drugs in USA and other European countries. Despite economical interest in this issue, in this article we review the interest of generic drugs from a pharmacological and clinical perspective that must undertake drug quality to ensure drug efficacy and safety of the patients. A generic drug (generic drugs, short: generics) is defined as "a drug product that is comparable to brand/reference listed drug product in dosage form, strength, route of administration, quality and performance characteristics, and intended use". Both the reference drug and the generic drug have to demonstrate previously they are therapeutically equivalent. With the exception of parenteral drugs, two products have demonstrated to be therapeutically equivalent if after administration in the same molar dose, their effects with respect to both efficacy and safety are essentially the same, as determined from bioequivalence studies in terms of comparison of appropriate pharmacokinetic parameters and bioavailability. Parenteral formulations, however, are not required to demonstrate therapeutic equivalence because it may be considered self-evident. Such assumptions have never been challenged, but there are reasons to do so for parenteral antimicrobials. It is interesting to highlight that although brand-name drugs and generic drugs are both approved by DRA and may be interchangeable with respect to their clinical effects, they can differ substantially in their appearance. Consumers of brand-name medications receive identical-appearing batches of pills with

  3. Compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm: preparation, evaluation, and mechanism of penetration enhancement.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shuo; Liu, Shu-Zhi; Zhang, Yu-Shi; Du, Mao-Bo; Liang, Ai-Hua; Song, Li-Hua; Ye, Zu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is still a serious public health problem in some parts of the world. The problems of recurrence and drug resistance are increasingly more serious. Thus, it is necessary to develop a novel antimalarial agent. The objectives of this study were to construct a novel compound antimalarial transdermal nanosystem-ethosomal cataplasm, to investigate its characteristics and efficiency, and to systematically explore the penetration-enhancing mechanisms of ethosomal cataplasm. Artesunate-loaded ethosomes and febrifugine-loaded ethosomes were prepared, and their characteristics were evaluated. Drug-loaded ethosomes were incorporated in the matrix of cataplasm to form the compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm. With the help of ethosomal technology, the accumulated permeation quantity of artesunate significantly increased at 8 hours after administration, which was 1.57 times as much as that of conventional cataplasm. Soon after administration, the ethosomal cataplasm could make a large quantity of antimalarial drug quickly penetrate through skin, then the remaining drug in the ethosomal cataplasm could be steadily released. These characteristics of ethosomal cataplasm are favorable for antimalarial drugs to kill Plasmodium spp. quickly and prevent the resurgence of Plasmodium spp. As expected, the ethosomal cataplasm showed good antimalarial efficiency in this experiment. The negative conversion rates were 100% and the recurrence rates were 0% at all dosages. The mechanism of penetration enhancement of the ethosomal cataplasm was systematically explored using an optics microscope, polarization microscope, and transmission electron microscopy. The microstructure, ultrastructure, and birefringent structure in skin were observed. Data obtained in this study showed that the application of ethosomal technology to antimalarial cataplasm could improve the transdermal delivery of drug, enhance the efficacy, and facilitate practical application in clinic. PMID:26170661

  4. Compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm: preparation, evaluation, and mechanism of penetration enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shuo; Liu, Shu-Zhi; Zhang, Yu-Shi; Du, Mao-Bo; Liang, Ai-Hua; Song, Li-Hua; Ye, Zu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is still a serious public health problem in some parts of the world. The problems of recurrence and drug resistance are increasingly more serious. Thus, it is necessary to develop a novel antimalarial agent. The objectives of this study were to construct a novel compound antimalarial transdermal nanosystem–ethosomal cataplasm, to investigate its characteristics and efficiency, and to systematically explore the penetration-enhancing mechanisms of ethosomal cataplasm. Artesunate-loaded ethosomes and febrifugine-loaded ethosomes were prepared, and their characteristics were evaluated. Drug-loaded ethosomes were incorporated in the matrix of cataplasm to form the compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm. With the help of ethosomal technology, the accumulated permeation quantity of artesunate significantly increased at 8 hours after administration, which was 1.57 times as much as that of conventional cataplasm. Soon after administration, the ethosomal cataplasm could make a large quantity of antimalarial drug quickly penetrate through skin, then the remaining drug in the ethosomal cataplasm could be steadily released. These characteristics of ethosomal cataplasm are favorable for antimalarial drugs to kill Plasmodium spp. quickly and prevent the resurgence of Plasmodium spp. As expected, the ethosomal cataplasm showed good antimalarial efficiency in this experiment. The negative conversion rates were 100% and the recurrence rates were 0% at all dosages. The mechanism of penetration enhancement of the ethosomal cataplasm was systematically explored using an optics microscope, polarization microscope, and transmission electron microscopy. The microstructure, ultrastructure, and birefringent structure in skin were observed. Data obtained in this study showed that the application of ethosomal technology to antimalarial cataplasm could improve the transdermal delivery of drug, enhance the efficacy, and facilitate practical application in clinic. PMID:26170661

  5. Access to orphan drugs despite poor quality of clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Alain G; Van Wilder, Philippe B

    2011-01-01

    AIM We analysed the Belgian reimbursement decisions of orphan drugs as compared with those of innovative drugs for more common but equally severe diseases, with special emphasis on the quality of clinical evidence. METHODS Using the National Health Insurance Agency administrative database, we evaluated all submitted orphan drug files between 2002 and 2007. A quality analysis of the clinical evidence in the orphan reimbursement files was performed. The evaluation reports of the French ‘Haute Autorité de Santé’, including the five-point scale parameter ‘Service Médical Rendu (SMR), were examined to compare disease severity. Chi-squared tests (at P < 0.05 significance level) were used to compare the outcome of the reimbursement decisions between orphan and non-orphan innovative medicines. RESULTS Twenty-five files of orphan drugs and 117 files of non-orphan drugs were evaluated. Twenty-two of 25 (88%) submissions of orphan drugs were granted reimbursement as opposed to 74 of the 117 (63%) non-orphan innovative medicines (P = 0.02). Only 52% of the 25 orphan drug files included a randomized controlled trial as opposed to 84% in a random control sample of 25 non-orphan innovative submissions (P < 0.01). The duration of drug exposure was in most cases far too short in relation to the natural history of the disease. CONCLUSIONS Orphan drug designation predicts reimbursement despite poor quality of clinical evidence. The evidence gap at market authorization should be reduced by post-marketing programmes, in which the centralized regulatory and the local reimbursement authorities collaborate in an efficient way across the European Union member states. PMID:21395641

  6. Discovering New Transmission-Blocking Antimalarial Compounds: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Coetzer, Theresa L; Mancama, Dalu; Leroy, Didier; Alano, Pietro

    2016-09-01

    The ability to target human-mosquito parasite transmission challenges global malaria elimination. However, it is not obvious what a transmission-blocking drug will look like; should it target only parasite transmission stages; be combined with a partner drug killing the pathogenic asexual stages; or kill both the sexual and asexual blood stages, preferably displaying polypharmacology? The development of transmission-blocking antimalarials requires objective analyses of the current strategies. Here, pertinent issues and questions regarding the target candidate profile of a transmission-blocking compound, and its role in malaria elimination strategies, are highlighted and novel perspectives proposed. The essential role of a test cascade that integrates screening and validation strategies to identify next-generation transmission-blocking antimalarials is emphasised. PMID:27209388

  7. Assessing Website Pharmacy Drug Quality: Safer Than You Think?

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Roger; Hess, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Background Internet-sourced drugs are often considered suspect. The World Health Organization reports that drugs from websites that conceal their physical address are counterfeit in over 50 percent of cases; the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) works with the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) to regularly update a list of websites likely to sell drugs that are illegal or of questionable quality. Methods and Findings This study examines drug purchasing over the Internet, by comparing the sales of five popular drugs from a selection of websites stratified by NABP or other ratings. The drugs were assessed for price, conditions of purchase, and basic quality. Prices and conditions of purchase varied widely. Some websites advertised single pills while others only permitted the purchase of large quantities. Not all websites delivered the exact drugs ordered, some delivered no drugs at all; many websites shipped from multiple international locations, and from locations that were different from those advertised on the websites. All drug samples were tested against approved U.S. brand formulations using Raman spectrometry. Many (17) websites substituted drugs, often in different formulations from the brands requested. These drugs, some of which were probably generics or perhaps non-bioequivalent copy versions, could not be assessed accurately. Of those drugs that could be assessed, none failed from “approved”, “legally compliant” or “not recommended” websites (0 out of 86), whereas 8.6% (3 out of 35) failed from “highly not recommended” and unidentifiable websites. Conclusions Of those drugs that could be assessed, all except Viagra® passed spectrometry testing. Of those that failed, few could be identified either by a country of manufacture listed on the packaging, or by the physical location of the website pharmacy. If confirmed by future studies on other drug samples, then U.S. consumers should be able to reduce their risk by

  8. Targeting Plasmodium falciparum Hsp90: Towards Reversing Antimalarial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shahinas, Dea; Folefoc, Asongna; Pillai, Dylan R.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria continues to exact a great human toll in tropical settings. Antimalarial resistance is rife and the parasite inexorably develops mechanisms to outwit our best drugs, including the now first-line choice, artesunate. Novel strategies to circumvent resistance are needed. Here we detail drug development focusing on heat shock protein 90 and its central role as a chaperone. A growing body of evidence supports the role for Hsp90 inhibitors as adjunctive drugs able to restore susceptibility to traditionally efficacious compounds like chloroquine. PMID:25436880

  9. X-ray Spectroscopy for Quality Control of Chemotherapy Drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Bermudez, J.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Angeli-Greaves, M.

    2007-10-26

    We develop a method, employing Compton peak standardization and the use of matrix-matched spiked samples with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF), for the determination of platinum plasma concentrations of patients undergoing chemotherapy with Pt-bearing drugs. Direct blood plasma analysis attains Pt detection limits of 70 ng/ml. Measurement results of prescribed drug doses are compared to achieved blood Pt concentrations indicating a lack of expected correlations. Direct analysis of Pt-containing infused drugs from a variety of suppliers indicates cases of abnormal concentrations which raises quality control issues. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of the method for pharmacokinetic studies or for routine optimization and quality control of Pt chemotherapy treatments.

  10. Single Ascending Dose Safety and Pharmacokinetics of CDRI-97/78: First-in-Human Study of a Novel Antimalarial Drug.

    PubMed

    Shafiq, N; Rajagopalan, S; Kushwaha, H N; Mittal, N; Chandurkar, N; Bhalla, A; Kaur, S; Pandhi, P; Puri, G D; Achuthan, S; Pareek, A; Singh, S K; Srivastava, J S; Gaur, S P S; Malhotra, S

    2014-01-01

    Background. CDRI 97/78 has shown efficacy in animal models of falciparum malaria. The present study is the first in-human phase I trial in healthy volunteers. Methods. The study was conducted in 50 healthy volunteers in a single, ascending dose, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind design. The dose ranges evaluated were from 80 mg to 700 mg. Volunteers were assessed for clinical, biochemical, haematological, radiographic, and electrocardiographic parameters for any adverse events in an in-house facility. After evaluation of safety study results, another cohort of 16 participants were administered a single oral dose of 200 mg of the drug and a detailed pharmacokinetic analysis was undertaken. Results. The compound was found to be well tolerated. MTD was not reached. The few adverse events noted were of grade 2 severity, not requiring intervention and not showing any dose response relationship. The laboratory and electrocardiographic parameters showed statistically significant differences, but all were within the predefined normal range. These parameters were not associated with symptoms/signs and hence regarded as clinically irrelevant. Mean values of T 1/2, MRT, and AUC0-∞ of the active metabolite 97/63 were 11.85 ± 1.94 h, 13.77 ± 2.05 h, and 878.74 ± 133.15 ng·h/mL, respectively Conclusion. The novel 1,2,4 trioxane CDRI 97/78 is safe and will be an asset in malarial therapy if results are replicated in multiple dose studies and benefit is shown in confirmatory trials. PMID:24800100

  11. Single Ascending Dose Safety and Pharmacokinetics of CDRI-97/78: First-in-Human Study of a Novel Antimalarial Drug

    PubMed Central

    Shafiq, N.; Rajagopalan, S.; Kushwaha, H. N.; Mittal, N.; Chandurkar, N.; Bhalla, A.; Kaur, S.; Pandhi, P.; Puri, G. D.; Achuthan, S.; Pareek, A.; Singh, S. K.; Srivastava, J. S.; Gaur, S. P. S.; Malhotra, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. CDRI 97/78 has shown efficacy in animal models of falciparum malaria. The present study is the first in-human phase I trial in healthy volunteers. Methods. The study was conducted in 50 healthy volunteers in a single, ascending dose, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind design. The dose ranges evaluated were from 80 mg to 700 mg. Volunteers were assessed for clinical, biochemical, haematological, radiographic, and electrocardiographic parameters for any adverse events in an in-house facility. After evaluation of safety study results, another cohort of 16 participants were administered a single oral dose of 200 mg of the drug and a detailed pharmacokinetic analysis was undertaken. Results. The compound was found to be well tolerated. MTD was not reached. The few adverse events noted were of grade 2 severity, not requiring intervention and not showing any dose response relationship. The laboratory and electrocardiographic parameters showed statistically significant differences, but all were within the predefined normal range. These parameters were not associated with symptoms/signs and hence regarded as clinically irrelevant. Mean values of T1/2, MRT, and AUC0−∞ of the active metabolite 97/63 were 11.85 ± 1.94 h, 13.77 ± 2.05 h, and 878.74 ± 133.15 ng·h/mL, respectively Conclusion. The novel 1,2,4 trioxane CDRI 97/78 is safe and will be an asset in malarial therapy if results are replicated in multiple dose studies and benefit is shown in confirmatory trials. PMID:24800100

  12. N-Cinnamoylation of Antimalarial Classics: Effects of Using Acyl Groups Other than Cinnamoyl toward Dual-Stage Antimalarials.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana; Machado, Marta; Lobo, Lis; Nogueira, Fátima; Prudêncio, Miguel; Teixeira, Cátia; Gomes, Paula

    2015-08-01

    In a follow-up study to our reports of N-cinnamoylated chloroquine and quinacrine analogues as promising dual-stage antimalarial leads with high in vitro potency against both blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum and liver-stage Plasmodium berghei, we decided to investigate the effect of replacing the cinnamoyl moiety with other acyl groups. Thus, a series of N-acylated analogues were synthesized, and their activities against blood- and liver-stage Plasmodium spp. were assessed along with their in vitro cytotoxicities. Although the new N-acylated analogues were found to be somewhat less active and more cytotoxic than their N-cinnamoylated counterparts, they equally displayed nanomolar activities in vitro against blood-stage drug-sensitive and drug-resistant P. falciparum, and significant in vitro liver-stage activity against P. berghei. Therefore, it is demonstrated that simple N-acylated surrogates of classical antimalarial drugs are promising dual-stage antimalarial leads. PMID:26038181

  13. Potential antimalarials from African natural products: A reviw

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Bashir; Shittu, Oluwatosin Kudirat; Kabiru, Adamu Yusuf; Jigam, Ali Audu; Umar, Maimuna Bello; Berinyuy, Eustace Bonghan; Alozieuwa, Blessing Uchenna

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains an overwhelming infectious disease with significant health challenges in African and other endemic countries globally. Resistance to antimalarial drugs has become one of the most momentous challenges to human health, and thus has necessitated the hunt for new and effective drugs. Consequently, few decades have witnessed a surfeit of research geared to validate the effectiveness of commonly used traditionally medicines against malaria fever. The present review work focuses on documenting natural products from African whose activity has been reported in vivo or in vitro against malaria parasite. Literature was collected using electronic search of published articles (Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline, Sciencedirect, and Science domain) that report on antiplasmodial activity of natural products from differernts Africa region. A total of 652 plant taxa from 146 families, 134 isolated antimalarial compounds from 39 plants species, 2 herbal formulations and 4 insect/products were found to be reported in literature from 1996 to 2015. Plants species from family Asteraceae (11.04%), Fababceae (8.128%), Euphorbiaceae (5.52%), Rubiaceas (5.52%), and Apocyanaceae (5.214%), have received more scientific validation than others. African natural products possess remarkable healing properties as revealed in the various citations as promising antimalarial agents. Some of these natural products from Africa demonstrate high, promising or low activities against Plasmodium parasite. This study also shows that natural products from Africa have a huge amount of novel antimalarial compounds that could serve as a leads for the development of new and effective antiplasmodial drugs. However, in a view of bridging the gap in knowledge, clinical validation of these natural products are of paramount importance. PMID:26649238

  14. Evaluation of spiropiperidine hydantoins as a novel class of antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Marvin J; Anderson, Elizabeth J; McNitt, Sarah A; Krenning, Thomas M; Singh, Megh; Xu, Jing; Zeng, Wentian; Qin, Limei; Xu, Wanwan; Zhao, Siting; Qin, Li; Eickhoff, Christopher S; Oliva, Jonathan; Campbell, Mary A; Arnett, Stacy D; Prinsen, Michael J; Griggs, David W; Ruminski, Peter G; Goldberg, Daniel E; Ding, Ke; Liu, Xiaorong; Tu, Zhengchao; Tortorella, Micky D; Sverdrup, Francis M; Chen, Xiaoping

    2015-08-15

    Given the rise of parasite resistance to all currently used antimalarial drugs, the identification of novel chemotypes with unique mechanisms of action is of paramount importance. Since Plasmodium expresses a number of aspartic proteases necessary for its survival, we have mined antimalarial datasets for drug-like aspartic protease inhibitors. This effort led to the identification of spiropiperidine hydantoins, bearing similarity to known inhibitors of the human aspartic protease β-secretase (BACE), as new leads for antimalarial drug discovery. Spiropiperidine hydantoins have a dynamic structure-activity relationship profile with positions identified as being tolerant of a variety of substitution patterns as well as a key piperidine N-benzyl phenol pharmacophore. Lead compounds 4e (CWHM-123) and 12k (CWHM-505) are potent antimalarials with IC50 values against Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 of 0.310 μM and 0.099 μM, respectively, and the former features equivalent potency on the chloroquine-resistant Dd2 strain. Remarkably, these compounds do not inhibit human aspartic proteases BACE, cathepsins D and E, or Plasmodium plasmepsins II and IV despite their similarity to known BACE inhibitors. Although the current leads suffer from poor metabolic stability, they do fit into a drug-like chemical property space and provide a new class of potent antimalarial agents for further study. PMID:25797165

  15. Anticancer Effect of AntiMalarial Artemisinin Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Das, AK

    2015-01-01

    The anti-malarial drug artemisinin has shown anticancer activity in vitro and animal experiments, but experience in human cancer is scarce. However, the ability of artemisinins to kill cancer cells through a variety of molecular mechanisms has been explored. A PubMed search of about 127 papers on anti-cancer effects of antimalarials has revealed that this class of drug, including other antimalarials, have several biological characteristics that include anticancer properties. Experimental evidences suggest that artemisinin compounds may be a therapeutic alternative in highly aggressive cancers with rapid dissemination, without developing drug resistance. They also exhibit synergism with other anticancer drugs with no increased toxicity toward normal cells. It has been found that semisynthetic artemisinin derivatives have much higher antitumor activity than their monomeric counterparts via mechanisms like apoptosis, arrest of cell cycle at G0/G1, and oxidative stress. The exact mechanism of activation and molecular basis of these anticancer effects are not fully elucidated. Artemisinins seem to regulate key factors such as nuclear factor-kappa B, survivin, NOXA, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, and BMI-1, involving multiple pathways that may affect drug response, drug interactions, drug resistance, and associated parameters upon normal cells. Newer synthetic artemisinins have been developed showing substantial antineoplastic activity, but there is still limited information regarding the mode of action of these synthetic compounds. In view of the emerging data, specific interactions with established chemotherapy need to be further investigated in different cancer cells and their phenotypes and validated further using different semisynthetic and synthetic artemisinin derivatives. PMID:25861527

  16. Arylmethyl substituted derivatives of Fosmidomycin: synthesis and antimalarial activity.

    PubMed

    Schlüter, Katrin; Walter, Rolf D; Bergmann, Bärbel; Kurz, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    The phosphonohydroxamic acid Fosmidomycin is a drug candidate for the treatment of Malaria, currently in phase II trials in combination with Clindamycin. In order to obtain compounds of higher lipophilicity, we recently synthesized alpha-phenyl substituted Fosmidomycin derivatives which display high antimalarial activity. We now report the synthesis and in vitro antimalarial activity of arylmethyl substituted bis(pivaloyloxymethyl) ester prodrugs of Fosmidomycin and its acetyl analogue FR900098. The 3,4-dichlorobenzyl substituted derivative of Fosmidomycin proved to be about twice as active as the respective Fosmidomycin prodrug, however, less active than the corresponding FR900098 prodrug. Electron donating substituents as well as voluminous substituents led to a significant reduction of activity. PMID:17055117

  17. Prescription drugs: issues of cost, coverage, and quality.

    PubMed

    Copeland, C

    1999-04-01

    This Issue Brief closely examines expenditures on prescription drugs, and discusses their potential to substitute for other types of health care services. In addition, it describes employer coverage of prescription drugs, direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs, and potential legislation affecting the prescription drug market. Prescription drug expenditures grew at double-digit rates during almost every year since 1980, accelerating to 14.1 percent in 1997. In contrast, total national health expenditures, hospital service expenditures, and physician service expenditures growth rates decreased from approximately 13 percent in 1980 to less than 5 percent in 1997. Private insurance payments for prescription drugs increased 17.7 percent in 1997, after growing 22.1 percent in 1995 and 18.3 percent in 1996. This growth in prescription drug payments compares with 4 percent or less overall annual growth in private insurance payments for each of those three years. From 1993 to 1997, the overwhelming majority of the increases in expenditures on prescription drugs were attributable to increased volume, mix, and availability of pharmaceutical products. In 1997, these factors accounted for more than 80 percent of the growth in prescription drug expenditures. A leading explanation for the sharp growth in drug expenditures is that prescription drugs are a substitute for other forms of health care. While it is difficult to determine the extent to which this substitution occurs, various studies have associated cost savings with the use of pharmaceutical products in treating specific diseases. Evidence suggests that more appropriate utilization of prescription drugs has the potential to lower total expenditures and improve the quality of care. Also, some studies indicate the U.S. health care system needs to improve the way patients use and physicians prescribe current medications. Prescription drug plans offered by employers are likely to undergo changes to ensure that

  18. Antimalarial activity of fractions of aqueous extract of Acacia nilotica root

    PubMed Central

    Alli, Lukman Adewale; Adesokan, Abdulfatai Ayoade; Salawu, Adeola Oluwakanyinsola

    2016-01-01

    Background: The problem of resistance of malarial parasites to available antimalarial drugs makes the development of new drugs imperative, with natural plant products providing an alternative source for discovering new drugs. Aim: To evaluate the antimalarial activity of eluted fractions of Acacia nilotica root extract and determine the phytochemicals responsible for its antimalarial activity. Materials and Methods: The extract was eluted successively in gradients of solvent mixture (hexane, ethyl acetate, and methanol) in multiples of 100 ml, and each fraction was collected separately. Eluates that showed similar thin layer chromatographic profiles and Rf values were combined to produce 4 main fractions (F-1, F-2, F-3, and F-4), which were tested separately for antimalarial activity using the curative test. Changes in body weight, temperature, and packed cell volume (PCV) were also recorded. Results: Fraction F-1 of A. nilotica at 50 and 100 mg/kg b/w produced significant and dose-dependent reduction in parasite count in Plasmodium berghei infected mice compared to the control, and also significantly increased the survival time of the mice compared to the control group. This fraction also ameliorated the malaria-induced anemia by improving PCV in treated mice. Conclusion: Antimalarial activity of extract of A. nilotica root is probably localized in the F-1 fraction of the extract, which was found to be rich in alkaloids and phenolics. Further study will provide information on the chemical properties of the active metabolites in this fraction. PMID:27104040

  19. Methionine recycling pathways and antimalarial drug design.

    PubMed Central

    Sufrin, J R; Meshnick, S R; Spiess, A J; Garofalo-Hannan, J; Pan, X Q; Bacchi, C J

    1995-01-01

    5'-Deoxy-5'-(methylthio)adenosine (MTA) is an S-adenosylmethionine metabolite that is generated as a by-product of polyamine biosynthesis. In mammalian cells, MTA undergoes a phosphorolytic cleavage catalyzed by MTA phosphorylase to produce adenine and 5-deoxy-5-(methylthio)ribose-1-phosphate (MTRP). Adenine is utilized in purine salvage pathways, and MTRP is subsequently recycled to methionine. Whereas some microorganisms metabolize MTA to MTRP via MTA phosphorylase, others metabolize MTA to MTRP in two steps via initial cleavage by MTA nucleosidase to adenine and 5-deoxy-5-(methylthio)ribose (MTR) followed by conversion of MTR to MTRP by MTR kinase. In order to assess the extent to which these pathways may be operative in Plasmodium falciparum, we have examined a series of 5'-alkyl-substituted analogs of MTA and the related MTR analogs and compared their abilities to inhibit in vitro growth of this malarial parasite. The MTR analogs 5-deoxy-5-(ethylthio)ribose and 5-deoxy-5-(hydroxyethylthio)ribose were inactive at concentrations up to 1 mM, and 5-deoxy-5-(monofluoroethylthio)ribose was weakly active (50% inhibitory concentration = 700 microM). In comparison, the MTA analogs, 5'-deoxy-5'-(ethylthio)adenosine,5'-deoxy-5'-(hydroxyethylthio)ade nosine (HETA), and 5'-deoxy-5'-(monofluoroethylthio)adenosine, had 50% inhibitory concentrations of 80, 46, and 61 microM, respectively. Extracts of P. falciparum were found to have substantial MTA phosphorylase activity. Coadministration of MTA with HETA partially protected the parasites against the growth-inhibitory effects of HETA. Results of this study indicate that P. falciparum has an active MTA phosphorylase that can be targeted by analogs of MTA. PMID:8585735

  20. Systematic review on quality control for drug management programs: Is quality reported in the literature?

    PubMed Central

    Holtorf, Anke-Peggy; McAdam-Marx, Carrie; Schaaf, David; Eng, Benjamin; Oderda, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Background Maintaining quality of care while managing limited healthcare resources is an ongoing challenge in healthcare. The objective of this study was to evaluate how the impact of drug management programs is reported in the literature and to identify potentially existing quality standards. Methods This analysis relates to the published research on the impact of drug management on economic, clinical, or humanistic outcomes in managed care, indemnity insurance, VA, or Medicaid in the USA published between 1996 and 2007. Included articles were systematically analyzed for study objective, study endpoints, and drug management type. They were further categorized by drug management tool, primary objective, and study endpoints. Results None of the 76 included publications assessed the overall quality of drug management tools. The impact of 9 different drug management tools used alone or in combination was studied in pharmacy claims, medical claims, electronic medical records or survey data from either patient, plan or provider perspective using an average of 2.1 of 11 possible endpoints. A total of 68% of the studies reported the impact on plan focused endpoints, while the clinical, the patient or the provider perspective were studied to a much lower degree (45%, 42% and 12% of the studies). Health outcomes were only accounted for in 9.2% of the studies. Conclusion Comprehensive assessment of quality considering plan, patient and clinical outcomes is not yet applied. There is no defined quality standard. Benchmarks including health outcomes should be determined and used to improve the overall clinical and economic effectiveness of drug management programs. PMID:19243591

  1. Liposomal Drug Products: A Quality by Design Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoming

    Quality by Design (QbD) principles has been applied to the development of two liposomal formulations, containing a hydrophilic small molecule therapeutic (Tenofovir) and a protein therapeutic (superoxide dismutase). The goal of the research is to provide critical information on 1) how to reduce the preparation variability in liposome formulations, and 2) how to increase drug encapsulation inside liposomes to reduce manufacturing cost. Most notably, an improved liposome preparation method was developed which increased the encapsulation efficiency of hydrophilic molecules. In particular, this method allows for very high encapsulation efficiency. For example, encapsulation efficiencies of up to 50% have been achieved, whereas previously only 20% or less have been reported. Another significant outcome from this research is a first principle mathematical model to predict the encapsulation efficiency of hydrophilic drugs in unilamellar liposomes. This mathematical model will be useful in: formulation development to rapidly achieve optimized formulations; comparison of drug encapsulation efficiencies of liposomes prepared using different methods; and assisting in the development of suitable process analytical technologies to achieve real-time monitoring and control of drug encapsulation during manufacturing. A novel two-stage reverse dialysis in vitro release testing method has also been developed for passively targeted liposomes, which uses the first stage to mimic the circulation of liposomes in the body and the second stage to imitate the drug release process at the target. The developed in vitro release testing method can be used to distinguish formulations with varied compositions for quality control testing purposes. This developed method may pave the way to the development of more biorelevant quality control testing methods for liposomal drug products in the future. The QbD case studies performed in this research are examples of how this approach can be used to

  2. Selective anti-malarial minor groove binders.

    PubMed

    Scott, Fraser J; Khalaf, Abedawn I; Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M; Suckling, Colin J

    2016-07-15

    A set of 31 DNA minor groove binders (MGBs) with diverse structural features relating to both physical chemical properties and DNA binding sequence preference has been evaluated as potential drugs to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections using a chloroquine sensitive strain (3D7) and a chloroquine resistant strain (Dd2) in comparison with human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells as an indicator of mammalian cell toxicity. MGBs with an alkene link between the two N-terminal building blocks were demonstrated to be most active with IC50 values in the range 30-500nM and therapeutic ratios in the range 10->500. Many active compounds contained a C-alkylthiazole building block. Active compounds with logD7.4 values of approximately 3 or 7 were identified. Importantly the MGBs tested were essentially equally effective against both chloroquine sensitive and resistant strains. The results show that suitably designed MGBs have the potential for development into clinical candidates for antimalarial drugs effective against resistant strains of Plasmodia. PMID:27212070

  3. Antimalarial Activity of Small-Molecule Benzothiazole Hydrazones.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Souvik; Siddiqui, Asim A; Saha, Shubhra J; De, Rudranil; Mazumder, Somnath; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Iqbal, Mohd S; Nag, Shiladitya; Adhikari, Susanta; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2016-07-01

    We synthesized a new series of conjugated hydrazones that were found to be active against malaria parasite in vitro, as well as in vivo in a murine model. These hydrazones concentration-dependently chelated free iron and offered antimalarial activity. Upon screening of the synthesized hydrazones, compound 5f was found to be the most active iron chelator, as well as antiplasmodial. Compound 5f also interacted with free heme (KD [equilibrium dissociation constant] = 1.17 ± 0.8 μM), an iron-containing tetrapyrrole released after hemoglobin digestion by the parasite, and inhibited heme polymerization by parasite lysate. Structure-activity relationship studies indicated that a nitrogen- and sulfur-substituted five-membered aromatic ring present within the benzothiazole hydrazones might be responsible for their antimalarial activity. The dose-dependent antimalarial and heme polymerization inhibitory activities of the lead compound 5f were further validated by following [(3)H]hypoxanthine incorporation and hemozoin formation in parasite, respectively. It is worth mentioning that compound 5f exhibited antiplasmodial activity in vitro against a chloroquine/pyrimethamine-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum (K1). We also evaluated in vivo antimalarial activity of compound 5f in a murine model where a lethal multiple-drug-resistant strain of Plasmodium yoelii was used to infect Swiss albino mice. Compound 5f significantly suppressed the growth of parasite, and the infected mice experienced longer life spans upon treatment with this compound. During in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays, compound 5f showed minimal alteration in biochemical and hematological parameters compared to control. In conclusion, we identified a new class of hydrazone with therapeutic potential against malaria. PMID:27139466

  4. Quality of Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine Given as Antimalarial Prophylaxis in Pregnant Women in Selected Health Facilities in Central Region of Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Yeboah, Danny F.; Afoakwah, Richmond; Nwaefuna, Ekene K.; Verner, Orish; Boampong, Johnson N.

    2016-01-01

    The use of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) as an intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) against malaria during pregnancy has become a policy in most sub-Sahara African countries and crucially depends on the efficacy of SP. This study sets out to evaluate the effectiveness of the SP given to the pregnant women in some selected health facilities in the Central Region of Ghana to prevent maternal malaria in pregnant women. A total of 543 pregnant women recruited from 7 selected health centres in Central Region of Ghana participated in the study. Parasite density of Plasmodium falciparum was determined from peripheral blood of the pregnant women using microscopy. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and dissolution tester were used to determine the quality of the SP. Malaria infection was recorded in 11.2% of pregnant women who had a history of SP consumption. SP failed the dissolution test. Pregnant women who did not receive IPT-SP were 44%. Low haemoglobin level was recorded in 73.5% of the pregnant women. The results indicated that SP was substandard. IPT-SP is ineffective in preventing malaria infection. PMID:27042341

  5. Quality of Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine Given as Antimalarial Prophylaxis in Pregnant Women in Selected Health Facilities in Central Region of Ghana.

    PubMed

    Yeboah, Danny F; Afoakwah, Richmond; Nwaefuna, Ekene K; Verner, Orish; Boampong, Johnson N

    2016-01-01

    The use of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) as an intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) against malaria during pregnancy has become a policy in most sub-Sahara African countries and crucially depends on the efficacy of SP. This study sets out to evaluate the effectiveness of the SP given to the pregnant women in some selected health facilities in the Central Region of Ghana to prevent maternal malaria in pregnant women. A total of 543 pregnant women recruited from 7 selected health centres in Central Region of Ghana participated in the study. Parasite density of Plasmodium falciparum was determined from peripheral blood of the pregnant women using microscopy. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and dissolution tester were used to determine the quality of the SP. Malaria infection was recorded in 11.2% of pregnant women who had a history of SP consumption. SP failed the dissolution test. Pregnant women who did not receive IPT-SP were 44%. Low haemoglobin level was recorded in 73.5% of the pregnant women. The results indicated that SP was substandard. IPT-SP is ineffective in preventing malaria infection. PMID:27042341

  6. Modelling the time course of antimalarial parasite killing: a tour of animal and human models, translation and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kashyap; Simpson, Julie A; Batty, Kevin T; Zaloumis, Sophie; Kirkpatrick, Carl M

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a global public health concern and current treatment options are suboptimal in some clinical settings. For effective chemotherapy, antimalarial drug concentrations must be sufficient to remove completely all of the parasites in the infected host. Optimized dosing therefore requires a detailed understanding of the time course of antimalarial response, whilst simultaneously considering the parasite life cycle and host immune elimination. Recently, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended the development of mathematical models for understanding better antimalarial drug resistance and management. Other international groups have also suggested that mechanistic pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) models can support the rationalization of antimalarial dosing strategies. At present, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is recommended as first line treatment of falciparum malaria for all patient groups. This review summarizes the PK–PD characterization of artemisinin derivatives and other partner drugs from both preclinical studies and human clinical trials. We outline the continuous and discrete time models that have been proposed to describe antimalarial activity on specific stages of the parasite life cycle. The translation of PK–PD predictions from animals to humans is considered, because preclinical studies can provide rich data for detailed mechanism-based modelling. While similar sampling techniques are limited in clinical studies, PK–PD models can be used to optimize the design of experiments to improve estimation of the parameters of interest. Ultimately, we propose that fully developed mechanistic models can simulate and rationalize ACT or other treatment strategies in antimalarial chemotherapy. PMID:24251882

  7. 21 CFR 212.20 - What activities must I perform to ensure drug quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What activities must I perform to ensure drug quality? 212.20 Section 212.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION...

  8. The Redox Cycler Plasmodione Is a Fast-Acting Antimalarial Lead Compound with Pronounced Activity against Sexual and Early Asexual Blood-Stage Parasites.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Katharina; Deregnaucourt, Christiane; Goetz, Alice-Anne; Tzanova, Tzvetomira; Gallo, Valentina; Arese, Paolo; Pradines, Bruno; Adjalley, Sophie H; Bagrel, Denyse; Blandin, Stephanie; Lanzer, Michael; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth

    2016-09-01

    Previously, we presented the chemical design of a promising series of antimalarial agents, 3-[substituted-benzyl]-menadiones, with potent in vitro and in vivo activities. Ongoing studies on the mode of action of antimalarial 3-[substituted-benzyl]-menadiones revealed that these agents disturb the redox balance of the parasitized erythrocyte by acting as redox cyclers-a strategy that is broadly recognized for the development of new antimalarial agents. Here we report a detailed parasitological characterization of the in vitro activity profile of the lead compound 3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-menadione 1c (henceforth called plasmodione) against intraerythrocytic stages of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum We show that plasmodione acts rapidly against asexual blood stages, thereby disrupting the clinically relevant intraerythrocytic life cycle of the parasite, and furthermore has potent activity against early gametocytes. The lead's antiplasmodial activity was unaffected by the most common mechanisms of resistance to clinically used antimalarials. Moreover, plasmodione has a low potential to induce drug resistance and a high killing speed, as observed by culturing parasites under continuous drug pressure. Drug interactions with licensed antimalarial drugs were also established using the fixed-ratio isobologram method. Initial toxicological profiling suggests that plasmodione is a safe agent for possible human use. Our studies identify plasmodione as a promising antimalarial lead compound and strongly support the future development of redox-active benzylmenadiones as antimalarial agents. PMID:27297478

  9. Fixed Dose Combination of Arterolane and Piperaquine: A Newer Prospect in Antimalarial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patil, CY; Katare, SS; Baig, MS; Doifode, SM

    2014-01-01

    Malaria has been very prevalent vector-borne disease in India and until date bears enormous implications on health care services of the country. Over the period of time, the development of resistance to traditional antimalarials like chloroquine has been posed as major deterrent in efforts of malaria control. As the drug resistance is today universally prevalent, especially in Plasmodium falciparum species, major burden of malarial control resides with the new artemisinin drug class. However, arterolane is one of the first fully synthetic non-artemisinin antimalarial compound with rapid schizontocidal activity, hence offering an alternative to artemisinin drugs in malaria control. Piperaquine is a synthetic bisquinoline (4-amioquinoline Antimalarial) with slow and longer schizontocidal activity. Therefore their combination has been shown to provide rapid parasitemic clearance and quick relief of most malaria-related symptoms along with prevention of recrudescences. This combination was approved by Drugs Controller General of India in 2011 for treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. The article is aimed at to review this newer prospect in antimalarial therapy for which comprehensive database search was done in Google, Google Scholar, PubMed using the terms “Malaria,” “Arterolane,” “OZ277,” “Piperaquine,” and “Artemisinin combination therapy.” A total of 323 articles were screened and 28 articles were considered for this review along with the World Health Organization and National malarial program guidelines. PMID:25221689

  10. Fixed dose combination of arterolane and piperaquine: a newer prospect in antimalarial therapy.

    PubMed

    Patil, Cy; Katare, Ss; Baig, Ms; Doifode, Sm

    2014-07-01

    Malaria has been very prevalent vector-borne disease in India and until date bears enormous implications on health care services of the country. Over the period of time, the development of resistance to traditional antimalarials like chloroquine has been posed as major deterrent in efforts of malaria control. As the drug resistance is today universally prevalent, especially in Plasmodium falciparum species, major burden of malarial control resides with the new artemisinin drug class. However, arterolane is one of the first fully synthetic non-artemisinin antimalarial compound with rapid schizontocidal activity, hence offering an alternative to artemisinin drugs in malaria control. Piperaquine is a synthetic bisquinoline (4-amioquinoline Antimalarial) with slow and longer schizontocidal activity. Therefore their combination has been shown to provide rapid parasitemic clearance and quick relief of most malaria-related symptoms along with prevention of recrudescences. This combination was approved by Drugs Controller General of India in 2011 for treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. The article is aimed at to review this newer prospect in antimalarial therapy for which comprehensive database search was done in Google, Google Scholar, PubMed using the terms "Malaria," "Arterolane," "OZ277," "Piperaquine," and "Artemisinin combination therapy." A total of 323 articles were screened and 28 articles were considered for this review along with the World Health Organization and National malarial program guidelines. PMID:25221689

  11. Antimalarials and the fight against malaria in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Carmargo, Luiz MA; de Oliveira, Saulo; Basano, Sergio; Garcia, Célia RS

    2009-01-01

    Malaria, known as the “fevers,” has been treated for over three thousand years in China with extracts of plants of the genus Artemisia (including Artemisia annua, A. opiacea, and A. lancea) from which the active compound is artemisin, a sesquiterpene that is highly effective in the treatment of the disease, especially against young forms of the parasite. South American Indians in the seventeenth century already used an extract of the bark of chinchona tree, commonly named “Jesuits’ powder.” Its active compound was isolated in 1820 and its use spread all over the world being used as a prophylactic drug during the construction of the Madeira–Mamoré railroad in the beginning of the twentieth century. During the 1920s to the 1940s, new antimalarial drugs were synthesized to increase the arsenal against this parasite. However, the parasite has presented systematic resistence to conventional antimalarial drugs, driving researchers to find new strategies to treat the disease. In the present review we discuss how Brazil treats Plasmodium-infected patients. PMID:19753125

  12. Antimalarials and the fight against malaria in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carmargo, Luiz Ma; de Oliveira, Saulo; Basano, Sergio; Garcia, Célia Rs

    2009-08-01

    Malaria, known as the "fevers," has been treated for over three thousand years in China with extracts of plants of the genus Artemisia (including Artemisia annua, A. opiacea, and A. lancea) from which the active compound is artemisin, a sesquiterpene that is highly effective in the treatment of the disease, especially against young forms of the parasite. South American Indians in the seventeenth century already used an extract of the bark of chinchona tree, commonly named "Jesuits' powder." Its active compound was isolated in 1820 and its use spread all over the world being used as a prophylactic drug during the construction of the Madeira-Mamoré railroad in the beginning of the twentieth century. During the 1920s to the 1940s, new antimalarial drugs were synthesized to increase the arsenal against this parasite. However, the parasite has presented systematic resistence to conventional antimalarial drugs, driving researchers to find new strategies to treat the disease. In the present review we discuss how Brazil treats Plasmodium-infected patients. PMID:19753125

  13. Screening of Different Extracts from Artemisia Species for Their Potential Antimalarial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mojarrab, Mahdi; Naderi, Rozhin; Heshmati Afshar, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    The formation of hemozoin (malaria pigment) has been proposed as an ideal drug target for antimalarial screening programs. In this study, we used an improved, cost-effective and high-throughput spectrophotometric assay to screen plant extracts for finding novel antimalarial plant sources. Fifteen extracts with different polarity from three Iranian Artemisia species, A. ciniformis, A. biennis and A. turanica, were assessed for their antimalarial activity by in-vitro β-hematin formation assay. The most potent effect was observed in dichloromethane (DCM) extract of A. ciniformis with IC50 and IC90 values of 0.92 ± 0.01 and 1.29 ± 0.02 mg/mL, respectively. Ethyl acetate (EtOAC) extracts of A. biennis and A. turanica also showed significant antimalarial activities with IC50 values of 1.11 ± 0.02 and 1.35 ± 0.08 mg/mL and IC90 values of 1.22 ± 0.04 and 2.81 ± 0.21 mg/mL, respectively. Based on these results, it is possible to conclude that the components with strong antimalarial activity have been concentrated in the medium-polar extracts. PMID:25901169

  14. Development of Diaminoquinazoline Histone Lysine Methyltransferase Inhibitors as Potent Blood-stage Anti-Malarial Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Joachim; Blundell, Scott; Liu, Feng; Chen, Xin; Srimongkolpithak, Nitipol; Jin, Jian; Charman, Susan A.; Scherf, Artur; Fuchter, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Modulating epigenetic mechanisms in malarial parasites is an emerging avenue for the discovery of novel antimalarial drugs. Previously we demonstrated the potent in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activity of BIX01294 (1), a known human G9a inhibitor, together with its dose-dependent effects on histone methylation in the malarial parasite. This work describes our initial medicinal chemistry efforts to optimize the diaminoquinazoline chemotype for antimalarial activity. A variety of analogues were designed by substituting the 2 and 4 positions of the quinazoline core and these molecules were tested against Plasmodium falciparum (3D7 strain). Several analogues with IC50 values as low as 18.5 nM and with low mammalian cell toxicity (HepG2) were identified. Certain pharmacophoric features required for the antimalarial activity were found to be analogous to the previously published SAR of these analogues for G9a inhibition, thereby suggesting potential similarities between the malarial and the human HKMT targets of this chemotype. Physiochemical, in vitro activity, and in vitro metabolism studies were also performed for a select set of potent analogues to evaluate their potential as anti-malarial leads. PMID:25044750

  15. Repositioning: the fast track to new anti-malarial medicines?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Repositioning of existing drugs has been suggested as a fast track for developing new anti-malarial agents. The compound libraries of GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), Pfizer and AstraZeneca (AZ) comprising drugs that have undergone clinical studies in other therapeutic areas, but not achieved approval, and a set of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs and other bio-actives were tested against Plasmodium falciparum blood stages. Methods Molecules were tested initially against erythrocytic co-cultures of P. falciparum to measure proliferation inhibition using one of the following methods: SYBR®I dye DNA staining assay (3D7, K1 or NF54 strains); [3H] hypoxanthine radioisotope incorporation assay (3D7 and 3D7A strain); or 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) DNA imaging assay (3D7 and Dd2 strains). After review of the available clinical pharmacokinetic and safety data, selected compounds with low μM activity and a suitable clinical profile were tested in vivo either in a Plasmodium berghei four-day test or in the P. falciparum Pf3D70087/N9 huSCID ‘humanized’ mouse model. Results Of the compounds included in the GSK and Pfizer sets, 3.8% (9/238) had relevant in vitro anti-malarial activity while 6/100 compounds from the AZ candidate drug library were active. In comparison, around 0.6% (24/3,800) of the FDA-approved drugs and other bio-actives were active. After evaluation of available clinical data, four investigational drugs, active in vitro were tested in the P. falciparum humanized mouse model: UK-112,214 (PAF-H1 inhibitor), CEP-701 (protein kinase inhibitor), CEP-1347 (protein kinase inhibitor), and PSC-833 (p-glycoprotein inhibitor). Only UK-112,214 showed significant efficacy against P. falciparum in vivo, although at high doses (ED90 131.3 mg/kg [95% CI 112.3, 156.7]), and parasitaemia was still present 96 hours after treatment commencement. Of the six actives from the AZ library, two compounds (AZ-1 and AZ-3) were marginally

  16. Insights into the Role of Heme in the Mechanism of Action of Antimalarials

    PubMed Central

    Combrinck, Jill M.; Mabotha, Tebogo E.; Ncokazi, Kanyile K.; Ambele, Melvin A.; Taylor, Dale; Smith, Peter J.; Hoppe, Heinrich C.; Egan, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Using cell fractionation and measurement of Fe(III)heme-pyridine, the antimalarial chloroquine (CQ) has been shown to cause a dose-dependent decrease in hemozoin and concomitant increase in toxic “free” heme in cultured Plasmodium falciparum that is directly correlated with parasite survival. Transmission electron microscopy techniques have further shown that heme is redistributed from the parasite digestive vacuole to the cytoplasm and that CQ disrupts hemozoin crystal growth, resulting in mosaic boundaries in the crystals formed in the parasite. Extension of the cell fractionation study to other drugs has shown that artesunate, amodiaquine, lumefantrine, mefloquine and quinine, all clinically important antimalarials, also inhibit hemozoin formation in the parasite cell, while the antifolate pyrimethamine and its combination with sulfadoxine do not. This study finally provides direct evidence in support of the hemozoin inhibition hypothesis for the mechanism of action of CQ and shows that other quinoline and related antimalarials inhibit cellular hemozoin formation. PMID:23043646

  17. Chemical Determinants of antimalarial activity of reversed siderophores.

    PubMed Central

    Tsafack, A; Libman, J; Shanzer, A; Cabantchik, Z I

    1996-01-01

    Reversed siderophores (RSFs) are artificial hydroxamate-based iron chelators designed after the natural siderophore ferrichrome. The modular molecular design of RSF derivatives allowed the synthesis of various congeners with controlled iron-binding capacities and partition coefficients. These two physicochemical properties were assessed by a novel fluorescent method and were found to be the major determinants of RSF permeation across erythrocyte membranes and scavenging of compartmentalized iron. The partition coefficient apparently conferred upon RSFs two major features: (i) the ability to rapidly access iron pools of in vitro-grown Plasmodium falciparum at all developmental stages and to mobilize intracellular iron and transfer it to the medium and (ii) the ability to suppress parasite growth at all developmental stages. These features of RSFs were assessed by quantitative determination of the structure-activity relationships of the biological activities and partition coefficients spanning a wide range of values. The most effective RSF containing the aromatic group of phenylalanine (RSFm2phe) showed 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.60 +/- 0.03 nmol/ml in a 48-h test and a 2-h onset of inhibition of ring development at 5 nmol/ml. The lipophilic compound RSFm2phe and the lipophilic and esterase-cleavable compound RSFm2pee inhibited parasite growth at all developmental stages whether inhibition was assessed in a continuous mode or after discontinuing drug administration. The antimalarial effects of RSFm2phe and cleavable RSFm2pee were potentiated in the presence of desferrioxamine (DFO) at concentrations at which DFO alone had no effect on parasite growth. These studies provide experimental evidence indicating that the effective and persistent antimalarial actions of RSFs are associated with drug access to infected cells and scavenging of iron from intracellular parasites. Moreover, the optimal antimalarial actions of RSFs are apparently also determined by improved

  18. Antimalarial activity of anthothecol derived from Khaya anthotheca (Meliaceae).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Eun; Kim, Mi-Ran; Kim, Jeong-Han; Takeoka, Gary R; Kim, Tae-Wan; Park, Byeoung-Soo

    2008-06-01

    Antimalarial activity of anthothecol, a limonoid of Khaya anthotheca (Meliaceae) against Plasmodium falciparum was tested using a [(3)H]-hypoxanthine and 48h culture assay in vitro. Anthotechol showed potent antimalarial activity against malaria parasites with IC(50) values of 1.4 and 0.17microM using two different assays. Also, gedunin had antimalarial activity with IC(50) values of 3.1 and 0.14microM. However, the citrus limonoids, limonin and obacunone did not show any antimalarial activity. The antimalarial activities were compared with the three currently used antimalarial medicines quinine, chloroquinine and artemisinin. PMID:17913482

  19. In vitro and in vivo assessment of the anti-malarial activity of Caesalpinia pluviosa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To overcome the problem of increasing drug resistance, traditional medicines are an important source for potential new anti-malarials. Caesalpinia pluviosa, commonly named "sibipiruna", originates from Brazil and possess multiple therapeutic properties, including anti-malarial activity. Methods Crude extract (CE) was obtained from stem bark by purification using different solvents, resulting in seven fractions. An MTT assay was performed to evaluate cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. The CE and its fractions were tested in vitro against chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) and -resistant (S20) strains of Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo in Plasmodium chabaudi-infected mice. In vitro interaction with artesunate and the active C. pluviosa fractions was assessed, and mass spectrometry analyses were conducted. Results At non-toxic concentrations, the 100% ethanolic (F4) and 50% methanolic (F5) fractions possessed significant anti-malarial activity against both 3D7 and S20 strains. Drug interaction assays with artesunate showed a synergistic interaction with the F4. Four days of treatment with this fraction significantly inhibited parasitaemia in mice in a dose-dependent manner. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed the presence of an ion corresponding to m/z 303.0450, suggesting the presence of quercetin. However, a second set of analyses, with a quercetin standard, showed distinct ions of m/z 137 and 153. Conclusions The findings show that the F4 fraction of C. pluviosa exhibits anti-malarial activity in vitro at non-toxic concentrations, which was potentiated in the presence of artesunate. Moreover, this anti-malarial activity was also sustained in vivo after treatment of infected mice. Finally, mass spectrometry analyses suggest that a new compound, most likely an isomer of quercetin, is responsible for the anti-malarial activity of the F4. PMID:21535894

  20. Potentiation of antimalarial activity of arteether in combination with Vetiver root extract.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Sangeeta; Gunjan, Sarika; Pal, Anirban; Tripathi, Renu

    2016-05-01

    In malaria, development of resistance towards artemisinin derivatives has urged the need for new drugs or new drug combinations to tackle the drug resistant malaria. We studied the fresh root extract of Vetiver zizanioides (Linn.) Nash (VET) with a CDRI-CIMAP antimalarial α/β arteether (ART) together for their antimalarial potential. Our results showed additive to synergistic antimalarial activity of VET and ART with sum fractional inhibitory concentrations Σ FICs 1.02 ± 0.24 and 1.12 ± 0.32 for chloroquine sensitive (CQS) and chloroquine resistant (CQR) strain of Plasmodium falciparum (William H. Welch), respectively. Further, these combinations were explored against multidrug resistant rodent malaria parasite i.e. P. yoelii nigeriensis. Analysis of in vivo interaction of ART and VET showed that 10 mg/kg x 5 days of ART with 1000 mg/kg of VET x 5 days cured 100% mice infected with MDR parasite, while the same dose of ART could produce only up to 30% cure and VET fraction was not curative at all. Synergism/additiveness, found between VET and ART is reported for the first time. The curative dose of ART in the combination was reduced to its one fourth, and thus limits the side effects, if any. Although antimalarial potential of ART was enhanced by VET, action mechanism of later needs to be elucidated in detail. PMID:27319050

  1. A novel multiple-stage antimalarial agent that inhibits protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Baragaña, Beatriz; Hallyburton, Irene; Lee, Marcus C. S.; Norcross, Neil R.; Grimaldi, Raffaella; Otto, Thomas D.; Proto, William R.; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Meister, Stephan; Wirjanata, Grennady; Ruecker, Andrea; Upton, Leanna M.; Abraham, Tara S.; Almeida, Mariana J.; Pradhan, Anupam; Porzelle, Achim; Martínez, María Santos; Bolscher, Judith M.; Woodland, Andrew; Norval, Suzanne; Zuccotto, Fabio; Thomas, John; Simeons, Frederick; Stojanovski, Laste; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Brock, Paddy M.; Churcher, Tom S.; Sala, Katarzyna A.; Zakutansky, Sara E.; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Sanz, Laura Maria; Riley, Jennifer; Basak, Rajshekhar; Campbell, Michael; Avery, Vicky M.; Sauerwein, Robert W; Dechering, Koen J.; Noviyanti, Rintis; Campo, Brice; Frearson, Julie A.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer-Bazaga, Santiago; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Wyatt, Paul G.; Leroy, Didier; Siegl, Peter; Delves, Michael J.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Wittlin, Sergio; Marfurt, Jutta; Price, Ric N.; Sinden, Robert E.; Winzeler, Elizabeth; Charman, Susan A.; Bebrevska, Lidiya; Gray, David W.; Campbell, Simon; Fairlamb, Alan H.; Willis, Paul; Rayner, Julian C.; Fidock, David A.; Read, Kevin D.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary There is an urgent need for new drugs to treat malaria, with broad therapeutic potential and novel modes of action, to widen the scope of treatment and to overcome emerging drug resistance. We describe the discovery of DDD107498, a compound with a potent and novel spectrum of antimalarial activity against multiple life-cycle stages of the parasite, with good pharmacokinetic properties, and an acceptable safety profile. DDD107498 demonstrates potential to address a variety of clinical needs, including single dose treatment, transmission blocking and chemoprotection. DDD107498 was developed from a screening programme against blood stage malaria parasites; its molecular target has been identified as translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which is responsible for the GTP-dependent translocation of the ribosome along mRNA, and is essential for protein synthesis. This discovery of eEF2 as a viable antimalarial drug target opens up new possibilities for drug discovery. PMID:26085270

  2. A novel multiple-stage antimalarial agent that inhibits protein synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baragaña, Beatriz; Hallyburton, Irene; Lee, Marcus C. S.; Norcross, Neil R.; Grimaldi, Raffaella; Otto, Thomas D.; Proto, William R.; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Meister, Stephan; Wirjanata, Grennady; Ruecker, Andrea; Upton, Leanna M.; Abraham, Tara S.; Almeida, Mariana J.; Pradhan, Anupam; Porzelle, Achim; Martínez, María Santos; Bolscher, Judith M.; Woodland, Andrew; Norval, Suzanne; Zuccotto, Fabio; Thomas, John; Simeons, Frederick; Stojanovski, Laste; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Brock, Paddy M.; Churcher, Tom S.; Sala, Katarzyna A.; Zakutansky, Sara E.; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Sanz, Laura Maria; Riley, Jennifer; Basak, Rajshekhar; Campbell, Michael; Avery, Vicky M.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Dechering, Koen J.; Noviyanti, Rintis; Campo, Brice; Frearson, Julie A.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer-Bazaga, Santiago; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Wyatt, Paul G.; Leroy, Didier; Siegl, Peter; Delves, Michael J.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Wittlin, Sergio; Marfurt, Jutta; Price, Ric N.; Sinden, Robert E.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Charman, Susan A.; Bebrevska, Lidiya; Gray, David W.; Campbell, Simon; Fairlamb, Alan H.; Willis, Paul A.; Rayner, Julian C.; Fidock, David A.; Read, Kevin D.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2015-06-01

    There is an urgent need for new drugs to treat malaria, with broad therapeutic potential and novel modes of action, to widen the scope of treatment and to overcome emerging drug resistance. Here we describe the discovery of DDD107498, a compound with a potent and novel spectrum of antimalarial activity against multiple life-cycle stages of the Plasmodium parasite, with good pharmacokinetic properties and an acceptable safety profile. DDD107498 demonstrates potential to address a variety of clinical needs, including single-dose treatment, transmission blocking and chemoprotection. DDD107498 was developed from a screening programme against blood-stage malaria parasites; its molecular target has been identified as translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which is responsible for the GTP-dependent translocation of the ribosome along messenger RNA, and is essential for protein synthesis. This discovery of eEF2 as a viable antimalarial drug target opens up new possibilities for drug discovery.

  3. Discovery of Novel Liver-Stage Antimalarials through Quantum Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David J.; Liu, Yi; Mott, Bryan T.; Kaludov, Nikola; Martinov, Martin N.

    2015-01-01

    Without quantum theory any understanding of molecular interactions is incomplete. In principal, chemistry, and even biology, can be fully derived from non-relativistic quantum mechanics. In practice, conventional quantum chemical calculations are computationally too intensive and time consuming to be useful for drug discovery on more than a limited basis. A previously described, original, quantum-based computational process for drug discovery and design bridges this gap between theory and practice, and allows the application of quantum methods to large-scale in silico identification of active compounds. Here, we show the results of this quantum-similarity approach applied to the discovery of novel liver-stage antimalarials. Testing of only five of the model-predicted compounds in vitro and in vivo hepatic stage drug inhibition assays with P. berghei identified four novel chemical structures representing three separate quantum classes of liver-stage antimalarials. All four compounds inhibited liver-stage Plasmodium as a single oral dose in the quantitative PCR mouse liver-stage sporozoites-challenge model. One of the newly identified compounds, cethromycin [ABT-773], a macrolide-quinoline hybrid, is a drug with an extensive (over 5,000 people) safety profile warranting its exploitation as a new weapon for the current effort of malaria eradication. The results of our molecular modeling exceed current state-of-the-art computational methods. Drug discovery through quantum similarity is data-driven, agnostic to any particular target or disease process that can evaluate multiple phenotypic, target-specific, or co-crystal structural data. This allows the incorporation of additional pharmacological requirements, as well as rapid exploration of novel chemical spaces for therapeutic applications. PMID:25951139

  4. Antimalarial Benzoxaboroles Target Plasmodium falciparum Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Sonoiki, Ebere; Palencia, Andres; Guo, Denghui; Ahyong, Vida; Dong, Chen; Li, Xianfeng; Hernandez, Vincent S; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Choi, Wai; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jennifer; Cooper, Roland; Alley, M R K; Freund, Yvonne R; DeRisi, Joseph; Cusack, Stephen; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2016-08-01

    There is a need for new antimalarials, ideally with novel mechanisms of action. Benzoxaboroles have been shown to be active against bacteria, fungi, and trypanosomes. Therefore, we investigated the antimalarial activity and mechanism of action of 3-aminomethyl benzoxaboroles against Plasmodium falciparum Two 3-aminomethyl compounds, AN6426 and AN8432, demonstrated good potency against cultured multidrug-resistant (W2 strain) P. falciparum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 310 nM and 490 nM, respectively) and efficacy against murine Plasmodium berghei infection when administered orally once daily for 4 days (90% effective dose [ED90], 7.4 and 16.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively). To characterize mechanisms of action, we selected parasites with decreased drug sensitivity by culturing with stepwise increases in concentration of AN6426. Resistant clones were characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Three generations of resistant parasites had polymorphisms in the predicted editing domain of the gene encoding a P. falciparum leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS; PF3D7_0622800) and in another gene (PF3D7_1218100), which encodes a protein of unknown function. Solution of the structure of the P. falciparum LeuRS editing domain suggested key roles for mutated residues in LeuRS editing. Short incubations with AN6426 and AN8432, unlike artemisinin, caused dose-dependent inhibition of [(14)C]leucine incorporation by cultured wild-type, but not resistant, parasites. The growth of resistant, but not wild-type, parasites was impaired in the presence of the unnatural amino acid norvaline, consistent with a loss of LeuRS editing activity in resistant parasites. In summary, the benzoxaboroles AN6426 and AN8432 offer effective antimalarial activity and act, at least in part, against a novel target, the editing domain of P. falciparum LeuRS. PMID:27270277

  5. Antimalarial activity of Malaysian Plectranthus amboinicus against Plasmodium berghei

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Norazsida; Ahamed, Pakeer Oothuman Syed; Elhady, Hassan Mohamed; Taher, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Context: Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by parasitic protozoa from the genus of Plasmodium. The protozoans have developed resistance against many of current drugs. It is urgent to find an alternative source of new antimalarial agent. In the effort to discover new antimalarial agents, this research has been conducted on Plectranthus amboinicus. Aims: This study was conducted to evaluate the toxicity and antiplasmodial properties of P. amboinicus. Materials and Methods: Acute oral toxicity dose at 5000 mg/kg was conducted to evaluate the safety of this extract. Twenty mice were divided into control and experimental group. All the mice were observed for signs of toxicity, mortality, weight changes and histopathological changes. Antimalarial activity of different extract doses of 50, 200, 400 and 1000 mg/kg were tested in vivo against Plasmodium berghei infections in mice (five mice for each group) during early, established and residual infections. Results: The acute oral toxicity test revealed that no mortality or evidence of adverse effects was seen in the treated mice. The extract significantly reduced the parasitemia by the 50 (P = 0.000), 200 (P = 0.000) and 400 mg/kg doses (P = 0.000) in the in vivo prophylactic assay. The percentage chemo-suppression was calculated as 83.33% for 50 mg/kg dose, 75.62% for 200 mg/kg dose and 90.74% for 400 mg/kg dose. Body weight of all treated groups; T1, T2, T3 and T4 also showed enhancement after 7 days posttreatment. Statistically no reduction of parasitemia calculated for curative and suppressive test. Conclusion: Thus, this extract may give a promising agent to be used as a prophylactic agent of P. berghei infection. PMID:25276063

  6. Hydroxyethylamine Based Phthalimides as New Class of Plasmepsin Hits: Design, Synthesis and Antimalarial Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anil K; Rathore, Sumit; Tang, Yan; Goldfarb, Nathan E; Dunn, Ben M; Rajendran, Vinoth; Ghosh, Prahlad C; Singh, Neelu; Latha, N; Singh, Brajendra K; Rawat, Manmeet; Rathi, Brijesh

    2015-01-01

    A novel class of phthalimides functionalized with privileged scaffolds was designed, synthesized and evaluated as potential inhibitors of plasmepsin 2 (Ki: 0.99 ± 0.1 μM for 6u) and plasmepsin 4 (Ki: 3.3 ± 0.3 μM for 6t), enzymes found in the digestive vacuole of the plasmodium parasite and considered as crucial drug targets. Three compounds were identified as potential candidates for further development. The listed compounds were also assayed for their antimalarial efficacy against chloroquine (CQ) sensitive strain (3D7) of Plasmodium falciparum. Assay of twenty seven hydroxyethylamine derivatives revealed four (5e, 6j, 6o and 6s) as strongly active, which were further evaluated against CQ resistant strain (7GB) of P. falciparum. Compound 5e possessing the piperidinopiperidine moiety exhibited promising antimalarial activity with an IC50 of 1.16 ± 0.04 μM. Further, compounds 5e, 6j, 6o and 6s exhibited low cytotoxic effect on MCF-7 cell line. Compound 6s possessing C2 symmetry was identified as the least cytotoxic with significant antimalarial activity (IC50: 1.30 ± 0.03 μM). The combined presence of hydroxyethylamine and cyclic amines (piperazines and piperidines) was observed as crucial for the activity. The current studies suggest that hydroxyethylamine based molecules act as potent antimalarial agent and may be helpful in drug development. PMID:26502278

  7. Hydroxyethylamine Based Phthalimides as New Class of Plasmepsin Hits: Design, Synthesis and Antimalarial Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anil K.; Rathore, Sumit; Tang, Yan; Goldfarb, Nathan E.; Dunn, Ben M.; Rajendran, Vinoth; Ghosh, Prahlad C.; Singh, Neelu; Latha, N.; Singh, Brajendra K.; Rawat, Manmeet; Rathi, Brijesh

    2015-01-01

    A novel class of phthalimides functionalized with privileged scaffolds was designed, synthesized and evaluated as potential inhibitors of plasmepsin 2 (Ki: 0.99 ± 0.1 μM for 6u) and plasmepsin 4 (Ki: 3.3 ± 0.3 μM for 6t), enzymes found in the digestive vacuole of the plasmodium parasite and considered as crucial drug targets. Three compounds were identified as potential candidates for further development. The listed compounds were also assayed for their antimalarial efficacy against chloroquine (CQ) sensitive strain (3D7) of Plasmodium falciparum. Assay of twenty seven hydroxyethylamine derivatives revealed four (5e, 6j, 6o and 6s) as strongly active, which were further evaluated against CQ resistant strain (7GB) of P. falciparum. Compound 5e possessing the piperidinopiperidine moiety exhibited promising antimalarial activity with an IC50 of 1.16 ± 0.04 μM. Further, compounds 5e, 6j, 6o and 6s exhibited low cytotoxic effect on MCF-7 cell line. Compound 6s possessing C2 symmetry was identified as the least cytotoxic with significant antimalarial activity (IC50: 1.30 ± 0.03 μM). The combined presence of hydroxyethylamine and cyclic amines (piperazines and piperidines) was observed as crucial for the activity. The current studies suggest that hydroxyethylamine based molecules act as potent antimalarial agent and may be helpful in drug development. PMID:26502278

  8. Probing the antimalarial mechanism of artemisinin and OZ277 (arterolane) with nonperoxidic isosteres and nitroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Fügi, Matthias A; Wittlin, Sergio; Dong, Yuxiang; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L

    2010-03-01

    Peroxidic antimalarials such as the semisynthetic artemisinins are critically important in the treatment of drug-resistant malaria. Nevertheless, their peroxide bond-dependent mode of action is still not well understood. Using combination experiments with cultured Plasmodium falciparum cells, we investigated the interactions of the nitroxide radical spin trap, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO), and four of its analogs with artemisinin and the ozonide drug development candidate OZ277. The antagonism observed for combinations of artemisinin or OZ277 with the TEMPO analogs supports the hypothesis that the formation of carbon-centered radicals is critical for the activity of these two antimalarial peroxides. The TEMPO analogs showed a trend toward greater antagonism with artemisinin than they did with OZ277, an observation that can be explained by the greater tendency of artemisinin-derived carbon-centered radicals to undergo internal self-quenching reactions, resulting in a lower proportion of radicals available for subsequent chemical reactions such as the alkylation of heme and parasite proteins. In a further mechanistic experiment, we tested both artemisinin and OZ277 in combination with their nonperoxidic analogs. The latter had no effect on the antimalarial activities of the former. These data indicate that the antimalarial properties of peroxides do not derive from reversible interactions with parasite targets. PMID:20028825

  9. 76 FR 50741 - 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Public Conference; Quality...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug.... Written requests are to be sent to Division of Freedom of Information (ELEM-1029), Food and...

  10. In vitro and in vivo characterization of the antimalarial lead compound SSJ-183 in Plasmodium models

    PubMed Central

    Schleiferböck, Sarah; Scheurer, Christian; Ihara, Masataka; Itoh, Isamu; Bathurst, Ian; Burrows, Jeremy N; Fantauzzi, Pascal; Lotharius, Julie; Charman, Susan A; Morizzi, Julia; Shackleford, David M; White, Karen L; Brun, Reto; Wittlin, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to characterize the in vitro (Plasmodium falciparum) and in vivo (Plasmodium berghei) activity profile of the recently discovered lead compound SSJ-183. The molecule showed in vitro a fast and strong inhibitory effect on growth of all P. falciparum blood stages, with a tendency to a more pronounced stage-specific action on ring forms at low concentrations. Furthermore, the compound appeared to be equally efficacious on drug-resistant and drug-sensitive parasite strains. In vivo, SSJ-183 showed a rapid onset of action, comparable to that seen for the antimalarial drug artesunate. SSJ-183 exhibited a half-life of about 10 hours and no significant differences in absorption or exposure between noninfected and infected mice. SSJ-183 appears to be a promising new lead compound with an attractive antimalarial profile. PMID:24255594

  11. Intermittent preventive antimalarial treatment for children with anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Athuman, Mwaka; Kabanywanyi, Abdunoor M; Rohwer, Anke C

    2015-01-01

    children probably increases the mean change in haemoglobin levels from baseline to follow-up at 12 weeks on average by 0.32 g/dL (MD 0.32, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.45; four trials, 1672 participants, moderate quality evidence); and may improve haemoglobin levels at 12 weeks (MD 0.35, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.64; four trials, 1672 participants, low quality evidence). For both of these outcomes, subgroup analysis did not demonstrate a difference between children receiving iron and those that did not. IPT for children with anaemia probably has little or no effect on mortality or hospital admissions at six months (three trials, 3160 participants moderate quality evidence). Subgroup analysis did not show a difference between those children receiving iron supplements and those that did not. Authors' conclusions Trials did show a small effect on average haemoglobin levels but this did not appear to translate into an effect on mortality and hospital admissions. Three of the six trials were conducted in low endemicity areas where transmission is low and thus any protective effect is likely to be modest. Plain Language Summary Antimalarial drugs as a treatment of anaemia in children living in malaria-endemic areas Children living in malaria areas may develop severe anaemia, often caused by malaria infection, and this can cause death if not treated properly. Intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) is a course of malaria treatment given regularly to these children in order to prevent infection and malaria illness. It has been suggested that IPT could be used to treat children with anaemia in these areas. We aimed to find all the studies looking at treating anaemic children with IPT in order to see what the overall effect is. We examined the evidence available up to 4 December 2014. We included six trials in this review, with a total number of 3847 participants. In all the trials, one group received IPT and the control group received placebo. Three trials were done in low malaria endemicity areas and

  12. Antimalarial activity in Xylocarpus granatum (Koen).

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Vijai; Srivastava, Shishir; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Srivastava, Mahendra Nath; Srivastava, Kumkum; Puri, Sunil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The antimalarial activity of Xylocarpus granatum fruits and their active constituents gedunin and xyloccensin-I were investigated using an in vitro model in this study. The chloroform fraction of X. granatum fruits was found to show promising antimalarial activity using an in vitro model of Plasmodium falciparum. On purification of the active fraction, four pure compounds were isolated and characterised, namely gedunin, photogedunin, xyloccensin-I and palmitic acid. Out of these only gedunin and xyloccensin-I were found to show activity equivalent to the parent active fraction in vitro model. PMID:21787243

  13. Bayesian models trained with HTS data for predicting β-haematin inhibition and in vitro antimalarial activity.

    PubMed

    Wicht, Kathryn J; Combrinck, Jill M; Smith, Peter J; Egan, Timothy J

    2015-08-15

    A large quantity of high throughput screening (HTS) data for antimalarial activity has become available in recent years. This includes both phenotypic and target-based activity. Realising the maximum value of these data remains a challenge. In this respect, methods that allow such data to be used for virtual screening maximise efficiency and reduce costs. In this study both in vitro antimalarial activity and inhibitory data for β-haematin formation, largely obtained from publically available sources, has been used to develop Bayesian models for inhibitors of β-haematin formation and in vitro antimalarial activity. These models were used to screen two in silico compound libraries. In the first, the 1510 U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved drugs available on PubChem were ranked from highest to lowest Bayesian score based on a training set of β-haematin inhibiting compounds active against Plasmodium falciparum that did not include any of the clinical antimalarials or close analogues. The six known clinical antimalarials that inhibit β-haematin formation were ranked in the top 2.1% of compounds. Furthermore, the in vitro antimalarial hit-rate for this prioritised set of compounds was found to be 81% in the case of the subset where activity data are available in PubChem. In the second, a library of about 5000 commercially available compounds (Aldrich(CPR)) was virtually screened for ability to inhibit β-haematin formation and then for in vitro antimalarial activity. A selection of 34 compounds was purchased and tested, of which 24 were predicted to be β-haematin inhibitors. The hit rate for inhibition of β-haematin formation was found to be 25% and a third of these were active against P. falciparum, corresponding to enrichments estimated at about 25- and 140-fold relative to random screening, respectively. PMID:25573118

  14. Bayesian models trained with HTS data for predicting β-haematin inhibition and in vitro antimalarial activity

    PubMed Central

    Wicht, Kathryn J.; Combrinck, Jill M.; Smith, Peter J.; Egan, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    A large quantity of high throughput screening (HTS) data for antimalarial activity has become available in recent years. This includes both phenotypic and target-based activity. Realising the maximum value of these data remains a challenge. In this respect, methods that allow such data to be used for virtual screening maximise efficiency and reduce costs. In this study both in vitro antimalarial activity and inhibitory data for β-haematin formation, largely obtained from publically available sources, has been used to develop Bayesian models for inhibitors of β-haematin formation and in vitro antimalarial activity. These models were used to screen two in silico compound libraries. In the first, the 1510 U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved drugs available on PubChem were ranked from highest to lowest Bayesian score based on a training set of β-haematin inhibiting compounds active against P. falciparum that did not include any of the clinical antimalarials or close analogues. The six known clinical antimalarials that inhibit β-haematin formation were ranked in the top 2.1% of compounds. Furthermore, the in vitro antimalarial hit-rate for this prioritised set of compounds was found to be 81% in the case of the subset where activity data are available in PubChem. In the second, a library of about 5,000 commercially available compounds (AldrichCPR) was virtually screened for ability to inhibit β-haematin formation and then for in vitro antimalarial activity. A selection of 34 compounds was purchased and tested, of which 24 were predicted to be β-haematin inhibitors. The hit rate for inhibition of β-haematin formation was found to be 25% and a third of these were active against P. falciparum, corresponding to enrichments estimated at about 25- and 140-fold relative to random screening, respectively. PMID:25573118

  15. Access to artesunate-amodiaquine, quinine and other anti-malarials: policy and markets in Burundi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in post-conflict Burundi. To counter the increasing challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve highly effective treatment Burundi adopted artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and oral quinine as second-line treatment in its national treatment policy in 2003. Uptake of this policy in the public, private and non-governmental (NGO) retail market sectors of Burundi is relatively unknown. This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. Methods Adapting a standardized methodology developed by Health Action International/World Health Organization (HAI/WHO), a cross-sectional survey of 70 (24 public, 36 private, and 10 NGO) medicine outlets was conducted in three regions of Burundi, representing different levels of transmission of malaria. The availability on day of the survey, the median prices, and affordability (in terms of number of days' wages to purchase treatment) of AS-AQ, quinine and other anti-malarials were calculated. Results Anti-malarials were stocked in all outlets surveyed. AS-AQ was available in 87.5%, 33.3%, and 90% of public, private, and NGO retail outlets, respectively. Quinine was the most common anti-malarial found in all outlet types. Non-policy recommended anti-malarials were mainly found in the private outlets (38.9%) compared to public (4.2%) and NGO (0%) outlets. The median price of a course of AS-AQ was US$0.16 (200 Burundi Francs, FBu) for the public and NGO markets, and 3.5-fold higher in the private sector (US$0.56 or 700 FBu). Quinine tablets were similarly priced in the public (US$1.53 or 1,892.50 FBu), private and NGO sectors (both US$1.61 or 2,000 FBu). Non-policy anti-malarials were priced 50-fold higher than the price of AS-AQ in the public sector. A course of AS-AQ was affordable at 0.4 of a day's wage in the public and NGO sectors, whereas, it was

  16. In silico activity profiling reveals the mechanism of action of antimalarials discovered in a high-throughput screen

    PubMed Central

    Plouffe, David; Brinker, Achim; McNamara, Case; Henson, Kerstin; Kato, Nobutaka; Kuhen, Kelli; Nagle, Advait; Adrián, Francisco; Matzen, Jason T.; Anderson, Paul; Nam, Tae-gyu; Gray, Nathanael S.; Chatterjee, Arnab; Janes, Jeff; Yan, S. Frank; Trager, Richard; Caldwell, Jeremy S.; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhou, Yingyao; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    The growing resistance to current first-line antimalarial drugs represents a major health challenge. To facilitate the discovery of new antimalarials, we have implemented an efficient and robust high-throughput cell-based screen (1,536-well format) based on proliferation of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) in erythrocytes. From a screen of ≈1.7 million compounds, we identified a diverse collection of ≈6,000 small molecules comprised of >530 distinct scaffolds, all of which show potent antimalarial activity (<1.25 μM). Most known antimalarials were identified in this screen, thus validating our approach. In addition, we identified many novel chemical scaffolds, which likely act through both known and novel pathways. We further show that in some cases the mechanism of action of these antimalarials can be determined by in silico compound activity profiling. This method uses large datasets from unrelated cellular and biochemical screens and the guilt-by-association principle to predict which cellular pathway and/or protein target is being inhibited by select compounds. In addition, the screening method has the potential to provide the malaria community with many new starting points for the development of biological probes and drugs with novel antiparasitic activities. PMID:18579783

  17. Pharmacophore modeling of substituted 1,2,4-Trioxanes for quantitative prediction of their antimalarial activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit K; Chakroborty, S; Srivastava, Kumkum; Puri, Sunil K; Saxena, Anil K

    2010-08-23

    A pharmacophore model has been developed for determining the essential structural requirements for antimalarial activity from the eight series of substituted 1,2,4-trioxanes. The best pharmacophore model possessing two aliphatic hydrophobic, one aromatic hydrophobic, one hydrogen-bond (H-bond) acceptor, and one H-bond acceptor (lipid) feature for antimalarial activity showed an excellent correlation coefficient for the training (r(2)(training) = 0.85) and a fair correlation coefficient for the test set (r(2)(test) = 0.51) molecules. The model predicts well to other known substituted 1,2,4-trioxanes including those which either are drugs or are undergoing clinical trials. In order to further validate this model, five substituted 1,2,4-trioxanes were synthesized from the generated focused library and screened for antimalarial activity. The observed activity of these molecules was consistent with the pharmacophore model, suggesting that the model may be useful in the design of potent antimalarial agents. PMID:20726605

  18. Synthesis, Antimalarial, Antileishmanial, Antimicrobial, Cytotoxicity and Methemoglobin (MetHb) Formation Activities of New 8-Quinolinamines

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Kirandeep; Jain, Meenakshi; Khan, Shabana I.; Jacob, Melissa R.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Jain, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis, in vitro antiprotozoal (against Plasmodium and Leishmania), antimicrobial, cytotoxicity (Vero and MetHb-producing properties) and in vivo antimalarial activities of two series of 8-quinolinamines. N1-{4-[2-(tert-Butyl)-6-methoxy-8-quinolylamino]pentyl}-(2S/2R)-2-aminosubstitutedamides (21–33) and N1-[4-(4-ethyl-6-methoxy-5-pentyloxy-8-quinolylamino)pentyl]-(2S/2R)-2-aminosubstitutedamides (51–63) were synthesized in six steps from 6-methoxy-8-nitroquinoline and 4-methoxy-2-nitro-5-pentyloxyaniline, respectively. Several analogs displayed promising antimalarial activity in vitro against P. falciparum D6 (chloroquine-sensitive) and W2 (chloroquine-resistant) clones with high selectivity indices vs. mammalian cells. The most promising analogs (21–24) also displayed potent antimalarial activity in vivo in a P. berghei-infected mouse model. Most interestingly, many analogs exhibited promising in vitro antileishmanial activity against L. donovani promastigotes, and antimicrobial activities against a panel of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Several analogs, notably 21–24, 26–32 and 60, showed less MetHb formation compared to primaquine indicating the potential of these compounds in 8-quinolinamine-based antimalarial drug development. PMID:17084633

  19. Hematin Polymerization Assay as a High-Throughput Screen for Identification of New Antimalarial Pharmacophores

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Yae; Dorn, Arnulf; Kitsuji-Shirane, Michiko; Shimada, Hisao; Satoh, Tomoko; Matile, Hugues; Hofheinz, Werner; Masciadri, Raffaello; Kansy, Manfred; Ridley, Robert G.

    2000-01-01

    Hematin polymerization is a parasite-specific process that enables the detoxification of heme following its release in the lysosomal digestive vacuole during hemoglobin degradation, and represents both an essential and a unique pharmacological drug target. We have developed a high-throughput in vitro microassay of hematin polymerization based on the detection of 14C-labeled hematin incorporated into polymeric hemozoin (malaria pigment). The assay uses 96-well filtration microplates and requires 12 h and a Wallac 1450 MicroBeta liquid scintillation counter. The robustness of the assay allowed the rapid screening and evaluation of more than 100,000 compounds. Random screening was complemented by the development of a pharmacophore hypothesis using the “Catalyst” program and a large amount of data available on the inhibitory activity of a large library of 4-aminoquinolines. Using these methods, we identified “hit” compounds belonging to several chemical structural classes that had potential antimalarial activity. Follow-up evaluation of the antimalarial activity of these compounds in culture and in the Plasmodium berghei murine model further identified compounds with actual antimalarial activity. Of particular interest was a triarylcarbinol (Ro 06-9075) and a related benzophenone (Ro 22-8014) that showed oral activity in the murine model. These compounds are chemically accessible and could form the basis of a new antimalarial medicinal chemistry program. PMID:10991837

  20. Hematin polymerization assay as a high-throughput screen for identification of new antimalarial pharmacophores.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Y; Dorn, A; Kitsuji-Shirane, M; Shimada, H; Satoh, T; Matile, H; Hofheinz, W; Masciadri, R; Kansy, M; Ridley, R G

    2000-10-01

    Hematin polymerization is a parasite-specific process that enables the detoxification of heme following its release in the lysosomal digestive vacuole during hemoglobin degradation, and represents both an essential and a unique pharmacological drug target. We have developed a high-throughput in vitro microassay of hematin polymerization based on the detection of (14)C-labeled hematin incorporated into polymeric hemozoin (malaria pigment). The assay uses 96-well filtration microplates and requires 12 h and a Wallac 1450 MicroBeta liquid scintillation counter. The robustness of the assay allowed the rapid screening and evaluation of more than 100, 000 compounds. Random screening was complemented by the development of a pharmacophore hypothesis using the "Catalyst" program and a large amount of data available on the inhibitory activity of a large library of 4-aminoquinolines. Using these methods, we identified "hit" compounds belonging to several chemical structural classes that had potential antimalarial activity. Follow-up evaluation of the antimalarial activity of these compounds in culture and in the Plasmodium berghei murine model further identified compounds with actual antimalarial activity. Of particular interest was a triarylcarbinol (Ro 06-9075) and a related benzophenone (Ro 22-8014) that showed oral activity in the murine model. These compounds are chemically accessible and could form the basis of a new antimalarial medicinal chemistry program. PMID:10991837

  1. The Sergent brothers and the antimalarial campaigns in Algeria (1902-1948).

    PubMed

    Dedet, J-P

    2008-12-01

    Edmond and Etienne Sergent, "the Sergent brothers", were both born in Algeria. They both studied medicine at the Algiers Medical School and then followed the Course of Microbiology of Emile Roux at the Institut Pasteur in Paris (1899-1900). From 1900, they were put in charge of a permanent mission aimed at antimalarial control in Algeria, which was supervised by the Institut Pasteur. The first campaign was carried out during the summer of 1902 at a station of the East Algerian Railway Company. The success of this mission lead to the creation of the Antimalaric Department of Algeria in 1904, which was directed by Etienne Sergent for the duration his life. This antimalarial programme was progressively extended to many other locations. The programme was optimized between 1927 and 1947, in the experimental field study of the Ouled Mendil Marsh, where global environmental measures and drainage lead to settlement of farms, the families of which did not suffered from malaria. At a time when neither insecticides nor synthetic antimalarial drug existed, antimalarial control measures that were developed tended to target human reservoirs and the mosquito vectors. The extension of the programme across the Algerian territory lead to a decrease of both malaria endemicity and extension of affected areas. PMID:20055231

  2. Development of a New Generation of 4-Aminoquinoline Antimalarial Compounds Using Predictive Pharmacokinetic and Toxicology Models

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sunetra; Madrid, Peter B.; Catz, Paul; LeValley, Susanna E.; Furniss, Michael J.; Rausch, Linda L.; Guy, R. Kiplin; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Iyer, Lalitha V.; Green, Carol E.; Mirsalis, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    Among the known antimalarial drugs, chloroquine (CQ) and other 4-aminoquinolines have shown high potency and good bioavailability, yet complications associated with drug resistance necessitate the discovery of effective new antimalarial agents. ADMETa prediction studies were employed to evaluate a library of new molecules based on the 4-aminoquinolone-related structure of CQ. Extensive in vitro screening and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in mice helped to identify two lead molecules, 18 and 4, with promising in vitro therapeutic efficacy, improved ADMET properties, low risk for drug-drug interactions, and desirable pharmacokinetic profiles. Both 18 and 4 are highly potent antimalarial compounds, with IC50 values = 5.6 nM and 17.3 nM, respectively, against the W2 (CQ-resistant) strain of Plasmodium falciparum (IC50 for CQ = 382 nM). When tested in mice, these compounds were found to have biological half-lives and plasma exposure values similar to or higher than those of CQ; they are therefore desirable candidates to pursue in future clinical trials. PMID:20361799

  3. In Silico Exploration for New Antimalarials: Arylsulfonyloxy Acetimidamides as Prospective Agents.

    PubMed

    Verma, Saroj; Debnath, Utsab; Agarwal, Pooja; Srivastava, Kumkum; Prabhakar, Yenamandra S

    2015-08-24

    A strategy is described to identify new antimalarial agents to overcome the drug resistance and/or failure issues through in silico screening of multiple biological targets. As a part of this, three enzymes namely CTPS, CK, and GST were selected, from among 56 drug targets of P. falciparum, and used them in virtual screening of ZINC database entries which led to the design and synthesis of arylsulfonyloxy acetimidamides as their consensus inhibitors. From these, two compounds showed good activity against sensitive (3D7; IC50, 1.10 and 1.45 μM) and resistant (K1; IC50, 2.10 and 2.13 μM) strains of the parasite, and they were further investigated through docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings of this study collectively paved the way for arylsulfonyloxy acetimidamides as a new class of antimalarial agents. PMID:26237069

  4. Exploring the 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indole scaffold as a novel antimalarial chemotype.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sofia A; Lukens, Amanda K; Coelho, Lis; Nogueira, Fátima; Wirth, Dyann F; Mazitschek, Ralph; Moreira, Rui; Paulo, Alexandra

    2015-09-18

    A series of 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indoles with building block diversity was synthesized based on a hit derived from an HTS whole-cell screen against Plasmodium falciparum. Thirty-eight compounds were obtained following a three-step synthetic approach and evaluated for anti-parasitic activity. The SAR shows that 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indole is intolerant to most N-piperidinyl modifications. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a new compound (10d) with lead-like properties (MW = 305; cLogP = 2.42), showing antimalarial activity against drug-resistant and sensitive strains (EC50 values ∼ 3 μM), selectivity for malaria parasite and no cross-resistance with chloroquine, thus representing a potential new chemotype for further optimization towards novel and affordable antimalarial drugs. PMID:26295174

  5. Cross-Resistance and Collateral Susceptibility to Antifolic Antimalarial Compounds1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carl C.; Genther, Clara S.

    1972-01-01

    Series of strains of Streptococcus faecium ATCC 8043, Lactobacillus casei ATCC 7469, and Pediococcus cerevisiae ATCC 8081 with increasing resistance to the active antifolate antimalarial drugs chlorguanide triazine (CGT), pyrimethamine (PM), and trimethoprim (TMP) were isolated. These mutant strains, stable for at least 3 to 5 years, were examined for cross-resistance and collateral susceptibility to the above compounds and to methotrexate (MTX). Generally, they exhibited cross-resistance to all four compounds, but resistance of a strain to one compound did not predict accurately its resistance to another drug. Unexpectedly, L. casei resistant to CGT exhibited collateral susceptibility to MTX, TMP, and PM varying from 5- to 20-fold. P. cerevisiae developed resistance to CGT readily but maintained its susceptibility to PM and TMP after prolonged exposure to these compounds. Resistance to these antimalarial antifolates was accompanied by only low-grade cross-resistance to MTX, a representative antileukemic antifolate agent. PMID:4208273

  6. Hollow-Fiber Methodology for Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Studies of Antimalarial Compounds.

    PubMed

    Caton, Emily; Nenortas, Elizabeth; Bakshi, Rahul P; Shapiro, Theresa A

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships can enhance the speed and economy of drug development by enabling informed and rational decisions at every step, from lead selection to clinical dosing. For anti-infective agents in particular, dynamic in vitro hollow-fiber cartridge experiments permit exquisite control of kinetic parameters and the study of their consequent impact on pharmacodynamic efficacy. Such information is of great interest for the cost-restricted but much-needed development of new antimalarial drugs, especially since the major human pathogen Plasmodium falciparum can be cultivated in vitro but is not readily available in animal models. This protocol describes the materials and procedures for determining the PK/PD relationships of antimalarial compounds. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26995353

  7. Antimalarial activity of tropical Meliaceae extracts and gedunin derivatives.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, S; Durst, T; Arnason, J T; Angerhofer, C; Pezzuto, J; Sanchez-Vindas, P E; Poveda, L J; Gbeassor, M

    1997-04-01

    Extracts of 22 species of Meliaceae were examined for antimalarial activity using in vitro tests with two clones of Plasmodium falciparum, one sensitive to chloroquine (W2) and one chloroquine-resistant (D6). Twelve extracts were found to have activity, including extracts of Cedrela odorata wood and Azadirachta indica leaves, which contained the limonoid gedunin. These extracts were more effective against the W2 clone than the D6 clone, suggesting there is no cross-resistance to chloroquine. Gedunin was extracted in quantity, and nine derivatives prepared for a structure-activity study, which revealed essential functionalities for activity. The study also included four other limonoids derived from related Meliaceae. Only gedunin had better activity than chloroquine against the W2 clone. This active principle could be used to standardize a popular crude drug based on traditional use of A. indica in West Africa. PMID:9134742

  8. Antimalarial benzylisoquinoline alkaloid from the rainforest tree Doryphora sassafras.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Malcolm S; Davis, Rohan A; Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M; Quinn, Ronald J

    2009-08-01

    Mass-directed isolation of the CH(2)Cl(2)/MeOH extract of Doryphora sassafras resulted in the purification of a new benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, 1-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-6,7-methylenedioxy-2-methylisoquinolinium trifluoroacetate (1), and the known aporphine alkaloid (S)-isocorydine (2). The structures of 1 and 2 were determined by 1D and 2D NMR and MS data analyses. The compounds were isolated during a drug discovery program aimed at identifying new antimalarial leads from a prefractionated natural product library. When tested against two different strains of the parasite Plasmodium falciparum (3D7 and Dd2), 1 displayed IC(50) values of 3.0 and 4.4 microM, respectively. Compound 1 was tested for cytotoxicity toward a human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293) and displayed no activity at 120 microM. PMID:19637893

  9. Antimalarial Chemotherapy: Natural Product Inspired Development of Preclinical and Clinical Candidates with Diverse Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Álvaro, Elena; Hong, W David; Nixon, Gemma L; O'Neill, Paul M; Calderón, Félix

    2016-06-23

    Natural products have played a pivotal role in malaria chemotherapy progressing from quinine and artemisinin to ozonide-based compounds. Many of these natural products have served as template for the design and development of antimalarial drugs currently in the clinic or in the development phase. In this review, we will detail those privileged scaffolds that have guided medicinal chemistry efforts yielding molecules that have reached the clinic. PMID:26791529

  10. Identifying antimalarial compounds targeting dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) by chemogenomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Aroonsri, Aiyada; Akinola, Olugbenga; Posayapisit, Navaporn; Songsungthong, Warangkhana; Uthaipibull, Chairat; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Gbotosho, Grace O; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Shaw, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    The mode of action of many antimalarial drugs is unknown. Chemogenomic profiling is a powerful method to address this issue. This experimental approach entails disruption of gene function and phenotypic screening for changes in sensitivity to bioactive compounds. Here, we describe the application of reverse genetics for chemogenomic profiling in Plasmodium. Plasmodium falciparum parasites harbouring a transgenic insertion of the glmS ribozyme downstream of the dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) gene were used for chemogenomic profiling of antimalarial compounds to identify those which target DHFR-TS. DHFR-TS expression can be attenuated by exposing parasites to glucosamine. Parasites with attenuated DHFR-TS expression were significantly more sensitive to antifolate drugs known to target DHFR-TS. In contrast, no change in sensitivity to other antimalarial drugs with different modes of action was observed. Chemogenomic profiling was performed using the Medicines for Malaria Venture (Switzerland) Malaria Box compound library, and two compounds were identified as novel DHFR-TS inhibitors. We also tested the glmS ribozyme in Plasmodium berghei, a rodent malaria parasite. The expression of reporter genes with downstream glmS ribozyme could be attenuated in transgenic parasites comparable with that obtained in P. falciparum. The chemogenomic profiling method was applied in a P. berghei line expressing a pyrimethamine-resistant Toxoplasma gondii DHFR-TS reporter gene under glmS ribozyme control. Parasites with attenuated expression of this gene were significantly sensitised to antifolates targeting DHFR-TS, but not other drugs with different modes of action. In conclusion, these data show that the glmS ribozyme reverse genetic tool can be applied for identifying primary targets of antimalarial compounds in human and rodent malaria parasites. PMID:27150044

  11. Case Study of Small Molecules As Antimalarials: 2-Amino-1-phenylethanol (APE) Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Antiparasitic oral drugs have been associated to lipophilic molecules due to their intrinsic permeability. However, these kind of molecules are associated to numerous adverse effects, which have been extensively studied. Within the Tres Cantos Antimalarial Set (TCAMS) we have identified two small, soluble and simple hits that even presenting antiplasmodial activities in the range of 0.4–0.5 μM are able to show in vivo activity. PMID:24944739

  12. Alkoxycarbonyloxyethyl ester prodrugs of FR900098 with improved in vivo antimalarial activity.

    PubMed

    Ortmann, Regina; Wiesner, Jochen; Reichenberg, Armin; Henschker, Dajana; Beck, Ewald; Jomaa, Hassan; Schlitzer, Martin

    2005-07-01

    FR900098 represents a derivative of the new antimalarial drug fosmidomycin with enhanced activity. The mechanism of action is the inhibition of the 1-desoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DOXP) reductoisomerase, an essential enzyme of the mevalonate independent pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis. Prodrugs with increased oral activity in mice infected with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium vinckei were obtained by masking the phosphonate moiety of FR900098 as alkoxycarbonyloxyethyl esters. PMID:15996004

  13. Diaryl ester prodrugs of FR900098 with improved in vivo antimalarial activity.

    PubMed

    Reichenberg, A; Wiesner, J; Weidemeyer, C; Dreiseidler, E; Sanderbrand, S; Altincicek, B; Beck, E; Schlitzer, M; Jomaa, H

    2001-03-26

    The fosmidomycin derivative FR900098 represents an inhibitor of the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DOXP) reductoisomerase with potent antimalarial activity. Prodrugs of FR900098 with increased activity after oral administration were obtained by chemical modification of the phosphonate moiety to yield phosphodiaryl esters. One diaryl ester prodrug demonstrated efficacy in mice infected with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium vinckei comparable to i.p. drug administration. PMID:11277531

  14. Acyloxyalkyl ester prodrugs of FR900098 with improved in vivo anti-malarial activity.

    PubMed

    Ortmann, Regina; Wiesner, Jochen; Reichenberg, Armin; Henschker, Dajana; Beck, Ewald; Jomaa, Hassan; Schlitzer, Martin

    2003-07-01

    FR900098 represents an improved derivative of the new antimalarial drug fosmidomycin and acts through inhibition of the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DOXP) reductoisomerase, an essential enzyme of the mevalonate independent pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis. Prodrugs with increased activity after oral administration were obtained by chemical modification of the phosphonate moiety to yield acyloxyalkyl esters. The most successful compound demonstrated 2-fold increased activity in mice infected with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium vinckei. PMID:12798327

  15. Barrier Qualities of the Mouse Eye to Topically Applied Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao; Do, Chi Wai; Avila, Marcel Y.; Stone, Richard A.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Civan, Mortimer M.

    2007-01-01

    The mouse eye displays unusually rapid intraocular pressure (IOP) responses to topically applied drugs as measured by the invasive servo-null micropipette system (SNMS). To learn if the time course reflected rapid drug transfer across the thin mouse cornea and sclera, we monitored a different parameter, pupillary size, following topical application of droplets containing 40 μM (0.073μg) carbachol. No miosis developed from this low carbachol concentration unless the cornea was impaled with an exploring micropipette as used in the SNMS. We also compared the mouse IOP response to several purinergic drugs, measured by the invasive SNMS and non-invasive pneumotonometry. Responses to the previously-studied non-selective adenosine-receptor (AR) agonist adenosine, the A3-selective agonist Cl-IB-MECA and the A3-selective antagonist MRS 1191 were all enhanced to varying degrees, in time and magnitude, by corneal impalement. We conclude that the thin ocular coats of the mouse eye actually present a substantial barrier to drug penetration. Corneal impalement with even fine-tipped micropipettes can significantly enhance entry of topically-applied drugs into the mouse aqueous humor, reflecting either direct diffusion around the tip or a more complex impalement-triggered change in ocular barrier properties. Comparison of invasive and non-invasive measurement methods can document drug efficacy at intraocular target sites even if topical drug penetration is too slow to manifest convincing physiologic effects in intact eyes. PMID:17490649

  16. Barrier qualities of the mouse eye to topically applied drugs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Do, Chi Wai; Avila, Marcel Y; Stone, Richard A; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Civan, Mortimer M

    2007-07-01

    The mouse eye displays unusually rapid intraocular pressure (IOP) responses to topically applied drugs as measured by the invasive servo-null micropipette system (SNMS). To learn if the time course reflected rapid drug transfer across the thin mouse cornea and sclera, we monitored a different parameter, pupillary size, following topical application of droplets containing 40 microM (0.073 microg) carbachol. No miosis developed from this low carbachol concentration unless the cornea was impaled with an exploring micropipette as used in the SNMS. We also compared the mouse IOP response to several purinergic drugs, measured by the invasive SNMS and non-invasive pneumotonometry. Responses to the previously studied non-selective adenosine-receptor (AR) agonist adenosine, the A(3)-selective agonist Cl-IB-MECA and the A(3)-selective antagonist MRS 1191 were all enhanced to varying degrees, in time and magnitude, by corneal impalement. We conclude that the thin ocular coats of the mouse eye actually present a substantial barrier to drug penetration. Corneal impalement with even fine-tipped micropipettes can significantly enhance entry of topically-applied drugs into the mouse aqueous humor, reflecting either direct diffusion around the tip or a more complex impalement-triggered change in ocular barrier properties. Comparison of invasive and non-invasive measurement methods can document drug efficacy at intraocular target sites even if topical drug penetration is too slow to manifest convincing physiologic effects in intact eyes. PMID:17490649

  17. Molecular modelling based target identification for endo-peroxides class of antimalarials.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit K; Saxena, Anil K

    2015-01-01

    The emerging cases of artemisinin and endoperoxide drug resistance are becoming a challenge to antimalarial drug discovery and therapy. The exact mode of action of this class of antimalarials is still unknown which presents a bottleneck for the understanding of drug resistance as well as designing new lead molecules of this class. To address this issue, the molecular docking and scoring studies of a homogeneous and structurally diverse dataset of artemisinin derived trioxanes have been performed on each of the two plausible targets of this class viz. heme and PfATP6. Since the crystal structure of PfATP6 is unknown, its homology model was built utilizing the human SERCA1 protein crystallized structure as a template. The binding energies of the heme binding site of the docked artemisinin derivatives showed very good correlation with the antimalarial activity (r(2) = 0.69), whereas the same study with the binding site of pfATP6 showed a very poor correlation (r(2) = 0.12), suggesting heme to be the possible target of artemisinin derived endoperoxides. PMID:25543685

  18. In vitro antimalarial activity of extracts of some plants from a biological reserve in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Chinchilla, Misael; Valerio, Idalia; Sánchez, Ronald; Mora, Víctor; Bagnarello, Vanessa; Martínez, Laura; Gonzalez, Antonieta; Vanegas, Juan Carlos; Apestegui, Alvaro

    2012-06-01

    Treatment with the usual antimalarial drugs, have induced parasite resistance, reinforcing the need to finding natural antimalarial components that would be found on plants from the forest. Therefore, we decided to look for these components in Costa Rican plants from a protected forest area. Fresh and dry extracts of roots, bark, leaves, flowers and fruits of 25 plants from a biological reserve in Costa Rica, Reserva Biol6gica Alberto Manuel Brenes (REBAMB), were studied in vitro for the presence of substances with antimalarial activity. By studying the inhibition of P berghei schizogony, we assessed the antimalarial activity of several plant extracts: Aphelandra aurantiaca, A. tridentata (Acanthaceae); Xanthosoma undipes (Araceae); Iriartea deltoidea (Arecaceae); Neurolaena lobata (Asteraceae); Senna papillosa, Pterocarpus hayessi, Lonchocarpus pentaphyllus (Fabaceae); Nectandra membranacea, Persea povedae, Cinamomum chavarrianum (Lauraceae); Hampea appendiculata (Malvaceae); Ruagea glabra, Guarea glabra (Meliaceae); Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae); Bocconia frutescens (Papaveraceae); Piper friedrichsthalii (Piperaceae); Clematis dioica (Ranunculaceae); Prunus annularis (Rosaceae); Siparuna thecaphora (Siparunaceae); Solanum arboreum, Witheringia solanacea (Solanaceae); Ticodendrum incognitum (Ticodendraceae); Heliocarpus appendiculatus (Tiliaceae) and Myriocarpa longipes (Urticaceae). We used different parts of the plants as well as fresh and dried extracts for testing IC50. The solid content of the extracts ranged from 1-71.9 microg/mL. The fresh extracts showed stronger activity than the dry ones. Since the plants showing the strongest antimalarial activity are very common in Central America, and some similar genera of these plants have shown positives results in South America, we considered important to present these findings for discussion. On the other hand, this is the first systematic study of this kind ever realized in a circumscribed and protected area of

  19. Identification and deconvolution of cross-resistance signals from antimalarial compounds using multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Monika; Scheurer, Christian; Sax, Sibylle; Bilsland, Elizabeth; van Schalkwyk, Donelly A; Wicht, Kathryn J; Hofmann, Natalie; Sharma, Anil; Bashyam, Sridevi; Singh, Shivendra; Oliver, Stephen G; Egan, Timothy J; Malhotra, Pawan; Sutherland, Colin J; Beck, Hans-Peter; Wittlin, Sergio; Spangenberg, Thomas; Ding, Xavier C

    2015-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the most deadly agent of malaria, displays a wide variety of resistance mechanisms in the field. The ability of antimalarial compounds in development to overcome these must therefore be carefully evaluated to ensure uncompromised activity against real-life parasites. We report here on the selection and phenotypic as well as genotypic characterization of a panel of sensitive and multidrug-resistant P. falciparum strains that can be used to optimally identify and deconvolute the cross-resistance signals from an extended panel of investigational antimalarials. As a case study, the effectiveness of the selected panel of strains was demonstrated using the 1,2,4-oxadiazole series, a newly identified antimalarial series of compounds with in vitro activity against P. falciparum at nanomolar concentrations. This series of compounds was to be found inactive against several multidrug-resistant strains, and the deconvolution of this signal implicated pfcrt, the genetic determinant of chloroquine resistance. Targeted mode-of-action studies further suggested that this new chemical series might act as falcipain 2 inhibitors, substantiating the suggestion that these compounds have a site of action similar to that of chloroquine but a distinct mode of action. New antimalarials must overcome existing resistance and, ideally, prevent its de novo appearance. The panel of strains reported here, which includes recently collected as well as standard laboratory-adapted field isolates, is able to efficiently detect and precisely characterize cross-resistance and, as such, can contribute to the faster development of new, effective antimalarial drugs. PMID:25487796

  20. Identification and Deconvolution of Cross-Resistance Signals from Antimalarial Compounds Using Multidrug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Monika; Scheurer, Christian; Sax, Sibylle; Bilsland, Elizabeth; van Schalkwyk, Donelly A.; Wicht, Kathryn J.; Hofmann, Natalie; Sharma, Anil; Bashyam, Sridevi; Singh, Shivendra; Oliver, Stephen G.; Egan, Timothy J.; Malhotra, Pawan; Sutherland, Colin J.; Beck, Hans-Peter; Wittlin, Sergio; Spangenberg, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the most deadly agent of malaria, displays a wide variety of resistance mechanisms in the field. The ability of antimalarial compounds in development to overcome these must therefore be carefully evaluated to ensure uncompromised activity against real-life parasites. We report here on the selection and phenotypic as well as genotypic characterization of a panel of sensitive and multidrug-resistant P. falciparum strains that can be used to optimally identify and deconvolute the cross-resistance signals from an extended panel of investigational antimalarials. As a case study, the effectiveness of the selected panel of strains was demonstrated using the 1,2,4-oxadiazole series, a newly identified antimalarial series of compounds with in vitro activity against P. falciparum at nanomolar concentrations. This series of compounds was to be found inactive against several multidrug-resistant strains, and the deconvolution of this signal implicated pfcrt, the genetic determinant of chloroquine resistance. Targeted mode-of-action studies further suggested that this new chemical series might act as falcipain 2 inhibitors, substantiating the suggestion that these compounds have a site of action similar to that of chloroquine but a distinct mode of action. New antimalarials must overcome existing resistance and, ideally, prevent its de novo appearance. The panel of strains reported here, which includes recently collected as well as standard laboratory-adapted field isolates, is able to efficiently detect and precisely characterize cross-resistance and, as such, can contribute to the faster development of new, effective antimalarial drugs. PMID:25487796

  1. Evaluation of the ex vivo antimalarial activity of organotin (IV) ethylphenyldithiocarbamate on erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium berghei NK 65.

    PubMed

    Awang, Normah; Jumat, Hafizah; Ishak, Shafariatul Akmar; Kamaludin, Nurul Farahana

    2014-06-01

    Malaria is the most destructive and dangerous parasitic disease. The commonness of this disease is getting worse mainly due to the increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum against antimalarial drugs. Therefore, the search for new antimalarial drug is urgently needed. This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of dibutyltin (IV) ethylphenyldithiocarbamate (DBEP), diphenyltin (IV) ethylphenyldithiocarbamate (DPEP) and triphenyltin (IV) ethylphenyldithiocarbamate (TPEP) compounds as antimalarial agents. These compounds were evaluated against erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 via ex vivo. Organotin (IV) ethylphenyldithiocarbamate, [R(n)Sn(C9H10NS2)(4-n)] with R = C4H9 and C6H5 for n = 2; R = C6H5 for n = 3 is chemically synthesised for its potential activities. pLDH assay was employed for determination of the concentration that inhibited 50% of the Plasmodium's activity (IC50) after 24 h treatment at concentration range of 10-0.0000001 mg mL(-1). Plasmodium berghei NK65 was cultured in vitro to determine the different morphology of trophozoite and schizont. Only DPEP and TPEP compounds have antimalarial activity towards P. berghei NK65 at IC50 0.094±0.011 and 0.892±0.088 mg mL(-1), respectively. The IC50 of DPEP and TPEP were lowest at 30% parasitemia with IC50 0.001±0.00009 and 0.0009±0.0001 mg mL(-1), respectively. In vitro culture showed that TPEP was effective towards P. berghei NK65 in trophozoite and schizont morphology with IC50 0.0001±0.00005 and 0.00009±0.00003 μg mL(-1), respectively. In conclusion, DPEP and TPEP have antimalarial effect on erythrocytes infected with P. berghei NK65 and have potential as antimalarial and schizonticidal agents. PMID:26035957

  2. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). 423.153 Section 423.153 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a... to reduce medication errors and adverse drug interactions and improve medication use that include...

  3. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). 423.153 Section 423.153 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a... to reduce medication errors and adverse drug interactions and improve medication use that include...

  4. The counterfeit anti-malarial is a crime against humanity: a systematic review of the scientific evidence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The counterfeiting of anti-malarials represents a form of attack on global public health in which fake and substandard anti-malarials serve as de facto weapons of mass destruction, particularly in resource-constrained endemic settings, where malaria causes nearly 660,000 preventable deaths and threatens millions of lives annually. It has been estimated that fake anti-malarials contribute to nearly 450,000 preventable deaths every year. This crime against humanity is often underestimated or ignored. This study attempts to describe and characterize the direct and indirect effects of counterfeit anti-malarials on public health, clinical care and socio-economic conditions. Methods A search was performed using key databases, WHO documents, and English language search engines. Of 262 potential articles that were identified using a fixed set of criteria, a convenience sample of 105 appropriate articles was selected for this review. Results Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is an important tool in the fight against malaria, but a sizable number of patients are unable to afford to this first-line treatment. Consequently, patients tend to procure cheaper anti-malarials, which may be fake or substandard. Forensic palynology reveals that counterfeits originate in Asia. Fragile drug regulations, ineffective law-enforcement agencies and corruption further burden ailing healthcare facilities. Substandard/fake anti-malarials can cause (a) economic sabotage; (b) therapeutic failure; (c) increased risk of the emergence and spread of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax; (d) an undermining of trust/confidence in healthcare stakeholders/systems; and, (e) serious side effects or death. Conclusion Combating counterfeit anti-malarials is a complex task due to limited resources and poor techniques for the detection and identification of fake anti-malarials. This situation calls for sustainable, global, scientific research and policy change

  5. Association between drug‐specific indicators of prescribing quality and quality of drug treatment: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Belfrage, Björn; Fastbom, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To evaluate the concurrent validity of three European sets of drug‐specific indicators of prescribing quality Methods In 200 hip fracture patients (≥65 years), consecutively recruited to a randomized controlled study in Sahlgrenska University Hospital in 2009, quality of drug treatment at study entry was assessed according to a gold standard as well as to three drug‐specific indicator sets (Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, French consensus panel list, and German PRISCUS list). As gold standard, two specialist physicians independently assessed and then agreed on the quality for each patient, after initial screening with STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Persons' potentially inappropriate Prescriptions) and START (Screening Tool to Alert to Right Treatment). Results According to the Swedish, French, and German indicator sets, 82 (41%), 54 (27%), and 43 (22%) patients had potentially inappropriate drug treatment. A total of 141 (71%) patients had suboptimal drug treatment according to the gold standard. The sensitivity for the indicator sets was 0.51 (95% confidence interval: 0.43; 0.59), 0.33 (0.26; 0.41), and 0.29 (0.22; 0.37), respectively. The specificity was 0.83 (0.72; 0.91), 0.88 (0.77; 0.94), and 0.97 (0.88; 0.99). Suboptimal drug treatment was 2.0 (0.8; 5.3), 1.9 (0.7; 5.1), and 6.1 (1.3; 28.6) times as common in patients with potentially inappropriate drug treatment according to the indicator sets, after adjustments for age, sex, cognition, residence, multi‐dose drug dispensing, and number of drugs. Conclusions In this setting, the indicator sets had high specificity and low sensitivity. This needs to be considered upon use and interpretation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26147790

  6. Intervention to Promote Patients' Adherence to Antimalarial Medication: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Fuangchan, Anjana; Dhippayom, Teerapon; Kongkaew, Chuenjid

    2014-01-01

    Non-adherence as a major contributor to poor treatment outcomes. This study aimed to explore the effectiveness of existing interventions promoting adherence to antimalarial drugs by systematic review. The following databases were used to identify potential articles: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane CENTRAL, and CINAHL (through March 2013). From 1,813 potential papers identified, 16 studies met the selection criteria comprising 9,247 patients. Interventions were classified as packaging aids, visual media, combined visual media and verbal information, community education, medication supervision, and convenient regimen. These interventions were shown to increase adherence to antimalarial drugs (median relative risk = 1.4, interquartile range 1.2–2.0). Although a most effective intervention did not emerge, community education and visual media/verbal information combinations may well have most potential to improve adherence to antimalarial medication. These interventions should be implemented in combination to optimize their beneficial effects. The current understanding on improved adherence would facilitate to contain outbreaks of malaria cost effectively. PMID:24166045

  7. Pyrazoleamide compounds are potent antimalarials that target Na+ homeostasis in intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Akhil B.; Morrisey, Joanne M.; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Das, Sudipta; Daly, Thomas M.; Otto, Thomas D.; Spillman, Natalie J.; Wyvratt, Matthew; Siegl, Peter; Marfurt, Jutta; Wirjanata, Grennady; Sebayang, Boni F.; Price, Ric N.; Chatterjee, Arnab; Nagle, Advait; Stasiak, Marcin; Charman, Susan A.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Belén Jiménez-Díaz, María; Martínez, María Santos; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Avery, Vicky M.; Ruecker, Andrea; Delves, Michael; Kirk, Kiaran; Berriman, Matthew; Kortagere, Sandhya; Burrows, Jeremy; Fan, Erkang; Bergman, Lawrence W.

    2014-01-01

    The quest for new antimalarial drugs, especially those with novel modes of action, is essential in the face of emerging drug-resistant parasites. Here we describe a new chemical class of molecules, pyrazoleamides, with potent activity against human malaria parasites and showing remarkably rapid parasite clearance in an in vivo model. Investigations involving pyrazoleamide-resistant parasites, whole-genome sequencing and gene transfers reveal that mutations in two proteins, a calcium-dependent protein kinase (PfCDPK5) and a P-type cation-ATPase (PfATP4), are necessary to impart full resistance to these compounds. A pyrazoleamide compound causes a rapid disruption of Na+ regulation in blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum parasites. Similar effect on Na+ homeostasis was recently reported for spiroindolones, which are antimalarials of a chemical class quite distinct from pyrazoleamides. Our results reveal that disruption of Na+ homeostasis in malaria parasites is a promising mode of antimalarial action mediated by at least two distinct chemical classes. PMID:25422853

  8. Pyrazoleamide compounds are potent antimalarials that target Na+ homeostasis in intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Akhil B; Morrisey, Joanne M; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Das, Sudipta; Daly, Thomas M; Otto, Thomas D; Spillman, Natalie J; Wyvratt, Matthew; Siegl, Peter; Marfurt, Jutta; Wirjanata, Grennady; Sebayang, Boni F; Price, Ric N; Chatterjee, Arnab; Nagle, Advait; Stasiak, Marcin; Charman, Susan A; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Belén Jiménez-Díaz, María; Martínez, María Santos; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Avery, Vicky M; Ruecker, Andrea; Delves, Michael; Kirk, Kiaran; Berriman, Matthew; Kortagere, Sandhya; Burrows, Jeremy; Fan, Erkang; Bergman, Lawrence W

    2014-01-01

    The quest for new antimalarial drugs, especially those with novel modes of action, is essential in the face of emerging drug-resistant parasites. Here we describe a new chemical class of molecules, pyrazoleamides, with potent activity against human malaria parasites and showing remarkably rapid parasite clearance in an in vivo model. Investigations involving pyrazoleamide-resistant parasites, whole-genome sequencing and gene transfers reveal that mutations in two proteins, a calcium-dependent protein kinase (PfCDPK5) and a P-type cation-ATPase (PfATP4), are necessary to impart full resistance to these compounds. A pyrazoleamide compound causes a rapid disruption of Na(+) regulation in blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum parasites. Similar effect on Na(+) homeostasis was recently reported for spiroindolones, which are antimalarials of a chemical class quite distinct from pyrazoleamides. Our results reveal that disruption of Na(+) homeostasis in malaria parasites is a promising mode of antimalarial action mediated by at least two distinct chemical classes. PMID:25422853

  9. 75 FR 70011 - Guidance for Industry, Mammography Quality Standards Act Inspectors, and Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the guidance entitled ``The Mammography Quality Standards Act Final Regulations: Modifications and Additions to Policy Guidance Help System 13.'' This document is intended to assist mammography facilities and their personnel in meeting the requirements of the Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA)...

  10. Are Patent Medicine Vendors Effective Agents in Malaria Control? Using Lot Quality Assurance Sampling to Assess Quality of Practice in Jigawa, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Berendes, Sima; Adeyemi, Olusegun; Oladele, Edward Adekola; Oresanya, Olusola Bukola; Okoh, Festus; Valadez, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Patent medicine vendors (PMV) provide antimalarial treatment and care throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, and can play an important role in the fight against malaria. Their close-to-client infrastructure could enable lifesaving artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) to reach patients in time. However, systematic assessments of drug sellers’ performance quality are crucial if their role is to be managed within the health system. Lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) could be an efficient method to monitor and evaluate PMV practice, but has so far never been used for this purpose. Methods In support of the Nigeria Malaria Booster Program we assessed PMV practices in three Senatorial Districts (SDs) of Jigawa, Nigeria. A two-stage LQAS assessed whether at least 80% of PMV stores in SDs used national treatment guidelines. Acceptable sampling errors were set in consultation with government officials (alpha and beta <0.10). The hypergeometric formula determined sample sizes and cut-off values for SDs. A structured assessment tool identified high and low performing SDs for quality of care indicators. Findings Drug vendors performed poorly in all SDs of Jigawa for all indicators. For example, all SDs failed for stocking and selling first-line antimalarials. PMV sold no longer recommended antimalarials, such as Chloroquine, Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine and oral Artesunate monotherapy. Most PMV were ignorant of and lacked training about new treatment guidelines that had endorsed ACTs as first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria. Conclusion There is urgent need to regularly monitor and improve the availability and quality of malaria treatment provided by medicine sellers in Nigeria; the irrational use of antimalarials in the ACT era revealed in this study bears a high risk of economic loss, death and development of drug resistance. LQAS has been shown to be a suitable method for monitoring malaria-related indicators among PMV, and should be applied in Nigeria

  11. In vitro inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum by substances isolated from Amazonian antimalarial plants.

    PubMed

    de Andrade-Neto, Valter F; Pohlit, Adrian M; Pinto, Ana Cristina S; Silva, Ellen Cristina C; Nogueira, Karla L; Melo, Márcia R S; Henrique, Marycleuma C; Amorim, Rodrigo C N; Silva, Luis Francisco R; Costa, Mônica R F; Nunomura, Rita C S; Nunomura, Sergio M; Alecrim, Wilson D; Alecrim, M das Graças C; Chaves, F Célio M; Vieira, Pedro Paulo R

    2007-06-01

    In the present study, a quassinoid, neosergeolide, isolated from the roots and stems of Picrolemma sprucei (Simaroubaceae), the indole alkaloids ellipticine and aspidocarpine, isolated from the bark of Aspidosperma vargasii and A. desmanthum (Apocynaceae), respectively, and 4-nerolidylcatechol, isolated from the roots of Pothomorphe peltata (Piperaceae), all presented significant in vitro inhibition (more active than quinine and chloroquine) of the multi-drug resistant K1 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Neosergeolide presented activity in the nanomolar range. This is the first report on the antimalarial activity of these known, natural compounds. This is also the first report on the isolation of aspidocarpine from A. desmanthum. These compounds are good candidates for pre-clinical tests as novel lead structures with the aim of finding new antimalarial prototypes and lend support to the traditional use of the plants from which these compounds are derived. PMID:17568942

  12. Evaluation of plants used for antimalarial treatment by the Maasai of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Koch, A; Tamez, P; Pezzuto, J; Soejarto, D

    2005-10-01

    Semi-structured interviews with three Maasai herbalists led to the identification and collection of 21 species of plants used to treat malaria. Extracts were evaluated using in vitro antimalarial and cytotoxicity assays. Of the species tested, over half were antiplasmodial (IC50<10 microg/ml), and all but one (Gutenbergia cordifolia Benth.) displayed selectivity for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum as indicated by a lack of cytotoxicity (ED50>20 microg/ml) against cultured KB cells. The results of this preliminary investigation support the traditional knowledge of Maasai herbalists and justify ethnomedical inquiry as a promising method, specifically, in antimalarial therapy, to yield leads for drug discovery. PMID:15878245

  13. Prescription drugs in nursing homes: managing costs and quality in a complex environment.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Dan; Ramchand, Rajeev; Abramson, Richard; Tumlinson, Anne

    2002-11-12

    This brief provides a description of prescription drug use in nursing homes and a summary of current policy issues in this area. The brief first profiles the nursing home pharmaceutical market, outlining the major trends in demographics and drug utilization, the supply chain by which drugs go from manufacturers to pharmacies to nursing home residents, and the alternative arrangements by which prescription drugs in nursing homes are financed. The brief then provides a synopsis of current policy issues, focusing in turn on cost containment and quality improvement initiatives. PMID:12463231

  14. Understanding Private Sector Antimalarial Distribution Chains: A Cross-Sectional Mixed Methods Study in Six Malaria-Endemic Countries

    PubMed Central

    Palafox, Benjamin; Patouillard, Edith; Tougher, Sarah; Goodman, Catherine; Hanson, Kara; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Rueda, Sergio Torres; Kiefer, Sabine; O’Connell, Kathryn A.; Zinsou, Cyprien; Phok, Sochea; Akulayi, Louis; Arogundade, Ekundayo; Buyungo, Peter; Mpasela, Felton; Chavasse, Desmond

    2014-01-01

    Background Private for-profit outlets are important treatment sources for malaria in most endemic countries. However, these outlets constitute only the last link in a chain of businesses that includes manufacturers, importers and wholesalers, all of which influence the availability, price and quality of antimalarials patients can access. We present evidence on the composition, characteristics and operation of these distribution chains and of the businesses that comprise them in six endemic countries (Benin, Cambodia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia). Methods and Findings We conducted nationally representative surveys of antimalarial wholesalers during 2009–2010 using an innovative sampling approach that captured registered and unregistered distribution channels, complemented by in-depth interviews with a range of stakeholders. Antimalarial distribution chains were pyramidal in shape, with antimalarials passing through a maximum of 4–6 steps between manufacturer and retailer; however, most likely pass through 2–3 steps. Less efficacious non-artemisinin therapies (e.g. chloroquine) dominated weekly sales volumes among African wholesalers, while volumes for more efficacious artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) were many times smaller. ACT sales predominated only in Cambodia. In all countries, consumer demand was the principal consideration when selecting products to stock. Selling prices and reputation were key considerations regarding supplier choice. Business practices varied across countries, with large differences in the proportions of wholesalers offering credit and delivery services to customers, and the types of distribution models adopted by businesses. Regulatory compliance also varied across countries, particularly with respect to licensing. The proportion of wholesalers possessing any up-to-date licence from national regulators was lowest in Benin and Nigeria, where vendors in traditional markets are important

  15. In vitro antimalarial activity of medicinal plant extracts against Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Bagavan, Asokan; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul; Kaushik, Naveen Kumar; Sahal, Dinkar

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is a major global public health problem, and the alarming spread of drug resistance and limited number of effective drugs now available underline how important it is to discover new antimalarial compounds. In the present study, ten plants were extracted with ethyl acetate and methanol and tested for their antimalarial activity against chloroquine (CQ)-sensitive (3D7) and CQ-resistant (Dd2 and INDO) strains of Plasmodium falciparum in culture using the fluorescence-based SYBR Green assay. Plant extracts showed moderate to good antiparasitic effects. Promising antiplasmodial activity was found in the extracts from two plants, Phyllanthus emblica leaf 50% inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) 3D7: 7.25 μg/mL (ethyl acetate extract), 3.125 μg/mL (methanol extract), and Syzygium aromaticum flower bud, IC₅₀ 3D7:13 μg/mL, (ethyl acetate extract) and 6.25 μg/mL (methanol extract). Moderate activity (30-75 μg/mL) was found in the ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Abrus precatorius (seed) and Gloriosa superba (leaf); leaf ethyl acetate extracts of Annona squamosa and flower of Musa paradisiaca. The above mentioned plant extracts were also found to be active against CQ-resistant strains (Dd2 and INDO). Cytotoxicity study with P. emblica leaf and S. aromaticum flower bud, extracts showed good therapeutic indices. These results demonstrate that leaf ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of P. emblica and flower bud extract of S. aromaticum may serve as antimalarial agents even in their crude form. The isolation of compounds from P. emblica and S. aromaticum seems to be of special interest for further antimalarial studies. PMID:20809417

  16. Bilayer Effects of Antimalarial Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Nicole B; Andersen, Olaf S

    2015-01-01

    Because of the perpetual development of resistance to current therapies for malaria, the Medicines for Malaria Venture developed the Malaria Box to facilitate the drug development process. We tested the 80 most potent compounds from the box for bilayer-mediated effects on membrane protein conformational changes (a measure of likely toxicity) in a gramicidin-based stopped flow fluorescence assay. Among the Malaria Box compounds tested, four compounds altered membrane properties (p< 0.05); MMV007384 stood out as a potent bilayer-perturbing compound that is toxic in many cell-based assays, suggesting that testing for membrane perturbation could help identify toxic compounds. In any case, MMV007384 should be approached with caution, if at all. PMID:26551613

  17. Bilayer Effects of Antimalarial Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Nicole B.; Andersen, Olaf S.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the perpetual development of resistance to current therapies for malaria, the Medicines for Malaria Venture developed the Malaria Box to facilitate the drug development process. We tested the 80 most potent compounds from the box for bilayer-mediated effects on membrane protein conformational changes (a measure of likely toxicity) in a gramicidin-based stopped flow fluorescence assay. Among the Malaria Box compounds tested, four compounds altered membrane properties (p< 0.05); MMV007384 stood out as a potent bilayer-perturbing compound that is toxic in many cell-based assays, suggesting that testing for membrane perturbation could help identify toxic compounds. In any case, MMV007384 should be approached with caution, if at all. PMID:26551613

  18. Plasmodium falciparum Thioredoxin Reductase (PfTrxR) and Its Role as a Target for New Antimalarial Discovery.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Sara E; Schellenberger, Amanda; Goodwin, Douglas C; Fuanta, Ngolui Rene; Tekwani, Babu L; Calderón, Angela I

    2015-01-01

    The growing resistance to current antimalarial drugs is a major concern for global public health. The pressing need for new antimalarials has led to an increase in research focused on the Plasmodium parasites that cause human malaria. Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), an enzyme needed to maintain redox equilibrium in Plasmodium species, is a promising target for new antimalarials. This review paper provides an overview of the structure and function of TrxR, discusses similarities and differences between the thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs) of different Plasmodium species and the human forms of the enzyme, gives an overview of modeling Plasmodium infections in animals, and suggests the role of Trx functions in antimalarial drug resistance. TrxR of Plasmodium falciparum is a central focus of this paper since it is the only Plasmodium TrxR that has been crystallized and P. falciparum is the species that causes most malaria cases. It is anticipated that the information summarized here will give insight and stimulate new directions in which research might be most beneficial. PMID:26111176

  19. Antimalarial Activity of Anthothecol Derived from Khaya anthotheca (Meliaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimalarial activity of anthothecol, a limonoid of Khaya anthotheca (Meliaceae) against Plasmodium falciparum was tested using a [3H]-hypoxanthine and 48 h culture assay in vitro. Anthothecol showed potent antimalarial activity against malarial parasites with IC50 values of 1.4 and 0.17 uM using t...

  20. Synthesis and Antimalarial Activities of Cyclen 4-Aminoquinoline Analogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an attempt to augment the efficacy of 7-chloro 4-aminoquinoline analogs and also to overcome resistance to anti-malarial agents we synthesized three cyclen analogs of chloroquine (4,6,7). Compound 4 displays the most potent in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activities. It displays an IC50 of 7.5 ...

  1. Quality medicines for the poor: experience of the Delhi programme on rational use of drugs.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, R Roy; Parameswar, R; Gupta, U; Sharma, S; Tekur, U; Bapna, J S

    2005-03-01

    Prior to 1994, most Delhi hospitals and dispensaries experienced constant shortages of essential medicines. There was erratic prescribing of expensive branded products, frequent complaints about poor drug quality and low patient satisfaction. Delhi took the lead in developing a comprehensive Drug Policy in 1994 and was the only Indian state to have such a comprehensive policy. The policy's main objective is to improve the availability and accessibility of quality essential drugs for all those in need. The Delhi Society for the Promotion of Rational Use of Drugs (DSPRUD), a non-governmental organization, worked in close collaboration with the Delhi Government and with universities to implement various components of the policy. The first Essential Drugs List (EDL) was developed, a centralized pooled procurement system was set up and activities promoting rational use of drugs were initiated. In 1997, the Delhi Programme was designated the INDIA-WHO Essential Drugs Programme by the World Health Organization. The EDL was developed by a committee consisting of a multidisciplinary group of experts using balanced criteria of efficacy, safety, suitability and cost. The first list contained 250 drugs for hospitals and 100 drugs for dispensaries; the list is revised every 2 years. The pooled procurement system, including the rigorous selection of suppliers with a minimum annual threshold turnover and the introduction of Good Manufacturing Practice inspections, resulted in the supply of good quality drugs and in holding down the procurement costs of many drugs. Bulk purchasing of carefully selected essential drugs was estimated to save nearly 30% of the annual drugs bill for the Government of Delhi, savings which were mobilized for procuring more drugs, which in turn improved availability of drugs (more than 80%) at health facilities. Further, training programmes for prescribers led to a positive change in prescribing behaviour, with more than 80% of prescriptions being from

  2. Antimalarial activities of medicinal plants and herbal formulations used in Thai traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Thiengsusuk, Artitaya; Chaijaroenkul, Wanna; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2013-04-01

    Malaria is one of the world's leading killer infectious diseases with high incidence and morbidity. The problem of multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum has been aggravating particularly in Southeast Asia. Therefore, development of new potential antimalarial drugs is urgently required. The present study aimed to investigate antimalarial activities of a total of 27 medicinal plants and 5 herbal formulations used in Thai traditional medicine against chloroquine-resistant (K1) and chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) P. falciparum clones. Antimalarial activity of the ethanolic extracts of all plants/herbal formulations against K1 and 3D7 P. falciparum clones was assessed using SYBR Green I-based assay. All plants were initially screened at the concentration of 50 μg/ml to select the candidate plants that inhibited malaria growth by ≥50%. Each candidate plant was further assessed for the IC50 value (concentration that inhibits malaria growth by 50%) to select the potential plants. Selectivity index (SI) of each extract was determined from the IC50 ratio obtained from human renal epithelial cell and K1 or 3D7 P. falciparum clone. The ethanolic extracts from 19 medicinal plants/herbal formulation exhibited promising activity against both K1 and 3D7 clones of P. falciparum with survival of less than 50% at the concentration of 50 μg/ml. Among these, the extracts from the eight medicinal plants (Plumbago indica Linn., Garcinia mangostana Linn., Dracaena loureiri Gagnep., Dioscorea membranacea Pierre., Artemisia annua Linn., Piper chaba Hunt., Myristica fragrans Houtt., Kaempferia galanga Linn.) and two herbal formulations (Benjakul Formulation 1 and Pra-Sa-Prao-Yhai Formulation) showed potent antimalarial activity with median range IC50 values of less than 10 μg/ml against K1 or 3D7 P. falciparum clone or both. All except G. mangostana Linn. and A. annua Linn. showed high selective antimalarial activity against both clones with SI>10. Further studies on antimalarial

  3. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Considerations in Antimalarial Dose Optimization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs have usually been first deployed in areas of malaria endemicity at doses which were too low, particularly for high-risk groups such as young children and pregnant women. This may accelerate the emergence and spread of resistance, thereby shortening the useful life of the drug, but it is an inevitable consequence of the current imprecise method of dose finding. An alternative approach to dose finding is suggested in which phase 2 studies concentrate initially on pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) characterization and in vivo calibration of in vitro susceptibility information. PD assessment is facilitated in malaria because serial parasite densities are readily assessed by microscopy, and at low densities by quantitative PCR, so that initial therapeutic responses can be quantitated accurately. If the in vivo MIC could be characterized early in phase 2 studies, it would provide a sound basis for the choice of dose in all target populations in subsequent combination treatments. Population PK assessments in phase 2b and phase 3 studies which characterize PK differences between different age groups, clinical disease states, and human populations can then be combined with the PK-PD observations to provide a sound evidence base for dose recommendations in different target groups. PMID:24002099

  4. Using genetic methods to define the targets of compounds with antimalarial activity

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Erika L.; Fidock, David A.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Although phenotypic cellular screening has been used to drive antimalarial drug discovery in recent years, in some cases target-based drug discovery remains more attractive. This is especially true when appropriate high-throughput cellular assays are lacking, as is the case for drug discovery efforts that aim to provide a replacement for primaquine (4-N-(6-methoxyquinolin-8-yl)pentane-1,4-diamine), the only drug that can block Plasmodium transmission to Anopheles mosquitoes and eliminate liver-stage hypnozoites. At present, however, there are no known chemically validated parasite protein targets that are important in all Plasmodium parasite developmental stages and that can be used in traditional biochemical compound screens. We propose that a plethora of novel, chemically validated, cross-stage antimalarial targets still remain to be discovered from the ~5,500 proteins encoded by the Plasmodium genomes. Here we discuss how in vitro evolution of drug-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum and subsequent whole-genome analysis can be used to find the targets of some of the many compounds discovered in whole-cell phenotypic screens. PMID:23927658

  5. Access to Artemisinin-Combination Therapy (ACT) and other Anti-Malarials: National Policy and Markets in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Amuasi, John H.; Diap, Graciela; Nguah, Samuel Blay; Karikari, Patrick; Boakye, Isaac; Jambai, Amara; Lahai, Wani Kumba; Louie, Karly S.; Kiechel, Jean-Rene

    2012-01-01

    Malaria remains the leading burden of disease in post-conflict Sierra Leone. To overcome the challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve effective treatment, Sierra Leone adopted artemisinin-combination therapy artesunate-amodiaquine (AS+AQ) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Other national policy anti-malarials include artemether-lumefantrine (AL) as an alternative to AS+AQ, quinine and artemether for treatment of complicated malaria; and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp). This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. A cross-sectional survey of 127 medicine outlets (public, private and NGO) was conducted in urban and rural areas. The availability on the day of the survey, median prices, and affordability policy and available non-policy anti-malarials were calculated. Anti-malarials were stocked in 79% of all outlets surveyed. AS+AQ was widely available in public medicine outlets; AL was only available in the private and NGO sectors. Quinine was available in nearly two-thirds of public and NGO outlets and over one-third of private outlets. SP was widely available in all outlets. Non-policy anti-malarials were predominantly available in the private outlets. AS+AQ in the public sector was widely offered for free. Among the anti-malarials sold at a cost, the same median price of a course of AS+AQ (US$1.56), quinine tablets (US$0.63), were found in both the public and private sectors. Quinine injection had a median cost of US$0.31 in the public sector and US$0.47 in the private sector, while SP had a median cost of US$0.31 in the public sector compared to US$ 0.63 in the private sector. Non-policy anti-malarials were more affordable than first-line AS+AQ in all sectors. A course of AS+AQ was affordable at nearly two days’ worth of wages in both the public and private sectors. PMID:23133522

  6. In vivo antimalarial activity of the endophytic actinobacteria, Streptomyces SUK 10.

    PubMed

    Baba, Mohd Shukri; Zin, Noraziah Mohamad; Hassan, Zainal Abidin Abu; Latip, Jalifah; Pethick, Florence; Hunter, Iain S; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; Herron, Paul R

    2015-12-01

    Endophytic bacteria, such as Streptomyces, have the potential to act as a source for novel bioactive molecules with medicinal properties. The present study was aimed at assessing the antimalarial activity of crude extract isolated from various strains of actinobacteria living endophytically in some Malaysian medicinal plants. Using the four day suppression test method on male ICR strain mice, compounds produced from three strains of Streptomyces (SUK8, SUK10, and SUK27) were tested in vivo against Plasmodium berghei PZZ1/100 in an antimalarial screen using crude extracts at four different concentrations. One of these extracts, isolated from Streptomyces SUK10 obtained from the bark of Shorea ovalis tree, showed inhibition of the test organism and was further tested against P. berghei-infected mice for antimalarial activity at different concentrations. There was a positive relationship between the survival of the infected mouse group treated with 50 µg/kg body weight (bw) of ethyl acetate-SUK10 crude extract and the ability to inhibit the parasites growth. The parasite inhibition percentage for this group showed that 50% of the mice survived for more than 90 days after infection with the parasite. The nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic tree suggested that Streptomyces SUK10 may constitute a new species within the Streptomyces genus. As part of the drug discovery process, these promising finding may contribute to the medicinal and pharmaceutical field for malarial treatment. PMID:26626355

  7. Natural and Semi synthetic Antimalarial Compounds: Emphasis on the Terpene Class.

    PubMed

    Silva, G N S; Rezende, L C D; Emery, F S; Gosmann, G; Gnoatto, S C B

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most important tropical diseases since more than 40% of the world population is at risk. This disease is endemic to more than 100 nations and remains one of the main leading causes of death in children less than five years of age worldwide. Natural product-derived compounds have played a major role in drug discovery, often as prototypes to obtain more active semi synthetic derivatives. Antimalarial pharmacotherapy is a significant example of plant-derived medicines, such as quinine and artemisinin. This review highlights studies on terpenes and their semi synthetic derivatives from natural sources with antimalarial activity reported in the literature during eleven years (2002-2013). A total of 114 compounds are found among terpenes and their semi synthetic derivatives. Cytotoxicity of the compounds is also found in this review. Furthermore, the physicochemical properties of the terpenes addressed are discussed based on seven well established descriptors, which provide a useful source for the elaboration of a terpene library of antimalarial compounds. PMID:25553426

  8. Drug-Induced Itch Management.

    PubMed

    Ebata, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Drugs may cause itching as a concomitant symptom of drug-induced skin reactions or in the form of pruritus without skin lesions. Drug-induced itch is defined as generalized itching without skin lesions, caused by a drug. Itching associated with drug-induced cholestasis is among the common dermatologic adverse events (dAEs) that induce itching. Some drugs such as opioids, antimalarials, and hydroxyethyl starch are known to induce itching without skin lesions. The clinical features and underlying proposed mechanisms of itching caused by these drugs have been specifically investigated. The recent application of targeted anticancer drugs has increased the survival rate of cancer patients. These new agents cause significant dAEs such as acneiform rashes, dry skin, hand-foot syndrome, paronychia, and itching. Itching is a common side effect of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. Though not life-threatening, these dAEs have a negative impact on a patient's quality of life, leading to dose reduction and possibly less effective cancer therapy. It is important to provide an effective supportive antipruritic treatment without interruption of the administration of these drugs. This chapter concludes by describing basic measures to be taken for diagnosis and treatment of drug-induced itch. The principle of treatment is discontinuation of suspected causative drugs in general except for anticancer medications. In case itching lasts long after drug withdrawal or the causative drug cannot be stopped, vigorous symptomatic antipruritic treatment and specific therapies for different types of drug-induced itch should be undertaken. PMID:27578085

  9. Experiences of drug use and ageing: health, quality of life, relationship and service implications

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Brenda; Beynon, Caryl; Pickering, Lucy; Duffy, Paul

    2010-01-01

    roe b., beynon c., pickering l. & duffy p. (2010)Experiences of drug use and ageing: health, quality of life, relationship and service implications. Journal of Advanced Nursing66(9), 1968–1979. Aim This paper is a report of an exploration of older people’s experiences of substance use in the context of ageing, and its impact on health, quality of life, relationships and service use. Background Use of illicit drugs by older people is a neglected policy, research and service provision and is generally perceived as a lifestyle of younger populations. Method A convenience sample of 11 people aged 49–61 years (mean 57 years) in contact with voluntary sector drug treatment services participated in qualitative semi-structured tape-recorded interviews and thematic content analysis was performed. The data were collected in 2008. Findings Drug use can have negative impacts on health status, quality of life, family relationships and social networks that accrue with age. Participants were identified as early or later onset users of drugs due to the impact of life events and relationships. A range of substances had been used currently and throughout their lives, with no single gateway drug identified as a prelude to personal drug careers. Life review and reflection were common, in keeping with ageing populations, along with regret of ever having started to use drugs. Living alone and their accommodation made them more susceptible to social isolation, and they reported experiences of death and dying of their contemporaries and family members earlier than usual in the life course. Conclusion Older people who continue to use drugs and require the support of services for treatment and care are an important emerging population and their specific needs should recognized. PMID:20626477

  10. Rapid evaluation of artesunate quality with a specific monoclonal antibody-based lateral flow dipstick.

    PubMed

    Guo, Suqin; Zhang, Wei; He, Lishan; Tan, Guiyu; Min, Myo; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Wang, Baomin; Cui, Liwang

    2016-09-01

    Artesunate is a frontline antimalarial drug for treating Plasmodium falciparum malaria. To produce specific antibodies to artesunate, the carboxyl group of artesunate was directly conjugated to carrier protein as the immunogen. A specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3D82G6 against artesunate was obtained by high-throughput screening of positive hybridoma clones. This monoclonal antibody had 4.0, 0.5, and 0.9 % cross reactivities with artemisinin, dihydroartemisinin, and artemether, respectively. A dipstick immunoassay was developed, and the indicator range for artesunate was 1000-2000 ng mL(-1). No interference was observed with artemisinin, dihydroartemisinin, artemether, and other commonly used antimalarial drugs for up to 20,000 ng mL(-1). The dipsticks were used for determination of artesunate contents in commercial drugs, and the results were agreeable with those determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. This dipstick, with its specificity and sensitivity for artesunate and simplicity to use, makes it a potential point-of-care device for rapid quality evaluation of artesunate-containing antimalarial drugs. Graphical Abstract Specific monoclonal antibody-based lateral flow dipstick for artesunate. PMID:26873200

  11. Antimalarial and cytotoxic properties of Chukrasia tabularis A. Juss and Turraea vogelii Hook F. Ex. Benth.

    PubMed

    Ogbole, Omonike O; Saka, Yusuf A; Fasinu, Pius S; Fadare, Adenike A; Ajaiyeoba, Edith O

    2016-04-01

    Malaria, caused by plasmodium parasite, is at the moment the highest cause of morbidity and mortality in the tropics. Recently, there is increasing efforts to develop more potent antimalarials from plant sources that will have little or no adverse effects. This study is aimed at investigating the in vivo mice antimalarial and in vitro antiplasmodial effects of two Meliaceae plants commonly used in Nigerian ethnomedicine as part of recipe for treating malaria infection: Chukrasia tabularis and Turraea vogelii. Hot water decoction and methanol extract of both plants were evaluated for their antimalarial activity in vivo using the mice model assay and in vitro using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay. The extracts were also assessed for toxicity with brine shrimp lethality assay and in mammalian cell lines using the neural red assay. The in vivo mice model antimalarial study showed that the methanol extract of the stem bark of C. tabularis exhibited the highest % chemosuppression (83.65 ± 0.66) at the highest dosage administered (800 mg/kg) when compared with chloroquine diphosphate, the standard reference drug which had a % suppression of 90.36 ± 0.04 (p < 0.05). The in vitro antiplasmodial study indicated that the aqueous extract of the stem bark of C. tabularis displayed good activity against Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine-sensitive (D6) strain (IC50 of 10.739 μg/mL) and chloroquine-resistant (W2) strain. Chloroquine and artemisinin had <0.163 and <0.0264, respectively. PMID:26911147

  12. In vitro antimalarial activity of different extracts of Eremostachys macrophylla Montbr. & Auch.

    PubMed Central

    Asnaashari, Solmaz; Heshmati Afshar, Fariba; Ebrahimi, Atefeh; Bamdad Moghadam, Sedigheh; Delazar, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:The risk of drug resistance and the use of medicinal plants in malaria prevention and treatment have led to the search for new antimalarial compounds with natural origin. Methods:In the current study, six extracts with different polarity from aerial parts and rhizomes of Eremostachys macrophylla Montbr. & Auch., were screened for their antimalarial properties by cell-free β-hematin formation assay. Results: Dichloromethane (DCM) extracts of both parts of plant showed significant antimalarial activities with IC50 values of 0.797 ± 0.016 mg/mL in aerial parts and 0.324 ± 0.039 mg/mL in rhizomes compared to positive control (Chloroquine, IC50 = 0.014 ± 0.003 mg/mL, IC90 = 0.163 ± 0.004 mg/mL). Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the most potent part (DCM extract of rhizomes) by vacuum liquid chromatography (VLC) afforded seven fractions. Sixty percent ethyl acetate/n-hexane fraction showed considerable antimalarial activity with IC50 value of 0.047 ± 0.0003 mg/mL. Conclusion: From 6 extracts with different polarity of E. macrophylla,s aerial parts and rhizomes, the DCM extract of both parts were the most active extract in this assay. The preliminary phytochemical study on the VLC fractions of the most potent part persuades us to focus on purifying the active components of these extracts and to conduct further investigation towards in vivo evaluation. PMID:26457251

  13. Antimalarial dyes revisited: xanthenes, azines, oxazines, and thiazines.

    PubMed Central

    Vennerstrom, J L; Makler, M T; Angerhofer, C K; Williams, J A

    1995-01-01

    In 1891 Guttmann and Ehrlich (P. Guttmann and P. Ehrlich, Berlin Klin. Wochenschr. 28:953-956, 1891) were the first to report the antimalarial properties of a synthetic, rather than a natural, material when they described the clinical cure of two patients after oral administration of a thiazine dye, methylene blue. Since that time, sporadic reports of the antimalarial properties of several xanthene and azine dyes related to methylene blue have been noted. We report here the results from a reexamination of the antimalarial properties of methylene blue. Janus green B, and three rhodamine dyes and disclose new antimalarial data for 16 commercially available structural analogs of these dyes. The 50% inhibitory concentrations for the chloroquine-susceptible D6 clone and SN isolate and the chloroquine-resistant W2 clone of Plasmodium falciparum were determined by the recently described parasite lactate dehydrogenase enzyme assay. No cross-resistance to chloroquine was observed for any of the dyes. For the 21 dyes tested, no correlation was observed between antimalarial activity and cytotoxicity against KB cells. No correlation between log P (where P is the octanol/water partition coefficient) or relative catalyst efficiency for glucose oxidation and antimalarial activity or cytotoxicity was observed for the dyes as a whole or for the thiazine dyes. The thiazine dyes were the most uniformly potent structural class tested, and among the dyes in this class, methylene blue was notable for both its high antimalarial potency and selectivity. PMID:8593000

  14. Anti-malarial property of steroidal alkaloid conessine isolated from the bark of Holarrhena antidysenterica

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the face of chronic and emerging resistance of parasites to currently available drugs and constant need for new anti-malarials, natural plant products have been the bastion of anti-malarials for thousands of years. Moreover natural plant products and their derivatives have traditionally been a common source of drugs, and represent more than 30% of the current pharmaceutical market. The present study shows evaluation of anti-malarial effects of compound conessine isolated from plant Holarrhena antidysenterica frequently used against malaria in the Garhwal region of north-west Himalaya. Methods In vitro anti-plasmodial activity of compound was assessed using schizont maturation and parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay. Cytotoxic activities of the examined compound were determined on L-6 cells of rat skeletal muscle myoblast. The four-day test for anti-malarial activity against a chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium berghei NK65 strain in BALB/c mice was used for monitoring in vivo activity of compound. In liver and kidney function test, the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was examined by p-NPP method, bilirubin by Jendrassik and Grof method. The urea percentage was determined by modified Berthelot method and creatinine by alkaline picrate method in serum of mice using ENZOPAK/CHEMPAK reagent kits. Results Compound conessine showed in vitro anti-plasmodial activity with its IC50 value 1.9 μg/ml and 1.3 μg/ml using schizont maturation and pLDH assay respectively. The compound showed cytotoxity IC50= 14 μg/ml against L6 cells of rat skeletal muscle myoblast. The isolated compound from plant H. antidysenterica significantly reduced parasitaemia (at 10 mg/kg exhibited 88.95% parasite inhibition) in P. berghei-infected mice. Due to slightly toxic nature (cytotoxicity = 14), biochemical analysis (liver and kidney function test) of the serum from mice after administration of conessine were also observed. Conclusion The present investigation

  15. Inhibition of cytochrome bc1 as a strategy for single-dose, multi-stage antimalarial therapy.

    PubMed

    Stickles, Allison M; Ting, Li-Min; Morrisey, Joanne M; Li, Yuexin; Mather, Michael W; Meermeier, Erin; Pershing, April M; Forquer, Isaac P; Miley, Galen P; Pou, Sovitj; Winter, Rolf W; Hinrichs, David J; Kelly, Jane X; Kim, Kami; Vaidya, Akhil B; Riscoe, Michael K; Nilsen, Aaron

    2015-06-01

    Single-dose therapies for malaria have been proposed as a way to reduce the cost and increase the effectiveness of antimalarial treatment. However, no compound to date has shown single-dose activity against both the blood-stage Plasmodium parasites that cause disease and the liver-stage parasites that initiate malaria infection. Here, we describe a subset of cytochrome bc1 (cyt bc1) inhibitors, including the novel 4(1H)-quinolone ELQ-400, with single-dose activity against liver, blood, and transmission-stage parasites in mouse models of malaria. Although cyt bc1 inhibitors are generally classified as slow-onset antimalarials, we found that a single dose of ELQ-400 rapidly induced stasis in blood-stage parasites, which was associated with a rapid reduction in parasitemia in vivo. ELQ-400 also exhibited a low propensity for drug resistance and was active against atovaquone-resistant P. falciparum strains with point mutations in cyt bc1. Ultimately, ELQ-400 shows that cyt bc1 inhibitors can function as single-dose, blood-stage antimalarials and is the first compound to provide combined treatment, prophylaxis, and transmission blocking activity for malaria after a single oral administration. This remarkable multi-stage efficacy suggests that metabolic therapies, including cyt bc1 inhibitors, may be valuable additions to the collection of single-dose antimalarials in current development. PMID:25918204

  16. Inhibition of Cytochrome bc1 as a Strategy for Single-Dose, Multi-Stage Antimalarial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stickles, Allison M.; Ting, Li-Min; Morrisey, Joanne M.; Li, Yuexin; Mather, Michael W.; Meermeier, Erin; Pershing, April M.; Forquer, Isaac P.; Miley, Galen P.; Pou, Sovitj; Winter, Rolf W.; Hinrichs, David J.; Kelly, Jane X.; Kim, Kami; Vaidya, Akhil B.; Riscoe, Michael K.; Nilsen, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Single-dose therapies for malaria have been proposed as a way to reduce the cost and increase the effectiveness of antimalarial treatment. However, no compound to date has shown single-dose activity against both the blood-stage Plasmodium parasites that cause disease and the liver-stage parasites that initiate malaria infection. Here, we describe a subset of cytochrome bc1 (cyt bc1) inhibitors, including the novel 4(1H)-quinolone ELQ-400, with single-dose activity against liver, blood, and transmission-stage parasites in mouse models of malaria. Although cyt bc1 inhibitors are generally classified as slow-onset antimalarials, we found that a single dose of ELQ-400 rapidly induced stasis in blood-stage parasites, which was associated with a rapid reduction in parasitemia in vivo. ELQ-400 also exhibited a low propensity for drug resistance and was active against atovaquone-resistant P. falciparum strains with point mutations in cyt bc1. Ultimately, ELQ-400 shows that cyt bc1 inhibitors can function as single-dose, blood-stage antimalarials and is the first compound to provide combined treatment, prophylaxis, and transmission blocking activity for malaria after a single oral administration. This remarkable multi-stage efficacy suggests that metabolic therapies, including cyt bc1 inhibitors, may be valuable additions to the collection of single-dose antimalarials in current development. PMID:25918204

  17. Pharmacological effects of primaquine ureas and semicarbazides on the central nervous system in mice and antimalarial activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kedzierska, Ewa; Orzelska, Jolanta; Perković, Ivana; Knežević, Danijel; Fidecka, Sylwia; Kaiser, Marcel; Zorc, Branka

    2016-02-01

    New primaquine (PQ) urea and semicarbazide derivatives 1-4 were screened for the first time for central nervous system (CNS) and antimalarial activity. Behavioural tests were performed on mice. In vitro cytotoxicity on L-6 cells and activity against erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum was determined. Compound 4 inhibited 'head-twitch' responses and decreased body temperature of mice, which suggests some involvement of the serotonergic system. Compound 4 protected mice against clonic seizures and was superior in the antimalarial test. A hybrid of two PQ urea 2 showed a strong antimalarial activity, confirming the previous findings of the high activity of bis(8-aminoquinolines) and other bisantimalarial drugs. All the compounds decreased the locomotor activity of mice, what suggests their weak depressive effects on the CNS, while PQ derivatives 1 and 2 increased amphetamine-induced hyperactivity. None of the compounds impaired coordination, what suggests a lack of their neurotoxicity. All the tested compounds presented an antinociceptive activity in the 'writhing' test. Compounds 3 and 4 were active in nociceptive tests, and those effects were reversed by naloxone. Compound 4 could be a useful lead compound in the development of CNS active agents and antimalarials, whereas compound 3 may be considered as the most promising lead for new antinociceptive agents. PMID:26501210

  18. Basigin is a druggable target for host-oriented antimalarial interventions.

    PubMed

    Zenonos, Zenon A; Dummler, Sara K; Müller-Sienerth, Nicole; Chen, Jianzhu; Preiser, Peter R; Rayner, Julian C; Wright, Gavin J

    2015-07-27

    Plasmodium falciparum is the parasite responsible for the most lethal form of malaria, an infectious disease that causes a large proportion of childhood deaths and poses a significant barrier to socioeconomic development in many countries. Although antimalarial drugs exist, the repeated emergence and spread of drug-resistant parasites limit their useful lifespan. An alternative strategy that could limit the evolution of drug-resistant parasites is to target host factors that are essential and universally required for parasite growth. Host-targeted therapeutics have been successfully applied in other infectious diseases but have never been attempted for malaria. Here, we report the development of a recombinant chimeric antibody (Ab-1) against basigin, an erythrocyte receptor necessary for parasite invasion as a putative antimalarial therapeutic. Ab-1 inhibited the PfRH5-basigin interaction and potently blocked erythrocyte invasion by all parasite strains tested. Importantly, Ab-1 rapidly cleared an established P. falciparum blood-stage infection with no overt toxicity in an in vivo infection model. Collectively, our data demonstrate that antibodies or other therapeutics targeting host basigin could be an effective treatment for patients infected with multi-drug resistant P. falciparum. PMID:26195724

  19. Reemergence of chloroquine (CQ) analogs as multi-targeting antimalarial agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Mushtaque, Md; Shahjahan

    2015-01-27

    Amongst several communicable diseases (CDs), malaria is one of the deadliest parasitic disease all over the world, particularly in African and Asian countries. To curb this menace, numbers of antimalarial agents are being sold as over the counter (OTC) drugs. Chloroquine (CQ) is one of them and is one of the oldest, cheapest, and easily available synthetic agents used to curb malaria. Unfortunately, after the reports of CQ-resistance against different strains of malarial parasite strains worldwide, scientist are continuously modifying the core structure of CQ to get an efficient drug. Interestingly, several new drugs have been emerged in due course having unique and enhanced properties (like dual stage inhibitors, resistance reversing ability etc.) and are ready to enter into the clinical trial. In this course, some new agents have also been discovered which are; though inactive against CQS strain, highly active against CQR strains. The present article describes the role of modification of the core structure of CQ and its effects on the biological activities. Moreover, the attempt has also been made to predict the future prospects of such drugs to reemerge as antimalarial agents. PMID:25461328

  20. Microbial burden of some herbal antimalarials marketed at Elele, Rivers State.

    PubMed

    Tatfeng, Y M; Olama, E H; Ojo, T O

    2010-01-01

    Herbal antimalarials still remain an alternative to our traditional communities who can not afford orthodox antimalarials. This study was aimed at investigating the microbial quality of six herbal antimalarials using standard microbiological methods. Of the six preparations analyzed, "schnapps", palm wine and water were the media of preparation; the water base preparations recorded higher microbial load. The mean microbial load was 159.5 × 10(5) cfu/ml and 217.4 × 10(2)cfu/ml in water and alcohol base preparations respectively. The microbial profile of the preparations showed that the schnapps base preparations were predominantly contaminated with Bacillus sp (Aerobic spore bearers) and Mucor spp. The palm wine preparation harboured Bacillus sp, yeasts and Mucor spp while the water base preparations had several isolates such as Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli 0157H7, Proteus mirabilis, Enterococcus feacalis, Serratia marcensces, Staph. aureus, Bacillus spp and Mucor spp. Conclusively, this study underlines the public health importance of these preparations given the high burden of such human pathogen as Ecoli O157H7, Ps aeruginosa, Stahp aureus, etc. in the preparations. PMID:21304626

  1. Reverse pharmacology for developing an anti-malarial phytomedicine. The example of Argemone mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Simoes-Pires, Claudia; Hostettmann, Kurt; Haouala, Amina; Cuendet, Muriel; Falquet, Jacques; Graz, Bertrand; Christen, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Classical pharmacology has been the basis for the discovery of new chemical entities with therapeutic effects for decades. In natural product research, compounds are generally tested in vivo only after full in vitro characterization. However drug screening using this methodology is expensive, time-consuming and very often inefficient. Reverse pharmacology, also called bedside-to-bench, is a research approach based on the traditional knowledge and relates to reversing the classical laboratory to clinic pathway to a clinic to laboratory practice. It is a trans-disciplinary approach focused on traditional knowledge, experimental observations and clinical experiences. This paper is an overview of the reverse pharmacology approach applied to the decoction of Argemone mexicana, used as an antimalarial traditional medicine in Mali. A. mexicana appeared as the most effective traditional medicine for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Mali, and the clinical efficacy of the decoction was comparable to artesunate–amodiaquine as previously published. Four stages of the reverse pharmacology process will be described here with a special emphasis on the results for stage 4. Briefly, allocryptopine, protopine and berberine were isolated through bioguided fractionation, and had their identity confirmed by spectroscopic analysis. The three alkaloids showed antiparasitic activity in vitro, of which allocryptopine and protopine were selective towards Plasmodiumfalciparum. Furthermore, the amount of the three active alkaloids in the decoction was determined by quantitative NMR, and preliminary in vivo assays were conducted. On the basis of these results, the reverse pharmacology approach is discussed and further pharmacokinetic studies appear to be necessary in order to determine whether these alkaloids can be considered as phytochemical markers for quality control and standardization of an improved traditional medicine made with this plant. PMID:25516845

  2. A first new antimalarial pregnane glycoside from Gongronema napalense

    PubMed Central

    Libman, Amey; Zhang, Hongjie; Ma, Cuiying; Southavong, Bounhong; Sydara, Kongmany; Bouamanivong, Somsanith; Tan, Ghee T.; Fong, Harry H. S.; Soejarto, D. Doel

    2010-01-01

    As a part of the UIC-based ICBG project in Laos, plants were collected based on ethnomedical interviews and evaluated for antimalarial activity. A CHCl3 extract from the vine of Gongronema napalense (Wall.) Decne. (Asclepiadaceae) showed promising anti-malarial activity while exhibiting low levels of cytotoxicity and was thus followed up with further fractionation and biological evaluation. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of a new steroidal glycoside, gongroneside A, which showed antimalarial activity in vitro with an IC50 value of 1.60 and 1.39 μM against the Plasmodium falciparum D6 and W2 clones, respectively. PMID:23653676

  3. Quality Assurance for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Services: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towery, O. B.; And Others

    This is a comprehensive bibliography for all those in the alcohol, drug abuse and mental health fields who are developing and implementing programs for assuring quality in the services they provide. A major problem is the newness of the language and the unfamilarity with procedures required by the government and others seeking accountability from…

  4. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). 423.153 Section 423.153 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) VOLUNTARY MEDICARE PRESCRIPTION...

  5. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). 423.153 Section 423.153 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a) General rule. Each... and systems to reduce medication errors and adverse drug interactions and improve medication use...

  6. Interrater reliability of the modified Jadad quality scale for systematic reviews of Alzheimer's disease drug trials.

    PubMed

    Oremus, M; Wolfson, C; Perrault, A; Demers, L; Momoli, F; Moride, Y

    2001-01-01

    Drug therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been evaluated in clinical trials over the past 2 decades. Systematic reviews of AD drug trials can shed more light on the efficacy of pharmaceutical interventions. The modified Jadad scale can be used to assess the quality of trial reports that are candidates for inclusion in these systematic reviews. The interrater reliability of the modified Jadad scale was examined during such a review. Three blinded reviewers rated the quality of 42 AD drug trial reports: the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.90. The modified Jadad scale appears to be a useful tool for AD research because of the very good interrater reliability. Also, it is composed of items that are well suited to the specific disease characteristics of AD. Further research should focus on the validity of this instrument. PMID:11244218

  7. In vitro antimalarial activity and chloroquine potentiating action of two bisbenzylisoquinoline enantiomer alkaloids isolated from Strychnopsis thouarsii and Spirospermum penduliflorum.

    PubMed

    Ratsimamanga-Urverg, S; Rasoanaivo, P; Ramiaramanana, L; Milijaona, R; Rafatro, H; Verdier, F; Rakoto-Ratsimamanga, A; Le Bras, J

    1992-12-01

    The bisbenzylisoquinolines 7-O-demethyltetrandrine and limacine, respectively, isolated from Strychnopsis thouarsii Baill. and Spirospermum penduliflorum Thou. were evaluated for their intrinsic antimalarial activity in vitro and chloroquine potentiating action against the chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum FCM 29 originating from Cameroon. They both showed significant antiplasmodial potency in vitro with very similar IC50 values of respectively, 740 nM and 789 nM (IC50 = 214 nM for chloroquine used as standard drug), which demonstrated that the stereochemistry of the C-1 and C-1' configuration likely plays a role in the chloroquine potentiating effect of these drugs. If confirmed in vivo, these results may account for the traditional use of the two plants as antimalarials and adjuvant to chloroquine in Madagascan folklore remedies. PMID:1484894

  8. In vivo antiplasmodial potentials of the combinations of four nigerian antimalarial plants.

    PubMed

    Adebajo, Adeleke Clement; Odediran, Samuel Akintunde; Aliyu, Fatimah Abosede; Nwafor, Paul Alozie; Nwoko, Ndifreke Thomas; Umana, Usenobong Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Various combinations of Nauclea latifolia root, Artocarpus altilis stem bark, Murraya koenigii leaf and Enantia chlorantha stem bark used in African ethnomedicine as decoctions for malaria and fevers, and combinations with standard drugs, were investigated for antiplasmodial activities using Plasmodium berghei berghei-infected mice. The respective prophylactic and curative ED50 values of 189.4 and 174.5 mg/kg for N. latifolia and chemosuppressive ED50 value of 227.2 mg/kg for A. altilis showed that they were the best antimalarial herbal drugs. A 1.6-fold increase of the survival time given by the negative control was elicited by M. koenigii, thereby confirming its curative activity. Pyrimethamine with an ED50 of 0.5 ± 0.1 mg/kg for the prophylactic, and chloroquine with ED50 = 2.2 ± 0.1 and 2.2 ± 0.0 mg/kg for the chemosuppressive and curative tests, respectively, were significantly (p < 0.05) more active. Co-administrations of N. latifolia with the standard drugs significantly reduced their prophylactic, chemosuppressive and curative actions, possibly increasing the parasites' resistance. Binary combinations of N. latifolia or M. koenigii with any of the other plants significantly increased the prophylactic and suppressive activities of their individual plants, respectively. Also, E. chlorantha with A. altilis or N. latifolia enhanced their respective prophylactic or curative activities, making these combinations most beneficial against malaria infections. Combinations of three and four extracts gave varied activities. Hence, the results justified the combinations of ethnomedicinal plants in antimalarial herbal remedies and showed the importance of the three in vivo models in establishing antimalarial activity. PMID:25162955

  9. Molecular markers associated with resistance to commonly used antimalarial drugs among Plasmodium falciparum isolates from a malaria-endemic area in Taiz governorate-Yemen during the transmission season.

    PubMed

    Alareqi, Lina M Q; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lau, Yee-Ling; Fong, Mun-Yik; Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Mahmud, Rohela

    2016-10-01

    Since 2005, artesunate (AS) plus sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) combination has been adopted as the first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in Yemen in response to the high level of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to chloroquine (CQ). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the frequency distribution of molecular markers associated with resistance to CQ and AS plus SP combination among P. falciparum isolates from a malaria-endemic area in Taiz governorate, Yemen. Fifty P. falciparum isolates were collected during a cross-sectional study in Mawza district, Taiz, in the period from October 2013 to April 2014. The isolates were investigated for drug resistance-associated molecular markers in five genes, including P. falciparum CQ resistance transporter (pfcrt) 76T and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) 86Y as markers of resistance to CQ, mutations in the Kelch 13 (K13) propeller domain for resistance to AS, and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr) and P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps) genes for resistance to SP. Nested polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify target genes in DNA extracts of the isolates followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism for detecting 76T and 86Y mutations in pfcrt and pfmdr1, respectively, and by DNA sequencing for detecting mutations in K13, pfdhfr and pfdhps. All the investigated isolates from Mawza district were harboring the pfcrt 76T mutant and the pfmdr1 N86 wild-type alleles. The pfdhfr 51I/108N double mutant allele was found in 2.2% (1/45) of the isolates; however, no mutations were detected at codons 436, 437, 540, 581 and 613 of pfdhps. All P. falciparum isolates that were successfully sequenced (n=47) showed the K13 Y493, R539, I543 and C580 wild-type alleles. In conclusion, the pfcrt 76T mutant allele is fixed in the study area about six years after the official withdrawal of CQ, possibly indicating its over-the-counter availability and continued use as a

  10. Chemical genomic profiling for antimalarial therapies, response signatures and molecular targets

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Cheng, Ken Chih-Chien; Johnson, Ronald L.; Huang, Ruili; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Liu, Anna; Guha, Rajarshi; Fidock, David; Inglese, James; Wellems, Thomas E.; Austin, Christopher P.; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2012-01-01

    Malaria remains a devastating disease largely because of widespread drug resistance. New drugs and a better understanding of the mechanisms of drug action and resistance are essential for fulfilling the promise of eradicating malaria. Using high-throughput chemical screening and genome-wide association analysis, we identified 32 highly active compounds and genetic loci and genes associated with differential chemical phenotypes (DCPs), defined as ≥5-fold differences in half-maximum inhibitor concentration (IC50) between parasite lines. Chromosomal loci associated with 49 DCPs were confirmed by linkage analysis and tests of genetically modified parasites, including three genes that were linked to 96% of the DCPs. Drugs whose responses mapped to wild type or mutant pfcrt alleles were tested in combination in vitro and in vivo, yielding promising new leads for antimalarial treatments. PMID:21817045

  11. Study on quality control of sulfated polysaccharide drug, propylene glycol alginate sodium sulfate (PSS).

    PubMed

    Xue, Yi-Ting; Ren, Li; Li, Shuang; Wang, Lin-Lin; He, Xiao-Xi; Zhao, Xia; Yu, Guang-Li; Guan, Hua-Shi; Li, Chun-Xia

    2016-06-25

    The combination of biological and chemical analysis methods was developed to improve quality control of propylene glycol alginate sodium sulfate (PSS), a sulfated polysaccharide drug. The allergic and anticoagulant assays revealed that PSS fractions with higher Mw and lower M/G ratio may have allergic response and bleeding risks. HPLC with pre-column derivatization, HPGPC and IC methods were combined to analyze 10 batches of PSS samples from different manufacturers. The results showed that the quality of these PSSs varied greatly which in turn led to the unstable anticoagulant activity and side effects. The study indicated that PSS with high purity, M/G ratio above 1.5, Mw of ∼9kD and DS of 9.0-13.0% can ensure clinical efficacy and low incidence of adverse drug reactions. In conclusion, the combined methods would be in favor of guiding manufacture and quality control of PSS to guarantee its effectiveness and safety. PMID:27083824

  12. Antimalarial potency of the methanol leaf extract of Maerua crassifolia Forssk (Capparaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Akuodor Godwin; Akanimo, Essiet Grace; Ahunna, Ajoku Gloria; Nwakaego, Ezeunala Mercy; Chimsorom, Chilaka Kingsley

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the in vivo antiplasmodial effect of methanol leaf extract of Maerua crassifolia in mice infected with chloroquine sensitive Plasmodium berghei berghei. Methods The extract was evaluated for activity against early infection, curative effect against established infection at dose levels of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o. Chloroquine at 10 mg/kg was used as standard drug. Results A dose dependent chemo-suppression of the parasites was obtained at different dose levels of the extract tested with a considerable mean survival time. Conclusions The results support continued investigation of components of traditional medicines as potential new antimalarial agents.

  13. Quality of Animal Experiments in Anti-Angiogenic Cancer Drug Development – A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Martić-Kehl, Marianne Isabelle; Wernery, Jannis; Folkers, Gerd; Schubiger, Pius August

    2015-01-01

    Translation from preclinical animal research to clinical bedside has proven to be difficult to impossible in many fields of research (e.g. acute stroke, ALS and HIV vaccination development) with oncology showing particularly low translation rates (5% vs. 20% for cardiovascular diseases). Several investigations on published preclinical animal research have revealed that apart from plain species differences, translational problems can arise from low study quality (e.g. study design) or non-representative experimental conditions (e.g. treatment schedule). This review assessed the published experimental circumstances and quality of anti-angiogenic cancer drug development in 232 in vivo studies. The quality of study design was often insufficient; at least the information published about the experiments was not satisfactory in most cases. There was no quality improvement over time, with the exception of conflict of interest statements. This increase presumably arose mainly because journal guidelines request such statements more often recently. Visual inspection of data and a cluster analysis confirmed a trend described in literature that low study quality tends to overestimate study outcome. It was also found that experimental outcome was more favorable when a potential drug was investigated as the main focus of a study, compared to drugs that were used as comparison interventions. We assume that this effect arises from the frequent neglect of blinding investigators towards treatment arms and refer to it as hypothesis bias. In conclusion, the reporting and presumably also the experimental performance of animal studies in drug development for oncology suffer from similar shortcomings as other fields of research (such as stroke or ALS). We consider it necessary to enforce experimental quality and reporting that corresponds to the level of clinical studies. It seems that only clear journal guidelines or guidelines from licensing authorities, where failure to fulfill

  14. Assessment of Methodological Quality of Economic Evaluations in Belgian Drug Reimbursement Applications

    PubMed Central

    Simoens, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This paper aims to assess the methodological quality of economic evaluations included in Belgian reimbursement applications for Class 1 drugs. Materials and Methods For 19 reimbursement applications submitted during 2011 and Spring 2012, a descriptive analysis assessed the methodological quality of the economic evaluation, evaluated the assessment of that economic evaluation by the Drug Reimbursement Committee and the response to that assessment by the company. Compliance with methodological guidelines issued by the Belgian Healthcare Knowledge Centre was assessed using a detailed checklist of 23 methodological items. The rate of compliance was calculated based on the number of economic evaluations for which the item was applicable. Results Economic evaluations tended to comply with guidelines regarding perspective, target population, subgroup analyses, comparator, use of comparative clinical data and final outcome measures, calculation of costs, incremental analysis, discounting and time horizon. However, more attention needs to be paid to the description of limitations of indirect comparisons, the choice of an appropriate analytic technique, the expression of unit costs in values for the current year, the estimation and valuation of outcomes, the presentation of results of sensitivity analyses, and testing the face validity of model inputs and outputs. Also, a large variation was observed in the scope and depth of the quality assessment by the Drug Reimbursement Committee. Conclusions Although general guidelines exist, pharmaceutical companies and the Drug Reimbursement Committee would benefit from the existence of a more detailed checklist of methodological items that need to be reported in an economic evaluation. PMID:24386474

  15. Synthesis and Potent Antimalarial Activity of Kalihinol B

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Of the 50+ kalihinane diterpenoids reported to date, only five had been tested for antimalarial activity, in spite of the fact that kalihinol A is the most potent among the members of the larger family of antimalarial isocyanoterpenes. We have validated a strategy designed to access many of the kalihinanes with a 12-step enantioselective synthesis of kalihinol B, the tetrahydrofuran isomer of kalihinol A (a tetrahydropyran). Kalihinol B shows similarly high potency against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:25815413

  16. Toxicity and side-effects of antimalarials in Africa: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Salako, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    Notwithstanding the presence of resistance to chloroquine in some parts of Africa, this drug is still the most widely used antimalarial in the continent. One adverse reaction of chloroquine that has an important bearing on its use is pruritus. The risk of increasing the incidence of ocular toxicity through prolonged use of chloroquine for prophylaxis must be borne in mind by physicians. Another antimalarial that is likely to be used in increasing amounts in Africa is pyrimethamine—sulfadoxine. With prolonged use of this combination for prophylaxis, the adverse reactions usually associated with the long-acting sulfonamides are possible. Genetic abnormalities may also play a part in the incidence and severity of adverse reactions to certain drugs, e.g., primaquine and quinine. Most of the common adverse reactions are mild and have little or no influence on the acceptability and utilization of the drugs, with the exception of chloroquine-induced pruritus. Studies to define the precise epidemiology and pathophysiology of this reaction are urgently needed. PMID:6335683

  17. A review of quality of life in Alzheimer's disease. Part 2: Issues in assessing drug effects.

    PubMed

    Salek, S S; Walker, M D; Bayer, A J

    1998-12-01

    There are numerous methods available for assessing patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or other forms of dementia. Quality-of-life (QOL) assessment is unique among these methods. The subjective nature of quality of life provides healthcare professionals with the opportunity of incorporating the value systems of patients and their carers into their assessments. A systematic review was carried out to assess the published data (and some unpublished data) on QOL assessment tools and instruments that claim to measure quality of life in dementia. A number of measures or methods used in the literature for assessing the quality of life of patients with dementing illnesses were identified. It was decided to present the resultant review in 2 parts that correspond to the 2 main groups into which the instruments were categorised. The first (part 1), looked at measures used to assess the impact of disease as well as instruments at a developmental or testing stage. The second (part 2), includes instruments that claim to measure quality of life in studies documenting the impact of a drug in this therapeutic area. This second group consists mainly of instruments identified as being used to assess quality of life during clinical trials in dementia/AD. As in part 1, this part of the review was unable to identify any validated methods of assessing the quality of life of both patients with dementia and their carers at the same time. The ideal instrument must show that it can reliably, reproducibly and comprehensively assess quality of life for both patients with dementia and their carers. It should also demonstrate that it can measure quality of life effectively using a practical administration technique that does not place any unnecessary burden on either informal carers, other healthcare workers involved or the patient themselves. In addition, any measure intended for use in assessing the impact of drug treatment on quality of life must demonstrate sensitivity to change, also

  18. Benefits of Exercise for the Quality of Life of Drug-Dependent Patients.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Meseguer, Jorge; Tortosa-Martínez, Juan; de los Remedios Fernández-Valenciano, María

    2015-01-01

    This study combined quantitative and qualitative research methods to evaluate quality-of-life changes in drug-dependent patients after participation in a group-based exercise program. Quality of life (SF-36) and physical fitness (six-minute Walk Test, Timed Get Up and Go Test, and Chair Stand Test) were quantitatively determined in a group (n=37) of drug-dependent patients before and after a 12-week group exercise program (n=18) or routine care (n=19). Additionally, in-depth interviews were conducted at the end of the program with a subsample of 11 participants from the exercise group. Quantitative results showed improvements in fitness and different aspects of quality of life, such as physical function, mental health, vitality, social function, and general health perception. Qualitative results showed specific physical benefits (decreased injuries and muscle pain, decreased weight, and increased vitality with improvement in activities of daily living), psychological benefits (forgetting about everyday problems, improved mood, decreased stress and anxiety), social benefits, and a reduction in craving. The results of this study provide insight into the importance of exercise for the quality of life and recovery process of drug-dependent patients. PMID:26595433

  19. Synthesis, Antimalarial Activity, and Intracellular Targets of MEFAS, a New Hybrid Compound Derived from Mefloquine and Artesunate▿

    PubMed Central

    de Pilla Varotti, Fernando; Botelho, Ana Cristina C.; Andrade, Anderson Assunção; de Paula, Renata C.; Fagundes, Elaine M. S.; Valverde, Alessandra; Mayer, Lúcia M. U.; Mendonça, Jorge Souza; de Souza, Marcus V. N.; Boechat, Núbia; Krettli, Antoniana Ursine

    2008-01-01

    A new synthetic antimalarial drug, a salt derived from two antimalarial molecules, mefloquine (MQ) and artesunate (AS), here named MEFAS, has been tested for its pharmacological activity. Combinations of AS plus MQ hydrochloride are currently being used in areas with drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum parasites; although AS clears parasitemia in shorter time periods than any other antimalarial drug, it does not cure infected patients; in addition, MQ causes side effects and is rather expensive, important problems considering that malaria affects mostly populations in poor countries. Here, we show that MEFAS is more effective than the combination of AS and MQ, tested in parallel at different mass proportions, against P. falciparum (chloroquine-resistant clone W2 and chloroquine-sensitive clone 3D7) in vitro and in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei, promoting cure of this infection. MEFAS tested against HepG2 hepatoma cells exhibited lower toxicity than the antimalarials AS and MQ alone or combined. Possible targets of MEFAS have been studied by confocal microscopy using fluorescent probes (Fluo-4 AM and BCECF-AM) in P. falciparum synchronous culture of W2-infected red blood cells. Dynamic images show that MEFAS exhibited intracellular action increasing cytoplasmic Ca2+ at 1.0 ng/ml. This effect was also observed in the presence of tapsigargin, an inhibitor of SERCA, suggesting an intracellular target distinct from the endoplasmic reticulum. Trophozoites loaded with BCECF-AM, when treated with MEFAS, were still able to mobilize protons from the digestive vacuole (DV), altering the pH gradient. However, in the presence of bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of the H+ pump from acidic compartments of eukaryotic cells, MEFAS had no action on the DV. In conclusion, the endoplasmic reticulum and DV are intracellular targets for MEFAS in Plasmodium sp., suggesting two modes of action of this new salt. Our data support MEFAS as a candidate for treating human malaria. PMID

  20. Poor quality drugs: grand challenges in high throughput detection, countrywide sampling, and forensics in developing countries†

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Facundo M.; Hostetler, Dana; Powell, Kristen; Kaur, Harparkash; Green, Michael D.; Mildenhall, Dallas C.; Newton, Paul N.

    2012-01-01

    Throughout history, poor quality medicines have been a persistent problem, with periodical crises in the supply of antimicrobials, such as fake cinchona bark in the 1600s and fake quinine in the 1800s. Regrettably, this problem seems to have grown in the last decade, especially afflicting unsuspecting patients and those seeking medicines via on-line pharmacies. Here we discuss some of the challenges related to the fight against poor quality drugs, and counterfeits in particular, with an emphasis on the analytical tools available, their relative performance, and the necessary workflows needed for distinguishing between genuine, substandard, degraded and counterfeit medicines. PMID:21107455

  1. Drug-specific quality indicators assessing outpatient antibiotic use among French general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Pulcini, Céline; Lions, Caroline; Ventelou, Bruno; Verger, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    Quality indicators assessing the use of antibiotics among general practitioners (GPs) would be useful to target antibiotic stewardship interventions. We adapted to an individual GP level a set of 12 drug-specific quality indicators of outpatient antibiotic use in Europe developed by the European surveillance of antimicrobial consumption project. We performed a cross-sectional study analysing reimbursement data on outpatient antibiotic prescriptions in adults in south-eastern France in 2009. Substantial heterogeneity in antibiotic prescribing among French GPs was observed, and opportunity to improve antibiotic prescribing can be identified. PMID:22843612

  2. A Delphi Process to Optimize Quality and Performance of Drug Evaluation in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, Frederic; Boulkedid, Rym; Elie, Valery; Leroux, Stephanie; Valls, Elizabeth; Van den Anker, Johannes N.; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2014-01-01

    Background Neonatal trials remain difficult to conduct for several reasons: in particular the need for study sites to have an existing infrastructure in place, with trained investigators and validated quality procedures to ensure good clinical, laboratory practices and a respect for high ethical standards. The objective of this work was to identify the major criteria considered necessary for selecting neonatal intensive care units that are able to perform drug evaluations competently. Methodology and Main Findings This Delphi process was conducted with an international multidisciplinary panel of 25 experts from 13 countries, selected to be part of two committees (a scientific committee and an expert committee), in order to validate criteria required to perform drug evaluation in neonates. Eighty six items were initially selected and classified under 7 headings: “NICUs description - Level of care” (21), “Ability to perform drug trials: NICU organization and processes (15), “Research Experience” (12), “Scientific competencies and area of expertise” (8), “Quality Management” (16), “Training and educational capacity” (8) and “Public involvement” (6). Sixty-one items were retained and headings were rearranged after the first round, 34 were selected after the second round. A third round was required to validate 13 additional items. The final set includes 47 items divided under 5 headings. Conclusion A set of 47 relevant criteria will help to NICUs that want to implement, conduct or participate in drug trials within a neonatal network identify important issues to be aware of. Summary Points 1) Neonatal trials remain difficult to conduct for several reasons: in particular the need for study sites to have an existing infrastructure in place, with trained investigators and validated quality procedures to ensure good clinical, laboratory practices and a respect for high ethical standards. 2) The present Delphi study was conducted with an

  3. Increasing Access to Subsidized Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy through Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Morogoro Rural. Conclusions The intervention increased access to affordable ACTs for underserved populations. Indications are that antimalarial monotherapies are being "crowded out" of the market. Importantly, the transition to ACTs has been accomplished in an environment where the safety and efficacy of the drugs and the quality of services are being monitored and regulated. This paper presents a description of the pilot program implementation, results of the program evaluation, and a discussion of the challenges and recommendations that will be used to guide rollout of subsidized ACT in ADDOs in the rest of Tanzania and possibly in other countries. PMID:21658259

  4. Unhealthy Alcohol and Illicit Drug Use are Associated with Decreased Quality of HIV Care

    PubMed Central

    Korthuis, P. Todd; Fiellin, David A.; McGinnis, Kathleen A.; Skanderson, Melissa; Justice, Amy C.; Gordon, Adam J.; Doebler, Donna Almario; Asch, Steven M.; Fiellin, Lynn E.; Bryant, Kendall; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Crystal, Stephen; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Rimland, David; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Kraemer, Kevin L.

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV-infected patients with substance use experience suboptimal health outcomes, possibly to due to variations in care. Objectives To assess the association between substance use and the quality of HIV care (QOC) received. Research Design Retrospective cohort study. Subjects HIV-infected patients enrolled in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study. Measures We collected self-report substance use data and abstracted 9 HIV quality indicators (QIs) from medical records. Independent variables were unhealthy alcohol use (AUDIT-C score ≥4) and illicit drug use (self-report of stimulants, opioids, or injection drug use in past year). Main outcome was the percentage of QIs received, if eligible. We estimated associations between substance use and QOC using multivariable linear regression. Results The majority of the 3,410 patients were male (97.4%) and Black (67.0%) with a mean age of 49.1 years (SD 8.8). Overall, 25.8% reported unhealthy alcohol use, 22% illicit drug use, and participants received 81.5% (SD=18.9) of QIs. The mean percentage of QIs received was lower for those with unhealthy alcohol use vs. not (59.3% vs. 70.0%, p<.001) and those using illicit drugs vs. not (57.8% vs. 70.7%, p<.001). In multivariable models, unhealthy alcohol use (adjusted β −2.74; 95% CI −4.23, −1.25) and illicit drug use (adjusted β −3.51 95% CI −4.99, −2.02) remained inversely associated with the percentage of QIs received. Conclusions Though the overall QOC for these HIV-infected Veteran patients was high, gaps persist for those with unhealthy alcohol and illicit drug use. Interventions that address substance use in HIV-infected patients may improve the QOC received. PMID:22820808

  5. A Repeat Random Survey of the Prevalence of Falsified and Substandard Antimalarials in the Lao PDR: A Change for the Better

    PubMed Central

    Tabernero, Patricia; Mayxay, Mayfong; Culzoni, María Julia; Dwivedi, Prabha; Swamidoss, Isabel; Allan, Elizabeth Louise; Khanthavong, Maniphone; Phonlavong, Chindaphone; Vilayhong, Chantala; Yeuchaixiong, Sengchanh; Sichanh, Chanvilay; Sengaloundeth, Sivong; Kaur, Harparkash; Fernández, Facundo M.; Green, Michael D.; Newton, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    In 2003, a stratified random sample survey was conducted in the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Laos) to study the availability and quality of antimalarials in the private sector. In 2012, this survey was repeated to allow a statistically valid analysis of change through time. The counterfeit detection device 3 (CD-3) was used to assess packaging quality in the field and HPLC and mass spectroscopy analysis chemical analysis performed. The availability of oral artesunate monotherapies had significantly decreased from 22.9% (22) of 96 outlets in southern Laos in 2003 to 4.8% (7) of 144 outlets in 2012 (P < 0.0001). All the samples collected in the 2012 survey contained the correct active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in contrast to the 21 (84%) falsified artesunate samples found in the 2003 survey. Although none of the medicines found in 2012 survey had evidence for falsification, 25.4% (37) of the samples were outside the 90–110% pharmacopeial limits of the label claim, suggesting that they were substandard or degraded. Results obtained from this survey show that patients are still exposed to poorly manufactured drugs or to ineffective medicines such as chloroquine. The quality of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) used in Laos needs to be monitored, since falsified ACTs would have devastating consequences in public health. PMID:25897062

  6. A Repeat Random Survey of the Prevalence of Falsified and Substandard Antimalarials in the Lao PDR: A Change for the Better.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, Patricia; Mayxay, Mayfong; Culzoni, María Julia; Dwivedi, Prabha; Swamidoss, Isabel; Allan, Elizabeth Louise; Khanthavong, Maniphone; Phonlavong, Chindaphone; Vilayhong, Chantala; Yeuchaixiong, Sengchanh; Sichanh, Chanvilay; Sengaloundeth, Sivong; Kaur, Harparkash; Fernández, Facundo M; Green, Michael D; Newton, Paul N

    2015-06-01

    In 2003, a stratified random sample survey was conducted in the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Laos) to study the availability and quality of antimalarials in the private sector. In 2012, this survey was repeated to allow a statistically valid analysis of change through time. The counterfeit detection device 3 (CD-3) was used to assess packaging quality in the field and HPLC and mass spectroscopy analysis chemical analysis performed. The availability of oral artesunate monotherapies had significantly decreased from 22.9% (22) of 96 outlets in southern Laos in 2003 to 4.8% (7) of 144 outlets in 2012 (P < 0.0001). All the samples collected in the 2012 survey contained the correct active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in contrast to the 21 (84%) falsified artesunate samples found in the 2003 survey. Although none of the medicines found in 2012 survey had evidence for falsification, 25.4% (37) of the samples were outside the 90-110% pharmacopeial limits of the label claim, suggesting that they were substandard or degraded. Results obtained from this survey show that patients are still exposed to poorly manufactured drugs or to ineffective medicines such as chloroquine. The quality of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) used in Laos needs to be monitored, since falsified ACTs would have devastating consequences in public health. PMID:25897062

  7. Plasmodium dihydroorotate dehydrogenase: a promising target for novel anti-malarial chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Margaret A.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2010-01-01

    Malaria remains a globally prevalent infectious disease that leads to significant morbidity and mortality. While there are a number of drugs approved for its treatment, drug resistance has compromised most of them, making the development of new drugs for the treatment and prevention of malaria essential. The completion of the Plasmodium falciparum genome and a growing understanding of parasite biology are fueling the search for novel drug targets. Despite this, few targets have been chemically validated in vivo. The pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway illustrates one of the best examples of successful identification of anti-malarial drug targets. This review focuses on recent studies to exploit the fourth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of P. falciparum, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH), as a new target for drug discovery. Several chemical scaffolds have been identified by high throughput screening as potent inhibitors of PfDHODH and these show strong selectivity for the malarial enzyme over that from the human host. Potent activity against parasites in whole cell models with good correlation between activity on the enzyme and the parasite have also been observed for a number of the identified series. Lead optimization of a triazolopyrimidine-based series has identified an analog with prolonged plasma exposure, that is orally bioavailable, and which shows good efficacy against the in vivo mouse model of the disease. These data provide strong evidence that PfDHODH is a validated target for the identification of new antimalarial chemotherapy. The challenge remains to identify compounds with the necessary combination of potency and metabolic stability to allow identification of a clinical candidate. PMID:20334617

  8. Health-related quality of life of HIV-infected intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Surah, S; Adams, R; Townsend, L; Reynolds, I; Kinahan, J C; Keating, S; Mulcahy, F; Keenan, E; Barry, M; Lyons, F

    2013-11-01

    To investigate health-related quality of life in HIV-infected intravenous drug users registered but not engaged in HIV outpatient care (missing ≥2 outpatient appointments over 1 year or non-attendance for ≥6 months) we conducted a cross-sectional study to examine health-related quality of life of HIV-infected intravenous drug users registered for care at an inner city HIV unit. EQ-5D, SF-36, SF-6D, mood disorder, clinical and substance misuse data were collected. Mean scores and preference derived utility scores were calculated. Statistical relationships between health-related quality of life and other variables were explored using univariate and multivariate analysis. Fifty-five patients were recruited, 64% were males. The mean anxiety value was 11.44 (anxious) and mean depression score was 9.3 (borderline depressed). The mean EQ-5D utility was 0.45 (95% CI 0.35, 0.55) and mean SF-6D utility was 0.52 (95% CI 0.48, 0.55). There was no statistical relationship between HIV indices, substance misuse and EQ-5D and SF-6D utility. Anxiety and depression were significantly correlated with EQ-5D and SF-6D utility values on univariate and multivariate analysis. Health-related quality of life was reduced in this HIV-infected intravenous drug user population. Whilst hepatitis C co-infection and substance misuse did not affect health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression had a significant impact on it. PMID:23970601

  9. In vitro and in vivo anti-malarial activity of Boerhavia elegans and Solanum surattense

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need to identify new anti-malarial drug targets for both prophylaxis and chemotherapy, due to the increasing problem of drug resistance to malaria parasites. In the present study, the aim was to discover novel, effective plant-based extracts for the activity against malaria. Methods Ten plants found in Iran were selected by ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants. The crude ethanolic extracts were tested for in vitro anti-plasmodial activity against two strains of Plasmodium falciparum: K1 (chloroquine-resistant strain) and CY27 (chloroquine-sensitive strain), using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay. The anti-plasmodial activity of the extracts was also assessed in the 4-day suppressive anti-malarial assay in mice inoculated with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA strain). Crude ethanolic extracts showed good anti-plasmodial activity were further fractionated by partitioning in water and dichloromethane. Results Of 10 plant species assayed, three species: Boerhavia elegans (Choisy), Solanum surattense (Burm.f.) and Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) showed promising anti-plasmodial activity in vitro (IC50 ≤ 50 μg/ml) and in vivo with no toxicity. The dichloromethane fraction of three extracts revealed stronger anti-plasmodial activity than the total extracts. Conclusion Anti-plasmodial activities of extracts of B. elegans and S. surattense are reported for the first time. PMID:20462416

  10. Back to the Future: Lessons Learned in Modern Target-based and Whole-Cell Lead Optimization of Antimalarials

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Arnab K; Yeung, Bryan KS

    2012-01-01

    Antimalarial drug discovery has historically benefited from the whole-cell (phenotypic) screening approach to identify lead molecules in the search for new drugs. However over the past two decades there has been a shift in the pharmaceutical industry to move away from whole-cell screening to target-based approaches. As part of a Wellcome Trust and Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) funded consortium to discover new blood-stage antimalarials, we used both approaches to identify new antimalarial chemotypes, two of which have progressed beyond the lead optimization phase and display excellent in vivo efficacy in mice. These two advanced series were identified through a cell-based optimization devoid of target information and in this review we summarize the advantages of this approach versus a target-based optimization. Although the each lead optimization required slightly different medicinal chemistry strategies, we observed some common issues across the different the scaffolds which could be applied to other cell based lead optimization programs. PMID:22242845

  11. Use of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling to Ascertain Levels of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ted; Zignol, Matteo; Nyakan, Edwin; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L.; Gardner, Adrian; Kamle, Lydia; Injera, Wilfred; Carter, E. Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objective To classify the prevalence of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in two different geographic settings in western Kenya using the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) methodology. Design The prevalence of drug resistance was classified among treatment-naïve smear positive TB patients in two settings, one rural and one urban. These regions were classified as having high or low prevalence of MDR-TB according to a static, two-way LQAS sampling plan selected to classify high resistance regions at greater than 5% resistance and low resistance regions at less than 1% resistance. Results This study classified both the urban and rural settings as having low levels of TB drug resistance. Out of the 105 patients screened in each setting, two patients were diagnosed with MDR-TB in the urban setting and one patient was diagnosed with MDR-TB in the rural setting. An additional 27 patients were diagnosed with a variety of mono- and poly- resistant strains. Conclusion Further drug resistance surveillance using LQAS may help identify the levels and geographical distribution of drug resistance in Kenya and may have applications in other countries in the African Region facing similar resource constraints. PMID:27167381

  12. Design, synthesis and antimalarial screening of some hybrid 4-aminoquinoline-triazine derivatives against pf-DHFR-TS.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Supriya; Ghosh, Surajit Kumar; Kalita, Junmoni; Dutta, Mayurakhi; Bhat, Hans Raj

    2016-04-01

    Existing antifolate antimalarial drugs have shown resistance due to the mutations at some amino acid positions of Plasmodium falciparum DHFR-TS. In the present study, to overcome this resistance, a new series of hybrid 4-aminoquinoline-triazine derivatives were designed and docked into the active site of Pf-DHFR-TS (PDB i.d. 1J3K) using validated CDOCKER protocol. Binding energy was calculated by applying CHARMm forcefield. Binding energy and the pattern of interaction of the docked compounds were analysed. Fifteen compounds were selected for synthesis based on their binding energy values and docking poses. Synthesized compounds were characterised by FTIR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, mass spectroscopy and were screened for antimalarial activity against 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:26821296

  13. Antimalarial activity of some Colombian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Garavito, G; Rincón, J; Arteaga, L; Hata, Y; Bourdy, G; Gimenez, A; Pinzón, R; Deharo, E

    2006-10-11

    Antimalarial activity of 10 vegetal extracts (9 ethanolic extracts and 1 crude alkaloid extract), obtained from eight species traditionally used in Colombia to treat malaria symptoms, was evaluated in culture using Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistant (FcB2) strain and in vivo on rodent malaria Plasmodium berghei. The activity on ferriprotoporphyrin biomineralization inhibition test (FBIT) was also assessed. Against Plasmodium falciparum, eight extracts displayed good activity Abuta grandifolia (Mart.) Sandwith (Menispermaceae) leaves, Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd. (Mimosaceae) leaves, Acnistus arborescens (L.) Schltdl. (Solanaceae) aerial part, Croton leptostachyus Kunth (Euphorbiaceae) aerial part, Piper cumanense Kunth (Piperaceae) fruits and leaves, Piper holtonii C. DC. (Piperaceae) aerial part and Xylopia aromatica (Lam.) Mart. (Annonaceae) bark with IC(50) values ranging from <1 to 2.1 microg/ml, while in the in vivo model only Abuta grandifolia alkaloid crude extract exhibits activity, inhibiting 66% of the parasite growth at 250 mg/kg/day. In the FBIT model, five extracts were active (Abuta grandifolia, Croton leptostachyus, Piper cumanense fruit and leaves and Xylopia aromatica). PMID:16713157

  14. Quality of Reporting of Serious Adverse Drug Events to an Institutional Review Board

    PubMed Central

    Dorr, David A.; Burdon, Rachel; West, Dennis P.; Lagman, Jennifer; Georgopoulos, Christina; Belknap, Steven M.; McKoy, June M.; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Edwards, Beatrice J.; Weitzman, Sigmund A.; Boyle, Simone; Tallman, Martin S.; Talpaz, Moshe; Sartor, Oliver; Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Serious adverse drug event (sADE) reporting to Institutional Review Boards (IRB) is essential to ensure pharmaceutical safety. However, the quality of these reports has not been studied. Safety reports are especially important for cancer drugs that receive accelerated Food and Drug Administration approval, like imatinib, as preapproval experience with these drugs is limited. We evaluated the quality, accuracy, and completeness of sADE reports submitted to an IRB. Experimental Design sADE reports submitted to an IRB from 14 clinical trials with imatinib were reviewed. Structured case report forms, containing detailed clinical data fields and a validated causality assessment instrument, were developed. Two forms were generated for each ADE, the first populated with data abstracted from the IRB reports, and the second populated with data from the corresponding clinical record. Completeness and causality assessments were evaluated for each of the two sources, and then compared. Accuracy (concordance between sources) was also assessed. Results Of 115 sADEs reported for 177 cancer patients to the IRB, overall completeness of adverse event descriptions was 2.4-fold greater for structured case report forms populated with information from the clinical record versus the corresponding forms from IRB reports (95.0% versus 40.3%, P < 0.05). Information supporting causality assessments was recorded 3.5-fold more often in primary data sources versus IRB adverse event descriptions (93% versus 26%, P < 0.05). Some key clinical information was discrepant between the two sources. Conclusions The use of structured syndrome-specific case report forms could enhance the quality of reporting to IRBs, thereby improving the safety of pharmaceuticals administered to cancer patients. PMID:19458059

  15. New quinoline derivatives demonstrate a promising antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro and Plasmodium berghei in vivo.

    PubMed

    Soares, Roberta Reis; da Silva, José Marcio Fernandes; Carlos, Bianca Cecheto; da Fonseca, Camila Campos; de Souza, Laila Salomé Araújo; Lopes, Fernanda Valério; de Paula Dias, Rafael Mafra; Moreira, Paulo Otávio Lourenço; Abramo, Clarice; Viana, Gustavo Henrique Ribeiro; de Pila Varotti, Fernando; da Silva, Adilson David; Scopel, Kézia Katiani Gorza

    2015-06-01

    Malaria continues to be an important public health problem in the world. Nowadays, the widespread parasite resistance to many drugs used in antimalarial therapy has made the effective treatment of cases and control of the disease a constant challenge. Therefore, the discovery of new molecules with good antimalarial activity and tolerance to human use can be really important in the further treatment of the disease. In this study we have investigated the antiplasmodial activity of 10 synthetic compounds derived from quinoline, five of them combined to sulfonamide and five to the hydrazine or hydrazide group. The compounds were evaluated according to their cytotoxicity against HepG2 and HeLa cell lines, their antimalarial activity against CQ-sensitive and CQ-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains and, finally, their schizonticide blood action in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65. The compounds exhibited no cytotoxic action in HepG2 and HeLa cell lines when tested up to a concentration of 100 μg/mL. In addition, the hydrazine or hydrazide derivative compounds were less cytotoxic against cell lines and more active against CQ-sensitive and CQ-resistant P. falciparum strains, showing high SI (>1000 when SI was calculated using the CC50 from the 3D7 strain as reference). When tested in vivo, the hydrazine derivative 1f compound showed activity against the development of blood parasites similar to that observed with CQ, the reference drug. Interestingly, the 1f compound demonstrated the best LipE value (4.84) among all those tested in vivo. Considering the in vitro and in vivo activities of the compounds studied here and the LipE values, we believe the 1f compound to be the most promising molecule for further studies in antimalarial chemotherapy. PMID:25920564

  16. The effect of an anti-malarial subsidy programme on the quality of service provision of artemisinin-based combination therapy in Kenya: a cluster-randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with suspected malaria in sub-Saharan Africa seek treatment from private providers, but this sector suffers from sub-standard medicine dispensing practices. To improve the quality of care received for presumptive malaria from the highly accessed private retail sector in western Kenya, subsidized pre-packaged artemether-lumefantrine (AL) was provided to private retailers, together with a one day training for retail staff on malaria diagnosis and treatment, job aids and community engagement activities. Methods The intervention was assessed using a cluster-randomized, controlled design. Provider and mystery-shopper cross-sectional surveys were conducted at baseline and eight months post-intervention to assess provider practices. Data were analysed based on cluster-level summaries, comparing control and intervention arms. Results On average, 564 retail outlets were interviewed per year. At follow-up, 43% of respondents reported that at least one staff member had attended the training in the intervention arm. The intervention significantly increased the percentage of providers knowing the first line treatment for uncomplicated malaria by 24.2% points (confidence interval (CI): 14.8%, 33.6%; adjusted p=0.0001); the percentage of outlets stocking AL by 31.7% points (CI: 22.0%, 41.3%; adjusted p=0.0001); and the percentage of providers prescribing AL for presumptive malaria by 23.6% points (CI: 18.7%, 28.6%; adjusted p=0.0001). Generally outlets that received training and job aids performed better than those receiving one or none of these intervention components. Conclusion Overall, subsidizing ACT and retailer training can significantly increase the percentage of outlets stocking and selling AL for the presumptive treatment of malaria, but further research is needed on strategies to improve the provision of counselling advice to retail customers. PMID:23452547

  17. Antimalarial Activity of the Anticancer Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor SB939

    PubMed Central

    Sumanadasa, Subathdrage D. M.; Goodman, Christopher D.; Lucke, Andrew J.; Skinner-Adams, Tina; Sahama, Ishani; Haque, Ashraful; Do, Tram Anh; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Fairlie, David P.

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes posttranslationally modify lysines on histone and nonhistone proteins and play crucial roles in epigenetic regulation and other important cellular processes. HDAC inhibitors (e.g., suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid [SAHA; also known as vorinostat]) are used clinically to treat some cancers and are under investigation for use against many other diseases. Development of new HDAC inhibitors for noncancer indications has the potential to be accelerated by piggybacking onto cancer studies, as several HDAC inhibitors have undergone or are undergoing clinical trials. One such compound, SB939, is a new orally active hydroxamate-based HDAC inhibitor with an improved pharmacokinetic profile compared to that of SAHA. In this study, the in vitro and in vivo antiplasmodial activities of SB939 were investigated. SB939 was found to be a potent inhibitor of the growth of Plasmodium falciparum asexual-stage parasites in vitro (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 100 to 200 nM), causing hyperacetylation of parasite histone and nonhistone proteins. In combination with the aspartic protease inhibitor lopinavir, SB939 displayed additive activity. SB939 also potently inhibited the in vitro growth of exoerythrocytic-stage Plasmodium parasites in liver cells (IC50, ∼150 nM), suggesting that inhibitor targeting to multiple malaria parasite life cycle stages may be possible. In an experimental in vivo murine model of cerebral malaria, orally administered SB939 significantly inhibited P. berghei ANKA parasite growth, preventing development of cerebral malaria-like symptoms. These results identify SB939 as a potent new antimalarial HDAC inhibitor and underscore the potential of investigating next-generation anticancer HDAC inhibitors as prospective new drug leads for treatment of malaria. PMID:22508312

  18. Quality of Online Pharmacies and Websites Selling Prescription Drugs: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Merla, Anna; Schulz, Peter J; Gelatti, Umberto

    2011-01-01

    Background Online pharmacies are companies that sell pharmaceutical preparations, including prescription-only drugs, on the Internet. Very little is known about this phenomenon because many online pharmacies operate from remote countries, where legal bases and business practices are largely inaccessible to international research. Objective The aim of the study was to perform an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the scientific literature focusing on the broader picture of online pharmacies by scanning several scientific and institutional databases, with no publication time limits. Methods We searched 4 electronic databases up to January 2011 and the gray literature on the Internet using the Google search engine and its tool Google Scholar. We also investigated the official websites of institutional agencies (World Health Organization, and US and European centers for disease control and drug regulation authorities). We focused specifically on online pharmacies offering prescription-only drugs. We decided to analyze and report only articles with original data, in order to review all the available data regarding online pharmacies and their usage. Results We selected 193 relevant articles: 76 articles with original data, and 117 articles without original data (editorials, regulation articles, or the like) including 5 reviews. The articles with original data cover samples of online pharmacies in 47 cases, online drug purchases in 13, consumer characteristics in 15, and case reports on adverse effects of online drugs in 12. The studies show that random samples with no specific limits to prescription requirements found that at least some websites sold drugs without a prescription and that an online questionnaire was a frequent tool to replace prescription. Data about geographical characteristics show that this information can be concealed in many websites. The analysis of drug offer showed that online a consumer can get virtually everything. Regarding quality of drugs

  19. In vitro-in vivo Pharmacokinetic correlation model for quality assurance of antiretroviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo Valencia, Piedad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The in vitro-in vivo pharmacokinetic correlation models (IVIVC) are a fundamental part of the drug discovery and development process. The ability to accurately predict the in vivo pharmacokinetic profile of a drug based on in vitro observations can have several applications during a successful development process. Objective: To develop a comprehensive model to predict the in vivo absorption of antiretroviral drugs based on permeability studies, in vitro and in vivo solubility and demonstrate its correlation with the pharmacokinetic profile in humans. Methods: Analytical tools to test the biopharmaceutical properties of stavudine, lamivudine y zidovudine were developed. The kinetics of dissolution, permeability in caco-2 cells and pharmacokinetics of absorption in rabbits and healthy volunteers were evaluated. Results: The cumulative areas under the curve (AUC) obtained in the permeability study with Caco-2 cells, the dissolution study and the pharmacokinetics in rabbits correlated with the cumulative AUC values in humans. These results demonstrated a direct relation between in vitro data and absorption, both in humans and in the in vivo model. Conclusions: The analytical methods and procedures applied to the development of an IVIVC model showed a strong correlation among themselves. These IVIVC models are proposed as alternative and cost/effective methods to evaluate the biopharmaceutical properties that determine the bioavailability of a drug and their application includes the development process, quality assurance, bioequivalence studies and pharmacosurveillance. PMID:26600625

  20. Parasites resistant to the antimalarial atovaquone fail to transmit by mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Christopher D; Siregar, Josephine E; Mollard, Vanessa; Vega-Rodríguez, Joel; Syafruddin, Din; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Matsuzaki, Motomichi; Toyama, Tomoko; Sturm, Angelika; Cozijnsen, Anton; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo; Kita, Kiyoshi; Marzuki, Sangkot; McFadden, Geoffrey I

    2016-04-15

    Drug resistance compromises control of malaria. Here, we show that resistance to a commonly used antimalarial medication, atovaquone, is apparently unable to spread. Atovaquone pressure selects parasites with mutations in cytochrome b, a respiratory protein with low but essential activity in the mammalian blood phase of the parasite life cycle. Resistance mutations rescue parasites from the drug but later prove lethal in the mosquito phase, where parasites require full respiration. Unable to respire efficiently, resistant parasites fail to complete mosquito development, arresting their life cycle. Because cytochrome b is encoded by the maternally inherited parasite mitochondrion, even outcrossing with wild-type strains cannot facilitate spread of resistance. Lack of transmission suggests that resistance will be unable to spread in the field, greatly enhancing the utility of atovaquone in malaria control. PMID:27081071

  1. Design, synthesis and antimalarial evaluation of novel thiazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bueno, José María; Carda, Miguel; Crespo, Benigno; Cuñat, Ana Carmen; de Cozar, Cristina; León, María Luisa; Marco, J Alberto; Roda, Nuria; Sanz-Cervera, Juan F

    2016-08-15

    As part of our medicinal chemistry program's ongoing search for compounds with antimalarial activity, we prepared a series of thiazole analogs and conducted a SAR study analyzing their in vitro activities against the chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 strain. The results indicate that modifications of the N-aryl amide group linked to the thiazole ring are the most significant in terms of in vitro antimalarial activity, leading to compounds with high antimalarial potency and low cytotoxicity in HepG2 cell lines. Furthermore, the observed SAR implies that non-bulky, electron-withdrawing groups are preferred at ortho position on the phenyl ring, whereas small atoms such as H or F are preferred at para position. Finally, replacement of the phenyl ring by a pyridine affords a compound with similar potency, but with potentially better physicochemical properties which could constitute a new line of research for further studies. PMID:27432764

  2. Case series in drug safety: a review to determine characteristics and quality.

    PubMed

    Abou Chakra, Claire Nour; Pariente, Antoine; Pinet, Marion; Nkeng, Lenhangmbong; Moore, Nicholas; Moride, Yola

    2010-12-01

    Case series and case reports are a cornerstone of drug safety research; however, the characteristics of case series published in the literature remain poorly examined. A narrative review of case series addressing drug safety, published in the literature between 1 January 2003 and 15 July 2009, and identified through a PubMed search, was conducted in order to determine their characteristics and quality according to the criteria found in the US FDA Pharmacovigilance Guidance 2005. Of 130 publications that met the search criteria, 11.5% included an analytical component and 88.5% were descriptive. The median number of cases included in a given case series was 7 (range 2-2195) and the median time period for recruitment of the cases was 23 months (range 0.5-96). Overall, 43.1% of case series consisted of individual case reports, while 24.6% originated from cohorts and 21% from pharmacovigilance databases. Of the case series, 65.1% concerned adults (age ≥18 years), 11.6% elderly (age ≥65 years) and 8.5% youth (<18 years). Adverse effects involved mainly the skin (18.5%) and the circulatory system (13.8%). The main suspected drug classes (Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification) were nervous system drugs (23.1%) and antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents (20.0%). On average, six out of the possible nine US FDA Pharmacovigilance Guidance Criteria were fulfilled, with 27% of publications fulfilling at least seven criteria. Only 10% reported data on co-morbidity. In conclusion, this review highlights the reporting gaps and heterogeneity in published case series with respect to size, recruitment period and quality. PMID:21077699

  3. Injection Drug User Quality of Life Scale (IDUQOL): Findings from a content validation study

    PubMed Central

    Hubley, Anita M; Palepu, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Background Quality of life studies among injection drug users have primarily focused on health-related measures. The chaotic life-style of many injection drug users (IDUs), however, extends far beyond their health, and impacts upon social relationships, employment opportunities, housing, and day to day survival. Most current quality of life instruments do not capture the realities of people living with addictions. The Injection Drug Users' Quality of Life Scale (IDUQOL) was developed to reflect the life areas of relevance to IDUs. The present study examined the content validity of the IDUQOL using judgmental methods based on subject matter experts' (SMEs) ratings of various elements of this measure (e.g., appropriateness of life areas or items, names and descriptions of life areas, instructions for administration and scoring). Methods Six SMEs were provided with a copy of the IDUQOL and its administration and scoring manual and a detailed content validation questionnaire. Two commonly used judgmental measures of inter-rater agreement, the Content Validity Index (CVI) and the Average Deviation Mean Index (ADM), were used to evaluate SMEs' agreement on ratings of IDUQOL elements. Results A total of 75 elements of the IDUQOL were examined. The CVI results showed that all elements were endorsed by the required number of SMEs or more. The ADM results showed that acceptable agreement (i.e., practical significance) was obtained for all elements but statistically significant agreement was missed for nine elements. For these elements, SMEs' feedback was examined for ways to improve the elements. Open-ended feedback also provided suggestions for other revisions to the IDUQOL. Conclusion The results of the study provided strong evidence in support of the content validity of the IDUQOL and direction for the revision of some IDUQOL elements. PMID:17663783

  4. Biological activities of nitidine, a potential anti-malarial lead compound

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nitidine is thought to be the main active ingredient in several traditional anti-malarial remedies used in different parts of the world. The widespread use of these therapies stresses the importance of studying this molecule in the context of malaria control. However, little is known about its potential as an anti-plasmodial drug, as well as its mechanism of action. Methods In this study, the anti-malarial potential of nitidine was evaluated in vitro on CQ-sensitive and -resistant strains. The nitidine's selectivity index compared with cancerous and non-cancerous cell lines was then determined. In vivo assays were then performed, using the four-day Peter's test methodology. To gain information about nitidine's possible mode of action, its moment of action on the parasite cell cycle was studied, and its localization inside the parasite was determined using confocal microscopy. The in vitro abilities of nitidine to bind haem and to inhibit β-haematin formation were also demonstrated. Results Nitidine showed similar in vitro activity in CQ-sensitive and resistant strains, and also a satisfying selectivity index (> 10) when compared with a non-cancerous cells line. Its in vivo activity was moderate; however, no sign of acute toxicity was observed during treatment. Nitidine's moment of action on the parasite cycle showed that it could not interfere with DNA replication; this was consistent with the observation that nitidine did not localize in the nucleus, but rather in the cytoplasm of the parasite. Nitidine was able to form a 1-1 complex with haem in vitro and also inhibited β-haematin formation with the same potency as chloroquine. Conclusion Nitidine can be considered a potential anti-malarial lead compound. Its ability to complex haem and inhibit β-haematin formation suggests a mechanism of action similar to that of chloroquine. The anti-malarial activity of nitidine could therefore be improved by structural modification of this molecule to increase

  5. Synthesis of new arylaminoquinoxalines and their antimalarial activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Rangisetty, J B; Gupta, C N; Prasad, A L; Srinivas, P; Sridhar, N; Parimoo, P; Veeranjaneyulu, A

    2001-10-01

    2-Arylaminoquinoxalines were prepared by the condensation of 2-chloroquinoxaline with the appropriate Mannich bases in the presence of HCl. To synthesize the Mannich bases, 4-acetamidophenol was reacted with formaldehyde and dialkylamine to yield 3-[(dialkylamino) methyl]-4-hydroxyacetanilide, followed by hydrolysis. Antimalarial activities of the new arylaminoquinoxalines were evaluated against the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii at a dose of 75 mg kg(-1). Three compounds synthesized (2-[3-[(diethylamino) methyl]-4-hydroxyanilino]-quinoxaline dihydrochloride (2b), 2-[3-[(pyrrolidinyl) methyl]-4-hydroxyanilino]-quinoxaline dihydrochloride (2f), and 2-[3-[(piperidinyl) methyl]-4-hydroxyanilino]-quinoxaline dihydrochloride (2g)) showed moderate antimalarial activity. PMID:11697550

  6. Differences in malaria care seeking and dispensing outcomes for adults and children attending drug vendors in Nasarawa, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jenny; Isiguzo, Chinwoke; Sieverding, Maia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To characterise the differences in care seeking behaviour and dispensing outcomes between adults and children purchasing drugs for malaria at retail shops in Nigeria. Methods In Nasarawa State, retail drug shops were enumerated and a subset of those stocking antimalarials were selected as study sites and surveyed. Customers exiting shops after purchasing antimalarial drugs were surveyed and tested with a malaria rapid diagnostic test. Sick adults and caregivers accompanying sick children were eligible, but individuals purchasing drugs for a sick person that was not present were excluded. Multivariate regression analysis was used to identify the correlates of care seeking and the quality of interaction at the shop. Results Of 737 participants, 80% were adults and 20% were children (under age 18). Caregivers of sick children were more likely to obtain a prescription prior to attending a drug retailer than adults seeking care for themselves and waited a shorter time before seeking care. Caregivers of sick children were also more likely than sick adults to have been asked about symptoms by the retailer, to have been given an examination, and to have purchased an ACT. Fewer than half of respondents had purchased an ACT. Only 14% of adults, but 27% of children were RDT-positive; RDT-positive children were more likely to have had an ACT purchased for them than RDT-positive adults. Conclusions Children with suspected malaria tend to receive better care at drug retailers than adults. The degree of overtreatment and prevalence of dispensing non-recommended antimalarials emphasise the need for routine diagnosis before treatment to properly treat both malaria and non-malaria illnesses. PMID:25877471

  7. Formulation and particle size reduction improve bioavailability of poorly water-soluble compounds with antimalarial activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxing; Li, Qigui; Reyes, Sean; Zhang, Jing; Xie, Lisa; Melendez, Victor; Hickman, Mark; Kozar, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Decoquinate (DQ) is highly effective at killing malaria parasites in vitro; however, it is extremely insoluble in water. In this study, solid dispersion method was used for DQ formulation which created a suitable physical form of DQ in aqueous phase for particle manipulation. Among many polymers and surfactants tested, polyvinylpyrrolidone 10, a polymer, and L- α -phosphatidylcholine or polysorbate, two surfactants, were chosen as DQ formulation components. The formulation particles were reduced to a mean size between 200 to 400 nm, which was stable in aqueous medium for at least three weeks. Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies showed that compared to DQ microparticle suspension, a nanoparticle formulation orally dosed to mice showed a 14.47-fold increase in area under the curve (AUC) of DQ plasma concentration and a 4.53-fold increase in AUC of DQ liver distribution. WR 299666, a poorly water-soluble compound with antimalarial activity, was also tested and successfully made into nanoparticle formulation without undergoing solid dispersion procedure. We concluded that nanoparticles generated by using appropriate formulation components and sufficient particle size reduction significantly increased the bioavailability of DQ and could potentially turn this antimalarial agent to a therapeutic drug. PMID:23766925

  8. Do ethnobotanical and laboratory data predict clinical safety and efficacy of anti-malarial plants?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Over 1200 plant species are reported in ethnobotanical studies for the treatment of malaria and fevers, so it is important to prioritize plants for further development of anti-malarials. Methods The “RITAM score” was designed to combine information from systematic literature searches of published ethnobotanical studies and laboratory pharmacological studies of efficacy and safety, in order to prioritize plants for further research. It was evaluated by correlating it with the results of clinical trials. Results and discussion The laboratory efficacy score correlated with clinical parasite clearance (rs=0.7). The ethnobotanical component correlated weakly with clinical symptom clearance but not with parasite clearance. The safety component was difficult to validate as all plants entering clinical trials were generally considered safe, so there was no clinical data on toxic plants. Conclusion The RITAM score (especially the efficacy and safety components) can be used as part of the selection process for prioritising plants for further research as anti-malarial drug candidates. The validation in this study was limited by the very small number of available clinical studies, and the heterogeneity of patients included. PMID:21411018

  9. Formulation, characterization and anti-malarial activity of homolipid-based artemether microparticles.

    PubMed

    Agubata, Chukwuma O; Nzekwe, Ifeanyi T; Attama, Anthony A; Mueller-Goymann, Christel C; Onunkwo, Godswill C

    2015-01-15

    The anti-malarial activity of artemether is dependent on its bioavailability. The purpose of the research is to improve the solubility, bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy of lipophilic artemether using homolipid-based microparticles. Irvingia fat was extracted from Irvingia gabonensis var. excelsa (Irvingia wombolu), and its lipid matrices (LM) with Phospholipon(®) 90G (P90G) were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). Solid lipid microparticles were formulated, characterized, filled and compressed into capsules and tablets, respectively, and drug release studied. In vivo anti-plasmodial activity of artemether SLMs was evaluated in mice. The crystallinity of the phyto-lipid reduced in the presence of P90G, which was integrated into the irvingia fat crystal lattice. SLM dispersions with 3:1 irvingia fat/P90G composition showed higher diffusion and permeability through dialysis membrane while lower proportion of P90G (9:1 LM) favored increased dissolution rate of artemether from capsules (p<0.05). Significant increase (p<0.05) in % plasmodial growth inhibition and reduced parasitemia were observed in mice administered with the SLM dispersions compared with the controls. Therefore, SLMs prepared with composite mixtures of a homolipid and P90G could be used to improve the solubility, dissolution, permeability, bioavailability and anti-malarial efficacy of artemether. PMID:25448583

  10. An Alternative Paradigm for the Role of Antimalarial Plants in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Maranz, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Most investigations into the antimalarial activity of African plants are centered on finding an indigenous equivalent to artemisinin, the compound from which current frontline antimalarial drugs are synthesized. As a consequence, the standard practice in ethnopharmacological research is to use in vitro assays to identify compounds that inhibit parasites at nanomolar concentrations. This approach fails to take into consideration the high probability of acquisition of resistance to parasiticidal compounds since parasite populations are placed under direct selection for genetic that confers a survival advantage. Bearing in mind Africa's long exposure to malaria and extensive ethnobotanical experimentation with both therapies and diet, it is more likely that compounds not readily overcome by Plasmodium parasites would have been retained in the pharmacopeia and cuisine. Such compounds are characterized by acting primarily on the host rather than directly targeting the parasite and thus cannot be adequately explored in vitro. If Africa's long history with malaria has in fact produced effective plant therapies, their scientific elucidation will require a major emphasis on in vivo investigation. PMID:22593717

  11. Antimalarial activity of axidjiferosides, new β-galactosylceramides from the African sponge Axinyssa djiferi.

    PubMed

    Farokhi, Fereshteh; Grellier, Philippe; Clément, Monique; Roussakis, Christos; Loiseau, Philippe M; Genin-Seward, Emilie; Kornprobst, Jean-Michel; Barnathan, Gilles; Wielgosz-Collin, Gaëtane

    2013-04-01

    The marine sponge, Axinyssa djiferi, collected on mangrove tree roots in Senegal, was investigated for glycolipids. A mixture containing new glycosphingolipids, named axidjiferoside-A, -B and -C, accounted for 0.07% of sponge biomass (dry weight) and for 2.16% of total lipids. It showed a significant antimalarial activity, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.53 ± 0.2 μM against a chloroquine-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum. They were identified as homologous β-galactopyranosylceramides composed of 2-amino-(6E)-octadec-6-en-1,3,4-triol, and the major one, axidjiferoside-A (around 60%), contained 2-hydroxytetracosanoic acid. Cytotoxicity was studied in vitro on human cancer cell lines (multiple myeloma, colorectal adenocarcinoma, glioblastoma and two lung cancer NSCLC-N6 and A549). Results of this investigation showed that axidjiferosides are of interest, because they proved a good antiplasmodial activity, with only a low cytotoxicity against various human cell lines and no significant antitrypanosomal and antileishmanial activity. Thus, it seems that galactosylceramides with a β anomeric configuration may be suitable in searching for new antimalarial drugs. PMID:23595058

  12. Antimalarial Activity of Axidjiferosides, New β-Galactosylceramides from the African Sponge Axinyssa djiferi

    PubMed Central

    Farokhi, Fereshteh; Grellier, Philippe; Clément, Monique; Roussakis, Christos; Loiseau, Philippe M.; Genin-Seward, Emilie; Kornprobst, Jean-Michel; Barnathan, Gilles; Wielgosz-Collin, Gaëtane

    2013-01-01

    The marine sponge, Axinyssa djiferi, collected on mangrove tree roots in Senegal, was investigated for glycolipids. A mixture containing new glycosphingolipids, named axidjiferoside-A, -B and -C, accounted for 0.07% of sponge biomass (dry weight) and for 2.16% of total lipids. It showed a significant antimalarial activity, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.53 ± 0.2 μM against a chloroquine-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum. They were identified as homologous β-galactopyranosylceramides composed of 2-amino-(6E)-octadec-6-en-1,3,4-triol, and the major one, axidjiferoside-A (around 60%), contained 2-hydroxytetracosanoic acid. Cytotoxicity was studied in vitro on human cancer cell lines (multiple myeloma, colorectal adenocarcinoma, glioblastoma and two lung cancer NSCLC-N6 and A549). Results of this investigation showed that axidjiferosides are of interest, because they proved a good antiplasmodial activity, with only a low cytotoxicity against various human cell lines and no significant antitrypanosomal and antileishmanial activity. Thus, it seems that galactosylceramides with a β anomeric configuration may be suitable in searching for new antimalarial drugs. PMID:23595058

  13. "This body does not want free medicines": South African consumer perceptions of drug quality.

    PubMed

    Patel, Aarti; Gauld, Robin; Norris, Pauline; Rades, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Like many other developing countries, South Africa provides free medicines through its public health care facilities. Recent policies encourage generic substitution in the private sector. This study explored South African consumer perceptions of drug quality and whether these perceptions influenced how people procured and used their medicines. METHODS The study was undertaken in Durban, Cape Town and Johannesburg in South Africa between December 2005 and January 2006. A combination of purposive and snowball sampling was used to recruit participants from low and middle socio-economic groups as well as the elderly and teenagers. Data were collected through 12 focus group discussions involving a total of 73 participants. Interviews were tape-recorded. Thematic analysis was performed on the transcripts. RESULTS Irrespective of socio-economic status, respondents described medicine quality in terms of the effect the medicine produced on felt symptoms. Generic medicines, as well as medicines supplied without charge by the state, were considered to be poor quality and treated with suspicion. Respondents obtained medicines from three sources: public sector hospitals and/or clinics, dispensing doctors and community pharmacies. Cost, avoidance of feeling 'second-class', receiving individualized care and choice in drug selection were the main determinants influencing their procurement behaviour. Selection of over-the-counter medicines was influenced by prior knowledge of products, through advertising and previous use. Participants perceived that they had limited influence on selection of prescription medicines. Generic substitution would be supported if the doctor, rather than the pharmacist, recommended it. CONCLUSIONS Our findings emphasize the importance of meaningful consumer involvement in the development of national medicines policies, and strategic campaigns targeting consumers and prescribers regarding the quality of generic and essential medicines. Where

  14. Data quality in drug discovery: the role of analytical performance in ligand binding assays.

    PubMed

    Wätzig, Hermann; Oltmann-Norden, Imke; Steinicke, Franziska; Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Albishri, Hassan M; Baumann, Knut; Exner, Thomas; Böckler, Frank M; El Deeb, Sami

    2015-09-01

    Despite its importance and all the considerable efforts made, the progress in drug discovery is limited. One main reason for this is the partly questionable data quality. Models relating biological activity and structures and in silico predictions rely on precisely and accurately measured binding data. However, these data vary so strongly, such that only variations by orders of magnitude are considered as unreliable. This can certainly be improved considering the high analytical performance in pharmaceutical quality control. Thus the principles, properties and performances of biochemical and cell-based assays are revisited and evaluated. In the part of biochemical assays immunoassays, fluorescence assays, surface plasmon resonance, isothermal calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance and affinity capillary electrophoresis are discussed in details, in addition radiation-based ligand binding assays, mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and microscale thermophoresis are briefly evaluated. In addition, general sources of error, such as solvent, dilution, sample pretreatment and the quality of reagents and reference materials are discussed. Biochemical assays can be optimized to provide good accuracy and precision (e.g. percental relative standard deviation <10 %). Cell-based assays are often considered superior related to the biological significance, however, typically they cannot still be considered as really quantitative, in particular when results are compared over longer periods of time or between laboratories. A very careful choice of assays is therefore recommended. Strategies to further optimize assays are outlined, considering the evaluation and the decrease of the relevant error sources. Analytical performance and data quality are still advancing and will further advance the progress in drug development. PMID:26070362

  15. A pilot study on quality of artesunate and amodiaquine tablets used in the fishing community of Tema, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ineffectiveness of artesunate and amodiaquine tablets in malaria treatment remains a health burden to WHO and governments of malaria-endemic countries, including Ghana. The proliferation of illegitimate anti-malarial drugs and its use by patients is of primary concern to international and local drug regulatory agencies because such drugs are known to contribute to the development of the malaria-resistant parasites in humans. No data exist on quality of these drugs in the fishing village communities in Ghana although the villagers are likely users of such drugs. A pilot study on the quality of anti-malarial tablets in circulation during the major fishing season at a malarious fishing village located along the coast of Tema in southern Ghana was determined. Methods Blisterpacks of anti-malarial tablets were randomly sampled. The International Pharmacopoeia and Global Pharma Health Fund Minilab protocols were used to assess the quality of anti-malarial tablets per blisterpacks allegedly manufactured by Guilin Pharmaceutical Co Ltd, China (GPCL) and Letap Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Ghana (LPL) and sold in chemical sales outlets at Kpone-on–Sea. Ferric chloride and cobaltous thiocyanate tests confirmed the presence of active ingredients in the tablets. A confirmatory test for the active ingredient was achieved with artesunate (ICRS1409) and amodiaquine (ICRS0209) reference standards. A high performance liquid chromatography analysis confirmed the amount of artesunate found in tablets. Results Based on the International Pharmacopoeia acceptable range of 96/98 to 102% for genuine artesunate per tablet, 10% [relative standard deviation (RSD): 3.2%] of field-selected artesunate blisterpack per tablets manufactured by GPCL, and 50% (RSD: 5.1%) of a similar package per tablet by LPL, passed the titrimetric test. However, 100% (RSD: 2.2%) of amodiaquine blisterpack per tablet by GPCL were found to be within the International Pharmacopeia acceptable range of 90 to

  16. Ligand-based virtual screening and in silico design of new antimalarial compounds using nonstochastic and stochastic total and atom-type quadratic maps.

    PubMed

    Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Iyarreta-Veitía, Maité; Montero-Torres, Alina; Romero-Zaldivar, Carlos; Brandt, Carlos A; Avila, Priscilla E; Kirchgatter, Karin; Machado, Yanetsy

    2005-01-01

    Malaria has been one of the most significant public health problems for centuries. It affects many tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The increasing resistance of Plasmodium spp. to existing therapies has heightened alarms about malaria in the international health community. Nowadays, there is a pressing need for identifying and developing new drug-based antimalarial therapies. In an effort to overcome this problem, the main purpose of this study is to develop simple linear discriminant-based quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for the classification and prediction of antimalarial activity using some of the TOMOCOMD-CARDD (TOpological MOlecular COMputer Design-Computer Aided "Rational" Drug Design) fingerprints, so as to enable computational screening from virtual combinatorial datasets. In this sense, a database of 1562 organic chemicals having great structural variability, 597 of them antimalarial agents and 965 compounds having other clinical uses, was analyzed and presented as a helpful tool, not only for theoretical chemists but also for other researchers in this area. This series of compounds was processed by a k-means cluster analysis in order to design training and predicting sets. Afterward, two linear classification functions were derived in order to discriminate between antimalarial and nonantimalarial compounds. The models (including nonstochastic and stochastic indices) correctly classify more than 93% of the compound set, in both training and external prediction datasets. They showed high Matthews' correlation coefficients, 0.889 and 0.866 for the training set and 0.855 and 0.857 for the test one. The models' predictivity was also assessed and validated by the random removal of 10% of the compounds to form a new test set, for which predictions were made using the models. The overall means of the correct classification for this process (leave group 10% full-out cross validation) using the equations with nonstochastic

  17. Quality control of the paracetamol drug by chemometrics and imaging spectroscopy in the near infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptistao, Mariana; Rocha, Werickson Fortunato de Carvalho; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2011-09-01

    In this work, it was used imaging spectroscopy and chemometric tools for the development and analysis of paracetamol and excipients in pharmaceutical formulations. It was also built concentration maps to study the distribution of the drug in the tablets surface. Multivariate models based on PLS regression were developed for paracetamol and excipients concentrations prediction. For the construction of the models it was used 31 samples in the tablet form containing the active principle in a concentration range of 30.0-90.0% (w/w) and errors below to 5% were obtained for validation samples. Finally, the study of the distribution in the drug was performed through the distribution maps of concentration of active principle and excipients. The analysis of maps showed the complementarity between the active principle and excipients in the tablets. The region with a high concentration of a constituent must have, necessarily, absence or low concentration of the other one. Thus, an alternative method for the paracetamol drug quality monitoring is presented.

  18. Antiretroviral Choice for HIV Impacts Antimalarial Exposure and Treatment Outcomes in Ugandan Children

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Sunil; Kajubi, Richard; Huang, Liusheng; Ssebuliba, Joshua; Kiconco, Sylvia; Gao, Qin; Li, Fangyong; Were, Moses; Kakuru, Abel; Achan, Jane; Mwebaza, Norah; Aweeka, Francesca T.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The optimal treatment of malaria in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected children requires consideration of critical drug–drug interactions in coinfected children, as these may significantly impact drug exposure and clinical outcomes. Methods. We conducted an intensive and sparse pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study in Uganda of the most widely adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy, artemether-lumefantrine. HIV-infected children on 3 different first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens were compared to HIV-uninfected children not on ART, all of whom required treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Pharmacokinetic sampling for artemether, dihydroartemisinin, and lumefantrine exposure was conducted through day 21, and associations between drug exposure and outcomes through day 42 were investigated. Results. One hundred forty-five and 225 children were included in the intensive and sparse pharmacokinetic analyses, respectively. Compared with no ART, efavirenz (EFV) reduced exposure to all antimalarial components by 2.1- to 3.4-fold; lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) increased lumefantrine exposure by 2.1-fold; and nevirapine reduced artemether exposure only. Day 7 concentrations of lumefantrine were 10-fold lower in children on EFV vs LPV/r-based ART, changes that were associated with an approximate 4-fold higher odds of recurrent malaria by day 28 in those on EFV vs LPV/r-based ART. Conclusions. The choice of ART in children living in a malaria-endemic region has highly significant impacts on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of artemether-lumefantrine treatment. EFV-based ART reduces all antimalarial components and is associated with the highest risk of recurrent malaria following treatment. For those on EFV, close clinical follow-up for recurrent malaria following artemether-lumefantrine treatment, along with the study of modified dosing regimens that provide higher exposure, is warranted. PMID:27143666

  19. Antimalarial NADPH-Consuming Redox-Cyclers As Superior Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Copycats

    PubMed Central

    Bielitza, Max; Belorgey, Didier; Ehrhardt, Katharina; Johann, Laure; Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Gallo, Valentina; Schwarzer, Evelin; Mohring, Franziska; Jortzik, Esther; Williams, David L.; Becker, Katja; Arese, Paolo; Elhabiri, Mourad

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Early phagocytosis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient erythrocytes parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum were shown to protect G6PD-deficient populations from severe malaria. Here, we investigated the mechanism of a novel antimalarial series, namely 3-[substituted-benzyl]-menadiones, to understand whether these NADPH-consuming redox-cyclers, which induce oxidative stress, mimic the natural protection of G6PD deficiency. Results: We demonstrated that the key benzoylmenadione metabolite of the lead compound acts as an efficient redox-cycler in NADPH-dependent methaemoglobin reduction, leading to the continuous formation of reactive oxygen species, ferrylhaemoglobin, and subsequent haemichrome precipitation. Structure–activity relationships evidenced that both drug metabolites and haemoglobin catabolites contribute to potentiate drug effects and inhibit parasite development. Disruption of redox homeostasis by the lead benzylmenadione was specifically induced in Plasmodium falciparum parasitized erythrocytes and not in non-infected cells, and was visualized via changes in the glutathione redox potential of living parasite cytosols. Furthermore, the redox-cycler shows additive and synergistic effects in combination with compounds affecting the NADPH flux in vivo. Innovation: The lead benzylmenadione 1c is the first example of a novel redox-active agent that mimics the behavior of a falciparum parasite developing inside a G6PD-deficient red blood cell (RBC) giving rise to malaria protection, and it exerts specific additive effects that are inhibitory to parasite development, without harm for non-infected G6PD-sufficient or -deficient RBCs. Conclusion: This strategy offers an innovative perspective for the development of future antimalarial drugs for G6PD-sufficient and -deficient populations. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1337–1351. PMID:25714942

  20. Influence of LAR and VAR on Para-Aminopyridine Antimalarials Targetting Haematin in Chloroquine-Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Warhurst, David C.; Craig, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Antimalarial chloroquine (CQ) prevents haematin detoxication when CQ-base concentrates in the acidic digestive vacuole through protonation of its p-aminopyridine (pAP) basic aromatic nitrogen and sidechain diethyl-N. CQ export through the variant vacuolar membrane export channel, PFCRT, causes CQ-resistance in Plasmodium falciparum but 3-methyl CQ (sontochin SC), des-ethyl amodiaquine (DAQ) and bis 4-aminoquinoline piperaquine (PQ) are still active. This is determined by changes in drug accumulation ratios in parasite lipid (LAR) and in vacuolar water (VAR). Higher LAR may facilitate drug binding to and blocking PFCRT and also aid haematin in lipid to bind drug. LAR for CQ is only 8.3; VAR is 143,482. More hydrophobic SC has LAR 143; VAR remains 68,523. Similarly DAQ with a phenol substituent has LAR of 40.8, with VAR 89,366. In PQ, basicity of each pAP is reduced by distal piperazine N, allowing very high LAR of 973,492, retaining VAR of 104,378. In another bis quinoline, dichlorquinazine (DCQ), also active but clinically unsatisfactory, each pAP retains basicity, being insulated by a 2-carbon chain from a proximal nitrogen of the single linking piperazine. While LAR of 15,488 is still high, the lowest estimate of VAR approaches 4.9 million. DCQ may be expected to be very highly lysosomotropic and therefore potentially hepatotoxic. In 11 pAP antimalarials a quadratic relationship between logLAR and logResistance Index (RI) was confirmed, while log (LAR/VAR) vs logRI for 12 was linear. Both might be used to predict the utility of structural modifications. PMID:27483471

  1. Influence of LAR and VAR on Para-Aminopyridine Antimalarials Targetting Haematin in Chloroquine-Resistance.

    PubMed

    Warhurst, David C; Craig, John C; Raheem, K Saki

    2016-01-01

    Antimalarial chloroquine (CQ) prevents haematin detoxication when CQ-base concentrates in the acidic digestive vacuole through protonation of its p-aminopyridine (pAP) basic aromatic nitrogen and sidechain diethyl-N. CQ export through the variant vacuolar membrane export channel, PFCRT, causes CQ-resistance in Plasmodium falciparum but 3-methyl CQ (sontochin SC), des-ethyl amodiaquine (DAQ) and bis 4-aminoquinoline piperaquine (PQ) are still active. This is determined by changes in drug accumulation ratios in parasite lipid (LAR) and in vacuolar water (VAR). Higher LAR may facilitate drug binding to and blocking PFCRT and also aid haematin in lipid to bind drug. LAR for CQ is only 8.3; VAR is 143,482. More hydrophobic SC has LAR 143; VAR remains 68,523. Similarly DAQ with a phenol substituent has LAR of 40.8, with VAR 89,366. In PQ, basicity of each pAP is reduced by distal piperazine N, allowing very high LAR of 973,492, retaining VAR of 104,378. In another bis quinoline, dichlorquinazine (DCQ), also active but clinically unsatisfactory, each pAP retains basicity, being insulated by a 2-carbon chain from a proximal nitrogen of the single linking piperazine. While LAR of 15,488 is still high, the lowest estimate of VAR approaches 4.9 million. DCQ may be expected to be very highly lysosomotropic and therefore potentially hepatotoxic. In 11 pAP antimalarials a quadratic relationship between logLAR and logResistance Index (RI) was confirmed, while log (LAR/VAR) vs logRI for 12 was linear. Both might be used to predict the utility of structural modifications. PMID:27483471

  2. Antimalarial Activity of the Myxobacterial Macrolide Chlorotonil A

    PubMed Central

    Gebru, Tamirat; Kalesse, Markus; Jansen, Rolf; Gerth, Klaus; Müller, Rolf; Mordmüller, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Myxobacteria are Gram-negative soil-dwelling bacteria belonging to the phylum Proteobacteria. They are a rich source of promising compounds for clinical application, such as epothilones for cancer therapy and several new antibiotics. In the course of a bioactivity screening program of secondary metabolites produced by Sorangium cellulosum strains, the macrolide chlorotonil A was found to exhibit promising antimalarial activity. Subsequently, we evaluated chlorotonil A against Plasmodium falciparum laboratory strains and clinical isolates from Gabon. Chlorotonil A was highly active, with a 50% inhibitory concentration between 4 and 32 nM; additionally, no correlations between the activities of chlorotonil A and artesunate (rho, 0.208) or chloroquine (rho, −0.046) were observed. Per os treatment of Plasmodium berghei-infected mice with four doses of as little as 36 mg of chlorotonil A per kg of body weight led to the suppression of parasitemia with no obvious signs of toxicity. Chlorotonil A acts against all stages of intraerythrocytic parasite development, including ring-stage parasites and stage IV to V gametocytes, and it requires only a very short exposure to the parasite to exert its antimalarial action. Conclusively, chlorotonil A has an exceptional and unprecedented profile of action and represents an urgently required novel antimalarial chemical scaffold. Therefore, we propose it as a lead structure for further development as an antimalarial chemotherapeutic. PMID:25114138

  3. Natural products as starting points for future anti-malarial therapies: going back to our roots?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The discovery and development of new anti-malarials are at a crossroads. Fixed dose artemisinin combination therapy is now being used to treat a hundred million children each year, with a cost as low as 30 cents per child, with cure rates of over 95%. However, as with all anti-infective strategies, this triumph brings with it the seeds of its own downfall, the emergence of resistance. It takes ten years to develop a new medicine. New classes of medicines to combat malaria, as a result of infection by Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are urgently needed. Results Natural product scaffolds have been the basis of the majority of current anti-malarial medicines. Molecules such as quinine, lapachol and artemisinin were originally isolated from herbal medicinal products. After improvement with medicinal chemistry and formulation technologies, and combination with other active ingredients, they now make up the current armamentarium of medicines. In recent years advances in screening technologies have allowed testing of millions of compounds from pharmaceutical diversity for anti-malarial activity in cellular assays. These initiatives have resulted in thousands of new sub-micromolar active compounds – starting points for new drug discovery programmes. Against this backdrop, the paucity of potent natural products identified has been disappointing. Now is a good time to reflect on the current approach to screening herbal medicinal products and suggest revisions. Nearly sixty years ago, the Chinese doctor Chen Guofu, suggested natural products should be approached by dao-xing-ni-shi or ‘acting in the reversed order’, starting with observational clinical studies. Natural products based on herbal remedies are in use in the community, and have the potential unique advantage that clinical observational data exist, or can be generated. The first step should be the confirmation and definition of the clinical activity of herbal medicinal products already

  4. In-silico studies on DegP protein of Plasmodium falciparum in search of anti-malarials.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Drista; Soni, Rani; Patel, Sachin; Joshi, Deepti; Bhatt, Tarun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Despite encouraging progress over the past decade, malaria caused by the Plasmodium parasite continues to pose an enormous disease burden and is one of the major global health problems. The extreme challenge in malaria management is the resistance of parasites to traditional monochemotherapies like chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. No vaccine is yet in sight, and the foregoing effective drugs are also losing ground against the disease due to the resistivity of parasites. New antimalarials with novel mechanisms of action are needed to circumvent existing or emerging drug resistance. DegP protein, secretory in nature has been shown to be involved in regulation of thermo-oxidative stress generated during asexual life cycle of Plasmodium, probably required for survival of parasite in host. Considering the significance of protein, in this study, we have generated a three-dimensional structure of PfDegP followed by validation of the modeled structure using several tools like RAMPAGE, ERRAT, and others. We also performed an in-silico screening of small molecule database against PfDegP using Glide. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation of protein and protein-ligand complex was carried out using GROMACS. This study substantiated potential drug-like molecules and provides the scope for development of novel antimalarial drugs. PMID:27491850

  5. Antimalarial activity of prodrugs of N-branched acyclic nucleoside phosphonate inhibitors of 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Hocková, Dana; Janeba, Zlatko; Naesens, Lieve; Edstein, Michael D; Chavchich, Marina; Keough, Dianne T; Guddat, Luke W

    2015-09-01

    Acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs) that contain a 6-oxopurine base are good inhibitors of the human and Plasmodium falciparum 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferases (PRTs), key enzymes of the purine salvage pathway. Chemical modifications, based on the crystal structures of several inhibitors in complex with the human PRTase, led to the design of a new class of inhibitors--the aza-ANPs. Because of the negative charges of the phosphonic acid moiety, their ability to cross cell membranes is, however, limited. Thus, phosphoramidate prodrugs of the aza-ANPs were prepared to improve permeability. These prodrugs arrest parasitemia with IC50 values in the micromolar range against Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocyte cultures (both chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant Pf strains). The prodrugs exhibit low cytotoxicity in several human cell lines. Thus, they fulfill two essential criteria to qualify them as promising antimalarial drug leads. PMID:26275679

  6. The anti-malarial atovaquone increases radiosensitivity by alleviating tumour hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Thomas M.; Fokas, Emmanouil; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A.; Folkes, Lisa K.; Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Huether, Melanie; Kelly, Catherine J.; Pirovano, Giacomo; Buffa, Francesca M.; Hammond, Ester M.; Stratford, Michael; Muschel, Ruth J.; Higgins, Geoff S.; McKenna, William Gillies

    2016-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia renders cancer cells resistant to cancer therapy, resulting in markedly worse clinical outcomes. To find clinical candidate compounds that reduce hypoxia in tumours, we conduct a high-throughput screen for oxygen consumption rate (OCR) reduction and identify a number of drugs with this property. For this study we focus on the anti-malarial, atovaquone. Atovaquone rapidly decreases the OCR by more than 80% in a wide range of cancer cell lines at pharmacological concentrations. In addition, atovaquone eradicates hypoxia in FaDu, HCT116 and H1299 spheroids. Similarly, it reduces hypoxia in FaDu and HCT116 xenografts in nude mice, and causes a significant tumour growth delay when combined with radiation. Atovaquone is a ubiquinone analogue, and decreases the OCR by inhibiting mitochondrial complex III. We are now undertaking clinical studies to assess whether atovaquone reduces tumour hypoxia in patients, thereby increasing the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:27453292

  7. The anti-malarial atovaquone increases radiosensitivity by alleviating tumour hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Thomas M; Fokas, Emmanouil; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Folkes, Lisa K; Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Huether, Melanie; Kelly, Catherine J; Pirovano, Giacomo; Buffa, Francesca M; Hammond, Ester M; Stratford, Michael; Muschel, Ruth J; Higgins, Geoff S; McKenna, William Gillies

    2016-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia renders cancer cells resistant to cancer therapy, resulting in markedly worse clinical outcomes. To find clinical candidate compounds that reduce hypoxia in tumours, we conduct a high-throughput screen for oxygen consumption rate (OCR) reduction and identify a number of drugs with this property. For this study we focus on the anti-malarial, atovaquone. Atovaquone rapidly decreases the OCR by more than 80% in a wide range of cancer cell lines at pharmacological concentrations. In addition, atovaquone eradicates hypoxia in FaDu, HCT116 and H1299 spheroids. Similarly, it reduces hypoxia in FaDu and HCT116 xenografts in nude mice, and causes a significant tumour growth delay when combined with radiation. Atovaquone is a ubiquinone analogue, and decreases the OCR by inhibiting mitochondrial complex III. We are now undertaking clinical studies to assess whether atovaquone reduces tumour hypoxia in patients, thereby increasing the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:27453292

  8. Fingerprinting and validation of a LC-DAD method for the analysis of biflavanones in Garcinia kola-based antimalarial improved traditional medicines.

    PubMed

    Tshibangu, P Tshisekedi; Kapepula, P Mutwale; Kapinga, M J Kabongo; Lupona, H Kabika; Ngombe, N Kabamba; Kalenda, Dibungi T; Jansen, O; Wauters, J N; Tits, M; Angenot, L; Rozet, E; Hubert, Ph; Marini, R D; Frédérich, M

    2016-09-01

    African populations use traditional medicines in their initial attempt to treat a range of diseases. Nevertheless, accurate knowledge of the composition of these drugs remains a challenge in terms of ensuring the health of population and in order to advance towards improved traditional medicines (ITMs). In this paper chromatographic methods were developed for qualitative and quantitative analyses of a per os antimalarial ITM containing Garcinia kola. The identified analytical markers were used to establish TLC and HPLC fingerprints. G. kola seeds were analysed by HPLC to confirm the identity of the extract used by the Congolese manufacturer in the ITM. The main compounds (GB1, GB2, GB-1a and Kolaflavanone) were isolated by preparative TLC and identified by UPLC-MS and NMR. For the quantification of the major compound GB1, a simple and rapid experimental design was applied to develop an LC method, and then its validation was demonstrated using the total error strategy with the accuracy profile as a decision tool. The accurate results were observed within 0.14-0.45mg/mL range of GB1 expressed as naringenin. The extracts used in several batches of the analysed oral solutions contained GB1 (expressed as naringenin) within 2.04-2.43%. Both the fingerprints and the validated LC-DAD were found suitable for the quality control of G. kola-based raw material and finished products, respectively. PMID:27343901

  9. Plasmodium Drug Targets Outside the Genetic Control of the Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Drug development often seeks to find “magic bullets” which target microbiologic proteins while not affecting host proteins. Paul Ehrlich tested methylene blue as an antimalarial but this dye was not superior to quinine. Many successful antimalarial therapies are “magic shotguns” which target many Plasmodium pathways with little interference in host metabolism. Two malaria drug classes, the 8-aminoquinolines and the artemisinins interact with cytochrome P450s and host iron protoporphyrin IX or iron, respectively, to generate toxic metabolites and/or radicals, which kill the parasite by interference with many proteins. The non 8-amino antimalarial quinolines like quinine or piperaquine bind heme to inhibit the process of heme crystallization, which results in multiple enzyme inhibition and membrane dysfunction. The quinolines and artemisinins are rapidly parasiticidal in contrast to metal chelators, which have a slower parasite clearance rate with higher drug concentrations. Iron chelators interfere with the artemisinins but otherwise represent a strategy of targeting multiple enzymes containing iron. Interest has been revived in antineoplastic drugs that target DNA metabolism as antimalarials. Specific drug targeting or investigation of the innate immunity directed to the more permeable trophozoite or schizont infected erythrocyte membrane has been under explored. Novel drug classes in the antimalarial development pipeline which either target multiple proteins or unchangeable cellular targets will slow the pace of drug resistance acquisition. PMID:22973888

  10. Antimalarial activity of artefenomel (OZ439), a novel synthetic antimalarial endoperoxide, in patients with Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax malaria: an open-label phase 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    Phyo, Aung Pyae; Jittamala, Podjanee; Nosten, François H; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Imwong, Mallika; White, Nicholas J; Duparc, Stephan; Macintyre, Fiona; Baker, Mark; Möhrle, Jörg J

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Artefenomel (OZ439) is a novel synthetic trioxolane with improved pharmacokinetic properties compared with other antimalarial drugs with the artemisinin pharmacophore. Artefenomel has been generally well tolerated in volunteers at doses up to 1600 mg and is being developed as a partner drug in an antimalarial combination treatment. We investigated the efficacy, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of artefenomel at different doses in patients with Plasmodium falciparum or Plasmodium vivax malaria. Methods This phase 2a exploratory, open-label trial was done at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Bangkok, and the Shoklo Malaria Research Unit in Thailand. Adult patients with acute, uncomplicated P falciparum or P vivax malaria received artefenomel in a single oral dose (200 mg, 400 mg, 800 mg, or 1200 mg). The first cohort received 800 mg. Testing of a new dose of artefenomel in a patient cohort was decided on after safety and efficacy assessment of the preceding cohort. The primary endpoint was the natural log parasite reduction per 24 h. Definitive oral treatment was given at 36 h. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01213966. Findings Between Oct 24, 2010, and May 25, 2012, 82 patients were enrolled (20 in each of the 200 mg, 400 mg, and 800 mg cohorts, and 21 in the 1200 mg cohort). One patient withdrew consent (before the administration of artefenomel) but there were no further dropouts. The parasite reduction rates per 24 h ranged from 0·90 to 1·88 for P falciparum, and 2·09 to 2·53 for P vivax. All doses were equally effective in both P falciparum and P vivax malaria, with median parasite clearance half-lives of 4·1 h (range 1·3–6·7) to 5·6 h (2·0–8·5) for P falciparum and 2·3 h (1·2–3·9) to 3·2 h (0·9–15·0) for P vivax. Maximum plasma concentrations, dose-proportional to 800 mg, occurred at 4 h (median). The estimated elimination half-life was 46–62 h. No serious drug-related adverse effects

  11. Utility of physiologically based absorption modeling in implementing Quality by Design in drug development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyuan; Lionberger, Robert A; Davit, Barbara M; Yu, Lawrence X

    2011-03-01

    To implement Quality by Design (QbD) in drug development, scientists need tools that link drug products properties to in vivo performance. Physiologically based absorption models are potentially useful tools; yet, their utility of QbD implementation has not been discussed or explored much in the literature. We simulated pharmacokinetics (PK) of carbamazepine (CBZ) after administration of four oral formulations, immediate-release (IR) suspension, IR tablet, extended-release (XR) tablet and capsule, under fasted and fed conditions and presented a general diagram of a modeling and simulation strategy integrated with pharmaceutical development. We obtained PK parameters and absorption scale factors (ASFs) by deconvolution of the PK data for IR suspension under fasted condition. The model was validated for other PK profiles of IR formulations and used to predict PK for XR formulations. We explored three key areas where a modeling and simulation approach impacts QbD. First, the model was used to help identify optimal in vitro dissolution conditions for XR formulations. Second, identification of critical formulations variables was illustrated by a parameter sensitivity analysis of mean particle radius for the IR tablet that showed a PK shift with decreased particle radius, C (max) was increased and T (max) was decreased. Finally, virtual trial simulations allowed incorporation of inter-subject variability in the model. Virtual bioequivalence studies performed for two test formulations suggested that an in vitro dissolution test may be a more sensitive discriminative method than in vivo PK studies. In summary, a well-validated predictive model is a potentially useful tool for QbD implementation in drug development. PMID:21207216

  12. Identification of novel class of falcipain-2 inhibitors as potential antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Chakka, Sai Kumar; Kalamuddin, Mohammad; Sundararaman, Srividhya; Wei, Lianhu; Mundra, Sourabh; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Malhotra, Pawan; Mohmmed, Asif; Kotra, Lakshmi P

    2015-05-01

    Falcipain-2 is a papain family cysteine protease and an emerging antimalarial drug target. A pseudo-tripeptide scaffold I was designed using in silico screening tools and the three dimensional structures of falcipain-2, falcipain-3, and papain. This scaffold was investigated at four positions, T1, T2, T3, and T3', with various targeted substitutions to understand the structure-activity relationships. Inhibitor synthesis was accomplished by first obtaining the appropriate dipeptide precursors with common structural components. The pyrrolidine moiety introduced interesting rotamers in a number of synthesized molecules, which was confirmed using high-temperature (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Among the synthesized compounds, 61, 62, and 66 inhibited falcipain-2 activity with inhibition constants (Ki) of 1.8 ± 1.1, 0.2 ± 0.1 and 7.0 ± 2.3 μM, respectively. A group of molecules with a pyrrolidine moiety at the T2 position (68, 70, 71, 72, and 73) also potently inhibited falcipain-2 activity (Ki=0.4 ± 0.1, 2.5 ± 0.5, 3.3 ± 1.1, 7.5 ± 1.9, and 4.6 ± 0.7 μM, respectively). Overall, compound 74 exhibited potent anti-parasitic activity (IC₅₀=0.9 ± 0.1 μM), corresponding with its inhibitory activity against falcipain-2, with a Ki of 1.1 ± 0.1 μM. Compounds 62 and 67 inhibited the growth of the drug resistant parasite Dd2 with better efficacy, and compound 74 exhibited a 7- to 12-fold higher potency against Dd2 and MCamp isolates, than the laboratory strain (3D7). These data suggest that this novel series of compounds should be further investigated as potential antimalarial agents. PMID:25840796

  13. In Vivo Antimalarial Activity of Annona muricata Leaf Extract in Mice Infected with Plasmodium berghei

    PubMed Central

    Somsak, Voravuth; Polwiang, Natsuda; Chachiyo, Sukanya

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most important infectious diseases in the world. The choice for the treatment is highly limited due to drug resistance. Hence, finding the new compounds to treat malaria is urgently needed. The present study was attempted to evaluate the antimalarial activity of the Annona muricata aqueous leaf extract in Plasmodium berghei infected mice. Aqueous leaf extract of A. muricata was prepared and tested for acute toxicity in mice. For efficacy test in vivo, standard 4-day suppressive test was carried out. ICR mice were inoculated with 107 parasitized erythrocytes of P. berghei ANKA by intraperitoneal injection. The extracts (100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg) were then given orally by gavage once a day for 4 consecutive days. Parasitemia, percentage of inhibition, and packed cell volume were subsequently calculated. Chloroquine (10 mg/kg) was given to infected mice as positive control while untreated control was given only distilled water. It was found that A. muricata aqueous leaf extract at doses of 100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg resulted in dose dependent parasitemia inhibition of 38.03%, 75.25%, and 85.61%, respectively. Survival time was prolonged in infected mice treated with the extract. Moreover, no mortality to mice was observed with this extract up to a dose of 4000 mg/kg. In conclusion, the A. muricata aqueous leaf extract exerted significant antimalarial activity with no toxicity and prolonged survival time. Therefore, this extract might contain potential lead molecule for the development of a new drug for malaria treatment. PMID:27092277

  14. In Vivo Antimalarial Activity of Annona muricata Leaf Extract in Mice Infected with Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Somsak, Voravuth; Polwiang, Natsuda; Chachiyo, Sukanya

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most important infectious diseases in the world. The choice for the treatment is highly limited due to drug resistance. Hence, finding the new compounds to treat malaria is urgently needed. The present study was attempted to evaluate the antimalarial activity of the Annona muricata aqueous leaf extract in Plasmodium berghei infected mice. Aqueous leaf extract of A. muricata was prepared and tested for acute toxicity in mice. For efficacy test in vivo, standard 4-day suppressive test was carried out. ICR mice were inoculated with 10(7) parasitized erythrocytes of P. berghei ANKA by intraperitoneal injection. The extracts (100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg) were then given orally by gavage once a day for 4 consecutive days. Parasitemia, percentage of inhibition, and packed cell volume were subsequently calculated. Chloroquine (10 mg/kg) was given to infected mice as positive control while untreated control was given only distilled water. It was found that A. muricata aqueous leaf extract at doses of 100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg resulted in dose dependent parasitemia inhibition of 38.03%, 75.25%, and 85.61%, respectively. Survival time was prolonged in infected mice treated with the extract. Moreover, no mortality to mice was observed with this extract up to a dose of 4000 mg/kg. In conclusion, the A. muricata aqueous leaf extract exerted significant antimalarial activity with no toxicity and prolonged survival time. Therefore, this extract might contain potential lead molecule for the development of a new drug for malaria treatment. PMID:27092277

  15. Influence of anaesthetic drugs on the epididymal sperm quality in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, E; Pérez-Marín, C C; Millán, Y; Agüera, E

    2011-02-01

    The present study investigated the effect of different anaesthetic agents commonly used in cats on the fresh and frozen-thawed epididymal sperm. Seventeen male domestic cats were castrated using pentobarbital, ketamine HCl or isoflurane. Sperm samples were recovered from epididymides and evaluated before and after freezing, determining the vigor, motility, morphology, acrosome status, sperm viability and functional membrane integrity. Fresh epididymal sperm was influenced by the drugs used, noting that motility features, i.e. vigor (p≤0.05) and progressive motility (p≤0.05), were higher for the inhalation anaesthetic while the others did not showed statistical differences. In frozen-thawed sperm samples, cats treated with barbiturics showed lower values for acrosome status (p≤0.05) and integrity and functionality of membrane (p≤0.05 and p≤0.01, respectively) than in the others groups. Results suggested that drugs used for castration in cats could affect the sperm quality and this should be considered when implementing sperm cryopreservation in the feline. PMID:21288668

  16. Identifying and assessing highly hazardous drugs within quality risk management programs.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Robert G; Schatz, Anthony R; Kimmel, Tracy A; Ader, Allan; Naumann, Bruce D; Weideman, Patricia A

    2016-08-01

    Historically, pharmaceutical industry regulatory guidelines have assigned certain active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) to various categories of concern, such as "cytotoxic", "hormones", and "steroids". These categories have been used to identify APIs requiring segregation or dedication in order to prevent cross-contamination and protect the quality and safety of drug products. Since these terms were never defined by regulatory authorities, and many novel pharmacological mechanisms challenge these categories, there is a recognized need to modify the historical use of these terms. The application of a risk-based approach using a health-based limit, such as an acceptable daily exposure (ADE), is more appropriate for the development of a Quality Risk Management Program (QRMP) than the use of categories of concern. The toxicological and pharmacological characteristics of these categories are discussed to help identify and prioritize compounds requiring special attention. Controlling airborne concentrations and the contamination of product contact surfaces in accordance with values derived from quantitative risk assessments can prevent adverse effects in workers and patients, regardless of specific categorical designations to which these APIs have been assigned. The authors acknowledge the movement away from placing compounds into categories and, while not yet universal, the importance of basing QRMPs on compound-specific ADEs and risk assessments. Based on the results of a risk assessment, segregation and dedication may also be required for some compounds to prevent cross contamination during manufacture of APIs. PMID:27267171

  17. Economic access to effective drugs for falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Panosian, Claire B

    2005-03-01

    The increasing death toll from drug-resistant falciparum malaria is cause for international concern. In 2002, the US Agency for International Development commissioned the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to recommend global actions to ensure the broadest possible access to new, effective antimalarial treatments. In a report issued in 2004, the IOM Committee on Economics of Antimalarial Drugs recommended a global subsidy of 300 million dollars to 500 million dollars per year to replace increasingly ineffective drugs with coformulated artemisinin combination treatments to be distributed through public and private channels in affected areas. This approach allows the existing market to support the switch to new drugs and keeps treatment costs for consumers at levels similar to the current price of chloroquine. The leverage of an international subsidy of combination therapy can also discourage the distribution of monotherapies (such as solo artemisinins), the use of which might foster increasing resistance to antimalarial drugs in the future. PMID:15714418

  18. Drug therapy reviews: antirheumatic agents.

    PubMed

    Evens, R P

    1979-05-01

    The pathophysiology, symptoms and drug treatment of rheumatic disease are reviewed. Antirheumatic drugs reviewed are salicylates (including aspirin, sodium salicylate, choline salicylate, choline magnesium salicylate, salsalate), phenylpropionic acid derivatives (fenoprofen, ibuprofen, naproxen), indole derivatives (sulindac, tolmetin and indomethacin), pyrazolone derivatives (phenylbutazone, oxyphenbutazone), gold compounds, penicillamine, antimalarials mefenamic acid, corticosteroids and immunosuppressives. Simple analgesic therapy (acetaminophen, aspirin, propoxyphene) is used in the early stage of the disease. As the disease progresses, aspirin remains the drug of choice for antiinflammatory activity but the phenylpropionic acid or indole derivatives may be preferred in patients unable to tolerate salicylates. If such nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents are not effective, parenteral therapy with gold compounds or oral penicillamine usually is indicated. Indomethacin or phenylbutazone, then antimalarials, are resorted to next. Corticosteroids or immunosuppressives are reserved for patients who are unsuccessfully controlled or who have major side effects with the other drugs. Mefenamic acid occupies a very secondary place in rheumatoid arthritis treatment. PMID:377958

  19. When Quality Beats Quantity: Decision Theory, Drug Discovery, and the Reproducibility Crisis.

    PubMed

    Scannell, Jack W; Bosley, Jim

    2016-01-01

    A striking contrast runs through the last 60 years of biopharmaceutical discovery, research, and development. Huge scientific and technological gains should have increased the quality of academic science and raised industrial R&D efficiency. However, academia faces a "reproducibility crisis"; inflation-adjusted industrial R&D costs per novel drug increased nearly 100 fold between 1950 and 2010; and drugs are more likely to fail in clinical development today than in the 1970s. The contrast is explicable only if powerful headwinds reversed the gains and/or if many "gains" have proved illusory. However, discussions of reproducibility and R&D productivity rarely address this point explicitly. The main objectives of the primary research in this paper are: (a) to provide quantitatively and historically plausible explanations of the contrast; and (b) identify factors to which R&D efficiency is sensitive. We present a quantitative decision-theoretic model of the R&D process. The model represents therapeutic candidates (e.g., putative drug targets, molecules in a screening library, etc.) within a "measurement space", with candidates' positions determined by their performance on a variety of assays (e.g., binding affinity, toxicity, in vivo efficacy, etc.) whose results correlate to a greater or lesser degree. We apply decision rules to segment the space, and assess the probability of correct R&D decisions. We find that when searching for rare positives (e.g., candidates that will successfully complete clinical development), changes in the predictive validity of screening and disease models that many people working in drug discovery would regard as small and/or unknowable (i.e., an 0.1 absolute change in correlation coefficient between model output and clinical outcomes in man) can offset large (e.g., 10 fold, even 100 fold) changes in models' brute-force efficiency. We also show how validity and reproducibility correlate across a population of simulated screening and

  20. When Quality Beats Quantity: Decision Theory, Drug Discovery, and the Reproducibility Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Scannell, Jack W.; Bosley, Jim

    2016-01-01

    A striking contrast runs through the last 60 years of biopharmaceutical discovery, research, and development. Huge scientific and technological gains should have increased the quality of academic science and raised industrial R&D efficiency. However, academia faces a "reproducibility crisis"; inflation-adjusted industrial R&D costs per novel drug increased nearly 100 fold between 1950 and 2010; and drugs are more likely to fail in clinical development today than in the 1970s. The contrast is explicable only if powerful headwinds reversed the gains and/or if many "gains" have proved illusory. However, discussions of reproducibility and R&D productivity rarely address this point explicitly. The main objectives of the primary research in this paper are: (a) to provide quantitatively and historically plausible explanations of the contrast; and (b) identify factors to which R&D efficiency is sensitive. We present a quantitative decision-theoretic model of the R&D process. The model represents therapeutic candidates (e.g., putative drug targets, molecules in a screening library, etc.) within a “measurement space", with candidates' positions determined by their performance on a variety of assays (e.g., binding affinity, toxicity, in vivo efficacy, etc.) whose results correlate to a greater or lesser degree. We apply decision rules to segment the space, and assess the probability of correct R&D decisions. We find that when searching for rare positives (e.g., candidates that will successfully complete clinical development), changes in the predictive validity of screening and disease models that many people working in drug discovery would regard as small and/or unknowable (i.e., an 0.1 absolute change in correlation coefficient between model output and clinical outcomes in man) can offset large (e.g., 10 fold, even 100 fold) changes in models’ brute-force efficiency. We also show how validity and reproducibility correlate across a population of simulated screening and

  1. Identification of β-hematin inhibitors in a high-throughput screening effort reveals scaffolds with in vitro antimalarial activity

    PubMed Central

    Sandlin, Rebecca D.; Fong, Kim Y.; Wicht, Kathryn J.; Carrell, Holly M.; Egan, Timothy J.; Wright, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistant strains of Plasmodium spp. creates a critical need for the development of novel antimalarials. Formation of hemozoin, a crystalline heme detoxification process vital to parasite survival serves as an important drug target. The quinoline antimalarials including chloroquine and amodiaquine owe their antimalarial activity to inhibition of hemozoin formation. Though in vivo formation of hemozoin occurs within the presence of neutral lipids, the lipophilic detergent NP-40 was previously shown to serve as a surrogate in the β-hematin (synthetic hemozoin) formation process. Consequently, an NP-40 mediated β-hematin formation assay was developed for use in high-throughput screening. Here, the assay was utilized to screen 144,330 compounds for the identification of inhibitors of crystallization, resulting in 530 hits. To establish the effectiveness of these target-based β-hematin inhibitors against Plasmodiumfalciparum, each hit was further tested in cultures of parasitized red blood cells. This effort revealed that 171 of the β-hematin inhibitors are also active against the parasite. Dose–response data identified 73 of these β-hematin inhibitors have IC50 values ⩽5 μM, including 25 compounds with nanomolar activity against P. falciparum. A scaffold-based analysis of this data identified 14 primary scaffolds that represent 46% of the 530 total hits. Representative compounds from each of the classes were further assessed for hemozoin inhibitory activity in P. falciparum infected human erythrocytes. Each of the hit compounds tested were found to be positive inhibitors, while a negative control did not perturb this biological pathway in culture. PMID:25516843

  2. Methods for implementing a medicine outlet survey: lessons from the anti-malarial market

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years an increasing number of public investments and policy changes have been made to improve the availability, affordability and quality of medicines available to consumers in developing countries, including anti-malarials. It is important to monitor the extent to which these interventions are successful in achieving their aims using quantitative data on the supply side of the market. There are a number of challenges related to studying supply, including outlet sampling, gaining provider cooperation and collecting accurate data on medicines. This paper provides guidance on key steps to address these issues when conducting a medicine outlet survey in a developing country context. While the basic principles of good survey design and implementation are important for all surveys, there are a set of specific issues that should be considered when conducting a medicine outlet survey. Methods This paper draws on the authors’ experience of designing and implementing outlet surveys, including the lessons learnt from ACTwatch outlet surveys on anti-malarial retail supply, and other key studies in the field. Key lessons and points of debate are distilled around the following areas: selecting a sample of outlets; techniques for collecting and analysing data on medicine availability, price and sales volumes; and methods for ensuring high quality data in general. Results and conclusions The authors first consider the inclusion criteria for outlets, contrasting comprehensive versus more focused approaches. Methods for developing a reliable sampling frame of outlets are then presented, including use of existing lists, key informants and an outlet census. Specific issues in the collection of data on medicine prices and sales volumes are discussed; and approaches for generating comparable price and sales volume data across products using the adult equivalent treatment dose (AETD) are explored. The paper concludes with advice on practical considerations

  3. Hit-to-Lead Studies for the Antimalarial Tetrahydroisoquinolone Carboxanilides.

    PubMed

    Floyd, David M; Stein, Philip; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Jian; Castro, Steve; Clark, Julie A; Connelly, Michele; Zhu, Fangyi; Holbrook, Gloria; Matheny, Amy; Sigal, Martina S; Min, Jaeki; Dhinakaran, Rajkumar; Krishnan, Senthil; Bashyum, Sridevi; Knapp, Spencer; Guy, R Kiplin

    2016-09-01

    Phenotypic whole-cell screening in erythrocytic cocultures of Plasmodium falciparum identified a series of dihydroisoquinolones that possessed potent antimalarial activity against multiple resistant strains of P. falciparum in vitro and show no cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. Systematic structure-activity studies revealed relationships between potency and modifications at N-2, C-3, and C-4. Careful structure-property relationship studies, coupled with studies of metabolism, addressed the poor aqueous solubility and metabolic vulnerability, as well as potential toxicological effects, inherent in the more potent primary screening hits such as 10b. Analogues 13h and 13i, with structural modifications at each site, were shown to possess excellent antimalarial activity in vivo. The (+)-(3S,4S) enantiomer of 13i and similar analogues were identified as the more potent. On the basis of these studies, we have selected (+)-13i for further study as a preclinical candidate. PMID:27505686

  4. Isolation of antileishmanial, antimalarial and antimicrobial metabolites from Jatropha multifida

    PubMed Central

    Falodun, Abiodun; Imieje, Vincent; Erharuyi, Osayewenre; Joy, Ahomafor; Langer, Peter; Jacob, Melissa; Khan, Shabanna; Abaldry, Mohammed; Hamann, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antileishmanial, antimicrobial and antimalarial activities of the pure metabolites from Jatropha multifida used in African ethnomedicine. Methods The methanolic stem bark extract of Jatropha multifida used in Nigerian folk medicine as remedy against bacterial infections was subjected to column chromatography and HPLC analyses to obtain three known metabolites, microcyclic lathyrane diterpenoids (1-3). Structures were confirmed by comparison of 1D and 2D spectral data with literature. Results The three compounds exhibited inhibition of antileishmanial, antimalarial and antimicrobial actions against the tested organisms with compouds 2 and 3 active against Cryptococcus neoformans at IC50 of 8.2 and 8.7 µg/mL, respectively. Conclusions The research lends support to the ethnomedicinal use of the plant in combating microbial infections, leishmaniasis and malarial infections. PMID:25182722

  5. Isolation and antimalarial activity of alkaloids from Pseudoxandra cuspidata.

    PubMed

    Roumy, Vincent; Fabre, Nicolas; Souard, Florence; Massou, Stéphane; Bourdy, Geneviève; Maurel, Séverine; Valentin, Alexis; Moulis, Claude

    2006-08-01

    A novel and very unusual azaanthracene alkaloid, 1-aza-7,8,9,10-tetramethoxy-4-methyl-2-oxo-1,2-dihydroanthracene ( 1) and a new diastereoisomer of the bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid rodiasine, 1 S,1' R-rodiasine ( 2), as well as the alkaloids O-methylpunjabine ( 3) and O-methylmoschatoline ( 4) have been isolated from Pseudoxandra cuspidata bark, used in French Guiana as an antimalarial. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses, especially 2D-NMR techniques (ADEQUATE and NOESY). We found that the antimalarial activity of this bark was mostly due to bis-benzylisoquinoline 1 S,1' R-rodiasine ( 2) (IC (50)= 1 microM) also displaying a low cytotoxicity. PMID:16902855

  6. Imidazolopiperazines: Lead Optimization of the Second-Generation Antimalarial Agents

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the initial success of optimization of a novel series of imidazolopiperazines, a second generation of compounds involving changes in the core piperazine ring was synthesized to improve antimalarial properties. These changes were carried out to further improve the potency and metabolic stability of the compounds by leveraging the outcome of a set of in vitro metabolic identification studies. The optimized 8,8-dimethyl imidazolopiperazine analogues exhibited improved potency, in vitro metabolic stability profile and, as a result, enhanced oral exposure in vivo in mice. The optimized compounds were found to be more efficacious than the current antimalarials in a malaria mouse model. They exhibit moderate oral exposure in rat pharmacokinetic studies to achieve sufficient multiples of the oral exposure at the efficacious dose in toxicology studies. PMID:22524250

  7. Discovery and optimisation studies of antimalarial phenotypic hits

    PubMed Central

    Mital, Alka; Murugesan, Dinakaran; Kaiser, Marcel; Yeates, Clive; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for the development of new antimalarial compounds. As a result of a phenotypic screen, several compounds with potent activity against the parasite Plasmodium falciparum were identified. Characterization of these compounds is discussed, along with approaches to optimise the physicochemical properties. The in vitro antimalarial activity of these compounds against P. falciparum K1 had EC50 values in the range of 0.09–29 μM, and generally good selectivity (typically >100-fold) compared to a mammalian cell line (L6). One example showed no significant activity against a rodent model of malaria, and more work is needed to optimise these compounds. PMID:26408453

  8. Quality of drug information on the World Wide Web and strategies to improve pages with poor information quality. An intervention study on pages about sildenafil

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Facklam, Meret; Kostrzewa, Michael; Martin, Peter; Haefeli, Walter E

    2004-01-01

    Aims The generally poor quality of health information on the world wide web (WWW) has caused preventable adverse outcomes. Quality management of information on the internet is therefore critical given its widespread use. In order to develop strategies for the safe use of drugs, we scored general and content quality of pages about sildenafil and performed an intervention to improve their quality. Methods The internet was searched with Yahoo and AltaVista for pages about sildenafil and 303 pages were included. For assessment of content quality a score based on accuracy and completeness of essential drug information was assigned. For assessment of general quality, four criteria were evaluated and their association with high content quality was determined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. The pages were randomly allocated to either control or intervention group. Evaluation took place before, as well as 7 and 22 weeks after an intervention which consisted of two letters with individualized feedback information on the respective page which were sent electronically to the address mentioned on the page. Results Providing references to scientific publications or prescribing information was significantly associated with high content quality (odds ratio: 8.2, 95% CI 3.2, 20.5). The intervention had no influence on general or content quality. Conclusions To prevent adverse outcomes caused by misinformation on the WWW individualized feedback to the address mentioned on the page was ineffective. It is currently probably the most straight-forward approach to inform lay persons about indicators of high information quality, i.e. the provision of references. PMID:14678344

  9. Presumptive Treatment of Malaria from Formal and Informal Drug Vendors in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Isiguzo, Chinwoke; Anyanti, Jennifer; Ujuju, Chinazo; Nwokolo, Ernest; De La Cruz, Anna; Schatzkin, Eric; Modrek, Sepideh; Montagu, Dominic; Liu, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite policies that recommend parasitological testing before treatment for malaria, presumptive treatment remains widespread in Nigeria. The majority of Nigerians obtain antimalarial drugs from two types of for-profit drug vendors—formal and informal medicine shops—but little is known about the quality of malaria care services provided at these shops. Aims This study seeks to (1) describe the profile of patients who seek treatment at different types of drug outlets, (2) document the types of drugs purchased for treating malaria, (3) assess which patients are purchasing recommended drugs, and (4) estimate the extent of malaria over-treatment. Methods In urban, peri-urban, and rural areas in Oyo State, customers exiting proprietary and patent medicine vendor (PPMV) shops or pharmacies having purchased anti-malarial drugs were surveyed and tested with malaria rapid diagnostic test. A follow-up phone survey was conducted four days after to assess self-reported drug administration. Bivariate and multivariate regression analysis was conducted to determine the correlates of patronizing a PPMV versus pharmacy, and the likelihood of purchasing an artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT) drug. Results Of the 457participants who sought malaria treatment in 49 enrolled outlets, nearly 92% had diagnosed their condition by themselves, a family member, or a friend. Nearly 60% pharmacy customers purchased an ACT compared to only 29% of PPMV customers, and pharmacy customers paid significantly more on average. Multivariate regression results show that patrons of PPMVs were younger, less wealthy, waited fewer days before seeking care, and were less likely to be diagnosed at a hospital, clinic, or laboratory. Only 3.9% of participants tested positive with a malaria rapid diagnostic test. Conclusions Poorer individuals seeking care at PPMVs are more likely to receive inappropriate malaria treatment when compared to those who go to pharmacies. Increasing accessibility to

  10. Modified quaternary ammonium salts as potential antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Basilico, Nicoletta; Migotto, Mara; Ilboudo, Denise Patoinewende; Taramelli, Donatella; Stradi, Riccardo; Pini, Elena

    2015-08-01

    A series of new quaternary ammonium salts containing a polyconjugated moiety has been synthesized and characterized; their biological activity as potential antimalarial agents was investigated, as well. All compounds were screened against chloroquine resistant W-2 (CQ-R) and chloroquine sensitive, D-10 (CQ-S) strains of Plasmodium falciparum showing IC50 in the submicromolar range and low toxicity against human endothelial cells. PMID:26081764

  11. The Clinically Tested Gardos Channel Inhibitor Senicapoc Exhibits Antimalarial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tubman, Venée N.; Mejia, Pedro; Shmukler, Boris E.; Bei, Amy K.; Alper, Seth L.; Mitchell, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Senicapoc, a Gardos channel inhibitor, prevented erythrocyte dehydration in clinical trials of patients with sickle cell disease. We tested the hypothesis that senicapoc-induced blockade of the Gardos channel inhibits Plasmodium growth. Senicapoc inhibited in vitro growth of human and primate plasmodia during the clinical blood stage. Senicapoc treatment suppressed P. yoelii parasitemia in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. The reassuring safety and biochemical profile of senicapoc encourage its use in antimalarial development. PMID:26459896

  12. Cytotoxic and antimalarial bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Cyclea barbata.

    PubMed

    Lin, L Z; Shieh, H L; Angerhofer, C K; Pezzuto, J M; Cordell, G A; Xue, L; Johnson, M E; Ruangrungsi, N

    1993-01-01

    An alkaloid extract derived from the roots of Cyclea barbata demonstrated cytotoxic and antimalarial activities, and five bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids, (+)-tetrandrine [1], (-)-limacine [2], (+)-thalrugosine [3], (+)-homoaromoline [4], and (-)-cycleapeltine [5], were isolated as the active principles. The complete and unambiguous assignments of the 1H- and 13C-nmr data of these substances were made by 1D and 2D nmr techniques (COSY, phase-sensitive ROESY, HETCOR, and FLOCK). PMID:8450318

  13. Antimalarial and antimicrobial activities of 8-Aminoquinoline-Uracils metal complexes

    PubMed Central

    Phopin, Kamonrat; Sinthupoom, Nujarin; Treeratanapiboon, Lertyot; Kunwittaya, Sarun; Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2016-01-01

    8-Aminoquinoline (8AQ) derivatives have been reported to have antimalarial, anticancer, and antioxidant activities. This study investigated the potency of 8AQ-5-substituted (iodo and nitro) uracils metal (Mn, Cu, Ni) complexes (1-6) as antimalarial and antimicrobial agents. Interestingly, all of these metal complexes (1-6) showed fair antimalarial activities. Moreover, Cu complexes 2 (8AQ-Cu-5Iu) and 5 (8AQ-Cu-5Nu) exerted antimicrobial activities against Gram-negative bacteria including P. shigelloides and S. dysenteriae. The results reveal application of 8AQ and its metal complexes as potential compounds to be further developed as novel antimalarial and antibacterial agents. PMID:27103894

  14. Development of polymeric nanoparticles with highly entrapped herbal hydrophilic drug using nanoprecipitation technique: an approach of quality by design.

    PubMed

    Vuddanda, Parameswara Rao; Mishra, Amit; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The intention of this study is to achieve higher entrapment efficiency (EE) of berberine chloride (selected hydrophilic drug) using nanoprecipitation technique. The solubility of drug was studied in various pH buffers (1.2-7.2) for selection of aqueous phase and stabilizer. Quality by design (QbD)-based 3(2) factorial design were employed for optimization of formulation variables; drug to polymer ratio (X1) and surfactant concentration (X2) on entrapment efficiency (EE), particle size (PS) and polydispersity index (PDI) of the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were subjected to solid state analysis, in vitro drug release and stability study. The aqueous phase and stabilizer selected for the formulations were pH 4.5 phthalate buffer and surfactant F-68, respectively. The formulation (F-6) containing drug to polymer ratio (1:3) and stabilizer (F-68) concentration of 50 mM exhibited best EE (82.12%), PS (196.71 nm), PDI (0.153). The various solid state characterizations assured that entrapped drug is amorphous and nanoparticles are fairly spherical in shape. In vitro drug release of the F-6 exhibited sustained release with non-Fickian diffusion and stable at storage condition. This work illustrates that the proper selection of aqueous phase and optimization of formulation variables could be helpful in improving the EE of hydrophilic drugs by nanoprecipitation technique. PMID:24831535

  15. An Exploration of Quality of Life and Its Predictors in Patients with Addictive Disorders: Gambling, Alcohol and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Victoria; Gomez, Brenda; Guo, Song; Low, Yee Deng; Koh, Puay Kee; Wong, Kim Eng

    2012-01-01

    The study set out to examine Quality of Life (QoL), specifically subjective well being in three different addiction populations (260 alcohol-dependent, 282 drug-dependent, and 132 pathological gambling outpatients) at their first visit to treatment, using the Personal Well being Index (PWI). The mean PWI score for all patients was significantly…

  16. Quality of life, depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation among men who inject drugs in Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mental disorders such as depression, anxiety and suicide represent an important public health problem in India. Elsewhere in the world a high prevalence of symptoms of common mental disorders have been found among people who inject drugs (PWID). Research in India has largely overlooked symptoms of common mental disorders among this high risk group. This paper reports on the results of a survey examining quality of life, depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation among adult males who inject drugs living in Delhi. Methods Participants (n = 420) were recruited from needle and syringe programs using time location sampling and were interviewed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Self-report symptom scales were used to measure the severity of symptoms of depression (PHQ-9) and anxiety (GAD-2) within the preceding 2 weeks. We assessed the presence of suicidal thoughts and attempts within the past 12 months. Results The mean length of injecting career was 20.9 years indicating a sample of chronic injecting drug users, of whom only one-third (38%) were born in Delhi. The level of illiteracy was very high (62%), and just 2% had completed class 12. Scavenging / rag picking was the main form of income for 48%, and many were homeless (69%). One-third (33%) had been beaten up at least twice during the preceding 6 months, and many either never (45%) or rarely (27%) attended family events. We found a high prevalence of depressive (84%, cut-off ≥10) and anxiety (71%, cut-off score of ≥3) symptoms. Fifty-three percent thought about killing themselves in the past 12 months, and 36% had attempted to kill themselves. Conclusions Our findings revealed a socially excluded population of PWID in Delhi who have minimal education and are often homele