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Sample records for antimalarial drug resistance

  1. Antimalarial drug resistance: An overview.

    PubMed

    Antony, Hiasindh Ashmi; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health burden throughout the world. Resistance to the antimalarial drugs has increased the mortality and morbidity rate that is achieved so far through the malaria control program. Monitoring the drug resistance to the available antimalarial drugs helps to implement effective drug policy, through the in vivo efficacy studies, in vitro drug susceptibility tests and detection of molecular markers. It is important to understand the mechanism of the antimalarial drugs, as it is one of the key factors in the emergence and spread of drug resistance. This review summarizes the commonly used antimalarial drugs, their mechanism of action and the genetic markers validated so far for the detection of drug-resistant parasites. PMID:26998432

  2. Antimalarial drug resistance: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Hiasindh Ashmi; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health burden throughout the world. Resistance to the antimalarial drugs has increased the mortality and morbidity rate that is achieved so far through the malaria control program. Monitoring the drug resistance to the available antimalarial drugs helps to implement effective drug policy, through the in vivo efficacy studies, in vitro drug susceptibility tests and detection of molecular markers. It is important to understand the mechanism of the antimalarial drugs, as it is one of the key factors in the emergence and spread of drug resistance. This review summarizes the commonly used antimalarial drugs, their mechanism of action and the genetic markers validated so far for the detection of drug-resistant parasites. PMID:26998432

  3. [Resistance to the antimalarial drugs].

    PubMed

    Venanzi, E; López-Vélez, R

    2016-09-01

    Malaria is one of the most widespread infectious diseases around the world with 214 million cases and 438,000 deaths in 2015. In the early twentieth century it was described for the first time the resistance to quinine and, since then, drug resistance to antimalarial drugs has spread up to represent a global challenge in the fight and control of malaria. Understanding the mechanisms, geography and monitoring tools that we can act against resistance to antimalarial drugs is critical to prevent its expansion. PMID:27608319

  4. Drug resistance genomics of the antimalarial drug artemisinin.

    PubMed

    Winzeler, Elizabeth A; Manary, Micah J

    2014-01-01

    Across the globe, over 200 million annual malaria infections result in up to 660,000 deaths, 77% of which occur in children under the age of five years. Although prevention is important, malaria deaths are typically prevented by using antimalarial drugs that eliminate symptoms and clear parasites from the blood. Artemisinins are one of the few remaining compound classes that can be used to cure multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum infections. Unfortunately, clinical trials from Southeast Asia are showing that artemisinin-based treatments are beginning to lose their effectiveness, adding renewed urgency to the search for the genetic determinants of parasite resistance to this important drug class. We review the genetic and genomic approaches that have led to an improved understanding of artemisinin resistance, including the identification of resistance-conferring mutations in the P. falciparum kelch13 gene. PMID:25470531

  5. World Antimalarial Resistance Network (WARN) II: in vitro antimalarial drug susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bacon, David J; Jambou, Ronan; Fandeur, Thierry; Le Bras, Jacques; Wongsrichanalai, Chansuda; Fukuda, Mark M; Ringwald, Pascal; Sibley, Carol Hopkins; Kyle, Dennis E

    2007-01-01

    Intrinsic resistance of Plasmodium falciparum is clearly a major determinant of the clinical failure of antimalarial drugs. However, complex interactions between the host, the parasite and the drug obscure the ability to define parasite drug resistance in vivo. The in vitro antimalarial drug susceptibility assay determines ex-vivo growth of parasite in the presence of serial drug concentrations and, thus, eliminates host effects, such as drug metabolism and immunity. Although the sensitivity of the parasite to various antimalarials provided by such a test provides an important indicator of intrinsic parasite susceptibility, there are fundamental methodological issues that undermine comparison of in vitro susceptibility both between laboratories and within a single laboratory over time. A network of laboratories is proposed that will agree on the basic parameters of the in vitro test and associated measures of quality control. The aim of the network would be to establish baseline values of sensitivity to commonly used antimalarial agents from key regions of the world, and create a global database, linked to clinical, molecular and pharmacology databases, to support active surveillance to monitor temporal trends in parasite susceptibility. Such a network would facilitate the rapid detection of strains with novel antimalarial resistance profiles and investigate suitable alternative treatments with retained efficacy. PMID:17822533

  6. Resistance to antimalarial drugs: molecular, pharmacological and clinical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Travassos, Mark A.; Laufer, Miriam K.

    2009-01-01

    One of the greatest obstacles to the control of malaria has been the spread of resistance to drugs used on a large scale. This review provides an update of the current understanding of the molecular basis for antimalarial drug resistance. Parasite intrinsic resistance is just one component that determines the in vivo efficacy of a drug. Human immune responses and pharmacological properties play important roles in determining the clinical outcome of treatment. The emergence and spread of resistance also results from an interplay of these factors. Current efforts to characterize and deter resistance to new combination therapy are also discussed. PMID:19918214

  7. Fighting fire with fire: mass antimalarial drug administrations in an era of antimalarial resistance.

    PubMed

    von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dondorp, Arjen

    2015-06-01

    The emergence and spread of antimalarial resistance has been a major liability for malaria control. The spread of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains had catastrophic consequences for people in malaria-endemic regions, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. The recent emergence of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum strains is of highest concern. Current efforts to contain artemisinin resistance have yet to show success. In the absence of more promising plans, it has been suggested to eliminate falciparum malaria from foci of artemisinin resistance using a multipronged approach, including mass drug administrations. The use of mass drug administrations is controversial as it increases drug pressure. Based on current knowledge it is difficult to conceptualize how targeted malaria elimination could contribute to artemisinin resistance, provided a full treatment course is ensured. PMID:25831482

  8. Superinfection and the evolution of resistance to antimalarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Eili Y.; Smith, David L.; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Levin, Simon

    2012-01-01

    A major issue in the control of malaria is the evolution of drug resistance. Ecological theory has demonstrated that pathogen superinfection and the resulting within-host competition influences the evolution of specific traits. Individuals infected with Plasmodium falciparum are consistently infected by multiple parasites; however, while this probably alters the dynamics of resistance evolution, there are few robust mathematical models examining this issue. We developed a general theory for modelling the evolution of resistance with host superinfection and examine: (i) the effect of transmission intensity on the rate of resistance evolution; (ii) the importance of different biological costs of resistance; and (iii) the best measure of the frequency of resistance. We find that within-host competition retards the ability and slows the rate at which drug-resistant parasites invade, particularly as the transmission rate increases. We also find that biological costs of resistance that reduce transmission are less important than reductions in the duration of drug-resistant infections. Lastly, we find that random sampling of the population for resistant parasites is likely to significantly underestimate the frequency of resistance. Considering superinfection in mathematical models of antimalarial drug resistance may thus be important for generating accurate predictions of interventions to contain resistance. PMID:22787024

  9. Antimalarial Drug Resistance: Literature Review and Activities and Findings of the ICEMR Network.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liwang; Mharakurwa, Sungano; Ndiaye, Daouda; Rathod, Pradipsinh K; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2015-09-01

    Antimalarial drugs are key tools for the control and elimination of malaria. Recent decreases in the global malaria burden are likely due, in part, to the deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapies. Therefore, the emergence and potential spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites in southeast Asia and changes in sensitivities to artemisinin partner drugs have raised concerns. In recognition of this urgent threat, the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMRs) are closely monitoring antimalarial drug efficacy and studying the mechanisms underlying drug resistance. At multiple sentinel sites of the global ICEMR network, research activities include clinical studies to track the efficacies of antimalarial drugs, ex vivo/in vitro assays to measure drug susceptibilities of parasite isolates, and characterization of resistance-mediating parasite polymorphisms. Taken together, these efforts offer an increasingly comprehensive assessment of the efficacies of antimalarial therapies, and enable us to predict the emergence of drug resistance and to guide local antimalarial drug policies. Here we briefly review worldwide antimalarial drug resistance concerns, summarize research activities of the ICEMRs related to drug resistance, and assess the global impacts of the ICEMR programs. PMID:26259943

  10. Antimalarial Drug Resistance: Literature Review and Activities and Findings of the ICEMR Network

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liwang; Mharakurwa, Sungano; Ndiaye, Daouda; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Rosenthal, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs are key tools for the control and elimination of malaria. Recent decreases in the global malaria burden are likely due, in part, to the deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapies. Therefore, the emergence and potential spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites in southeast Asia and changes in sensitivities to artemisinin partner drugs have raised concerns. In recognition of this urgent threat, the International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research (ICEMRs) are closely monitoring antimalarial drug efficacy and studying the mechanisms underlying drug resistance. At multiple sentinel sites of the global ICEMR network, research activities include clinical studies to track the efficacies of antimalarial drugs, ex vivo/in vitro assays to measure drug susceptibilities of parasite isolates, and characterization of resistance-mediating parasite polymorphisms. Taken together, these efforts offer an increasingly comprehensive assessment of the efficacies of antimalarial therapies, and enable us to predict the emergence of drug resistance and to guide local antimalarial drug policies. Here we briefly review worldwide antimalarial drug resistance concerns, summarize research activities of the ICEMRs related to drug resistance, and assess the global impacts of the ICEMR programs. PMID:26259943

  11. Quality of Antimalarials at the Epicenter of Antimalarial Drug Resistance: Results from an Overt and Mystery Client Survey in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Shunmay; Lawford, Harriet L. S.; Tabernero, Patricia; Nguon, Chea; van Wyk, Albert; Malik, Naiela; DeSousa, Mikhael; Rada, Ouk; Boravann, Mam; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hostetler, Dana M.; Swamidoss, Isabel; Green, Michael D.; Fernandez, Facundo M.; Kaur, Harparkash

    2015-01-01

    Widespread availability of monotherapies and falsified antimalarials is thought to have contributed to the historical development of multidrug-resistant malaria in Cambodia. This study aimed to document the quality of artemisinin-containing antimalarials (ACAs) and to compare two methods of collecting antimalarials from drug outlets: through open surveyors and mystery clients (MCs). Few oral artemisinin-based monotherapies and no suspected falsified medicines were found. All 291 samples contained the stated active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of which 69% were considered good quality by chemical analysis. Overall, medicine quality did not differ by collection method, although open surveyors were less likely to obtain oral artemisinin-based monotherapies than MCs. The results are an encouraging indication of the positive impact of the country's efforts to tackle falsified antimalarials and artemisinin-based monotherapies. However, poor-quality medicines remain an ongoing challenge that demands sustained political will and investment of human and financial resources. PMID:25897063

  12. Quality of antimalarials at the epicenter of antimalarial drug resistance: results from an overt and mystery client survey in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Shunmay; Lawford, Harriet L S; Tabernero, Patricia; Nguon, Chea; van Wyk, Albert; Malik, Naiela; DeSousa, Mikhael; Rada, Ouk; Boravann, Mam; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hostetler, Dana M; Swamidoss, Isabel; Green, Michael D; Fernandez, Facundo M; Kaur, Harparkash

    2015-06-01

    Widespread availability of monotherapies and falsified antimalarials is thought to have contributed to the historical development of multidrug-resistant malaria in Cambodia. This study aimed to document the quality of artemisinin-containing antimalarials (ACAs) and to compare two methods of collecting antimalarials from drug outlets: through open surveyors and mystery clients (MCs). Few oral artemisinin-based monotherapies and no suspected falsified medicines were found. All 291 samples contained the stated active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of which 69% were considered good quality by chemical analysis. Overall, medicine quality did not differ by collection method, although open surveyors were less likely to obtain oral artemisinin-based monotherapies than MCs. The results are an encouraging indication of the positive impact of the country's efforts to tackle falsified antimalarials and artemisinin-based monotherapies. However, poor-quality medicines remain an ongoing challenge that demands sustained political will and investment of human and financial resources. PMID:25897063

  13. To kill or not to kill, that is the question: cytocidal antimalarial drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Roepe, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating mechanisms of antimalarial drug resistance accelerates development of improved diagnostics and the design of new, effective malaria therapy. Recently, several studies have emphasized that chloroquine (CQ) resistance (CQR) can be quantified in two very distinct ways, depending on whether sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effects or parasite – kill effects of the drug are being measured. It is now clear that these cytostatic and cytocidal CQR phenotypes are not equivalent, and recent genetic, cell biological, and biophysical evidence suggests how the molecular mechanisms may overlap. These conclusions have important implications for elucidating other drug resistance phenomena and emphasize new concepts that are essential for the development of new drug therapy. PMID:24530127

  14. Antimalarial drug resistance: a review of the biology and strategies to delay emergence and spread

    PubMed Central

    Klein, E.Y.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to former first-line antimalarial drugs has been an unmitigated disaster. In recent years, artemisinin class drugs have become standard and they are considered an essential tool for helping to eradicate the disease. However, their ability to reduce morbidity and mortality and to slow transmission requires the maintenance of effectiveness. Recently, an artemisinin delayed-clearance phenotype was described. This is believed to be the precursor to resistance and threatens local elimination and global eradication plans. Understanding how resistance emerges and spreads is important for developing strategies to contain its spread. Resistance is the result of two processes: (i) drug selection of resistant parasites; and (ii) the spread of resistance. In this review, we examine the factors that lead to both drug selection and the spread of resistance. We then examine strategies for controlling the spread of resistance, pointing out the complexities and deficiencies in predicting how resistance will spread. PMID:23394809

  15. Molecular surveillance of antimalarial drug resistance related genes in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Eritrea.

    PubMed

    Menegon, Michela; Nurahmed, Abduselam M; Talha, Albadawi A; Nour, Bakri Y M; Severini, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    The introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy has led to extraordinary results in malaria control, however the recent emergence of partial resistance to artemisinin therapy in Southeast Asia jeopardizes these successes. This study aimed at investigating resistance to the antimalarial drugs by evaluating the polymorphisms in the PfK13, Pfcrt and Pfmdr1 genes in Plasmodium falciparum isolates obtained from patients in Eritrea. PMID:26875763

  16. Resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to antimalarial drugs in Equatorial Guinea.

    PubMed

    Roche, J; Benito, A; Ayecaba, S; Amela, C; Molina, R; Alvar, J

    1993-10-01

    One hundred and sixty-six children from Equatorial Guinea, all under 10 years of age and with acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria, were randomly allocated to four groups and treated with one of the following regimens: chloroquine or amodiaquine (25 mg base/kg body weight over 3 days), quinine (8 mg/kg every 8 h for 3 or 5 days), and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (25-1.25 mg/kg, in one dose). The parasite clearance rates up to day 14 were 28% with chloroquine, 74% with amodiaquine, and 95% with quinine or sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. The times required to clear asexual blood forms of Plasmodium falciparum in sensitive cases were 64, 70, 73 and 65 h, respectively. Although quinine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine are equally effective, quinine is recommended for treatment of multidrug-resistant malaria in paediatric patients, essentially because of the risk of serious reactions to sulpha drugs. Health providers are, however, encouraged to keep supplies of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine as an option and to refer patients quickly, if required. PMID:8311568

  17. Are transporter genes other than the chloroquine resistance locus (pfcrt) and multidrug resistance gene (pfmdr) associated with antimalarial drug resistance?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Timothy J C; Nair, Shalini; Qin, Huang; Singlam, Sittaporn; Brockman, Alan; Paiphun, Lucy; Nosten, François

    2005-06-01

    Mu et al. (Mu, J., M. T. Ferdig, X. Feng, D. A. Joy, J. Duan, T. Furuya, G. Subramanian, L. Aravind, R. A. Cooper, J. C. Wootton, M. Xiong, and X. Z. Su, Mol. Microbiol. 49:977-989, 2003) recently reported exciting associations between nine new candidate transporter genes and in vitro resistance to chloroquine (CQ) and quinine (QN), with six of these loci showing association with CQ or QN in a southeast Asian population sample. We replicated and extended this work by examining polymorphisms in these genes and in vitro resistance to eight drugs in parasites collected from the Thailand-Burma border. To minimize problems of multiple testing, we used a two-phase study design, while to minimize problems caused by population structure, we analyzed parasite isolates collected from a single clinic. We first examined associations between genotype and drug response in 108 unique single-clone parasite isolates. We found strong associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in pfmdr and mefloquine (MFQ), artesunate (AS), and lumefantrine (LUM) response. We also observed associations between an ABC transporter (G7) and response to QN and AS and between another ABC transporter (G49) and response to dihydro-artemisinin (DHA). We reexamined significant associations in an independent sample of 199 unique single-clone infections from the same location. The significant associations with pfmdr-1042 detected in the first survey remained. However, with the exception of the G7-artesunate association, all other associations observed with the nine new candidate transporters disappeared. We also examined linkage disequilibrium (LD) between markers and phenotypic correlations between drug responses. We found minimal LD between genes. Furthermore, we found no correlation between chloroquine and quinine responses, although we did find expected strong correlations between MFQ, QN, AS, DHA, and LUM. To conclude, we found no evidence for an association between 8/9 candidate genes and

  18. Emerging targets for antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Padmanaban, Govinarajan; Rangarajan, Pundi N

    2001-08-01

    The absence of an effective vaccine against malaria and the ability of the parasite to develop resistance to known antimalarial drugs makes it mandatory to unravel newer drug targets with a view to developing newer pharmacophores. While conventional targets such as the purine, pyrimidine and folate pathways are still being investigated in the light of newer knowledge, a new opportunity has emerged from an understanding of certain unique features of the parasite biology. These include the food vacuole, haemoglobin catabolism, haeme biosynthesis, apicoplasts and their metabolism as well as macromolecular transactions, import of host proteins, parasite induced alterations in the red cell surface and transport phenomena. This review seeks to emphasise the new and emerging targets, while giving a brief account of the targets that have already been exploited. PMID:12540258

  19. ANTIMALARIAL DRUG QUALITY IN AFRICA

    PubMed Central

    Amin, AA; Kokwaro, GO

    2009-01-01

    Background and objective There are several reports of sub-standard and counterfeit antimalarial drugs circulating in the markets of developing countries; we aimed to review the literature for the African continent. Methods A search was conducted in PubMED in English using the medical subject headings (MeSH) terms: “Antimalarials/analysis”[MeSH] OR “Antimalarials/standards”[MeSH] AND “Africa”[MeSH]” to include articles published up to and including 26/02/07. Data were augmented with reports on the quality of antimalarial drugs in Africa obtained from colleagues in the World Health Organization. We summarised the data under the following themes: content and dissolution; relative bioavalability of antimalarial products; antimalarial stability and shelf life; general tests on pharmaceutical dosage forms; and the presence of degradation or unidentifiable impurities in formulations. Results and discussion The search yielded 21 relevant peer-reviewed articles and three reports on the quality of antimalarial drugs in Africa. The literature was varied in the quality and breadth of data presented, with most bioavailability studies poorly designed and executed. The review highlights the common finding in drug quality studies that 1) most antimalarial products pass the basic tests for pharmaceutical dosage forms, such as the uniformity of weight for tablets 2) most antimalarial drugs pass the content test 3) in vitro product dissolution is the main problem area where most drugs fail to meet required pharmacopoeial specifications, especially with regard to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine products. In addition, there are worryingly high quality failure rates for artemisinin monotherapies such as dihydroartemisin (DHA); for instance all five DHA sampled products in one study in Nairobi, Kenya, were reported to have failed the requisite tests. Conclusions There is an urgent need to strengthen pharmaceutical management systems such as post-marketing surveillance and the

  20. The Tragedy Caused by Fake Antimalarial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ambroise-Thomas, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Counterfeit antimalarials (mainly artemisinin derivatives) is a crucial health problem in developing countries, particularly in Africa. The illegal production, sale and distribution of fake drugs is a huge market evaluated to several billion of dollars and represents more than 50% of the pharmaceutical market in several African countries. Fake drugs have led to a very great number of deaths from untreated malaria or fatality provoked by toxic ingredients. These fake medicines increase the risk of artemisinin resistance developed by the use of sub therapeutic dosages of antimalarials. Tackling this criminal traffic is the objective of an international program created by WHO and involves the international police and custom organizations like INTERPOL. Several very important and encouraging results have been obtained, but the problem will be completely solved if genuine antimalarials, free-of-charge, are handed-over to populations in sub Sahara African countries. PMID:22708042

  1. How can we identify parasite genes that underlie antimalarial drug resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Tim; Nkhoma, Standwell; Ecker, Andrea; Fidock, David

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines genome-scale approaches that can be used to identify mutations in malaria (Plasmodium) parasites that underlie drug resistance and contribute to treatment failure. These approaches include genetic mapping by linkage or genome-wide association studies, drug selection and characterization of resistant mutants, and the identification of genome regions under strong recent selection. While these genomic approaches can identify candidate resistance loci, genetic manipulation is needed to demonstrate causality. We therefore also describe the growing arsenal of available transfection approaches for direct incrimination of mutations suspected to play a role in resistance. Our intention is both to review past progress and highlight promising approaches for future investigations. PMID:21174623

  2. Pricing, distribution, and use of antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Foster, S D

    1991-01-01

    Prices of new antimalarial drugs are targeted at the "travellers' market" in developed countries, which makes them unaffordable in malaria-endemic countries where the per capita annual drug expenditures are US$ 5 or less. Antimalarials are distributed through a variety of channels in both public and private sectors, the official malaria control programmes accounting for 25-30% of chloroquine distribution. The unofficial drug sellers in markets, streets, and village shops account for as much as half of antimalarials distributed in many developing countries. Use of antimalarials through the health services is often poor; drug shortages are common and overprescription and overuse of injections are significant problems. Anxiety over drug costs may prevent patients from getting the necessary treatment for malaria, especially because of the seasonal appearance of this disease when people's cash reserves are very low. The high costs may lead them to unofficial sources, which will sell a single tablet instead of a complete course of treatment, and subsequently to increased, often irrational demand for more drugs and more injections. Increasingly people are resorting to self-medication for malaria, which may cause delays in seeking proper treatment in cases of failure, especially in areas where chloroquine resistance has increased rapidly. Self-medication is now widespread, and measures to restrict the illicit sale of drugs have been unsuccessful. The "unofficial" channels thus represent an unacknowledged extension of the health services in many countries; suggestions are advanced to encourage better self-medication by increasing the knowledge base among the population at large (mothers, schoolchildren, market sellers, and shopkeepers), with an emphasis on correct dosing and on the importance of seeking further treatment without delay, if necessary. PMID:1893512

  3. Assessment of Markers of Antimalarial Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Pregnant Women in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Agomo, Chimere Obiora; Oyibo, Wellington Aghoghovwia; Sutherland, Colin; Hallet, Rachael; Oguike, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of antimalarial drugs for prevention and treatment is a major strategy in the prevention of malaria in pregnancy. Although sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is currently recommended for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy in Nigeria, previously used drugs for prophylaxis such as chloroquine (CQ) and pyrimethamine are accessible as they are purchased over the counter. This study describes the markers of absence or presence of resistance to quinoline (Pfcrt and Pfmdr 1) and type 1 antifolate antimalarial medicines (Pfdhfr). Methods Plasmodium falciparum-positive dried blood spots from pregnant women attending antenatal clinics for the first time during current pregnancy were investigated for the presence of mutations at codons 72–76 of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (Pfcrt) gene by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using haplotype-specific probes. PCR followed by sequence analysis was used to identify mutations at codons 86, 184, 1034, 1042 and 1246 of P. falciparum multi-drug resistance-1 (Pfmdr1) gene; and codons 16, 50, 51, 59, 108, 140 and 164 of Pfdhfr gene. Results Two haplotypes of Pfcrt (n = 54) were observed: CVMNK 13(24.2%) and CVIET 41 (75.9%) of the samples. The SVMNT haplotype was absent in this population. The Pfmdr1 (n = 28) haplotypes were NYSND 15(53.6%), YYSND 5(17.9%), NFSND 6(21.4%) and YFSND 2(7.1%). The Pfdhfr (n = 15) were ACNCSVI 4(26.7%), and ACICNSVI 1(6.7%) and ACIRNVI 10 (66.7%). The rate of occurrence of Pfcrt 76T, Pfdhfr108N, Pfmdr186Yand184F were 75.9%, 73.3%, 25% and 28.1% respectively. The Pfmdr1 86Y was associated with low parasitaemia (median = 71 parasites/μl, P = 0.024) while Pfcrt 76T was associated with young maternal age (mean 24.1 ± 4.5 years; P = 0.006). The median parasitaemia were similar (P>0.05) in wild and mutant strains of Pfcrt 76, Pfmdr1 184 and Pfdhfr 108. There was no association between gravidity or gestational age of the women and

  4. Temporal trends in prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance alleles over two decades of changing antimalarial policy in coastal Kenya.

    PubMed

    Okombo, John; Kamau, Alice W; Marsh, Kevin; Sutherland, Colin J; Ochola-Oyier, Lynette Isabella

    2014-12-01

    Molecular surveillance of drug resistance markers through time provides crucial information on genomic adaptations, especially in parasite populations exposed to changing drug pressures. To assess temporal trends of established genotypes associated with tolerance to clinically important antimalarials used in Kenya over the last two decades, we sequenced a region of the pfcrt locus encompassing codons 72-76 of the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, full-length pfmdr1 - encoding multi-drug resistance protein, P-glycoprotein homolog (Pgh1) and pfdhfr encoding dihydrofolate reductase, in 485 archived Plasmodium falciparum positive blood samples collected in coastal Kenya at four different time points between 1995 and 2013. Microsatellite loci were also analyzed to compare the genetic backgrounds of parasite populations circulating before and after the withdrawal of chloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine. Our results reveal a significant increase in the prevalence of the pfcrt K76 wild-type allele between 1995 and 2013 from 38% to 81.7% (p < 0.0001). In contrast, we noted a significant decline in wild-type pfdhfr S108 allele (p < 0.0001) culminating in complete absence of this allele in 2013. We also observed a significant increase in the prevalence of the wild-type pfmdr1 N86/Y184/D1246 haplotype from 14.6% in 1995 to 66.0% in 2013 (p < 0.0001) and a corresponding decline of the mutant pfmdr1 86Y/184Y/1246Y allele from 36.4% to 0% in 19 years (p < 0.0001). We also show extensive genetic heterogeneity among the chloroquine-sensitive parasites before and after the withdrawal of the drug in contrast to a selective sweep around the triple mutant pfdhfr allele, leading to a mono-allelic population at this locus. These findings highlight the importance of continual surveillance and characterization of parasite genotypes as indicators of the therapeutic efficacy of antimalarials, particularly in the context of changes in malaria treatment

  5. Plasmodium falciparum susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs in Dakar, Senegal, in 2010: an ex vivo and drug resistance molecular markers study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2006, the Senegalese National Malaria Control Programme recommended artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) as the first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria. Since the introduction of ACT, there have been very few reports on the level of resistance of P. falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. To determine whether parasite susceptibility has been affected by the new anti-malarial policies, an ex vivo susceptibility and drug resistance molecular marker study was conducted on local isolates obtained from the Centre de santé Elizabeth Diouf (Médina, Dakar, Senegal). Methods The prevalence of genetic polymorphisms in genes associated with anti-malarial drug resistance, i.e., pfcrt, pfdhfr, pfdhps and pfmdr1, were evaluated for a panel of 165 isolates collected from patients recruited from 17 August 2010 to 6 January 2011. The malaria isolates were assessed for susceptibility to chloroquine (CQ); quinine (QN); monodesethylamodiaquine (MDAQ), the active metabolite of amodiaquine; mefloquine (MQ); lumefantrine (LMF); dihydroartemisinin (DHA), the active metabolite of artemisinin derivatives; and doxycycline (DOX) using the Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) ELISA. Results The prevalence of the in vitro resistant isolates, or isolates with reduced susceptibility, was 62.1% for MQ, 24.2% for CQ, 10.3% for DOX, 11.8% MDAQ, 9.7% for QN, 2.9% for LMF and 0% for DHA. The Pfcrt 76T mutation was identified in 43.6% of the samples. The pfmdr1 86Y, 184F and 1246Y mutations were found in 16.2%, 50.0% and 1.6% of the samples, respectively. The pfdhfr 108N, 51I and 59R mutations were identified in 81.9%, 77.4% and 79.4% of the samples, respectively. The double mutant (108N and 51I) was detected in 75.5% of the isolates, and the triple mutant (108N, 51I and 59R) was detected in 73.6% of the isolates. The pfdhps 437G, 436A and 613S mutations were found in 54.4%, 38.6% and 1.2% of the samples, respectively. There was only one double mutant, 437G and 540E, and one

  6. In Vitro and Molecular Surveillance for Antimalarial Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites in Western Kenya Reveals Sustained Artemisinin Sensitivity and Increased Chloroquine Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Komino, Franklin; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Goldman, Ira; Onyona, Philip; Wiegand, Ryan E.; Juma, Elizabeth; Shi, Ya Ping; Barnwell, John W.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Kariuki, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Malaria control is hindered by the evolution and spread of resistance to antimalarials, necessitating multiple changes to drug policies over time. A comprehensive antimalarial drug resistance surveillance program is vital for detecting the potential emergence of resistance to antimalarials, including current artemisinin-based combination therapies. An antimalarial drug resistance surveillance study involving 203 Plasmodium falciparum malaria-positive children was conducted in western Kenya between 2010 and 2013. Specimens from enrolled children were analyzed in vitro for sensitivity to chloroquine (CQ), amodiaquine (AQ), mefloquine (MQ), lumefantrine, and artemisinin derivatives (artesunate and dihydroartemisinin) and for drug resistance allele polymorphisms in P. falciparum crt (Pfcrt), Pfmdr-1, and the K13 propeller domain (K13). We observed a significant increase in the proportion of samples with the Pfcrt wild-type (CVMNK) genotype, from 61.2% in 2010 to 93.0% in 2013 (P < 0.0001), and higher proportions of parasites with elevated sensitivity to CQ in vitro. The majority of isolates harbored the wild-type N allele in Pfmdr-1 codon 86 (93.5%), with only 7 (3.50%) samples with the N86Y mutant allele (the mutant nucleotide is underlined). Likewise, most isolates harbored the wild-type Pfmdr-1 D1246 allele (79.8%), with only 12 (6.38%) specimens with the D1246Y mutant allele and 26 (13.8%) with mixed alleles. All the samples had a single copy of the Pfmdr-1 gene (mean of 0.907 ± 0.141 copies). None of the sequenced parasites had mutations in K13. Our results suggest that artemisinin is likely to remain highly efficacious and that CQ sensitivity appears to be on the rise in western Kenya. PMID:26392510

  7. In Vitro and Molecular Surveillance for Antimalarial Drug Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites in Western Kenya Reveals Sustained Artemisinin Sensitivity and Increased Chloroquine Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lucchi, Naomi W; Komino, Franklin; Okoth, Sheila Akinyi; Goldman, Ira; Onyona, Philip; Wiegand, Ryan E; Juma, Elizabeth; Shi, Ya Ping; Barnwell, John W; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Kariuki, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Malaria control is hindered by the evolution and spread of resistance to antimalarials, necessitating multiple changes to drug policies over time. A comprehensive antimalarial drug resistance surveillance program is vital for detecting the potential emergence of resistance to antimalarials, including current artemisinin-based combination therapies. An antimalarial drug resistance surveillance study involving 203 Plasmodium falciparum malaria-positive children was conducted in western Kenya between 2010 and 2013. Specimens from enrolled children were analyzed in vitro for sensitivity to chloroquine (CQ), amodiaquine (AQ), mefloquine (MQ), lumefantrine, and artemisinin derivatives (artesunate and dihydroartemisinin) and for drug resistance allele polymorphisms in P. falciparum crt (Pfcrt), Pfmdr-1, and the K13 propeller domain (K13). We observed a significant increase in the proportion of samples with the Pfcrt wild-type (CVMNK) genotype, from 61.2% in 2010 to 93.0% in 2013 (P < 0.0001), and higher proportions of parasites with elevated sensitivity to CQ in vitro. The majority of isolates harbored the wild-type N allele in Pfmdr-1 codon 86 (93.5%), with only 7 (3.50%) samples with the N86Y mutant allele (the mutant nucleotide is underlined). Likewise, most isolates harbored the wild-type Pfmdr-1 D1246 allele (79.8%), with only 12 (6.38%) specimens with the D1246Y mutant allele and 26 (13.8%) with mixed alleles. All the samples had a single copy of the Pfmdr-1 gene (mean of 0.907 ± 0.141 copies). None of the sequenced parasites had mutations in K13. Our results suggest that artemisinin is likely to remain highly efficacious and that CQ sensitivity appears to be on the rise in western Kenya. PMID:26392510

  8. Trioxaferroquines as new hybrid antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Bellot, François; Coslédan, Frédéric; Vendier, Laure; Brocard, Jacques; Meunier, Bernard; Robert, Anne

    2010-05-27

    The synthesis, characterization, and antimalarial evaluation of a new series of potential antimalarial molecules, named trioxaferroquines, are reported. Trioxaferroquines are hybrid antimalarial drugs containing a 1,2,4-trioxane covalently linked to ferroquine (Fq), a synthetic ferrocenylquinoline derivative currently under clinical development. The aim was to combine, within a single structure, an iron(II) species, a 1,2,4-trioxane, as in artemisinin, and a substituted quinoline, as in chloroquine. PMID:20443628

  9. Hemozoin and antimalarial drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Kim Y; Wright, David W

    2014-01-01

    Recent initiatives to develop more effective and affordable drugs, controlling mosquitoes and development of a preventative vaccine have been launched with the goal of completely eradicating malaria. To this end, Novartis (Surrey, UK) and GlaxoSmithKline (Middlesex, UK) screened their chemical libraries of approximately two million small molecules for antimalarial properties, which resulted in a set of over 20,000 ‘highly druggable’ initial hits. Efforts in academia are centered on specific pathway targets. One such high-throughput screening effort has been focused on hemozoin formation, a unique heme detoxification pathway found in the malaria parasite. This review discusses the current approaches and limitations of high-throughput screening discovery of hemozoin inhibitors. In the future, new methods must be developed to validate the mechanism of action of these hit compounds within the parasite. PMID:23919553

  10. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Avinaba; Sadhukhan, Gobinda Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug resistance. PMID

  11. Antimalarial drug policy in India: Past, present & future

    PubMed Central

    Anvikar, Anupkumar R.; Arora, Usha; Sonal, G.S.; Mishra, Neelima; Shahi, Bharatendu; Savargaonkar, Deepali; Kumar, Navin; Shah, Naman K.; Valecha, Neena

    2014-01-01

    The use of antimalarial drugs in India has evolved since the introduction of quinine in the 17th century. Since the formal establishment of a malaria control programme in 1953, shortly after independence, treatments provided by the public sector ranged from chloroquine, the mainstay drug for many decades, to the newer, recently introduced artemisinin based combination therapy. The complexity of considerations in antimalarial treatment led to the formulation of a National Antimalarial Drug Policy to guide procurement as well as communicate best practices to both public and private healthcare providers. Challenges addressed in the policy include the use of presumptive treatment, the introduction of alternate treatments for drug-resistant malaria, the duration of primaquine therapy to prevent relapses of vivax malaria, the treatment of malaria in pregnancy, and the choice of drugs for chemoprophylaxis. While data on antimalarial drug resistance and both public and private sector treatment practices have been recently reviewed, the policy process of setting national standards has not. In this perspective on antimalarial drug policy, this review highlights its relevant history, analyzes the current policy, and examines future directions. PMID:24718394

  12. Prevalence of In Vitro Resistance to Eleven Standard or New Antimalarial Drugs among Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Pointe-Noire, Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Pradines, Bruno; Hovette, Philippe; Fusai, Thierry; Atanda, Henri Léonard; Baret, Eric; Cheval, Philippe; Mosnier, Joel; Callec, Alain; Cren, Julien; Amalvict, Rémy; Gardair, Jean Pierre; Rogier, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    We determined the level of in vitro resistance of Plasmodium falciparum parasites to standard antimalarial drugs, such as chloroquine, quinine, amodiaquine, halofantrine, mefloquine, cycloguanil, and pyrimethamine, and to new compounds, such as dihydroartemisinin, doxycycline, atovaquone, and lumefantrine. The in vitro resistance to chloroquine reached 75.5%. Twenty-eight percent of the isolates were intermediate or had reduced susceptibility to quinine. Seventy-six percent and 96% of the tested isolates showed in vitro resistance or intermediate susceptibilities to cycloguanil and pyrimethamine, respectively. Only 2% of the parasites demonstrated in vitro resistance to monodesethylamodiaquine. No resistance was shown with halofantrine, lumefantrine, dihydroartemisinin, or atovaquone. Halofantrine, mefloquine, and lumefantrine demonstrated high correlation. No cross-resistance was identified between responses to monodesethyl-amodiaquine, dihydroartemisinin, atovaquone, and cycloguanil. Since the level of chloroquine resistance in vitro exceed an unacceptable upper limit, high rates of in vitro resistance to pyrimethamine and cycloguanil and diminution of the susceptibility to quinine, antimalarial drugs used in combination, such as amodiaquine, artemisinin derivatives, mefloquine, lumefantrine, or atovaquone, seem to be appropriate alternatives for the first line of treatment of acute, uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. PMID:16825356

  13. From hybrid compounds to targeted drug delivery in antimalarial therapy.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rudi; Miranda, Daniela; Magalhães, Joana; Capela, Rita; Perry, Maria J; O'Neill, Paul M; Moreira, Rui; Lopes, Francisca

    2015-08-15

    The discovery of new drugs to treat malaria is a continuous effort for medicinal chemists due to the emergence and spread of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum to nearly all used antimalarials. The rapid adaptation of the malaria parasite remains a major limitation to disease control. Development of hybrid antimalarial agents has been actively pursued as a promising strategy to overcome the emergence of resistant parasite strains. This review presents the journey that started with simple combinations of two active moieties into one chemical entity and progressed into a delivery/targeted system based on major antimalarial classes of drugs. The rationale for providing different mechanisms of action against a single or additional targets involved in the multiple stages of the parasite's life-cycle is highlighted. Finally, a perspective for this polypharmacologic approach is presented. PMID:25913864

  14. High-throughput matrix screening identifies synergistic and antagonistic antimalarial drug combinations.

    PubMed

    Mott, Bryan T; Eastman, Richard T; Guha, Rajarshi; Sherlach, Katy S; Siriwardana, Amila; Shinn, Paul; McKnight, Crystal; Michael, Sam; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Patel, Paresma R; Khine, Pwint; Sun, Hongmao; Kasbekar, Monica; Aghdam, Nima; Fontaine, Shaun D; Liu, Dongbo; Mierzwa, Tim; Mathews-Griner, Lesley A; Ferrer, Marc; Renslo, Adam R; Inglese, James; Yuan, Jing; Roepe, Paul D; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Thomas, Craig J

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in Plasmodium parasites is a constant threat. Novel therapeutics, especially new drug combinations, must be identified at a faster rate. In response to the urgent need for new antimalarial drug combinations we screened a large collection of approved and investigational drugs, tested 13,910 drug pairs, and identified many promising antimalarial drug combinations. The activity of known antimalarial drug regimens was confirmed and a myriad of new classes of positively interacting drug pairings were discovered. Network and clustering analyses reinforced established mechanistic relationships for known drug combinations and identified several novel mechanistic hypotheses. From eleven screens comprising >4,600 combinations per parasite strain (including duplicates) we further investigated interactions between approved antimalarials, calcium homeostasis modulators, and inhibitors of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). These studies highlight important targets and pathways and provide promising leads for clinically actionable antimalarial therapy. PMID:26403635

  15. High-throughput matrix screening identifies synergistic and antagonistic antimalarial drug combinations

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Bryan T.; Eastman, Richard T.; Guha, Rajarshi; Sherlach, Katy S.; Siriwardana, Amila; Shinn, Paul; McKnight, Crystal; Michael, Sam; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Patel, Paresma R.; Khine, Pwint; Sun, Hongmao; Kasbekar, Monica; Aghdam, Nima; Fontaine, Shaun D.; Liu, Dongbo; Mierzwa, Tim; Mathews-Griner, Lesley A.; Ferrer, Marc; Renslo, Adam R.; Inglese, James; Yuan, Jing; Roepe, Paul D.; Su, Xin-zhuan; Thomas, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance in Plasmodium parasites is a constant threat. Novel therapeutics, especially new drug combinations, must be identified at a faster rate. In response to the urgent need for new antimalarial drug combinations we screened a large collection of approved and investigational drugs, tested 13,910 drug pairs, and identified many promising antimalarial drug combinations. The activity of known antimalarial drug regimens was confirmed and a myriad of new classes of positively interacting drug pairings were discovered. Network and clustering analyses reinforced established mechanistic relationships for known drug combinations and identified several novel mechanistic hypotheses. From eleven screens comprising >4,600 combinations per parasite strain (including duplicates) we further investigated interactions between approved antimalarials, calcium homeostasis modulators, and inhibitors of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). These studies highlight important targets and pathways and provide promising leads for clinically actionable antimalarial therapy. PMID:26403635

  16. Induction of multiple pleiotropic drug resistance genes in yeast engineered to produce an increased level of anti-malarial drug precursor, artemisinic acid

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Ouellet, Mario; Paradise, Eric M; Burd, Helcio; Eng, Diana; Paddon, Chris J; Newman, Jack D; Keasling, Jay D

    2008-01-01

    Background Due to the global occurrence of multi-drug-resistant malarial parasites (Plasmodium falciparum), the anti-malarial drug most effective against malaria is artemisinin, a natural product (sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide) extracted from sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua). However, artemisinin is in short supply and unaffordable to most malaria patients. Artemisinin can be semi-synthesized from its precursor artemisinic acid, which can be synthesized from simple sugars using microorganisms genetically engineered with genes from A. annua. In order to develop an industrially competent yeast strain, detailed analyses of microbial physiology and development of gene expression strategies are required. Results Three plant genes coding for amorphadiene synthase, amorphadiene oxidase (AMO or CYP71AV1), and cytochrome P450 reductase, which in concert divert carbon flux from farnesyl diphosphate to artemisinic acid, were expressed from a single plasmid. The artemisinic acid production in the engineered yeast reached 250 μg mL-1 in shake-flask cultures and 1 g L-1 in bio-reactors with the use of Leu2d selection marker and appropriate medium formulation. When plasmid stability was measured, the yeast strain synthesizing amorphadiene alone maintained the plasmid in 84% of the cells, whereas the yeast strain synthesizing artemisinic acid showed poor plasmid stability. Inactivation of AMO by a point-mutation restored the high plasmid stability, indicating that the low plasmid stability is not caused by production of the AMO protein but by artemisinic acid synthesis or accumulation. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and quantitative real time-PCR consistently showed that pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) genes, belonging to the family of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporter, were massively induced in the yeast strain producing artemisinic acid, relative to the yeast strain producing the hydrocarbon amorphadiene alone. Global transcriptional analysis by

  17. Evolution from double to triple-antimalarial drug combinations.

    PubMed

    Shanks, G Dennis; Edstein, Michael D; Jacobus, David

    2015-03-01

    Drug combinations are used to treat multiple-drug resistant malaria parasites and to attempt to further delay the evolution of drug resistance. Most current antimalarial combinations are binary but it is likely that new triple drug combinations will be required in the future. A review of previous triple combinations of antimalarial drugs was done to focus attention on past problems and possible future combinations. The advantages of such triple drug combinations include greater efficacy against multiple-drug resistant strains, synergistic action between the different medications and simplification of the regimen so that it could be administered under direct observation and possibly as single-dose therapy. The disadvantages of poly-pharmacy include increased cost of medication, difficulty preparing robust regulatory packages and problems constructing combined formulations due to drug-drug interactions. Given the arrival of artemisinin tolerance/resistance in Southeast Asia, it is likely that new drugs introduced for malaria treatment will be in triple drug combinations. PMID:25549631

  18. Miniaturized Cultivation of Microbiota for Antimalarial Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Carrie; Calcul, Laurent; Beau, Jeremy; Ma, Wai Sheung; Lebar, Matthew D; von Salm, Jacqueline L; Harter, Charles; Mutka, Tina; Morton, Lindsay C; Maignan, Patrick; Barisic, Betty; van Olphen, Alberto; Kyle, Dennis E; Vrijmoed, Lilian; Pang, Ka-Lai; Pearce, Cedric J; Baker, Bill J

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing search for effective antiplasmodial agents remains essential in the fight against malaria worldwide. Emerging parasitic drug resistance places an urgent need to explore chemotherapies with novel structures and mechanisms of action. Natural products have historically provided effective antimalarial drug scaffolds. In an effort to search nature's chemical potential for antiplasmodial agents, unconventionally sourced organisms coupled with innovative cultivation techniques were utilized. Approximately 60,000 niche microbes from various habitats (slow-growing terrestrial fungi, Antarctic microbes, and mangrove endophytes) were cultivated on a small-scale, extracted, and used in high-throughput screening to determine antimalarial activity. About 1% of crude extracts were considered active and 6% partially active (≥ 67% inhibition at 5 and 50 μg/mL, respectively). Active extracts (685) were cultivated on a large-scale, fractionated, and screened for both antimalarial activity and cytotoxicity. High interest fractions (397) with an IC50 < 1.11 μg/mL were identified and subjected to chromatographic separation for compound characterization and dereplication. Identifying active compounds with nanomolar antimalarial activity coupled with a selectivity index tenfold higher was accomplished with two of the 52 compounds isolated. This microscale, high-throughput screening project for antiplasmodial agents is discussed in the context of current natural product drug discovery efforts. PMID:25545963

  19. Quantifying the pharmacology of antimalarial drug combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Ian M; Hodel, Eva Maria; Kay, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Most current antimalarial drugs are combinations of an artemisinin plus a 'partner' drug from another class, and are known as artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). They are the frontline drugs in treating human malaria infections. They also have a public-health role as an essential component of recent, comprehensive scale-ups of malaria interventions and containment efforts conceived as part of longer term malaria elimination efforts. Recent reports that resistance has arisen to artemisinins has caused considerable concern. We investigate the likely impact of artemisinin resistance by quantifying the contribution artemisinins make to the overall therapeutic capacity of ACTs. We achieve this using a simple, easily understood, algebraic approach and by more sophisticated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses of drug action; the two approaches gave consistent results. Surprisingly, the artemisinin component typically makes a negligible contribution (≪0.0001%) to the therapeutic capacity of the most widely used ACTs and only starts to make a significant contribution to therapeutic outcome once resistance has started to evolve to the partner drugs. The main threat to antimalarial drug effectiveness and control comes from resistance evolving to the partner drugs. We therefore argue that public health policies be re-focussed to maximise the likely long-term effectiveness of the partner drugs. PMID:27604175

  20. Targeting Plasmodium falciparum Hsp90: Towards Reversing Antimalarial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shahinas, Dea; Folefoc, Asongna; Pillai, Dylan R.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria continues to exact a great human toll in tropical settings. Antimalarial resistance is rife and the parasite inexorably develops mechanisms to outwit our best drugs, including the now first-line choice, artesunate. Novel strategies to circumvent resistance are needed. Here we detail drug development focusing on heat shock protein 90 and its central role as a chaperone. A growing body of evidence supports the role for Hsp90 inhibitors as adjunctive drugs able to restore susceptibility to traditionally efficacious compounds like chloroquine. PMID:25436880

  1. A combined within-host and between-hosts modelling framework for the evolution of resistance to antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Legros, Mathieu; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The spread of drug resistance represents a significant challenge to many disease control efforts. The evolution of resistance is a complex process influenced by transmission dynamics between hosts as well as infection dynamics within these hosts. This study aims to investigate how these two processes combine to impact the evolution of resistance in malaria parasites. We introduce a stochastic modelling framework combining an epidemiological model of Plasmodium transmission and an explicit within-human infection model for two competing strains. Immunity, treatment and resistance costs are included in the within-host model. We show that the spread of resistance is generally less likely in areas of intense transmission, and therefore of increased competition between strains, an effect exacerbated when costs of resistance are higher. We also illustrate how treatment influences the spread of resistance, with a trade-off between slowing resistance and curbing disease incidence. We show that treatment coverage has a stronger impact on disease prevalence, whereas treatment efficacy primarily affects resistance spread, suggesting that coverage should constitute the primary focus of control efforts. Finally, we illustrate the importance of feedbacks between modelling scales. Overall, our results underline the importance of concomitantly modelling the evolution of resistance within and between hosts. PMID:27075004

  2. A combined within-host and between-hosts modelling framework for the evolution of resistance to antimalarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The spread of drug resistance represents a significant challenge to many disease control efforts. The evolution of resistance is a complex process influenced by transmission dynamics between hosts as well as infection dynamics within these hosts. This study aims to investigate how these two processes combine to impact the evolution of resistance in malaria parasites. We introduce a stochastic modelling framework combining an epidemiological model of Plasmodium transmission and an explicit within-human infection model for two competing strains. Immunity, treatment and resistance costs are included in the within-host model. We show that the spread of resistance is generally less likely in areas of intense transmission, and therefore of increased competition between strains, an effect exacerbated when costs of resistance are higher. We also illustrate how treatment influences the spread of resistance, with a trade-off between slowing resistance and curbing disease incidence. We show that treatment coverage has a stronger impact on disease prevalence, whereas treatment efficacy primarily affects resistance spread, suggesting that coverage should constitute the primary focus of control efforts. Finally, we illustrate the importance of feedbacks between modelling scales. Overall, our results underline the importance of concomitantly modelling the evolution of resistance within and between hosts. PMID:27075004

  3. Economic prospects for a new antimalarial drug.

    PubMed

    Foster, S

    1994-06-01

    The market for antimalarial drugs consists of the 2.8 billion (2.8 x 10(9) people living in malaria endemic areas and about 20-30 million people, mainly Europeans and North Americans, who travel or live in malarious areas, and the wealthy elite of malarious developing countries. Some of the largest markets include China, India, and Indonesia with a total of 1.9 billion people exposed; Latin America, with 119 million; and sub-Saharan Africa with 400 million. An estimated 200 million clinical cases occur each year, with around 2 million deaths annually, primarily in African children. Antimalarial drugs are distributed through several different networks and are purchased by governments and private individuals. At present the world market is dominated by chloroquine by virtue of its safety, wide availability and low price. Approximately 20% of the total production of chloroquine was distributed through national control programmes and 80% through other channels; chloroquine is probably the second or third most widely consumed drug in the world. The global market for antimalarial drugs is likely to be of the order of US$100-120 million, with chloroquine making up about US$64-80 m, sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine about US$20 m, and other drugs making up US$10-20 m. Chloroquine is rapidly losing its effectiveness against the malaria parasite, and a safe, effective, cheap replacement is urgently needed. Another product which was found to be safe and effective against malaria, with a price per treatment held at or near the present price of chloroquine, could quickly replace chloroquine as the first-line treatment against malaria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8053030

  4. Anticancer Properties of Distinct Antimalarial Drug Classes

    PubMed Central

    Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob; Guy, R. Kiplin; Chibale, Kelly; Haynes, Richard K.; Peitz, Ingmar; Kelter, Gerhard; Phillips, Margaret A.; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L.; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Wells, Timothy N. C.

    2013-01-01

    We have tested five distinct classes of established and experimental antimalarial drugs for their anticancer potential, using a panel of 91 human cancer lines. Three classes of drugs: artemisinins, synthetic peroxides and DHFR (dihydrofolate reductase) inhibitors effected potent inhibition of proliferation with IC50s in the nM- low µM range, whereas a DHODH (dihydroorotate dehydrogenase) and a putative kinase inhibitor displayed no activity. Furthermore, significant synergies were identified with erlotinib, imatinib, cisplatin, dasatinib and vincristine. Cluster analysis of the antimalarials based on their differential inhibition of the various cancer lines clearly segregated the synthetic peroxides OZ277 and OZ439 from the artemisinin cluster that included artesunate, dihydroartemisinin and artemisone, and from the DHFR inhibitors pyrimethamine and P218 (a parasite DHFR inhibitor), emphasizing their shared mode of action. In order to further understand the basis of the selectivity of these compounds against different cancers, microarray-based gene expression data for 85 of the used cell lines were generated. For each compound, distinct sets of genes were identified whose expression significantly correlated with compound sensitivity. Several of the antimalarials tested in this study have well-established and excellent safety profiles with a plasma exposure, when conservatively used in malaria, that is well above the IC50s that we identified in this study. Given their unique mode of action and potential for unique synergies with established anticancer drugs, our results provide a strong basis to further explore the potential application of these compounds in cancer in pre-clinical or and clinical settings. PMID:24391728

  5. Modulation of PF10_0355 (MSPDBL2) Alters Plasmodium falciparum Response to Antimalarial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Van Tyne, Daria; Uboldi, Alessandro D.; Healer, Julie; Cowman, Alan F.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria's ability to rapidly adapt to new drugs has allowed it to remain one of the most devastating infectious diseases of humans. Understanding and tracking the genetic basis of these adaptations are critical to the success of treatment and intervention strategies. The novel antimalarial resistance locus PF10_0355 (Pfmspdbl2) was previously associated with the parasite response to halofantrine, and functional validation confirmed that overexpression of this gene lowered parasite sensitivity to both halofantrine and the structurally related antimalarials mefloquine and lumefantrine, predominantly through copy number variation. Here we further characterize the role of Pfmspdbl2 in mediating the antimalarial drug response of Plasmodium falciparum. Knockout of Pfmspdbl2 increased parasite sensitivity to halofantrine, mefloquine, and lumefantrine but not to unrelated antimalarials, further suggesting that this gene mediates the parasite response to a specific class of antimalarial drugs. A single nucleotide polymorphism encoding a C591S mutation within Pfmspdbl2 had the strongest association with halofantrine sensitivity and showed a high derived allele frequency among Senegalese parasites. Transgenic parasites expressing the ancestral Pfmspdbl2 allele were more sensitive to halofantrine and structurally related antimalarials than were parasites expressing the derived allele, revealing an allele-specific effect on drug sensitivity in the absence of copy number effects. Finally, growth competition experiments showed that under drug pressure, parasites expressing the derived allele of Pfmspdbl2 outcompeted parasites expressing the ancestral allele within a few generations. Together, these experiments demonstrate that modulation of Pfmspdbl2 affects malaria parasite responses to antimalarial drugs. PMID:23587962

  6. Modulation of PF10_0355 (MSPDBL2) alters Plasmodium falciparum response to antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Van Tyne, Daria; Uboldi, Alessandro D; Healer, Julie; Cowman, Alan F; Wirth, Dyann F

    2013-07-01

    Malaria's ability to rapidly adapt to new drugs has allowed it to remain one of the most devastating infectious diseases of humans. Understanding and tracking the genetic basis of these adaptations are critical to the success of treatment and intervention strategies. The novel antimalarial resistance locus PF10_0355 (Pfmspdbl2) was previously associated with the parasite response to halofantrine, and functional validation confirmed that overexpression of this gene lowered parasite sensitivity to both halofantrine and the structurally related antimalarials mefloquine and lumefantrine, predominantly through copy number variation. Here we further characterize the role of Pfmspdbl2 in mediating the antimalarial drug response of Plasmodium falciparum. Knockout of Pfmspdbl2 increased parasite sensitivity to halofantrine, mefloquine, and lumefantrine but not to unrelated antimalarials, further suggesting that this gene mediates the parasite response to a specific class of antimalarial drugs. A single nucleotide polymorphism encoding a C591S mutation within Pfmspdbl2 had the strongest association with halofantrine sensitivity and showed a high derived allele frequency among Senegalese parasites. Transgenic parasites expressing the ancestral Pfmspdbl2 allele were more sensitive to halofantrine and structurally related antimalarials than were parasites expressing the derived allele, revealing an allele-specific effect on drug sensitivity in the absence of copy number effects. Finally, growth competition experiments showed that under drug pressure, parasites expressing the derived allele of Pfmspdbl2 outcompeted parasites expressing the ancestral allele within a few generations. Together, these experiments demonstrate that modulation of Pfmspdbl2 affects malaria parasite responses to antimalarial drugs. PMID:23587962

  7. Searching for new antimalarial therapeutics amongst known drugs.

    PubMed

    Weisman, Jennifer L; Liou, Ally P; Shelat, Anang A; Cohen, Fred E; Guy, R Kiplin; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2006-06-01

    The need to discover and develop new antimalarial therapeutics is overwhelming. The annual mortality attributed to malaria, currently approximately 2.5 million, is increasing due primarily to widespread resistance to currently used drugs. One strategy to identify new treatment alternatives for malaria is to examine libraries of diverse compounds for the possible identification of novel scaffolds. Beginning with libraries of drug or drug-like compounds is an ideal starting point because, in the case of approved drugs, substantial pharmacokinetic and toxicologic data should be available for each compound series. We have employed a high-throughput screen of the MicroSource Spectrum and Killer Collections, a library of known drugs, bioactive compounds, and natural products. Our screening assay identifies compounds that inhibit growth of Plasmodium falciparum cultured in human erythrocytes. We have identified 36 novel inhibitors of P. falciparum, of which 19 are therapeutics, and five of these drugs exhibit effective 50% inhibitory concentrations within similar ranges to therapeutic serum concentrations for their recently indicated uses: propafenone, thioridazine, chlorprothixene, perhexiline, and azlocillin. The findings we report here indicate that this is an effective strategy to identify novel scaffolds and therefore aid in antimalarial drug discovery efforts. PMID:16882315

  8. Searching for New Antimalarial Therapeutics amongst Known Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Weisman, Jennifer L.; Liou, Ally P.; Shelat, Anang A.; Cohen, Fred E.; Guy, R. Kiplin; DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2006-01-01

    The need to discover and develop new antimalarial therapeutics is severe. The annual mortality attributed to malaria, currently approximately 2.5 million, is increasing due primarily to widespread resistance to currently used drugs. One strategy to identify new treatment alternatives for malaria is to examine libraries of diverse compounds for the possible identification of novel scaffolds. Beginning with libraries of drug or drug-like compounds is an ideal starting point because, in the case of approved drugs, substantial pharmacokinetic and toxicologic data should be available for each compound series. We have employed a high throughput screen of the MicroSource Spectrum and Killer collections, a library of known drugs, bioactive compounds, and natural products. Our screening assay identifies compounds that inhibit growth of Plasmodium falciparum cultured in human erythrocytes. We have identified 36 novel inhibitors of P. falciparum, of which 19 are therapeutics, and five of these drugs exhibit effective 50% inhibitory concentrations within similar ranges to therapeutic serum concentrations for their currently indicated uses: propafenone, thioridazine, chlorprothixene, perhexiline and azlocillin. The findings we report here indicate that this is an effective strategy to identify novel scaffolds and therefore aid in antimalarial drug discovery efforts. PMID:16882315

  9. Selection of a trioxaquine as an antimalarial drug candidate

    PubMed Central

    Coslédan, Frédéric; Fraisse, Laurent; Pellet, Alain; Guillou, François; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Kremsner, Peter G.; Moreno, Alicia; Mazier, Dominique; Maffrand, Jean-Pierre; Meunier, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Trioxaquines are antimalarial agents based on hybrid structures with a dual mode of action. One of these molecules, PA1103/SAR116242, is highly active in vitro on several sensitive and resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum at nanomolar concentrations (e.g., IC50 value = 10 nM with FcM29, a chloroquine-resistant strain) and also on multidrug-resistant strains obtained from fresh patient isolates in Gabon. This molecule is very efficient by oral route with a complete cure of mice infected with chloroquine-sensitive or chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodia at 26–32 mg/kg. This compound is also highly effective in humanized mice infected with P. falciparum. Combined with a good drug profile (preliminary absorption, metabolism, and safety parameters), these data were favorable for the selection of this particular trioxaquine for development as drug candidate among 120 other active hybrid molecules. PMID:18987321

  10. Selection of antimalarial drug resistance after intermittent preventive treatment of infants and children (IPTi/c) in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Magatte; Tine, Roger; Faye, Babacar; Ndiaye, Jean L; Diouf, Ibrahima; Lo, Aminata C; Sylla, Khadime; Dieng, Yemou; Hallett, Rachel; Alifrangis, Michael; Gaye, Oumar

    2013-01-01

    Senegal has since 2003 used sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPT) of malaria in risk groups. However, the large-scale IPT strategy may result in increasing drug resistance. Our study investigated the possible impact of SP-IPT given to infants and children on the prevalence of SP-resistant haplotypes in the Plasmodium falciparum genes Pfdhfr and Pfdhps, comparing sites with and without IPTi/c. P. falciparum positives samples (n=352) were collected from children under 5years of age during two cross-sectional surveys in 2010 and 2011 in three health districts (two on IPTi/c and one without IPTi/c intervention) located in the southern part of Senegal. The prevalence of SP-resistance-related haplotypes in Pfdhfr and Pfdhps was determined by nested PCR followed by sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe (SSOP)-ELISA. The prevalence of the Pfdhfr double mutant haplotypes (CNRN and CICN) was stable between years at<10% in the control group (P=0.69), while it rose significantly in the IPTi/c group from 2% in 2010 to 20% in 2011 (P=0.008). The prevalence of the Pfdhfr triple mutant haplotype (CIRN) increased in both groups, but only significantly in the IPTi/c group from 41% to 65% in 2011 (P=0.005). Conversely, the Pfdhps 437G mutation decreased in both groups from 44.6% to 28.6% (P=0.07) and from 66.7% to 47.5% (P=0.02) between 2010 and 2011 in the control and the IPTi/c groups, respectively. Combined with Pfdhfr, there was a weak trend for decreasing prevalence of quadruple mutants (triple Pfdhfr+Pfdhps 437G) in both groups (P=0.15 and P=0.34). During the two cross-sectional surveys, some significant changes were observed in the SP-resistance-related genes. However, since these changes were observed in the two groups, the IPTi/c strategy does only seem to have limited impact on resistance development and other factors as well. However, continuous monitoring will be needed, due to the up-scaling of the IPTi/c strategy in Senegal

  11. Inclusion of gametocyte parameters in anti-malarial drug efficacy studies: filling a neglected gap needed for malaria elimination.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Basco, Leonardo K; Beier, John C; Mahdy, Mohammed A K

    2015-01-01

    Standard anti-malarial drug efficacy and drug resistance assessments neglect the gametocyte parameters in their protocols. With the spread of drug resistance and the absence of clinically proven vaccines, the use of gametocytocidal drugs or drug combinations with transmission-blocking activity is a high priority for malaria control and elimination. However, the limited repertoire of gametocytocidal drugs and induction of gametocytogenesis after treatment with certain anti-malarial drugs necessitate both regular monitoring of gametocytocidal activities of anti-malarial drugs in clinical use and the effectiveness of candidate gametocytocidal agents. Therefore, updating current protocols of anti-malarial drug efficacy is needed to reflect the effects of anti-malarial drugs or drug combinations on gametocyte carriage and gametocyte density along with asexual parasite density. Developing protocols of anti-malarial drug efficacy that include gametocyte parameters related to both microscopic and submicroscopic gametocytaemias is important if drugs or drug combinations are to be strategically used in transmission-blocking interventions in the context of malaria elimination. The present piece of opinion highlights the challenges in gametocyte detection and follow-up and discuss the need for including the gametocyte parameter in anti-malarial efficacy studies. PMID:26481312

  12. Targeting protein kinases in the malaria parasite: update of an antimalarial drug target.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Veronica M; Chavchich, Marina; Waters, Norman C

    2012-01-01

    Millions of deaths each year are attributed to malaria worldwide. Transmitted through the bite of an Anopheles mosquito, infection and subsequent death from the Plasmodium species, most notably P. falciparum, can readily spread through a susceptible population. A malaria vaccine does not exist and resistance to virtually every antimalarial drug predicts that mortality and morbidity associated with this disease will increase. With only a few antimalarial drugs currently in the pipeline, new therapeutic options and novel chemotypes are desperately needed. Hit-to-Lead diversity may successfully provide novel inhibitory scaffolds when essential enzymes are targeted, for example, the plasmodial protein kinases. Throughout the entire life cycle of the malaria parasite, protein kinases are essential for growth and development. Ongoing efforts continue to characterize these kinases, while simultaneously pursuing them as antimalarial drug targets. A collection of structural data, inhibitory profiles and target validation has set the foundation and support for targeting the malarial kinome. Pursuing protein kinases as cancer drug targets has generated a wealth of information on the inhibitory strategies that can be useful for antimalarial drug discovery. In this review, progress on selected protein kinases is described. As the search for novel antimalarials continues, an understanding of the phosphor-regulatory pathways will not only validate protein kinase targets, but also will identify novel chemotypes to thwart malaria drug resistance. PMID:22242850

  13. Ophthalmologic safety profile of antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Rynes, R I; Bernstein, H N

    1993-02-01

    The ophthalmologic safety of antimalarial drugs is well established, but absolute safety cannot be assured. Three types of side effects may develop. Corneal deposits and neuromuscular-associated blurred vision are always reversible and therefore benign. Visual loss has occurred in patients with retinopathy. Retinopathy may be divided into true retinopathy and premaculopathy. It is true retinopathy that may be associated with visual loss, while premaculopathy consists of subtle visual field and funduscopic abnormalities. These premaculopathic changes are generally completely reversible with drug discontinuation and have not been shown to progress. Hydroxychloroquine appears safer than chloroquine when currently accepted equivalent doses are used. Fewer than 20 patients with true retinopathy caused by hydroxychloroquine have been reported; more patients have developed true retinopathy when taking chloroquine. The safety profile is most dependent on low daily dose and regular ophthalmologic monitoring. The optimal strategy of ophthalmologic testing has not yet been determined, but visual acuity, funduscopic examination and visual field examination should be monitored. Self-administered ophthalmologic testing with Amsler grids may contribute additional safety but is not a replacement for physician testing. PMID:8485566

  14. Coartemether (artemether and lumefantrine): an oral antimalarial drug.

    PubMed

    Wernsdorfer, Walther H

    2004-04-01

    Coartemether (Riamet, Coartem, Novartis), a tablet formulation of artemether and lumefantrine, is a well-tolerated, fast-acting and effective blood schizontocidal drug that serves primarily in the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria that is resistant to other antimalarials. Initial clinical-parasitological response relies mainly on the artemether component, while lumefantrine effects radical cure. The absorption of lumefantrine is poor during the fasting state, the normal condition in acutely ill malaria patients, but with return to normal diet it becomes adequate. This highlights the need for an appropriate adjustment of the dose regimen. In the area where Plasmodium falciparum shows the highest degree of multidrug resistance worldwide, the best results (99% cure) were obtained with a six-dose regimen given over 5 days. Extensive cardiological investigations have demonstrated the high cardiac safety of coartemether. PMID:15482185

  15. Cross-Resistance and Collateral Susceptibility to Antifolic Antimalarial Compounds1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carl C.; Genther, Clara S.

    1972-01-01

    Series of strains of Streptococcus faecium ATCC 8043, Lactobacillus casei ATCC 7469, and Pediococcus cerevisiae ATCC 8081 with increasing resistance to the active antifolate antimalarial drugs chlorguanide triazine (CGT), pyrimethamine (PM), and trimethoprim (TMP) were isolated. These mutant strains, stable for at least 3 to 5 years, were examined for cross-resistance and collateral susceptibility to the above compounds and to methotrexate (MTX). Generally, they exhibited cross-resistance to all four compounds, but resistance of a strain to one compound did not predict accurately its resistance to another drug. Unexpectedly, L. casei resistant to CGT exhibited collateral susceptibility to MTX, TMP, and PM varying from 5- to 20-fold. P. cerevisiae developed resistance to CGT readily but maintained its susceptibility to PM and TMP after prolonged exposure to these compounds. Resistance to these antimalarial antifolates was accompanied by only low-grade cross-resistance to MTX, a representative antileukemic antifolate agent. PMID:4208273

  16. Ecotoxicological evaluation of the antimalarial drug chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Jorge L; Jos, Angeles; del Peso, Ana; Salguero, Manuel; López-Artíguez, Miguel; Repetto, Guillermo

    2005-10-15

    There is limited information available about the potential environmental effects of chloroquine (CQ), a widely used antimalarial agent and a promising inexpensive drug in the management of HIV disease. The acute effects of CQ were studied using four ecotoxicological model systems. The most sensitive bioindicator was the immobilization of the cladoceran Daphnia magna, with an EC50 of 12 microM CQ at 72 h and a non-observed adverse effect level of 2.5 microM CQ, followed very closely by the decrease of the uptake of neutral red and the reduction of the lysosomal function in the fish cell line PLHC-1 derived from the top minnow Poeciliopsis lucida, probably due to the selective accumulation of the drug into the lysosomes. There was significant cellular stress as indicated by the increases on metallothionein and glucose-6P dehydrogenase levels after 24 h of exposure and succinate dehydrogenase activity mainly after 48 h. No changes were observed for ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity. The least sensitive model was the inhibition of bioluminescence in the bacterium Vibrio fischeri. An increase of more than five-fold in the toxicity from 24 to 72 h of exposure was observed for the inhibition of the growth in the alga Chlorella vulgaris and the content of total protein and MTS tetrazolium salt metabolization in PLHC-1 cells. At the morphological level, the most evident alterations in PLHC-1 cultures were hydropic degeneration from 25 microM CQ after 24h of exposure and the presence of many cells with pyknotic nuclei, condensed cytoplasm and apoptosis with concentrations higher than 50 microM CQ after 48 h of exposure. In conclusion, CQ should be classified as harmful to aquatic organisms. PMID:16153718

  17. Antimalarial Drug Discovery: From Quinine to the Dream of Eradication

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The search for antimalarial remedies predates modern medicine and the concept of small molecule chemotherapy, yet has played a central role in the development of both. This history is reviewed in the context of the current renaissance in antimalarial drug discovery, which is seeing modern drug discovery approaches applied to the problem for the first time. Great strides have been made in the past decade, but further innovations from the drug discovery community will be required if the ultimate dream of eradication is to be achieved. PMID:24790706

  18. Drug Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  19. Identification and deconvolution of cross-resistance signals from antimalarial compounds using multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Monika; Scheurer, Christian; Sax, Sibylle; Bilsland, Elizabeth; van Schalkwyk, Donelly A; Wicht, Kathryn J; Hofmann, Natalie; Sharma, Anil; Bashyam, Sridevi; Singh, Shivendra; Oliver, Stephen G; Egan, Timothy J; Malhotra, Pawan; Sutherland, Colin J; Beck, Hans-Peter; Wittlin, Sergio; Spangenberg, Thomas; Ding, Xavier C

    2015-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the most deadly agent of malaria, displays a wide variety of resistance mechanisms in the field. The ability of antimalarial compounds in development to overcome these must therefore be carefully evaluated to ensure uncompromised activity against real-life parasites. We report here on the selection and phenotypic as well as genotypic characterization of a panel of sensitive and multidrug-resistant P. falciparum strains that can be used to optimally identify and deconvolute the cross-resistance signals from an extended panel of investigational antimalarials. As a case study, the effectiveness of the selected panel of strains was demonstrated using the 1,2,4-oxadiazole series, a newly identified antimalarial series of compounds with in vitro activity against P. falciparum at nanomolar concentrations. This series of compounds was to be found inactive against several multidrug-resistant strains, and the deconvolution of this signal implicated pfcrt, the genetic determinant of chloroquine resistance. Targeted mode-of-action studies further suggested that this new chemical series might act as falcipain 2 inhibitors, substantiating the suggestion that these compounds have a site of action similar to that of chloroquine but a distinct mode of action. New antimalarials must overcome existing resistance and, ideally, prevent its de novo appearance. The panel of strains reported here, which includes recently collected as well as standard laboratory-adapted field isolates, is able to efficiently detect and precisely characterize cross-resistance and, as such, can contribute to the faster development of new, effective antimalarial drugs. PMID:25487796

  20. Identification and Deconvolution of Cross-Resistance Signals from Antimalarial Compounds Using Multidrug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Monika; Scheurer, Christian; Sax, Sibylle; Bilsland, Elizabeth; van Schalkwyk, Donelly A.; Wicht, Kathryn J.; Hofmann, Natalie; Sharma, Anil; Bashyam, Sridevi; Singh, Shivendra; Oliver, Stephen G.; Egan, Timothy J.; Malhotra, Pawan; Sutherland, Colin J.; Beck, Hans-Peter; Wittlin, Sergio; Spangenberg, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the most deadly agent of malaria, displays a wide variety of resistance mechanisms in the field. The ability of antimalarial compounds in development to overcome these must therefore be carefully evaluated to ensure uncompromised activity against real-life parasites. We report here on the selection and phenotypic as well as genotypic characterization of a panel of sensitive and multidrug-resistant P. falciparum strains that can be used to optimally identify and deconvolute the cross-resistance signals from an extended panel of investigational antimalarials. As a case study, the effectiveness of the selected panel of strains was demonstrated using the 1,2,4-oxadiazole series, a newly identified antimalarial series of compounds with in vitro activity against P. falciparum at nanomolar concentrations. This series of compounds was to be found inactive against several multidrug-resistant strains, and the deconvolution of this signal implicated pfcrt, the genetic determinant of chloroquine resistance. Targeted mode-of-action studies further suggested that this new chemical series might act as falcipain 2 inhibitors, substantiating the suggestion that these compounds have a site of action similar to that of chloroquine but a distinct mode of action. New antimalarials must overcome existing resistance and, ideally, prevent its de novo appearance. The panel of strains reported here, which includes recently collected as well as standard laboratory-adapted field isolates, is able to efficiently detect and precisely characterize cross-resistance and, as such, can contribute to the faster development of new, effective antimalarial drugs. PMID:25487796

  1. Targeting Plasmodium Metabolism to Improve Antimalarial Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Avitia-Domínguez, Claudia; Sierra-Campos, Erick; Betancourt-Conde, Irene; Aguirre-Raudry, Miriam; Vázquez-Raygoza, Alejandra; Luevano-De la Cruz, Artemisa; Favela-Candia, Alejandro; Sarabia-Sanchez, Marie; Ríos-Soto, Lluvia; Méndez-Hernández, Edna; Cisneros-Martínez, Jorge; Palacio-Gastélum, Marcelo Gómez; Valdez-Solana, Mónica; Hernández-Rivera, Jessica; De Lira-Sánchez, Jaime; Campos-Almazán, Mara; Téllez-Valencia, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the main infectious diseases in tropical developing countries and represents high morbidity and mortality rates nowadays. The principal etiological agent P. falciparum is transmitted through the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito. The issue has escalated due to the emergence of resistant strains to most of the antimalarials used for the treatment including Chloroquine, Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, and recently Artemisinin derivatives, which has led to diminished effectiveness and by consequence increased the severity of epidemic outbreaks. Due to the lack of effective compounds to treat these drug-resistant strains, the discovery or development of novel anti-malaria drugs is important. In this context, one strategy has been to find inhibitors of enzymes, which play an important role for parasite survival. Today, promising results have been obtained in this regard, involving the entire P. falciparum metabolism. These inhibitors could serve as leads in the search of a new chemotherapy against malaria. This review focuses on the achievements in recent years with regard to inhibition of enzymes used as targets for drug design against malaria. PMID:26983887

  2. Development of antimalarial drugs and their application in China: a historical review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This historical review covers antimalarials developed in China, which include artemisinin, artemether, artesunate, and dihydroartemisinin, as well as other synthetic drugs such as piperaquine, pyronaridine, benflumetol (lumefantrine), and naphthoquine. The curative effects of these antimalarials in the treatment of falciparum malaria, including chloroquine-resistant strain, are especially discussed. Following the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), different combinations of artemisinin, or its derivative, along with another antimalarial drug were orally used to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections. The recrudescence rates were low, gametocyte carriers lessened, and the curative rate increased remarkably. The combination therapy effectively deferred the emergence of drug resistance in the parasite. The regulation “The guidelines and regimens for the use of antimalarial drugs in China” was issued to guide rational application and standardize malaria treatment in the country. As the recommended first-line drug to treat falciparum malaria in the world, ACT was adopted in the regulation. In response to the global initiative of malaria eradication proposed by the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the Chinese government has set a target to eliminate malaria by 2020. PMID:24650735

  3. Phenotypic Screens in Antimalarial Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Hovlid, Marisa L; Winzeler, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    Phenotypic high-throughput screens are a valuable tool for identifying new chemical compounds with antimalarial activity. Traditionally, these screens have focused solely on the symptomatic asexual blood stage of the parasite life cycle; however, to discover new medicines for malaria treatment and prevention, robust screening technologies against other parasite life-cycle stages are required. This review highlights recent advances and progress toward phenotypic screening methodologies over the past several years, with a focus on exoerythrocytic stage screens. PMID:27247245

  4. Serine Proteases of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum: Potential as Antimalarial Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a major global parasitic disease and a cause of enormous mortality and morbidity. Widespread drug resistance against currently available antimalarials warrants the identification of novel drug targets and development of new drugs. Malarial proteases are a group of molecules that serve as potential drug targets because of their essentiality for parasite life cycle stages and feasibility of designing specific inhibitors against them. Proteases belonging to various mechanistic classes are found in P. falciparum, of which serine proteases are of particular interest due to their involvement in parasite-specific processes of egress and invasion. In P. falciparum, a number of serine proteases belonging to chymotrypsin, subtilisin, and rhomboid clans are found. This review focuses on the potential of P. falciparum serine proteases as antimalarial drug targets. PMID:24799897

  5. Antimalarial mass drug administration: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Phaik Yeong; White, Nicholas J

    2016-07-01

    Falciparum malaria is a major cause of death and illness in tropical countries, particularly in childhood. In endemic countries, a significant proportion of the community is infected with malaria asymptomatically. One promising way to eliminate malaria is to give the entire population malaria treatment. This is called mass drug administration (MDA) and it raises a number of ethical issues, as possible long-term benefits are uncertain. The effectiveness of MDA is critically dependent on level of participation, so the promised benefits to the community can be annulled by non-participation of a small number of individuals. These potential benefits range a wide spectrum, from the permanent elimination of malaria (success) to a transient reduction in the prevalence of infection and the incidence of illness (failure). The drawbacks of MDA are: inconvenience, potential toxicity, loss of confidence in the elimination campaign, possible drug resistance (though highly unlikely), and the potential for a rebound of malaria illness (if immunity is lost and malaria is reintroduced later). Other ethical issues are related to balancing individual and public health interests, and potentially limiting individual autonomy by making MDA compulsory. PMID:27481834

  6. Artemisinin anti-malarial drugs in China

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zongru

    2016-01-01

    Discovered by Youyou Tu, one of the 2015 Nobel Prize winners in Physiology or Medicine, together with many other Chinese scientists, artemisinin, artemether and artesunate, as well as other artemisinins, have brought the global anti-malarial treatment to a new era, saving millions of lives all around the world for the past 40 years. The discoveries of artemisinins were carried out beginning from the 1970s, a special period in China, by hundreds of scientists all together under the “whole nation” system. This article focusing on medicinal chemistry research, briefly introduced the discovery and invention course of the scientists according to the published papers, and highlighted their academic contribution and achievements. PMID:27006895

  7. Artemisinin anti-malarial drugs in China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zongru

    2016-03-01

    Discovered by Youyou Tu, one of the 2015 Nobel Prize winners in Physiology or Medicine, together with many other Chinese scientists, artemisinin, artemether and artesunate, as well as other artemisinins, have brought the global anti-malarial treatment to a new era, saving millions of lives all around the world for the past 40 years. The discoveries of artemisinins were carried out beginning from the 1970s, a special period in China, by hundreds of scientists all together under the "whole nation" system. This article focusing on medicinal chemistry research, briefly introduced the discovery and invention course of the scientists according to the published papers, and highlighted their academic contribution and achievements. PMID:27006895

  8. Investigation of some medicinal plants traditionally used for treatment of malaria in Kenya as potential sources of antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Muthaura, C N; Keriko, J M; Derese, S; Yenesew, A; Rukunga, G M

    2011-03-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem in many tropical and subtropical countries and the burden of this disease is getting worse, mainly due to the increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum against the widely available antimalarial drugs. There is an urgent need for discovery of new antimalarial agents. Herbal medicines for the treatment of various diseases including malaria are an important part of the cultural diversity and traditions of which Kenya's biodiversity has been an integral part. Two major antimalarial drugs widely used today came originally from indigenous medical systems, that is quinine and artemisinin, from Peruvian and Chinese ancestral treatments, respectively. Thus ethnopharmacology is a very important resource in which new therapies may be discovered. The present review is an analysis of ethnopharmacological publications on antimalarial therapies from some Kenyan medicinal plants. PMID:21095187

  9. Impact of prepackaging antimalarial drugs on cost to patients and compliance with treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Yeboah-Antwi, K.; Gyapong, J. O.; Asare, I. K.; Barnish, G.; Evans, D. B.; Adjei, S.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the extent to which district health teams could reduce the burden of malaria, a continuing major cause of mortality and morbidity, in a situation where severe resource constraints existed and integrated care was provided. METHODS: Antimalarial drugs were prepackaged into unit doses in an attempt to improve compliance with full courses of chemotherapy. FINDINGS: Compliance improved by approximately 20% in both adults and children. There were 50% reductions in cost to patients, waiting time at dispensaries and drug wastage at facilities. The intervention, which tended to improve both case and drug management at facilities, was well accepted by health staff and did not involve them in additional working time. CONCLUSION: The prepackaging of antimalarials at the district level offers the prospect of improved compliance and a reduction in the spread of resistance. PMID:11417034

  10. Metabolic Dysregulation Induced in Plasmodium falciparum by Dihydroartemisinin and Other Front-Line Antimalarial Drugs.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, Simon A; Chua, Hwa H; Nijagal, Brunda; Creek, Darren J; Ralph, Stuart A; McConville, Malcolm J

    2016-01-15

    Detailed information on the mode of action of antimalarial drugs can be used to improve existing drugs, identify new drug targets, and understand the basis of drug resistance. In this study we describe the use of a time-resolved, mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolite profiling approach to map the metabolic perturbations induced by a panel of clinical antimalarial drugs and inhibitors on Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood stages. Drug-induced changes in metabolite levels in P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes were monitored over time using gas chromatography-MS and liquid chromatography-MS and changes in specific metabolic fluxes confirmed by nonstationary [(13)C]-glucose labeling. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) was found to disrupt hemoglobin catabolism within 1 hour of exposure, resulting in a transient decrease in hemoglobin-derived peptides. Unexpectedly, it also disrupted pyrimidine biosynthesis, resulting in increased [(13)C]-glucose flux toward malate production, potentially explaining the susceptibility of P. falciparum to DHA during early blood-stage development. Unique metabolic signatures were also found for atovaquone, chloroquine, proguanil, cycloguanil and methylene blue. We also show that this approach can be used to identify the mode of action of novel antimalarials, such as the compound Torin 2, which inhibits hemoglobin catabolism. PMID:26150544

  11. Antimicrobial peptides: a new class of antimalarial drugs?

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Nuno; Aguiar, Luísa; Gomes, Paula

    2014-01-01

    A range of antimicrobial peptides (AMP) exhibit activity on malaria parasites, Plasmodium spp., in their blood or mosquito stages, or both. These peptides include a diverse array of both natural and synthetic molecules varying greatly in size, charge, hydrophobicity, and secondary structure features. Along with an overview of relevant literature reports regarding AMP that display antiplasmodial activity, this review makes a few considerations about those molecules as a potential new class of antimalarial drugs. PMID:25566072

  12. Policy options for deploying anti-malarial drugs in endemic countries: a population genetics approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anti-malarial drugs are constantly exposed to the threat of evolving drug resistance so good stewardship of existing therapy is an essential component of public health policy. However, the widespread availability of numerous different drugs through informal providers could undermine official drug deployment policies. A policy of multiple first-line therapy (MFT) is compared with the conventional policy of sequential drug deployment, i.e., where one drug is used until resistance evolves and then replaced by the next drug in the sequence. Methods Population genetic models of drug resistance are used to make the comparison; this methodology explicitly tracks the genetics of drug resistance (including, importantly, recombination in the sexual stage, intrahost dynamics, and direction of linkage disequilibrium). Results A policy of MFT outlasts sequential application providing drug usages are low to moderate, and appears not to drive widespread multi-drug resistance. Inadequate dosing is an even more potent driver of drug resistance than the MFT/sequential policy decision. Conclusions The provision of MFT as a deliberate policy can be encouraged provided overall treatment rates are low or moderate (less than around half of malaria infections are treated) and the ad hoc provision of MFT through the private sector may be tolerated. This must be fully supported by education to ensure people take adequate doses of each of the drugs. PMID:23244624

  13. Factors determining anti-malarial drug use in a peri-urban population from malaria holoendemic region of western kenya

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Interventions to reverse trends in malaria-related morbidity and mortality in Kenya focus on preventive strategies and drug efficacy. However, the pattern of use of anti-malarials in malaria-endemic populations, such as in western Kenya, is still poorly understood. It is critical to understand the patterns of anti-malarial drug use to ascertain that the currently applied new combination therapy to malaria treatment, will achieve sustained cure rates and protection against parasite resistance. Therefore, this cross-sectional study was designed to determine the patterns of use of anti-malarial drugs in households (n = 397) in peri-urban location of Manyatta-B sub-location in Kisumu in western Kenya. Methods Household factors, associated with the pattern of anti-malarials use, were evaluated. Using clusters, questionnaire was administered to a particular household member who had the most recent malaria episode (within <2 weeks) and used an anti-malarial for cure. Mothers/caretakers provided information for children aged <13 years. Results Stratification of the type of anti-malarial drugs taken revealed that 37.0% used sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP), 32.0% artemisinin-based combined therapy (ACT), 11.1% anti-pyretics, 7.3% chloroquine (CQ), 7.1% quinine, 2.5% amodiaquine (AQ), while 3.0% used others which were perceived as anti-malarials (cough syrups and antibiotics). In a regression model, it was demonstrated that age (P = 0.050), household size (P = 0.047), household head (P = 0.049), household source of income (P = 0.015), monthly income (P = 0.020), duration of use (P = 0.029), dosage of drugs taken (P = 0.036), and source of drugs (P = 0.005) significantly influenced anti-malarial drug use. Overall, 38.8% of respondents used drugs as recommended by the Ministry of Health. Conclusion This study demonstrates that consumers require access to correct and comprehensible information associated with use of drugs, including self-prescription. There is

  14. CRIMALDDI: a prioritized research agenda to expedite the discovery of new anti-malarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The CRIMALDDI Consortium has been a three-year project funded by the EU Framework Seven Programme. It aimed to develop a prioritized set of recommendations to speed up anti-malarial drug discovery research and contribute to the setting of the global research agenda. It has attempted to align thinking on the high priority issues and then to develop action plans and strategies to address these issues. Through a series of facilitated and interactive workshops, it has concluded that these priorities can be grouped under five key themes: attacking artemisinin resistance; creating and sharing community resources; delivering enabling technologies; exploiting high throughput screening hits quickly; and, identifying novel targets. Recommendations have been prioritized into one of four levels: quick wins; removing key roadblocks to future progress; speeding-up drug discovery; and, nice to have (but not essential). Use of this prioritization allows efforts and resources to be focused on the lines of work that will contribute most to expediting anti-malarial drug discovery. Estimates of the time and finances required to implement the recommendations have also been made, along with indications of when recommendations within each theme will make an impact. All of this has been collected into an indicative roadmap that, it is hoped, will guide decisions about the direction and focus of European anti-malarial drug discovery research and contribute to the setting of the global research agenda. PMID:24191947

  15. Current issues for anti-malarial drugs to control P. falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, D; Abdulla, S; Roper, C

    2006-03-01

    Successful malaria control depends heavily on efficacious anti-malarial drugs for the treatment of malaria. Artesunate-containing Combination Treatments (ACT) are increasingly recommended as first line malaria treatment in endemic countries, but implementation of this recommendation is limited by the small number of available and affordable co-formulated anti-malarial drugs. In recent years Intermittent Preventive Treatment has been recommended for malaria control in pregnancy and has been shown to be of potential public health importance in the prevention of malaria and anaemia in children. The use of drugs for malaria treatment or prevention is associated with the development of resistance and recent advances in molecular biology facilitate the evaluation of the impact on drug resistance of new drug-based strategies. This review concentrates on the challenges surrounding the use of ACT, the current understanding of IPT in infants and the use of molecular approaches to enhance our understanding of the effects of interventions on the spread of drug resistance. PMID:16515515

  16. Parasites resistant to the antimalarial atovaquone fail to transmit by mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Christopher D; Siregar, Josephine E; Mollard, Vanessa; Vega-Rodríguez, Joel; Syafruddin, Din; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Matsuzaki, Motomichi; Toyama, Tomoko; Sturm, Angelika; Cozijnsen, Anton; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo; Kita, Kiyoshi; Marzuki, Sangkot; McFadden, Geoffrey I

    2016-04-15

    Drug resistance compromises control of malaria. Here, we show that resistance to a commonly used antimalarial medication, atovaquone, is apparently unable to spread. Atovaquone pressure selects parasites with mutations in cytochrome b, a respiratory protein with low but essential activity in the mammalian blood phase of the parasite life cycle. Resistance mutations rescue parasites from the drug but later prove lethal in the mosquito phase, where parasites require full respiration. Unable to respire efficiently, resistant parasites fail to complete mosquito development, arresting their life cycle. Because cytochrome b is encoded by the maternally inherited parasite mitochondrion, even outcrossing with wild-type strains cannot facilitate spread of resistance. Lack of transmission suggests that resistance will be unable to spread in the field, greatly enhancing the utility of atovaquone in malaria control. PMID:27081071

  17. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Luis; Martínez-García, Marta; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, José Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa; Gamarro, Francisco; Pérez-Victoria, José M

    2015-10-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca(2+), and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. PMID:26195527

  18. The Oral Antimalarial Drug Tafenoquine Shows Activity against Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Luis; Martínez-García, Marta; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Manzano, José Ignacio; Yardley, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, a neglected tropical disease that requires new, safer, and more effective treatments. Repurposing oral drugs could reduce both the time and cost involved in sleeping sickness drug discovery. Tafenoquine (TFQ) is an oral antimalarial drug belonging to the 8-aminoquinoline family which is currently in clinical phase III. We show here that TFQ efficiently kills different T. brucei spp. in the submicromolar concentration range. Our results suggest that TFQ accumulates into acidic compartments and induces a necrotic process involving cell membrane disintegration and loss of cytoplasmic content, leading to parasite death. Cell lysis is preceded by a wide and multitarget drug action, affecting the lysosome, mitochondria, and acidocalcisomes and inducing a depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation of intracellular Ca2+, and production of reactive oxygen species. This is the first report of an 8-aminoquinoline demonstrating significant in vitro activity against T. brucei. PMID:26195527

  19. Treatment of Murine Cerebral Malaria by Artemisone in Combination with Conventional Antimalarial Drugs: Antiplasmodial Effects and Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Guiguemde, W. Armand; Hunt, Nicholas H.; Guo, Jintao; Marciano, Annael; Haynes, Richard K.; Clark, Julie; Guy, R. Kiplin

    2014-01-01

    The decreasing effectiveness of antimalarial therapy due to drug resistance necessitates constant efforts to develop new drugs. Artemisinin derivatives are the most recent drugs that have been introduced and are considered the first line of treatment, but there are already indications of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinins. Consequently, drug combinations are recommended for prevention of the induction of resistance. The research here demonstrates the effects of novel combinations of the new artemisinin derivative, artemisone, a recently described 10-alkylamino artemisinin derivative with improved antimalarial activity and reduced neurotoxicity. We here investigate its ability to kill P. falciparum in a high-throughput in vitro assay and to protect mice against lethal cerebral malaria caused by Plasmodium berghei ANKA when used alone or in combination with established antimalarial drugs. Artemisone effects against P. falciparum in vitro were synergistic with halofantrine and mefloquine, and additive with 25 other drugs, including chloroquine and doxycycline. The concentrations of artemisone combinations that were toxic against THP-1 cells in vitro were much higher than their effective antimalarial concentration. Artemisone, mefloquine, chloroquine, or piperaquine given individually mostly protected mice against cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA but did not prevent parasite recrudescence. Combinations of artemisone with any of the other three drugs did completely cure most mice of malaria. The combination of artemisone and chloroquine decreased the ratio of proinflammatory (gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor) to anti-inflammatory (interleukin 10 [IL-10], IL-4) cytokines in the plasma of P. berghei-infected mice. Thus, artemisone in combinations with other antimalarial drugs might have a dual action, both killing parasites and limiting the potentially deleterious host inflammatory response. PMID:24913162

  20. Sensitivity of Plasmodium falciparum to Antimalarial Drugs in Hainan Island, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Qing; Wang, Guang-Ze; Li, Yu-Chun; Meng, Feng; Lin, Shi-Gan; Zhu, Zhen-Hu; Sun, Ding-Wei; He, Chang-Hua; Hu, Xi-Min; Du, Jian-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Pyronaridine and artesunate have been shown to be effective in falciparum malaria treatment. However, pyronaridine is rarely used in Hainan Island clinically, and artesunate is not widely used as a therapeutic agent. Instead, conventional antimalarial drugs, chloroquine and piperaquine, are used, explaining the emergence of chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. In this article, we investigated the sensitivity of P. falciparum to antimalarial drugs used in Hainan Island for rational drug therapy. We performed in vivo (28 days) and in vitro tests to determine the sensitivity of P. falciparum to antimalarial drugs. Total 46 patients with falciparum malaria were treated with dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine phosphate (DUO-COTECXIN) and followed up for 28 day. The cure rate was 97.8%. The mean fever clearance time (22.5±10.6 hr) and the mean parasite clearance time (27.3±12.2 hr) showed no statistical significance with different genders, ages, temperatures, or parasite density (P>0.05). The resistance rates of chloroquine, piperaquine, pyronarididine, and artesunate detected in vitro were 71.9%, 40.6%, 12.5%, and 0%, respectively (P<0.0001). The resistance intensities decreased as follows: chloroquine>piperaquine>pyronarididine>artesunate. The inhibitory dose 50 (IC50) was 3.77×10-6 mol/L, 2.09×10-6 mol/L, 0.09×10-6 mol/L, and 0.05×10-6 mol/L, and the mean concentrations for complete inhibition (CIMC) of schizont formation were 5.60×10-6 mol/L, 9.26×10-6 mol/L, 0.55×10-6 mol/L, and 0.07×10-6 mol/L, respectively. Dihydroartemisinin showed a strong therapeutic effect against falciparum malaria with a low toxicity. PMID:25748707

  1. Atorvastatin Is a Promising Partner for Antimalarial Drugs in Treatment of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria▿

    PubMed Central

    Parquet, Véronique; Briolant, Sébastien; Torrentino-Madamet, Marylin; Henry, Maud; Almeras, Lionel; Amalvict, Rémy; Baret, Eric; Fusaï, Thierry; Rogier, Christophe; Pradines, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Atorvastatin (AVA) is a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor. AVA exposure resulted in the reduced in vitro growth of 22 Plasmodium falciparum strains, with the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) ranging from 2.5 μM to 10.8 μM. A significant positive correlation was found between the strains’ responses to AVA and mefloquine (r = 0.553; P = 0.008). We found no correlation between the responses to AVA and to chloroquine, quinine, monodesethylamodiaquine, lumefantrine, dihydroartemisinin, atovaquone, or doxycycline. These data could suggest that the mechanism of AVA uptake and/or the mode of action of AVA is different from those for other antimalarial drugs. The IC50s for AVA were unrelated to the occurrence of mutations in the transport protein genes involved in quinoline antimalarial drug resistance, such as the P. falciparum crt, mdr1, mrp, and nhe-1 genes. Therefore, AVA can be ruled out as a substrate for the transport proteins (CRT, Pgh1, and MRP) and is not subject to the pH modification induced by the P. falciparum NHE-1 protein. The absence of in vitro cross-resistance between AVA and chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine, monodesethylamodiaquine, lumefantrine, dihydroartemisinin, atovaquone, and doxycycline argues that these antimalarial drugs could potentially be paired with AVA as a treatment for malaria. In conclusion, the present observations suggest that AVA is a good candidate for further studies on the use of statins in association with drugs known to have activities against the malaria parasite. PMID:19307369

  2. Drug Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drug resistance refers to both intrinsic and acquired abilities of cells or organisms to become insensitive or refractory to chemotherapeutic intervention. The advent of antibiotics is considered one of the most important medicinal developments in human history, which has led to significantly reduce...

  3. Assessment of urinary excretion of antimalarial drugs in large-scale chemotherapeutic eradication projects.

    PubMed

    BRUCE-CHWATT, L J

    1959-01-01

    Assessment of the urinary excretion of an antimalarial drug is a useful means of checking the amount of drug administered and the regularity of intake. The author describes the various methods available for the qualitative and quantitative estimation of antimalarial drugs in urine and discusses their relative merits, with special reference to their suitability for use in the field. He points out the difficulties involved in estimating the urinary excretion of antimalarials in large-scale chemotherapeutic eradication projects and stress the importance of simplifying testing techniques as far as possible. PMID:13805135

  4. Heme as trigger and target for trioxane-containing antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Bernard; Robert, Anne

    2010-11-16

    Heme is not only just the binding site responsible for oxygen transport by hemoglobin, but it is also the prosthetic group of many different heme-containing enzymes, such as cytochromes P450, peroxidases, catalase, and several proteins involved in electron transfer. Heme plays a key role in the mechanism of action of many different antimalarial drugs. In degrading the host's hemoglobin, the malaria parasite Plasmodium and several other heme-eating parasites are faced with this redox-active metal complex. Heme is able to induce the toxic reductive cascade of molecular oxygen, which leads to the production of destructive hydroxyl radicals. Plasmodium detoxifies heme by converting it into a redox-inactive iron(III) polymer called hemozoin. Artemisinin, a natural drug containing a biologically important 1,2,4-trioxane structure, is now the first-line treatment for multidrug-resistant malaria. The peroxide moiety in artemisinin reacts in the presence of the flat, achiral iron(II)-heme; the mechanism does not reflect the classical "key and lock" paradigm for drugs. Instead, the reductive activation of the peroxide function generates a short-lived alkoxy radical, which quickly rearranges to a C-centered primary radical. This radical alkylates heme via an intramolecular process to produce covalent heme-drug adducts. The accumulation of non-polymerizable redox-active heme derivatives, a consequence of heme alkylation, is thought to be toxic for the parasite. The alkylation of heme by artemisinin has been demonstrated in malaria-infected mice, indicating that heme is acting as the trigger and target of artemisinin. The alkylation of heme by artemisinin is not limited to this natural compound: the mechanism is invoked for a large number of antimalarial semisynthetic derivatives. Synthetic trioxanes or trioxolanes also alkylate heme, and their alkylation ability correlates well with their antimalarial efficacy. In addition, several reports have demonstrated the cytotoxicity of

  5. Chemogenomic profiling of Plasmodium falciparum as a tool to aid antimalarial drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Anupam; Siwo, Geoffrey H.; Singh, Naresh; Martens, Brian; Balu, Bharath; Button-Simons, Katrina A.; Tan, Asako; Zhang, Min; Udenze, Kenneth O.; Jiang, Rays H.Y.; Ferdig, Michael T.; Adams, John H.; Kyle, Dennis E.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance highlights the urgency to discover new targets and chemical scaffolds. Unfortunately, lack of experimentally validated functional information about most P. falciparum genes remains a strategic hurdle. Chemogenomic profiling is an established tool for classification of drugs with similar mechanisms of action by comparing drug fitness profiles in a collection of mutants. Inferences of drug mechanisms of action and targets can be obtained by associations between shifts in drug fitness and specific genetic changes in the mutants. In this screen, P. falciparum, piggyBac single insertion mutants were profiled for altered responses to antimalarial drugs and metabolic inhibitors to create chemogenomic profiles. Drugs targeting the same pathway shared similar response profiles and multiple pairwise correlations of the chemogenomic profiles revealed novel insights into drugs’ mechanisms of action. A mutant of the artemisinin resistance candidate gene - “K13-propeller” gene (PF3D7_1343700) exhibited increased susceptibility to artemisinin drugs and identified a cluster of 7 mutants based on similar enhanced responses to the drugs tested. Our approach of chemogenomic profiling reveals artemisinin functional activity, linked by the unexpected drug-gene relationships of these mutants, to signal transduction and cell cycle regulation pathways. PMID:26541648

  6. Altering Antimalarial Drug Regimens May Dramatically Enhance and Restore Drug Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kay, Katherine; Hodel, Eva Maria; Hastings, Ian M

    2015-10-01

    There is considerable concern that malaria parasites are starting to evolve resistance to the current generation of antimalarial drugs, the artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). We use pharmacological modeling to investigate changes in ACT effectiveness likely to occur if current regimens are extended from 3 to 5 days or, alternatively, given twice daily over 3 days. We show that the pharmacology of artemisinins allows both regimen changes to substantially increase the artemisinin killing rate. Malaria patients rarely contain more than 10(12) parasites, while the standard dosing regimens allow approximately 1 in 10(10) parasites to survive artemisinin treatment. Parasite survival falls dramatically, to around 1 in 10(17) parasites if the dose is extended or split; theoretically, this increase in drug killing appears to be more than sufficient to restore failing ACT efficacy. One of the most widely used dosing regimens, artemether-lumefantrine, already successfully employs a twice-daily dosing regimen, and we argue that twice-daily dosing should be incorporated into all ACT regimen design considerations as a simple and effective way of ensuring the continued long-term effectiveness of ACTs. PMID:26239993

  7. Altering Antimalarial Drug Regimens May Dramatically Enhance and Restore Drug Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Hodel, Eva Maria; Hastings, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable concern that malaria parasites are starting to evolve resistance to the current generation of antimalarial drugs, the artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). We use pharmacological modeling to investigate changes in ACT effectiveness likely to occur if current regimens are extended from 3 to 5 days or, alternatively, given twice daily over 3 days. We show that the pharmacology of artemisinins allows both regimen changes to substantially increase the artemisinin killing rate. Malaria patients rarely contain more than 1012 parasites, while the standard dosing regimens allow approximately 1 in 1010 parasites to survive artemisinin treatment. Parasite survival falls dramatically, to around 1 in 1017 parasites if the dose is extended or split; theoretically, this increase in drug killing appears to be more than sufficient to restore failing ACT efficacy. One of the most widely used dosing regimens, artemether-lumefantrine, already successfully employs a twice-daily dosing regimen, and we argue that twice-daily dosing should be incorporated into all ACT regimen design considerations as a simple and effective way of ensuring the continued long-term effectiveness of ACTs. PMID:26239993

  8. Antimalarial drug targets in Plasmodium falciparum predicted by stage-specific metabolic network analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite enormous efforts to combat malaria the disease still afflicts up to half a billion people each year of which more than one million die. Currently no approved vaccine is available and resistances to antimalarials are widely spread. Hence, new antimalarial drugs are urgently needed. Results Here, we present a computational analysis of the metabolism of Plasmodium falciparum, the deadliest malaria pathogen. We assembled a compartmentalized metabolic model and predicted life cycle stage specific metabolism with the help of a flux balance approach that integrates gene expression data. Predicted metabolite exchanges between parasite and host were found to be in good accordance with experimental findings when the parasite's metabolic network was embedded into that of its host (erythrocyte). Knock-out simulations identified 307 indispensable metabolic reactions within the parasite. 35 out of 57 experimentally demonstrated essential enzymes were recovered and another 16 enzymes, if additionally the assumption was made that nutrient uptake from the host cell is limited and all reactions catalyzed by the inhibited enzyme are blocked. This predicted set of putative drug targets, shown to be enriched with true targets by a factor of at least 2.75, was further analyzed with respect to homology to human enzymes, functional similarity to therapeutic targets in other organisms and their predicted potency for prophylaxis and disease treatment. Conclusions The results suggest that the set of essential enzymes predicted by our flux balance approach represents a promising starting point for further drug development. PMID:20807400

  9. Malaria drug resistance: new observations and developments

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Juliana M.; Chong, Jason L.; Wellems, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Drug-resistant micro-organisms became widespread in the 20th Century, often with devastating consequences, in response to widespread use of natural and synthetic drugs against infectious diseases. Antimalarial resistance provides one of the earliest examples, following the introduction of new medicines that filled important needs for prophylaxis and treatment around the globe. In the present chapter, we offer a brief synopsis of major antimalarial developments from two natural remedies, the qinghaosu and cinchona bark infusions, and of synthetic drugs inspired by the active components of these remedies. We review some contributions that early efficacy studies of antimalarial treatment brought to clinical pharmacology, including convincing documentation of atebrine-resistant malaria in the 1940s, prior to the launching of what soon became first-choice antimalarials, chloroquine and amodiaquine. Finally, we discuss some new observations on the molecular genetics of drug resistance, including delayed parasite clearances that have been increasingly observed in response to artemisinin derivatives in regions of South-East Asia. PMID:22023447

  10. Targeting the Plasmodium vivax equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (PvENT1) for antimalarial drug development.

    PubMed

    Deniskin, Roman; Frame, I J; Sosa, Yvett; Akabas, Myles H

    2016-04-01

    Infection with Plasmodium falciparum and vivax cause most cases of malaria. Emerging resistance to current antimalarial medications makes new drug development imperative. Ideally a new antimalarial drug should treat both falciparum and vivax malaria. Because malaria parasites are purine auxotrophic, they rely on purines imported from the host erythrocyte via Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters (ENTs). Thus, the purine import transporters represent a potential target for antimalarial drug development. For falciparum parasites the primary purine transporter is the P. falciparum Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter Type 1 (PfENT1). Recently we identified potent PfENT1 inhibitors with nanomolar IC50 values using a robust, yeast-based high throughput screening assay. In the current work we characterized the Plasmodium vivax ENT1 (PvENT1) homologue and its sensitivity to the PfENT1 inhibitors. We expressed a yeast codon-optimized PvENT1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PvENT1-expressing yeast imported both purines ([(3)H]adenosine) and pyrimidines ([(3)H]uridine), whereas wild type (fui1Δ) yeast did not. Based on radiolabel substrate uptake inhibition experiments, inosine had the lowest IC50 (3.8 μM), compared to guanosine (14.9 μM) and adenosine (142 μM). For pyrimidines, thymidine had an IC50 of 183 μM (vs. cytidine and uridine; mM range). IC50 values were higher for nucleobases compared to the corresponding nucleosides; hypoxanthine had a 25-fold higher IC50 than inosine. The archetypal human ENT1 inhibitor 4-nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR) had no effect on PvENT1, whereas dipyridamole inhibited PvENT1, albeit with a 40 μM IC50, a 1000-fold less sensitive than human ENT1 (hENT1). The PfENT1 inhibitors blocked transport activity of PvENT1 and the five known naturally occurring non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with similar IC50 values. Thus, the PfENT1 inhibitors also target PvENT1. This implies that development of novel antimalarial

  11. Targeting the Plasmodium vivax equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (PvENT1) for antimalarial drug development

    PubMed Central

    Deniskin, Roman; Frame, I.J.; Sosa, Yvett; Akabas, Myles H.

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Plasmodium falciparum and vivax cause most cases of malaria. Emerging resistance to current antimalarial medications makes new drug development imperative. Ideally a new antimalarial drug should treat both falciparum and vivax malaria. Because malaria parasites are purine auxotrophic, they rely on purines imported from the host erythrocyte via Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporters (ENTs). Thus, the purine import transporters represent a potential target for antimalarial drug development. For falciparum parasites the primary purine transporter is the P. falciparum Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter Type 1 (PfENT1). Recently we identified potent PfENT1 inhibitors with nanomolar IC50 values using a robust, yeast-based high throughput screening assay. In the current work we characterized the Plasmodium vivax ENT1 (PvENT1) homologue and its sensitivity to the PfENT1 inhibitors. We expressed a yeast codon-optimized PvENT1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PvENT1-expressing yeast imported both purines ([3H]adenosine) and pyrimidines ([3H]uridine), whereas wild type (fui1Δ) yeast did not. Based on radiolabel substrate uptake inhibition experiments, inosine had the lowest IC50 (3.8 μM), compared to guanosine (14.9 μM) and adenosine (142 μM). For pyrimidines, thymidine had an IC50 of 183 μM (vs. cytidine and uridine; mM range). IC50 values were higher for nucleobases compared to the corresponding nucleosides; hypoxanthine had a 25-fold higher IC50 than inosine. The archetypal human ENT1 inhibitor 4-nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR) had no effect on PvENT1, whereas dipyridamole inhibited PvENT1, albeit with a 40 μM IC50, a 1000-fold less sensitive than human ENT1 (hENT1). The PfENT1 inhibitors blocked transport activity of PvENT1 and the five known naturally occurring non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with similar IC50 values. Thus, the PfENT1 inhibitors also target PvENT1. This implies that development of novel antimalarial drugs

  12. Validating a Firefly Luciferase-Based High-Throughput Screening Assay for Antimalarial Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Che, Pulin; Cui, Long; Kutsch, Olaf; Cui, Liwang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and recent detection of potential artemisinin-resistant strains in Southeast Asia highlight the importance of developing novel antimalarial therapies. Using a previously generated stable transgenic P. falciparum line with high-level firefly luciferase expression, we report the adaptation, miniaturization, optimization, and validation of a high-throughput screening assay in 384-well plates. Assay conditions, including the percentage of parasitemia and hematocrit, were optimized. Parameters of assay robustness, including Z′-value, coefficient variation (CV), and signal-to-background (S/B) ratio, were determined. The LOPAC1280 small-compound library was used to validate this assay. Our results demonstrated that this assay is robust and reliable, with an average Z′-value of >0.7 and CV of <10%. Moreover, this assay showed a very low background, with the S/B ratio up to 71. Further, identified hits were selected and confirmed using a SYBR Green I-based confirmatory assay. It is evident that this assay is suitable for large-scale screening of chemical libraries for antimalarial drug discovery. PMID:22050430

  13. Use and quality of antimalarial drugs in the private sector in Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Cong, L D; Yen, P T; Nhu, T V; Binh, L N

    1998-01-01

    This study examines the use and quality of antimalarial drugs in the growing private sector of Viet Nam. The practices of drug vendors (called alternative treatment providers (ATPs)) as well as their stocks and the quality of drugs sold by them, and the local production and distribution of antimalarials were investigated. Antimalarials were sold by the vast majority of ATPs, almost all the common antimalarials being available for sale. The practices and indications for sale, however, varied. Underdosing for malaria was frequent in all three provinces studied, and lack of knowledge of the appropriate regimen for cure was common among the drug-sellers. Samples of antimalarials were collected from ATP outlets in the three provinces, and the drugs were assessed for their contents and expiry date by the Institute of Drug Quality Control in Hanoi. Of the 218 samples of drugs examined by the Institute, over 96% met the quality requirements. However, a 10% sample of these drugs were independently assessed by WHO and revealed a different picture: 70% of them failed to meet the standard specifications required. There is therefore an urgent need to improve the capability and monitoring procedures of bodies involved in assessing and regulating drugs in Viet Nam. PMID:9763723

  14. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antibiotic-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria ...

  15. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as an antimalarial drug target using an integrated chemical biology approach.

    PubMed

    Wright, Megan H; Clough, Barbara; Rackham, Mark D; Rangachari, Kaveri; Brannigan, James A; Grainger, Munira; Moss, David K; Bottrill, Andrew R; Heal, William P; Broncel, Malgorzata; Serwa, Remigiusz A; Brady, Declan; Mann, David J; Leatherbarrow, Robin J; Tewari, Rita; Wilkinson, Anthony J; Holder, Anthony A; Tate, Edward W

    2014-02-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium, which leads to approximately one million deaths per annum worldwide. Chemical validation of new antimalarial targets is urgently required in view of rising resistance to current drugs. One such putative target is the enzyme N-myristoyltransferase, which catalyses the attachment of the fatty acid myristate to protein substrates (N-myristoylation). Here, we report an integrated chemical biology approach to explore protein myristoylation in the major human parasite P. falciparum, combining chemical proteomic tools for identification of the myristoylated and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteome with selective small-molecule N-myristoyltransferase inhibitors. We demonstrate that N-myristoyltransferase is an essential and chemically tractable target in malaria parasites both in vitro and in vivo, and show that selective inhibition of N-myristoylation leads to catastrophic and irreversible failure to assemble the inner membrane complex, a critical subcellular organelle in the parasite life cycle. Our studies provide the basis for the development of new antimalarials targeting N-myristoyltransferase. PMID:24451586

  16. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as an antimalarial drug target using an integrated chemical biology approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Megan H.; Clough, Barbara; Rackham, Mark D.; Rangachari, Kaveri; Brannigan, James A.; Grainger, Munira; Moss, David K.; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Heal, William P.; Broncel, Malgorzata; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Brady, Declan; Mann, David J.; Leatherbarrow, Robin J.; Tewari, Rita; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Holder, Anthony A.; Tate, Edward W.

    2014-02-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium, which leads to approximately one million deaths per annum worldwide. Chemical validation of new antimalarial targets is urgently required in view of rising resistance to current drugs. One such putative target is the enzyme N-myristoyltransferase, which catalyses the attachment of the fatty acid myristate to protein substrates (N-myristoylation). Here, we report an integrated chemical biology approach to explore protein myristoylation in the major human parasite P. falciparum, combining chemical proteomic tools for identification of the myristoylated and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteome with selective small-molecule N-myristoyltransferase inhibitors. We demonstrate that N-myristoyltransferase is an essential and chemically tractable target in malaria parasites both in vitro and in vivo, and show that selective inhibition of N-myristoylation leads to catastrophic and irreversible failure to assemble the inner membrane complex, a critical subcellular organelle in the parasite life cycle. Our studies provide the basis for the development of new antimalarials targeting N-myristoyltransferase.

  17. Influence of LAR and VAR on Para-Aminopyridine Antimalarials Targetting Haematin in Chloroquine-Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Warhurst, David C.; Craig, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Antimalarial chloroquine (CQ) prevents haematin detoxication when CQ-base concentrates in the acidic digestive vacuole through protonation of its p-aminopyridine (pAP) basic aromatic nitrogen and sidechain diethyl-N. CQ export through the variant vacuolar membrane export channel, PFCRT, causes CQ-resistance in Plasmodium falciparum but 3-methyl CQ (sontochin SC), des-ethyl amodiaquine (DAQ) and bis 4-aminoquinoline piperaquine (PQ) are still active. This is determined by changes in drug accumulation ratios in parasite lipid (LAR) and in vacuolar water (VAR). Higher LAR may facilitate drug binding to and blocking PFCRT and also aid haematin in lipid to bind drug. LAR for CQ is only 8.3; VAR is 143,482. More hydrophobic SC has LAR 143; VAR remains 68,523. Similarly DAQ with a phenol substituent has LAR of 40.8, with VAR 89,366. In PQ, basicity of each pAP is reduced by distal piperazine N, allowing very high LAR of 973,492, retaining VAR of 104,378. In another bis quinoline, dichlorquinazine (DCQ), also active but clinically unsatisfactory, each pAP retains basicity, being insulated by a 2-carbon chain from a proximal nitrogen of the single linking piperazine. While LAR of 15,488 is still high, the lowest estimate of VAR approaches 4.9 million. DCQ may be expected to be very highly lysosomotropic and therefore potentially hepatotoxic. In 11 pAP antimalarials a quadratic relationship between logLAR and logResistance Index (RI) was confirmed, while log (LAR/VAR) vs logRI for 12 was linear. Both might be used to predict the utility of structural modifications. PMID:27483471

  18. Influence of LAR and VAR on Para-Aminopyridine Antimalarials Targetting Haematin in Chloroquine-Resistance.

    PubMed

    Warhurst, David C; Craig, John C; Raheem, K Saki

    2016-01-01

    Antimalarial chloroquine (CQ) prevents haematin detoxication when CQ-base concentrates in the acidic digestive vacuole through protonation of its p-aminopyridine (pAP) basic aromatic nitrogen and sidechain diethyl-N. CQ export through the variant vacuolar membrane export channel, PFCRT, causes CQ-resistance in Plasmodium falciparum but 3-methyl CQ (sontochin SC), des-ethyl amodiaquine (DAQ) and bis 4-aminoquinoline piperaquine (PQ) are still active. This is determined by changes in drug accumulation ratios in parasite lipid (LAR) and in vacuolar water (VAR). Higher LAR may facilitate drug binding to and blocking PFCRT and also aid haematin in lipid to bind drug. LAR for CQ is only 8.3; VAR is 143,482. More hydrophobic SC has LAR 143; VAR remains 68,523. Similarly DAQ with a phenol substituent has LAR of 40.8, with VAR 89,366. In PQ, basicity of each pAP is reduced by distal piperazine N, allowing very high LAR of 973,492, retaining VAR of 104,378. In another bis quinoline, dichlorquinazine (DCQ), also active but clinically unsatisfactory, each pAP retains basicity, being insulated by a 2-carbon chain from a proximal nitrogen of the single linking piperazine. While LAR of 15,488 is still high, the lowest estimate of VAR approaches 4.9 million. DCQ may be expected to be very highly lysosomotropic and therefore potentially hepatotoxic. In 11 pAP antimalarials a quadratic relationship between logLAR and logResistance Index (RI) was confirmed, while log (LAR/VAR) vs logRI for 12 was linear. Both might be used to predict the utility of structural modifications. PMID:27483471

  19. In vitro studies on the sensitivity pattern of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs and local herbal extracts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The resistance of human malaria parasites to anti-malarial compounds has become considerable concern, particularly in view of the shortage of novel classes of anti-malarial drugs. One way to prevent resistance is by using new compounds that are not based on existing synthetic antimicrobial agents. Results Sensitivity of 100 Plasmodium falciparum isolates to chloroquine, quinine, amodiaquine, mefloquine, sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine, artemisinin, Momordica charantia (‘Ejirin’) Diospyros monbuttensis (‘Egun eja’) and Morinda lucida (‘Oruwo’) was determined using the in vitro microtest (Mark III) technique to determine the IC50 of the drugs. All the isolates tested were sensitive to quinine, mefloquine and artesunate. Fifty-one percent of the isolates were resistant to chloroquine, 13% to amodiaquine and 5% to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine. Highest resistance to chloroquine (68.9%) was recorded among isolates from Yewa zone while highest resistance to amodiaquine (30%) was observed in Ijebu zone. Highest resistance to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine was recorded in Yewa and Egba zones, respectively. A positive correlation was observed between the responses to artemisinin and mefloquine (P<0.05), artemisinin and quinine (P<0.05) and quinine and mefloquine (P<0.05). A negative correlation was observed between the responses to chloroquine and mefloquine (P>0.05). Highest anti-plasmodial activity was obtained with the ethanolic extract of D. monbuttensis (IC50 = 3.2nM) while the lowest was obtained from M. lucida (IC50 =25nM). Conclusions Natural products isolated from plants used in traditional medicine, which have potent anti-plasmodial action in vitro, represent potential sources of new anti-malarial drugs. PMID:24555525

  20. Evaluation of Antimalarial Resistance Marker Polymorphism in Returned Migrant Workers in China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jun; Li, Jun; Yan, He; Feng, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    Imported malaria has been a great challenge for public health in China due to decreased locally transmitted cases and frequent exchange worldwide. Plasmodium falciparum has been mainly responsible for the increasing impact. Currently, artesunate plus amodiaquine, one of the artemisinin combination therapies recommended by the World Health Organization, has been mainly used against uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in China. However, drug resistance marker polymorphism in returning migrant workers has not been demonstrated. Here, we have evaluated the prevalence of pfmdr1 and pfcrt polymorphisms, as well as the K13 propeller gene, a molecular marker of artemisinin resistance, in migrant workers returned from Ghana to Shanglin County, Guangxi Province, China, in 2013. A total of 118 blood samples were randomly selected and used for the assay. Mutations of the pfmdr1 gene that covered codons 86, 184, 1034, and 1246 were found in 11 isolates. Mutations at codon N86Y (9.7%) were more frequent than at others, and Y86Y184S1034D1246 was the most prevalent (63.6%) of the four haplotypes. Mutations of the pfcrt gene that covered codons 74, 75, and 76 were observed in 17 isolates, and M74N75T76 was common (70.6%) in three haplotypes. Eight different genotypes of the K13 propeller were first observed in 10 samples in China, 2 synonymous mutations (V487V and A627A) and 6 nonsynonymous mutations. C580Y was the most prevalent (2.7%) in all the samples. The data presented might be helpful for enrichment of molecular surveillance of antimalarial resistance and will be useful for developing and updating antimalarial guidance in China. PMID:25348538

  1. Challenges of drug-resistant malaria

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Shweta; Medhi, Bikash; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Over the past six decades, the drug resistance of Plasmodium falciparum has become an issue of utmost concern. Despite the remarkable progress that has been made in recent years in reducing the mortality rate to about 30% with the scaling-up of vector control, introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapies and other malaria control strategies, the confirmation of artemisinin resistance on the Cambodia–Thailand border threatened all the previous success. This review addresses the global scenario of antimalarial resistance and factors associated with it, with the main emphasis on futuristic approaches like nanotechnology and stem cell therapy that may impede resistant malaria, along with novel medications which are preparing to enter the global antimalarial market. These novel studies are likely to escalate over the coming years and will hopefully help to reduce the burden of malaria. PMID:25402734

  2. Challenges of drug-resistant malaria.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Shweta; Medhi, Bikash; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Over the past six decades, the drug resistance of Plasmodium falciparum has become an issue of utmost concern. Despite the remarkable progress that has been made in recent years in reducing the mortality rate to about 30% with the scaling-up of vector control, introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapies and other malaria control strategies, the confirmation of artemisinin resistance on the Cambodia-Thailand border threatened all the previous success. This review addresses the global scenario of antimalarial resistance and factors associated with it, with the main emphasis on futuristic approaches like nanotechnology and stem cell therapy that may impede resistant malaria, along with novel medications which are preparing to enter the global antimalarial market. These novel studies are likely to escalate over the coming years and will hopefully help to reduce the burden of malaria. PMID:25402734

  3. Understanding the biology of the Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast; an excellent target for antimalarial drug development.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arnish

    2016-08-01

    Malaria is a life-threatening tropical disease, caused by the intracellular parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The World Health Organization counts malaria as one of the top ten causes of worldwide death. The unavailability of a successful malaria vaccine and the ever-increasing instances of drug resistance in the malaria parasite demand the discovery of new targets within P. falciparum for the development of next generation antimalarials. Fortunately, all apicomplexan parasites, including P. falciparum harbor a relict, non-photosynthetic plastid known as the apicoplast. The apicoplast is a semi-autonomous organelle within P. falciparum containing a 35kb circular genome. Despite a genome of its own, majority of the apicoplast proteins are encoded by the parasite nucleus and imported into the apicoplast. The organelle has been shown to be essential to P. falciparum survival and the loss the apicoplast manifests as a 'delayed death' response in the parasite. The apicoplast has evolved out of cyanobacteria in a complex, two step endosymbiotic event. As a result the architecture and the gene expression machinery of the apicoplast is quite bacteria-like and is susceptible to a wide range of antibiotics such as fosmidomycin, tetracycline, azithromycin, clindamycin and triclosan. The biosynthetic pathways for isoprenoids, fatty acids and heme operate within the malaria apicoplast, making the organelle an excellent target for drug development. The review focuses on the evolution, biology and the essentiality of the apicoplast within the malaria parasite and discusses some of the recent achievements towards the design and discovery of apicoplast targeted antimalarial compounds. PMID:27381078

  4. Evaluation of bioluminescence-based assays of anti-malarial drug activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transgenic Plasmodium falciparum expressing luciferase offers an attractive bioluminescence-based assay platform for the investigation of the pharmacological properties of anti-malarial drugs. Here a side-by-side comparison of bioluminescence and fluorescence-based assays, utilizing a luciferase reporter cassette that confers a strong temporal pattern of luciferase expression during the S-phase of intraerythrocytic development, is reported. Methods Key assay parameters for a range of commercially available luminogenic substrates are determined and compared to those measured using a Malaria Sybr Green I fluorescence assay. In addition, the short-term temporal effects of anti-malarial compounds are evaluated using both bioluminescent and fluorescent assay platforms. Results The Z’, % coefficient of variation and 50% inhibition concentrations are essentially the same for bioluminescent and fluorescent assays in transgenic parasites generated in both chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant genetic backgrounds. Bioluminescent assays, irrespective of the luminogenic agent employed, do, however, offer significantly enhanced signal-to-noise ratios. Moreover, the bioluminescent assay is more dynamic in terms of determining temporal effects immediately following drug perturbation. Conclusion This study suggests that opportunities for bioluminescence-based assays lie not in the measurement of 50% inhibition concentrations, where the cheaper fluorescence assay performs excellently and is not restricted by the need to genetically modify the parasite clone under investigation. Instead, assays that use the dynamic response of the luciferase reporter for semi-automated screening of additional pharmacological properties, such as relative rate-of-kill and lethal dose estimation, are a more attractive development opportunity. PMID:23394077

  5. Retinal toxicity induced by antimalarial drugs: literature review and case report.

    PubMed

    Garza-Leon, Manuel; Flores-Alvarado, Diana Elsa; Muñoz-Bravo, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs are widely used in several countries for control of rheumatologic diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. They are still used in Mexico because of their low cost and few secondary effects, most of which are mild and reversible. Even so, at an ophthalmological level, they could produce irreversible visual damage, which is why it is important to have ophthalmological evaluation and proper follow up. We present a clinical case as an example of characteristic ophthalmological findings as well as risk factors for retinal toxicity. We then discuss guidelines for diagnosis and follow up of patients who use antimalarial drugs for the treatment of rheumatologic illnesses. PMID:27391903

  6. Rational Design of Proteasome Inhibitors as Antimalarial Drugs.

    PubMed

    Le Chapelain, Camille; Groll, Michael

    2016-05-23

    One life, two strategies: Crucial structural differences between the human and the Plasmodium falciparum proteasomes were recently identified. A combination of cryo-EM and functional characterization enabled the design of a selective antimalarial proteasome inhibitor that shows low toxicity in the host. When used with artemisinin, this ligand offers a new approach for the efficient treatment of malaria at all stages of the parasite lifecycle. PMID:27079849

  7. Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Angola.

    PubMed

    Fançony, Cláudia; Brito, Miguel; Gil, Jose Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Facing chloroquine drug resistance, Angola promptly adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy as the first-line to treat malaria. Currently, the country aims to consolidate malaria control, while preparing for the elimination of the disease, along with others African countries in the region. However, the remarkable capacity of Plasmodium to develop drug resistance represents an alarming threat for those achievements. Herein, the available, but relatively scarce and dispersed, information on malaria drug resistance in Angola, is reviewed and discussed. The review aims to inform but also to encourage future research studies that monitor and update the information on anti-malarial drug efficacy and prevalence of molecular markers of drug resistance, key fields in the context and objectives of elimination. PMID:26858018

  8. Peroxide bond strength of antimalarial drugs containing an endoperoxide cycle. Relation with biological activity.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Israel; Robert, Anne

    2011-06-01

    Several endoperoxide compounds are very efficient antimalarial analogues of the natural drug artemisinin. Quantum chemical calculations have been used to correlate the computed free energies of the O-O bond with respect to the total number of oxygen atoms contained in the cycle, and with the size/strain of the cycle (5- or 6-membered cycles). The gas-phase homolysis of the O-O bond has been studied for five- and six-membered oxygenated cycles which are models of the "real" drugs. Our results indicate that, in 6-membered cycles, the stability order is the following: 1,2-dioxane > 1,2,4-trioxane > 1,2,4,5-tetraoxane. In cycles containing 3 oxygen atoms, the 5-membered cycle 1,2,4-trioxolane was found much less stable than its 6-membered counterpart 1,2,4-trioxane. This feature indicates the possible role of the cycle strain for the O-O bond stability, and may also explain the high antimalarial activity of some trioxolane derivatives. Similar trends in the O-O bond strength have been found for the real antimalarial drugs. However, the O-O bond stability is not in itself a decisive argument to anticipate the antimalarial activity of drugs. PMID:21487624

  9. Synthesis of the antimalarial drug FR900098 utilizing the nitroso-ene reaction.

    PubMed

    Fokin, Andrey A; Yurchenko, Alexander G; Rodionov, Vladimir N; Gunchenko, Pavel A; Yurchenko, Raisa I; Reichenberg, Armin; Wiesner, Jochen; Hintz, Martin; Jomaa, Hassan; Schreiner, Peter R

    2007-10-11

    The antimalarial drug FR900098 was prepared from diethyl allylphosphonate involving the nitroso-ene reaction with nitrosocarbonyl methane as the key step followed by hydrogenation and dealkylation. The utilization of dibenzyl allylphosphonate as the starting compound allows one-step hydrogenation with dealkylation, which simplifies the preparative scheme further. PMID:17887769

  10. Amphiphilic dendritic derivatives as nanocarriers for the targeted delivery of antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Movellan, Julie; Urbán, Patricia; Moles, Ernest; de la Fuente, Jesús M; Sierra, Teresa; Serrano, José Luis; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    It can be foreseen that in a future scenario of malaria eradication, a varied armamentarium will be required, including strategies for the targeted administration of antimalarial compounds. The development of nanovectors capable of encapsulating drugs and of delivering them to Plasmodium-infected cells with high specificity and efficacy and at an affordable cost is of particular interest. With this objective, dendritic derivatives based on 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)propionic acid (bis-MPA) and Pluronic(®) polymers have been herein explored. Four different dendritic derivatives have been tested for their capacity to encapsulate the antimalarial drugs chloroquine (CQ) and primaquine (PQ), their specific targeting to Plasmodium-infected red blood cells (pRBCs), and their antimalarial activity in vitro against the human pathogen Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo against the rodent malaria species Plasmodium yoelii. The results obtained have allowed the identification of two dendritic derivatives exhibiting specific targeting to pRBCs vs. non-infected RBCs, which reduce the in vitro IC50 of CQ and PQ by ca. 3- and 4-fold down to 4.0 nm and 1.1 μm, respectively. This work on the application of dendritic derivatives to antimalarial targeted drug delivery opens the way for the use of this new type of chemicals in future malaria eradication programs. PMID:24930847

  11. Drug-Resistant Malaria: The Era of ACT

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jessica T.; Juliano, Jonathan J.

    2010-01-01

    As drug-resistant falciparum malaria has continued to evolve and spread worldwide, artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT) have become the centerpiece of global malaria control over the past decade. This review discusses how advances in antimalarial drug resistance monitoring and rational use of the array of ACTs now available can maximize the impact of this highly efficacious therapy, even as resistance to artemisinins is emerging in Southeast Asia. PMID:21308525

  12. Interactions between artemisinins and other antimalarial drugs in relation to the cofactor model--a unifying proposal for drug action.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Richard K; Cheu, Kwan-Wing; Chan, Ho-Wai; Wong, Ho-Ning; Li, Ka-Yan; Tang, Maggie Mei-Ki; Chen, Min-Jiao; Guo, Zu-Feng; Guo, Zhi-Hong; Sinniah, Kumar; Witte, Amanda B; Coghi, Paolo; Monti, Diego

    2012-12-01

    exert antimalarial activities by enhancing heme-Fe(III) and thence free Fe(III) concentrations in the cytosol. The iron species enter into redox cycles through reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) largely mediated by reduced flavin cofactors and likely also by NAD(P)H-Fre. Generation of ROS through oxidation of Fe(II) by oxygen will also result. The cytotoxicities of artemisinins are thereby reinforced by the iron. Other aspects of drug action are emphasized. In the cytosol or DV, association by π complex formation between pairs of lipophilic drugs must adversely influence the pharmacokinetics of each drug. This explains the antagonism between PPQ and MFQ, for example. The basis for the antimalarial activity of RF mirrors that of MB, wherein it participates in redox cycling that involves flavoenzymes or Fre, resulting in attrition of NAD(P)H. The generation of ROS by artemisinins and ensuing Fenton chemistry accommodate the ability of artemisinins to induce membrane damage and to affect the parasite SERCA PfATP6 Ca(2+) transporter. Thus, the effect exerted by artemisinins is more likely a downstream event involving ROS that will also be modulated by mutations in PfATP6. Such mutations attenuate, but cannot abrogate, antimalarial activities of artemisinins. Overall, parasite resistance to artemisinins arises through enhancement of antioxidant defense mechanisms. PMID:23112085

  13. Recent developments in naturally derived antimalarials: cryptolepine analogues.

    PubMed

    Wright, Colin W

    2007-06-01

    Increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to commonly used antimalarial drugs has made the need for new agents increasingly urgent. In this paper, the potential of cryptolepine, an alkaloid from the West African shrub Cryptolepis sanguinolenta, as a lead towards new antimalarial agents is discussed. Several cryptolepine analogues have been synthesized that have promising in-vitro and in-vivo antimalarial activity. Studies on the antimalarial modes of action of these analogues indicate that they may have different or additional modes of action to the parent compound. Elucidation of the mode of action may facilitate the development of more potent antimalarial cryptolepine analogues. PMID:17637183

  14. Production of the antimalarial drug precursor artemisinic acid in engineered yeast.

    PubMed

    Ro, Dae-Kyun; Paradise, Eric M; Ouellet, Mario; Fisher, Karl J; Newman, Karyn L; Ndungu, John M; Ho, Kimberly A; Eachus, Rachel A; Ham, Timothy S; Kirby, James; Chang, Michelle C Y; Withers, Sydnor T; Shiba, Yoichiro; Sarpong, Richmond; Keasling, Jay D

    2006-04-13

    Malaria is a global health problem that threatens 300-500 million people and kills more than one million people annually. Disease control is hampered by the occurrence of multi-drug-resistant strains of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Synthetic antimalarial drugs and malarial vaccines are currently being developed, but their efficacy against malaria awaits rigorous clinical testing. Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide extracted from Artemisia annua L (family Asteraceae; commonly known as sweet wormwood), is highly effective against multi-drug-resistant Plasmodium spp., but is in short supply and unaffordable to most malaria sufferers. Although total synthesis of artemisinin is difficult and costly, the semi-synthesis of artemisinin or any derivative from microbially sourced artemisinic acid, its immediate precursor, could be a cost-effective, environmentally friendly, high-quality and reliable source of artemisinin. Here we report the engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce high titres (up to 100 mg l(-1)) of artemisinic acid using an engineered mevalonate pathway, amorphadiene synthase, and a novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP71AV1) from A. annua that performs a three-step oxidation of amorpha-4,11-diene to artemisinic acid. The synthesized artemisinic acid is transported out and retained on the outside of the engineered yeast, meaning that a simple and inexpensive purification process can be used to obtain the desired product. Although the engineered yeast is already capable of producing artemisinic acid at a significantly higher specific productivity than A. annua, yield optimization and industrial scale-up will be required to raise artemisinic acid production to a level high enough to reduce artemisinin combination therapies to significantly below their current prices. PMID:16612385

  15. Irrational use of antimalarial drugs in rural areas of eastern Pakistan: a random field study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prescription of antimalarial drugs in the absence of malarial disease is a common practice in countries where malaria is endemic. However, unwarranted use of such drugs can cause side effects in some people and is a financial drain on local economies. In this study, we surveyed the prevalence of malaria parasites in humans, and the prevalence of the malaria transmitting mosquito vectors in the study area. We also investigated the use of antimalarial drugs in the local people. We focused on randomly selected rural areas of eastern Pakistan where no malaria cases had been reported since May 2004. Methods Mass blood surveys, active case detection, passive case detection, and vector density surveys were carried out in selected areas of Sargodha district from September 2008 to August 2009. Data pertaining to the quantities and types of antimalarial drugs used in these areas were collected from health centers, pharmacies, and the district CDC program of the Health Department of the Government of the Punjab. Results Seven hundred and forty four blood samples were examined, resulting in a Blood Examination Rate (BER) of 3.18; microscopic analysis of blood smears showed that none of the samples were positive for malaria parasites. Investigation of the mosquito vector density in 43 living rooms (bedrooms or rooms used for sleeping), 23 stores, and 32 animal sheds, revealed no vectors capable of transmitting malaria in these locations. In contrast, the density of Culex mosquitoes was high. Substantial consumption of a variety of antimalarial tablets, syrups, capsules and injections costing around 1000 US$, was documented for the region. Conclusion Use of antimalarial drugs in the absence of malarial infection or the vectors that transmit the disease was common in the study area. Continuous use of such drugs, not only in Pakistan, but in other parts of the world, may lead to drug-induced side effects amongst users. Better training of health care professionals is

  16. Lead Clinical and Preclinical Antimalarial Drugs Can Significantly Reduce Sporozoite Transmission to Vertebrate Populations

    PubMed Central

    Upton, L. M.; Brock, P. M.; Churcher, T. S.; Ghani, A. C.; Gething, P. W.; Delves, M. J.; Sala, K. A.; Leroy, D.; Sinden, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    To achieve malarial elimination, we must employ interventions that reduce the exposure of human populations to infectious mosquitoes. To this end, numerous antimalarial drugs are under assessment in a variety of transmission-blocking assays which fail to measure the single crucial criteria of a successful intervention, namely impact on case incidence within a vertebrate population (reduction in reproductive number/effect size). Consequently, any reduction in new infections due to drug treatment (and how this may be influenced by differing transmission settings) is not currently examined, limiting the translation of any findings. We describe the use of a laboratory population model to assess how individual antimalarial drugs can impact the number of secondary Plasmodium berghei infections over a cycle of transmission. We examine the impact of multiple clinical and preclinical drugs on both insect and vertebrate populations at multiple transmission settings. Both primaquine (>6 mg/kg of body weight) and NITD609 (8.1 mg/kg) have significant impacts across multiple transmission settings, but artemether and lumefantrine (57 and 11.8 mg/kg), OZ439 (6.5 mg/kg), and primaquine (<1.25 mg/kg) demonstrated potent efficacy only at lower-transmission settings. While directly demonstrating the impact of antimalarial drug treatment on vertebrate populations, we additionally calculate effect size for each treatment, allowing for head-to-head comparison of the potential impact of individual drugs within epidemiologically relevant settings, supporting their usage within elimination campaigns. PMID:25385107

  17. DETECTION OF PUTATIVE ANTIMALARIAL-RESISTANT PLASMODIUM VIVAX IN ANOPHELES VECTORS AT THAILAND-CAMBODIA AND THAILAND-MYANMAR BORDERS.

    PubMed

    Rattaprasert, Pongruj; Chaksangchaichot, Panee; Wihokhoen, Benchawan; Suparach, Nutjaree; Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp, Prapa

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring of multidrug-resistant (MDR)falciparum and vivax malaria has recently been included in the Global Plan for Artemisinin Resistance Containment (GPARC) of the Greater Mekong Sub-region, particularly at the Thailand-Cambodia and Thailand-Myanmar borders. In parallel to GPARC, monitoring MDR malaria parasites in anopheline vectors is an ideal augment to entomological surveillance. Employing Plasmodium- and species-specific nested PCR techniques, only P. vivax was detected in 3/109 salivary gland DNA extracts of anopheline vectors collected during a rainy season between 24-26 August 2009 and 22-24 September 2009 and a dry season between 29-31 December 2009 and 16-18 January 2010. Indoor and out- door resting mosquitoes were collected in Thong Pha Phum District, Kanchanaburi Province (border of Thailand-Myanmar) and Bo Rai District, Trat Province (border of Thailand-Cambodia): one sample from Anopheles dirus at the Thailand-Cambodia border and two samples from An. aconitus from Thailand-Myanmar border isolate. Nucleotide sequencing of dihydrofolate reductase gene revealed the presence in all three samples of four mutations known to cause high resistance to antifolate pyrimethamine, but no mutations were found in multidrug resistance transporter 1 gene that are associated with (falciparum) resistance to quinoline antimalarials. Such findings indicate the potential usefulness of this approach in monitoring the prevalence of drug-resistant malaria parasites in geographically regions prone to the development of drug resistance and where screening of human population at risk poses logistical and ethical problems. Keywords: Anopheles spp, Plasmodium vivax, antimalarial resistance, Greater Mekong Sub-region, nested PCR, vector surveillance PMID:27244954

  18. Mechanisms of hematin crystallization and inhibition by the antimalarial drug chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Olafson, Katy N; Ketchum, Megan A; Rimer, Jeffrey D; Vekilov, Peter G

    2015-04-21

    Hematin crystallization is the primary mechanism of heme detoxification in malaria parasites and the target of the quinoline class of antimalarials. Despite numerous studies of malaria pathophysiology, fundamental questions regarding hematin growth and inhibition remain. Among them are the identity of the crystallization medium in vivo, aqueous or organic; the mechanism of crystallization, classical or nonclassical; and whether quinoline antimalarials inhibit crystallization by sequestering hematin in the solution, or by blocking surface sites crucial for growth. Here we use time-resolved in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and show that the lipid subphase in the parasite may be a preferred growth medium. We provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence of the molecular mechanisms of hematin crystallization and inhibition by chloroquine, a common quinoline antimalarial drug. AFM observations demonstrate that crystallization strictly follows a classical mechanism wherein new crystal layers are generated by 2D nucleation and grow by the attachment of solute molecules. We identify four classes of surface sites available for binding of potential drugs and propose respective mechanisms of drug action. Further studies reveal that chloroquine inhibits hematin crystallization by binding to molecularly flat {100} surfaces. A 2-μM concentration of chloroquine fully arrests layer generation and step advancement, which is ∼10(4)× less than hematin's physiological concentration. Our results suggest that adsorption at specific growth sites may be a general mode of hemozoin growth inhibition for the quinoline antimalarials. Because the atomic structures of the identified sites are known, this insight could advance the future design and/or optimization of new antimalarials. PMID:25831526

  19. Interspecies Allometric Scaling of Antimalarial Drugs and Potential Application to Pediatric Dosing

    PubMed Central

    Senarathna, S. M. D. K. Ganga

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacopeial recommendations for administration of antimalarial drugs are the same weight-based (mg/kg of body weight) doses for children and adults. However, linear calculations are known to underestimate pediatric doses; therefore, interspecies allometric scaling data may have a role in predicting doses in children. We investigated the allometric scaling relationships of antimalarial drugs using data from pharmacokinetic studies in mammalian species. Simple allometry (Y = a × Wb) was utilized and compared to maximum life span potential (MLP) correction. All drugs showed a strong correlation with clearance (CL) in healthy controls. Insufficient data from malaria-infected species other than humans were available for allometric scaling. The allometric exponents (b) for CL of artesunate, dihydroartemisinin (from intravenous artesunate), artemether, artemisinin, clindamycin, piperaquine, mefloquine, and quinine were 0.71, 0.85, 0.66, 0.83, 0.62, 0.96, 0.52, and 0.40, respectively. Clearance was significantly lower in malaria infection than in healthy (adult) humans for quinine (0.07 versus 0.17 liter/h/kg; P = 0.0002) and dihydroartemisinin (0.81 versus 1.11 liters/h/kg; P = 0.04; power = 0.6). Interpolation of simple allometry provided better estimates of CL for children than MLP correction, which generally underestimated CL values. Pediatric dose calculations based on simple allometric exponents were 10 to 70% higher than pharmacopeial (mg/kg) recommendations. Interpolation of interspecies allometric scaling could provide better estimates than linear scaling of adult to pediatric doses of antimalarial drugs; however, the use of a fixed exponent for CL was not supported in the present study. The variability in allometric exponents for antimalarial drugs also has implications for scaling of fixed-dose combinations. PMID:25092696

  20. A SYBR Green 1-based in vitro test of susceptibility of Ghanaian Plasmodium falciparum clinical isolates to a panel of anti-malarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Based on report of declining efficacy of chloroquine, Ghana shifted to the use of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in 2005 as the first-line anti-malarial drug. Since then, there has not been any major evaluation of the efficacy of anti-malarial drugs in Ghana in vitro. The sensitivity of Ghanaian Plasmodium falciparum isolates to anti-malarial drugs was, therefore, assessed and the data compared with that obtained prior to the change in the malaria treatment policy. Methods A SYBR Green 1 fluorescent-based in vitro drug sensitivity assay was used to assess the susceptibility of clinical isolates of P. falciparum to a panel of 12 anti-malarial drugs in three distinct eco-epidemiological zones in Ghana. The isolates were obtained from children visiting health facilities in sentinel sites located in Hohoe, Navrongo and Cape Coast municipalities. The concentration of anti-malarial drug inhibiting parasite growth by 50% (IC50) for each drug was estimated using the online program, ICEstimator. Results Pooled results from all the sentinel sites indicated geometric mean IC50 values of 1.60, 3.80, 4.00, 4.56, 5.20, 6.11, 10.12, 28.32, 31.56, 93.60, 107.20, and 8952.50 nM for atovaquone, artesunate, dihydroartemisin, artemether, lumefantrine, amodiaquine, mefloquine, piperaquine, chloroquine, tafenoquine, quinine, and doxycycline, respectively. With reference to the literature threshold value indicative of resistance, the parasites showed resistance to all the test drugs except the artemisinin derivatives, atovaquone and to a lesser extent, lumefantrine. There was nearly a two-fold decrease in the IC50 value determined for chloroquine in this study compared to that determined in 2004 (57.56 nM). This observation is important, since it suggests a significant improvement in the efficacy of chloroquine, probably as a direct consequence of reduced drug pressure after cessation of its use. Compared to that measured prior to the change in treatment policy

  1. Evaluating the Pharmacodynamic Effect of Antimalarial Drugs in Clinical Trials by Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Marquart, Louise; Baker, Mark; O'Rourke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing development of new antimalarial drugs and the increasing use of controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) studies to investigate their activity in early-stage clinical trials require the development of methods to analyze their pharmacodynamic effect. This is especially so for studies where quantitative PCR (qPCR) is becoming the preferred method for assessing parasite clearance as the study endpoint. We report the development and validation of an analytic approach for qPCR-determined parasite clearance data. First, in a clinical trial with the licensed antimalarial combination sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (S/P), qPCR data were collected from 12 subjects and used to determine qPCR replicate variability and to identify outliers. Then, an iterative analytic approach based on modeling the log-linear decay of parasitemia following drug treatment was developed to determine the parasite reduction ratio (PRR) and parasite clearance half-life, both measures of parasite clearance. This analytic approach was then validated with data from 8 subjects enrolled in a second study with the licensed antimalarial drug mefloquine. By this method, the PRR and parasite clearance half-lives for S/P and Mefloquine were determined to be 38,878 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 17,396 to 86,889) at 3.15 (95% CI, 2.93 to 3.41) days and 157 (95% CI, 130 to 189) at 6.58 (95% CI, 6.35 to 6.83) days for the respective studies. No serious adverse events occurred in the two trials, and pharmacokinetic values were within expected ranges for sulfadoxine and pyrimethamine. The robust statistical method that we have developed to analyze qPCR-derived pharmacodynamic data from CHMI studies will facilitate the assessment of the activity of a range of experimental antimalarial drugs now entering clinical trials. (This trial was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry under registration numbers ACTRN12611001203943 and ACTRN12612000323820.) PMID:25963983

  2. Linking Murine and Human Plasmodium falciparum Challenge Models in a Translational Path for Antimalarial Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, James S.; Marquart, Louise; Sekuloski, Silvana; Trenholme, Katharine; Elliott, Suzanne; Griffin, Paul; Rockett, Rebecca; O'Rourke, Peter; Sloots, Theo; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Martínez, María-Santos; Duparc, Stephan; Leroy, Didier; Wells, Timothy N. C.; Baker, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Effective progression of candidate antimalarials is dependent on optimal dosing in clinical studies, which is determined by a sound understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD). Recently, two important translational models for antimalarials have been developed: the NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ−/− (NSG) model, whereby mice are engrafted with noninfected and Plasmodium falciparum-infected human erythrocytes, and the induced blood-stage malaria (IBSM) model in human volunteers. The antimalarial mefloquine was used to directly measure the PK/PD in both models, which were compared to previously published trial data for malaria patients. The clinical part was a single-center, controlled study using a blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum challenge inoculum in volunteers to characterize the effectiveness of mefloquine against early malaria. The study was conducted in three cohorts (n = 8 each) using different doses of mefloquine. The characteristic delay in onset of action of about 24 h was seen in both NSG and IBSM systems. In vivo 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were estimated at 2.0 μg/ml and 1.8 μg/ml in the NSG and IBSM models, respectively, aligning with 1.8 μg/ml reported previously for patients. In the IBSM model, the parasite reduction ratios were 157 and 195 for the 10- and 15-mg/kg doses, within the range of previously reported clinical data for patients but significantly lower than observed in the mouse model. Linking mouse and human challenge models to clinical trial data can accelerate the accrual of critical data on antimalarial drug activity. Such data can guide large clinical trials required for development of urgently needed novel antimalarial combinations. (This trial was registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry [http://anzctr.org.au] under registration number ACTRN12612000323820.) PMID:27044554

  3. Linking Murine and Human Plasmodium falciparum Challenge Models in a Translational Path for Antimalarial Drug Development.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, James S; Marquart, Louise; Sekuloski, Silvana; Trenholme, Katharine; Elliott, Suzanne; Griffin, Paul; Rockett, Rebecca; O'Rourke, Peter; Sloots, Theo; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Martínez, María-Santos; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob; Duparc, Stephan; Leroy, Didier; Wells, Timothy N C; Baker, Mark; Möhrle, Jörg J

    2016-06-01

    Effective progression of candidate antimalarials is dependent on optimal dosing in clinical studies, which is determined by a sound understanding of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD). Recently, two important translational models for antimalarials have been developed: the NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ(-/-) (NSG) model, whereby mice are engrafted with noninfected and Plasmodium falciparum-infected human erythrocytes, and the induced blood-stage malaria (IBSM) model in human volunteers. The antimalarial mefloquine was used to directly measure the PK/PD in both models, which were compared to previously published trial data for malaria patients. The clinical part was a single-center, controlled study using a blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum challenge inoculum in volunteers to characterize the effectiveness of mefloquine against early malaria. The study was conducted in three cohorts (n = 8 each) using different doses of mefloquine. The characteristic delay in onset of action of about 24 h was seen in both NSG and IBSM systems. In vivo 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were estimated at 2.0 μg/ml and 1.8 μg/ml in the NSG and IBSM models, respectively, aligning with 1.8 μg/ml reported previously for patients. In the IBSM model, the parasite reduction ratios were 157 and 195 for the 10- and 15-mg/kg doses, within the range of previously reported clinical data for patients but significantly lower than observed in the mouse model. Linking mouse and human challenge models to clinical trial data can accelerate the accrual of critical data on antimalarial drug activity. Such data can guide large clinical trials required for development of urgently needed novel antimalarial combinations. (This trial was registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry [http://anzctr.org.au] under registration number ACTRN12612000323820.). PMID:27044554

  4. Ex vivo susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Dakar, Senegal, to seven standard anti-malarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As a result of widespread chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) (which includes artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine) has been recommended as a first-line anti-malarial regimen in Senegal since 2006. Since then, there have been very few reports on the ex vivo susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. To examine whether parasite susceptibility has been affected by the widespread use of ACT, the ex vivo susceptibility of local isolates was assessed at the military hospital of Dakar. Methods The ex vivo susceptibility of 93 P. falciparum isolates from Dakar was successfully determined using the Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) ELISA for the following drugs: chloroquine (CQ), quinine (QN), mefloquine (MQ), monodesethylamodiaquine (MDAQ), lumefantrine (LMF), dihydroartemisinin (DHA) and doxycycline (DOX). Results After transformation of the isolate IC50 in ratio of IC50 according to the susceptibility of the 3D7 reference strain (isolate IC50/3D7 IC50), the prevalence of the in vitro resistant isolates with reduced susceptibility was 50% for MQ, 22% for CQ, 12% for DOX, 6% for both QN and MDAQ and 1% for the drugs LMF and DHA. The highest significant positive correlations were shown between responses to CQ and MDAQ (r = 0.569; P < 0.0001), LMF and QN (r = 0.511; P < 0.0001), LMF and DHA (r = 0.428; P = 0.0001), LMF and MQ (r = 0.413; P = 0.0002), QN and DHA (r = 0.402; P = 0.0003) and QN and MQ (r = 0.421; P = 0.0001). Conclusions The introduction of ACT in 2002 has not induced a decrease in P. falciparum susceptibility to the drugs DHA, MDAQ and LMF, which are common ACT components. However, the prevalence of P. falciparum isolates with reduced susceptibility has increased for both MQ and DOX. Taken together, these data suggest that intensive surveillance of the P. falciparum in vitro susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs in Senegal is required. PMID

  5. How Patients Take Malaria Treatment: A Systematic Review of the Literature on Adherence to Antimalarial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bruxvoort, Katia; Goodman, Catherine; Kachur, S. Patrick; Schellenberg, David

    2014-01-01

    Background High levels of patient adherence to antimalarial treatment are important in ensuring drug effectiveness. To achieve this goal, it is important to understand levels of patient adherence, and the range of study designs and methodological challenges involved in measuring adherence and interpreting results. Since antimalarial adherence was reviewed in 2004, there has been a major expansion in the use of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) in the public sector, as well as initiatives to make them more widely accessible through community health workers and private retailers. These changes and the large number of recent adherence studies raise the need for an updated review on this topic. Objective We conducted a systematic review of studies reporting quantitative results on patient adherence to antimalarials obtained for treatment. Results The 55 studies identified reported extensive variation in patient adherence to antimalarials, with many studies reporting very high adherence (90–100%) and others finding adherence of less than 50%. We identified five overarching approaches to assessing adherence based on the definition of adherence and the methods used to measure it. Overall, there was no clear pattern in adherence results by approach. However, adherence tended to be higher among studies where informed consent was collected at the time of obtaining the drug, where patient consultations were directly observed by research staff, and where a diagnostic test was obtained. Conclusion Variations in reported adherence may reflect factors related to patient characteristics and the nature of their consultation with the provider, as well as methodological variations such as interaction between the research team and patients before and during the treatment. Future studies can benefit from an awareness of the impact of study procedures on adherence outcomes, and the identification of improved measurement methods less dependent on self-report. PMID:24465418

  6. Stated preferences for anti-malarial drug characteristics in Zomba, a malaria endemic area of Malawi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The evidence on determinants of individuals’ choices for anti-malarial drug treatments is scarce. This study sought to measure the strength of preference for adult antimalarial drug treatment attributes of heads of urban, rural and peri-urban households in a resource-limited malaria-endemic area of sub-Saharan Africa. Methods Discrete choice experiments were conducted with 508 heads of household interviewed face-to-face for a household population survey of health-seeking behavior in Zomba District, Malawi. The interviews were held in Chichewa and the choice experiment questions were presented with cartoon aids. The anti-malarial drug attributes included in the stated preference experiment were: speed of fever resolution, side effects (pruritus) risk, protection (duration of prophylactic effect), price, duration of treatment course and recommendation by a health professional. Sixteen treatment profiles from a fractional factorial design by orthogonal array were paired into choice scenarios, and scenarios were randomly assigned to participants so that each participant was presented with a series of eight pairwise choice scenarios. Respondents had the option to state indifference between the two profiles or decline to choose. Data were analysed in a mixed logit model, with normally distributed coefficients for all six attributes. Results The sex ratio was balanced in urban areas, whereas 63% of participants in rural areas were male. The proportion of individuals with no education was considerably higher in the rural group (25%) than in the urban (5%) and peri-urban (6%) groups. All attributes investigated had the expected influence, and traded-off in most respondents’ choices. There were heterogeneous effects of price, pruritus risk, treatment recommendation by a professional, and duration of prophylaxis across respondents, only partly explained by their differences in education, household per capita expenditure, sex and age. Individuals´ demand

  7. Molecular markers associated with resistance to commonly used antimalarial drugs among Plasmodium falciparum isolates from a malaria-endemic area in Taiz governorate-Yemen during the transmission season.

    PubMed

    Alareqi, Lina M Q; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lau, Yee-Ling; Fong, Mun-Yik; Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Mahmud, Rohela

    2016-10-01

    Since 2005, artesunate (AS) plus sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) combination has been adopted as the first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in Yemen in response to the high level of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to chloroquine (CQ). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the frequency distribution of molecular markers associated with resistance to CQ and AS plus SP combination among P. falciparum isolates from a malaria-endemic area in Taiz governorate, Yemen. Fifty P. falciparum isolates were collected during a cross-sectional study in Mawza district, Taiz, in the period from October 2013 to April 2014. The isolates were investigated for drug resistance-associated molecular markers in five genes, including P. falciparum CQ resistance transporter (pfcrt) 76T and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) 86Y as markers of resistance to CQ, mutations in the Kelch 13 (K13) propeller domain for resistance to AS, and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr) and P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps) genes for resistance to SP. Nested polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify target genes in DNA extracts of the isolates followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism for detecting 76T and 86Y mutations in pfcrt and pfmdr1, respectively, and by DNA sequencing for detecting mutations in K13, pfdhfr and pfdhps. All the investigated isolates from Mawza district were harboring the pfcrt 76T mutant and the pfmdr1 N86 wild-type alleles. The pfdhfr 51I/108N double mutant allele was found in 2.2% (1/45) of the isolates; however, no mutations were detected at codons 436, 437, 540, 581 and 613 of pfdhps. All P. falciparum isolates that were successfully sequenced (n=47) showed the K13 Y493, R539, I543 and C580 wild-type alleles. In conclusion, the pfcrt 76T mutant allele is fixed in the study area about six years after the official withdrawal of CQ, possibly indicating its over-the-counter availability and continued use as a

  8. Study of the efficacy of antimalarial drugs delivered inside targeted immunoliposomal nanovectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbán, Patricia; Estelrich, Joan; Adeva, Alberto; Cortés, Alfred; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2011-12-01

    Paul Ehrlich's dream of a 'magic bullet' that would specifically destroy invading microbes is now a major aspect of clinical medicine. However, a century later, the implementation of this medical holy grail continues being a challenge in three main fronts: identifying the right molecular or cellular targets for a particular disease, having a drug that is effective against it, and finding a strategy for the efficient delivery of sufficient amounts of the drug in an active state exclusively to the selected targets. In a previous work, we engineered an immunoliposomal nanovector for the targeted delivery of its contents exclusively to Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells [pRBCs]. In preliminary assays, the antimalarial drug chloroquine showed improved efficacy when delivered inside immunoliposomes targeted with the pRBC-specific monoclonal antibody BM1234. Because difficulties in determining the exact concentration of the drug due to its low amounts prevented an accurate estimation of the nanovector performance, here, we have developed an HPLC-based method for the precise determination of the concentrations in the liposomal preparations of chloroquine and of a second antimalarial drug, fosmidomycin. The results obtained indicate that immunoliposome encapsulation of chloroquine and fosmidomycin improves by tenfold the efficacy of antimalarial drugs. The targeting antibody used binds preferentially to pRBCs containing late maturation stages of the parasite. In accordance with this observation, the best performing immunoliposomes are those added to Plasmodium cultures having a larger number of late form-containing pRBCs. An average of five antibody molecules per liposome significantly improves in cell cultures the performance of immunoliposomes over non-functionalized liposomes as drug delivery vessels. Increasing the number of antibodies on the liposome surface correspondingly increases performance, with a reduction of 50% parasitemia achieved with

  9. Antimalarial Drug Discovery: Approaches and Progress towards New Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Erika L.; Chatterjee, Arnab K.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria elimination has recently been reinstated as a global health priority but current therapies seem to be insufficient for the task. Elimination efforts require new drug classes that alleviate symptoms, prevent transmission and provide a radical cure. To develop these next generation medicines, public-private partnerships are funding innovative approaches to identify compounds that target multiple parasite species at multiple stages of the parasite lifecycle. Here, we review the cell-, chemistry- and target-based approaches used to discover new drug candidates that are currently in clinical trials or undergoing preclinical testing. PMID:24217412

  10. The Interactions of P-Glycoprotein with Antimalarial Drugs, Including Substrate Affinity, Inhibition and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Senarathna, S M D K Ganga; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Crowe, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The combination of passive drug permeability, affinity for uptake and efflux transporters as well as gastrointestinal metabolism defines net drug absorption. Efflux mechanisms are often overlooked when examining the absorption phase of drug bioavailability. Knowing the affinity of antimalarials for efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) may assist in the determination of drug absorption and pharmacokinetic drug interactions during oral absorption in drug combination therapies. Concurrent administration of P-gp inhibitors and P-gp substrate drugs may also result in alterations in the bioavailability of some antimalarials. In-vitro Caco-2 cell monolayers were used here as a model for potential drug absorption related problems and P-gp mediated transport of drugs. Artemisone had the highest permeability at around 50 x 10−6 cm/sec, followed by amodiaquine around 20 x 10−6 cm/sec; both mefloquine and artesunate were around 10 x 10−6 cm/sec. Methylene blue was between 2 and 6 x 10−6 cm/sec depending on the direction of transport. This 3 fold difference was able to be halved by use of P-gp inhibition. MRP inhibition also assisted the consolidation of the methylene blue transport. Mefloquine was shown to be a P-gp inhibitor affecting our P-gp substrate, Rhodamine 123, although none of the other drugs impacted upon rhodamine123 transport rates. In conclusion, mefloquine is a P-gp inhibitor and methylene blue is a partial substrate; methylene blue may have increased absorption if co-administered with such P-gp inhibitors. An upregulation of P-gp was observed when artemisone and dihydroartemisinin were co-incubated with mefloquine and amodiaquine. PMID:27045516

  11. The Interactions of P-Glycoprotein with Antimalarial Drugs, Including Substrate Affinity, Inhibition and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Senarathna, S M D K Ganga; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Crowe, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The combination of passive drug permeability, affinity for uptake and efflux transporters as well as gastrointestinal metabolism defines net drug absorption. Efflux mechanisms are often overlooked when examining the absorption phase of drug bioavailability. Knowing the affinity of antimalarials for efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) may assist in the determination of drug absorption and pharmacokinetic drug interactions during oral absorption in drug combination therapies. Concurrent administration of P-gp inhibitors and P-gp substrate drugs may also result in alterations in the bioavailability of some antimalarials. In-vitro Caco-2 cell monolayers were used here as a model for potential drug absorption related problems and P-gp mediated transport of drugs. Artemisone had the highest permeability at around 50 x 10(-6) cm/sec, followed by amodiaquine around 20 x 10(-6) cm/sec; both mefloquine and artesunate were around 10 x 10(-6) cm/sec. Methylene blue was between 2 and 6 x 10(-6) cm/sec depending on the direction of transport. This 3 fold difference was able to be halved by use of P-gp inhibition. MRP inhibition also assisted the consolidation of the methylene blue transport. Mefloquine was shown to be a P-gp inhibitor affecting our P-gp substrate, Rhodamine 123, although none of the other drugs impacted upon rhodamine123 transport rates. In conclusion, mefloquine is a P-gp inhibitor and methylene blue is a partial substrate; methylene blue may have increased absorption if co-administered with such P-gp inhibitors. An upregulation of P-gp was observed when artemisone and dihydroartemisinin were co-incubated with mefloquine and amodiaquine. PMID:27045516

  12. Structural modifications of quinoline-based antimalarial agents: Recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Bawa, Sandhya; Kumar, Suresh; Drabu, Sushma; Kumar, Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs constitute a major part of antiprotozoal drugs and have been in practice for a long time. Antimalarial agents generally belong to the class of quinoline which acts by interfering with heme metabolism. The recent increase in development of chloroquine-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum and failure of vaccination program against malaria have fuelled the drug discovery program against this old and widespread disease. Quinoline and its related derivative comprise a class of heterocycles, which has been exploited immensely than any other nucleus for the development of potent antimalarial agents. Various chemical modifications of quinoline have been attempted to achieve analogs with potent antimalarial properties against sensitive as well as resistant strains of Plasmodium sp., together with minimal potential undesirable side effects. This review outlines essentially some of the recent chemical modifications undertaken for the development of potent antimalarial agents based on quinoline. PMID:21814435

  13. Mechanism of artemisinin resistance for malaria PfATP6 L263 mutations and discovering potential antimalarials: An integrated computational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasundaram, N.; George Priya Doss, C.; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Karthick, V.; Thirumal Kumar, D.; Balaji, V.; Siva, R.; Lu, Aiping; Ge, Zhang; Zhu, Hailong

    2016-07-01

    Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum threatens global efforts in the elimination or eradication of malaria. Several studies have associated mutations in the PfATP6 gene in conjunction with artemisinin resistance, but the underlying molecular mechanism of the resistance remains unexplored. Associated mutations act as a biomarker to measure the artemisinin efficacy. In the proposed work, we have analyzed the binding affinity and efficacy between PfATP6 and artemisinin in the presence of L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. Furthermore, we performed virtual screening to identify potential compounds to inhibit the PfATP6 mutant proteins. In this study, we observed that artemisinin binding affinity with PfATP6 gets affected by L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. This in silico elucidation of artemisinin resistance enhanced the identification of novel compounds (CID: 10595058 and 10625452) which showed good binding affinity and efficacy with L263D, L263E and L263K mutant proteins in molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations studies. Owing to the high propensity of the parasite to drug resistance the need for new antimalarial drugs will persist until the malarial parasites are eventually eradicated. The two compounds identified in this study can be tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments as possible candidates for the designing of new potential antimalarial drugs.

  14. Mechanism of artemisinin resistance for malaria PfATP6 L263 mutations and discovering potential antimalarials: An integrated computational approach

    PubMed Central

    N., Nagasundaram; C., George Priya Doss; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; V., Karthick; D., Thirumal Kumar; V., Balaji; R., Siva; Lu, Aiping; Ge, Zhang; Zhu, Hailong

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum threatens global efforts in the elimination or eradication of malaria. Several studies have associated mutations in the PfATP6 gene in conjunction with artemisinin resistance, but the underlying molecular mechanism of the resistance remains unexplored. Associated mutations act as a biomarker to measure the artemisinin efficacy. In the proposed work, we have analyzed the binding affinity and efficacy between PfATP6 and artemisinin in the presence of L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. Furthermore, we performed virtual screening to identify potential compounds to inhibit the PfATP6 mutant proteins. In this study, we observed that artemisinin binding affinity with PfATP6 gets affected by L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. This in silico elucidation of artemisinin resistance enhanced the identification of novel compounds (CID: 10595058 and 10625452) which showed good binding affinity and efficacy with L263D, L263E and L263K mutant proteins in molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations studies. Owing to the high propensity of the parasite to drug resistance the need for new antimalarial drugs will persist until the malarial parasites are eventually eradicated. The two compounds identified in this study can be tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments as possible candidates for the designing of new potential antimalarial drugs. PMID:27471101

  15. Mechanism of artemisinin resistance for malaria PfATP6 L263 mutations and discovering potential antimalarials: An integrated computational approach.

    PubMed

    N, Nagasundaram; C, George Priya Doss; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; V, Karthick; D, Thirumal Kumar; V, Balaji; R, Siva; Lu, Aiping; Ge, Zhang; Zhu, Hailong

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum threatens global efforts in the elimination or eradication of malaria. Several studies have associated mutations in the PfATP6 gene in conjunction with artemisinin resistance, but the underlying molecular mechanism of the resistance remains unexplored. Associated mutations act as a biomarker to measure the artemisinin efficacy. In the proposed work, we have analyzed the binding affinity and efficacy between PfATP6 and artemisinin in the presence of L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. Furthermore, we performed virtual screening to identify potential compounds to inhibit the PfATP6 mutant proteins. In this study, we observed that artemisinin binding affinity with PfATP6 gets affected by L263D, L263E and L263K mutations. This in silico elucidation of artemisinin resistance enhanced the identification of novel compounds (CID: 10595058 and 10625452) which showed good binding affinity and efficacy with L263D, L263E and L263K mutant proteins in molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations studies. Owing to the high propensity of the parasite to drug resistance the need for new antimalarial drugs will persist until the malarial parasites are eventually eradicated. The two compounds identified in this study can be tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments as possible candidates for the designing of new potential antimalarial drugs. PMID:27471101

  16. New orally active diphenylmethyl-based ester analogues of dihydroartemisinin: Synthesis and antimalarial assessment against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis in mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sandeep; Naikade, Niraj K; Tiwari, Mohit K; Yadav, Lalit; Shyamlal, Bharti Rajesh K; Puri, Sunil K

    2016-03-15

    A new series of ester analogues of artemisinin 8a-f, incorporating diphenylmethyl as pharmacologically privileged substructure, and 8g-j have been prepared and evaluated for their antimalarial activity against multidrug-resistant (MDR) Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis in Swiss mice via oral route. These diphenylmethyl-based ester analogues 8a-f were found to be 2-4 folds more active than the antimalarial drugs β-arteether 4 and artesunic acid 5. Ester 8a, the most active compound of the series, provided complete protection to the infected mice at 24 mg/kg × 4 days as well as 12 mg/kg × 4 days, respectively. In this model β-arteether provided 100% and 20% protection at 48 mg/kg × 4 days and 24 mg/kg × 4 days, respectively. PMID:26898813

  17. The Activities of Current Antimalarial Drugs on the Life Cycle Stages of Plasmodium: A Comparative Study with Human and Rodent Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Delves, Michael; Plouffe, David; Scheurer, Christian; Meister, Stephan; Wittlin, Sergio; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Sinden, Robert E.; Leroy, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Background Malaria remains a disease of devastating global impact, killing more than 800,000 people every year—the vast majority being children under the age of 5. While effective therapies are available, if malaria is to be eradicated a broader range of small molecule therapeutics that are able to target the liver and the transmissible sexual stages are required. These new medicines are needed both to meet the challenge of malaria eradication and to circumvent resistance. Methods and Findings Little is known about the wider stage-specific activities of current antimalarials that were primarily designed to alleviate symptoms of malaria in the blood stage. To overcome this critical gap, we developed assays to measure activity of antimalarials against all life stages of malaria parasites, using a diverse set of human and nonhuman parasite species, including male gamete production (exflagellation) in Plasmodium falciparum, ookinete development in P. berghei, oocyst development in P. berghei and P. falciparum, and the liver stage of P. yoelii. We then compared 50 current and experimental antimalarials in these assays. We show that endoperoxides such as OZ439, a stable synthetic molecule currently in clinical phase IIa trials, are strong inhibitors of gametocyte maturation/gamete formation and impact sporogony; lumefantrine impairs development in the vector; and NPC-1161B, a new 8-aminoquinoline, inhibits sporogony. Conclusions These data enable objective comparisons of the strengths and weaknesses of each chemical class at targeting each stage of the lifecycle. Noting that the activities of many compounds lie within achievable blood concentrations, these results offer an invaluable guide to decisions regarding which drugs to combine in the next-generation of antimalarial drugs. This study might reveal the potential of life-cycle–wide analyses of drugs for other pathogens with complex life cycles. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID

  18. Drug Resistance in Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Jaya; Sundar, Shyam

    2010-01-01

    The treatment options of leishmaniasis are limited and far from satisfactory. For more than 60 years, treatment of leishmaniasis has centered around pentavalent antimonials (Sbv). Widespread misuse has led to the emergence of Sbv resistance in the hyperendemic areas of North Bihar. Other antileishmanials could also face the same fate, especially in the anthroponotic cycle. The HIV/ visceral leishmaniasis (VL) coinfected patients are another potential source for the emergence of drug resistance. At present no molecular markers of resistance are available and the only reliable method for monitoring resistance of isolates is the technically demanding in vitro amastigote-macrophage model. As the armametrium of drugs for leishmaniasis is limited, it is important that effective monitoring of drug use and response should be done to prevent the spread of resistance. Regimens of simultaneous or sequential combinations should be seriously considered to limit the emergence of resistance. PMID:20606973

  19. 2D Inorganic-Antimalarial Drug-Polymer Hybrid with pH-Responsive Solubility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Yeong; Yang, Jae-Hun; Lee, Ji-Hee; Choi, Goeun; Park, Dae-Hwan; Jo, Mi-Rea; Choi, Soo-Jin; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2015-10-01

    Artesunic acid (ASH), an antimalarial drug, has low oral bioavailability due to its low aqueous solubility. To overcome this problem, artesunate (AS) was intercalated into zinc basic salt (ZBS) via co-precipitation. AS was immobilized with a tilted double layer arrangement, which was also confirmed by XRD and 1-D electron density mapping. In order to decrease the release rate of AS under gastrointestinal conditions and to simultaneously increase the release rate of AS under intestinal conditions, ZBS-AS was coated with EUDRAGIT L100 (ZBS-AS-L100). Finally, we performed an in-vivo pharmacokinetic study to compare the oral bioavailability of AS of ZBS-AS-L100 with that of ASH. Surprisingly, it was found that the former is 5.5 times greater than the latter due to an enhanced solubility of AS thanks to the ternary hybridization with ZBS and EUDRAGIT L100. Therefore, the present ZBS-AS-L100 system has a great potential as a novel antimalarial drug formulation with pH selectivity and enhanced bioavailability. PMID:25965188

  20. Purine import into malaria parasites as a target for antimalarial drug development

    PubMed Central

    Frame, I.J.; Deniskin, Roman; Arora, Avish; Akabas, Myles H.

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Plasmodium species parasites causes malaria. Plasmodium parasites are purine auxotrophs. In all life cycle stages, they require purines for RNA and DNA synthesis and other cellular metabolic processes. Purines are imported from the host erythrocyte by equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). They are processed via purine salvage–pathway enzymes to form the required purine nucleotides. The P. falciparum genome encodes four putative ENTs (PfENT1–4). Genetic, biochemical, and physiologic evidence suggest that PfENT1 is the primary purine transporter supplying the purine-salvage pathway. Protein mass spectrometry shows that PfENT1 is expressed in all parasite stages. PfENT1 knockout parasites are not viable in culture at purine concentrations found in human blood (< 10 µM). Thus, PfENT1 is a potential target for novel antimalarial drugs, but no PfENT1 inhibitors have been identified to test the hypothesis. Identifying inhibitors of PfENT1 is an essential step to validate PfENT1 as a potential antimalarial drug target. PMID:25424653

  1. Purine import into malaria parasites as a target for antimalarial drug development.

    PubMed

    Frame, I J; Deniskin, Roman; Arora, Avish; Akabas, Myles H

    2015-04-01

    Infection with Plasmodium species parasites causes malaria. Plasmodium parasites are purine auxotrophs. In all life cycle stages, they require purines for RNA and DNA synthesis and other cellular metabolic processes. Purines are imported from the host erythrocyte by equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs). They are processed via purine salvage pathway enzymes to form the required purine nucleotides. The Plasmodium falciparum genome encodes four putative ENTs (PfENT1-4). Genetic, biochemical, and physiologic evidence suggest that PfENT1 is the primary purine transporter supplying the purine salvage pathway. Protein mass spectrometry shows that PfENT1 is expressed in all parasite stages. PfENT1 knockout parasites are not viable in culture at purine concentrations found in human blood (<10 μM). Thus, PfENT1 is a potential target for novel antimalarial drugs, but no PfENT1 inhibitors have been identified to test the hypothesis. Identifying inhibitors of PfENT1 is an essential step to validate PfENT1 as a potential antimalarial drug target. PMID:25424653

  2. CRIMALDDI: a co-ordinated, rational, and integrated effort to set logical priorities in anti-malarial drug discovery initiatives

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Despite increasing efforts and support for anti-malarial drug R&D, globally anti-malarial drug discovery and development remains largely uncoordinated and fragmented. The current window of opportunity for large scale funding of R&D into malaria is likely to narrow in the coming decade due to a contraction in available resources caused by the current economic difficulties and new priorities (e.g. climate change). It is, therefore, essential that stakeholders are given well-articulated action plans and priorities to guide judgments on where resources can be best targeted. The CRIMALDDI Consortium (a European Union funded initiative) has been set up to develop, through a process of stakeholder and expert consultations, such priorities and recommendations to address them. It is hoped that the recommendations will help to guide the priorities of the European anti-malarial research as well as the wider global discovery agenda in the coming decade. PMID:20626844

  3. Evaluation of aminohydantoins as a novel class of antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Marvin J; Tortorella, Micky D; Xu, Jing; Qin, Limei; He, Zhengxiang; Lang, Xingfen; Zeng, Wentian; Xu, Wanwan; Qin, Li; Prinsen, Michael J; Sverdrup, Francis M; Eickhoff, Christopher S; Griggs, David W; Oliva, Jonathan; Ruminski, Peter G; Jacobsen, E Jon; Campbell, Mary A; Wood, David C; Goldberg, Daniel E; Liu, Xiaorong; Lu, Yongzhi; Lu, Xin; Tu, Zhengchao; Lu, Xiaoyun; Ding, Ke; Chen, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Given the threat of drug resistance, there is an acute need for new classes of antimalarial agents that act via a unique mechanism of action relative to currently used drugs. We have identified a set of druglike compounds within the Tres Cantos Anti-Malarial Set (TCAMS) which likely act via inhibition of a Plasmodium aspartic protease. Structure-activity relationship analysis and optimization of these aminohydantoins demonstrate that these compounds are potent nanomolar inhibitors of the Plasmodium aspartic proteases PM-II and PM-IV and likely one or more other Plasmodium aspartic proteases. Incorporation of a bulky group, such as a cyclohexyl group, on the aminohydantion N-3 position gives enhanced antimalarial potency while reducing inhibition of human aspartic proteases such as BACE. We have identified compound 8p (CWHM-117) as a promising lead for optimization as an antimalarial drug with a low molecular weight, modest lipophilicity, oral bioavailability, and in vivo antimalarial activity in mice. PMID:24900778

  4. Molecular Farming in Artemisia annua, a Promising Approach to Improve Anti-malarial Drug Production

    PubMed Central

    Pulice, Giuseppe; Pelaz, Soraya; Matías-Hernández, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a parasite infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Even though progress has been made in prevention and treatment of the disease; an estimated 214 million cases of malaria occurred in 2015, resulting in 438,000 estimated deaths; most of them occurring in Africa among children under the age of five. This article aims to review the epidemiology, future risk factors and current treatments of malaria, with particular focus on the promising potential of molecular farming that uses metabolic engineering in plants as an effective anti-malarial solution. Malaria represents an example of how a health problem may, on one hand, influence the proper development of a country, due to its burden of the disease. On the other hand, it constitutes an opportunity for lucrative business of diverse stakeholders. In contrast, plant biofarming is proposed here as a sustainable, promising, alternative for the production, not only of natural herbal repellents for malaria prevention but also for the production of sustainable anti-malarial drugs, like artemisinin (AN), used for primary parasite infection treatments. AN, a sesquiterpene lactone, is a natural anti-malarial compound that can be found in Artemisia annua. However, the low concentration of AN in the plant makes this molecule relatively expensive and difficult to produce in order to meet the current worldwide demand of Artemisinin Combination Therapies (ACTs), especially for economically disadvantaged people in developing countries. The biosynthetic pathway of AN, a process that takes place only in glandular secretory trichomes of A. annua, is relatively well elucidated. Significant efforts have been made using plant genetic engineering to increase production of this compound. These include diverse genetic manipulation approaches, such as studies on diverse transcription factors which have been shown to regulate the AN genetic pathway and other biological processes. Results look promising; however, further

  5. Availability of Antimalarial Drugs and Evaluation of the Attitude and Practices for the Treatment of Uncomplicated Malaria in Bangui, Central African Republic

    PubMed Central

    Manirakiza, Alexandre; Njuimo, Siméon Pierre; Le Faou, Alain; Malvy, Denis; Millet, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    National malaria management policy is based upon the availability of effective and affordable antimalarial drugs. This study was undertaken to evaluate the quality of the treatment of uncomplicated malaria cases in Bangui, an area with multidrug-resistant parasites, at a time preceding implementation of a new therapeutic policy relying on the artemisinin derivative combined treatment artemether-lumefantrine. A cross-sectional study was carried out in Bangui city to assess availability of antimalarial drugs and the performances of health workers in the management of uncomplicated malaria. Availability of drugs was recorded in all drugs wholesalers (n = 3), all pharmacies in health facilities (n = 14), private drugstores (n = 15), and in 60 non-official drug shops randomly chosen in the city. Despite a limited efficacy at the time of the survey, chloroquine remained widely available in the official and nonofficial markets. Artemisinin derivatives used in monotherapy or in combination were commonly sold. In health care facilities, 93% of the uncomplicated malaria cases were treated in the absence of any laboratory confirmation and the officially recommended treatment, amodiaquine-sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, was seldom prescribed. Thus, the national guidelines for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria are not followed by health professionals in Bangui. Its use should be implemented while a control of importation of drug has to be reinforced. PMID:20339579

  6. Quality of Antimalarial Drugs and Antibiotics in Papua New Guinea: A Survey of the Health Facility Supply Chain

    PubMed Central

    Hetzel, Manuel W.; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Bala, Nancy; Pulford, Justin; Betuela, Inoni; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Lavu, Evelyn K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor-quality life-saving medicines are a major public health threat, particularly in settings with a weak regulatory environment. Insufficient amounts of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) endanger patient safety and may contribute to the development of drug resistance. In the case of malaria, concerns relate to implications for the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT). In Papua New Guinea (PNG), Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax are both endemic and health facilities are the main source of treatment. ACT has been introduced as first-line treatment but other drugs, such as primaquine for the treatment of P. vivax hypnozoites, are widely available. This study investigated the quality of antimalarial drugs and selected antibiotics at all levels of the health facility supply chain in PNG. Methods and Findings Medicines were obtained from randomly sampled health facilities and selected warehouses and hospitals across PNG and analysed for API content using validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Of 360 tablet/capsule samples from 60 providers, 9.7% (95% CI 6.9, 13.3) contained less, and 0.6% more, API than pharmacopoeial reference ranges, including 29/37 (78.4%) primaquine, 3/70 (4.3%) amodiaquine, and one sample each of quinine, artemether, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and amoxicillin. According to the package label, 86.5% of poor-quality samples originated from India. Poor-quality medicines were found in 48.3% of providers at all levels of the supply chain. Drug quality was unrelated to storage conditions. Conclusions This study documents the presence of poor-quality medicines, particularly primaquine, throughout PNG. Primaquine is the only available transmission-blocking antimalarial, likely to become important to prevent the spread of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum and eliminating P. vivax hypnozoites. The availability of poor-quality medicines reflects the lack of adequate quality control and regulatory

  7. Psychiatric effects of malaria and anti-malarial drugs: historical and modern perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Remington L; Croft, Ashley M

    2016-01-01

    The modern medical literature implicates malaria, and particularly the potentially fatal form of cerebral malaria, with a risk of neurocognitive impairment. Yet historically, even milder forms of malaria were associated in the literature with a broad range of psychiatric effects, including disorders of personality, mood, memory, attention, thought, and behaviour. In this article, the history of psychiatric effects attributed to malaria and post-malaria syndromes is reviewed, and insights from the historical practice of malariotherapy in contributing to understanding of these effects are considered. This review concludes with a discussion of the potentially confounding role of the adverse effects of anti-malarial drugs, particularly of the quinoline class, in the unique attribution of certain psychiatric effects to malaria, and of the need for a critical reevaluation of the literature in light of emerging evidence of the chronic nature of these adverse drug effects. PMID:27335053

  8. Holographic analysis on deformation and restoration of malaria-infected red blood cells by antimalarial drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Hyeokjun; Ha, Young-Ran; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-11-01

    Malaria parasites induce morphological, biochemical, and mechanical changes in red blood cells (RBCs). Mechanical variations are closely related to the deformability of individual RBCs. The deformation of various RBCs, including healthy and malaria-infected RBCs (iRBCs), can be directly observed through quantitative phase imaging (QPI). The effects of chloroquine treatment on the mechanical property variation of iRBCs were investigated using time-resolved holographic QPI of single live cells on a millisecond time scale. The deformabilities of healthy RBCs, iRBCs, and drug-treated iRBCs were compared, and the effect of chloroquine on iRBC restoration was experimentally examined. The present results are beneficial to elucidate the dynamic characteristics of iRBCs and the effect of the antimalarial drug on iRBCs.

  9. A population genetic model for the initial spread of partially resistant malaria parasites under anti-malarial combination therapy and weak intrahost competition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuseob; Escalante, Ananias A; Schneider, Kristan A

    2014-01-01

    To develop public-health policies that extend the lifespan of affordable anti-malarial drugs as effective treatment options, it is necessary to understand the evolutionary processes leading to the origin and spread of mutations conferring drug resistance in malarial parasites. We built a population-genetic model for the emergence of resistance under combination drug therapy. Reproductive cycles of parasites are specified by their absolute fitness determined by clinical parameters, thus coupling the evolutionary-genetic with population-dynamic processes. Initial mutations confer only partial drug-resistance. Therefore, mutant parasites rarely survive combination therapy and within-host competition is very weak among parasites. The model focuses on the early phase of such unsuccessful recurrent mutations. This ends in the rare event of mutants enriching in an infected individual from which the successful spread of resistance over the entire population is initiated. By computer simulations, the waiting time until the establishment of resistant parasites is analysed. Resistance spreads quickly following the first appearance of a host infected predominantly by mutant parasites. This occurs either through a rare transmission of a resistant parasite to an uninfected host or through a rare failure of drugs in removing "transient" mutant alleles. The emergence of resistance is delayed with lower mutation rate, earlier treatment, higher metabolic cost of resistance, longer duration of high drug dose, and higher drug efficacy causing a stronger reduction in the sensitive and resistant parasites' fitnesses. Overall, contrary to other studies' proposition, the current model based on absolute fitness suggests that aggressive drug treatment delays the emergence of drug resistance. PMID:25007207

  10. Natural polyhydroxyalkanoate-gold nanocomposite based biosensor for detection of antimalarial drug artemisinin.

    PubMed

    Phukon, Pinkee; Radhapyari, Keisham; Konwar, Bolin Kumar; Khan, Raju

    2014-04-01

    The worrisome trend of antimalarial resistance has already highlighted the importance of artemisinin as a potent antimalarial agent. The current investigation aimed at fabricating a biosensor based on natural polymer polyhydroxyalkanoate-gold nanoparticle composite mounting on an indium-tin oxide glass plate for the analysis of artemisinin. The biosensor was fabricated using an adsorbing horse-radish peroxidase enzyme on the electrode surface for which cyclic voltammetry was used to monitor the electro-catalytic reduction of artemisinin under diffusion controlled conditions. Electrochemical interfacial properties and immobilization of enzyme onto a polyhydroxyalkanoate-gold nanoparticle film were evaluated, and confirmed by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The differential pulse voltammetric peak current for artemisinin was increased linearly (concentration range of 0.01-0.08μg mL(-1)) with sensitivity of 0.26μAμg mL(-1). The greater sensitivity of the fabricated biosensor to artemisinin (optimum limits of detection were 0.0035μg mL(-1) and 0.0036μg mL(-1) in bulk and spiked human serum, respectively) could be of much aid in medical diagnosis. PMID:24582254

  11. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors: New class of antimalarials on the horizon?

    PubMed

    Pathak, Vrushali; Colah, Roshan; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-08-01

    Development of the antimalarial drug resistant strains has currently become a major public health challenge. There is an urgent need to develop new antimalarial drugs. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are receiving increasing attention as anticancer therapy. It has revolutionarised the management of CML to say the least. TKIs are also increasingly being implicated in complicated but vital life cycle of malaria parasite. Hence we tested two commonly used but different classes of TKIs (imatinib and sorafenib) in-vitro for their antimalarial activity and possible synergistic activity with existing antimalarial drug. Antimalarial activity was tested with the help of modified WHO microtest technique in-vitro for five different Plasmodium falciparum laboratory strains (3D7, Dd2, 7G8, MRC2, PKL9). Imatinib and sorafenib showed a promising antimalarial activity with all the strains. These compounds caused dose dependent inhibition of parasite maturation. The isobologram analysis of the interactions of these TKIs with standard antimalarial drug, artesunate revealed distinct patterns of synergism, additivity and antagonism at different ratios. Imatinib showed worthwhile synergism with artesunate indicating imatinib and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors may have significant antimalarial activity and can be used in combination therapy. PMID:26142327

  12. Quinoline-based antimalarial hybrid compounds.

    PubMed

    Vandekerckhove, Stéphanie; D'hooghe, Matthias

    2015-08-15

    Quinoline-containing compounds, such as quinine and chloroquine, have a long-standing history as potent antimalarial agents. However, the increasing resistance of the Plasmodium parasite against these drugs and the lack of licensed malaria vaccines have forced chemists to develop synthetic strategies toward novel biologically active molecules. A strategy that has attracted considerable attention in current medicinal chemistry is based on the conjugation of two biologically active molecules into one hybrid compound. Since quinolines are considered to be privileged antimalarial building blocks, the synthesis of quinoline-containing antimalarial hybrids has been elaborated extensively in recent years. This review provides a literature overview of antimalarial hybrid molecules containing a quinoline core, covering publications between 2009 and 2014. PMID:25593097

  13. Stability of the Antimalarial Drug Dihydroartemisinin under Physiologically Relevant Conditions: Implications for Clinical Treatment and Pharmacokinetic and In Vitro Assays

    PubMed Central

    Parapini, Silvia; Olliaro, Piero; Navaratnam, Visweswaran; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinins are peroxidic antimalarial drugs known to be very potent but highly chemically unstable; they degrade in the presence of ferrous iron, Fe(II)-heme, or biological reductants. Less documented is how this translates into chemical stability and antimalarial activity across a range of conditions applying to in vitro testing and clinical situations. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is studied here because it is an antimalarial drug on its own and the main metabolite of other artemisinins. The behaviors of DHA in phosphate-buffered saline, plasma, or erythrocyte lysate at different temperatures and pH ranges were examined. The antimalarial activity of the residual drug was evaluated using the chemosensitivity assay on Plasmodium falciparum, and the extent of decomposition of DHA was established through use of high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection analysis. The role of the Fe(II)-heme was investigated by blocking its reactivity using carbon monoxide (CO). A significant reduction in the antimalarial activity of DHA was seen after incubation in plasma and to a lesser extent in erythrocyte lysate. Activity was reduced by half after 3 h and almost completely abolished after 24 h. Serum-enriched media also affected DHA activity. Effects were temperature and pH dependent and paralleled the increased rate of decomposition of DHA from pH 7 upwards and in plasma. These results suggest that particular care should be taken in conducting and interpreting in vitro studies, prone as their results are to experimental and drug storage conditions. Disorders such as fever, hemolysis, or acidosis associated with malaria severity may contribute to artemisinin instability and reduce their clinical efficacy. PMID:25918150

  14. Mass administration of the antimalarial drug mefloquine to Guantánamo detainees: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Remington L

    2012-10-01

    Recently, evidence has emerged from an unusual form of mass drug administration practised among detainees held at US Naval Station Guantánamo Bay, Cuba ('Guantánamo'), ostensibly as a public health measure. Mefloquine, an antimalarial drug originally developed by the US military, whose use is associated with a range of severe neuropsychiatric adverse effects, was administered at treatment doses to detainees immediately upon their arrival at Guantánamo, prior to laboratory testing for malaria and irrespective of symptoms of disease. In this analysis, the history of mefloquine's development is reviewed and the indications for its administration at treatment doses are discussed. The stated rationale for the use of mefloquine among Guantánamo detainees is then evaluated in the context of accepted forms of population-based malaria control. It is concluded that there was no plausible public health indication for the use of mefloquine at Guantánamo and that based on prevailing standards of care, the clinical indications for its use are decidedly unclear. This analysis suggests the troubling possibility that the use of mefloquine at Guantánamo may have been motivated in part by knowledge of the drug's adverse effects, and points to a critical need for further investigation to resolve unanswered questions regarding the drug's potentially inappropriate use. PMID:22882560

  15. Practical aspects of in vivo antimalarial drug efficacy testing in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Ruebush, Trenton K; Marquiño, Wilmer; Zegarra, Jorge; Neyra, Daniel; Villaroel, Rodolfo; Avila, Juan Carlos; Díaz, César; Beltrán, Efraín

    2003-04-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed guidelines for in vivo antimalarial drug efficacy testing for Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax in areas with low-to-moderate transmission, such as the Americas. These guidelines are used widely by ministries of health and national malaria control programs to assess the efficacy of their first-line and second-line drugs for the treatment of malaria and to provide the information necessary to update national malaria treatment policies. Following the WHO guidelines, we have conducted in vivo efficacy trials with a variety of drugs and drug combinations against P. falciparum and P. vivax at 13 sites in Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador. Based on these experiences, we have identified several modifications that we believe should be made in the WHO recommendations to make them more suitable to the relatively low levels of P. falciparum transmission in the Americas and to the logistic challenges of carrying out such studies in sparsely populated areas, such as the Amazon Basin. These include changes in inclusion and exclusion criteria, in enrollment and follow-up procedures, and in the measurement of study outcomes. PMID:12875285

  16. Peptide deformylase: a new target in antibacterial, antimalarial and anticancer drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Sangshetti, Jaiprakash N; Khan, Firoz A Kalam; Shinde, Devanand B

    2015-01-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is a class of metalloenzyme responsible for catalyzing the removal of the N-formyl group from N-terminal methionine following translation. PDF inhibitors are moving into new phase of drug development. Initially, PDF was considered as an important target in antibacterial drug discovery; however genome database searches have revealed PDF-like sequences in parasites (P. falciparum) and human, widening the utility of this target in antimalarial and anticancer drug discovery along with antibacterial. Using structural and mechanistic information together with high throughput screening, several types of chemical classes of PDF inhibitors with improved efficacy and specificity have been identified. Various drugs like, GSK-1322322 (Phase II), BB-83698 (Phase I), and LBM-415 (Phase I) have entered into clinical developments. Developments in the field have prompted us to review the current aspects of PDFs, especially their structures, different classes of PDF inhibitors, and molecular modeling studies. In nut shell, this review enlightens PDF as a versatile target along with its inhibitors and future perspectives of different PDF inhibitors. PMID:25174923

  17. Highly active ozonides selected against drug resistant malaria.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Lis; Sousa, Bruno de; Cabral, Lília; Cristiano, Maria Ls; Nogueira, Fátima

    2016-06-01

    Ever increasing multi-drug resistance by Plasmodium falciparum is creating new challenges in malaria chemotherapy. In the absence of licensed vaccines, treatment and prevention of malaria is heavily dependent on drugs. Potency, range of activity, safety, low cost and ease of administration are crucial issues in the design and formulation of antimalarials. We have tested three synthetic ozonides NAC89, LC50 and LCD67 in vitro and in vivo against multidrug resistant Plasmodium. In vitro, LC50 was at least 10 times more efficient inhibiting P. falciparum multidrug resistant Dd2 strain than chloroquine and mefloquine and as efficient as artemisinin (ART), artesunate and dihydroartemisinin. All three ozonides showed high efficacy in clearing parasitaemia in mice, caused by multi-drug resistant Plasmodium chabaudi strains, by subcutaneous administration, demonstrating high efficacy in vivo against ART and artesunate resistant parasites. PMID:27276364

  18. Highly active ozonides selected against drug resistant malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Lis; de Sousa, Bruno; Cabral, Lília; Cristiano, Maria LS; Nogueira, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Ever increasing multi-drug resistance by Plasmodium falciparum is creating new challenges in malaria chemotherapy. In the absence of licensed vaccines, treatment and prevention of malaria is heavily dependent on drugs. Potency, range of activity, safety, low cost and ease of administration are crucial issues in the design and formulation of antimalarials. We have tested three synthetic ozonides NAC89, LC50 and LCD67 in vitro and in vivo against multidrug resistant Plasmodium. In vitro, LC50 was at least 10 times more efficient inhibiting P. falciparum multidrug resistant Dd2 strain than chloroquine and mefloquine and as efficient as artemisinin (ART), artesunate and dihydroartemisinin. All three ozonides showed high efficacy in clearing parasitaemia in mice, caused by multi-drug resistant Plasmodium chabaudi strains, by subcutaneous administration, demonstrating high efficacy in vivo against ART and artesunate resistant parasites. PMID:27276364

  19. Drug resistance in leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Croft, Simon L; Sundar, Shyam; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2006-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a complex disease, with visceral and cutaneous manifestations, and is caused by over 15 different species of the protozoan parasite genus Leishmania. There are significant differences in the sensitivity of these species both to the standard drugs, for example, pentavalent antimonials and miltefosine, and those on clinical trial, for example, paromomycin. Over 60% of patients with visceral leishmaniasis in Bihar State, India, do not respond to treatment with pentavalent antimonials. This is now considered to be due to acquired resistance. Although this class of drugs has been used for over 60 years for leishmaniasis treatment, it is only in the past 2 years that the mechanisms of action and resistance have been identified, related to drug metabolism, thiol metabolism, and drug efflux. With the introduction of new therapies, including miltefosine in 2002 and paromomycin in 2005-2006, it is essential that there be a strategy to prevent the emergence of resistance to new drugs; combination therapy, monitoring of therapy, and improved diagnostics could play an essential role in this strategy. PMID:16418526

  20. Artemisinin-based antimalarial research: application of biotechnology to the production of artemisinin, its mode of action, and the mechanism of resistance of Plasmodium parasites.

    PubMed

    Muangphrom, Paskorn; Seki, Hikaru; Fukushima, Ery Odette; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2016-07-01

    Malaria is a worldwide disease caused by Plasmodium parasites. A sesquiterpene endoperoxide artemisinin isolated from Artemisia annua was discovered and has been accepted for its use in artemisinin-based combinatorial therapies, as the most effective current antimalarial treatment. However, the quantity of this compound produced from the A. annua plant is very low, and the availability of artemisinin is insufficient to treat all infected patients. In addition, the emergence of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium has been reported recently. Several techniques have been applied to enhance artemisinin availability, and studies related to its mode of action and the mechanism of resistance of malaria-causing parasites are ongoing. In this review, we summarize the application of modern technologies to improve the production of artemisinin, including our ongoing research on artemisinin biosynthetic genes in other Artemisia species. The current understanding of the mode of action of artemisinin as well as the mechanism of resistance against this compound in Plasmodium parasites is also presented. Finally, the current situation of malaria infection and the future direction of antimalarial drug development are discussed. PMID:27250562

  1. New Antimalarial Hits from Dacryodes edulis (Burseraceae) - Part I: Isolation, In Vitro Activity, In Silico “drug-likeness” and Pharmacokinetic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zofou, Denis; Tematio, Esther Laure; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Tene, Mathieu; Ngemenya, Moses N.; Tane, Pierre; Titanji, Vincent P. K.

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to identify the compounds responsible for the anti-malarial activity of Dacryoedes edulis (Burseraceae) and to investigate their suitability as leads for the treatment of drug resistant malaria. Five compounds were isolated from ethyl acetate and hexane extracts of D. edulis stem bark and tested against 3D7 (chloroquine-susceptible) and Dd2 (multidrug-resistant) strains of Plasmodium falciparum, using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase method. Cytotoxicity studies were carried out on LLC-MK2 monkey kidney epithelial cell-line. In silico analysis was conducted by calculating molecular descriptors using the MOE software running on a Linux workstation. The “drug-likeness” of the isolated compounds was assessed using Lipinski criteria, from computed molecular properties of the geometry optimized structures. Computed descriptors often used to predict absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination and toxicity (ADMET) were used to assess the pharmacokinetic profiles of the isolated compounds. Antiplasmodial activity was demonstrated for the first time in five major natural products previously identified in D. edulis, but not tested against malaria parasites. The most active compound identified was termed DES4. It had IC50 values of 0.37 and 0.55 µg/mL, against 3D7 and Dd2 respectively. In addition, this compound was shown to act in synergy with quinine, satisfied all criteria of “Drug-likeness” and showed considerable probability of providing an antimalarial lead. The remaining four compounds also showed antiplasmodial activity, but were less effective than DES4. None of the tested compounds was cytotoxicity against LLC-MK2 cells, suggesting their selective activities on malaria parasites. Based on the high in vitro activity, low toxicity and predicted “Drug-likeness” DES4 merits further investigation as a possible drug lead for the treatment of malaria. PMID:24282507

  2. Validation of ELISA for Quantitation of Artemisinin-Based Antimalarial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Cui, Yongliang; Zhou, Guofa; Yan, Guiyun; Cui, Liwang; Wang, Baomin

    2013-01-01

    The circulation of counterfeit or substandard artemisinins (ARTs) in malaria-endemic areas poses a serious threat to the long-term use of these drugs. Here, we validated an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) for quantification of ARTs and found that 50% of inhibitory concentrations of dihydroartemisinin, artemether, and artesunate were 8.1, 207.0, and 4.7 ng/mL, respectively. We compared the icELISA with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for quantifying ART and its derivatives in 22 convenience samples of commercial antimalarial drugs. Paired t tests showed a borderline significant difference between the two methods (mean = 0.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.00–0.07, P = 0.074) and the icELISA results were more variable than those of the HPLC analysis (P < 0.001), suggesting that further improvement is needed to enhance the performance of the icELISA. Our results showed that the icELISA has the potential to be improved for quality assurance of ARTs at the point of care in endemic settings. PMID:24080636

  3. Salinomycin and Other Ionophores as a New Class of Antimalarial Drugs with Transmission-Blocking Activity

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessandro, Sarah; Corbett, Yolanda; Ilboudo, Denise P.; Misiano, Paola; Dahiya, Nisha; Abay, Solomon M.; Habluetzel, Annette; Grande, Romualdo; Gismondo, Maria R.; Dechering, Koen J.; Koolen, Karin M. J.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Taramelli, Donatella; Parapini, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The drug target profile proposed by the Medicines for Malaria Venture for a malaria elimination/eradication policy focuses on molecules active on both asexual and sexual stages of Plasmodium, thus with both curative and transmission-blocking activities. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether the class of monovalent ionophores, which includes drugs used in veterinary medicine and that were recently proposed as human anticancer agents, meets these requirements. The activity of salinomycin, monensin, and nigericin on Plasmodium falciparum asexual and sexual erythrocytic stages and on the development of the Plasmodium berghei and P. falciparum mosquito stages is reported here. Gametocytogenesis of the P. falciparum strain 3D7 was induced in vitro, and gametocytes at stage II and III or stage IV and V of development were treated for different lengths of time with the ionophores and their viability measured with the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay. The monovalent ionophores efficiently killed both asexual parasites and gametocytes with a nanomolar 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50). Salinomycin showed a fast speed of kill compared to that of standard drugs, and the potency was higher on stage IV and V than on stage II and III gametocytes. The ionophores inhibited ookinete development and subsequent oocyst formation in the mosquito midgut, confirming their transmission-blocking activity. Potential toxicity due to hemolysis was excluded, since only infected and not normal erythrocytes were damaged by ionophores. Our data strongly support the downstream exploration of monovalent ionophores for repositioning as new antimalarial and transmission-blocking leads. PMID:26055362

  4. Antimalarial drug utilization by women in Ethiopia: a knowledge-attitudes-practice study.

    PubMed Central

    Yeneneh, H.; Gyorkos, T. W.; Joseph, L.; Pickering, J.; Tedla, S.

    1993-01-01

    A survey was undertaken between December 1991 and February 1992 to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practices with respect to malaria of 300 women from six randomly selected rural communities in central Ethiopia. A total of 85% were able to recognize one or more of the common symptoms of the disease; however, the modes of transmission were generally misunderstood and only 23% believed that transmission could be prevented. More women preferred to obtain antimalarials from government clinics rather than from private drug shops, mission clinics, unofficial suppliers of injections, open markets, or from leftover sources. Under-5-year-olds were identified as the most malaria-vulnerable group and given priority for treatment; severity of illness was the principal determinant in seeking treatment. Decisions about treatment were generally made jointly by both parents. Knowledge about the transmissibility of malaria decreased with increasing distance from a health unit (odds ratio: 0.48; 95% confidence interval: 0.27, 0.86). A logistic regression analysis indicated that literacy and village were the most important variables associated with knowledge about preventing malaria. PMID:8313494

  5. Hemin potentiates the anti-hepatitis C virus activity of the antimalarial drug artemisinin

    SciTech Connect

    Paeshuyse, Jan; Coelmont, Lotte; Vliegen, Inge; Hemel, Johan van; Vandenkerckhove, Jan; Peys, Eric; Sas, Benedikt; Clercq, Erik De; Neyts, Johan . E-mail: johan.neyts@rega.kuleuven.be

    2006-09-15

    We report that the antimalarial drug artemisinin inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicon replication in a dose-dependent manner in two replicon constructs at concentrations that have no effect on the proliferation of the exponentially growing host cells. The 50% effective concentration (EC{sub 5}) for inhibition of HCV subgenomic replicon replication in Huh 5-2 cells (luciferase assay) by artemisinin was 78 {+-} 21 {mu}M. Hemin, an iron donor, was recently reported to inhibit HCV replicon replication [mediated by inhibition of the viral polymerase (C. Fillebeen, A.M. Rivas-Estilla, M. Bisaillon, P. Ponka, M. Muckenthaler, M.W. Hentze, A.E. Koromilas, K. Pantopoulos, Iron inactivates the RNA polymerase NS5B and suppresses subgenomic replication of hepatitis C virus, J. Biol. Chem. 280 (2005) 9049-9057.)] at a concentration that had no adverse effect on the host cells. When combined, artemisinin and hemin resulted, over a broad concentration range, in a pronounced synergistic antiviral activity. Also at a concentration (2 {mu}M) that alone had no effect on HCV replication, hemin still potentiated the anti-HCV activity of artemisinin.

  6. Assessing the utility of an anti-malarial pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for aiding drug clinical development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mechanistic within-host models relating blood anti-malarial drug concentrations with the parasite-time profile help in assessing dosing schedules and partner drugs for new anti-malarial treatments. A comprehensive simulation study to assess the utility of a stage-specific pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model for predicting within-host parasite response was performed. Methods Three anti-malarial combination therapies were selected: artesunate-mefloquine, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, and artemether-lumefantrine. The PK-PD model included parameters to represent the concentration-time profiles of both drugs, the initial parasite burden and distribution across the parasite life cycle, and the parasite multiplication factor due to asexual reproduction. The model also included the maximal killing rate of each drug, and the blood drug concentration associated with half of that killing effect (in vivo EC50), derived from the in vitro IC50, the extent of binding to 0.5% Albumax present in the in vitro testing media, and the drugs plasma protein binding and whole blood to plasma partitioning ratio. All stochastic simulations were performed using a Latin-Hypercube-Sampling approach. Results The simulations demonstrated that the proportion of patients cured was highly sensitive to the in vivo EC50 and the maximal killing rate of the partner drug co-administered with the artemisinin derivative. The in vivo EC50 values that corresponded to on average 95% of patients cured were much higher than the adjusted values derived from the in vitro IC50. The proportion clinically cured was not strongly influenced by changes in the parameters defining the age distribution of the initial parasite burden (mean age of 4 to 16 hours) and the parasite multiplication factor every life cycle (ranging from 8 to 12 fold/cycle). The median parasite clearance times, however, lengthened as the standard deviation of the initial parasite burden increased (i.e. the infection became

  7. Molecular Mechanisms for Drug Hypersensitivity Induced by the Malaria Parasite's Chloroquine Resistance Transporter.

    PubMed

    Richards, Sashika N; Nash, Megan N; Baker, Eileen S; Webster, Michael W; Lehane, Adele M; Shafik, Sarah H; Martin, Rowena E

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum 'chloroquine resistance transporter' (PfCRT) confer resistance to chloroquine (CQ) and related antimalarials by enabling the protein to transport these drugs away from their targets within the parasite's digestive vacuole (DV). However, CQ resistance-conferring isoforms of PfCRT (PfCRTCQR) also render the parasite hypersensitive to a subset of structurally-diverse pharmacons. Moreover, mutations in PfCRTCQR that suppress the parasite's hypersensitivity to these molecules simultaneously reinstate its sensitivity to CQ and related drugs. We sought to understand these phenomena by characterizing the functions of PfCRTCQR isoforms that cause the parasite to become hypersensitive to the antimalarial quinine or the antiviral amantadine. We achieved this by measuring the abilities of these proteins to transport CQ, quinine, and amantadine when expressed in Xenopus oocytes and complemented this work with assays that detect the drug transport activity of PfCRT in its native environment within the parasite. Here we describe two mechanistic explanations for PfCRT-induced drug hypersensitivity. First, we show that quinine, which normally accumulates inside the DV and therewithin exerts its antimalarial effect, binds extremely tightly to the substrate-binding site of certain isoforms of PfCRTCQR. By doing so it likely blocks the normal physiological function of the protein, which is essential for the parasite's survival, and the drug thereby gains an additional killing effect. In the second scenario, we show that although amantadine also sequesters within the DV, the parasite's hypersensitivity to this drug arises from the PfCRTCQR-mediated transport of amantadine from the DV into the cytosol, where it can better access its antimalarial target. In both cases, the mutations that suppress hypersensitivity also abrogate the ability of PfCRTCQR to transport CQ, thus explaining why rescue from hypersensitivity restores the parasite

  8. Discovery of a selective, safe and novel anti-malarial compound with activity against chloroquine resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ankita; Paliwal, Sarvesh; Mishra, Ruchi; Sharma, Swapnil; Kumar Dwivedi, Anil; Tripathi, Renu; Gunjan, Sarika

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the DNA minor groove has attracted much attention for the development of anti-malarial agents. In view of this we have attempted to discover novel DNA minor groove binders through in-silico and in-vitro workflow. A rigorously validated pharmacophore model comprising of two positive ionizable (PI), one hydrophobic (HY) and one ring aromatic (RA) features was used to mine NCI chemical compound database. This led to retrieval of many hits which were screened on the basis of estimated activity, fit value and Lipinski’s violation. Finally two compounds NSC639017 and NSC371488 were evaluated for their in-vitro anti-malarial activities against Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 (CQ sensitive) and K1 (CQ resistant) strains by SYBR green-I based fluorescence assay. The results revealed that out of two, NSC639017 posses excellent anti-malarial activity particularly against chloroquine resistant strain and moreover NSC639017 also appeared to be safe (CC50 126.04 μg/ml) and selective during cytotoxicity evaluation. PMID:26346444

  9. Origin of Robustness in Generating Drug-Resistant Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Kümpornsin, Krittikorn; Modchang, Charin; Heinberg, Adina; Ekland, Eric H.; Jirawatcharadech, Piyaporn; Chobson, Pornpimol; Suwanakitti, Nattida; Chaotheing, Sastra; Wilairat, Prapon; Deitsch, Kirk W.; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Fidock, David A.; Kirkman, Laura A.; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Chookajorn, Thanat

    2014-01-01

    Biological robustness allows mutations to accumulate while maintaining functional phenotypes. Despite its crucial role in evolutionary processes, the mechanistic details of how robustness originates remain elusive. Using an evolutionary trajectory analysis approach, we demonstrate how robustness evolved in malaria parasites under selective pressure from an antimalarial drug inhibiting the folate synthesis pathway. A series of four nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions at the targeted enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), render the parasites highly resistant to the antifolate drug pyrimethamine. Nevertheless, the stepwise gain of these four dhfr mutations results in tradeoffs between pyrimethamine resistance and parasite fitness. Here, we report the epistatic interaction between dhfr mutations and amplification of the gene encoding the first upstream enzyme in the folate pathway, GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1). gch1 amplification confers low level pyrimethamine resistance and would thus be selected for by pyrimethamine treatment. Interestingly, the gch1 amplification can then be co-opted by the parasites because it reduces the cost of acquiring drug-resistant dhfr mutations downstream in the same metabolic pathway. The compensation of compromised fitness by extra GCH1 is an example of how robustness can evolve in a system and thus expand the accessibility of evolutionary trajectories leading toward highly resistant alleles. The evolution of robustness during the gain of drug-resistant mutations has broad implications for both the development of new drugs and molecular surveillance for resistance to existing drugs. PMID:24739308

  10. Incorporating Stage-Specific Drug Action into Pharmacological Modeling of Antimalarial Drug Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological modeling of antiparasitic treatment based on a drug's pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties plays an increasingly important role in identifying optimal drug dosing regimens and predicting their potential impact on control and elimination programs. Conventional modeling of treatment relies on methods that do not distinguish between parasites at different developmental stages. This is problematic for malaria parasites, as their sensitivity to drugs varies substantially during their 48-h developmental cycle. We investigated four drug types (short or long half-lives with or without stage-specific killing) to quantify the accuracy of the standard methodology. The treatment dynamics of three drug types were well characterized with standard modeling. The exception were short-half-life drugs with stage-specific killing (i.e., artemisinins) because, depending on time of treatment, parasites might be in highly drug-sensitive stages or in much less sensitive stages. We describe how to bring such drugs into pharmacological modeling by including additional variation into the drug's maximal killing rate. Finally, we show that artemisinin kill rates may have been substantially overestimated in previous modeling studies because (i) the parasite reduction ratio (PRR) (generally estimated to be 104) is based on observed changes in circulating parasite numbers, which generally overestimate the “true” PRR, which should include both circulating and sequestered parasites, and (ii) the third dose of artemisinin at 48 h targets exactly those stages initially hit at time zero, so it is incorrect to extrapolate the PRR measured over 48 h to predict the impact of doses at 48 h and later. PMID:26902760

  11. Incorporating Stage-Specific Drug Action into Pharmacological Modeling of Antimalarial Drug Treatment.

    PubMed

    Hodel, Eva Maria; Kay, Katherine; Hastings, Ian M

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacological modeling of antiparasitic treatment based on a drug's pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties plays an increasingly important role in identifying optimal drug dosing regimens and predicting their potential impact on control and elimination programs. Conventional modeling of treatment relies on methods that do not distinguish between parasites at different developmental stages. This is problematic for malaria parasites, as their sensitivity to drugs varies substantially during their 48-h developmental cycle. We investigated four drug types (short or long half-lives with or without stage-specific killing) to quantify the accuracy of the standard methodology. The treatment dynamics of three drug types were well characterized with standard modeling. The exception were short-half-life drugs with stage-specific killing (i.e., artemisinins) because, depending on time of treatment, parasites might be in highly drug-sensitive stages or in much less sensitive stages. We describe how to bring such drugs into pharmacological modeling by including additional variation into the drug's maximal killing rate. Finally, we show that artemisinin kill rates may have been substantially overestimated in previous modeling studies because (i) the parasite reduction ratio (PRR) (generally estimated to be 10(4)) is based on observed changes in circulating parasite numbers, which generally overestimate the "true" PRR, which should include both circulating and sequestered parasites, and (ii) the third dose of artemisinin at 48 h targets exactly those stages initially hit at time zero, so it is incorrect to extrapolate the PRR measured over 48 h to predict the impact of doses at 48 h and later. PMID:26902760

  12. A New Set of Chemical Starting Points with Plasmodium falciparum Transmission-Blocking Potential for Antimalarial Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Almela, Maria Jesus; Lozano, Sonia; Lelièvre, Joël; Colmenarejo, Gonzalo; Coterón, José Miguel; Rodrigues, Janneth; Gonzalez, Carolina; Herreros, Esperanza

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of new antimalarials with transmission blocking activity remains a key issue in efforts to control malaria and eventually eradicate the disease. Recently, high-throughput screening (HTS) assays have been successfully applied to Plasmodium falciparum asexual stages to screen millions of compounds, with the identification of thousands of new active molecules, some of which are already in clinical phases. The same approach has now been applied to identify compounds that are active against P. falciparum gametocytes, the parasite stage responsible for transmission. This study reports screening results for the Tres Cantos Antimalarial Set (TCAMS), of approximately 13,533 molecules, against P. falciparum stage V gametocytes. Secondary confirmation and cytotoxicity assays led to the identification of 98 selective molecules with dual activity against gametocytes and asexual stages. Hit compounds were chemically clustered and analyzed for appropriate physicochemical properties. The TCAMS chemical space around the prioritized hits was also studied. A selection of hit compounds was assessed ex vivo in the standard membrane feeding assay and demonstrated complete block in transmission. As a result of this effort, new chemical structures not connected to previously described antimalarials have been identified. This new set of compounds may serve as starting points for future drug discovery programs as well as tool compounds for identifying new modes of action involved in malaria transmission. PMID:26317851

  13. Blocking Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Transmission with Drugs: The Gametocytocidal and Sporontocidal Properties of Current and Prospective Antimalarials

    PubMed Central

    Kiszewski, Anthony E.

    2011-01-01

    Drugs that kill or inhibit the sexual stages of Plasmodium could potentially amplify or synergize the impact of other interventions by blocking transmission to mosquitoes. Primaquine and other 8-aminoquinolines have long offered such potential, but safety and other concerns have limited their use. Although transmission-blocking properties are not often a priority of drug discovery efforts, a number of interesting gametocytocidal and/or sporontocidal drug candidates have emerged in recent years. Some still bear significant technical and safety concerns, while others have passed clinical trials and are on the verge of entering the antimalarial armamentarium. Recent advances in our knowledge of gametocyte differentiation, gametogenesis and sporogony have also led to the identification of a large array of potential new targets for drugs that might interfere with malaria transmission. This review examines the properties of existing and prospective drugs, mechanisms of action, counter-indications and their potential role in regional malaria elimination efforts.

  14. Molecular Mechanism of Renal Tubular Secretion of the Antimalarial Drug Chloroquine ▿

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Fabian; König, Jörg; Glaeser, Hartmut; Schmidt, Ingrid; Zolk, Oliver; Fromm, Martin F.; Maas, Renke

    2011-01-01

    The antimalarial drug chloroquine is eliminated to a significant extent by renal tubular secretion. The molecular mechanism of renal chloroquine secretion remains unknown. We hypothesized that organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) and multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (MATE1), localized in the basolateral and luminal membranes of proximal tubule cells, respectively, are involved in chloroquine transport. The interaction of chloroquine with both transporters was investigated using single-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293)-MATE1 cells in uptake experiments and single-transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney II (MDCK)-OCT2 and MDCK-MATE1 cells as well as double-transfected MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells grown as polarized monolayers on transwell filters. In HEK293-MATE1 cells, chloroquine competitively inhibited MATE1-mediated metformin uptake (Ki = 2.8 μM). Cellular accumulation of chloroquine was significantly lower (P < 0.001) and transcellular chloroquine transport was significantly increased (P < 0.001) in MDCK-MATE1 and MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells compared to vector control cells after basal addition of chloroquine (0.1 to 10 μM). In contrast, no difference in cellular accumulation or transcellular transport of chloroquine was observed between MDCK-OCT2 and vector control cells. In line with an oppositely directed proton gradient acting as a driving force for MATE1, basal-to-apical transport of chloroquine by MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells increased with decreasing apical pH from 7.8 to 6.0. Transcellular transport of chloroquine by MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells was inhibited by cimetidine, trimethoprim, and amitriptyline. Our data demonstrate that chloroquine is a substrate and potent competitive inhibitor of MATE1, whereas OCT2 seems to play no role in chloroquine uptake. Concomitantly administered MATE1 inhibitors are likely to modify the renal secretion of chloroquine. PMID:21518836

  15. Concomitant efavirenz reduces pharmacokinetic exposure to the antimalarial drug artemether-lumefantrine in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liusheng; Parikh, Sunil; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Lizak, Patricia; Marzan, Florence; Dorsey, Grant; Havlir, Diane; Aweeka, Francesca T.

    2012-01-01

    Background The antiretroviral drug efavirenz (EFV) and the antimalarial artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) artemether-lumefantrine (AL) are commonly co-administered to treat HIV and malaria. EFV is a known inducer of cytochrome P450 3A4, which converts artemether to dihydroartemisinin (DHA) that is also active and metabolizes longer acting lumefantrine (LR). A study in healthy volunteers was completed to address the concern that EFV impacts AL pharmacokinetics (PK). Methods Adults received AL (80/480 mg BID) for 3-days prior to and during EFV co-administration (600 mg daily for 26-days) with intensive PK for artemether, DHA, and LR conducted after the last AL dose for each period. EFV PK was evaluated with and without AL. PK parameters were estimated using non-compartmental methods. Results Twelve subjects completed the two-period study. PK exposure for artemether, DHA, and LR [as estimated by the area under the concentration time curve (AUClast)] decreased or trended toward decrease with EFV, compared to when administered alone [−51% (p=0.084), −46% (p=0.005), and −21% (p=0.102), respectively]. Day 7 LR levels, previously deemed predictive of treatment success, were 46% lower (p=0.002) with EFV, but the LR half-life was unchanged. EFV PK exposure was minimally altered following AL co-administration [AUC0–24h decreased by 17% (p=0.034)]. Conclusions Exposure to DHA, but not LR, was significantly lower during EFV-AL co-administration compared to that during administration of AL alone. These findings may have implications for the treatment efficacy of AL, particularly in children. However, the observed modest changes probably do not warrant dosage adjustment during co-administration of AL with EFV. PMID:22918158

  16. The antimalarial drug primaquine targets Fe–S cluster proteins and yeast respiratory growth

    PubMed Central

    Lalève, Anaïs; Vallières, Cindy; Golinelli-Cohen, Marie-Pierre; Bouton, Cécile; Song, Zehua; Pawlik, Grzegorz; Tindall, Sarah M.; Avery, Simon V.; Clain, Jérôme; Meunier, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a major health burden in tropical and subtropical countries. The antimalarial drug primaquine is extremely useful for killing the transmissible gametocyte forms of Plasmodium falciparum and the hepatic quiescent forms of P. vivax. Yet its mechanism of action is still poorly understood. In this study, we used the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model to help uncover the mode of action of primaquine. We found that the growth inhibitory effect of primaquine was restricted to cells that relied on respiratory function to proliferate and that deletion of SOD2 encoding the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase severely increased its effect, which can be countered by the overexpression of AIM32 and MCR1 encoding mitochondrial enzymes involved in the response to oxidative stress. This indicated that ROS produced by respiratory activity had a key role in primaquine-induced growth defect. We observed that Δsod2 cells treated with primaquine displayed a severely decreased activity of aconitase that contains a Fe–S cluster notoriously sensitive to oxidative damage. We also showed that in vitro exposure to primaquine impaired the activity of purified aconitase and accelerated the turnover of the Fe–S cluster of the essential protein Rli1. It is suggested that ROS-labile Fe–S groups are the primary targets of primaquine. Aconitase activity is known to be essential at certain life-cycle stages of the malaria parasite. Thus primaquine-induced damage of its labile Fe–S cluster – and of other ROS-sensitive enzymes – could inhibit parasite development. PMID:26629948

  17. The antimalarial drug primaquine targets Fe-S cluster proteins and yeast respiratory growth.

    PubMed

    Lalève, Anaïs; Vallières, Cindy; Golinelli-Cohen, Marie-Pierre; Bouton, Cécile; Song, Zehua; Pawlik, Grzegorz; Tindall, Sarah M; Avery, Simon V; Clain, Jérôme; Meunier, Brigitte

    2016-04-01

    Malaria is a major health burden in tropical and subtropical countries. The antimalarial drug primaquine is extremely useful for killing the transmissible gametocyte forms of Plasmodium falciparum and the hepatic quiescent forms of P. vivax. Yet its mechanism of action is still poorly understood. In this study, we used the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model to help uncover the mode of action of primaquine. We found that the growth inhibitory effect of primaquine was restricted to cells that relied on respiratory function to proliferate and that deletion of SOD2 encoding the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase severely increased its effect, which can be countered by the overexpression of AIM32 and MCR1 encoding mitochondrial enzymes involved in the response to oxidative stress. This indicated that ROS produced by respiratory activity had a key role in primaquine-induced growth defect. We observed that Δsod2 cells treated with primaquine displayed a severely decreased activity of aconitase that contains a Fe-S cluster notoriously sensitive to oxidative damage. We also showed that in vitro exposure to primaquine impaired the activity of purified aconitase and accelerated the turnover of the Fe-S cluster of the essential protein Rli1. It is suggested that ROS-labile Fe-S groups are the primary targets of primaquine. Aconitase activity is known to be essential at certain life-cycle stages of the malaria parasite. Thus primaquine-induced damage of its labile Fe-S cluster - and of other ROS-sensitive enzymes - could inhibit parasite development. PMID:26629948

  18. Assessment of the efficacy of antimalarial drugs recommended by the National Malaria Control Programme in Madagascar: Up-dated baseline data from randomized and multi-site clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, Didier; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène; Randrianarivelojosia, Milijaona; Rabarijaona, Léon-Paul; Raharimalala, Lucie; Domarle, Olivier; Randrianasolo, Laurence; Randriamanantena, Arthur; Jahevitra, Martial; Andriantsoanirina, Valérie; Rason, Marie-Ange; Raherinjafy, Rogelin; Rakotomalala, Emma; Tuseo, Luciano; Raveloson, Andrianirina

    2008-01-01

    Background In order to improve the monitoring of the antimalarial drug resistance in Madagascar, a new national network based on eight sentinel sites was set up. In 2006/2007, a multi-site randomized clinical trial was designed to assess the therapeutic efficacy of chloroquine (CQ), sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), amodiaquine (AQ) and artesunate plus amodiaquine combination (ASAQ), the antimalarial therapies recommended by the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP). Methods Children between six months and 15 years of age, with uncomplicated falciparum malaria, were enrolled. Primary endpoints were the day-14 and day-28 risks of parasitological failure, either unadjusted or adjusted by genotyping. Risks of clinical and parasitological treatment failure after adjustment by genotyping were estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Secondary outcomes included fever clearance, parasite clearance, change in haemoglobin levels between Day 0 and the last day of follow-up, and the incidence of adverse events. Results A total of 1,347 of 1,434 patients (93.9%) completed treatment and follow-up to day 28. All treatment regimens, except for the chloroquine (CQ) treatment group, resulted in clinical cure rates above 97.6% by day-14 and 96.7% by day-28 (adjusted by genotyping). Parasite and fever clearance was more rapid with artesunate plus amodiaquine, but the extent of haematological recovery on day-28 did not differ significantly between the four groups. No severe side-effects were observed during the follow-up period. Conclusion These findings (i) constitute an up-dated baseline data on the efficacy of antimalarial drugs recommended by the NMCP, (ii) show that antimalarial drug resistance remains low in Madagascar, except for CQ, compared to the bordering countries in the Indian Ocean region such as the Comoros Archipelago and (iii) support the current policy of ASAQ as the first-line treatment in uncomplicated falciparum malaria. PMID:18394169

  19. Quinine, an old anti-malarial drug in a modern world: role in the treatment of malaria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Quinine remains an important anti-malarial drug almost 400 years after its effectiveness was first documented. However, its continued use is challenged by its poor tolerability, poor compliance with complex dosing regimens, and the availability of more efficacious anti-malarial drugs. This article reviews the historical role of quinine, considers its current usage and provides insight into its appropriate future use in the treatment of malaria. In light of recent research findings intravenous artesunate should be the first-line drug for severe malaria, with quinine as an alternative. The role of rectal quinine as pre-referral treatment for severe malaria has not been fully explored, but it remains a promising intervention. In pregnancy, quinine continues to play a critical role in the management of malaria, especially in the first trimester, and it will remain a mainstay of treatment until safer alternatives become available. For uncomplicated malaria, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) offers a better option than quinine though the difficulty of maintaining a steady supply of ACT in resource-limited settings renders the rapid withdrawal of quinine for uncomplicated malaria cases risky. The best approach would be to identify solutions to ACT stock-outs, maintain quinine in case of ACT stock-outs, and evaluate strategies for improving quinine treatment outcomes by combining it with antibiotics. In HIV and TB infected populations, concerns about potential interactions between quinine and antiretroviral and anti-tuberculosis drugs exist, and these will need further research and pharmacovigilance. PMID:21609473

  20. Quality of anti-malarial drugs provided by public and private healthcare providers in south-east Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Onwujekwe, Obinna; Kaur, Harparkash; Dike, Nkem; Shu, Elvis; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Hanson, Kara; Okoye, Viola; Okonkwo, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background There is little existing knowledge about actual quality of drugs provided by different providers in Nigeria and in many sub-Saharan African countries. Such information is important for improving malaria treatment that will help in the development and implementation of actions designed to improve the quality of treatment. The objective of the study was to determine the quality of drugs used for the treatment of malaria in a broad spectrum of public and private healthcare providers. Methods The study was undertaken in six towns (three urban and three rural) in Anambra state, south-east Nigeria. Anti-malarials (225 samples), which included artesunate, dihydroartemisinin, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), quinine, and chloroquine, were either purchased or collected from randomly selected providers. The quality of these drugs was assessed by laboratory analysis of the dissolution profile using published pharmacopoeial monograms and measuring the amount of active ingredient using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Findings It was found that 60 (37%) of the anti-malarials tested did not meet the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) specifications for the amount of active ingredients, with the suspect drugs either lacking the active ingredients or containing suboptimal quantities of the active ingredients. Quinine (46%) and SP formulations (39%) were among drugs that did not satisfy the tolerance limits published in USP monograms. A total of 78% of the suspect drugs were from private facilities, mostly low-level providers, such as patent medicine dealers (vendors). Conclusion This study found that there was a high prevalence of poor quality drugs. The findings provide areas for public intervention to improve the quality of malaria treatment services. There should be enforced checks and regulation of drug supply management as well as stiffer penalties for people stocking substandard and counterfeit drugs. PMID:19208221

  1. The interplay between drug resistance and fitness in malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Controlling the spread of antimalarial drug resistance, especially resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to artemisinin-based combination therapies, is a high priority. Available data indicate that, as with other microorganisms, the spread of drug-resistant malaria parasites is limited by fitness costs that frequently accompany resistance. Resistance-mediating polymorphisms in malaria parasites have been identified in putative drug transporters and in target enzymes. The impacts of these polymorphisms on parasite fitness have been characterized in vitro and in animal models. Additional insights have come from analyses of samples from clinical studies, both evaluating parasites under different selective pressures and determining the clinical consequences of infection with different parasites. With some exceptions, resistance-mediating polymorphisms lead to malaria parasites that, compared to wild type, grow less well in culture and in animals, and are replaced by wild type when drug pressure diminishes in the clinical setting. In some cases, the fitness costs of resistance may be offset by compensatory mutations that increase virulence or changes that enhance malaria transmission. However, not enough is known about effects of resistance mediators on parasite fitness. A better appreciation of the costs of fitness-mediating mutations will facilitate the development of optimal guidelines for the treatment and prevention of malaria. PMID:23899091

  2. Use of the atmospheric generators for capnophilic bacteria Genbag-CO2 for the evaluation of in vitro Plasmodium falciparum susceptibility to standard anti-malarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    generators for capnophilic bacteria Genbag CO2® is an appropriate technology that can be transferred to the field for epidemiological surveys of drug-resistant malaria. The present data suggest the importance of the gas mixture on in vitro microtest results for anti-malarial drugs and the importance of determining the microtest conditions before comparing and analysing the data from different laboratories and concluding on malaria resistance. PMID:21235757

  3. Research influence on antimalarial drug policy change in Tanzania: case study of replacing chloroquine with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine as the first-line drug

    PubMed Central

    Mubyazi, Godfrey M; Gonzalez-Block, Miguel A

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Research is an essential tool in facing the challenges of scaling up interventions and improving access to services. As in many other countries, the translation of research evidence into drug policy action in Tanzania is often constrained by poor communication between researchers and policy decision-makers, individual perceptions or attitudes towards the drug and hesitation by some policy decision-makers to approve change when they anticipate possible undesirable repercussions should the policy change as proposed. Internationally, literature on the role of researchers on national antimalarial drug policy change is limited. Objectives To describe the (a) role of researchers in producing evidence that influenced the Tanzanian government replace chloroquine (CQ) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) as the first-line drug and the challenges faced in convincing policy-makers, general practitioners, pharmaceutical industry and the general public on the need for change (b) challenges ahead before a new drug combination treatment policy is introduced in Tanzania. Methods In-depth interviews were held with national-level policy-makers, malaria control programme managers, pharmaceutical officers, general medical practitioners, medical research library and publications officers, university academicians, heads of medical research institutions and district and regional medical officers. Additional data were obtained through a review of malaria drug policy documents and participant observations were also done. Results In year 2001, the Tanzanian Government officially changed its malaria treatment policy guidelines whereby CQ – the first-line drug for a long time was replaced with SP. This policy decision was supported by research evidence indicating parasite resistance to CQ and clinical CQ treatment failure rates to have reached intolerable levels as compared to SP and amodiaquine (AQ). Research also indicated that since SP was also facing rising resistance trend

  4. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, David C.; Jacoby, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  5. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  6. An amphiphilic graft copolymer-based nanoparticle platform for reduction-responsive anticancer and antimalarial drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najer, Adrian; Wu, Dalin; Nussbaumer, Martin G.; Schwertz, Geoffrey; Schwab, Anatol; Witschel, Matthias C.; Schäfer, Anja; Diederich, François; Rottmann, Matthias; Palivan, Cornelia G.; Beck, Hans-Peter; Meier, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    Medical applications of anticancer and antimalarial drugs often suffer from low aqueous solubility, high systemic toxicity, and metabolic instability. Smart nanocarrier-based drug delivery systems provide means of solving these problems at once. Herein, we present such a smart nanoparticle platform based on self-assembled, reduction-responsive amphiphilic graft copolymers, which were successfully synthesized through thiol-disulfide exchange reaction between thiolated hydrophilic block and pyridyl disulfide functionalized hydrophobic block. These amphiphilic graft copolymers self-assembled into nanoparticles with mean diameters of about 30-50 nm and readily incorporated hydrophobic guest molecules. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was used to study nanoparticle stability and triggered release of a model compound in detail. Long-term colloidal stability and model compound retention within the nanoparticles was found when analyzed in cell media at body temperature. In contrast, rapid, complete reduction-triggered disassembly and model compound release was achieved within a physiological reducing environment. The synthesized copolymers revealed no intrinsic cellular toxicity up to 1 mg mL-1. Drug-loaded reduction-sensitive nanoparticles delivered a hydrophobic model anticancer drug (doxorubicin, DOX) to cancer cells (HeLa cells) and an experimental, metabolically unstable antimalarial drug (the serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) inhibitor (+/-)-1) to Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs), with higher efficacy compared to similar, non-sensitive drug-loaded nanoparticles. These responsive copolymer-based nanoparticles represent a promising candidate as smart nanocarrier platform for various drugs to be applied to different diseases, due to the biocompatibility and biodegradability of the hydrophobic block, and the protein-repellent hydrophilic block.Medical applications of anticancer and antimalarial drugs often suffer from low aqueous

  7. An amphiphilic graft copolymer-based nanoparticle platform for reduction-responsive anticancer and antimalarial drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Najer, Adrian; Wu, Dalin; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Schwertz, Geoffrey; Schwab, Anatol; Witschel, Matthias C; Schäfer, Anja; Diederich, François; Rottmann, Matthias; Palivan, Cornelia G; Beck, Hans-Peter; Meier, Wolfgang

    2016-08-21

    Medical applications of anticancer and antimalarial drugs often suffer from low aqueous solubility, high systemic toxicity, and metabolic instability. Smart nanocarrier-based drug delivery systems provide means of solving these problems at once. Herein, we present such a smart nanoparticle platform based on self-assembled, reduction-responsive amphiphilic graft copolymers, which were successfully synthesized through thiol-disulfide exchange reaction between thiolated hydrophilic block and pyridyl disulfide functionalized hydrophobic block. These amphiphilic graft copolymers self-assembled into nanoparticles with mean diameters of about 30-50 nm and readily incorporated hydrophobic guest molecules. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was used to study nanoparticle stability and triggered release of a model compound in detail. Long-term colloidal stability and model compound retention within the nanoparticles was found when analyzed in cell media at body temperature. In contrast, rapid, complete reduction-triggered disassembly and model compound release was achieved within a physiological reducing environment. The synthesized copolymers revealed no intrinsic cellular toxicity up to 1 mg mL(-1). Drug-loaded reduction-sensitive nanoparticles delivered a hydrophobic model anticancer drug (doxorubicin, DOX) to cancer cells (HeLa cells) and an experimental, metabolically unstable antimalarial drug (the serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) inhibitor (±)-1) to Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs), with higher efficacy compared to similar, non-sensitive drug-loaded nanoparticles. These responsive copolymer-based nanoparticles represent a promising candidate as smart nanocarrier platform for various drugs to be applied to different diseases, due to the biocompatibility and biodegradability of the hydrophobic block, and the protein-repellent hydrophilic block. PMID:27452350

  8. In Silico Mining for Antimalarial Structure-Activity Knowledge and Discovery of Novel Antimalarial Curcuminoids.

    PubMed

    Viira, Birgit; Gendron, Thibault; Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Cojean, Sandrine; Horvath, Dragos; Marcou, Gilles; Varnek, Alexandre; Maes, Louis; Maran, Uko; Loiseau, Philippe M; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a parasitic tropical disease that kills around 600,000 patients every year. The emergence of resistant Plasmodium falciparum parasites to artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) represents a significant public health threat, indicating the urgent need for new effective compounds to reverse ACT resistance and cure the disease. For this, extensive curation and homogenization of experimental anti-Plasmodium screening data from both in-house and ChEMBL sources were conducted. As a result, a coherent strategy was established that allowed compiling coherent training sets that associate compound structures to the respective antimalarial activity measurements. Seventeen of these training sets led to the successful generation of classification models discriminating whether a compound has a significant probability to be active under the specific conditions of the antimalarial test associated with each set. These models were used in consensus prediction of the most likely active from a series of curcuminoids available in-house. Positive predictions together with a few predicted as inactive were then submitted to experimental in vitro antimalarial testing. A large majority from predicted compounds showed antimalarial activity, but not those predicted as inactive, thus experimentally validating the in silico screening approach. The herein proposed consensus machine learning approach showed its potential to reduce the cost and duration of antimalarial drug discovery. PMID:27367660

  9. Substandard antimalarials available in Afghanistan: a case for assessing the quality of drugs in resource poor settings.

    PubMed

    Lalani, Mirza; Kaur, Harparkash; Mohammed, Nader; Mailk, Naiela; van Wyk, Albert; Jan, Sakhi; Kakar, Rishtya Meena; Mojadidi, Mohammed Khalid; Leslie, Toby

    2015-06-01

    Good-quality antimalarials are crucial for the effective treatment and control of malaria. A total of 7,740 individual and packaged tablets, ampoules, and syrups were obtained from 60 randomly selected public (N = 35) and private outlets (N = 25) in Afghanistan. Of these, 134 samples were screened using the Global Pharma Health Fund (GPHF) MiniLab® in Kabul with 33/126 (26%) samples failing the MiniLab® disintegration test. The quality of a subsample (N = 37) of cholorquine, quinine, and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine tablets was assessed by in vitro dissolution testing following U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP) monographs at a bioanalytical laboratory in London, United Kingdom. Overall, 12/32 (32%) samples of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine and quinine were found not to comply with the USP tolerance limits. Substandard antimalarials were available in Afghanistan demonstrating that continuous monitoring of drug quality is warranted. However, in Afghanistan as in many low-income countries, capacity to determine and monitor drug quality using methods such as dissolution testing needs to be established to empower national authorities to take appropriate action in setting up legislation and regulation. PMID:25897070

  10. Recent advances in novel heterocyclic scaffolds for the treatment of drug-resistant malaria.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sahil; Singh, Rajesh K; Patial, Babita; Goyal, Sachin; Bhardwaj, T R

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem all over the world, particularly in tropical and subtropical countries due to the development of resistance and most deadly infection is caused by Plasmodium falciparum. There is a direct need for the discovery of new drugs with unique structures and mechanism of action to treat sensitive and drug-resistant strains of various plasmodia for radical cure of this disease. Traditional compounds such as quinine and related derivatives represent a major source for the development of new drugs. This review presents recent modifications of 4-aminoquinoline and 8-aminoquinolone rings as leads to novel active molecules which are under clinical trials. The review also encompasses the other heterocyclic compounds emerged as potential antimalarial agents with promising results such as acridinediones and acridinone analogues, pyridines and quinolones as antimalarials. Miscellaneous heterocyclics such as tetroxane derivatives, indole derivatives, imidazolopiperazine derivatives, biscationic choline-based compounds and polymer-linked combined antimalarial drugs are also discussed. At last brief introduction to heterocyclics in natural products is also reviewed. Most of them have been under clinical trials and found to be promising in the treatment of drug-resistant strains of Plasmodium and others can be explored for the same purpose. PMID:25775094

  11. Assessment of global reporting of adverse drug reactions for anti-malarials, including artemisinin-based combination therapy, to the WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In spite of enhanced control efforts, malaria remains a major public health problem causing close to a million deaths annually. With support from several donors, large amounts of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) are being deployed in endemic countries raising safety concerns as little is known about the use of ACT in several of the settings where they are deployed. This project was undertaken to profile the provenance of the pharmacovigilance reporting of all anti-malarials, including ACT to the WHO adverse drug reaction (ADR) database (Vigibase™) over the past 40 years. Methods The WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring, the Uppsala Monitoring Centre (UMC) provided anonymized extracts of Vigibase™ covering the period 1968-2008. All countries in the programme were clustered according to their malaria control phase and income status. The number of individual case safety reports (ICSRs) of anti-malarials was analyzed according to those clusters. Results From 1968 to 2008, 21,312 ICSRs suspecting anti-malarials were received from 64 countries. Low-income countries, that are also malaria-endemic (categorized as priority 1 countries) submitted only 1.2% of the ICSRs. Only 60 out of 21,312 ICSRs were related to ACT, 51 of which were coming from four sub-Saharan African countries. Although very few ICSRs involved artemisinin-based compounds, many of the adverse events reported were potentially serious. Conclusions This paper illustrates the low reporting of ADRs to anti-malarials in general and ACT in particular. Most reports were submitted by non-endemic and/or high-income countries. Given the current mix of large donor funding, the insufficient information on safety of these drugs, increasing availability of ACT and artemisinin-based monotherapies in public and private sector channels, associated potential for inappropriate use and finally a pipeline of more than 10 new novel anti-malarials in various stages of development, the

  12. Modulation of Anopheles stephensi Gene Expression by Nitroquine, an Antimalarial Drug against Plasmodium yoelii Infection in the Mosquito

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Shuguang; Wang, Yanyan; Xu, Wenyue; Zhang, Jingru; Jiang, Haobo; Huang, Fusheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Antimalarial drugs may impact mosquito’s defense against Plasmodium parasites. Our previous study showed nitroquine significantly reduced infection of Anopheles stephensi by Plasmodium yoelii, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In order to understand how transmission capacity of An. stephensi was affected by nitroquine, we explored the transcriptome of adult females after different treatments, examined changes in gene expression profiles, and identified transcripts affected by the drug and parasite. Methodology/Principal Findings We extended massively parallel sequencing and data analysis (including gene discovery, expression profiling, and function prediction) to An. stephensi before and after Plasmodium infection with or without nitroquine treatment. Using numbers of reads assembled into specific contigs to calculate relative abundances (RAs), we categorized the assembled contigs into four groups according to the differences in RA values infection induced, infection suppressed, drug induced, and drug suppressed. We found both nitroquine in the blood meal and Plasmodium infection altered transcription of mosquito genes implicated in diverse processes, including pathogen recognition, signal transduction, prophenoloxidase activation, cytoskeleton assembling, cell adhesion, and oxidative stress. The differential gene expression may have promoted certain defense responses of An. stephensi against the parasite and decreased its infectivity. Conclusions/Significance Our study indicated that nitroquine may regulate several immune mechanisms at the level of gene transcription in the mosquito against Plasmodium infection. This highlights the need for better understanding of antimalarial drug’s impact on parasite survival and transmission. In addition, our data largely enriched the existing sequence information of An. stephensi, an epidemiologically important vector species. PMID:24586804

  13. How drug resistance takes shape

    PubMed Central

    Jeselsohn, Rinath

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in a hormone receptor can lead to therapeutic resistance by making it less able to bind and respond to hormone blocking drugs and by making it active, even when the hormome is not present. PMID:27010172

  14. Epidemic of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Involving Substandard Antimalarial Drugs, Pakistan, 2003

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harpakash; Mohammed, Nasir; Kolaczinski, Kate; Ord, Rosalynn L.; Rowland, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Because of instability in eastern Afghanistan, new refugees crossed into the federally administered tribal areas of northwestern Pakistan in 2002. In 2003, we investigated an epidemic of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in 1 of the camps. Incidence was 100.4 cases/1,000 person-years; in other nearby camps it was only 2.1/1,000 person-years. Anopheline mosquitoes were found despite an earlier spray campaign. Documented clinical failures at the basic health unit prompted a drug resistance survey of locally manufactured sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine used for routine treatment. The in vivo failure rate was 28.5%. PCR analysis of the P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase and dihyropteroate synthase genes showed no mutations associated with clinical failure. However, chemical analysis of the drug showed that it was substandard. As global incidence decreases and epidemics become more of a threat, enhanced quality assurance of control interventions is essential. PMID:19891862

  15. Inhibitors of the nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis as antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Jomaa, H; Wiesner, J; Sanderbrand, S; Altincicek, B; Weidemeyer, C; Hintz, M; Türbachova, I; Eberl, M; Zeidler, J; Lichtenthaler, H K; Soldati, D; Beck, E

    1999-09-01

    A mevalonate-independent pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis present in Plasmodium falciparum was shown to represent an effective target for chemotherapy of malaria. This pathway includes 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DOXP) as a key metabolite. The presence of two genes encoding the enzymes DOXP synthase and DOXP reductoisomerase suggests that isoprenoid biosynthesis in P. falciparum depends on the DOXP pathway. This pathway is probably located in the apicoplast. The recombinant P. falciparum DOXP reductoisomerase was inhibited by fosmidomycin and its derivative, FR-900098. Both drugs suppressed the in vitro growth of multidrug-resistant P. falciparum strains. After therapy with these drugs, mice infected with the rodent malaria parasite P. vinckei were cured. PMID:10477522

  16. Antimalarial Preclinical Drug Development: A Single Oral Dose of A 5-Carbon-linked Trioxane Dimer Plus Mefloquine Cures Malaria-Infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Moon, Deuk Kyu; Singhal, Vandana; Kumar, Nirbhay; Shapiro, Theresa A; Posner, Gary H

    2009-01-01

    Three new 5-carbon-linked trioxane dimer carboxylate esters have been prepared from the natural trioxane, artemisinin in only 3-steps and 40-50% overall yields. Each one of these new chemical entities is at least as efficacious as the clinically used trioxane antimalarial drug artemether when combined with mefloquine hydrochloride in a low single oral dose cure. PMID:20686674

  17. Mind the gaps - the epidemiology of poor-quality anti-malarials in the malarious world - analysis of the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network database

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor quality medicines threaten the lives of millions of patients and are alarmingly common in many parts of the world. Nevertheless, the global extent of the problem remains unknown. Accurate estimates of the epidemiology of poor quality medicines are sparse and are influenced by sampling methodology and diverse chemical analysis techniques. In order to understand the existing data, the Antimalarial Quality Scientific Group at WWARN built a comprehensive, open-access, global database and linked Antimalarial Quality Surveyor, an online visualization tool. Analysis of the database is described here, the limitations of the studies and data reported, and their public health implications discussed. Methods The database collates customized summaries of 251 published anti-malarial quality reports in English, French and Spanish by time and location since 1946. It also includes information on assays to determine quality, sampling and medicine regulation. Results No publicly available reports for 60.6% (63) of the 104 malaria-endemic countries were found. Out of 9,348 anti-malarials sampled, 30.1% (2,813) failed chemical/packaging quality tests with 39.3% classified as falsified, 2.3% as substandard and 58.3% as poor quality without evidence available to categorize them as either substandard or falsified. Only 32.3% of the reports explicitly described their definitions of medicine quality and just 9.1% (855) of the samples collected in 4.6% (six) surveys were conducted using random sampling techniques. Packaging analysis was only described in 21.5% of publications and up to twenty wrong active ingredients were found in falsified anti-malarials. Conclusions There are severe neglected problems with anti-malarial quality but there are important caveats to accurately estimate the prevalence and distribution of poor quality anti-malarials. The lack of reports in many malaria-endemic areas, inadequate sampling techniques and inadequate chemical analytical methods and

  18. Balancing drug resistance and growth rates via compensatory mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ines; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Johnston, Geoffrey L; Dhingra, Satish K; Ecker, Andrea; Lewis, Rebecca E; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Straimer, Judith; Henrich, Philipp P; Palatulan, Eugene; Johnson, David J; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sanchez, Cecilia; Lehane, Adele M; Lanzer, Michael; Fidock, David A

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of chloroquine to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections has resulted in the selection and dissemination of variant haplotypes of the primary resistance determinant PfCRT. These haplotypes have encountered drug pressure and within-host competition with wild-type drug-sensitive parasites. To examine these selective forces in vitro, we genetically engineered P. falciparum to express geographically diverse PfCRT haplotypes. Variant alleles from the Philippines (PH1 and PH2, which differ solely by the C72S mutation) both conferred a moderate gain of chloroquine resistance and a reduction in growth rates in vitro. Of the two, PH2 showed higher IC50 values, contrasting with reduced growth. Furthermore, a highly mutated pfcrt allele from Cambodia (Cam734) conferred moderate chloroquine resistance and enhanced growth rates, when tested against wild-type pfcrt in co-culture competition assays. These three alleles mediated cross-resistance to amodiaquine, an antimalarial drug widely used in Africa. Each allele, along with the globally prevalent Dd2 and 7G8 alleles, rendered parasites more susceptible to lumefantrine, the partner drug used in the leading first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy. These data reveal ongoing region-specific evolution of PfCRT that impacts drug susceptibility and relative fitness in settings of mixed infections, and raise important considerations about optimal agents to treat chloroquine-resistant malaria. PMID:25898991

  19. Balancing drug resistance and growth rates via compensatory mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ines; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Johnston, Geoffrey L.; Dhingra, Satish K.; Ecker, Andrea; Lewis, Rebecca E.; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Straimer, Judith; Henrich, Philipp H.; Palatulan, Eugene; Johnson, David J.; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sanchez, Cecilia; Lehane, Adele M.; Lanzer, Michael; Fidock, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The widespread use of chloroquine to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections has resulted in the selection and dissemination of variant haplotypes of the primary resistance determinant PfCRT. These haplotypes have encountered drug pressure and within-host competition with wild-type drug-sensitive parasites. To examine these selective forces in vitro, we genetically engineered P. falciparum to express geographically diverse PfCRT haplotypes. Variant alleles from the Philippines (PH1 and PH2, which differ solely by the C72S mutation) both conferred a moderate gain of chloroquine resistance and a reduction in growth rates in vitro. Of the two, PH2 showed higher IC50 values, contrasting with reduced growth. Furthermore, a highly mutated pfcrt allele from Cambodia (Cam734) conferred moderate chloroquine resistance and enhanced growth rates, when tested against wild-type pfcrt in co-culture competition assays. These three alleles mediated cross-resistance to amodiaquine, an antimalarial drug widely used in Africa. Each allele, along with the globally prevalent Dd2 and 7G8 alleles, rendered parasites more susceptible to lumefantrine, the partner drug used in the leading first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy. These data reveal ongoing region-specific evolution of PfCRT that impacts drug susceptibility and relative fitness in settings of mixed infections, and raise important considerations about optimal agents to treat chloroquine-resistant malaria. PMID:25898991

  20. Drug resistance in eukaryotic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Fairlamb, Alan H; Gow, Neil A R; Matthews, Keith R; Waters, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic microbial pathogens are major contributors to illness and death globally. Although much of their impact can be controlled by drug therapy as with prokaryotic microorganisms, the emergence of drug resistance has threatened these treatment efforts. Here, we discuss the challenges posed by eukaryotic microbial pathogens and how these are similar to, or differ from, the challenges of prokaryotic antibiotic resistance. The therapies used for several major eukaryotic microorganisms are then detailed, and the mechanisms that they have evolved to overcome these therapies are described. The rapid emergence of resistance and the restricted pipeline of new drug therapies pose considerable risks to global health and are particularly acute in the developing world. Nonetheless, we detail how the integration of new technology, biological understanding, epidemiology and evolutionary analysis can help sustain existing therapies, anticipate the emergence of resistance or optimize the deployment of new therapies. PMID:27572976

  1. Coupling laser ablation/desorption electrospray ionization to atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility spectrometry for the screening of antimalarial drug quality.

    PubMed

    Harris, Glenn A; Graf, Stephan; Knochenmuss, Richard; Fernández, Facundo M

    2012-07-01

    Significant developments in the field of ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MS) have led to high-throughput direct analysis and imaging capabilities. However, advances in coupling ambient ionization techniques with standalone drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS) have been comparatively slower, despite the attractive ruggedness and simplicity of IMS. In this study, we have developed and characterized a laser ablation/desorption electrospray ionization (LADESI) DTIMS platform, and applied it to the detection of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in antimalarial tablets collected in developing countries. The overarching goal of this work was to perform an initial evaluation of LADESI DTIMS as a technique with the potential for constituting the core of a portable drug quality-testing platform. The set-up consisted of an IR laser for desorption and an electrospray ionizer for capturing the ablated plume coupled to a high-resolution monolithic resistive glass drift tube ion mobility spectrometer. For more confident API identification, tablet extracts were also investigated via electrospray IM MS to correlate LADESI DTIMS reduced mobility (K(0)) values to m/z values. Overall, it was found that the IR LADESI DTIMS platform provided distinct ion mobility spectral fingerprints that could be used to detect the presence of the expected APIs, helping to distinguish counterfeit drugs from their genuine counterparts. PMID:22606690

  2. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (PDF) ​​​​​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned off causing certain features of the ... incorrectly. Please visit your browser settings and turn JavaScript on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Skip ...

  3. Screening of Thai medicinal plant extracts and their active constituents for in vitro antimalarial activity.

    PubMed

    Ichino, C; Soonthornchareonnon, N; Chuakul, W; Kiyohara, H; Ishiyama, A; Sekiguchi, H; Namatame, M; Otoguro, K; Omura, S; Yamada, H

    2006-04-01

    To discover antimalarial substances from plants cultivated in Thailand 80%-EtOH extracts from selected plants were screened for in vitro antimalarial activity against the drug resistant K1 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. In total, 86 Thai medicinal plant samples representing 48 species from 35 genera in 16 families were screened and two species (Polyalthia viridis and Goniothalamus marcanii) were found to show notable antimalarial activity (IC50: 10.0 and 6.3 microg/mL). Marcanine A and 16-hydroxycleroda-3,13(14)Z-dien-15,16-olide were identified as the respective major active constituents in P. viridis and G. marcanii, respectively. PMID:16557615

  4. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jassal, Mandeep; Bishai, William R

    2009-01-01

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis is defined as disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis with resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampicin, any fluoroquinolone, and at least one of three injectable second-line drugs (amikacin, capreomycin, or kanamycin). The definition has applicable clinical value and has allowed for more uniform surveillance in varied international settings. Recent surveillance data have indicated that the prevalence of tuberculosis drug resistance has risen to the highest rate ever recorded. The gold standard for drug-susceptibility testing has been the agar proportion method; however, this technique requires several weeks for results to be determined. More sensitive and specific diagnostic tests are still unavailable in resource-limited settings. Clinical manifestations, although variable in different settings and among different strains, have in general shown that XDR tuberculosis is associated with greater morbidity and mortality than non-XDR tuberculosis. The treatment of XDR tuberculosis should include agents to which the organism is susceptible, and should continue for a minimum of 18-24 months. However, treatment continues to be limited in tuberculosis-endemic countries largely because of weaknesses in national tuberculosis health-care models. The ultimate strategy to control drug-resistant tuberculosis is one that implements a comprehensive approach incorporating innovation from the political, social, economic, and scientific realms. PMID:18990610

  5. Clinical development of new prophylactic antimalarial drugs after the 5th Amendment to the Declaration of Helsinki

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Geoffrey S; Magill, Alan J; Ohrt, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Malaria is of continuing concern in nonimmune traveling populations. Traditionally, antimalarial drugs have been developed as agents for dual indications (treatment and prophylaxis). However, since 2000, when the 5th Amendment to the Declaration of Helsinki (DH2000) was adopted, development of new malaria prophylaxis drugs in this manner has ceased. As a consequence, there may not be any new drugs licensed for this indication in the foreseeable future. Major pharmaceutical companies have interpreted DH2000 to mean that the traditional development paradigm may be considered unethical because of doubt over the likelihood of benefit to endemic populations participating in clinical studies, the use of placebo, and the sustainability of post-trial access to study medications. In this article, we explore the basis of these concerns and suggest that the traditional development paradigm remains ethical under certain circumstances. We also consider alternative approaches that may be more attractive to sponsors as they either do not use placebo, or utilize populations in endemic countries who may unambiguously benefit. These approaches represent the way forward in the future, but are at present unproven in clinical practice, and face numerous regulatory, logistical and technical challenges. Consequently, in the short term, we argue that the traditional clinical development paradigm remains the most feasible approach and is ethical and consistent with the spirit of DH2000 under the appropriate circumstances. PMID:19209263

  6. Antiviral Drug Resistance: Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Sunwen

    2010-01-01

    Summary Antiviral drug resistance is an increasing concern in immunocompromised patient populations, where ongoing viral replication and prolonged drug exposure lead to the selection of resistant strains. Rapid diagnosis of resistance can be made by associating characteristic viral mutations with resistance to various drugs as determined by phenotypic assays. Management of drug resistance includes optimization of host factors and drug delivery, selection of alternative therapies based on knowledge of mechanisms of resistance, and the development of new antivirals. This article discusses drug resistance in herpesviruses and hepatitis B. PMID:20466277

  7. In vitro antimalarial activity of novel semisynthetic nocathiacin I antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Indu; Sullivan, Margery; McCutchan, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    Presently, the arsenal of antimalarial drugs is limited and needs to be replenished. We evaluated the potential antimalarial activity of two water-soluble derivatives of nocathiacin (BMS461996 and BMS411886) against the asexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Nocathiacins are a thiazolyl peptide group of antibiotics, are structurally related to thiostrepton, have potent activity against a wide spectrum of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, and inhibit protein synthesis. The in vitro growth inhibition assay was done using three laboratory strains of P. falciparum displaying various levels of chloroquine (CQ) susceptibility. Our results indicate that BMS461996 has potent antimalarial activity and inhibits parasite growth with mean 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of 51.55 nM for P. falciparum 3D7 (CQ susceptible), 85.67 nM for P. falciparum Dd2 (accelerated resistance to multiple drugs [ARMD]), and 99.44 nM for P. falciparum K1 (resistant to CQ, pyrimethamine, and sulfadoxine). Similar results at approximately 7-fold higher IC50s were obtained with BMS411886 than with BMS461996. We also tested the effect of BMS491996 on gametocytes; our results show that at a 20-fold excess of the mean IC50, gametocytes were deformed with a pyknotic nucleus and growth of stage I to IV gametocytes was arrested. This preliminary study shows a significant potential for nocathiacin analogues to be developed as antimalarial drug candidates and to warrant further investigation. PMID:25779576

  8. Mutations in the P-type cation-transporter ATPase 4, PfATP4, mediate resistance to both aminopyrazole and spiroindolone antimalarials.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Erika L; McNamara, Case W; Kim, Sang Wan; Kato, Tomoyo Sakata; Li, Fengwu; Teng, Christine H; Gagaring, Kerstin; Manary, Micah J; Barboa, Rachel; Meister, Stephan; Kuhen, Kelli; Vinetz, Joseph M; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Winzeler, Elizabeth A

    2015-02-20

    Aminopyrazoles are a new class of antimalarial compounds identified in a cellular antiparasitic screen with potent activity against Plasmodium falciparum asexual and sexual stage parasites. To investigate their unknown mechanism of action and thus identify their target, we cultured parasites in the presence of a representative member of the aminopyrazole series, GNF-Pf4492, to select for resistance. Whole genome sequencing of three resistant lines showed that each had acquired independent mutations in a P-type cation-transporter ATPase, PfATP4 (PF3D7_1211900), a protein implicated as the novel Plasmodium spp. target of another, structurally unrelated, class of antimalarials called the spiroindolones and characterized as an important sodium transporter of the cell. Similarly to the spiroindolones, GNF-Pf4492 blocks parasite transmission to mosquitoes and disrupts intracellular sodium homeostasis. Our data demonstrate that PfATP4 plays a critical role in cellular processes, can be inhibited by two distinct antimalarial pharmacophores, and supports the recent observations that PfATP4 is a critical antimalarial target. PMID:25322084

  9. Molecular Mechanisms for Drug Hypersensitivity Induced by the Malaria Parasite’s Chloroquine Resistance Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Eileen S.; Webster, Michael W.; Lehane, Adele M.; Shafik, Sarah H.; Martin, Rowena E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum ‘chloroquine resistance transporter’ (PfCRT) confer resistance to chloroquine (CQ) and related antimalarials by enabling the protein to transport these drugs away from their targets within the parasite’s digestive vacuole (DV). However, CQ resistance-conferring isoforms of PfCRT (PfCRTCQR) also render the parasite hypersensitive to a subset of structurally-diverse pharmacons. Moreover, mutations in PfCRTCQR that suppress the parasite’s hypersensitivity to these molecules simultaneously reinstate its sensitivity to CQ and related drugs. We sought to understand these phenomena by characterizing the functions of PfCRTCQR isoforms that cause the parasite to become hypersensitive to the antimalarial quinine or the antiviral amantadine. We achieved this by measuring the abilities of these proteins to transport CQ, quinine, and amantadine when expressed in Xenopus oocytes and complemented this work with assays that detect the drug transport activity of PfCRT in its native environment within the parasite. Here we describe two mechanistic explanations for PfCRT-induced drug hypersensitivity. First, we show that quinine, which normally accumulates inside the DV and therewithin exerts its antimalarial effect, binds extremely tightly to the substrate-binding site of certain isoforms of PfCRTCQR. By doing so it likely blocks the normal physiological function of the protein, which is essential for the parasite’s survival, and the drug thereby gains an additional killing effect. In the second scenario, we show that although amantadine also sequesters within the DV, the parasite’s hypersensitivity to this drug arises from the PfCRTCQR-mediated transport of amantadine from the DV into the cytosol, where it can better access its antimalarial target. In both cases, the mutations that suppress hypersensitivity also abrogate the ability of PfCRTCQR to transport CQ, thus explaining why rescue from hypersensitivity restores the parasite

  10. Development of a generic micellar electrokinetic chromatography method for the separation of 15 antimalarial drugs as a tool to detect medicine counterfeiting.

    PubMed

    Lamalle, Caroline; Djang'Eing'A Marini, Roland; Debrus, Benjamin; Lebrun, Pierre; Crommen, Jacques; Hubert, Philippe; Servais, Anne-Catherine; Fillet, Marianne

    2012-06-01

    Since antimalarial drugs counterfeiting is dramatically present on the African market, the development of simple analytical methods for their quality control is of great importance. This work consists in the CE analysis of 15 antimalarials (artesunate, artemether, amodiaquine, chloroquine, piperaquine, primaquine, quinine, cinchonine, mefloquine, halofantrine, sulfadoxine, sulfalen, atovaquone, proguanil, and pyrimethamine). Since all these molecules cannot be ionized at the same pH, MEKC was preferred because it also allows separation of neutral compounds. Preliminary experiments were first carried out to select the most crucial factors affecting the antimalarials separation. Several conditions were tested and four parameters as well as their investigation domain were chosen: pH (5-10), SDS concentration (20-90 mM), ACN proportion (10-40%), and temperature (20-35°C). Then, the experimental design methodology was used and a central composite design was selected. Mathematical modeling of the migration times allowed the prediction of optimal conditions (29°C, pH 6.6, 29 mM SDS, 36% ACN) regarding analyte separation. The prediction at this optimum was verified experimentally and led to the separation of 13 compounds within 8 min. Finally, the method was successfully applied to the quality control of African antimalarial medicines for their qualitative and quantitative content. PMID:22887081

  11. The malaria parasite cation ATPase PfATP4 and its role in the mechanism of action of a new arsenal of antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Spillman, Natalie Jane; Kirk, Kiaran

    2015-12-01

    The intraerythrocytic malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, maintains a low cytosolic Na(+) concentration and the plasma membrane P-type cation translocating ATPase 'PfATP4' has been implicated as playing a key role in this process. PfATP4 has been the subject of significant attention in recent years as mutations in this protein confer resistance to a growing number of new antimalarial compounds, including the spiroindolones, the pyrazoles, the dihydroisoquinolones, and a number of the antimalarial agents in the Medicines for Malaria Venture's 'Malaria Box'. On exposure of parasites to these compounds there is a rapid disruption of cytosolic Na(+). Whether, and if so how, such chemically distinct compounds interact with PfATP4, and how such interactions lead to parasite death, is not yet clear. The fact that multiple different chemical classes have converged upon PfATP4 highlights its significance as a potential target for new generation antimalarial agents. A spiroindolone (KAE609, now known as cipargamin) has progressed through Phase I and IIa clinical trials with favourable results. In this review we consider the physiological role of PfATP4, summarise the current repertoire of antimalarial compounds for which PfATP4 is implicated in their mechanism of action, and provide an outlook on translation from target identification in the laboratory to patient treatment in the field. PMID:26401486

  12. The malaria parasite cation ATPase PfATP4 and its role in the mechanism of action of a new arsenal of antimalarial drugs

    PubMed Central

    Spillman, Natalie Jane; Kirk, Kiaran

    2015-01-01

    The intraerythrocytic malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, maintains a low cytosolic Na+ concentration and the plasma membrane P-type cation translocating ATPase ‘PfATP4’ has been implicated as playing a key role in this process. PfATP4 has been the subject of significant attention in recent years as mutations in this protein confer resistance to a growing number of new antimalarial compounds, including the spiroindolones, the pyrazoles, the dihydroisoquinolones, and a number of the antimalarial agents in the Medicines for Malaria Venture's ‘Malaria Box’. On exposure of parasites to these compounds there is a rapid disruption of cytosolic Na+. Whether, and if so how, such chemically distinct compounds interact with PfATP4, and how such interactions lead to parasite death, is not yet clear. The fact that multiple different chemical classes have converged upon PfATP4 highlights its significance as a potential target for new generation antimalarial agents. A spiroindolone (KAE609, now known as cipargamin) has progressed through Phase I and IIa clinical trials with favourable results. In this review we consider the physiological role of PfATP4, summarise the current repertoire of antimalarial compounds for which PfATP4 is implicated in their mechanism of action, and provide an outlook on translation from target identification in the laboratory to patient treatment in the field. PMID:26401486

  13. Artemisinin Antimalarials: Preserving the “Magic Bullet”

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Richard J; Woodrow, Charles J; White, Lisa J

    2010-01-01

    The artemisinins are the most effective antimalarial drugs known. They possess a remarkably wide therapeutic index. These agents have been used in traditional Chinese herbal medicine for more than 2,000 years but were not subjected to scientific scrutiny until the 1970s. The first formal clinical trials of the artemisinins, and the development of methods for their industrial scale production, followed rapidly. A decade later, Chinese scientists shared their findings with the rest of the world; since then, a significant body of international trial evidence has confirmed these drugs to be far superior to any available alternatives. In particular, they have the ability to rapidly kill a broad range of asexual parasite stages at safe concentrations that are consistently achievable via standard dosing regimens. As their half-life is very short, there was also thought to be a low risk of resistance. These discoveries coincided with the appearance and spread of resistance to all the other major classes of antimalarials. As a result, the artemisinins now form an essential element of recommended first-line antimalarial treatment regimens worldwide. To minimize the risk of artemisinin resistance, they are recommended to be used to treat uncomplicated malaria in combination with other antimalarials as artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs). Their rollout has resulted in documented reductions in malaria prevalence in a number of African and Asian countries. Unfortunately, there are already worrisome early signs of artemisinin resistance appearing in western Cambodia. If this resistance were to spread, it would be disastrous for malaria control efforts worldwide. The enormous challenge for the international community is how to avert this catastrophe and preserve the effectiveness of this antimalarial “magic bullet”. Drug Dev Res 71: 12–19, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21399699

  14. Effects of the antimalarial drugs ferroquine and artesunate on Plasmodium yoelii yoelii gametocytegenesis and vectorial transmission.

    PubMed

    Mustfa, Kamla; Landau, Irène; Chabaud, Alain-Gabriel; Chavatte, Jean-Marc; Chandenier, Jacques; Duong, Thanh Hai; Richard-Lenoble, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Chemistry still has a role in the management of malaria, alongside the mosquito netting soaked in insecticide that is used increasingly, as we continue to await the long anticipated vaccine. During its cycle, the hematozoon parasite develops through three major periods. The first, malarial infection, corresponds to the intrahepatic development of infective forms from the mosquito vector; this period is not sensitive to treatment and is often asymptomatic. The period of erythrocytic schizogony is the most urgent, and treatment activity is primordial. Finally, the phase of sexual reproduction, when gametocytes develop within the erythrocytes ensures the perpetuation of the species when these reach the blood-feeding female anopheles mosquitoes. The aim of our work was to study the effect on gametocytes of drugs known to be effective on the asexual blood forms of the protozoan and thus the potential repercussions on malaria transmission. This experimental study was conducted with an animal model whose parasite cycle and modes of transmission are close to those of human malaria: Plasmodium yoelii, maintained on Swiss mice, with the Anopheles stephensi vector (maintained in an animal facility at the National Museum of Natural History in Paris). Two drugs were tested: ferroquine (a chloroquine derivative with a ferrocene molecule at the lateral carbon chain that restores its efficacy against chloroquine-resistant strains) and artesunate (a derivative of artemisinin, from ginghao, a Chinese plant also known as artemisia annua, or sweet wormwood), a treatment of choice in the combined therapies recommended by WHO. The efficacy of these drugs, prescribed at doses subcurative for the asexual forms, were tested against gametocyte production, quantitatively by counting them in the blood and qualitatively by counting the quantity of oocysts developed on the mosquito's midgut, which are indicators of gametocyte activity. The mice that were parasite-infected and then treated

  15. [Historical overview of antimalarials used in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Zerpa de Artiles, N

    1993-06-01

    A historical review of antimalarials used in Venezuela is presented from the time when the bark of quina was used until the massive distribution of quinine and metoquine by the Dirección de Malariología y Saneamiento Ambiental. The utility of chloroquine and primaquine against sensible parasite isolates and of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and quinine, currently used against P. falciparum resistant strains, is thoroughly discussed. The author suggests use of artemisimine and its derivatives as a very promising antimalarial drug. She also stresses the possibility of the application of new antimalaria vaccine against P. falciparum blood states, presently assayed in the country as an additional tool in malaria control programs. PMID:11640680

  16. Ex vivo anti-malarial drugs sensitivity profile of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from Burkina Faso five years after the national policy change

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent reports on the decreasing susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to artemisinin derivatives along the Thailand and Myanmar border are worrying. Indeed it may spread to India and then Africa, repeating the same pattern observed for chloroquine resistance. Therefore, it is essential to start monitoring P. falciparum sensitivity to artemisinin derivatives and its partner drugs in Africa. Efficacy of AL and ASAQ were tested by carrying out an in vivo drug efficacy test, with an ex vivo study against six anti-malarial drugs nested into it. Results of the latter are reported here. Methods Plasmodium falciparum ex-vivo susceptibility to chloroquine (CQ), quinine (Q), lumefantrine (Lum), monodesethylamodiaquine (MDA), piperaquine (PPQ) and dihydroartemisinin (DHA) was investigated in children (6 months – 15 years) with a parasitaemia of at least ≥4,000/μl. The modified isotopic microtest technique was used. The results of cellular proliferation were analysed using ICEstimator software to determine the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values. Results DHA was the most potent among the 6 drugs tested, with IC50 values ranging from 0.8 nM to 0.9 nM (Geometric mean IC50 = 0.8 nM; 95% CI [0.8 - 0.9]). High IC50 values ranged between 0.8 nM to 166.1 nM were reported for lumefantrine (Geometric mean IC50 = 25.1 nM; 95% CI [22.4 - 28.2]). MDA and Q IC50s were significantly higher in CQ-resistant than in CQ-sensitive isolates (P = 0.0001). However, the opposite occurred for Lum and DHA (P < 0.001). No difference was observed for PPQ. Conclusion Artemisinin derivatives are still very efficacious in Burkina Faso and DHA-PPQ seems a valuable alternative ACT. The high lumefantrine IC50 found in this study is worrying as it may indicate a decreasing efficacy of one of the first-line treatments. This should be further investigated and monitored over time with large in vivo and ex vivo studies that will include also plasma drug measurements

  17. 4-aminoquinoline based molecular hybrids as antimalarials: an overview.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Sunny; Tripathi, Mohit; Rawat, Diwan S

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, the novel concept of generating hybrid molecules by pharmacophoric hybridisation approach is fast becoming an alternative to other existing strategies of drug development. These hybrids also known as 'dual drugs' or 'double drugs' are especially found to be effective in overcoming drug resistance problems. Towards this end, a lot of effort has been put for generating 4-aminoquinoline based hybrid molecules as next generation antimalarial drugs effective in malarial chemotherapy. This short review deals about the recent advances carried in the field of 4-aminoquinoline based molecular hybrids as potential antimalarial agents. It also presents a brief and simplified story on the development of 4-aminoquinolines as a mainstay in malarial research programmes. PMID:25116580

  18. Antimalarial natural products: a review

    PubMed Central

    Mojab, Faraz

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Malaria is an infectious disease commonplace in tropical countries. For many years, major antimalarial drugs consisted of natural products, but since 1930s these drugs have been largely replaced with a series of synthetic drugs. This article tries to briefly indicate that some plants which previously were used to treat malaria, as a result of deficiencies of synthetic drugs, have revived into useful products once more. It also attempts to describe some tests which can be used to evaluate plant extracts for antimalarial activity. Materials and Methods: By referring to some recent literatures, data were collected about plants used for the treatment of malaria, evaluation of plant extracts for antimalarial activity, modes of action of natural antimalarial agents, and recent research on antimalarial plants in Iran and other countries. Results and Conclusion: There is an urgent need for the development of new treatments for malaria. Many countries have a vast precedence in the use of medicinal plants and the required knowledge spans many centuries. Although malaria is controlled in Iran, some researchers tend to study malaria and related subjects. In vitro biological tests for the detection of antimalarial activities in plant extracts are currently available. It is vital that the efficacy and safety of traditional medicines be validated and their active constituents be identified in order to establish reliable quality control measures. PMID:25050231

  19. Drug resistance in Giardia duodenalis.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Brendan R E; McConville, Malcolm J; Ma'ayeh, Showgy Y; Dagley, Michael J; Gasser, Robin B; Svärd, Staffan G; Jex, Aaron R

    2015-11-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a microaerophilic parasite of the human gastrointestinal tract and a major contributor to diarrheal and post-infectious chronic gastrointestinal disease world-wide. Treatment of G. duodenalis infection currently relies on a small number of drug classes. Nitroheterocyclics, in particular metronidazole, have represented the front line treatment for the last 40 years. Nitroheterocyclic-resistant G. duodenalis have been isolated from patients and created in vitro, prompting considerable research into the biomolecular mechanisms of resistance. These compounds are redox-active and are believed to damage proteins and DNA after being activated by oxidoreductase enzymes in metabolically active cells. In this review, we explore the molecular phenotypes of nitroheterocyclic-resistant G. duodenalis described to date in the context of the protist's unusual glycolytic and antioxidant systems. We propose that resistance mechanisms are likely to extend well beyond currently described resistance-associated enzymes (i.e., pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductases and nitroreductases), to include NAD(P)H- and flavin-generating pathways, and possibly redox-sensitive epigenetic regulation. Mechanisms that allow G. duodenalis to tolerate oxidative stress may lead to resistance against both oxygen and nitroheterocyclics, with implications for clinical control. The present review highlights the potential for systems biology tools and advanced bioinformatics to further investigate the multifaceted mechanisms of nitroheterocyclic resistance in this important pathogen. PMID:25922317

  20. Antimalarial activity of HIV-1 protease inhibitor in chromone series.

    PubMed

    Lerdsirisuk, Pradith; Maicheen, Chirattikan; Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn

    2014-12-01

    Increasing parasite resistance to nearly all available antimalarial drugs becomes a serious problem to human health and necessitates the need to continue the search for new effective drugs. Recent studies have shown that clinically utilized HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) inhibitors can inhibit the in vitro and in vivo growth of Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, a series of chromone derivatives possessing HIV-1 PR inhibitory activity has been tested for antimalarial activity against P. falciparum (K1 multi-drug resistant strain). Chromone 15, the potent HIV-1 PR inhibitor (IC50=0.65μM), was found to be the most potent antimalarial compound with IC50=0.95μM while primaquine and tafenoquine showed IC50=2.41 and 1.95μM, respectively. Molecular docking study of chromone compounds against plasmepsin II, an aspartic protease enzyme important in hemoglobin degradation, revealed that chromone 15 exhibited the higher binding affinity (binding energy=-13.24kcal/mol) than the known PM II inhibitors. Thus, HIV-1 PR inhibitor in chromone series has the potential to be a new class of antimalarial agent. PMID:25462990

  1. YAP and the drug resistance highway

    PubMed Central

    Keren-Paz, Alona; Emmanuel, Rafi

    2016-01-01

    Deciphering mechanisms of drug resistance is crucial to winning the battle against cancer. A new study points to an unexpected function of YAP in drug resistance and illuminates its potential role as a therapeutic target. PMID:25711863

  2. YAP and the drug resistance highway.

    PubMed

    Keren-Paz, Alona; Emmanuel, Rafi; Samuels, Yardena

    2015-03-01

    Deciphering mechanisms of drug resistance is crucial to winning the battle against cancer. A new study points to an unexpected function of YAP in drug resistance and illuminates its potential role as a therapeutic target. PMID:25711863

  3. Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Juan Carlos; Martin, Anandi

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious public health problem worldwide. Its situation is worsened by the presence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of the disease. In recent years, even more serious forms of drug resistance have been reported. A better knowledge of the mechanisms of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and the relevant molecular mechanisms involved will improve the available techniques for rapid drug resistance detection and will help to explore new targets for drug activity and development. This review article discusses the mechanisms of action of anti-tuberculosis drugs and the molecular basis of drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:27025748

  4. Pharmacokinetics of a novel sublingual spray formulation of the antimalarial drug artemether in African children with malaria.

    PubMed

    Salman, Sam; Bendel, Daryl; Lee, Toong C; Templeton, David; Davis, Timothy M E

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of sublingual artemether (ArTiMist) was investigated in 91 young African children with severe malaria or who could not tolerate oral antimalarial therapy. Each received 3.0 mg/kg of body weight of artemether at 0, 8, 24, 36, 48, and 60 h or until the initiation of oral treatment. Few blood samples were drawn postdose. Plasma artemether and dihydroartemisinin (DHA) levels were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the data were analyzed using established population compartmental pharmacokinetic models. Parasite clearance was prompt (median parasite clearance time, 24 h), and there were no serious adverse events. Consistent with studies in healthy adults (S. Salman, D. Bendel, T. C. Lee, D. Templeton, and T. M. E. Davis, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 59:3197-3207, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.05013-14), the absorption of sublingual artemether was biphasic, and multiple dosing was associated with the autoinduction of the metabolism of artemether to DHA (which itself has potent antimalarial activity). In contrast to studies using healthy volunteers, pharmacokinetic modeling indicated that the first absorption phase did not avoid first-pass metabolism, suggesting that the drug is transferred to the upper intestine through postdose fluid/food intake. Simulations using the present data and those from an earlier study in older Melanesian children with uncomplicated malaria treated with artemether-lumefantrine tablets suggested that the bioavailability of sublingual artemether was at least equivalent to that after conventional oral artemether-lumefantrine (median [interquartile range] areas under the concentration-time curve for artemether, 3,403 [2,471 to 4,771] versus 3,063 [2,358 to 4,514] μg · h/liter, respectively; and for DHA, 2,958 [2,146 to 4,278] versus 2,839 [1,812 to 3,488] μg · h/liter, respectively; P ≥ 0.42). These findings suggest that sublingual artemether could be used as prereferral treatment for sick

  5. Pharmacokinetics of a Novel Sublingual Spray Formulation of the Antimalarial Drug Artemether in African Children with Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Sam; Bendel, Daryl; Lee, Toong C.; Templeton, David

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of sublingual artemether (ArTiMist) was investigated in 91 young African children with severe malaria or who could not tolerate oral antimalarial therapy. Each received 3.0 mg/kg of body weight of artemether at 0, 8, 24, 36, 48, and 60 h or until the initiation of oral treatment. Few blood samples were drawn postdose. Plasma artemether and dihydroartemisinin (DHA) levels were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the data were analyzed using established population compartmental pharmacokinetic models. Parasite clearance was prompt (median parasite clearance time, 24 h), and there were no serious adverse events. Consistent with studies in healthy adults (S. Salman, D. Bendel, T. C. Lee, D. Templeton, and T. M. E. Davis, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 59:3197–3207, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.05013-14), the absorption of sublingual artemether was biphasic, and multiple dosing was associated with the autoinduction of the metabolism of artemether to DHA (which itself has potent antimalarial activity). In contrast to studies using healthy volunteers, pharmacokinetic modeling indicated that the first absorption phase did not avoid first-pass metabolism, suggesting that the drug is transferred to the upper intestine through postdose fluid/food intake. Simulations using the present data and those from an earlier study in older Melanesian children with uncomplicated malaria treated with artemether-lumefantrine tablets suggested that the bioavailability of sublingual artemether was at least equivalent to that after conventional oral artemether-lumefantrine (median [interquartile range] areas under the concentration-time curve for artemether, 3,403 [2,471 to 4,771] versus 3,063 [2,358 to 4,514] μg · h/liter, respectively; and for DHA, 2,958 [2,146 to 4,278] versus 2,839 [1,812 to 3,488] μg · h/liter, respectively; P ≥ 0.42). These findings suggest that sublingual artemether could be used as prereferral treatment for sick

  6. Drug-resistant malaria in Sudan: A review of evidence and scenarios for the future

    PubMed Central

    Adeel, Ahmed Awad

    2012-01-01

    Resistance of falciparum malaria to chloroquine (CQ) has gradually emerged in the late 1970s, reaching unacceptably high proportions over the following three decades of use as frst line treatment in Sudan. By 2004–2006 CQ was replaced by artemisinin-based combination treatment (ACTs), with combination of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and artesunate (AS) deployed as frst-line drug against falciparum malaria. The present review follows the evolution of CQ resistance in Sudan and the available evidence on the response to the present frst-line drugs. The fndings in Sudan are analyzed in view of developments in other African countries and at the global level, with the hope of elucidating possible scenarios for the course of events in the Sudan. Northern Sudan has been one of the areas where signals indicating the emergence of drug resistant malaria parasites have frst originated in Africa. The pattern of low endemicity and low population immunity to malaria, together with massive deployment and improper use of anti-malarial drugs created the ideal environment for creation of anti-malarial drug resistance. Such an environment existed in certain areas in South East Asia that had historically been the epicenter from which falciparum malaria parasites resistant to pyrimethamine and chloroquine have spread to the rest of the world. The alarming recent reports about the emergence of artemisinin (ART) resistance in South East Asia have lead WHO to take specifc measures for prevention, early detection and containment of drug resistance. What could be applicable in Sudan in these measures is discussed here.

  7. Structural mapping of the ClpB ATPases of Plasmodium falciparum: Targeting protein folding and secretion for antimalarial drug design.

    PubMed

    AhYoung, Andrew P; Koehl, Antoine; Cascio, Duilio; Egea, Pascal F

    2015-09-01

    Caseinolytic chaperones and proteases (Clp) belong to the AAA+ protein superfamily and are part of the protein quality control machinery in cells. The eukaryotic parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of malaria, has evolved an elaborate network of Clp proteins including two distinct ClpB ATPases. ClpB1 and ClpB2 are involved in different aspects of parasitic proteostasis. ClpB1 is present in the apicoplast, a parasite-specific and plastid-like organelle hosting various metabolic pathways necessary for parasite growth. ClpB2 localizes to the parasitophorous vacuole membrane where it drives protein export as core subunit of a parasite-derived protein secretion complex, the Plasmodium Translocon of Exported proteins (PTEX); this process is central to parasite virulence and survival in the human host. The functional associations of these two chaperones with parasite-specific metabolism and protein secretion make them prime drug targets. ClpB proteins function as unfoldases and disaggregases and share a common architecture consisting of four domains-a variable N-terminal domain that binds different protein substrates, followed by two highly conserved catalytic ATPase domains, and a C-terminal domain. Here, we report and compare the first crystal structures of the N terminal domains of ClpB1 and ClpB2 from Plasmodium and analyze their molecular surfaces. Solution scattering analysis of the N domain of ClpB2 shows that the average solution conformation is similar to the crystalline structure. These structures represent the first step towards the characterization of these two malarial chaperones and the reconstitution of the entire PTEX to aid structure-based design of novel anti-malarial drugs. PMID:26130467

  8. Cancer Metabolism and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mahbuba; Hasan, Mohammad Rubayet

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic alterations, driven by genetic and epigenetic factors, have long been known to be associated with the etiology of cancer. Furthermore, accumulating evidence suggest that cancer metabolism is intimately linked to drug resistance, which is currently one of the most important challenges in cancer treatment. Altered metabolic pathways help cancer cells to proliferate at a rate higher than normal, adapt to nutrient limited conditions, and develop drug resistance phenotypes. Application of systems biology, boosted by recent advancement of novel high-throughput technologies to obtain cancer-associated, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data, is expected to make a significant contribution to our understanding of metabolic properties related to malignancy. Indeed, despite being at a very early stage, quantitative data obtained from the omics platforms and through applications of 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) in in vitro studies, researchers have already began to gain insight into the complex metabolic mechanisms of cancer, paving the way for selection of molecular targets for therapeutic interventions. In this review, we discuss some of the major findings associated with the metabolic pathways in cancer cells and also discuss new evidences and achievements on specific metabolic enzyme targets and target-directed small molecules that can potentially be used as anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26437434

  9. Suppression of Drug Resistance in Dengue Virus

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, Roberto; Nagamine, Claude M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus is a major human pathogen responsible for 400 million infections yearly. As with other RNA viruses, daunting challenges to antiviral design exist due to the high error rates of RNA-dependent RNA synthesis. Indeed, treatment of dengue virus infection with a nucleoside analog resulted in the expected genetic selection of resistant viruses in tissue culture and in mice. However, when the function of the oligomeric core protein was inhibited, no detectable selection of drug resistance in tissue culture or in mice was detected, despite the presence of drug-resistant variants in the population. Suppressed selection of drug-resistant virus correlated with cooligomerization of the targeted drug-susceptible and drug-resistant core proteins. The concept of “dominant drug targets,” in which inhibition of oligomeric viral assemblages leads to the formation of drug-susceptible chimeras, can therefore be used to prevent the outgrowth of drug resistance during dengue virus infection. PMID:26670386

  10. Evaluation of spiropiperidine hydantoins as a novel class of antimalarial agents.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Marvin J; Anderson, Elizabeth J; McNitt, Sarah A; Krenning, Thomas M; Singh, Megh; Xu, Jing; Zeng, Wentian; Qin, Limei; Xu, Wanwan; Zhao, Siting; Qin, Li; Eickhoff, Christopher S; Oliva, Jonathan; Campbell, Mary A; Arnett, Stacy D; Prinsen, Michael J; Griggs, David W; Ruminski, Peter G; Goldberg, Daniel E; Ding, Ke; Liu, Xiaorong; Tu, Zhengchao; Tortorella, Micky D; Sverdrup, Francis M; Chen, Xiaoping

    2015-08-15

    Given the rise of parasite resistance to all currently used antimalarial drugs, the identification of novel chemotypes with unique mechanisms of action is of paramount importance. Since Plasmodium expresses a number of aspartic proteases necessary for its survival, we have mined antimalarial datasets for drug-like aspartic protease inhibitors. This effort led to the identification of spiropiperidine hydantoins, bearing similarity to known inhibitors of the human aspartic protease β-secretase (BACE), as new leads for antimalarial drug discovery. Spiropiperidine hydantoins have a dynamic structure-activity relationship profile with positions identified as being tolerant of a variety of substitution patterns as well as a key piperidine N-benzyl phenol pharmacophore. Lead compounds 4e (CWHM-123) and 12k (CWHM-505) are potent antimalarials with IC50 values against Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 of 0.310 μM and 0.099 μM, respectively, and the former features equivalent potency on the chloroquine-resistant Dd2 strain. Remarkably, these compounds do not inhibit human aspartic proteases BACE, cathepsins D and E, or Plasmodium plasmepsins II and IV despite their similarity to known BACE inhibitors. Although the current leads suffer from poor metabolic stability, they do fit into a drug-like chemical property space and provide a new class of potent antimalarial agents for further study. PMID:25797165

  11. Immunoliposome-mediated drug delivery to Plasmodium-infected and non-infected red blood cells as a dual therapeutic/prophylactic antimalarial strategy.

    PubMed

    Moles, Ernest; Urbán, Patricia; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Viera-Morilla, Sara; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Busquets, Maria Antònia; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2015-07-28

    One of the most important factors behind resistance evolution in malaria is the failure to deliver sufficiently high amounts of drugs to early stages of Plasmodium-infected red blood cells (pRBCs). Despite having been considered for decades as a promising approach, the delivery of antimalarials encapsulated in immunoliposomes targeted to pRBCs has not progressed towards clinical applications, whereas in vitro assays rarely reach drug efficacy improvements above 10-fold. Here we show that encapsulation efficiencies reaching >96% are achieved for the weak basic drugs chloroquine (CQ) and primaquine using the pH gradient loading method in liposomes containing neutral saturated phospholipids. Targeting antibodies are best conjugated through their primary amino groups, adjusting chemical crosslinker concentration to retain significant antigen recognition. Antigens from non-parasitized RBCs have also been considered as targets for the delivery to the cell of drugs not affecting the erythrocytic metabolism. Using this strategy, we have achieved unprecedented complete nanocarrier targeting to early intraerythrocytic stages of the malaria parasite for which there is a lack of specific extracellular molecular tags. Immunoliposomes studded with monoclonal antibodies raised against the erythrocyte surface protein glycophorin A were capable of targeting 100% RBCs and pRBCs at the low concentration of 0.5μM total lipid in the culture, with >95% of added liposomes retained on cell surfaces. When exposed for only 15min to Plasmodium falciparum in vitro cultures of early stages, free CQ had no significant effect on the viability of the parasite up to 200nM, whereas immunoliposomal 50nM CQ completely arrested its growth. In vivo assays in mice showed that immunoliposomes cleared the pathogen below detectable levels at a CQ dose of 0.5mg/kg, whereas free CQ administered at 1.75mg/kg was, at most, 40-fold less efficient. Our data suggest that this significant improvement is in part

  12. QSAR and pharmacophore modeling of natural and synthetic antimalarial prodiginines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Baljinder; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Bharate, Sandip B

    2013-09-01

    Prodiginines are a family of linear and cyclic oligopyrrole red-pigmented compounds possessing antibacterial, anticancer and immunosuppressive activities and are produced by actinomycetes and other eubacteria. Recently, prodiginines have been reported to possess potent in vitro as well as in vivo antimalarial activity against chloroquine sensitive D6 and multi-drug resistant Dd2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum. In the present paper, a QSAR and pharmacophore modeling for a series of natural and synthetic prodiginines was performed to find out structural features which are crucial for antimalarial activity against these D6 and Dd2 Plasmodium strains. The study indicated that inertia moment 2 length, Kier Chi6 (path) index, kappa 3 index and Wiener topological index plays important role in antimalarial activity against D6 strain whereas descriptors inertia moment 2 length, ADME H-bond donors, VAMP polarization XX component and VAMP quadpole XZ component play important role in antimalarial activity against Dd2 strain. Furthermore, a five-point pharmacophore (ADHRR) model with one H-bond acceptor (A), one H-bond donor (D), one hydrophobic group (H) and two aromatic rings (R) as pharmacophore features was developed for D6 strain by PHASE module of Schrodinger suite. Similarly a six-point pharmacophore AADDRR was developed for Dd2 strain activity. All developed QSAR models showed good correlation coefficient (r² > 0.7), higher F value (F >20) and excellent predictive power (Q² > 0.6). Developed models will be highly useful for predicting antimalarial activity of new compounds and could help in designing better molecules with enhanced antimalarial activity. Furthermore, calculated ADME properties indicated drug-likeness of prodiginines. PMID:24010933

  13. The Redox Cycler Plasmodione Is a Fast-Acting Antimalarial Lead Compound with Pronounced Activity against Sexual and Early Asexual Blood-Stage Parasites.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Katharina; Deregnaucourt, Christiane; Goetz, Alice-Anne; Tzanova, Tzvetomira; Gallo, Valentina; Arese, Paolo; Pradines, Bruno; Adjalley, Sophie H; Bagrel, Denyse; Blandin, Stephanie; Lanzer, Michael; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth

    2016-09-01

    Previously, we presented the chemical design of a promising series of antimalarial agents, 3-[substituted-benzyl]-menadiones, with potent in vitro and in vivo activities. Ongoing studies on the mode of action of antimalarial 3-[substituted-benzyl]-menadiones revealed that these agents disturb the redox balance of the parasitized erythrocyte by acting as redox cyclers-a strategy that is broadly recognized for the development of new antimalarial agents. Here we report a detailed parasitological characterization of the in vitro activity profile of the lead compound 3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-menadione 1c (henceforth called plasmodione) against intraerythrocytic stages of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum We show that plasmodione acts rapidly against asexual blood stages, thereby disrupting the clinically relevant intraerythrocytic life cycle of the parasite, and furthermore has potent activity against early gametocytes. The lead's antiplasmodial activity was unaffected by the most common mechanisms of resistance to clinically used antimalarials. Moreover, plasmodione has a low potential to induce drug resistance and a high killing speed, as observed by culturing parasites under continuous drug pressure. Drug interactions with licensed antimalarial drugs were also established using the fixed-ratio isobologram method. Initial toxicological profiling suggests that plasmodione is a safe agent for possible human use. Our studies identify plasmodione as a promising antimalarial lead compound and strongly support the future development of redox-active benzylmenadiones as antimalarial agents. PMID:27297478

  14. Compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm: preparation, evaluation, and mechanism of penetration enhancement.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shuo; Liu, Shu-Zhi; Zhang, Yu-Shi; Du, Mao-Bo; Liang, Ai-Hua; Song, Li-Hua; Ye, Zu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is still a serious public health problem in some parts of the world. The problems of recurrence and drug resistance are increasingly more serious. Thus, it is necessary to develop a novel antimalarial agent. The objectives of this study were to construct a novel compound antimalarial transdermal nanosystem-ethosomal cataplasm, to investigate its characteristics and efficiency, and to systematically explore the penetration-enhancing mechanisms of ethosomal cataplasm. Artesunate-loaded ethosomes and febrifugine-loaded ethosomes were prepared, and their characteristics were evaluated. Drug-loaded ethosomes were incorporated in the matrix of cataplasm to form the compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm. With the help of ethosomal technology, the accumulated permeation quantity of artesunate significantly increased at 8 hours after administration, which was 1.57 times as much as that of conventional cataplasm. Soon after administration, the ethosomal cataplasm could make a large quantity of antimalarial drug quickly penetrate through skin, then the remaining drug in the ethosomal cataplasm could be steadily released. These characteristics of ethosomal cataplasm are favorable for antimalarial drugs to kill Plasmodium spp. quickly and prevent the resurgence of Plasmodium spp. As expected, the ethosomal cataplasm showed good antimalarial efficiency in this experiment. The negative conversion rates were 100% and the recurrence rates were 0% at all dosages. The mechanism of penetration enhancement of the ethosomal cataplasm was systematically explored using an optics microscope, polarization microscope, and transmission electron microscopy. The microstructure, ultrastructure, and birefringent structure in skin were observed. Data obtained in this study showed that the application of ethosomal technology to antimalarial cataplasm could improve the transdermal delivery of drug, enhance the efficacy, and facilitate practical application in clinic. PMID:26170661

  15. Compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm: preparation, evaluation, and mechanism of penetration enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shuo; Liu, Shu-Zhi; Zhang, Yu-Shi; Du, Mao-Bo; Liang, Ai-Hua; Song, Li-Hua; Ye, Zu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is still a serious public health problem in some parts of the world. The problems of recurrence and drug resistance are increasingly more serious. Thus, it is necessary to develop a novel antimalarial agent. The objectives of this study were to construct a novel compound antimalarial transdermal nanosystem–ethosomal cataplasm, to investigate its characteristics and efficiency, and to systematically explore the penetration-enhancing mechanisms of ethosomal cataplasm. Artesunate-loaded ethosomes and febrifugine-loaded ethosomes were prepared, and their characteristics were evaluated. Drug-loaded ethosomes were incorporated in the matrix of cataplasm to form the compound antimalarial ethosomal cataplasm. With the help of ethosomal technology, the accumulated permeation quantity of artesunate significantly increased at 8 hours after administration, which was 1.57 times as much as that of conventional cataplasm. Soon after administration, the ethosomal cataplasm could make a large quantity of antimalarial drug quickly penetrate through skin, then the remaining drug in the ethosomal cataplasm could be steadily released. These characteristics of ethosomal cataplasm are favorable for antimalarial drugs to kill Plasmodium spp. quickly and prevent the resurgence of Plasmodium spp. As expected, the ethosomal cataplasm showed good antimalarial efficiency in this experiment. The negative conversion rates were 100% and the recurrence rates were 0% at all dosages. The mechanism of penetration enhancement of the ethosomal cataplasm was systematically explored using an optics microscope, polarization microscope, and transmission electron microscopy. The microstructure, ultrastructure, and birefringent structure in skin were observed. Data obtained in this study showed that the application of ethosomal technology to antimalarial cataplasm could improve the transdermal delivery of drug, enhance the efficacy, and facilitate practical application in clinic. PMID:26170661

  16. Inhibition of native 5-HT3 receptor-evoked contractions in guinea pig and mouse ileum by antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Stephen P; Walsh, Jacqueline; Kelly, Mark C; Muhdar, Simerjyot; Adel-Aziz, Mohammed; Barrett, Iain D; Wildman, Scott S

    2014-09-01

    Quinine, chloroquine and mefloquine are commonly used to treat malaria, however, with associated gastrointestinal (GI) side-effects. These drugs act as antagonists at recombinant 5-HT3 receptors and modulate gut peristalsis. These gastrointestinal side effects may be the result of antagonism at intestinal 5-HT3 receptors. Ileum from male C57BL/6 mice and guinea pigs was mounted longitudinally in organ baths. The concentration-response curves for 5-HT and the selective 5-HT3 agonist 2-Me-5-HT were obtained with 5-HT (pEC50 = 7.57 ± 0.33, 12) more potent (P = 0.004) than 2-Me-5-HT (pEC50 = 5.45 ± 0.58, n = 5) in mouse ileum. There was no difference in potency of 5-HT (pEC50 = 5.42 ± 0.15, n = 8) and 2-Me-5-HT (pIC50 = 5.01 ± 0.55, n = 11) in guinea pig ileum (P > 0.05). Quinine, chloroquine or mefloquine was applied for 10 min and inhibitions prior to submaximal agonist application. In mouse ileum, quinine, chloroquine and mefloquine antagonised 5-HT-induced contractions (pIC50 = 4.9 ± 0.17, n = 7; 4.76 ± 0.14, n = 5; 6.21 ± 0.2, n = 4, correspondingly) with mefloquine most potent (P < 0.05). Quinine, chloroquine and mefloquine antagonised 2-me-5-HT-induced contractions (pIC50 = 6.35 ± 0.11, n = 8; 4.64 ± 0.2, n = 7; 5.11 ± 0.22, n = 6, correspondingly) with quinine most potent (P < 0.05). In guinea-pig ileum, quinine, chloroquine and mefloquine antagonised 5-HT-induced contractions (pIC50 = 5.02 ± 0.15, n = 6; 4.54 ± 0.1, n = 7; 5.32 ± 0.13, n = 5) and 2-me-5-HT-induced contractions (pIC50 = 4.62 ± 0.25, n = 5; 4.56 ± 0.14, n = 6; 5.67 ± 0.12, n = 4) with chloroquine least potent against 5-HT and mefloquine most potent against 2-me-5-HT (P < 0.05). These results support previous studies identifying anti-malarial drugs as antagonists at recombinant 5-HT3 receptors and may also demonstrate the ability of these drugs to influence native 5-HT3 receptor-evoked contractile responses which may account for their associated GI side-effects. PMID:24886883

  17. Malaria Related Perceptions, Care Seeking after Onset of Fever and Anti-Malarial Drug Use in Malaria Endemic Settings of Southwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Birhanu, Zewdie; Abebe, Lakew; Sudhakar, Morankar; Dissanayake, Gunawardena; Yihdego, Yemane Ye-ebiyo; Alemayehu, Guda; Yewhalaw, Delenasaw

    2016-01-01

    Background Prompt care seeking and appropriate use of anti-malarial drugs are critical components of malaria prevention and control. This study assessed malaria related perceptions, care seeking behavior and anti-malarial drug use in malaria endemic settings of Ethiopia. Methods Data were generated from a community based cross-sectional study conducted among 798 households during January 2014 as part of a larger household behavioral study in three malaria endemic districts of Jimma Zone, Southwest Ethiopia. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected and analyzed using SPSS 17.0 and STATA 12.0. Results In this study, only 76.1% of the respondents associated malaria to mosquito bite, and incorrect beliefs and perceptions were noted. Despite moderate level of knowledge (estimated mean = 62.2, Std Err = 0.7, 95% CI: 60.6–63.8%), quite high favorable attitude (overall estimated mean = 91.5, Std Err = 0.6, 95% CI: 90.1–92.9%) were recorded towards malaria preventive measures. The mean attitude score for prompt care seeking, appropriate use of anti-malarial drugs, LLIN use and Indoor Residual Spray acceptance was 98.5 (Std Err = 0.4, 95% CI:97.5–99.4), 92.7 (Std Err = 0.6 95% CI:91.5–93.9), 88.8 (Std Err = 0.5, 95% CI:85.5–92.1) and 86.5 (Std Err = 1.2, 95% CI: 83.9–89.1), respectively. The prevalence of fever was 2.9% (116/4107) and of the study participants with fever, 71.9% (95% CI: 65.5–78.3%) sought care and all of them consulted formal health care system. However, only 17 (19.8%) sought care within 24 hours after onset of fever. The frequency of care seeking was higher (77.8%, n = 21/27) and more prompt (28.6%, 6/21) for children under five as compared to old age groups despite it was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). However, higher median time of seeking first care was observed among Muslims and people who did not attend school (p < 0.05). Of those who used anti-malarial drugs, 9.1% indicated that they used it inappropriately

  18. Plasmodial sugar transporters as anti-malarial drug targets and comparisons with other protozoa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy and a key substrate for most cells. Inhibition of cellular glucose uptake (the first step in its utilization) has, therefore, received attention as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat various unrelated diseases including malaria and cancers. For malaria, blood forms of parasites rely almost entirely on glycolysis for energy production and, without energy stores, they are dependent on the constant uptake of glucose. Plasmodium falciparum is the most dangerous human malarial parasite and its hexose transporter has been identified as being the major glucose transporter. In this review, recent progress regarding the validation and development of the P. falciparum hexose transporter as a drug target is described, highlighting the importance of robust target validation through both chemical and genetic methods. Therapeutic targeting potential of hexose transporters of other protozoan pathogens is also reviewed and discussed. PMID:21676209

  19. Assessment of causal prophylactic activity in Plasmodium berghei yoelii and its value for the development of new antimalarial drugs*

    PubMed Central

    Fink, E.

    1974-01-01

    The causal prophylactic activity of several reference and experimental antimalarial compounds was assessed in sporozoite-induced infections of NMRI mice with Plasmodium berghei yoelii (strain 17X). The animals were inoculated with 10 000 sporozoites per mouse and treated once 2-4 hours later. The test system has proved to be very suitable in experiments involving more than 3 000 mice. The infection rate in 448 untreated controls was 97.3%. Lowering the sporozoite content of the inoculum to 1 000 or 100 sporozoites markedly reduced the rate (65.1% and 32.7%). In experiments with primaquine the causal prophylactic activity was also influenced by the time of drug administration before or after sporozoite inoculation. No causal prophylactic effect was demonstrable with quinine, chloroquine, amodiaquine, amopyroquine, RC-12, or B 505. Primaquine was active, but pamaquine and pentaquine were only sporadically active. The pre-erythrocytic stages of P. b. yoelii were only slightly sensitive to dapsone, sulfadiazine, and sulformethoxine; they were 10-100 times more susceptible to proguanil, cycloguanil, and pyrimethamine. The experimental 6-aminoquinolines NI 147/36, NI 187/82, and BA 138/111 and the 7-chlorolincomycin derivative U 24729 were also studied. Experiments in which curative activity against blood-induced infections of P. b. yoelii was evaluated showed that the causal prophylactics act more specifically against the pre-erythrocytic than against the erythrocytic forms. This specificity was most pronounced among the DHFR-inhibitors, whose outstanding activity may be explained by the fact that the rate of multiplication of the pre-erythrocytic forms of P. b. yoelii is greater than that of other plasmodia used hitherto; it is also greater than the rate shown by the malaria parasites of man and that of the erythrocytic forms of P. b. yoelii itself. We believe that this feature will render P. b. yoelii very useful for determination of the causal prophylactic activity

  20. Clinical Management of HIV Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection has resulted in profound reductions in viremia and is associated with marked improvements in morbidity and mortality. Therapy is not curative, however, and prolonged therapy is complicated by drug toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance. Management of clinical drug resistance requires in depth evaluation, and includes extensive history, physical examination and laboratory studies. Appropriate use of resistance testing provides valuable information useful in constructing regimens for treatment-experienced individuals with viremia during therapy. This review outlines the emergence of drug resistance in vivo, and describes clinical evaluation and therapeutic options of the individual with rebound viremia during therapy. PMID:21994737

  1. Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Challenges and Progress.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Sebastian G; Furin, Jennifer J; Bark, Charles M

    2016-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a natural evolutionary process, which in the case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is based on spontaneous chromosomal mutations, meaning that well-designed combination drug regimens provided under supervised therapy will prevent the emergence of drug-resistant strains. Unfortunately, limited resources, poverty, and neglect have led to the emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis throughout the world. The international community has responded with financial and scientific support, leading to new rapid diagnostics, new drugs and regimens in advanced clinical development, and an increasingly sophisticated understanding of resistance mechanisms and their application to all aspects of TB control and treatment. PMID:27208770

  2. Photoreactivity of biologically active compounds. XIX: excited states and free radicals from the antimalarial drug primaquine.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Solveig; Edge, Ruth; Tønnesen, Hanne Hjorth; Bisby, Roger Hugh; Navaratnam, Suppiah

    2009-03-01

    The formation and reactivity of excited states and free radicals from primaquine, a drug used in the treatment of malaria, was studied in order to evaluate the primary photochemical reaction mechanisms. The excited primaquine triplet was not detected, but is likely to be formed with a short lifetime (<50 ns) and with a triplet energy <250 kJ/mol as the drug is an efficient quencher of the fenbufen triplet and the biphenyl triplet, and forms (1)O(2) by laser flash photolysis ((PQ)Phi(Delta)=0.025). Primaquine (PQ) exists as the monocation (PQH(+)) in aqueous solution at physiological pH. PQH(+) photoionises by a biphotonic process and also forms the monoprotonated cation radical (PQH(2+)*) by one electron oxidation by HO* (k(q)=6.6 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)) and Br*(2)(-) (k(q)=4.7 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)) at physiological pH, detected as a long-lived transient decaying essentially by a second order process (k(2)=7.4 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)). PQH(2+)* is scavenged by O(2), although at a limited rate (k(q)=1.0 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)). The reduction potential (E degrees) of PQH(2+)*/PQH(+) is < +1015 mV, as measured versus tryptophan (TRP*/TRPH). Primaquine also forms PQH(2+)* at pH 2.4, by one electron oxidation by Br*(2)(-) and proton loss (k(q)=2.7 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)). The non-protonated cation radical (PQ(+)*) is formed during one electron oxidation with Br*(2)(-) at alkaline conditions (k(q)=4.2 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 10.8). The estimated pK(a)-value of PQH(2+)*/PQ(+)* is pK(a) approximately 7-8. Primaquine is not a scavenger of O*(2)(-) at physiological pH. Thus self-sensitization by O*(2)(-) is eliminated as a degradation pathway in the photochemical reactions. Impurities in the raw material and photochemical degradation products initiate photosensitized degradation of primaquine in deuterium oxide, prevented by addition of the (1)O(2) quencher sodium azide. Photosensitized degradation by formation of (1)O(2) is thus important for the initial photochemical decomposition of

  3. Medical Management of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is still a major threat worldwide. However, recent scientific advances in diagnostic and therapeutic tools have improved the management of drug-resistant TB. The development of rapid molecular testing methods allows for the early detection of drug resistance and prompt initiation of an appropriate treatment. In addition, there has been growing supportive evidence for shorter treatment regimens in multidrug-resistant TB; and for the first time in over 50 years, new anti-TB drugs have been developed. The World Health Organization has recently revised their guidelines, primarily based on evidence from a meta-analysis of individual patient data (n=9,153) derived from 32 observational studies, and outlined the recommended combination and correct use of available anti-TB drugs. This review summarizes the updated guidelines with a focus on the medical management of drug-resistant TB. PMID:26175768

  4. Preventing drug resistance in severe influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolny, Hana; Deecke, Lucas

    2015-03-01

    Severe, long-lasting influenza infections are often caused by new strains of influenza. The long duration of these infections leads to an increased opportunity for the emergence of drug resistant mutants. This is particularly problematic for new strains of influenza since there is often no vaccine, so drug treatment is the first line of defense. One strategy for trying to minimize drug resistance is to apply periodic treatment. During treatment the wild-type virus decreases, but resistant virus might increase; when there is no treatment, wild-type virus will hopefully out-compete the resistant virus, driving down the number of resistant virus. We combine a mathematical model of severe influenza with a model of drug resistance to study emergence of drug resistance during a long-lasting infection. We apply periodic treatment with two types of antivirals: neuraminidase inhibitors, which block release of virions; and adamantanes, which block replication of virions. We compare the efficacy of the two drugs in reducing emergence of drug resistant mutants and examine the effect of treatment frequency on the emergence of drug resistant mutants.

  5. The effect of E. coli STa enterotoxin on the absorption of weakly dissociable anti-malarial drugs from rat intestine in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, J. M.; Lynch, J.; Lucas, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effect of E. coli heat stable (STa) enterotoxin on the absorption of radiolabelled anti-malarial weak bases and their appearance in peripheral blood was assessed in vivo by a recirculation procedure in rat intestinal loops. 2. Enterotoxin increased the jejunal disappearance of quinine (P less than 0.05), trimethoprim (P less than 0.05), proguanil (P less than 0.05) and chloroquine (P less than 0.001) and left pyrimethamine disappearance unaltered. Peripheral blood levels of trimethoprim (P less than 0.02) and proguanil (P less than 0.05) were higher after STa exposure. 3. In the ileum, enterotoxin increased the luminal disappearance (P less than 0.05) and peripheral blood appearance (P less than 0.001) of chloroquine. The luminal disappearance rate of trimethoprim was reduced (P less than 0.05) and that of pyrimethamine unchanged. 4. The increased jejunal absorption of the anti-malarial drugs occurred despite STa causing a reduction in the amount of net fluid absorption. It seems likely that the enhanced absorption with STa exposure is related to the effect of STa on the microclimate pH. An elevation in the microclimate pH would increase the amount of undissociated weak base available for non-ionic diffusion. 5. The favourable elevation of microclimate pH by STa seemed to be outweighted by the reduced fluid absorption in the ileum. Only chloroquine still showed enhanced absorption in the ileum and this may have been because unlike the other antimalarial drugs, chloroquine has two dissociable groups likely to be affected by the mucosal surface pH changes. PMID:1878755

  6. Potent Plasmodium falciparum gametocytocidal activity of diaminonaphthoquinones, lead antimalarial chemotypes identified in an antimalarial compound screen.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takeshi Q; Guiguemde, W Armand; Barnett, David S; Maron, Maxim I; Min, Jaeki; Connelly, Michele C; Suryadevara, Praveen Kumar; Guy, R Kiplin; Williamson, Kim C

    2015-03-01

    Forty percent of the world's population is threatened by malaria, which is caused by Plasmodium parasites and results in an estimated 200 million clinical cases and 650,000 deaths each year. Drug resistance has been reported for all commonly used antimalarials and has prompted screens to identify new drug candidates. However, many of these new candidates have not been evaluated against the parasite stage responsible for transmission, gametocytes. If Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes are not eliminated, patients continue to spread malaria for weeks after asexual parasite clearance. Asymptomatic individuals can also harbor gametocyte burdens sufficient for transmission, and a safe, effective gametocytocidal agent could also be used in community-wide malaria control programs. Here, we identify 15 small molecules with nanomolar activity against late-stage gametocytes. Fourteen are diaminonaphthoquinones (DANQs), and one is a 2-imino-benzo[d]imidazole (IBI). One of the DANQs identified, SJ000030570, is a lead antimalarial candidate. In contrast, 94% of the 650 compounds tested are inactive against late-stage gametocytes. Consistent with the ineffectiveness of most approved antimalarials against gametocytes, of the 19 novel compounds with activity against known anti-asexual-stage targets, only 3 had any strong effect on gametocyte viability. These data demonstrate the distinct biology of the transmission stages and emphasize the importance of screening for gametocytocidal activity. The potent gametocytocidal activity of DANQ and IBI coupled with their efficacy against asexual parasites provides leads for the development of antimalarials with the potential to prevent both the symptoms and the spread of malaria. PMID:25512421

  7. Potent Plasmodium falciparum Gametocytocidal Activity of Diaminonaphthoquinones, Lead Antimalarial Chemotypes Identified in an Antimalarial Compound Screen

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takeshi Q; Guiguemde, W. Armand; Barnett, David S.; Maron, Maxim I.; Min, Jaeki; Connelly, Michele C.; Suryadevara, Praveen Kumar; Guy, R. Kiplin

    2014-01-01

    Forty percent of the world's population is threatened by malaria, which is caused by Plasmodium parasites and results in an estimated 200 million clinical cases and 650,000 deaths each year. Drug resistance has been reported for all commonly used antimalarials and has prompted screens to identify new drug candidates. However, many of these new candidates have not been evaluated against the parasite stage responsible for transmission, gametocytes. If Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes are not eliminated, patients continue to spread malaria for weeks after asexual parasite clearance. Asymptomatic individuals can also harbor gametocyte burdens sufficient for transmission, and a safe, effective gametocytocidal agent could also be used in community-wide malaria control programs. Here, we identify 15 small molecules with nanomolar activity against late-stage gametocytes. Fourteen are diaminonaphthoquinones (DANQs), and one is a 2-imino-benzo[d]imidazole (IBI). One of the DANQs identified, SJ000030570, is a lead antimalarial candidate. In contrast, 94% of the 650 compounds tested are inactive against late-stage gametocytes. Consistent with the ineffectiveness of most approved antimalarials against gametocytes, of the 19 novel compounds with activity against known anti-asexual-stage targets, only 3 had any strong effect on gametocyte viability. These data demonstrate the distinct biology of the transmission stages and emphasize the importance of screening for gametocytocidal activity. The potent gametocytocidal activity of DANQ and IBI coupled with their efficacy against asexual parasites provides leads for the development of antimalarials with the potential to prevent both the symptoms and the spread of malaria. PMID:25512421

  8. Simple Molecular Methods for Early Detection of Chloroquine Drug Resistance in Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raksha; Urhehar, Anant Dattatraya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Malaria is a human disease of which causes high morbidity and mortality. In Plasmodium falciparum malaria, the resistance to antimalarial drugs, especially chloroquine (CQ) is one of the paramount factors contributing to the global increase in morbidity and mortality, due to malaria. Hence, there is a need for detection of chloroquine drug resistance genes i.e., pfcrt-o (Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter-o) and pfmdr-1 (Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance-1) of P. falciparum and pvcrt-o (Plasmodium vivax chloroquine resistance transporter-o) and pvmdr-1 (Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance-1) of P. vivax by using molecular methods to prevent mortality in malarial cases. Aim To standardize chloroquine drug sensitivity testing by molecular method so as to provide reports of chloroquine within 6-8 hours to physicians for better treatment. Materials and Methods This study was conducted over a period of one year from January to December 2014. A Total of 300 blood samples were collected from malaria suspected patient attending MGM Hospital, Kamothe, Navi Mumbai, India. Out of 300 blood samples, 44 were malaria positive as assessed by Thick and Thin blood smear stained, by Leishman’s method and examination with light microscope. Chloroquine drug sensitivity testing was performed using WHO III plate method (micro test). Nested PCR was done for detection of pfcrt-o and pfmdr-1 for P. falciparum and pvcrt-o, pvmdr-1 genes for P. vivax. Results Total 44 samples were included in this study, out of which 22 samples confirmed for Plasmodium falciparum and 22 samples confirmed for Plasmodium vivax. Out of 22 P. falciparum 15 (68.18%) samples were chloroquine resistant. P. vivax showed chloroquine resistance to 5 samples (22.73%) by method similar to WHO III plate method (micro test) and nested PCR. Conclusion Drug resistance testing by molecular methods is useful for early detection of antimalarial drug resistance. pfmdr-1 along with

  9. Anticipating designer drug-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Frangione, Mark L; Lockhart, John H; Morton, Daniel T; Pava, Libia M; Blanck, George

    2015-07-01

    Successful use of anticancer designer drugs is likely to depend on simultaneous combinations of these drugs to minimize the development of resistant cancer cells. Considering the knowledge base of cancer signaling pathways, mechanisms of designer drug resistance should be anticipated, and early clinical trials could be designed to include arms that combine new drugs specifically with currently US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs expected to blunt alternative signaling pathways. In this review, we indicate examples of alternative signal pathways for recent anticancer drugs, and the use of original, Python-based software to systematically identify signaling pathways that could facilitate resistance to drugs targeting a particular protein. Pathway alternatives can be assessed at http://www.alternativesignalingpathways.com, developed with this review article. PMID:25697478

  10. Prevalence of molecular markers of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Dakar, Senegal

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As a result of the widespread resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) (including artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine) has been recommended as a first-line anti-malarial regimen in Senegal since 2006. Intermittent preventive treatments with anti-malarial drugs based on sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine are also given to children or pregnant women once per month during the transmission season. Since 2006, there have been very few reports on the susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. To estimate the prevalence of resistance to several anti-malarial drugs since the introduction of the widespread use of ACT, the presence of molecular markers associated with resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine was assessed in local isolates at the military hospital of Dakar. Methods The prevalence of genetic polymorphisms in genes associated with anti-malarial drug resistance, i.e., Pfcrt, Pfdhfr, Pfdhps and Pfmdr1, and the copy number of Pfmdr1 were evaluated for a panel of 174 isolates collected from patients recruited at the military hospital of Dakar from 14 October 2009 to 19 January 2010. Results The Pfcrt 76T mutation was identified in 37.2% of the samples. The Pfmdr1 86Y and 184F mutations were found in 16.6% and 67.6% of the tested samples, respectively. Twenty-eight of the 29 isolates with the 86Y mutation were also mutated at codon 184. Only one isolate (0.6%) had two copies of Pfmdr1. The Pfdhfr 108N/T, 51I and 59R mutations were identified in 82.4%, 83.5% and 74.1% of the samples, respectively. The double mutant (108N and 51I) was detected in 83.5% of the isolates, and the triple mutant (108N, 51I and 59R) was detected in 75.3%. The Pfdhps 437G, 436F/A and 613S mutations were found in 40.2%, 35.1% and 1.8% of the samples, respectively. There was no double mutant (437G and 540E) or no quintuple mutant (Pfdhfr 108N, 51I and 59R and Pfdhps 437G and 540E

  11. Potentiation of antimalarial activity of arteether in combination with Vetiver root extract.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Sangeeta; Gunjan, Sarika; Pal, Anirban; Tripathi, Renu

    2016-05-01

    In malaria, development of resistance towards artemisinin derivatives has urged the need for new drugs or new drug combinations to tackle the drug resistant malaria. We studied the fresh root extract of Vetiver zizanioides (Linn.) Nash (VET) with a CDRI-CIMAP antimalarial α/β arteether (ART) together for their antimalarial potential. Our results showed additive to synergistic antimalarial activity of VET and ART with sum fractional inhibitory concentrations Σ FICs 1.02 ± 0.24 and 1.12 ± 0.32 for chloroquine sensitive (CQS) and chloroquine resistant (CQR) strain of Plasmodium falciparum (William H. Welch), respectively. Further, these combinations were explored against multidrug resistant rodent malaria parasite i.e. P. yoelii nigeriensis. Analysis of in vivo interaction of ART and VET showed that 10 mg/kg x 5 days of ART with 1000 mg/kg of VET x 5 days cured 100% mice infected with MDR parasite, while the same dose of ART could produce only up to 30% cure and VET fraction was not curative at all. Synergism/additiveness, found between VET and ART is reported for the first time. The curative dose of ART in the combination was reduced to its one fourth, and thus limits the side effects, if any. Although antimalarial potential of ART was enhanced by VET, action mechanism of later needs to be elucidated in detail. PMID:27319050

  12. Old drugs, novel ways out: Drug resistance toward cytotoxic chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wijdeven, Ruud H; Pang, Baoxu; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Neefjes, Jacques

    2016-09-01

    Efficacy of chemotherapy in the treatment of distinct malignancies is often hampered by drug resistance arising in the tumor. Understanding the molecular basis of drug resistance and translating this knowledge into personalized treatment decisions can enhance therapeutic efficacy and even curative outcome. Over the years, multiple drug resistance mechanisms have been identified that enable tumors to cope with the damage instigated by a specific drug or group of anti-tumor agents. Here we provide an overview of the molecular pathways leading to resistance against conventional anti-cancer drugs, with emphasis on the utility of these pathways for rational selection of treatments for individual cancer patients. We further complement the review by discussing the pitfalls and difficulties in translating these findings into novel treatment strategies for cancer patients. PMID:27620955

  13. Modelling the time course of antimalarial parasite killing: a tour of animal and human models, translation and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kashyap; Simpson, Julie A; Batty, Kevin T; Zaloumis, Sophie; Kirkpatrick, Carl M

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains a global public health concern and current treatment options are suboptimal in some clinical settings. For effective chemotherapy, antimalarial drug concentrations must be sufficient to remove completely all of the parasites in the infected host. Optimized dosing therefore requires a detailed understanding of the time course of antimalarial response, whilst simultaneously considering the parasite life cycle and host immune elimination. Recently, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended the development of mathematical models for understanding better antimalarial drug resistance and management. Other international groups have also suggested that mechanistic pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) models can support the rationalization of antimalarial dosing strategies. At present, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is recommended as first line treatment of falciparum malaria for all patient groups. This review summarizes the PK–PD characterization of artemisinin derivatives and other partner drugs from both preclinical studies and human clinical trials. We outline the continuous and discrete time models that have been proposed to describe antimalarial activity on specific stages of the parasite life cycle. The translation of PK–PD predictions from animals to humans is considered, because preclinical studies can provide rich data for detailed mechanism-based modelling. While similar sampling techniques are limited in clinical studies, PK–PD models can be used to optimize the design of experiments to improve estimation of the parameters of interest. Ultimately, we propose that fully developed mechanistic models can simulate and rationalize ACT or other treatment strategies in antimalarial chemotherapy. PMID:24251882

  14. MULTIPLE DRUG RESISTANCE: TRENDS AND IMPLICATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial resistance (AR) has emerged as a global problem. Although AR occurs shortly after the introduction and use of an antimicrobial, resistance levels vary over time. Historically, antimicrobials were regarded as wonder drugs and for years, when resistance to a single antimicrobial occurr...

  15. Antimalarial activity of fractions of aqueous extract of Acacia nilotica root

    PubMed Central

    Alli, Lukman Adewale; Adesokan, Abdulfatai Ayoade; Salawu, Adeola Oluwakanyinsola

    2016-01-01

    Background: The problem of resistance of malarial parasites to available antimalarial drugs makes the development of new drugs imperative, with natural plant products providing an alternative source for discovering new drugs. Aim: To evaluate the antimalarial activity of eluted fractions of Acacia nilotica root extract and determine the phytochemicals responsible for its antimalarial activity. Materials and Methods: The extract was eluted successively in gradients of solvent mixture (hexane, ethyl acetate, and methanol) in multiples of 100 ml, and each fraction was collected separately. Eluates that showed similar thin layer chromatographic profiles and Rf values were combined to produce 4 main fractions (F-1, F-2, F-3, and F-4), which were tested separately for antimalarial activity using the curative test. Changes in body weight, temperature, and packed cell volume (PCV) were also recorded. Results: Fraction F-1 of A. nilotica at 50 and 100 mg/kg b/w produced significant and dose-dependent reduction in parasite count in Plasmodium berghei infected mice compared to the control, and also significantly increased the survival time of the mice compared to the control group. This fraction also ameliorated the malaria-induced anemia by improving PCV in treated mice. Conclusion: Antimalarial activity of extract of A. nilotica root is probably localized in the F-1 fraction of the extract, which was found to be rich in alkaloids and phenolics. Further study will provide information on the chemical properties of the active metabolites in this fraction. PMID:27104040

  16. Ex Vivo Activity of Endoperoxide Antimalarials, Including Artemisone and Arterolane, against Multidrug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Lon, Chanthap; Saunders, David L.; Rutvisuttinunt, Wiriya; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Bathurst, Ian; Ding, Xavier C.; Tyner, Stuart D.

    2014-01-01

    Novel synthetic endoperoxides are being evaluated as new components of artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) to treat artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. We conducted blinded ex vivo activity testing of fully synthetic (OZ78 and OZ277) and semisynthetic (artemisone, artemiside, artesunate, and dihydroartemisinin) endoperoxides in the histidine-rich protein 2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against 200 P. falciparum isolates from areas of artemisinin-resistant malaria in western and northern Cambodia in 2009 and 2010. The order of potency and geometric mean (GM) 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were as follows: artemisone (2.40 nM) > artesunate (8.49 nM) > dihydroartemisinin (11.26 nM) > artemiside (15.28 nM) > OZ277 (31.25 nM) > OZ78 (755.27 nM). Ex vivo activities of test endoperoxides positively correlated with dihydroartemisinin and artesunate. The isolates were over 2-fold less susceptible to dihydroartemisinin than the artemisinin-sensitive P. falciparum W2 clone and showed sensitivity comparable to those with test endoperoxides and artesunate, with isolate/W2 IC50 susceptibility ratios of <2.0. All isolates had P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter mutations, with negative correlations in sensitivity to endoperoxides and chloroquine. The activities of endoperoxides (artesunate, dihydroartemisinin, OZ277, and artemisone) significantly correlated with that of the ACT partner drug, mefloquine. Isolates had mutations associated with clinical resistance to mefloquine, with 35% prevalence of P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene 1 (pfmdr1) amplification and 84.5% occurrence of the pfmdr1 Y184F mutation. GM IC50s for mefloquine, lumefantrine, and endoperoxides (artesunate, dihydroartemisinin, OZ277, OZ78, and artemisone) correlated with pfmdr1 copy number. Given that current ACTs are failing potentially from reduced sensitivity to artemisinins and partner drugs, newly identified mutations associated with artemisinin resistance

  17. The role of glucuronidation in drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Mazerska, Zofia; Mróz, Anna; Pawłowska, Monika; Augustin, Ewa

    2016-03-01

    The final therapeutic effect of a drug candidate, which is directed to a specific molecular target strongly depends on its absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME). The disruption of at least one element of ADME may result in serious drug resistance. In this work we described the role of one element of this resistance: phase II metabolism with UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). UGT function is the transformation of their substrates into more polar metabolites, which are better substrates for the ABC transporters, MDR1, MRP and BCRP, than the native drug. UGT-mediated drug resistance can be associated with (i) inherent overexpression of the enzyme, named intrinsic drug resistance or (ii) induced expression of the enzyme, named acquired drug resistance observed when enzyme expression is induced by the drug or other factors, as food-derived compounds. Very often this induction occurs via ligand binding receptors including AhR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor) PXR (pregnane X receptor), or other transcription factors. The effect of UGT dependent resistance is strengthened by coordinate action and also a coordinate regulation of the expression of UGTs and ABC transporters. This coupling of UGT and multidrug resistance proteins has been intensively studied, particularly in the case of antitumor treatment, when this resistance is "improved" by differences in UGT expression between tumor and healthy tissue. Multidrug resistance coordinated with glucuronidation has also been described here for drugs used in the management of epilepsy, psychiatric diseases, HIV infections, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. Proposals to reverse UGT-mediated drug resistance should consider the endogenous functions of UGT. PMID:26808161

  18. Crystal and molecular structure of the antimalarial agent enpiroline.

    PubMed

    Karle, J M; Karle, I L

    1989-07-01

    To identify common spatial and structural features of amino alcohol antimalarial agents with the eventual goal of designing more effective drugs and a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this class of antimalarial agents, the three-dimensional crystal and molecular structure of enpiroline, a new antimalarial agent active against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum, was determined by X-ray crystallography and compared with the crystal structures of the cinchona alkaloids and of the new antimalarial agent WR 194,965. The aromatic rings of the phenyl-pyridine ring system of enpiroline are twisted from each other by approximately 18 degrees. The intramolecular aliphatic N-O distance in enpiroline was 2.80 A (1 A = 0.1 nm), which is close to the N-O distance found in the antimalarial cinchona alkaloids. Enpiroline contains both an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the aliphatic nitrogen and oxygen atoms and an intermolecular hydrogen bond between the aliphatic nitrogen and oxygen atoms of two neighboring molecules. One enantiomer of enpiroline superimposed best with quinine, and the other enantiomer of enpiroline superimposed best with quinidine, suggesting that both enantiomers of enpiroline possess antimalarial activity. Since a common feature of the crystal structures of the amino alcohol antimalarial agents is the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, the common spatial direction of hydrogen bond formation indicates the potential ability of these antimalarial agents to bind to a common receptor site. The crystallographic parameters were as follows: C19H18F6N5O; Mr = 404.3; symmetry of unit cell, monoclinic; space group, P2(1)/a; parameters of unit cell---a = 9.454 +/- 0.004 A, b = 18.908 +/- 0.008 A, c = 10.300 +/- 0.004 A, and beta = 96.55 +/- 0.03 degrees: V (volume of unit cell) = 1829.2 A3; Z (number of molecules per unit cell) = 4; Dchi (calculated density) = 1.46 g cm-3; source of radiation, CuK alpha (lambda = 1.54178 A); mu

  19. Sequence-based association and selection scans identify drug resistance loci in the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Park, Daniel J.; Lukens, Amanda K.; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Chang, Hsiao-Han; Valim, Clarissa; Ribacke, Ulf; Van Tyne, Daria; Galinsky, Kevin; Galligan, Meghan; Becker, Justin S.; Ndiaye, Daouda; Mboup, Souleymane; Wiegand, Roger C.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Volkman, Sarah K.

    2012-01-01

    Through rapid genetic adaptation and natural selection, the Plasmodium falciparum parasite—the deadliest of those that cause malaria—is able to develop resistance to antimalarial drugs, thwarting present efforts to control it. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) provide a critical hypothesis-generating tool for understanding how this occurs. However, in P. falciparum, the limited amount of linkage disequilibrium hinders the power of traditional array-based GWAS. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility and power improvements gained by using whole-genome sequencing for association studies. We analyzed data from 45 Senegalese parasites and identified genetic changes associated with the parasites’ in vitro response to 12 different antimalarials. To further increase statistical power, we adapted a common test for natural selection, XP-EHH (cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity), and used it to identify genomic regions associated with resistance to drugs. Using this sequence-based approach and the combination of association and selection-based tests, we detected several loci associated with drug resistance. These loci included the previously known signals at pfcrt, dhfr, and pfmdr1, as well as many genes not previously implicated in drug-resistance roles, including genes in the ubiquitination pathway. Based on the success of the analysis presented in this study, and on the demonstrated shortcomings of array-based approaches, we argue for a complete transition to sequence-based GWAS for small, low linkage-disequilibrium genomes like that of P. falciparum. PMID:22826220

  20. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance: Daptomycin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Truc T.; Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2016-01-01

    Daptomycin (DAP) is a cyclic lipopeptide with in vitro activity against a variety of Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant organisms. Since its introduction in clinical practice in 2003, DAP has become an important key front-line antibiotic for severe or deep-seated infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. Unfortunately, DAP-resistance (R) has been extensively documented in clinically important organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp, and Streptococcus spp. Studies on the mechanisms of DAP-R in Bacillus subtilis and other Gram-positive bacteria indicate that the genetic pathways of DAP resistance are diverse and complex. However, a common phenomenon emerging from these mechanistic studies is that DAP-R is associated with important adaptive changes in cell wall and cell membrane homeostasis with critical changes in cell physiology. Findings related to these adaptive changes have offered novel insights into the genetics and molecular mechanisms of bacterial cell envelope stress response and the manner in which Gram-positive bacteria cope with the antimicrobial peptide attack and protect vital structures of the cell envelope such as the cell membrane. In this review, we will examine the most recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms of resistance to DAP in relevant Gram-positive pathogens and discuss the clinical implications for therapy against these important bacteria. PMID:26495887

  1. High School Students Are a Target Group for Fight against Self-Medication with Antimalarial Drugs: A Pilot Study in University of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Kabongo Kamitalu, Ramsès; Aloni, Michel Ntetani

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess the self-medication against malaria infection in population of Congolese students in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out in University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Medical records of all students with malaria admitted to Centre de Santé Universitaire of University of Kinshasa from January 1, 2008, to April 30, 2008, were reviewed retrospectively. Results. The median age of the patients was 25.4 years (range: from 18 to 36 years). The majority of them were male (67.9%). Artemisinin-based combination treatments (ACTs) was the most used self-prescribed antimalarial drugs. However, self-medication was associated with the ingestion of quinine in 19.9% of cases. No case of ingestion of artesunate/artemether in monotherapy was found. All the medicines taken were registered in DRC. In this series, self-prescribed antimalarial was very irrational in terms of dose and duration of treatment. Conclusion. This paper highlights self-medication by a group who should be aware of malaria treatment protocols. The level of self-prescribing quinine is relatively high among students and is disturbing for a molecule reserved for severe disease in Congolese health care policy in management of malaria. PMID:27340411

  2. Comparative protein modeling of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase enzyme from Plasmodium falciparum: a potential target for antimalarial drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nidhi; Chevé, Gwénaël; Avery, Mitchell A; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2006-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (Pf-DXR) is a potential target for antimalarial chemotherapy. The three-dimensional model (3D) of this enzyme was determined by means of comparative modeling through multiple alignment followed by intensive optimization, minimization, and validation. The resulting model demonstrates a reasonable topology as gauged from the Ramachandran plot and acceptable three-dimensional structure compatibility as assessed by the Profiles-3D score. The modeled monomeric subunit consists of three domains: (1) N-terminal NADPH binding domain, (2) connective or linker domain (with most of the active site residues located in this domain), and (3) a C-terminal domain. This structure proved to be consistent with known DXR crystal structures from other species. The predicted active site compared favorably with those of the templates and appears to have an active site with a highly conserved architecture. Additionally, the model explains several site-directed mutagenesis data. Besides using several protein structure-checking programs to validate the model, a set of known inhibitors of DXR were also docked into the active site of the modeled Pf-DXR. The docked scores correlated reasonably well with experimental pIC50 values with a regression coefficient (R2) equal to 0.84. Results of the current study should prove useful in the early design and development of inhibitors by either de novo drug design or virtual screening of large small-molecule databases leading to development of new antimalarial agents. PMID:16711755

  3. High School Students Are a Target Group for Fight against Self-Medication with Antimalarial Drugs: A Pilot Study in University of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Kabongo Kamitalu, Ramsès; Aloni, Michel Ntetani

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess the self-medication against malaria infection in population of Congolese students in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out in University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. Medical records of all students with malaria admitted to Centre de Santé Universitaire of University of Kinshasa from January 1, 2008, to April 30, 2008, were reviewed retrospectively. Results. The median age of the patients was 25.4 years (range: from 18 to 36 years). The majority of them were male (67.9%). Artemisinin-based combination treatments (ACTs) was the most used self-prescribed antimalarial drugs. However, self-medication was associated with the ingestion of quinine in 19.9% of cases. No case of ingestion of artesunate/artemether in monotherapy was found. All the medicines taken were registered in DRC. In this series, self-prescribed antimalarial was very irrational in terms of dose and duration of treatment. Conclusion. This paper highlights self-medication by a group who should be aware of malaria treatment protocols. The level of self-prescribing quinine is relatively high among students and is disturbing for a molecule reserved for severe disease in Congolese health care policy in management of malaria. PMID:27340411

  4. Fixed Dose Combination of Arterolane and Piperaquine: A Newer Prospect in Antimalarial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patil, CY; Katare, SS; Baig, MS; Doifode, SM

    2014-01-01

    Malaria has been very prevalent vector-borne disease in India and until date bears enormous implications on health care services of the country. Over the period of time, the development of resistance to traditional antimalarials like chloroquine has been posed as major deterrent in efforts of malaria control. As the drug resistance is today universally prevalent, especially in Plasmodium falciparum species, major burden of malarial control resides with the new artemisinin drug class. However, arterolane is one of the first fully synthetic non-artemisinin antimalarial compound with rapid schizontocidal activity, hence offering an alternative to artemisinin drugs in malaria control. Piperaquine is a synthetic bisquinoline (4-amioquinoline Antimalarial) with slow and longer schizontocidal activity. Therefore their combination has been shown to provide rapid parasitemic clearance and quick relief of most malaria-related symptoms along with prevention of recrudescences. This combination was approved by Drugs Controller General of India in 2011 for treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. The article is aimed at to review this newer prospect in antimalarial therapy for which comprehensive database search was done in Google, Google Scholar, PubMed using the terms “Malaria,” “Arterolane,” “OZ277,” “Piperaquine,” and “Artemisinin combination therapy.” A total of 323 articles were screened and 28 articles were considered for this review along with the World Health Organization and National malarial program guidelines. PMID:25221689

  5. Fixed dose combination of arterolane and piperaquine: a newer prospect in antimalarial therapy.

    PubMed

    Patil, Cy; Katare, Ss; Baig, Ms; Doifode, Sm

    2014-07-01

    Malaria has been very prevalent vector-borne disease in India and until date bears enormous implications on health care services of the country. Over the period of time, the development of resistance to traditional antimalarials like chloroquine has been posed as major deterrent in efforts of malaria control. As the drug resistance is today universally prevalent, especially in Plasmodium falciparum species, major burden of malarial control resides with the new artemisinin drug class. However, arterolane is one of the first fully synthetic non-artemisinin antimalarial compound with rapid schizontocidal activity, hence offering an alternative to artemisinin drugs in malaria control. Piperaquine is a synthetic bisquinoline (4-amioquinoline Antimalarial) with slow and longer schizontocidal activity. Therefore their combination has been shown to provide rapid parasitemic clearance and quick relief of most malaria-related symptoms along with prevention of recrudescences. This combination was approved by Drugs Controller General of India in 2011 for treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. The article is aimed at to review this newer prospect in antimalarial therapy for which comprehensive database search was done in Google, Google Scholar, PubMed using the terms "Malaria," "Arterolane," "OZ277," "Piperaquine," and "Artemisinin combination therapy." A total of 323 articles were screened and 28 articles were considered for this review along with the World Health Organization and National malarial program guidelines. PMID:25221689

  6. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  7. [Research development of HIV drug resistance].

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jian; Gao, Guo-Jian; Dong, Ji-Peng; Xian, Qing-Fei

    2013-08-01

    Highly active antiretroviral combination therapy significantly reduced the mortality, but in the high-speed copying, high genetic variation and drug selection pressure under the effect of the increasingly serious problem of drug resistance greatly weakened the role of HAART inhibit viral replication and reduce antiviral treatment. This paper reports the latest trends in HIV drug-resistance in order to develop anti-HIV drugs in clinical programs, research and development of new guidance anti-HIV-1 strategy to bring guidance. PMID:24228557

  8. Identifying representative drug resistant mutants of HIV

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug resistance is one of the most important causes for failure of anti-AIDS treatment. During therapy, multiple mutations accumulate in the HIV genome, eventually rendering the drugs ineffective in blocking replication of the mutant virus. The huge number of possible mutants precludes experimental analysis to explore the molecular mechanisms of resistance and develop improved antiviral drugs. Results In order to solve this problem, we have developed a new algorithm to reveal the most representative mutants from the whole drug resistant mutant database based on our newly proposed unified protein sequence and 3D structure encoding method. Mean shift clustering and multiple regression analysis were applied on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. This approach successfully chooses less than 100 mutants with the highest resistance to each drug out of about 10K in the whole database. When considering high level resistance to multiple drugs, the numbers reduce to one or two representative mutants. Conclusion This approach for predicting the most representative mutants for each drug has major importance for experimental verification since the results provide a small number of representative sequences, which will be amenable for in vitro testing and characterization of the expressed mutant proteins. PMID:26678327

  9. Facing multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sotgiu, Giovanni; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2015-06-01

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains resistant to at least two of the most effective anti-tuberculosis drugs (i.e., isoniazid and rifampicin). Therapeutic regimens based on second- and third-line anti-tuberculosis medicines showed poor efficacy, safety, and tolerability profiles. It was estimated that in 2012 the multi-drug resistant tuberculosis incidence ranged from 300,000 to 600,000 cases, mainly diagnosed in the Eastern European and Central Asian countries. The highest proportion of cases is among individuals previously exposed to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Three main conditions can favour the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis: the poor implementation of the DOTS strategy, the shortage or the poor quality of the anti-tuberculosis drugs, and the poor therapeutic adherence of the patients to the prescribed regimens. Consultation with tuberculosis experts (e.g., consilium) is crucial to tailor the best anti-tuberculosis therapy. New therapeutic options are necessary: bedaquiline and delamanid seem promising drugs; in particular, during the development phase they demonstrated a protective effect against the emergence of further resistances towards the backbone drugs. In the recent past, other antibiotics have been administered off-label: the most relevant efficacy, safety, and tolerability profile was proved in linezolid-, meropenem/clavulanate-, cotrimoxazole-containing regimens. New research and development activities are needed in the diagnostic, therapeutic, preventive fields. PMID:24792579

  10. Absence of Association between Polymorphisms in the RING E3 Ubiquitin Protein Ligase Gene and Ex Vivo Susceptibility to Conventional Antimalarial Drugs in Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Dakar, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Gendrot, Mathieu; Fall, Bécaye; Madamet, Marylin; Fall, Mansour; Wade, Khalifa Ababacar; Amalvict, Rémy; Nakoulima, Aminata; Benoit, Nicolas; Diawara, Silman; Diémé, Yaya; Diatta, Bakary; Wade, Boubacar; Pradines, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    The RING E3 ubiquitin protein ligase is crucial for facilitating the transfer of ubiquitin. The only polymorphism identified in the E3 ubiquitin protein ligase gene was the D113N mutation (62.5%) but was not significantly associated with the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of conventional antimalarial drugs. However, some mutated isolates (D113N) present a trend of reduced susceptibility to piperaquine (P = 0.0938). To evaluate the association of D113N polymorphism with susceptibility to antimalarials, more isolates are necessary. PMID:27185795

  11. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIAID invests in basic research to understand the biology of microbes, their behavior, and how drug resistance ... Nucleotide Polymorphism Phylogenetics & Ontology Proteomics & Protein Analysis Systems Biology Data Portals Software Applications BCBB Mobyle Interface Designer ( ...

  12. Combination therapy counteracts the enhanced transmission of drug-resistant malaria parasites to mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Rachel L; Sutherland, Colin J; Alexander, Neal; Ord, Rosalynn; Jawara, Musa; Drakeley, Chris J; Pinder, Margaret; Walraven, Gijs; Targett, Geoffrey A T; Alloueche, Ali

    2004-10-01

    Malaria parasites carrying genes conferring resistance to antimalarials are thought to have a selective advantage which leads to higher rates of transmissibility from the drug-treated host. This is a likely mechanism for the increasing prevalence of parasites with resistance to chloroquine (CQ) and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in sub-Saharan Africa. Combination therapy is the key strategy being implemented to reduce the impact of resistance, but its effect on the transmission of genetically resistant parasites from treated patients to mosquito vectors has not been measured directly. In a trial comparing CQ monotherapy to the combination CQ plus artesunate (AS) in Gambian children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria, we measured transmissibility by feeding Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes with blood from 43 gametocyte-positive patients through a membrane. In the CQ-treated group, gametocytes from patients carrying parasites with the CQ resistance-associated allele pfcrt-76T prior to treatment produced infected mosquitoes with 38 times higher Plasmodium falciparum oocyst burdens than mosquitoes fed on gametocytes from patients infected with sensitive parasites (P < 0.001). Gametocytes from parasites carrying the resistance-associated allele pfmdr1-86Y produced 14-fold higher oocyst burdens than gametocytes from patients infected with sensitive parasites (P = 0.011). However, parasites carrying either of these resistance-associated alleles pretreatment were not associated with higher mosquito oocyst burdens in the CQ-AS-treated group. Thus, combination therapy overcomes the transmission advantage enjoyed by drug-resistant parasites. PMID:15388456

  13. Anticancer Effect of AntiMalarial Artemisinin Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Das, AK

    2015-01-01

    The anti-malarial drug artemisinin has shown anticancer activity in vitro and animal experiments, but experience in human cancer is scarce. However, the ability of artemisinins to kill cancer cells through a variety of molecular mechanisms has been explored. A PubMed search of about 127 papers on anti-cancer effects of antimalarials has revealed that this class of drug, including other antimalarials, have several biological characteristics that include anticancer properties. Experimental evidences suggest that artemisinin compounds may be a therapeutic alternative in highly aggressive cancers with rapid dissemination, without developing drug resistance. They also exhibit synergism with other anticancer drugs with no increased toxicity toward normal cells. It has been found that semisynthetic artemisinin derivatives have much higher antitumor activity than their monomeric counterparts via mechanisms like apoptosis, arrest of cell cycle at G0/G1, and oxidative stress. The exact mechanism of activation and molecular basis of these anticancer effects are not fully elucidated. Artemisinins seem to regulate key factors such as nuclear factor-kappa B, survivin, NOXA, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, and BMI-1, involving multiple pathways that may affect drug response, drug interactions, drug resistance, and associated parameters upon normal cells. Newer synthetic artemisinins have been developed showing substantial antineoplastic activity, but there is still limited information regarding the mode of action of these synthetic compounds. In view of the emerging data, specific interactions with established chemotherapy need to be further investigated in different cancer cells and their phenotypes and validated further using different semisynthetic and synthetic artemisinin derivatives. PMID:25861527

  14. Mechanisms of echinocandin antifungal drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections due to Candida and Aspergillus species cause extensive morbidity and mortality, especially among immunosuppressed patients, and antifungal therapy is critical to patient management. Yet only a few drug classes are available to treat invasive fungal diseases, and this problem is compounded by the emergence of antifungal resistance. Echinocandin drugs are the preferred choice to treat candidiasis. They are the first cell wall–active agents and target the fungal-specific enzyme glucan synthase, which catalyzes the biosynthesis of β-1,3-glucan, a key cell wall polymer. Therapeutic failures occur rarely among common Candida species, with the exception of Candida glabrata, which are frequently multidrug resistant. Echinocandin resistance in susceptible species is always acquired during therapy. The mechanism of resistance involves amino acid changes in hot-spot regions of Fks subunits of glucan synthase, which decrease the sensitivity of the enzyme to drug. Cellular stress response pathways lead to drug adaptation, which promote the formation of resistant fks strains. Clinical factors promoting echinocandin resistance include empiric therapy, prophylaxis, gastrointestinal reservoirs, and intra-abdominal infections. A better understanding of the echinocandin resistance mechanism, along with cellular and clinical factors promoting resistance, will promote more effective strategies to overcome and prevent echinocandin resistance. PMID:26190298

  15. Expression of cytokeratin confers multiple drug resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, P.A.; Dalton, W.S.; Anderson, J.M.; Cress, A.E. )

    1994-06-07

    The cytokeratin network is an extensive filamentous structure in the cytoplasm whose biological function(s) is unknown. Based upon previous data showing the modification of cytokeratin by mitoxantrone, the authors investigated the ability of cytokeratin networks to influence the survival response of cells to chemotherapeutic agents. They have compared the survival of mouse L fibroblasts lacking cytokeratins with that of L cells transfected with cytokeratins 8 and 18 in the presence of chemotherapeutic drugs. The expression of cytokeratins 8 and 18 conferred a multiple drug resistance phenotype on cells exposed to mitoxantrone, doxorubicin, methotrexate, melphalan, Colcemid, and vincristine. The degree of drug resistance was 5-454 times that of parental cells, depending upon the agent used. Drug resistance could not be attributed to altered growth characteristics, altered drug accumulation, or an altered drug efflux in the transfected cells. Cytokeratin does not confer resistance to ionizing radiation, which damages DNA independently on intracellular transport mechanisms. These data suggest a role for cytokeratin networks in conferring a drug resistance phenotype.

  16. N-Cinnamoylation of Antimalarial Classics: Effects of Using Acyl Groups Other than Cinnamoyl toward Dual-Stage Antimalarials.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana; Machado, Marta; Lobo, Lis; Nogueira, Fátima; Prudêncio, Miguel; Teixeira, Cátia; Gomes, Paula

    2015-08-01

    In a follow-up study to our reports of N-cinnamoylated chloroquine and quinacrine analogues as promising dual-stage antimalarial leads with high in vitro potency against both blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum and liver-stage Plasmodium berghei, we decided to investigate the effect of replacing the cinnamoyl moiety with other acyl groups. Thus, a series of N-acylated analogues were synthesized, and their activities against blood- and liver-stage Plasmodium spp. were assessed along with their in vitro cytotoxicities. Although the new N-acylated analogues were found to be somewhat less active and more cytotoxic than their N-cinnamoylated counterparts, they equally displayed nanomolar activities in vitro against blood-stage drug-sensitive and drug-resistant P. falciparum, and significant in vitro liver-stage activity against P. berghei. Therefore, it is demonstrated that simple N-acylated surrogates of classical antimalarial drugs are promising dual-stage antimalarial leads. PMID:26038181

  17. Use of bacterial surrogates as a tool to explore antimalarial drug interaction: Synergism between inhibitors of malarial dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthase.

    PubMed

    Talawanich, Yuwadee; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Sirawaraporn, Worachart; Yuthavong, Yongyuth

    2015-09-01

    Interaction between antimalarial drugs is important in determining the outcome of chemotherapy using drug combinations. Inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) such as pyrimethamine and of dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) such as sulfa drugs are known to have synergistic interactions. However, studies of the synergism are complicated by the fact that the malaria parasite can also salvage exogenous folates, and the salvage may also be affected by the drugs. It is desirable to have a convenient system to study interaction of DHFR and DHPS inhibitors without such complications. Here, we describe the use of Escherichia coli transformed with malarial DHFR and DHPS, while its own corresponding genes have been inactivated by optimal concentration of trimethoprim and genetic knockout, respectively, to study the interaction of the inhibitors. Marked synergistic effects are observed for all combinations of pyrimethamine and sulfa inhibitors in the presence of trimethoprim. At 0.05μM trimethoprim, sum of fractional inhibitory concentrations, ΣFIC of pyrimethamine with sulfadoxine, pyrimethamine with sulfathiazole, pyrimethamine with sulfamethoxazole, and pyrimethamine with dapsone are in the range of 0.24-0.41. These results show synergism between inhibitors of the two enzymes even in the absence of folate transport and uptake. This bacterial surrogate system should be useful as a tool for assessing the interactions of drug combinations between the DHFR and DHPS inhibitors. PMID:25997881

  18. Antiretroviral drug resistance and routine therapy, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Christian; Kouanfack, Charles; Vergne, Laurence; Tardy, Michèle; Zekeng, Léopold; Noumsi, Nathalie; Butel, Christelle; Bourgeois, Anke; Mpoudi-Ngolé, Eitel; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata; Peeters, Martine; Delaporte, Eric

    2006-06-01

    Among 128 patients routinely receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy in an HIV/AIDS outpatient clinic in Cameroon, 16.4% had drug resistance after a median of 10 months. Of these, 12.5% had resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), 10.2% to non-NRTIs, and 2.3% to protease inhibitors. PMID:16707062

  19. Evolution of Drug Resistance in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Waclaw, B

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is an important and timely problem of contemporary medicine. Rapid evolution of resistant bacteria calls for new preventive measures to slow down this process, and a longer-term progress cannot be achieved without a good understanding of the mechanisms through which drug resistance is acquired and spreads in microbial populations. Here, we discuss recent experimental and theoretical advances in our knowledge how the dynamics of microbial populations affects the evolution of antibiotic resistance . We focus on the role of spatial and temporal drug gradients and show that in certain situations bacteria can evolve de novo resistance within hours. We identify factors that lead to such rapid onset of resistance and discuss their relevance for bacterial infections. PMID:27193537

  20. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance: Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Examples of Antimicrobial Resistance Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Overview Transmission Diagnosis ...

  1. Nitroheterocyclic drug resistance mechanisms in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Wyllie, Susan; Foth, Bernardo J.; Kelner, Anna; Sokolova, Antoaneta Y.; Berriman, Matthew; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to identify the mechanisms of resistance to nifurtimox and fexinidazole in African trypanosomes. Methods Bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei were selected for resistance to nifurtimox and fexinidazole by stepwise exposure to increasing drug concentrations. Clones were subjected to WGS to identify putative resistance genes. Transgenic parasites modulating expression of genes of interest were generated and drug susceptibility phenotypes determined. Results Nifurtimox-resistant (NfxR) and fexinidazole-resistant (FxR) parasites shared reciprocal cross-resistance suggestive of a common mechanism of action. Previously, a type I nitroreductase (NTR) has been implicated in nitro drug activation. WGS of resistant clones revealed that NfxR parasites had lost >100 kb from one copy of chromosome 7, rendering them hemizygous for NTR as well as over 30 other genes. FxR parasites retained both copies of NTR, but lost >70 kb downstream of one NTR allele, decreasing NTR transcription by half. A single knockout line of NTR displayed 1.6- and 1.9-fold resistance to nifurtimox and fexinidazole, respectively. Since NfxR and FxR parasites are ∼6- and 20-fold resistant to nifurtimox and fexinidazole, respectively, additional factors must be involved. Overexpression and knockout studies ruled out a role for a putative oxidoreductase (Tb927.7.7410) and a hypothetical gene (Tb927.1.1050), previously identified in a genome-scale RNAi screen. Conclusions NTR was confirmed as a key resistance determinant, either by loss of one gene copy or loss of gene expression. Further work is required to identify which of the many dozens of SNPs identified in the drug-resistant cell lines contribute to the overall resistance phenotype. PMID:26581221

  2. Progress in the understanding of the key pharmacophoric features of the antimalarial drug dihydroartemisinin: an experimental and theoretical charge density study.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Gabriele; Soave, Raffaella; Lo Presti, Leonardo; Destro, Riccardo

    2013-03-01

    The accurate, experimental charge density distribution, ρ(r), of the potent antimalarial drug dihydroartemisinin (DHA) has been derived for the first time from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data at T=100(2) K. Gas-phase and solid-state DFT simulations have also been performed to provide a firm basis of comparison with experimental results. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) has been employed to analyse the ρ(r) scalar field, with the aim of classifying and quantifying the key real-space elements responsible for the known pharmacophoric features of DHA. From the conformational perspective, the bicyclo[3.2.2]nonane system fixes the three-dimensional arrangement of the 1,2,4-trioxane bearing the active O-O redox centre. This is the most nucleophilic function in DHA and acts as an important CH⋅⋅⋅O acceptor. On the contrary, the rest of the molecular backbone is almost neutral, in accordance with the lipophilic character of the compound. Another remarkable feature is the C-O bond length alternation along the O-C-O-C polyether chain, due to correlations between pairs of adjacent C-O bonds. These bonding features have been related with possible reactivity routes of the α- and β-DHA epimers, namely 1) the base-catalysed hemiacetal breakdown and 2) the peroxide reduction. As a general conclusion, the base-driven proton transfer has significant non-local effects on the whole polyether chain, whereas DHA reduction is thermodynamically favourable and invariably leads to a significant weakening (or even breaking) of the O-O bond. The influence of the hemiacetal stereochemistry on the electronic properties of the system has also been considered. Such findings are discussed in the context of the known chemical reactivity of this class of important antimalarial drugs. PMID:23355355

  3. Traditionally-used antimalarials from the Meliaceae.

    PubMed

    Omar, S; Zhang, J; MacKinnon, S; Leaman, D; Durst, T; Philogene, B J R; Arnason, J T; Sanchez-Vindas, P E; Poveda, L; Tamez, P A; Pezzuto, J M

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative ethnobotanical approach to antimalarial drug discovery led to the identification of Lansium domesticum Corr. Ser. (Meliaceae) as an important antimalarial used by Kenyah Dyak healers in Indonesian Borneo. Triterpenoid lansiolides with antimalarial activity were isolated from the bark and shown to have activity in both in vitro bioassays with Plasmodium falciparum, and in mice infected with P. berghei. A survey of African and tropical American Meliaceae led to further development of the limonoid gedunin from the traditionally used medicinal plants, tropical cedar, Cedrela odorata L., and neem, Azadirachta indica A. Juss. Gedunin has significant in vitro activity but initially showed poor in vivo activity. In vivo activity was improved by (1) incorporation into an easy to absorb suspension, (2) preparation of a more stable compound, 7-methoxygedunin; and (3) synergism with dillapiol, a cytochrome P450 3A4 inhibitor. The results show the potential for both antimalarial drug and phytomedicine development from traditionally used plants. PMID:12570769

  4. [Drug resistant epilepsy. Clinical and neurobiological concepts].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo A; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel E

    2015-08-16

    Drug-resistant epilepsy, is a condition defined by the International League Against Epilepsy as persistent seizures despite having used at least two appropriate and adequate antiepileptic drug treatments. Approximately 20-30% of patients with epilepsy are going to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs, with different patterns of clinical presentation, which are related to the biological basis of this disease (de novo resistance, relapsing-remitting and progressive). Drug resistant epilepsy, impacts negatively the quality of life and significantly increases the risk of premature death. From the neurobiological point of view, this medical condition is the result of the interaction of multiple variables related to the underlying disease, drug interactions and proper genetic aspects of each patient. Thanks to advances in pharmacogenetics and molecular biology research, currently some hypotheses may explain the cause of this condition and promote the study of new therapeutic options. Currently, overexpression of membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein, appears to be one of the most important mechanisms in the development of drug resistant epilepsy. The objective of this review is to deepen the general aspects of this clinical condition, addressing the definition, epidemiology, differential diagnosis and the pathophysiological bases. PMID:26204087

  5. Drug Resistance in Glioblastoma: A Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    Haar, Catherine P.; Hebbar, Preetha; Wallace, Gerald C.; Das, Arabinda; Vandergrift, William A.; Smith, Joshua A.; Giglio, Pierre; Patel, Sunil J.; Ray, Swapan K.; Banik, Naren L.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is recognized as the most common and lethal form of central nervous system cancer. Currently used surgical techniques, chemotherapeutic agents, and radiotherapy strategies have done very little in extending the life expectancies of patients diagnosed with GBM. The difficulty in treating this malignant disease lies both in its inherent complexity and numerous mechanisms of drug resistance. In this review, we summarize several of the primary mechanisms of drug resistance. We reviewed available published literature in the English language regarding drug resistance in glioblastoma. The reasons for drug resistance in glioblastoma include drug efflux, hypoxic areas of tumor cells, cancer stem cells, DNA damage repair, and miRNAs. Many potential therapies target these mechanisms, including a series of investigated alternative and plant-derived agents. Future research and clinical trials in glioblastoma patients should pursue combination of therapies to help combat drug resistance. The emerging new data on the potential of plant-derived therapeutics should also be closely considered and further investigated. PMID:22228201

  6. Potential antimalarials from African natural products: A reviw

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Bashir; Shittu, Oluwatosin Kudirat; Kabiru, Adamu Yusuf; Jigam, Ali Audu; Umar, Maimuna Bello; Berinyuy, Eustace Bonghan; Alozieuwa, Blessing Uchenna

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains an overwhelming infectious disease with significant health challenges in African and other endemic countries globally. Resistance to antimalarial drugs has become one of the most momentous challenges to human health, and thus has necessitated the hunt for new and effective drugs. Consequently, few decades have witnessed a surfeit of research geared to validate the effectiveness of commonly used traditionally medicines against malaria fever. The present review work focuses on documenting natural products from African whose activity has been reported in vivo or in vitro against malaria parasite. Literature was collected using electronic search of published articles (Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline, Sciencedirect, and Science domain) that report on antiplasmodial activity of natural products from differernts Africa region. A total of 652 plant taxa from 146 families, 134 isolated antimalarial compounds from 39 plants species, 2 herbal formulations and 4 insect/products were found to be reported in literature from 1996 to 2015. Plants species from family Asteraceae (11.04%), Fababceae (8.128%), Euphorbiaceae (5.52%), Rubiaceas (5.52%), and Apocyanaceae (5.214%), have received more scientific validation than others. African natural products possess remarkable healing properties as revealed in the various citations as promising antimalarial agents. Some of these natural products from Africa demonstrate high, promising or low activities against Plasmodium parasite. This study also shows that natural products from Africa have a huge amount of novel antimalarial compounds that could serve as a leads for the development of new and effective antiplasmodial drugs. However, in a view of bridging the gap in knowledge, clinical validation of these natural products are of paramount importance. PMID:26649238

  7. Antimicrobial Drugs in Fighting against Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Ahmed, Saeed; Hao, Haihong; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The outbreak of antimicrobial resistance, together with the lack of newly developed antimicrobial drugs, represents an alarming signal for both human and animal healthcare worldwide. Selection of rational dosage regimens for traditional antimicrobial drugs based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles as well as development of novel antimicrobials targeting new bacterial targets or resistance mechanisms are key approaches in tackling AMR. In addition to the cellular level resistance (i.e., mutation and horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants), the community level resistance (i.e., bilofilms and persisters) is also an issue causing antimicrobial therapy difficulties. Therefore, anti-resistance and antibiofilm strategies have currently become research hotspot to combat antimicrobial resistance. Although metallic nanoparticles can both kill bacteria and inhibit biofilm formation, the toxicity is still a big challenge for their clinical applications. In conclusion, rational use of the existing antimicrobials and combinational use of new strategies fighting against antimicrobial resistance are powerful warranties to preserve potent antimicrobial drugs for both humans and animals. PMID:27092125

  8. Coinfection and the evolution of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J; Day, T

    2014-12-01

    Recent experimental work in the rodent malaria model has shown that when two or more strains share a host, there is competitive release of drug-resistant strains upon treatment. In other words, the propagule output of a particular strain is repressed when competing with other strains and increases upon the removal of this competition. This within-host effect is predicted to have an important impact on the evolution and growth of resistant strains. However, how this effect translates to epidemiological parameters at the between-host level, the level at which disease and resistance spread, has yet to be determined. Here we present a general, between-host epidemiological model that explicitly takes into account the effect of coinfection and competitive release. Although our model does show that when there is coinfection competitive release may contribute to the emergence of resistance, it also highlights an additional between-host effect. It is the combination of these two effects, the between-host effect and the within-host effect, that determines the overall influence of coinfection on the emergence of resistance. Therefore, even when competitive release of drug-resistant strains occurs, within an infected individual, it is not necessarily true that coinfection will result in the increased emergence of resistance. These results have important implications for the control of the emergence and spread of drug resistance. PMID:25417787

  9. In vitro and in vivo assessment of the anti-malarial activity of Caesalpinia pluviosa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To overcome the problem of increasing drug resistance, traditional medicines are an important source for potential new anti-malarials. Caesalpinia pluviosa, commonly named "sibipiruna", originates from Brazil and possess multiple therapeutic properties, including anti-malarial activity. Methods Crude extract (CE) was obtained from stem bark by purification using different solvents, resulting in seven fractions. An MTT assay was performed to evaluate cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. The CE and its fractions were tested in vitro against chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) and -resistant (S20) strains of Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo in Plasmodium chabaudi-infected mice. In vitro interaction with artesunate and the active C. pluviosa fractions was assessed, and mass spectrometry analyses were conducted. Results At non-toxic concentrations, the 100% ethanolic (F4) and 50% methanolic (F5) fractions possessed significant anti-malarial activity against both 3D7 and S20 strains. Drug interaction assays with artesunate showed a synergistic interaction with the F4. Four days of treatment with this fraction significantly inhibited parasitaemia in mice in a dose-dependent manner. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed the presence of an ion corresponding to m/z 303.0450, suggesting the presence of quercetin. However, a second set of analyses, with a quercetin standard, showed distinct ions of m/z 137 and 153. Conclusions The findings show that the F4 fraction of C. pluviosa exhibits anti-malarial activity in vitro at non-toxic concentrations, which was potentiated in the presence of artesunate. Moreover, this anti-malarial activity was also sustained in vivo after treatment of infected mice. Finally, mass spectrometry analyses suggest that a new compound, most likely an isomer of quercetin, is responsible for the anti-malarial activity of the F4. PMID:21535894

  10. Drug targeting of leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Anna; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Meli, Rosaria

    2015-11-01

    Leptin regulates glucose, lipid and energy homeostasis as well as feeding behavior, serving as a bridge between peripheral metabolically active tissues and the central nervous system (CNS). Indeed, this adipocyte-derived hormone, whose circulating levels mirror fat mass, not only exerts its anti-obesity effects mainly modulating the activity of specific hypothalamic neurons expressing the long form of the leptin receptor (Ob-Rb), but it also shows pleiotropic functions due to the activation of Ob-Rb in peripheral tissues. Nevertheless, several mechanisms have been suggested to mediate leptin resistance, including obesity-associated hyperleptinemia, impairment of leptin access to CNS and the reduction in Ob-Rb signal transduction effectiveness, among others. During the onset and progression of obesity, the dampening of leptin sensitivity often occurs, preventing the efficacy of leptin replacement therapy from overcoming obesity and/or its comorbidities. This review focuses on obesity-associated leptin resistance and the mechanisms underpinning this condition, to highlight the relevance of leptin sensitivity restoration as a useful therapeutic strategy to treat common obesity and its complications. Interestingly, although promising strategies to counteract leptin resistance have been proposed, these pharmacological approaches have shown limited efficacy or even relevant adverse effects in preclinical and clinical studies. Therefore, the numerous findings from this review clearly indicate a lack of a single and efficacious treatment for leptin resistance, highlighting the necessity to find new therapeutic tools to improve leptin sensitivity, especially in patients with most severe disease profiles. PMID:26071010

  11. Antibacterial drug discovery in the resistance era.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric D; Wright, Gerard D

    2016-01-21

    The looming antibiotic-resistance crisis has penetrated the consciousness of clinicians, researchers, policymakers, politicians and the public at large. The evolution and widespread distribution of antibiotic-resistance elements in bacterial pathogens has made diseases that were once easily treatable deadly again. Unfortunately, accompanying the rise in global resistance is a failure in antibacterial drug discovery. Lessons from the history of antibiotic discovery and fresh understanding of antibiotic action and the cell biology of microorganisms have the potential to deliver twenty-first century medicines that are able to control infection in the resistance era. PMID:26791724

  12. Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, enlarge the parasite's food vacuole and alter drug sensitivities.

    PubMed

    Pulcini, Serena; Staines, Henry M; Lee, Andrew H; Shafik, Sarah H; Bouyer, Guillaume; Moore, Catherine M; Daley, Daniel A; Hoke, Matthew J; Altenhofen, Lindsey M; Painter, Heather J; Mu, Jianbing; Ferguson, David J P; Llinás, Manuel; Martin, Rowena E; Fidock, David A; Cooper, Roland A; Krishna, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, are the major determinant of chloroquine resistance in this lethal human malaria parasite. Here, we describe P. falciparum lines subjected to selection by amantadine or blasticidin that carry PfCRT mutations (C101F or L272F), causing the development of enlarged food vacuoles. These parasites also have increased sensitivity to chloroquine and some other quinoline antimalarials, but exhibit no or minimal change in sensitivity to artemisinins, when compared with parental strains. A transgenic parasite line expressing the L272F variant of PfCRT confirmed this increased chloroquine sensitivity and enlarged food vacuole phenotype. Furthermore, the introduction of the C101F or L272F mutation into a chloroquine-resistant variant of PfCRT reduced the ability of this protein to transport chloroquine by approximately 93 and 82%, respectively, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These data provide, at least in part, a mechanistic explanation for the increased sensitivity of the mutant parasite lines to chloroquine. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into PfCRT function and PfCRT-mediated drug resistance, as well as the food vacuole, which is an important target of many antimalarial drugs. PMID:26420308

  13. Antifungals: Mechanism of Action and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra; Shah, Abdul Haseeb; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    There are currently few antifungals in use which show efficacy against fungal diseases. These antifungals mostly target specific components of fungal plasma membrane or its biosynthetic pathways. However, more recent class of antifungals in use is echinocandins which target the fungal cell wall components. The availability of mostly fungistatic antifungals in clinical use, often led to the development of tolerance to these very drugs by the pathogenic fungal species. Thus, the development of clinical multidrug resistance (MDR) leads to higher tolerance to drugs and its emergence is helped by multiple mechanisms. MDR is indeed a multifactorial phenomenon wherein a resistant organism possesses several mechanisms which contribute to display reduced susceptibility to not only single drug in use but also show collateral resistance to several drugs. Considering the limited availability of antifungals in use and the emergence of MDR in fungal infections, there is a continuous need for the development of novel broad spectrum antifungal drugs with better efficacy. Here, we briefly present an overview of the current understanding of the antifungal drugs in use, their mechanism of action and the emerging possible novel antifungal drugs with great promise. PMID:26721281

  14. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Adhvaryu, Meghna; Vakharia, Bhasker

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drugsusceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and markers for adequacy of treatment and an integrative approach to fulfill WHO goals. However, regulatory control over the drug market, as well as public-private partnership to use health program facilities to track patients and ensure

  15. History, Dynamics, and Public Health Importance of Malaria Parasite Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Talisuna, Ambrose O.; Bloland, Peter; D’Alessandro, Umberto

    2004-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts, malaria is still one of the most devastating infectious diseases in the tropics. The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance currently compounds this grim picture. In this paper, we review the history of antimalarial drug resistance and the methods for monitoring it and assess the current magnitude and burden of parasite resistance to two commonly used drugs: chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. Furthermore, we review the factors involved in the emergence and spread of drug resistance and highlight its public health importance. Finally, we discuss ways of dealing with such a problem by using combination therapy and suggest some of the research themes needing urgent answers. PMID:14726463

  16. A novel multiple-stage antimalarial agent that inhibits protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Baragaña, Beatriz; Hallyburton, Irene; Lee, Marcus C. S.; Norcross, Neil R.; Grimaldi, Raffaella; Otto, Thomas D.; Proto, William R.; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Meister, Stephan; Wirjanata, Grennady; Ruecker, Andrea; Upton, Leanna M.; Abraham, Tara S.; Almeida, Mariana J.; Pradhan, Anupam; Porzelle, Achim; Martínez, María Santos; Bolscher, Judith M.; Woodland, Andrew; Norval, Suzanne; Zuccotto, Fabio; Thomas, John; Simeons, Frederick; Stojanovski, Laste; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Brock, Paddy M.; Churcher, Tom S.; Sala, Katarzyna A.; Zakutansky, Sara E.; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Sanz, Laura Maria; Riley, Jennifer; Basak, Rajshekhar; Campbell, Michael; Avery, Vicky M.; Sauerwein, Robert W; Dechering, Koen J.; Noviyanti, Rintis; Campo, Brice; Frearson, Julie A.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer-Bazaga, Santiago; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Wyatt, Paul G.; Leroy, Didier; Siegl, Peter; Delves, Michael J.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Wittlin, Sergio; Marfurt, Jutta; Price, Ric N.; Sinden, Robert E.; Winzeler, Elizabeth; Charman, Susan A.; Bebrevska, Lidiya; Gray, David W.; Campbell, Simon; Fairlamb, Alan H.; Willis, Paul; Rayner, Julian C.; Fidock, David A.; Read, Kevin D.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary There is an urgent need for new drugs to treat malaria, with broad therapeutic potential and novel modes of action, to widen the scope of treatment and to overcome emerging drug resistance. We describe the discovery of DDD107498, a compound with a potent and novel spectrum of antimalarial activity against multiple life-cycle stages of the parasite, with good pharmacokinetic properties, and an acceptable safety profile. DDD107498 demonstrates potential to address a variety of clinical needs, including single dose treatment, transmission blocking and chemoprotection. DDD107498 was developed from a screening programme against blood stage malaria parasites; its molecular target has been identified as translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which is responsible for the GTP-dependent translocation of the ribosome along mRNA, and is essential for protein synthesis. This discovery of eEF2 as a viable antimalarial drug target opens up new possibilities for drug discovery. PMID:26085270

  17. A novel multiple-stage antimalarial agent that inhibits protein synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baragaña, Beatriz; Hallyburton, Irene; Lee, Marcus C. S.; Norcross, Neil R.; Grimaldi, Raffaella; Otto, Thomas D.; Proto, William R.; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Meister, Stephan; Wirjanata, Grennady; Ruecker, Andrea; Upton, Leanna M.; Abraham, Tara S.; Almeida, Mariana J.; Pradhan, Anupam; Porzelle, Achim; Martínez, María Santos; Bolscher, Judith M.; Woodland, Andrew; Norval, Suzanne; Zuccotto, Fabio; Thomas, John; Simeons, Frederick; Stojanovski, Laste; Osuna-Cabello, Maria; Brock, Paddy M.; Churcher, Tom S.; Sala, Katarzyna A.; Zakutansky, Sara E.; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Sanz, Laura Maria; Riley, Jennifer; Basak, Rajshekhar; Campbell, Michael; Avery, Vicky M.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Dechering, Koen J.; Noviyanti, Rintis; Campo, Brice; Frearson, Julie A.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer-Bazaga, Santiago; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Wyatt, Paul G.; Leroy, Didier; Siegl, Peter; Delves, Michael J.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Wittlin, Sergio; Marfurt, Jutta; Price, Ric N.; Sinden, Robert E.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Charman, Susan A.; Bebrevska, Lidiya; Gray, David W.; Campbell, Simon; Fairlamb, Alan H.; Willis, Paul A.; Rayner, Julian C.; Fidock, David A.; Read, Kevin D.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    2015-06-01

    There is an urgent need for new drugs to treat malaria, with broad therapeutic potential and novel modes of action, to widen the scope of treatment and to overcome emerging drug resistance. Here we describe the discovery of DDD107498, a compound with a potent and novel spectrum of antimalarial activity against multiple life-cycle stages of the Plasmodium parasite, with good pharmacokinetic properties and an acceptable safety profile. DDD107498 demonstrates potential to address a variety of clinical needs, including single-dose treatment, transmission blocking and chemoprotection. DDD107498 was developed from a screening programme against blood-stage malaria parasites; its molecular target has been identified as translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which is responsible for the GTP-dependent translocation of the ribosome along messenger RNA, and is essential for protein synthesis. This discovery of eEF2 as a viable antimalarial drug target opens up new possibilities for drug discovery.

  18. Antimalarials in dermatology: mechanism of action, indications, and side effects.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Caruncho, C; Bielsa Marsol, I

    2014-04-01

    Antimalarial drugs have been in common use in dermatology since the 1950s. Their mechanism of action is complex, and it is now known that they act through various pathways. We review the indications for antimalarials in dermatology, their adverse effects, and some less well-known effects, such as their antithrombotic and hypolipidemic action. The most recent recommendations concerning ophthalmological screening in patients on antimalarials are also reviewed. PMID:24656224

  19. Drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Michigan

    PubMed Central

    Boehme, Martha S.; Rudrik, James T.; Ganoczy, Dara; Crandell-Alden, Erin; Schneider, William A.; Somsel, Patricia A.

    2005-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae (QRNG) in the United States is a cause for concern. Detecting resistance is complicated by the widespread use of molecular tests that do not provide isolates for susceptibility testing. The Michigan Department of Community Health developed a sentinel surveillance program to detect antimicrobial drug resistance in N. gonorrhoeae. Sentinel surveillance from 11 laboratories submitted 1,122 isolates for antimicrobial drug susceptibility testing and detected 2 clusters of QRNG from January 2003 to September 2004. These clusters were epidemiologically distinct: one involved young, heterosexual youth, and the other involved older men who have sex with men. This finding led to changes in local treatment recommendations that limited spread of resistant strains. Development of the sentinel program, collection of data, and epidemiologic analysis of the clusters are discussed. PMID:16022773

  20. A Method for Amplicon Deep Sequencing of Drug Resistance Genes in Plasmodium falciparum Clinical Isolates from India

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Pavitra N.; Uplekar, Swapna; Kayal, Sriti; Mallick, Prashant K.; Bandyopadhyay, Nabamita; Kale, Sonal; Singh, Om P.; Mohanty, Akshaya; Mohanty, Sanjib; Wassmer, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge to global malaria control and elimination is early detection and containment of emerging drug resistance. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods provide the resolution, scalability, and sensitivity required for high-throughput surveillance of molecular markers of drug resistance. We have developed an amplicon sequencing method on the Ion Torrent PGM platform for targeted resequencing of a panel of six Plasmodium falciparum genes implicated in resistance to first-line antimalarial therapy, including artemisinin combination therapy, chloroquine, and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. The protocol was optimized using 12 geographically diverse P. falciparum reference strains and successfully applied to multiplexed sequencing of 16 clinical isolates from India. The sequencing results from the reference strains showed 100% concordance with previously reported drug resistance-associated mutations. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in clinical isolates revealed a number of known resistance-associated mutations and other nonsynonymous mutations that have not been implicated in drug resistance. SNP positions containing multiple allelic variants were used to identify three clinical samples containing mixed genotypes indicative of multiclonal infections. The amplicon sequencing protocol has been designed for the benchtop Ion Torrent PGM platform and can be operated with minimal bioinformatics infrastructure, making it ideal for use in countries that are endemic for the disease to facilitate routine large-scale surveillance of the emergence of drug resistance and to ensure continued success of the malaria treatment policy. PMID:27008882

  1. A Method for Amplicon Deep Sequencing of Drug Resistance Genes in Plasmodium falciparum Clinical Isolates from India.

    PubMed

    Rao, Pavitra N; Uplekar, Swapna; Kayal, Sriti; Mallick, Prashant K; Bandyopadhyay, Nabamita; Kale, Sonal; Singh, Om P; Mohanty, Akshaya; Mohanty, Sanjib; Wassmer, Samuel C; Carlton, Jane M

    2016-06-01

    A major challenge to global malaria control and elimination is early detection and containment of emerging drug resistance. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods provide the resolution, scalability, and sensitivity required for high-throughput surveillance of molecular markers of drug resistance. We have developed an amplicon sequencing method on the Ion Torrent PGM platform for targeted resequencing of a panel of six Plasmodium falciparum genes implicated in resistance to first-line antimalarial therapy, including artemisinin combination therapy, chloroquine, and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. The protocol was optimized using 12 geographically diverse P. falciparum reference strains and successfully applied to multiplexed sequencing of 16 clinical isolates from India. The sequencing results from the reference strains showed 100% concordance with previously reported drug resistance-associated mutations. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in clinical isolates revealed a number of known resistance-associated mutations and other nonsynonymous mutations that have not been implicated in drug resistance. SNP positions containing multiple allelic variants were used to identify three clinical samples containing mixed genotypes indicative of multiclonal infections. The amplicon sequencing protocol has been designed for the benchtop Ion Torrent PGM platform and can be operated with minimal bioinformatics infrastructure, making it ideal for use in countries that are endemic for the disease to facilitate routine large-scale surveillance of the emergence of drug resistance and to ensure continued success of the malaria treatment policy. PMID:27008882

  2. Virologic Tools for HCV Drug Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Fourati, Slim; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology have led to the development of new antiviral drugs that target specific steps of the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) lifecycle. These drugs, collectively termed direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), include non-structural (NS) HCV protein inhibitors, NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors (nucleotide analogues and non-nucleoside inhibitors), and NS5A inhibitors. Due to the high genetic variability of HCV, the outcome of DAA-based therapies may be altered by the selection of amino-acid substitutions located within the targeted proteins, which affect viral susceptibility to the administered compounds. At the drug developmental stage, preclinical and clinical characterization of HCV resistance to new drugs in development is mandatory. In the clinical setting, accurate diagnostic tools have become available to monitor drug resistance in patients who receive treatment with DAAs. In this review, we describe tools available to investigate drug resistance in preclinical studies, clinical trials and clinical practice. PMID:26690198

  3. Antimalarial Benzoxaboroles Target Plasmodium falciparum Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Sonoiki, Ebere; Palencia, Andres; Guo, Denghui; Ahyong, Vida; Dong, Chen; Li, Xianfeng; Hernandez, Vincent S; Zhang, Yong-Kang; Choi, Wai; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jennifer; Cooper, Roland; Alley, M R K; Freund, Yvonne R; DeRisi, Joseph; Cusack, Stephen; Rosenthal, Philip J

    2016-08-01

    There is a need for new antimalarials, ideally with novel mechanisms of action. Benzoxaboroles have been shown to be active against bacteria, fungi, and trypanosomes. Therefore, we investigated the antimalarial activity and mechanism of action of 3-aminomethyl benzoxaboroles against Plasmodium falciparum Two 3-aminomethyl compounds, AN6426 and AN8432, demonstrated good potency against cultured multidrug-resistant (W2 strain) P. falciparum (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 310 nM and 490 nM, respectively) and efficacy against murine Plasmodium berghei infection when administered orally once daily for 4 days (90% effective dose [ED90], 7.4 and 16.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively). To characterize mechanisms of action, we selected parasites with decreased drug sensitivity by culturing with stepwise increases in concentration of AN6426. Resistant clones were characterized by whole-genome sequencing. Three generations of resistant parasites had polymorphisms in the predicted editing domain of the gene encoding a P. falciparum leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS; PF3D7_0622800) and in another gene (PF3D7_1218100), which encodes a protein of unknown function. Solution of the structure of the P. falciparum LeuRS editing domain suggested key roles for mutated residues in LeuRS editing. Short incubations with AN6426 and AN8432, unlike artemisinin, caused dose-dependent inhibition of [(14)C]leucine incorporation by cultured wild-type, but not resistant, parasites. The growth of resistant, but not wild-type, parasites was impaired in the presence of the unnatural amino acid norvaline, consistent with a loss of LeuRS editing activity in resistant parasites. In summary, the benzoxaboroles AN6426 and AN8432 offer effective antimalarial activity and act, at least in part, against a novel target, the editing domain of P. falciparum LeuRS. PMID:27270277

  4. Artesunate overcomes drug resistance in multiple myeloma by inducing mitochondrial stress and non-caspase apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Xenofon; Johnson, Sarah; Garg, Tarun; Tian, Erming; Tytarenko, Ruslana; Zhang, Qing; Stein, Caleb; Barlogie, Bart; Epstein, Joshua; Heuck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Although novel drugs have contributed immensely to improving outcomes of patients with multiple myeloma (MM), many patients develop drug resistance and ultimately succumb to MM. Here, we show that artesunate, an anti-malarial drug, reliably induces cell death in vitro in naïve as well as drug-resistant MM cells at concentrations shown to be safe in humans. Artesunate induced apoptosis predominantly through the non-caspase mediated pathway by primarily targeting mitochondria and causing outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization that led to cytosolic and subsequent nuclear translocation of mitochondrial proteins apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) and endonuclease G (EndoG). Nuclear translocation of AIF and EndoG was accompanied by low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased mitochondrial production of superoxide. These effects were present before apoptosis was evident and were related to intracellular levels of bivalent iron (Fe+2). Artesunate's unique mechanism probably was at least partially responsible for, its ability to act synergistically with multiple anti-myeloma agents. Our findings suggest that artesunate acts through iron to affect the mitochondria and induce low ROS and non-caspase–mediated apoptosis. Its potency, toxicity profile, and synergism with other drugs make it an intriguing new candidate for MM treatment. PMID:24948357

  5. Antimalarial Activity of Small-Molecule Benzothiazole Hydrazones.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Souvik; Siddiqui, Asim A; Saha, Shubhra J; De, Rudranil; Mazumder, Somnath; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Iqbal, Mohd S; Nag, Shiladitya; Adhikari, Susanta; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2016-07-01

    We synthesized a new series of conjugated hydrazones that were found to be active against malaria parasite in vitro, as well as in vivo in a murine model. These hydrazones concentration-dependently chelated free iron and offered antimalarial activity. Upon screening of the synthesized hydrazones, compound 5f was found to be the most active iron chelator, as well as antiplasmodial. Compound 5f also interacted with free heme (KD [equilibrium dissociation constant] = 1.17 ± 0.8 μM), an iron-containing tetrapyrrole released after hemoglobin digestion by the parasite, and inhibited heme polymerization by parasite lysate. Structure-activity relationship studies indicated that a nitrogen- and sulfur-substituted five-membered aromatic ring present within the benzothiazole hydrazones might be responsible for their antimalarial activity. The dose-dependent antimalarial and heme polymerization inhibitory activities of the lead compound 5f were further validated by following [(3)H]hypoxanthine incorporation and hemozoin formation in parasite, respectively. It is worth mentioning that compound 5f exhibited antiplasmodial activity in vitro against a chloroquine/pyrimethamine-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum (K1). We also evaluated in vivo antimalarial activity of compound 5f in a murine model where a lethal multiple-drug-resistant strain of Plasmodium yoelii was used to infect Swiss albino mice. Compound 5f significantly suppressed the growth of parasite, and the infected mice experienced longer life spans upon treatment with this compound. During in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays, compound 5f showed minimal alteration in biochemical and hematological parameters compared to control. In conclusion, we identified a new class of hydrazone with therapeutic potential against malaria. PMID:27139466

  6. Repurposing salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs to combat drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Conery, Annie L; Kim, Wooseong; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kwon, Bumsup; Ausubel, Frederick M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ≤ 0.78 μg/ml for both drugs). The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 μg/ml respectively), but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 μg/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections. PMID:25897961

  7. Repurposing Salicylanilide Anthelmintic Drugs to Combat Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Conery, Annie L.; Kim, Wooseong; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kwon, Bumsup; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ≤ 0.78 μg/ml for both drugs). The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 μg/ml respectively), but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 μg/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections. PMID:25897961

  8. Time Course of the Changes in Novel Trioxane Antimalarial 99/411 Pharmacokinetics upon Antiepileptic Drugs Co-Administration in SD Rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yeshwant; Kushwaha, Hari Narayan; Misra, Anamika; Hidau, Mahendra Kumar; Singh, Shio Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The study aimed to evaluate the influences of coadministration of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) on an antimalarial candidate 99/411 pharmacokinetic (PK) profile. Method. For this, single oral dose PK drug interaction studies were conducted between 99/411 and FDA approved AEDs, namely, Phenytoin (PHT), Carbamazepine (CBZ), and Gabapentin (GB) in both male and female SD rats, to assess the coadministered and intersexual influences on 99/411 PK profile. Results. Studies revealed that there were no significant alterations in the PK profile of 99/411 upon PHT and CBZ coadministration in both male and female rats, while systemic exposure of 99/411 was significantly increased by about 80% in female rats upon GB coadministration. In terms of AUC, there was an increase from 2471 ± 586 to 4560 ± 1396 ng·h/mL. Overall, it was concluded that simultaneous administration of AEDs with 99/411 excludes the requirements for dose adjustment, additional therapeutic monitoring, contraindication to concomitant use, and/or other measures to mitigate risk, except for GB coadministration in females. These findings are further helpful to predict such interactions in humans, when potentially applied through proper allometric scaling to extrapolate the data. PMID:25383231

  9. Metabolism and Resistance of Fusarium spp. to the Manzamine Alkaloids via a Putative Retro Pictet-Spengler Reaction and Utility of the Rational Design of Antimalarial and Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Lorelei Lucas; Gholipour, Abbas; Wedge, David E.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    As a part of our continuing investigation of the manzamine alkaloids we studied the in vitro activity of the β-carboline containing manzamine alkaloids against Fusarium solani, Fusarium oxysporium, and Fusarium proliferatum by employing several bioassay techniques including one-dimensional direct bioautography, dilution, and plate susceptibility, and microtiter broth assays. In addition, we also studied the metabolism of the manzamine alkaloids by Fusarium spp. in order to facilitate the redesign of the compounds to prevent resistance of Fusarium spp. through metabolism. The present research reveals that the manzamine alkaloids are inactive against Fusarium spp. and the fungi transform manzamines via hydrolysis, reduction, and a retro Pictet-Spengler reaction. This is the first report to demonstrate an enzymatically retro Pictet-Spengler reaction. The results of this study reveal the utility of the rational design of metabolically stable antifungal agents from this class and the development of manzamine alkaloids as antimalarial drugs through the utilization of Fusarium’s metabolic products to reconstruct the molecule. PMID:24553735

  10. In Silico Exploration for New Antimalarials: Arylsulfonyloxy Acetimidamides as Prospective Agents.

    PubMed

    Verma, Saroj; Debnath, Utsab; Agarwal, Pooja; Srivastava, Kumkum; Prabhakar, Yenamandra S

    2015-08-24

    A strategy is described to identify new antimalarial agents to overcome the drug resistance and/or failure issues through in silico screening of multiple biological targets. As a part of this, three enzymes namely CTPS, CK, and GST were selected, from among 56 drug targets of P. falciparum, and used them in virtual screening of ZINC database entries which led to the design and synthesis of arylsulfonyloxy acetimidamides as their consensus inhibitors. From these, two compounds showed good activity against sensitive (3D7; IC50, 1.10 and 1.45 μM) and resistant (K1; IC50, 2.10 and 2.13 μM) strains of the parasite, and they were further investigated through docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings of this study collectively paved the way for arylsulfonyloxy acetimidamides as a new class of antimalarial agents. PMID:26237069

  11. Exploring the 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indole scaffold as a novel antimalarial chemotype.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sofia A; Lukens, Amanda K; Coelho, Lis; Nogueira, Fátima; Wirth, Dyann F; Mazitschek, Ralph; Moreira, Rui; Paulo, Alexandra

    2015-09-18

    A series of 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indoles with building block diversity was synthesized based on a hit derived from an HTS whole-cell screen against Plasmodium falciparum. Thirty-eight compounds were obtained following a three-step synthetic approach and evaluated for anti-parasitic activity. The SAR shows that 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indole is intolerant to most N-piperidinyl modifications. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a new compound (10d) with lead-like properties (MW = 305; cLogP = 2.42), showing antimalarial activity against drug-resistant and sensitive strains (EC50 values ∼ 3 μM), selectivity for malaria parasite and no cross-resistance with chloroquine, thus representing a potential new chemotype for further optimization towards novel and affordable antimalarial drugs. PMID:26295174

  12. Finding parasites and finding challenges: improved diagnostic access and trends in reported malaria and anti-malarial drug use in Livingstone district, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the impact of malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) use on management of acute febrile disease at a community level, and on the consumption of anti-malarial medicines, is critical to the planning and success of scale-up to universal parasite-based diagnosis by health systems in malaria-endemic countries. Methods A retrospective study of district-wide community-level RDT introduction was conducted in Livingstone District, Zambia, to assess the impact of this programmed on malaria reporting, incidence of mortality and on district anti-malarial consumption. Results Reported malaria declined from 12,186 cases in the quarter prior to RDT introduction in 2007 to an average of 12.25 confirmed and 294 unconfirmed malaria cases per quarter over the year to September 2009. Reported malaria-like fever also declined, with only 4,381 RDTs being consumed per quarter over the same year. Reported malaria mortality declined to zero in the year to September 2009, and all-cause mortality declined. Consumption of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) dropped dramatically, but remained above reported malaria, declining from 12,550 courses dispensed by the district office in the quarter prior to RDT implementation to an average of 822 per quarter over the last year. Quinine consumption in health centres also declined, with the district office ceasing to supply due to low usage, but requests for sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) rose to well above previous levels, suggesting substitution of ACT with this drug in RDT-negative cases. Conclusions RDT introduction led to a large decline in reported malaria cases and in ACT consumption in Livingstone district. Reported malaria mortality declined to zero, indicating safety of the new diagnostic regime, although adherence and/or use of RDTs was still incomplete. However, a deficiency is apparent in management of non-malarial fever, with inappropriate use of a low-cost single dose drug, SP, replacing ACT. While large

  13. Ex Vivo Drug Susceptibility Testing and Molecular Profiling of Clinical Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Cambodia from 2008 to 2013 Suggest Emerging Piperaquine Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Saunders, David L; Sea, Darapiseth; Chanarat, Nitima; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Sundrakes, Siratchana; Saingam, Piyaporn; Buathong, Nillawan; Sriwichai, Sabaithip; Chann, Soklyda; Se, Youry; Yom, You; Heng, Thay Kheng; Kong, Nareth; Kuntawunginn, Worachet; Tangthongchaiwiriya, Kuntida; Jacob, Christopher; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Plowe, Christopher; Lin, Jessica T; Chuor, Char Meng; Prom, Satharath; Tyner, Stuart D; Gosi, Panita; Teja-Isavadharm, Paktiya; Lon, Chanthap; Lanteri, Charlotte A

    2015-08-01

    Cambodia's first-line artemisinin combination therapy, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ), is no longer sufficiently curative against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria at some Thai-Cambodian border regions. We report recent (2008 to 2013) drug resistance trends in 753 isolates from northern, western, and southern Cambodia by surveying for ex vivo drug susceptibility and molecular drug resistance markers to guide the selection of an effective alternative to DHA-PPQ. Over the last 3 study years, PPQ susceptibility declined dramatically (geomean 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] increased from 12.8 to 29.6 nM), while mefloquine (MQ) sensitivity doubled (67.1 to 26 nM) in northern Cambodia. These changes in drug susceptibility were significantly associated with a decreased prevalence of P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 gene (Pfmdr1) multiple copy isolates and coincided with the timing of replacing artesunate-mefloquine (AS-MQ) with DHA-PPQ as the first-line therapy. Widespread chloroquine resistance was suggested by all isolates being of the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene CVIET haplotype. Nearly all isolates collected from the most recent years had P. falciparum kelch13 mutations, indicative of artemisinin resistance. Ex vivo bioassay measurements of antimalarial activity in plasma indicated 20% of patients recently took antimalarials, and their plasma had activity (median of 49.8 nM DHA equivalents) suggestive of substantial in vivo drug pressure. Overall, our findings suggest DHA-PPQ failures are associated with emerging PPQ resistance in a background of artemisinin resistance. The observed connection between drug policy changes and significant reduction in PPQ susceptibility with mitigation of MQ resistance supports reintroduction of AS-MQ, in conjunction with monitoring of the P. falciparum mdr1 copy number, as a stop-gap measure in areas of DHA-PPQ failure. PMID:26014942

  14. Ex Vivo Drug Susceptibility Testing and Molecular Profiling of Clinical Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Cambodia from 2008 to 2013 Suggest Emerging Piperaquine Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Saunders, David L.; Sea, Darapiseth; Chanarat, Nitima; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Sundrakes, Siratchana; Saingam, Piyaporn; Buathong, Nillawan; Sriwichai, Sabaithip; Chann, Soklyda; Se, Youry; Yom, You; Heng, Thay Kheng; Kong, Nareth; Kuntawunginn, Worachet; Tangthongchaiwiriya, Kuntida; Jacob, Christopher; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Plowe, Christopher; Lin, Jessica T.; Chuor, Char Meng; Prom, Satharath; Tyner, Stuart D.; Gosi, Panita; Teja-Isavadharm, Paktiya; Lon, Chanthap

    2015-01-01

    Cambodia's first-line artemisinin combination therapy, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ), is no longer sufficiently curative against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria at some Thai-Cambodian border regions. We report recent (2008 to 2013) drug resistance trends in 753 isolates from northern, western, and southern Cambodia by surveying for ex vivo drug susceptibility and molecular drug resistance markers to guide the selection of an effective alternative to DHA-PPQ. Over the last 3 study years, PPQ susceptibility declined dramatically (geomean 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] increased from 12.8 to 29.6 nM), while mefloquine (MQ) sensitivity doubled (67.1 to 26 nM) in northern Cambodia. These changes in drug susceptibility were significantly associated with a decreased prevalence of P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 gene (Pfmdr1) multiple copy isolates and coincided with the timing of replacing artesunate-mefloquine (AS-MQ) with DHA-PPQ as the first-line therapy. Widespread chloroquine resistance was suggested by all isolates being of the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene CVIET haplotype. Nearly all isolates collected from the most recent years had P. falciparum kelch13 mutations, indicative of artemisinin resistance. Ex vivo bioassay measurements of antimalarial activity in plasma indicated 20% of patients recently took antimalarials, and their plasma had activity (median of 49.8 nM DHA equivalents) suggestive of substantial in vivo drug pressure. Overall, our findings suggest DHA-PPQ failures are associated with emerging PPQ resistance in a background of artemisinin resistance. The observed connection between drug policy changes and significant reduction in PPQ susceptibility with mitigation of MQ resistance supports reintroduction of AS-MQ, in conjunction with monitoring of the P. falciparum mdr1 copy number, as a stop-gap measure in areas of DHA-PPQ failure. PMID:26014942

  15. Selective anti-malarial minor groove binders.

    PubMed

    Scott, Fraser J; Khalaf, Abedawn I; Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M; Suckling, Colin J

    2016-07-15

    A set of 31 DNA minor groove binders (MGBs) with diverse structural features relating to both physical chemical properties and DNA binding sequence preference has been evaluated as potential drugs to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections using a chloroquine sensitive strain (3D7) and a chloroquine resistant strain (Dd2) in comparison with human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells as an indicator of mammalian cell toxicity. MGBs with an alkene link between the two N-terminal building blocks were demonstrated to be most active with IC50 values in the range 30-500nM and therapeutic ratios in the range 10->500. Many active compounds contained a C-alkylthiazole building block. Active compounds with logD7.4 values of approximately 3 or 7 were identified. Importantly the MGBs tested were essentially equally effective against both chloroquine sensitive and resistant strains. The results show that suitably designed MGBs have the potential for development into clinical candidates for antimalarial drugs effective against resistant strains of Plasmodia. PMID:27212070

  16. In vitro and in vivo characterization of the antimalarial lead compound SSJ-183 in Plasmodium models

    PubMed Central

    Schleiferböck, Sarah; Scheurer, Christian; Ihara, Masataka; Itoh, Isamu; Bathurst, Ian; Burrows, Jeremy N; Fantauzzi, Pascal; Lotharius, Julie; Charman, Susan A; Morizzi, Julia; Shackleford, David M; White, Karen L; Brun, Reto; Wittlin, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to characterize the in vitro (Plasmodium falciparum) and in vivo (Plasmodium berghei) activity profile of the recently discovered lead compound SSJ-183. The molecule showed in vitro a fast and strong inhibitory effect on growth of all P. falciparum blood stages, with a tendency to a more pronounced stage-specific action on ring forms at low concentrations. Furthermore, the compound appeared to be equally efficacious on drug-resistant and drug-sensitive parasite strains. In vivo, SSJ-183 showed a rapid onset of action, comparable to that seen for the antimalarial drug artesunate. SSJ-183 exhibited a half-life of about 10 hours and no significant differences in absorption or exposure between noninfected and infected mice. SSJ-183 appears to be a promising new lead compound with an attractive antimalarial profile. PMID:24255594

  17. In silico activity profiling reveals the mechanism of action of antimalarials discovered in a high-throughput screen

    PubMed Central

    Plouffe, David; Brinker, Achim; McNamara, Case; Henson, Kerstin; Kato, Nobutaka; Kuhen, Kelli; Nagle, Advait; Adrián, Francisco; Matzen, Jason T.; Anderson, Paul; Nam, Tae-gyu; Gray, Nathanael S.; Chatterjee, Arnab; Janes, Jeff; Yan, S. Frank; Trager, Richard; Caldwell, Jeremy S.; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhou, Yingyao; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    The growing resistance to current first-line antimalarial drugs represents a major health challenge. To facilitate the discovery of new antimalarials, we have implemented an efficient and robust high-throughput cell-based screen (1,536-well format) based on proliferation of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) in erythrocytes. From a screen of ≈1.7 million compounds, we identified a diverse collection of ≈6,000 small molecules comprised of >530 distinct scaffolds, all of which show potent antimalarial activity (<1.25 μM). Most known antimalarials were identified in this screen, thus validating our approach. In addition, we identified many novel chemical scaffolds, which likely act through both known and novel pathways. We further show that in some cases the mechanism of action of these antimalarials can be determined by in silico compound activity profiling. This method uses large datasets from unrelated cellular and biochemical screens and the guilt-by-association principle to predict which cellular pathway and/or protein target is being inhibited by select compounds. In addition, the screening method has the potential to provide the malaria community with many new starting points for the development of biological probes and drugs with novel antiparasitic activities. PMID:18579783

  18. Synthesis and Antimalarial Activities of Cyclen 4-Aminoquinoline Analogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an attempt to augment the efficacy of 7-chloro 4-aminoquinoline analogs and also to overcome resistance to anti-malarial agents we synthesized three cyclen analogs of chloroquine (4,6,7). Compound 4 displays the most potent in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activities. It displays an IC50 of 7.5 ...

  19. Drug resistance in castration resistant prostate cancer: resistance mechanisms and emerging treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Cameron M; Gao, Allen C

    2015-01-01

    Several mechanisms facilitate the progression of hormone-sensitive prostate cancer to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). At present, the approved chemotherapies for CRPC include systemic drugs (docetaxel and cabazitaxel) and agents that target androgen signaling, including enzalutamide and abiraterone. While up to 30% of patients have primary resistance to these treatments, each of these drugs confers a significant survival benefit for many. Over time, however, all patients inevitably develop resistance to treatment and their disease will continue to progress. Several key mechanisms have been identified that give rise to drug resistance. Expression of constitutively active variants of the androgen receptor, such as AR-V7, intracrine androgens and overexpression of androgen synthesis enzymes like AKR1C3, and increased drug efflux through ABCB1 are just some of the many discovered mechanisms of drug resistance. Treatment strategies are being developed to target these pathways and reintroduce drug sensitivity. Niclosamide has been discovered to reduce AR-V7 activity and synergized to enzalutamide. Indomethacin has been explored to inhibit AKR1C3 activity and showed to be able to reverse resistance to enzalutamide. ABCB1 transport activity can be mitigated by the phytochemical apigenin and by antiandrogens such as bicalutamide, with each improving cellular response to chemotherapeutics. By better understanding the mechanisms by which drug resistance develops improved treatment strategies will be made possible. Herein, we review the existing knowledge of CRPC therapies and resistance mechanisms as well as methods that have been identified which may improve drug sensitivity. PMID:26309896

  20. Antifungal drug resistance of oral fungi.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Masakazu; Firth, Norman A; Cannon, Richard D

    2010-02-01

    Fungi comprise a minor component of the oral microbiota but give rise to oral disease in a significant proportion of the population. The most common form of oral fungal disease is oral candidiasis, which has a number of presentations. The mainstay for the treatment of oral candidiasis is the use of polyenes, such as nystatin and amphotericin B, and azoles including miconazole, fluconazole, and itraconazole. Resistance of fungi to polyenes is rare, but some Candida species, such as Candida glabrata and C. krusei, are innately less susceptible to azoles, and C. albicans can acquire azole resistance. The main mechanism of high-level fungal azole resistance, measured in vitro, is energy-dependent drug efflux. Most fungi in the oral cavity, however, are present in multispecies biofilms that typically demonstrate an antifungal resistance phenotype. This resistance is the result of multiple factors including the expression of efflux pumps in the fungal cell membrane, biofilm matrix permeability, and a stress response in the fungal cell. Removal of dental biofilms, or treatments to prevent biofilm development in combination with antifungal drugs, may enable better treatment and prevention of oral fungal disease. PMID:20155503

  1. Hydroxyethylamine Based Phthalimides as New Class of Plasmepsin Hits: Design, Synthesis and Antimalarial Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anil K; Rathore, Sumit; Tang, Yan; Goldfarb, Nathan E; Dunn, Ben M; Rajendran, Vinoth; Ghosh, Prahlad C; Singh, Neelu; Latha, N; Singh, Brajendra K; Rawat, Manmeet; Rathi, Brijesh

    2015-01-01

    A novel class of phthalimides functionalized with privileged scaffolds was designed, synthesized and evaluated as potential inhibitors of plasmepsin 2 (Ki: 0.99 ± 0.1 μM for 6u) and plasmepsin 4 (Ki: 3.3 ± 0.3 μM for 6t), enzymes found in the digestive vacuole of the plasmodium parasite and considered as crucial drug targets. Three compounds were identified as potential candidates for further development. The listed compounds were also assayed for their antimalarial efficacy against chloroquine (CQ) sensitive strain (3D7) of Plasmodium falciparum. Assay of twenty seven hydroxyethylamine derivatives revealed four (5e, 6j, 6o and 6s) as strongly active, which were further evaluated against CQ resistant strain (7GB) of P. falciparum. Compound 5e possessing the piperidinopiperidine moiety exhibited promising antimalarial activity with an IC50 of 1.16 ± 0.04 μM. Further, compounds 5e, 6j, 6o and 6s exhibited low cytotoxic effect on MCF-7 cell line. Compound 6s possessing C2 symmetry was identified as the least cytotoxic with significant antimalarial activity (IC50: 1.30 ± 0.03 μM). The combined presence of hydroxyethylamine and cyclic amines (piperazines and piperidines) was observed as crucial for the activity. The current studies suggest that hydroxyethylamine based molecules act as potent antimalarial agent and may be helpful in drug development. PMID:26502278

  2. Hydroxyethylamine Based Phthalimides as New Class of Plasmepsin Hits: Design, Synthesis and Antimalarial Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anil K.; Rathore, Sumit; Tang, Yan; Goldfarb, Nathan E.; Dunn, Ben M.; Rajendran, Vinoth; Ghosh, Prahlad C.; Singh, Neelu; Latha, N.; Singh, Brajendra K.; Rawat, Manmeet; Rathi, Brijesh

    2015-01-01

    A novel class of phthalimides functionalized with privileged scaffolds was designed, synthesized and evaluated as potential inhibitors of plasmepsin 2 (Ki: 0.99 ± 0.1 μM for 6u) and plasmepsin 4 (Ki: 3.3 ± 0.3 μM for 6t), enzymes found in the digestive vacuole of the plasmodium parasite and considered as crucial drug targets. Three compounds were identified as potential candidates for further development. The listed compounds were also assayed for their antimalarial efficacy against chloroquine (CQ) sensitive strain (3D7) of Plasmodium falciparum. Assay of twenty seven hydroxyethylamine derivatives revealed four (5e, 6j, 6o and 6s) as strongly active, which were further evaluated against CQ resistant strain (7GB) of P. falciparum. Compound 5e possessing the piperidinopiperidine moiety exhibited promising antimalarial activity with an IC50 of 1.16 ± 0.04 μM. Further, compounds 5e, 6j, 6o and 6s exhibited low cytotoxic effect on MCF-7 cell line. Compound 6s possessing C2 symmetry was identified as the least cytotoxic with significant antimalarial activity (IC50: 1.30 ± 0.03 μM). The combined presence of hydroxyethylamine and cyclic amines (piperazines and piperidines) was observed as crucial for the activity. The current studies suggest that hydroxyethylamine based molecules act as potent antimalarial agent and may be helpful in drug development. PMID:26502278

  3. Probing the antimalarial mechanism of artemisinin and OZ277 (arterolane) with nonperoxidic isosteres and nitroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Fügi, Matthias A; Wittlin, Sergio; Dong, Yuxiang; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L

    2010-03-01

    Peroxidic antimalarials such as the semisynthetic artemisinins are critically important in the treatment of drug-resistant malaria. Nevertheless, their peroxide bond-dependent mode of action is still not well understood. Using combination experiments with cultured Plasmodium falciparum cells, we investigated the interactions of the nitroxide radical spin trap, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO), and four of its analogs with artemisinin and the ozonide drug development candidate OZ277. The antagonism observed for combinations of artemisinin or OZ277 with the TEMPO analogs supports the hypothesis that the formation of carbon-centered radicals is critical for the activity of these two antimalarial peroxides. The TEMPO analogs showed a trend toward greater antagonism with artemisinin than they did with OZ277, an observation that can be explained by the greater tendency of artemisinin-derived carbon-centered radicals to undergo internal self-quenching reactions, resulting in a lower proportion of radicals available for subsequent chemical reactions such as the alkylation of heme and parasite proteins. In a further mechanistic experiment, we tested both artemisinin and OZ277 in combination with their nonperoxidic analogs. The latter had no effect on the antimalarial activities of the former. These data indicate that the antimalarial properties of peroxides do not derive from reversible interactions with parasite targets. PMID:20028825

  4. Competitive release and facilitation of drug-resistant parasites after therapeutic chemotherapy in a rodent malaria model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wargo, A.R.; Huijben, S.; De Roode, J. C.; Shepherd, J.; Read, A.F.

    2007-01-01

    Malaria infections frequently consist of mixtures of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive parasites. If crowding occurs, where clonal population densities are suppressed by the presence of coinfecting clones, removal of susceptible clones by drug treatment could allow resistant clones to expand into the newly vacated niche space within a host. Theoretical models show that, if such competitive release occurs, it can be a potent contributor to the strength of selection, greatly accelerating the rate at which resistance spreads in a population. A variety of correlational field data suggest that competitive release could occur in human malaria populations, but direct evidence cannot be ethically obtained from human infections. Here we show competitive release after pyrimethamine curative chemotherapy of acute infections of the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi in laboratory mice. The expansion of resistant parasite numbers after treatment resulted in enhanced transmission-stage densities. After the elimination or near-elimination of sensitive parasites, the number of resistant parasites increased beyond that achieved when a competitor had never been present. Thus, a substantial competitive release occurred, markedly elevating the fitness advantages of drug resistance above those arising from survival alone. This finding may explain the rapid spread of drug resistance and the subsequently brief useful lifespans of some antimalarial drugs. In a second experiment, where subcurative chemotherapy was administered, the resistant clone was only partly released from competitive suppression and experienced a restriction in the size of its expansion after treatment. This finding raises the prospect of harnessing in-host ecology to slow the spread of drug resistance. ?? 2007 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  5. Drug Resistant Fetal Arrhythmia in Obstetric Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Altug, Nahide; Kirbas, Ayse; Daglar, Korkut; Biberoglu, Ebru; Uygur, Dilek; Danisman, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    Obstetric cholestasis (OC) is a pregnancy specific liver disease characterized by increased levels of bile acid (BA) and pruritus. Raised maternal BA levels could be associated with intrauterine death, fetal distress, and preterm labor and also alter the rate and rhythm of cardiomyocyte contraction and may cause fetal arrhythmic events. We report a case of drug resistant fetal supraventricular tachycardia and concomitant OC. Conclusion. If there are maternal OC and concomitant fetal arrhythmia, possibility of the resistance to antiarrhythmic treatment should be kept in mind. PMID:25821617

  6. Genotoxic effects of the antimalarial drug lumefantrine in human lymphocytes in vitro and computational prediction of the mechanism associated with its interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    de Lucca, Renato M R; Batista Júnior, João; Fontes, Cor J Fernandes; Bahia, Marcelo de Oliveira; Bassi-Branco, Carmen L

    2015-07-01

    Lumefantrine (LF) is an aryl-amino alcohol antimalarial drug used in artemisinin-based combination therapies against malaria worldwide. In this study, we investigated the genotoxic effects of LF in human lymphocytes in vitro, and the potential noncovalent interaction of LF with DNA using a 3D DNA-docking model. The number of DNA breaks and the frequency of nuclear buds (NBUDS) was significantly increased (P < 0.01 and P < 0. 05, respectively) at LF concentrations of 60, 80, and 100 µg/mL (LF60, LF80, and LF100, respectively). Frequency (‰) of micronuclei (MN) formation also increased after LF treatments. However, this was only significant for LF100 (P = 0.01) and LF80 (P = 0.001). LF did not affect the frequency of nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) (P = 0.12) or the nuclear division index (NDI) (P = 0.32). Computational analysis suggests that LF may interact noncovalently with DNA via the DNA minor groove surface with a predicted binding affinity energy of -7.2 kcal/mol and showing a favorable shape complementary to this groove. Our results suggest that LF has clastogenic effects in human lymphocytes in vitro due to noncovalent interaction with the minor groove of DNA. PMID:25821123

  7. Development of a New Generation of 4-Aminoquinoline Antimalarial Compounds Using Predictive Pharmacokinetic and Toxicology Models

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sunetra; Madrid, Peter B.; Catz, Paul; LeValley, Susanna E.; Furniss, Michael J.; Rausch, Linda L.; Guy, R. Kiplin; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Iyer, Lalitha V.; Green, Carol E.; Mirsalis, Jon C.

    2010-01-01

    Among the known antimalarial drugs, chloroquine (CQ) and other 4-aminoquinolines have shown high potency and good bioavailability, yet complications associated with drug resistance necessitate the discovery of effective new antimalarial agents. ADMETa prediction studies were employed to evaluate a library of new molecules based on the 4-aminoquinolone-related structure of CQ. Extensive in vitro screening and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in mice helped to identify two lead molecules, 18 and 4, with promising in vitro therapeutic efficacy, improved ADMET properties, low risk for drug-drug interactions, and desirable pharmacokinetic profiles. Both 18 and 4 are highly potent antimalarial compounds, with IC50 values = 5.6 nM and 17.3 nM, respectively, against the W2 (CQ-resistant) strain of Plasmodium falciparum (IC50 for CQ = 382 nM). When tested in mice, these compounds were found to have biological half-lives and plasma exposure values similar to or higher than those of CQ; they are therefore desirable candidates to pursue in future clinical trials. PMID:20361799

  8. An insight into the drug resistance profile & mechanism of drug resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Patel, Achchhe Lal; Chaudhry, Uma; Sachdev, Divya; Sachdeva, Poonam Nagpal; Bala, Manju; Saluja, Daman

    2011-10-01

    Among the aetiological agents of treatable sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), Neissseria gonorrhoeae is considered to be most important because of emerging antibiotic resistant strains that compromise the effectiveness of treatment of the disease - gonorrhoea. In most of the developing countries, treatment of gonorrhoea relies mainly on syndromic management rather than the aetiological based therapy. Gonococcal infections are usually treated with single-dose therapy with an agent found to cure > 95 per cent of cases. Unfortunately during the last few decades, N. gonorrhoeae has developed resistance not only to less expensive antimicrobials such as sulphonamides, penicillin and tetracyclines but also to fluoroquinolones. The resistance trend of N. gonorrhoeae towards these antimicrobials can be categorised into pre-quinolone, quinolone and post-quinolone era. Among the antimicrobials available so far, only the third-generation cephalosporins could be safely recommended as first-line therapy for gonorrhoea globally. However, resistance to oral third-generation cephalosporins has also started emerging in some countries. Therefore, it has become imperative to initiate sustained national and international efforts to reduce infection and misuse of antibiotics so as to prevent further emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. It is necessary not only to monitor drug resistance and optimise treatment regimens, but also to gain insight into how gonococcus develops drug resistance. Knowledge of mechanism of resistance would help us to devise methods to prevent the occurrence of drug resistance against existing and new drugs. Such studies could also help in finding out new drug targets in N. gonorrhoeae and also a possibility of identification of new drugs for treating gonorrhoea. PMID:22089602

  9. An insight into the drug resistance profile & mechanism of drug resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Achchhe Lal; Chaudhry, Uma; Sachdev, Divya; Sachdeva, Poonam Nagpal; Bala, Manju; Saluja, Daman

    2011-01-01

    Among the aetiological agents of treatable sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), Neissseria gonorrhoeae is considered to be most important because of emerging antibiotic resistant strains that compromise the effectiveness of treatment of the disease - gonorrhoea. In most of the developing countries, treatment of gonorrhoea relies mainly on syndromic management rather than the aetiological based therapy. Gonococcal infections are usually treated with single-dose therapy with an agent found to cure > 95 per cent of cases. Unfortunately during the last few decades, N. gonorrhoeae has developed resistance not only to less expensive antimicrobials such as sulphonamides, penicillin and tetracyclines but also to fluoroquinolones. The resistance trend of N. gonorrhoeae towards these antimicrobials can be categorised into pre-quinolone, quinolone and post-quinolone era. Among the antimicrobials available so far, only the third-generation cephalosporins could be safely recommended as first-line therapy for gonorrhoea globally. However, resistance to oral third-generation cephalosporins has also started emerging in some countries. Therefore, it has become imperative to initiate sustained national and international efforts to reduce infection and misuse of antibiotics so as to prevent further emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. It is necessary not only to monitor drug resistance and optimise treatment regimens, but also to gain insight into how gonococcus develops drug resistance. Knowledge of mechanism of resistance would help us to devise methods to prevent the occurrence of drug resistance against existing and new drugs. Such studies could also help in finding out new drug targets in N. gonorrhoeae and also a possibility of identification of new drugs for treating gonorrhoea. PMID:22089602

  10. Clinical relevance of HCV antiviral drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Welsch, C; Zeuzem, S

    2012-10-01

    The approval of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) against the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease revolutionized antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C. They mark the beginning of an era with drugs designed to inhibit specific viral proteins involved in the virus life cycle rather than the nonspecific antiviral activity of interferon. Upcoming generations of antivirals are expected that lead to viral eradication in most patients who undergo treatment with hope held for years that HCV can be cured without interferon. Antiviral drug resistance plays a key role in DAA-treatment failure. Knowledge on molecular escape mechanisms of resistant variants, their time to wild-type reversal and potential persistence is of upmost importance to design treatment strategies for patients with previous DAA-treatment failure. PMID:23006585

  11. Current Perspectives on HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Iyidogan, Pinar; Anderson, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    Current advancements in antiretroviral therapy (ART) have turned HIV-1 infection into a chronic and manageable disease. However, treatment is only effective until HIV-1 develops resistance against the administered drugs. The most recent antiretroviral drugs have become superior at delaying the evolution of acquired drug resistance. In this review, the viral fitness and its correlation to HIV-1 mutation rates and drug resistance are discussed while emphasizing the concept of lethal mutagenesis as an alternative therapy. The development of resistance to the different classes of approved drugs and the importance of monitoring antiretroviral drug resistance are also summarized briefly. PMID:25341668

  12. In Vitro Resistance Selections for Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors Give Mutants with Multiple Point Mutations in the Drug-binding Site and Altered Growth*

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Leila S.; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria José; Singh, Onkar M. P.; Rowland, Paul; Wiegand, Roger C.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a preventable and treatable disease; yet half of the world's population lives at risk of infection, and an estimated 660,000 people die of malaria-related causes every year. Rising drug resistance threatens to make malaria untreatable, necessitating both the discovery of new antimalarial agents and the development of strategies to identify and suppress the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We focused on in-development dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibitors. Characterizing resistance pathways for antimalarial agents not yet in clinical use will increase our understanding of the potential for resistance. We identified resistance mechanisms of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) DHODH inhibitors via in vitro resistance selections. We found 11 point mutations in the PfDHODH target. Target gene amplification and unknown mechanisms also contributed to resistance, albeit to a lesser extent. These mutant parasites were often hypersensitive to other PfDHODH inhibitors, which immediately suggested a novel combination therapy approach to preventing resistance. Indeed, a combination of wild-type and mutant-type selective inhibitors led to resistance far less often than either drug alone. The effects of point mutations in PfDHODH were corroborated with purified recombinant wild-type and mutant-type PfDHODH proteins, which showed the same trends in drug response as the cognate cell lines. Comparative growth assays demonstrated that two mutant parasites grew less robustly than their wild-type parent, and the purified protein of those mutants showed a decrease in catalytic efficiency, thereby suggesting a reason for the diminished growth rate. Co-crystallography of PfDHODH with three inhibitors suggested that hydrophobic interactions are important for drug binding and selectivity. PMID:24782313

  13. Overcoming drug resistance in multi-drug resistant cancers and microorganisms: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Avner, Benjamin S; Fialho, Arsenio M; Chakrabarty, Ananda M

    2012-01-01

    Resistance development against multiple drugs is a common feature among many pathogens--including bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, viruses, and parasites--and also among cancers. The reasons are two-fold. Most commonly-used rationally-designed small molecule drugs or monoclonal antibodies, as well as antibiotics, strongly inhibit a key single step in the growth and proliferation of the pathogen or cancer cells. The disease agents quickly change or switch off this single target, or activate the efflux mechanisms to pump out the drug, thereby becoming resistant to the drug. A second problem is the way drugs are designed. The pharmaceutical industry chooses to use, by high-throughput screening, compounds that are maximally inhibitory to the key single step in the growth of the pathogen or cancer, thereby promoting selective pressure. An ideal drug would be one that inhibits multiple steps in the disease progression pathways with less stringency in these steps. Low levels of inhibition at multiple steps provide cumulative strong inhibitory effect, but little incentives or ability on the part of the pathogen/cancer to develop resistance. Such intelligent drug design involving multiple less stringent inhibitory steps is beyond the scope of the drug industry and requires evolutionary wisdom commonly possessed by bacteria. This review surveys assessments of the current clinical situation with regard to drug resistance in P. aeruginosa, and examines tools currently employed to limit this trend. We then provide a conceptual framework in which we explore the similarities between multi-drug resistance in pathogens and in cancers. We summarize promising work on anti-cancer drugs derived from the evolutionary wisdom of bacteria such as P. aeruginosa, and how such strategies can be the basis for how to look for candidate protein/peptide antibiotic drugs from bioengineered bugs. Such multi-domain proteins, unlike diffusible antibiotics, are not diffusible because of their

  14. UV-triggered Affinity Capture Identifies Interactions between the Plasmodium falciparum Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 (PfMDR1) and Antimalarial Agents in Live Parasitized Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Ralf; Ng, Caroline L.; Aissaoui, Hamed; Akabas, Myles H.; Boss, Christoph; Brun, Reto; Callaghan, Paul S.; Corminboeuf, Olivier; Fidock, David A.; Frame, Ithiel J.; Heidmann, Bibia; Le Bihan, Amélie; Jenö, Paul; Mattheis, Corinna; Moes, Suzette; Müller, Ingrid B.; Paguio, Michelle; Roepe, Paul D.; Siegrist, Romain; Voss, Till; Welford, Richard W. D.; Wittlin, Sergio; Binkert, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    A representative of a new class of potent antimalarials with an unknown mode of action was recently described. To identify the molecular target of this class of antimalarials, we employed a photo-reactive affinity capture method to find parasite proteins specifically interacting with the capture compound in living parasitized cells. The capture reagent retained the antimalarial properties of the parent molecule (ACT-213615) and accumulated within parasites. We identified several proteins interacting with the capture compound and established a functional interaction between ACT-213615 and PfMDR1. We surmise that PfMDR1 may play a role in the antimalarial activity of the piperazine-containing compound ACT-213615. PMID:23754276

  15. Evidence for Pyronaridine as a Highly Effective Partner Drug for Treatment of Artemisinin-Resistant Malaria in a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Philipp P.; O'Brien, Connor; Sáenz, Fabián E.; Cremers, Serge; Kyle, Dennis E.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence in Southeast Asia of Plasmodium falciparum infections with delayed parasite clearance rates, following treatment of malaria patients with the artemisinin derivative artesunate, highlights an urgent need to identify which of the currently available artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) are most suitable to treat populations with emerging artemisinin resistance. Here, we demonstrate that the rodent Plasmodium berghei SANA strain has acquired artemisinin resistance following drug pressure, as defined by reduced parasite clearance and early recrudescence following daily exposure to high doses of artesunate or the active metabolite dihydroartemisinin. Using the SANA strain and the parental drug-sensitive N strain, we have interrogated the antimalarial activity of five ACTs, namely, artemether-lumefantrine, artesunate-amodiaquine, artesunate-mefloquine, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, and the newest combination artesunate-pyronaridine. By monitoring parasitemia and outcome for 30 days following initiation of treatment, we found that infections with artemisinin-resistant P. berghei SANA parasites can be successfully treated with artesunate-pyronaridine used at doses that are curative for the parental drug-sensitive N strain. No other partner drug combination was as effective in resolving SANA infections. Of the five partner drugs tested, pyronaridine was also the most effective at suppressing the recrudescence of SANA parasites. These data support the potential benefit of implementing ACTs with pyronaridine in regions affected by artemisinin-resistant malaria. PMID:24145526

  16. Multidrug Resistant and Extensively Drug Resistant Bacteria: A Study

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Silpi; Singh, Priyanka; Rajurkar, Monali

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective. Antimicrobial resistance is now a major challenge to clinicians for treating patients. Hence, this short term study was undertaken to detect the incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR), extensively drug-resistant (XDR), and pandrug-resistant (PDR) bacterial isolates in a tertiary care hospital. Material and Methods. The clinical samples were cultured and bacterial strains were identified in the department of microbiology. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of different bacterial isolates was studied to detect MDR, XDR, and PDR bacteria. Results. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of 1060 bacterial strains was studied. 393 (37.1%) bacterial strains were MDR, 146 (13.8%) strains were XDR, and no PDR was isolated. All (100%) Gram negative bacterial strains were sensitive to colistin whereas all (100%) Gram positive bacterial strains were sensitive to vancomycin. Conclusion. Close monitoring of MDR, XDR, or even PDR must be done by all clinical microbiology laboratories to implement effective measures to reduce the menace of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:26942013

  17. Disagreement in genotyping results of drug resistance alleles of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) gene by allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) assays and Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Divya; Lather, Manila; Dykes, Cherry L; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of antimalarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum over the past few decades has necessitated intensive monitoring of such resistance for an effective malaria control strategy. P. falciparum dihydropteroate synthase (Pfdhps) and P. falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (Pfdhfr) genes act as molecular markers for resistance against the antimalarial drugs sulphadoxine and pyrimethamine, respectively. Resistance to pyrimethamine which is used as a partner drug in artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is associated with several mutations in the Pfdhfr gene, namely A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N/T and I164L. Therefore, routine monitoring of Pfdhfr-drug-resistant alleles in a population may help in effective drug resistance management. Allele-specific PCR (ASPCR) is one of the commonly used methods for molecular genotyping of these alleles. In this study, we genotyped 55 samples of P. falciparum for allele discrimination at four codons of Pfdhfr (N51, C59, S108 and I164) by ASPCR using published methods and by Sanger's DNA sequencing method. We found that the ASPCR identified a significantly higher number of mutant alleles as compared to the DNA sequencing method. Such discrepancies arise due to the non-specificity of some of the allele-specific primer sets and due to the lack of sensitivity of Sanger's DNA sequencing method to detect minor alleles present in multiple clone infections. This study reveals the need of a highly specific and sensitive method for genotyping and detecting minor drug-resistant alleles present in multiple clonal infections. PMID:26407876

  18. Molecular modelling based target identification for endo-peroxides class of antimalarials.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Amit K; Saxena, Anil K

    2015-01-01

    The emerging cases of artemisinin and endoperoxide drug resistance are becoming a challenge to antimalarial drug discovery and therapy. The exact mode of action of this class of antimalarials is still unknown which presents a bottleneck for the understanding of drug resistance as well as designing new lead molecules of this class. To address this issue, the molecular docking and scoring studies of a homogeneous and structurally diverse dataset of artemisinin derived trioxanes have been performed on each of the two plausible targets of this class viz. heme and PfATP6. Since the crystal structure of PfATP6 is unknown, its homology model was built utilizing the human SERCA1 protein crystallized structure as a template. The binding energies of the heme binding site of the docked artemisinin derivatives showed very good correlation with the antimalarial activity (r(2) = 0.69), whereas the same study with the binding site of pfATP6 showed a very poor correlation (r(2) = 0.12), suggesting heme to be the possible target of artemisinin derived endoperoxides. PMID:25543685

  19. Pyrazoleamide compounds are potent antimalarials that target Na+ homeostasis in intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Akhil B.; Morrisey, Joanne M.; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Das, Sudipta; Daly, Thomas M.; Otto, Thomas D.; Spillman, Natalie J.; Wyvratt, Matthew; Siegl, Peter; Marfurt, Jutta; Wirjanata, Grennady; Sebayang, Boni F.; Price, Ric N.; Chatterjee, Arnab; Nagle, Advait; Stasiak, Marcin; Charman, Susan A.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Belén Jiménez-Díaz, María; Martínez, María Santos; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Avery, Vicky M.; Ruecker, Andrea; Delves, Michael; Kirk, Kiaran; Berriman, Matthew; Kortagere, Sandhya; Burrows, Jeremy; Fan, Erkang; Bergman, Lawrence W.

    2014-01-01

    The quest for new antimalarial drugs, especially those with novel modes of action, is essential in the face of emerging drug-resistant parasites. Here we describe a new chemical class of molecules, pyrazoleamides, with potent activity against human malaria parasites and showing remarkably rapid parasite clearance in an in vivo model. Investigations involving pyrazoleamide-resistant parasites, whole-genome sequencing and gene transfers reveal that mutations in two proteins, a calcium-dependent protein kinase (PfCDPK5) and a P-type cation-ATPase (PfATP4), are necessary to impart full resistance to these compounds. A pyrazoleamide compound causes a rapid disruption of Na+ regulation in blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum parasites. Similar effect on Na+ homeostasis was recently reported for spiroindolones, which are antimalarials of a chemical class quite distinct from pyrazoleamides. Our results reveal that disruption of Na+ homeostasis in malaria parasites is a promising mode of antimalarial action mediated by at least two distinct chemical classes. PMID:25422853

  20. Pyrazoleamide compounds are potent antimalarials that target Na+ homeostasis in intraerythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Akhil B; Morrisey, Joanne M; Zhang, Zhongsheng; Das, Sudipta; Daly, Thomas M; Otto, Thomas D; Spillman, Natalie J; Wyvratt, Matthew; Siegl, Peter; Marfurt, Jutta; Wirjanata, Grennady; Sebayang, Boni F; Price, Ric N; Chatterjee, Arnab; Nagle, Advait; Stasiak, Marcin; Charman, Susan A; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Ferrer, Santiago; Belén Jiménez-Díaz, María; Martínez, María Santos; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Avery, Vicky M; Ruecker, Andrea; Delves, Michael; Kirk, Kiaran; Berriman, Matthew; Kortagere, Sandhya; Burrows, Jeremy; Fan, Erkang; Bergman, Lawrence W

    2014-01-01

    The quest for new antimalarial drugs, especially those with novel modes of action, is essential in the face of emerging drug-resistant parasites. Here we describe a new chemical class of molecules, pyrazoleamides, with potent activity against human malaria parasites and showing remarkably rapid parasite clearance in an in vivo model. Investigations involving pyrazoleamide-resistant parasites, whole-genome sequencing and gene transfers reveal that mutations in two proteins, a calcium-dependent protein kinase (PfCDPK5) and a P-type cation-ATPase (PfATP4), are necessary to impart full resistance to these compounds. A pyrazoleamide compound causes a rapid disruption of Na(+) regulation in blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum parasites. Similar effect on Na(+) homeostasis was recently reported for spiroindolones, which are antimalarials of a chemical class quite distinct from pyrazoleamides. Our results reveal that disruption of Na(+) homeostasis in malaria parasites is a promising mode of antimalarial action mediated by at least two distinct chemical classes. PMID:25422853

  1. Antimalarials and the fight against malaria in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Carmargo, Luiz MA; de Oliveira, Saulo; Basano, Sergio; Garcia, Célia RS

    2009-01-01

    Malaria, known as the “fevers,” has been treated for over three thousand years in China with extracts of plants of the genus Artemisia (including Artemisia annua, A. opiacea, and A. lancea) from which the active compound is artemisin, a sesquiterpene that is highly effective in the treatment of the disease, especially against young forms of the parasite. South American Indians in the seventeenth century already used an extract of the bark of chinchona tree, commonly named “Jesuits’ powder.” Its active compound was isolated in 1820 and its use spread all over the world being used as a prophylactic drug during the construction of the Madeira–Mamoré railroad in the beginning of the twentieth century. During the 1920s to the 1940s, new antimalarial drugs were synthesized to increase the arsenal against this parasite. However, the parasite has presented systematic resistence to conventional antimalarial drugs, driving researchers to find new strategies to treat the disease. In the present review we discuss how Brazil treats Plasmodium-infected patients. PMID:19753125

  2. Antimalarials and the fight against malaria in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carmargo, Luiz Ma; de Oliveira, Saulo; Basano, Sergio; Garcia, Célia Rs

    2009-08-01

    Malaria, known as the "fevers," has been treated for over three thousand years in China with extracts of plants of the genus Artemisia (including Artemisia annua, A. opiacea, and A. lancea) from which the active compound is artemisin, a sesquiterpene that is highly effective in the treatment of the disease, especially against young forms of the parasite. South American Indians in the seventeenth century already used an extract of the bark of chinchona tree, commonly named "Jesuits' powder." Its active compound was isolated in 1820 and its use spread all over the world being used as a prophylactic drug during the construction of the Madeira-Mamoré railroad in the beginning of the twentieth century. During the 1920s to the 1940s, new antimalarial drugs were synthesized to increase the arsenal against this parasite. However, the parasite has presented systematic resistence to conventional antimalarial drugs, driving researchers to find new strategies to treat the disease. In the present review we discuss how Brazil treats Plasmodium-infected patients. PMID:19753125

  3. Exploiting Nanotechnology to Overcome Tumor Drug Resistance: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Kirtane, Ameya; Kalscheuer, Stephen; Panyam, Jayanth

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells develop resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs through multiple mechanisms. Overexpression of efflux transporters is an important source of drug resistance. Efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein reduce intracellular drug accumulation and compromise drug efficacy. Various nanoparticle-based approaches have been investigated to overcome efflux-mediated resistance. These include the use of formulation excipients that inhibit transporter activity and co-delivery of the anticancer drug with a specific inhibitor of transporter function or expression. However, the effectiveness of nanoparticles can be diminished by poor transport in the tumor tissue. Hence, adjunct therapies that improve the intratumoral distribution of nanoparticles may be vital to the successful application of nanotechnology to overcome tumor drug resistance. This review discusses the mechanisms of tumor drug resistance and highlights the opportunities and challenges in the use of nanoparticles to improve the efficacy of anticancer drugs against resistant tumors. PMID:24036273

  4. Antimalarial Activity of Cupredoxins

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Donaire, Antonio; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Curd, Rachel D.; Rangachari, Kaveri; Birdsall, Berry; Ramos, Andres; Holder, Anthony A.; De la Rosa, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of effective new antimalarial agents is urgently needed. One of the most frequently studied molecules anchored to the parasite surface is the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP1). At red blood cell invasion MSP1 is proteolytically processed, and the 19-kDa C-terminal fragment (MSP119) remains on the surface and is taken into the red blood cell, where it is transferred to the food vacuole and persists until the end of the intracellular cycle. Because a number of specific antibodies inhibit erythrocyte invasion and parasite growth, MSP119 is therefore a promising target against malaria. Given the structural homology of cupredoxins with the Fab domain of monoclonal antibodies, an approach combining NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements with docking calculations based on BiGGER is employed on MSP119-cupredoxin complexes. Among the cupredoxins tested, rusticyanin forms a well defined complex with MSP119 at a site that overlaps with the surface recognized by the inhibitory antibodies. The addition of holo-rusticyanin to infected cells results in parasitemia inhibition, but negligible effects on parasite growth can be observed for apo-rusticyanin and other proteins of the cupredoxin family. These findings point to rusticyanin as an excellent therapeutic tool for malaria treatment and provide valuable information for drug design. PMID:23749994

  5. Plasmodium falciparum Thioredoxin Reductase (PfTrxR) and Its Role as a Target for New Antimalarial Discovery.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Sara E; Schellenberger, Amanda; Goodwin, Douglas C; Fuanta, Ngolui Rene; Tekwani, Babu L; Calderón, Angela I

    2015-01-01

    The growing resistance to current antimalarial drugs is a major concern for global public health. The pressing need for new antimalarials has led to an increase in research focused on the Plasmodium parasites that cause human malaria. Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), an enzyme needed to maintain redox equilibrium in Plasmodium species, is a promising target for new antimalarials. This review paper provides an overview of the structure and function of TrxR, discusses similarities and differences between the thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs) of different Plasmodium species and the human forms of the enzyme, gives an overview of modeling Plasmodium infections in animals, and suggests the role of Trx functions in antimalarial drug resistance. TrxR of Plasmodium falciparum is a central focus of this paper since it is the only Plasmodium TrxR that has been crystallized and P. falciparum is the species that causes most malaria cases. It is anticipated that the information summarized here will give insight and stimulate new directions in which research might be most beneficial. PMID:26111176

  6. Repurposing the anti-malarial drug artesunate as a novel therapeutic agent for metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to its attenuation of tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sharon; Lee, Se Jeong; Lim, Joung Eun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Seong Soo; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hye Won

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of molecularly targeted therapies, metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is still incurable. Artesunate (ART), a well-known anti-malarial drug with low toxicity, exhibits highly selective anti-tumor actions against various tumors through generation of cytotoxic carbon-centered free radical in the presence of free iron. However, the therapeutic efficacy of ART against metastatic RCC has not yet been fully elucidated. In the analysis on a dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n = 469) and a tissue microarray set from Samsung Medical Center (n = 119) from a cohort of patients with clear cell RCC (ccRCC), up-regulation of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), which is a well-known predictive marker for ART, was correlated with the presence of distant metastasis and an unfavorable prognosis. Moreover, ART exerted potent selective cytotoxicity against human RCC cell lines (Caki-1, 786-O, and SN12C-GFP-SRLu2) and sensitized these cells to sorafenib in vitro, and the extent of ART cytotoxicity correlated with TfR1 expression. ART-mediated growth inhibition of human RCC cell lines was shown to result from the induction of cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and oncosis-like cell death. Furthermore, ART inhibited cell clonogenicity and invasion of human RCC cells and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with these in vitro data, anti-tumor, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects of ART were also validated in human 786-O xenografts. Taken together, ART is a promising novel candidate for treating human RCC, either alone or in combination with other therapies. PMID:26426994

  7. Synthesis, Antimalarial, Antileishmanial, Antimicrobial, Cytotoxicity and Methemoglobin (MetHb) Formation Activities of New 8-Quinolinamines

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Kirandeep; Jain, Meenakshi; Khan, Shabana I.; Jacob, Melissa R.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Jain, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis, in vitro antiprotozoal (against Plasmodium and Leishmania), antimicrobial, cytotoxicity (Vero and MetHb-producing properties) and in vivo antimalarial activities of two series of 8-quinolinamines. N1-{4-[2-(tert-Butyl)-6-methoxy-8-quinolylamino]pentyl}-(2S/2R)-2-aminosubstitutedamides (21–33) and N1-[4-(4-ethyl-6-methoxy-5-pentyloxy-8-quinolylamino)pentyl]-(2S/2R)-2-aminosubstitutedamides (51–63) were synthesized in six steps from 6-methoxy-8-nitroquinoline and 4-methoxy-2-nitro-5-pentyloxyaniline, respectively. Several analogs displayed promising antimalarial activity in vitro against P. falciparum D6 (chloroquine-sensitive) and W2 (chloroquine-resistant) clones with high selectivity indices vs. mammalian cells. The most promising analogs (21–24) also displayed potent antimalarial activity in vivo in a P. berghei-infected mouse model. Most interestingly, many analogs exhibited promising in vitro antileishmanial activity against L. donovani promastigotes, and antimicrobial activities against a panel of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Several analogs, notably 21–24, 26–32 and 60, showed less MetHb formation compared to primaquine indicating the potential of these compounds in 8-quinolinamine-based antimalarial drug development. PMID:17084633

  8. Aberrant splicing and drug resistance in AML.

    PubMed

    de Necochea-Campion, Rosalia; Shouse, Geoffrey P; Zhou, Qi; Mirshahidi, Saied; Chen, Chien-Shing

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies has unveiled a new window into the heterogeneity of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In particular, recurrent mutations in spliceosome machinery and genome-wide aberrant splicing events have been recognized as a prominent component of this disease. This review will focus on how these factors influence drug resistance through altered splicing of tumor suppressor and oncogenes and dysregulation of the apoptotic signaling network. A better understanding of these factors in disease progression is necessary to design appropriate therapeutic strategies recognizing specific alternatively spliced or mutated oncogenic targets. PMID:27613060

  9. Access to artesunate-amodiaquine, quinine and other anti-malarials: policy and markets in Burundi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in post-conflict Burundi. To counter the increasing challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve highly effective treatment Burundi adopted artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and oral quinine as second-line treatment in its national treatment policy in 2003. Uptake of this policy in the public, private and non-governmental (NGO) retail market sectors of Burundi is relatively unknown. This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. Methods Adapting a standardized methodology developed by Health Action International/World Health Organization (HAI/WHO), a cross-sectional survey of 70 (24 public, 36 private, and 10 NGO) medicine outlets was conducted in three regions of Burundi, representing different levels of transmission of malaria. The availability on day of the survey, the median prices, and affordability (in terms of number of days' wages to purchase treatment) of AS-AQ, quinine and other anti-malarials were calculated. Results Anti-malarials were stocked in all outlets surveyed. AS-AQ was available in 87.5%, 33.3%, and 90% of public, private, and NGO retail outlets, respectively. Quinine was the most common anti-malarial found in all outlet types. Non-policy recommended anti-malarials were mainly found in the private outlets (38.9%) compared to public (4.2%) and NGO (0%) outlets. The median price of a course of AS-AQ was US$0.16 (200 Burundi Francs, FBu) for the public and NGO markets, and 3.5-fold higher in the private sector (US$0.56 or 700 FBu). Quinine tablets were similarly priced in the public (US$1.53 or 1,892.50 FBu), private and NGO sectors (both US$1.61 or 2,000 FBu). Non-policy anti-malarials were priced 50-fold higher than the price of AS-AQ in the public sector. A course of AS-AQ was affordable at 0.4 of a day's wage in the public and NGO sectors, whereas, it was

  10. Multiple drugs compete for transport via the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter at distinct but interdependent sites.

    PubMed

    Bellanca, Sebastiano; Summers, Robert L; Meyrath, Max; Dave, Anurag; Nash, Megan N; Dittmer, Martin; Sanchez, Cecilia P; Stein, Wilfred D; Martin, Rowena E; Lanzer, Michael

    2014-12-26

    Mutations in the "chloroquine resistance transporter" (PfCRT) are a major determinant of drug resistance in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We have previously shown that mutant PfCRT transports the antimalarial drug chloroquine away from its target, whereas the wild-type form of PfCRT does not. However, little is understood about the transport of other drugs via PfCRT or the mechanism by which PfCRT recognizes different substrates. Here we show that mutant PfCRT also transports quinine, quinidine, and verapamil, indicating that the protein behaves as a multidrug resistance carrier. Detailed kinetic analyses revealed that chloroquine and quinine compete for transport via PfCRT in a manner that is consistent with mixed-type inhibition. Moreover, our analyses suggest that PfCRT accepts chloroquine and quinine at distinct but antagonistically interacting sites. We also found verapamil to be a partial mixed-type inhibitor of chloroquine transport via PfCRT, further supporting the idea that PfCRT possesses multiple substrate-binding sites. Our findings provide new mechanistic insights into the workings of PfCRT, which could be exploited to design potent inhibitors of this key mediator of drug resistance. PMID:25378409

  11. Poor quality vital anti-malarials in Africa - an urgent neglected public health priority

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a major public health problem. A vital component of malaria control rests on the availability of good quality artemisinin-derivative based combination therapy (ACT) at the correct dose. However, there are increasing reports of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Methods Seven collections of artemisinin derivative monotherapies, ACT and halofantrine anti-malarials of suspicious quality were collected in 2002/10 in eleven African countries and in Asia en route to Africa. Packaging, chemical composition (high performance liquid chromatography, direct ionization mass spectrometry, X-ray diffractometry, stable isotope analysis) and botanical investigations were performed. Results Counterfeit artesunate containing chloroquine, counterfeit dihydroartemisinin (DHA) containing paracetamol (acetaminophen), counterfeit DHA-piperaquine containing sildenafil, counterfeit artemether-lumefantrine containing pyrimethamine, counterfeit halofantrine containing artemisinin, and substandard/counterfeit or degraded artesunate and artesunate+amodiaquine in eight countries are described. Pollen analysis was consistent with manufacture of counterfeits in eastern Asia. These data do not allow estimation of the frequency of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Conclusions Criminals are producing diverse harmful anti-malarial counterfeits with important public health consequences. The presence of artesunate monotherapy, substandard and/or degraded and counterfeit medicines containing sub-therapeutic amounts of unexpected anti-malarials will engender drug resistance. With the threatening spread of artemisinin resistance to Africa, much greater investment is required to ensure the quality of ACTs and removal of artemisinin monotherapies. The International Health Regulations may need to be invoked to counter these serious public health problems. PMID:22152094

  12. Lysosomes as mediators of drug resistance in cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhitomirsky, Benny; Assaraf, Yehuda G

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance remains a leading cause of chemotherapeutic treatment failure and cancer-related mortality. While some mechanisms of anticancer drug resistance have been well characterized, multiple mechanisms remain elusive. In this respect, passive ion trapping-based lysosomal sequestration of multiple hydrophobic weak-base chemotherapeutic agents was found to reduce the accessibility of these drugs to their target sites, resulting in a markedly reduced cytotoxic effect and drug resistance. Recently we have demonstrated that lysosomal sequestration of hydrophobic weak base drugs triggers TFEB-mediated lysosomal biogenesis resulting in an enlarged lysosomal compartment, capable of enhanced drug sequestration. This study further showed that cancer cells with an increased number of drug-accumulating lysosomes are more resistant to lysosome-sequestered drugs, suggesting a model of drug-induced lysosome-mediated chemoresistance. In addition to passive drug sequestration of hydrophobic weak base chemotherapeutics, other mechanisms of lysosome-mediated drug resistance have also been reported; these include active lysosomal drug sequestration mediated by ATP-driven transporters from the ABC superfamily, and a role for lysosomal copper transporters in cancer resistance to platinum-based chemotherapeutics. Furthermore, lysosomal exocytosis was suggested as a mechanism to facilitate the clearance of chemotherapeutics which highly accumulated in lysosomes, thus providing an additional line of resistance, supplementing the organelle entrapment of chemotherapeutics away from their target sites. Along with these mechanisms of lysosome-mediated drug resistance, several approaches were recently developed for the overcoming of drug resistance or exploiting lysosomal drug sequestration, including lysosomal photodestruction and drug-induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization. In this review we explore the current literature addressing the role of lysosomes in mediating cancer drug

  13. Identification of drug-resistant subpopulations in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Khammanivong, A; Gorden, B H; Frantz, A M; Graef, A J; Dickerson, E B

    2016-09-01

    Canine hemangiosarcoma is a rapidly progressive disease that is poorly responsive to conventional chemotherapy. Despite numerous attempts to advance treatment options and improve outcomes, drug resistance remains a hurdle to successful therapy. To address this problem, we used recently characterized progenitor cell populations derived from canine hemangiosarcoma cell lines and grown as non-adherent spheres to identify potential drug resistance mechanisms as well as drug-resistant cell populations. Cells from sphere-forming cultures displayed enhanced resistance to chemotherapy drugs, expansion of dye-excluding side populations and altered ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression. Invasion studies demonstrated variability between cell lines as well as between sphere and monolayer cell populations. Collectively, our results suggest that sphere cell populations contain distinct subpopulations of drug-resistant cells that utilize multiple mechanisms to evade cytotoxic drugs. Our approach represents a new tool for the study of drug resistance in hemangiosarcoma, which could alter approaches for treating this disease. PMID:25112808

  14. Comprehensive Treatment of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitnick, Carole D.; Shin, Sonya S.; Seung, Kwonjune J.; Rich, Michael L.; Atwood, Sidney S.; Furin, Jennifer J.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Alcantara Viru, Felix A.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Bayona, Jaime N.; Bonilla, Cesar A.; Chalco, Katiuska; Choi, Sharon; Franke, Molly F.; Fraser, Hamish S.F.; Guerra, Dalia; Hurtado, Rocio M.; Jazayeri, Darius; Joseph, Keith; Llaro, Karim; Mestanza, Lorena; Mukherjee, Joia S.; Muñoz, Maribel; Palacios, Eda; Sanchez, Epifanio; Sloutsky, Alexander; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis has been reported in 45 countries, including countries with limited resources and a high burden of tuberculosis. We describe the management of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and treatment outcomes among patients who were referred for individualized outpatient therapy in Peru. METHODS A total of 810 patients were referred for free individualized therapy, including drug treatment, resective surgery, adverse-event management, and nutritional and psychosocial support. We tested isolates from 651 patients for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and developed regimens that included five or more drugs to which the infecting isolate was not resistant. RESULTS Of the 651 patients tested, 48 (7.4%) had extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis; the remaining 603 patients had multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis had undergone more treatment than the other patients (mean [±SD] number of regimens, 4.2±1.9 vs. 3.2±1.6; P<0.001) and had isolates that were resistant to more drugs (number of drugs, 8.4±1.1 vs. 5.3±1.5; P<0.001). None of the patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis were coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis received daily, supervised therapy with an average of 5.3±1.3 drugs, including cycloserine, an injectable drug, and a fluoroquinolone. Twenty-nine of these patients (60.4%) completed treatment or were cured, as compared with 400 patients (66.3%) with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (P=0.36). CONCLUSIONS Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis can be cured in HIV-negative patients through outpatient treatment, even in those who have received multiple prior courses of therapy for tuberculosis. PMID:18687637

  15. Young Women's Experiences of Resisting Invitations to Use Illicit Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehn, Corinne V.; O'Neill, Linda K.

    2011-01-01

    Ten young women were interviewed regarding their experiences of resisting invitations to use illicit drugs. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used to gather and analyze information. One key theme was the motivations that inspired women to refuse drug offers. Young women resisted drug invitations because of their desires to be authentic, protect their…

  16. Evaluation of Idaho's DARE "Drug Abuse Resistance Education Projects."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Roberta K.

    The goal of DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) is not to completely eliminate the drug and alcohol problems of society. It is a proactive prevention program designed to equip youth (focusing on elementary school) with skills for resisting peer pressure to experiment with drugs, and to manage anger without resorting to violence or the use of…

  17. Rural Adolescent Perceptions of Alcohol and Other Drug Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Jeanne E.

    2001-01-01

    Used questionnaires and focus groups to examine 361 rural high schoolers' perceptions of drug resistance difficulties when offered beer, marijuana, and hard drugs. Found that drug nonusers had the widest range of explanations for resistance difficulty. Peer pressure was cited most frequently by nonusers, and seldom by heavy users. Frequent users…

  18. Evaluation of Idaho's DARE "Drug Abuse Resistance Education" Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Roberta K.

    The DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) program teaches students decision-making skills, shows them how to resist peer pressure to experiment with drugs and alcohol, and provides positive alternatives to drug use. This report looks at one state's DARE programs. Included are an overview of the implementation process, a program appraisal with…

  19. Evaluation of the ex vivo antimalarial activity of organotin (IV) ethylphenyldithiocarbamate on erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium berghei NK 65.

    PubMed

    Awang, Normah; Jumat, Hafizah; Ishak, Shafariatul Akmar; Kamaludin, Nurul Farahana

    2014-06-01

    Malaria is the most destructive and dangerous parasitic disease. The commonness of this disease is getting worse mainly due to the increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum against antimalarial drugs. Therefore, the search for new antimalarial drug is urgently needed. This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of dibutyltin (IV) ethylphenyldithiocarbamate (DBEP), diphenyltin (IV) ethylphenyldithiocarbamate (DPEP) and triphenyltin (IV) ethylphenyldithiocarbamate (TPEP) compounds as antimalarial agents. These compounds were evaluated against erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 via ex vivo. Organotin (IV) ethylphenyldithiocarbamate, [R(n)Sn(C9H10NS2)(4-n)] with R = C4H9 and C6H5 for n = 2; R = C6H5 for n = 3 is chemically synthesised for its potential activities. pLDH assay was employed for determination of the concentration that inhibited 50% of the Plasmodium's activity (IC50) after 24 h treatment at concentration range of 10-0.0000001 mg mL(-1). Plasmodium berghei NK65 was cultured in vitro to determine the different morphology of trophozoite and schizont. Only DPEP and TPEP compounds have antimalarial activity towards P. berghei NK65 at IC50 0.094±0.011 and 0.892±0.088 mg mL(-1), respectively. The IC50 of DPEP and TPEP were lowest at 30% parasitemia with IC50 0.001±0.00009 and 0.0009±0.0001 mg mL(-1), respectively. In vitro culture showed that TPEP was effective towards P. berghei NK65 in trophozoite and schizont morphology with IC50 0.0001±0.00005 and 0.00009±0.00003 μg mL(-1), respectively. In conclusion, DPEP and TPEP have antimalarial effect on erythrocytes infected with P. berghei NK65 and have potential as antimalarial and schizonticidal agents. PMID:26035957

  20. Investigations of the effects of the antimalarial drug dihydroartemisinin (DHA) using the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX).

    PubMed

    Longo, Monica; Zanoncelli, Sara; Della Torre, Paola; Rosa, Francesco; Giusti, AnnaMaria; Colombo, Paolo; Brughera, Marco; Mazué, Guy; Olliaro, Piero

    2008-08-01

    Artemisinin derivatives are effective and safe drugs for treating malaria, but they are not recommended during the first trimester of pregnancy because of resorptions and abnormalities observed in animal reproduction studies. Previous studies in rats showed that artemisinin embryotoxicity derives from the depletion of primitive red blood cells (RBCs) over a narrow critical time window (gestation Days 9-14). In order to further investigate the susceptibility of primitive RBCs to artemisinins and to establish whether this susceptibility is species-specific or inherent to the compound, we studied dihydroartemisinin (DHA), both a drug in its own right and the main metabolite of current artemisinin derivatives in use, in the Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX). This model readily allows investigation and monitoring of primitive and definitive RBCs. Effects on frog larvae exposed to DHA for 48 h during early embryonic development, starting from 24 h post fertilization, were similar to those on rat embryos in terms of reduction in the number of primitive RBCs (clonally produced within the ventral blood island). In contrast, RBCs of older larvae (stage 47, produced at the definitive sites of hematopoiesis) were affected minimally and subsequently recovered. Compared to rat embryos, the frog larvae had no areas of necrosis but they shared similar heart defects. The mitochondrion appeared to be the main subcellular target, similar to observations in Plasmodium. These results implicate artemisinin-induced embryotoxicity through perturbation of metabolically active RBCs; whereas this mode of action does not appear to be species-specific, the stages of susceptibility varied between different species. The window of susceptibility and duration of exposure must be considered to evaluate the clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:18394862

  1. In vitro antimalarial activity of medicinal plant extracts against Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Bagavan, Asokan; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul; Kaushik, Naveen Kumar; Sahal, Dinkar

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is a major global public health problem, and the alarming spread of drug resistance and limited number of effective drugs now available underline how important it is to discover new antimalarial compounds. In the present study, ten plants were extracted with ethyl acetate and methanol and tested for their antimalarial activity against chloroquine (CQ)-sensitive (3D7) and CQ-resistant (Dd2 and INDO) strains of Plasmodium falciparum in culture using the fluorescence-based SYBR Green assay. Plant extracts showed moderate to good antiparasitic effects. Promising antiplasmodial activity was found in the extracts from two plants, Phyllanthus emblica leaf 50% inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) 3D7: 7.25 μg/mL (ethyl acetate extract), 3.125 μg/mL (methanol extract), and Syzygium aromaticum flower bud, IC₅₀ 3D7:13 μg/mL, (ethyl acetate extract) and 6.25 μg/mL (methanol extract). Moderate activity (30-75 μg/mL) was found in the ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Abrus precatorius (seed) and Gloriosa superba (leaf); leaf ethyl acetate extracts of Annona squamosa and flower of Musa paradisiaca. The above mentioned plant extracts were also found to be active against CQ-resistant strains (Dd2 and INDO). Cytotoxicity study with P. emblica leaf and S. aromaticum flower bud, extracts showed good therapeutic indices. These results demonstrate that leaf ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of P. emblica and flower bud extract of S. aromaticum may serve as antimalarial agents even in their crude form. The isolation of compounds from P. emblica and S. aromaticum seems to be of special interest for further antimalarial studies. PMID:20809417

  2. Antimalarial activity of tropical Meliaceae extracts and gedunin derivatives.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, S; Durst, T; Arnason, J T; Angerhofer, C; Pezzuto, J; Sanchez-Vindas, P E; Poveda, L J; Gbeassor, M

    1997-04-01

    Extracts of 22 species of Meliaceae were examined for antimalarial activity using in vitro tests with two clones of Plasmodium falciparum, one sensitive to chloroquine (W2) and one chloroquine-resistant (D6). Twelve extracts were found to have activity, including extracts of Cedrela odorata wood and Azadirachta indica leaves, which contained the limonoid gedunin. These extracts were more effective against the W2 clone than the D6 clone, suggesting there is no cross-resistance to chloroquine. Gedunin was extracted in quantity, and nine derivatives prepared for a structure-activity study, which revealed essential functionalities for activity. The study also included four other limonoids derived from related Meliaceae. Only gedunin had better activity than chloroquine against the W2 clone. This active principle could be used to standardize a popular crude drug based on traditional use of A. indica in West Africa. PMID:9134742

  3. Active case detection, treatment of falciparum malaria with combined chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and vivax malaria with chloroquine and molecular markers of anti-malarial resistance in the Republic of Vanuatu

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum was first described in the Republic of Vanuatu in the early 1980s. In 1991, the Vanuatu Ministry of Health instituted new treatment guidelines for uncomplicated P. falciparum infection consisting of chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine combination therapy. Chloroquine remains the recommended treatment for Plasmodium vivax. Methods In 2005, cross-sectional blood surveys at 45 sites on Malo Island were conducted and 4,060 adults and children screened for malaria. Of those screened, 203 volunteer study subjects without malaria at the time of screening were followed for 13 weeks to observe peak seasonal incidence of infection. Another 54 subjects with malaria were followed over a 28-day period to determine efficacy of anti-malarial therapy; chloroquine alone for P. vivax and chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for P. falciparum infections. Results The overall prevalence of parasitaemia by mass blood screening was 6%, equally divided between P. falciparum and P. vivax. Twenty percent and 23% of participants with patent P. vivax and P. falciparum parasitaemia, respectively, were febrile at the time of screening. In the incidence study cohort, after 2,303 person-weeks of follow-up, the incidence density of malaria was 1.3 cases per person-year with P. vivax predominating. Among individuals participating in the clinical trial, the 28-day chloroquine P. vivax cure rate was 100%. The 28-day chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine P. falciparum cure rate was 97%. The single treatment failure, confirmed by merozoite surface protein-2 genotyping, was classified as a day 28 late parasitological treatment failure. All P. falciparum isolates carried the Thr-76 pfcrt mutant allele and the double Asn-108 + Arg-59 dhfr mutant alleles. Dhps mutant alleles were not detected in the study sample. Conclusion Peak seasonal malaria prevalence on Malo Island reached hypoendemic levels during the study observation period. The only in

  4. Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, enlarge the parasite’s food vacuole and alter drug sensitivities

    PubMed Central

    Pulcini, Serena; Staines, Henry M.; Lee, Andrew H.; Shafik, Sarah H.; Bouyer, Guillaume; Moore, Catherine M.; Daley, Daniel A.; Hoke, Matthew J.; Altenhofen, Lindsey M.; Painter, Heather J.; Mu, Jianbing; Ferguson, David J. P.; Llinás, Manuel; Martin, Rowena E.; Fidock, David A.; Cooper, Roland A.; Krishna, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter, PfCRT, are the major determinant of chloroquine resistance in this lethal human malaria parasite. Here, we describe P. falciparum lines subjected to selection by amantadine or blasticidin that carry PfCRT mutations (C101F or L272F), causing the development of enlarged food vacuoles. These parasites also have increased sensitivity to chloroquine and some other quinoline antimalarials, but exhibit no or minimal change in sensitivity to artemisinins, when compared with parental strains. A transgenic parasite line expressing the L272F variant of PfCRT confirmed this increased chloroquine sensitivity and enlarged food vacuole phenotype. Furthermore, the introduction of the C101F or L272F mutation into a chloroquine-resistant variant of PfCRT reduced the ability of this protein to transport chloroquine by approximately 93 and 82%, respectively, when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These data provide, at least in part, a mechanistic explanation for the increased sensitivity of the mutant parasite lines to chloroquine. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into PfCRT function and PfCRT-mediated drug resistance, as well as the food vacuole, which is an important target of many antimalarial drugs. PMID:26420308

  5. Assessing the cost-benefit effect of a Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance mutation on parasite growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fröberg, Gabrielle; Ferreira, Pedro Eduardo; Mårtensson, Andreas; Ali, Abdullah; Björkman, Anders; Gil, José Pedro

    2013-02-01

    Plasmodium falciparum mutations associated with antimalarial resistance may be beneficial for parasites under drug pressure, although they may also cause a fitness cost. We herein present an in vitro model showing how this combined effect on parasite growth varies with the drug concentration and suggest a calculated drug-specific cost-benefit index, indicating the possible advantage for mutated parasites. We specifically studied the D-to-Y change at position 1246 encoded by the pfmdr1 gene (pfmdr1 D1246Y) in relation to amodiaquine resistance. Susceptibilities to amodiaquine, desethylamodiaquine, and chloroquine, as well as relative fitness, were determined for two modified isogenic P. falciparum clones differing only in the pfmdr1 1246 position. Data were used to create a new comparative graph of relative growth in relation to the drug concentration and to calculate the ratio between the benefit of resistance and the fitness cost. Results were related to an in vivo allele selection analysis after amodiaquine or artesunate-amodiaquine treatment. pfmdr1 1246Y was associated with decreased susceptibility to amodiaquine and desethylamodiaquine but at a growth fitness cost of 11%. Mutated parasites grew less in low drug concentrations due to a predominating fitness cost, but beyond a breakpoint concentration they grew more due to a predominating benefit of increased resistance. The cost-benefit indexes indicated that pfmdr1 1246Y was most advantageous for amodiaquine-exposed parasites. In vivo, a first drug selection of mutant parasites followed by a fitness selection of wild-type parasites supported the in vitro data. This cost-benefit model may predict the risk for selection of drug resistance mutations in different malaria transmission settings. PMID:23208719

  6. Assessing the Cost-Benefit Effect of a Plasmodium falciparum Drug Resistance Mutation on Parasite Growth In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Pedro Eduardo; Mårtensson, Andreas; Ali, Abdullah; Björkman, Anders; Gil, José Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum mutations associated with antimalarial resistance may be beneficial for parasites under drug pressure, although they may also cause a fitness cost. We herein present an in vitro model showing how this combined effect on parasite growth varies with the drug concentration and suggest a calculated drug-specific cost-benefit index, indicating the possible advantage for mutated parasites. We specifically studied the D-to-Y change at position 1246 encoded by the pfmdr1 gene (pfmdr1 D1246Y) in relation to amodiaquine resistance. Susceptibilities to amodiaquine, desethylamodiaquine, and chloroquine, as well as relative fitness, were determined for two modified isogenic P. falciparum clones differing only in the pfmdr1 1246 position. Data were used to create a new comparative graph of relative growth in relation to the drug concentration and to calculate the ratio between the benefit of resistance and the fitness cost. Results were related to an in vivo allele selection analysis after amodiaquine or artesunate-amodiaquine treatment. pfmdr1 1246Y was associated with decreased susceptibility to amodiaquine and desethylamodiaquine but at a growth fitness cost of 11%. Mutated parasites grew less in low drug concentrations due to a predominating fitness cost, but beyond a breakpoint concentration they grew more due to a predominating benefit of increased resistance. The cost-benefit indexes indicated that pfmdr1 1246Y was most advantageous for amodiaquine-exposed parasites. In vivo, a first drug selection of mutant parasites followed by a fitness selection of wild-type parasites supported the in vitro data. This cost-benefit model may predict the risk for selection of drug resistance mutations in different malaria transmission settings. PMID:23208719

  7. Economic access to effective drugs for falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Panosian, Claire B

    2005-03-01

    The increasing death toll from drug-resistant falciparum malaria is cause for international concern. In 2002, the US Agency for International Development commissioned the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to recommend global actions to ensure the broadest possible access to new, effective antimalarial treatments. In a report issued in 2004, the IOM Committee on Economics of Antimalarial Drugs recommended a global subsidy of 300 million dollars to 500 million dollars per year to replace increasingly ineffective drugs with coformulated artemisinin combination treatments to be distributed through public and private channels in affected areas. This approach allows the existing market to support the switch to new drugs and keeps treatment costs for consumers at levels similar to the current price of chloroquine. The leverage of an international subsidy of combination therapy can also discourage the distribution of monotherapies (such as solo artemisinins), the use of which might foster increasing resistance to antimalarial drugs in the future. PMID:15714418

  8. Cytokines in cancer drug resistance: Cues to new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Valerie Sloane; Huang, Ren-Yu; Chen, Li-Pai; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Fu, Liwu; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2016-04-01

    The development of oncoprotein-targeted anticancer drugs is an invaluable weapon in the war against cancer. However, cancers do not give up without a fight. They may develop multiple mechanisms of drug resistance, including apoptosis inhibition, drug expulsion, and increased proliferation that reduce the effectiveness of the drug. The collective work of researchers has highlighted the role of cytokines in the mechanisms of cancer drug resistance, as well as in cancer cell progression. Furthermore, recent studies have described how specific cytokines secreted by cancer stromal cells confer resistance to chemotherapeutic treatments. In order to gain a better understanding of mechanism of cancer drug resistance and a prediction of treatment outcome, it is imperative that correlations are established between global cytokine profiles and cancer drug resistance. Here we discuss the recent discoveries in this field of research and discuss their implications for the future development of effective anti-cancer medicines. PMID:26993403

  9. Stop the Spread of Superbugs: Help Fight Drug Resistant Bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Spread of Superbugs Help Fight Drug-Resistant Bacteria For nearly a century, bacteria-fighting drugs known as antibiotics have helped to control and destroy many of the harmful bacteria that can make us sick. But in recent ...

  10. Nanomedicine therapeutic approaches to overcome cancer drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Markman, Janet L; Rekechenetskiy, Arthur; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y

    2013-11-01

    Nanomedicine is an emerging form of therapy that focuses on alternative drug delivery and improvement of the treatment efficacy while reducing detrimental side effects to normal tissues. Cancer drug resistance is a complicated process that involves multiple mechanisms. Here we discuss the major forms of drug resistance and the new possibilities that nanomedicines offer to overcome these treatment obstacles. Novel nanomedicines that have a high ability for flexible, fast drug design and production based on tumor genetic profiles can be created making drug selection for personal patient treatment much more intensive and effective. This review aims to demonstrate the advantage of the young medical science field, nanomedicine, for overcoming cancer drug resistance. With the advanced design and alternative mechanisms of drug delivery known for different nanodrugs including liposomes, polymer conjugates, micelles, dendrimers, carbon-based, and metallic nanoparticles, overcoming various forms of multi-drug resistance looks promising and opens new horizons for cancer treatment. PMID:24120656

  11. Identifying antimalarial compounds targeting dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) by chemogenomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Aroonsri, Aiyada; Akinola, Olugbenga; Posayapisit, Navaporn; Songsungthong, Warangkhana; Uthaipibull, Chairat; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Gbotosho, Grace O; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Shaw, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    The mode of action of many antimalarial drugs is unknown. Chemogenomic profiling is a powerful method to address this issue. This experimental approach entails disruption of gene function and phenotypic screening for changes in sensitivity to bioactive compounds. Here, we describe the application of reverse genetics for chemogenomic profiling in Plasmodium. Plasmodium falciparum parasites harbouring a transgenic insertion of the glmS ribozyme downstream of the dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) gene were used for chemogenomic profiling of antimalarial compounds to identify those which target DHFR-TS. DHFR-TS expression can be attenuated by exposing parasites to glucosamine. Parasites with attenuated DHFR-TS expression were significantly more sensitive to antifolate drugs known to target DHFR-TS. In contrast, no change in sensitivity to other antimalarial drugs with different modes of action was observed. Chemogenomic profiling was performed using the Medicines for Malaria Venture (Switzerland) Malaria Box compound library, and two compounds were identified as novel DHFR-TS inhibitors. We also tested the glmS ribozyme in Plasmodium berghei, a rodent malaria parasite. The expression of reporter genes with downstream glmS ribozyme could be attenuated in transgenic parasites comparable with that obtained in P. falciparum. The chemogenomic profiling method was applied in a P. berghei line expressing a pyrimethamine-resistant Toxoplasma gondii DHFR-TS reporter gene under glmS ribozyme control. Parasites with attenuated expression of this gene were significantly sensitised to antifolates targeting DHFR-TS, but not other drugs with different modes of action. In conclusion, these data show that the glmS ribozyme reverse genetic tool can be applied for identifying primary targets of antimalarial compounds in human and rodent malaria parasites. PMID:27150044

  12. Incorporation of an Intramolecular Hydrogen-bonding Motif in the Side-Chain of 4-Aminoquinolines Enhances Activity against Drug-Resistant P. falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Madrid, Peter B.; Liou, Ally P.; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Guy, R. Kiplin

    2006-01-01

    Previous data showing that several chloroquine analogs containing an intramolecular hydrogen bonding motif were potent against multidrug-resistant P. falciparum, led to the exploration of the importance of this motif. A series of 116 compounds containing four different alkyl linkers and various aromatic substitutions with hydrogen bond accepting capability was synthesized. The series showed broad potency against the drug-resistant W2 strain of P. falciparum. In particular, a novel series containing variations of the α-aminocresol motif gave 8 compounds with IC50's more potent than 5 nM against the W2 strain. Such simple modifications, significantly altering the pKa and sterics of the basic side chain in chloroquine analogs, may prove to be part of a strategy for overcoming the problem of worldwide resistance to affordable antimalarial drugs. PMID:16854059

  13. Mechanisms of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: update 2015.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Yew, W-W

    2015-11-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB), including multi- and extensively drug-resistant TB, is posing a significant challenge to effective treatment and TB control worldwide. New progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. This review provides an update on the major advances in drug resistance mechanisms since the previous publication in 2009, as well as added information on mechanisms of resistance to new drugs and repurposed agents. The recent application of whole genome sequencing technologies has provided new insight into the mechanisms and complexity of drug resistance. However, further research is needed to address the significance of newly discovered gene mutations in causing drug resistance. Improved knowledge of drug resistance mechanisms will help understand the mechanisms of action of the drugs, devise better molecular diagnostic tests for more effective DR-TB management (and for personalised treatment), and facilitate the development of new drugs to improve the treatment of this disease. PMID:26467578

  14. Klebsiella pneumoniae Antimicrobial Drug Resistance, United States, 1998–2010

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Guillermo V.; Master, Ronald N.; Clark, Richard B.; Fyyaz, Madiha; Duvvuri, Padmaraj; Ekta, Gupta

    2013-01-01

    We studied antimicrobial-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae for 1998–2010 by using data from The Surveillance Network. Susceptibility results (n = 3,132,354) demonstrated significant increases in resistance to all antimicrobial drugs studied, except tetracycline. Cross-resistance among carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae was lower for tetracycline and amikacin. PMID:23260464

  15. Antimalarial dyes revisited: xanthenes, azines, oxazines, and thiazines.

    PubMed Central

    Vennerstrom, J L; Makler, M T; Angerhofer, C K; Williams, J A

    1995-01-01

    In 1891 Guttmann and Ehrlich (P. Guttmann and P. Ehrlich, Berlin Klin. Wochenschr. 28:953-956, 1891) were the first to report the antimalarial properties of a synthetic, rather than a natural, material when they described the clinical cure of two patients after oral administration of a thiazine dye, methylene blue. Since that time, sporadic reports of the antimalarial properties of several xanthene and azine dyes related to methylene blue have been noted. We report here the results from a reexamination of the antimalarial properties of methylene blue. Janus green B, and three rhodamine dyes and disclose new antimalarial data for 16 commercially available structural analogs of these dyes. The 50% inhibitory concentrations for the chloroquine-susceptible D6 clone and SN isolate and the chloroquine-resistant W2 clone of Plasmodium falciparum were determined by the recently described parasite lactate dehydrogenase enzyme assay. No cross-resistance to chloroquine was observed for any of the dyes. For the 21 dyes tested, no correlation was observed between antimalarial activity and cytotoxicity against KB cells. No correlation between log P (where P is the octanol/water partition coefficient) or relative catalyst efficiency for glucose oxidation and antimalarial activity or cytotoxicity was observed for the dyes as a whole or for the thiazine dyes. The thiazine dyes were the most uniformly potent structural class tested, and among the dyes in this class, methylene blue was notable for both its high antimalarial potency and selectivity. PMID:8593000

  16. The counterfeit anti-malarial is a crime against humanity: a systematic review of the scientific evidence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The counterfeiting of anti-malarials represents a form of attack on global public health in which fake and substandard anti-malarials serve as de facto weapons of mass destruction, particularly in resource-constrained endemic settings, where malaria causes nearly 660,000 preventable deaths and threatens millions of lives annually. It has been estimated that fake anti-malarials contribute to nearly 450,000 preventable deaths every year. This crime against humanity is often underestimated or ignored. This study attempts to describe and characterize the direct and indirect effects of counterfeit anti-malarials on public health, clinical care and socio-economic conditions. Methods A search was performed using key databases, WHO documents, and English language search engines. Of 262 potential articles that were identified using a fixed set of criteria, a convenience sample of 105 appropriate articles was selected for this review. Results Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is an important tool in the fight against malaria, but a sizable number of patients are unable to afford to this first-line treatment. Consequently, patients tend to procure cheaper anti-malarials, which may be fake or substandard. Forensic palynology reveals that counterfeits originate in Asia. Fragile drug regulations, ineffective law-enforcement agencies and corruption further burden ailing healthcare facilities. Substandard/fake anti-malarials can cause (a) economic sabotage; (b) therapeutic failure; (c) increased risk of the emergence and spread of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax; (d) an undermining of trust/confidence in healthcare stakeholders/systems; and, (e) serious side effects or death. Conclusion Combating counterfeit anti-malarials is a complex task due to limited resources and poor techniques for the detection and identification of fake anti-malarials. This situation calls for sustainable, global, scientific research and policy change

  17. Adverse drug events resulting from use of drugs with sulphonamide-containing anti-malarials and artemisinin-based ingredients: findings on incidence and household costs from three districts with routine demographic surveillance systems in rural Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anti-malarial regimens containing sulphonamide or artemisinin ingredients are widely used in malaria-endemic countries. However, evidence of the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADR) to these drugs is limited, especially in Africa, and there is a complete absence of information on the economic burden such ADR place on patients. This study aimed to document ADR incidence and associated household costs in three high malaria transmission districts in rural Tanzania covered by demographic surveillance systems. Methods Active and passive surveillance methods were used to identify ADR from sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and artemisinin (AS) use. ADR were identified by trained clinicians at health facilities (passive surveillance) and through cross-sectional household surveys (active surveillance). Potential cases were followed up at home, where a complete history and physical examination was undertaken, and household cost data collected. Patients were classified as having ‘possible’ or ‘probable’ ADR by a physician. Results A total of 95 suspected ADR were identified during a two-year period, of which 79 were traced, and 67 reported use of SP and/or AS prior to ADR onset. Thirty-four cases were classified as ‘probable’ and 33 as ‘possible’ ADRs. Most (53) cases were associated with SP monotherapy, 13 with the AS/SP combination (available in one of the two areas only), and one with AS monotherapy. Annual ADR incidence per 100,000 exposures was estimated based on ‘probable’ ADR only at 5.6 for AS/SP in combination, and 25.0 and 11.6 for SP monotherapy. Median ADR treatment costs per episode ranged from US$2.23 for those making a single provider visit to US$146.93 for patients with four visits. Seventy-three per cent of patients used out-of-pocket funds or sold part of their farm harvests to pay for treatment, and 19% borrowed money. Conclusion Both passive and active surveillance methods proved feasible methods for anti-malarial ADR

  18. In vitro inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum by substances isolated from Amazonian antimalarial plants.

    PubMed

    de Andrade-Neto, Valter F; Pohlit, Adrian M; Pinto, Ana Cristina S; Silva, Ellen Cristina C; Nogueira, Karla L; Melo, Márcia R S; Henrique, Marycleuma C; Amorim, Rodrigo C N; Silva, Luis Francisco R; Costa, Mônica R F; Nunomura, Rita C S; Nunomura, Sergio M; Alecrim, Wilson D; Alecrim, M das Graças C; Chaves, F Célio M; Vieira, Pedro Paulo R

    2007-06-01

    In the present study, a quassinoid, neosergeolide, isolated from the roots and stems of Picrolemma sprucei (Simaroubaceae), the indole alkaloids ellipticine and aspidocarpine, isolated from the bark of Aspidosperma vargasii and A. desmanthum (Apocynaceae), respectively, and 4-nerolidylcatechol, isolated from the roots of Pothomorphe peltata (Piperaceae), all presented significant in vitro inhibition (more active than quinine and chloroquine) of the multi-drug resistant K1 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Neosergeolide presented activity in the nanomolar range. This is the first report on the antimalarial activity of these known, natural compounds. This is also the first report on the isolation of aspidocarpine from A. desmanthum. These compounds are good candidates for pre-clinical tests as novel lead structures with the aim of finding new antimalarial prototypes and lend support to the traditional use of the plants from which these compounds are derived. PMID:17568942

  19. Inhibition of cytochrome bc1 as a strategy for single-dose, multi-stage antimalarial therapy.

    PubMed

    Stickles, Allison M; Ting, Li-Min; Morrisey, Joanne M; Li, Yuexin; Mather, Michael W; Meermeier, Erin; Pershing, April M; Forquer, Isaac P; Miley, Galen P; Pou, Sovitj; Winter, Rolf W; Hinrichs, David J; Kelly, Jane X; Kim, Kami; Vaidya, Akhil B; Riscoe, Michael K; Nilsen, Aaron

    2015-06-01

    Single-dose therapies for malaria have been proposed as a way to reduce the cost and increase the effectiveness of antimalarial treatment. However, no compound to date has shown single-dose activity against both the blood-stage Plasmodium parasites that cause disease and the liver-stage parasites that initiate malaria infection. Here, we describe a subset of cytochrome bc1 (cyt bc1) inhibitors, including the novel 4(1H)-quinolone ELQ-400, with single-dose activity against liver, blood, and transmission-stage parasites in mouse models of malaria. Although cyt bc1 inhibitors are generally classified as slow-onset antimalarials, we found that a single dose of ELQ-400 rapidly induced stasis in blood-stage parasites, which was associated with a rapid reduction in parasitemia in vivo. ELQ-400 also exhibited a low propensity for drug resistance and was active against atovaquone-resistant P. falciparum strains with point mutations in cyt bc1. Ultimately, ELQ-400 shows that cyt bc1 inhibitors can function as single-dose, blood-stage antimalarials and is the first compound to provide combined treatment, prophylaxis, and transmission blocking activity for malaria after a single oral administration. This remarkable multi-stage efficacy suggests that metabolic therapies, including cyt bc1 inhibitors, may be valuable additions to the collection of single-dose antimalarials in current development. PMID:25918204

  20. Inhibition of Cytochrome bc1 as a Strategy for Single-Dose, Multi-Stage Antimalarial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stickles, Allison M.; Ting, Li-Min; Morrisey, Joanne M.; Li, Yuexin; Mather, Michael W.; Meermeier, Erin; Pershing, April M.; Forquer, Isaac P.; Miley, Galen P.; Pou, Sovitj; Winter, Rolf W.; Hinrichs, David J.; Kelly, Jane X.; Kim, Kami; Vaidya, Akhil B.; Riscoe, Michael K.; Nilsen, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Single-dose therapies for malaria have been proposed as a way to reduce the cost and increase the effectiveness of antimalarial treatment. However, no compound to date has shown single-dose activity against both the blood-stage Plasmodium parasites that cause disease and the liver-stage parasites that initiate malaria infection. Here, we describe a subset of cytochrome bc1 (cyt bc1) inhibitors, including the novel 4(1H)-quinolone ELQ-400, with single-dose activity against liver, blood, and transmission-stage parasites in mouse models of malaria. Although cyt bc1 inhibitors are generally classified as slow-onset antimalarials, we found that a single dose of ELQ-400 rapidly induced stasis in blood-stage parasites, which was associated with a rapid reduction in parasitemia in vivo. ELQ-400 also exhibited a low propensity for drug resistance and was active against atovaquone-resistant P. falciparum strains with point mutations in cyt bc1. Ultimately, ELQ-400 shows that cyt bc1 inhibitors can function as single-dose, blood-stage antimalarials and is the first compound to provide combined treatment, prophylaxis, and transmission blocking activity for malaria after a single oral administration. This remarkable multi-stage efficacy suggests that metabolic therapies, including cyt bc1 inhibitors, may be valuable additions to the collection of single-dose antimalarials in current development. PMID:25918204

  1. In vitro antimalarial activity of extracts of some plants from a biological reserve in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Chinchilla, Misael; Valerio, Idalia; Sánchez, Ronald; Mora, Víctor; Bagnarello, Vanessa; Martínez, Laura; Gonzalez, Antonieta; Vanegas, Juan Carlos; Apestegui, Alvaro

    2012-06-01

    Treatment with the usual antimalarial drugs, have induced parasite resistance, reinforcing the need to finding natural antimalarial components that would be found on plants from the forest. Therefore, we decided to look for these components in Costa Rican plants from a protected forest area. Fresh and dry extracts of roots, bark, leaves, flowers and fruits of 25 plants from a biological reserve in Costa Rica, Reserva Biol6gica Alberto Manuel Brenes (REBAMB), were studied in vitro for the presence of substances with antimalarial activity. By studying the inhibition of P berghei schizogony, we assessed the antimalarial activity of several plant extracts: Aphelandra aurantiaca, A. tridentata (Acanthaceae); Xanthosoma undipes (Araceae); Iriartea deltoidea (Arecaceae); Neurolaena lobata (Asteraceae); Senna papillosa, Pterocarpus hayessi, Lonchocarpus pentaphyllus (Fabaceae); Nectandra membranacea, Persea povedae, Cinamomum chavarrianum (Lauraceae); Hampea appendiculata (Malvaceae); Ruagea glabra, Guarea glabra (Meliaceae); Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae); Bocconia frutescens (Papaveraceae); Piper friedrichsthalii (Piperaceae); Clematis dioica (Ranunculaceae); Prunus annularis (Rosaceae); Siparuna thecaphora (Siparunaceae); Solanum arboreum, Witheringia solanacea (Solanaceae); Ticodendrum incognitum (Ticodendraceae); Heliocarpus appendiculatus (Tiliaceae) and Myriocarpa longipes (Urticaceae). We used different parts of the plants as well as fresh and dried extracts for testing IC50. The solid content of the extracts ranged from 1-71.9 microg/mL. The fresh extracts showed stronger activity than the dry ones. Since the plants showing the strongest antimalarial activity are very common in Central America, and some similar genera of these plants have shown positives results in South America, we considered important to present these findings for discussion. On the other hand, this is the first systematic study of this kind ever realized in a circumscribed and protected area of

  2. Crystal structures of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease in complex with two potent anti-malarial compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Woster, Patrick M.; Kovari, Ladislau C.; Gupta, Deepak

    2012-06-19

    Two potent inhibitors (compounds 1 and 2) of malarial aspartyl protease, plasmepsin-II, were evaluated against wild type (NL4-3) and multidrug-resistant clinical isolate 769 (MDR) variants of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) aspartyl protease. Enzyme inhibition assays showed that both 1 and 2 have better potency against NL4-3 than against MDR protease. Crystal structures of MDR protease in complex with 1 and 2 were solved and analyzed. Crystallographic analysis revealed that the MDR protease exhibits a typical wide-open conformation of the flaps (Gly48 to Gly52) causing an overall expansion in the active site cavity, which, in turn caused unstable binding of the inhibitors. Due to the expansion of the active site cavity, both compounds showed loss of direct contacts with the MDR protease compared to the docking models of NL4-3. Multiple water molecules showed a rich network of hydrogen bonds contributing to the stability of the ligand binding in the distorted binding pockets of the MDR protease in both crystal structures. Docking analysis of 1 and 2 showed a decrease in the binding affinity for both compounds against MDR supporting our structure-function studies. Thus, compounds 1 and 2 show promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 protease variants and hence are good candidates for further development to enhance their potency against NL4-3 as well as MDR HIV-1 protease variants.

  3. New approaches for understanding mechanisms of drug resistance in schistosomes

    PubMed Central

    GREENBERG, ROBERT M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Schistosomes are parasitic flatworms that cause schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease that affects hundreds of millions worldwide. Treatment and control of schistosomiasis relies almost entirely on the single drug praziquantel (PZQ), making the prospect of emerging drug resistance particularly worrisome. This review will survey reports of PZQ (and other drug) resistance in schistosomes and other platyhelminths, and explore mechanisms by which drug resistance might develop. Newer genomic and post-genomic strategies that offer the promise of better understanding of how drug resistance might arise in these organisms will be discussed. These approaches could also lead to insights into the mode of action of these drugs and potentially provide markers for monitoring the emergence of resistance. PMID:23552512

  4. Public health implications of antiretroviral therapy and HIV drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wainberg, M A; Friedland, G

    1998-06-24

    Widespread use of antiretroviral agents and increasing occurrence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) strains resistant to these drugs have given rise to a number of important issues. Some of these concerns are distinct from the obvious question of the relationship between drug resistance and treatment failure and have potentially widespread public health implications. The relevant issues include but are not limited to the following: (1) frequency with which drug-resistant virus may be transmitted via sexual, intravenous, or mother-to-child routes; (2) ability of drug-resistant variants to be transmitted, a question that relates, in part, to the relative fitness of such strains; (3) effectiveness of antiviral therapy in diminishing viral burden in both blood and genital secretions, and whether this may be compromised in persons harboring resistant virus; and (4) importance of patient adherence to antiviral therapy and its relationship to sustained reduction in viral load to minimize the appearance in and transmission of drug-resistant virus from both blood and genital secretions. Thus, prevention of both development of HIV drug resistance as well as transmission of drug-resistant variants is a central issue of public health importance. Unless this topic is appropriately addressed, the likelihood is that drug-resistant variants of HIV, if able to successfully replicate, will sustain the epidemic and limit the effectiveness of antiviral therapy. PMID:9643862

  5. Mutational Pathway Determines Whether Drug Gradients Accelerate Evolution of Drug-Resistant Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greulich, Philip; Waclaw, Bartłomiej; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2012-08-01

    Drug gradients are believed to play an important role in the evolution of bacteria resistant to antibiotics and tumors resistant to anticancer drugs. We use a statistical physics model to study the evolution of a population of malignant cells exposed to drug gradients, where drug resistance emerges via a mutational pathway involving multiple mutations. We show that a nonuniform drug distribution has the potential to accelerate the emergence of resistance when the mutational pathway involves a long sequence of mutants with increasing resistance, but if the pathway is short or crosses a fitness valley, the evolution of resistance may actually be slowed down by drug gradients. These predictions can be verified experimentally, and may help to improve strategies for combating the emergence of resistance.

  6. Efficacy of antimalarial treatment in Guinea: in vivo study of two artemisinin combination therapies in Dabola and molecular markers of resistance to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine in N'Zérékoré

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Maryline; Roper, Cally; Félix, Martine; Coulibaly, Léonie; Kankolongo, Gabriel Mufuta; Guthmann, Jean Paul

    2007-01-01

    Background In the last five years, countries have been faced with changing their malaria treatment policy to an artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), many with no national data on which to base their decision. This is particularly true for a number of West African countries, including Guinea, where these studies were performed. Two studies were conducted in 2004/2005 in programmes supported by Medecins Sans Frontieres, when chloroquine was still national policy, but artesunate (AS)/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) had been used in refugee camps for two years. Methods In Dabola (central Guinea), 220 children aged 6–59 months with falciparum malaria were randomized to receive either AS/amodiaquine (AQ) or AS/SP. In vivo efficacy was assessed following the 2003 World Health Organization guidelines. In a refugee camp in Laine (south of Guinea), where an in vivo study was not feasible due to the unstable context, a molecular genotyping study in 160 patients assessed the prevalence of mutations in the dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) (codons 108, 51, 59) and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) (codons 436, 437, 540) genes of Plasmodium falciparum, which have been associated with resistance to pyrimethamine and sulphadoxine, respectively. Results In Dabola, after 28 days of follow-up, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)-adjusted failure rates were 1.0% (95%CI 0–5.3) for AS/AQ and 1.0% (95%CI 0–5.5) for AS/SP. In the refugee camp in Laine, the molecular genotyping study found three dhfr mutations in 85.6% (95%CI 79.2–90.7) patients and quintuple dhfr/dhps mutations in 9.6% (95%CI 5.2–15.9). Conclusion Both AS/AQ and AS/SP are highly efficacious in Dabola, whereas there is molecular evidence of established SP resistance in Laine. This supports the choice of the national programme of Guinea to adopt AS/AQ as first line antimalarial treatment. The results highlight the difficulties faced by control programmes, which have gone through the upheaval of implementing ACTs

  7. Antimalarial activity of Malaysian Plectranthus amboinicus against Plasmodium berghei

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Norazsida; Ahamed, Pakeer Oothuman Syed; Elhady, Hassan Mohamed; Taher, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Context: Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by parasitic protozoa from the genus of Plasmodium. The protozoans have developed resistance against many of current drugs. It is urgent to find an alternative source of new antimalarial agent. In the effort to discover new antimalarial agents, this research has been conducted on Plectranthus amboinicus. Aims: This study was conducted to evaluate the toxicity and antiplasmodial properties of P. amboinicus. Materials and Methods: Acute oral toxicity dose at 5000 mg/kg was conducted to evaluate the safety of this extract. Twenty mice were divided into control and experimental group. All the mice were observed for signs of toxicity, mortality, weight changes and histopathological changes. Antimalarial activity of different extract doses of 50, 200, 400 and 1000 mg/kg were tested in vivo against Plasmodium berghei infections in mice (five mice for each group) during early, established and residual infections. Results: The acute oral toxicity test revealed that no mortality or evidence of adverse effects was seen in the treated mice. The extract significantly reduced the parasitemia by the 50 (P = 0.000), 200 (P = 0.000) and 400 mg/kg doses (P = 0.000) in the in vivo prophylactic assay. The percentage chemo-suppression was calculated as 83.33% for 50 mg/kg dose, 75.62% for 200 mg/kg dose and 90.74% for 400 mg/kg dose. Body weight of all treated groups; T1, T2, T3 and T4 also showed enhancement after 7 days posttreatment. Statistically no reduction of parasitemia calculated for curative and suppressive test. Conclusion: Thus, this extract may give a promising agent to be used as a prophylactic agent of P. berghei infection. PMID:25276063

  8. Basigin is a druggable target for host-oriented antimalarial interventions.

    PubMed

    Zenonos, Zenon A; Dummler, Sara K; Müller-Sienerth, Nicole; Chen, Jianzhu; Preiser, Peter R; Rayner, Julian C; Wright, Gavin J

    2015-07-27

    Plasmodium falciparum is the parasite responsible for the most lethal form of malaria, an infectious disease that causes a large proportion of childhood deaths and poses a significant barrier to socioeconomic development in many countries. Although antimalarial drugs exist, the repeated emergence and spread of drug-resistant parasites limit their useful lifespan. An alternative strategy that could limit the evolution of drug-resistant parasites is to target host factors that are essential and universally required for parasite growth. Host-targeted therapeutics have been successfully applied in other infectious diseases but have never been attempted for malaria. Here, we report the development of a recombinant chimeric antibody (Ab-1) against basigin, an erythrocyte receptor necessary for parasite invasion as a putative antimalarial therapeutic. Ab-1 inhibited the PfRH5-basigin interaction and potently blocked erythrocyte invasion by all parasite strains tested. Importantly, Ab-1 rapidly cleared an established P. falciparum blood-stage infection with no overt toxicity in an in vivo infection model. Collectively, our data demonstrate that antibodies or other therapeutics targeting host basigin could be an effective treatment for patients infected with multi-drug resistant P. falciparum. PMID:26195724

  9. Synthesis and Potent Antimalarial Activity of Kalihinol B

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Of the 50+ kalihinane diterpenoids reported to date, only five had been tested for antimalarial activity, in spite of the fact that kalihinol A is the most potent among the members of the larger family of antimalarial isocyanoterpenes. We have validated a strategy designed to access many of the kalihinanes with a 12-step enantioselective synthesis of kalihinol B, the tetrahydrofuran isomer of kalihinol A (a tetrahydropyran). Kalihinol B shows similarly high potency against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:25815413

  10. Chemical genomic profiling for antimalarial therapies, response signatures and molecular targets

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Cheng, Ken Chih-Chien; Johnson, Ronald L.; Huang, Ruili; Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Liu, Anna; Guha, Rajarshi; Fidock, David; Inglese, James; Wellems, Thomas E.; Austin, Christopher P.; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2012-01-01

    Malaria remains a devastating disease largely because of widespread drug resistance. New drugs and a better understanding of the mechanisms of drug action and resistance are essential for fulfilling the promise of eradicating malaria. Using high-throughput chemical screening and genome-wide association analysis, we identified 32 highly active compounds and genetic loci and genes associated with differential chemical phenotypes (DCPs), defined as ≥5-fold differences in half-maximum inhibitor concentration (IC50) between parasite lines. Chromosomal loci associated with 49 DCPs were confirmed by linkage analysis and tests of genetically modified parasites, including three genes that were linked to 96% of the DCPs. Drugs whose responses mapped to wild type or mutant pfcrt alleles were tested in combination in vitro and in vivo, yielding promising new leads for antimalarial treatments. PMID:21817045

  11. Counterfeit and Substandard Antimalarial Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... a CDC Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  12. Prediction of resistance development against drug combinations by collateral responses to component drugs

    PubMed Central

    Munck, Christian; Gumpert, Heidi K.; Nilsson Wallin, Annika I.; Wang, Harris H.; Sommer, Morten O. A.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance arises quickly during chemotherapeutic selection and is particularly problematic during long-term treatment regimens such as those for tuberculosis, HIV infections, or cancer. Although drug combination therapy reduces the evolution of drug resistance, drug pairs vary in their ability to do so. Thus, predictive models are needed to rationally design resistance-limiting therapeutic regimens. Using adaptive evolution, we studied the resistance response of the common pathogen Escherichia coli to 5 different single antibiotics and all 10 different antibiotic drug pairs. By analyzing the genomes of all evolved E. coli lineages, we identified the mutational events that drive the differences in drug resistance levels and found that the degree of resistance development against drug combinations can be understood in terms of collateral sensitivity and resistance that occurred during adaptation to the component drugs. Then, using engineered E. coli strains, we confirmed that drug resistance mutations that imposed collateral sensitivity were suppressed in a drug pair growth environment. These results provide a framework for rationally selecting drug combinations that limit resistance evolution. PMID:25391482

  13. Prediction of resistance development against drug combinations by collateral responses to component drugs.

    PubMed

    Munck, Christian; Gumpert, Heidi K; Wallin, Annika I Nilsson; Wang, Harris H; Sommer, Morten O A

    2014-11-12

    Resistance arises quickly during chemotherapeutic selection and is particularly problematic during long-term treatment regimens such as those for tuberculosis, HIV infections, or cancer. Although drug combination therapy reduces the evolution of drug resistance, drug pairs vary in their ability to do so. Thus, predictive models are needed to rationally design resistance-limiting therapeutic regimens. Using adaptive evolution, we studied the resistance response of the common pathogen Escherichia coli to 5 different single antibiotics and all 10 different antibiotic drug pairs. By analyzing the genomes of all evolved E. coli lineages, we identified the mutational events that drive the differences in drug resistance levels and found that the degree of resistance development against drug combinations can be understood in terms of collateral sensitivity and resistance that occurred during adaptation to the component drugs. Then, using engineered E. coli strains, we confirmed that drug resistance mutations that imposed collateral sensitivity were suppressed in a drug pair growth environment. These results provide a framework for rationally selecting drug combinations that limit resistance evolution. PMID:25391482

  14. Acquired Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Poor Outcomes among Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kipiani, Maia; Mirtskhulava, Veriko; Tukvadze, Nestani; Magee, Matthew J.; Blumberg, Henry M.

    2015-01-01

    Rates and risk factors for acquired drug resistance and association with outcomes among patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) are not well defined. In an MDR TB cohort from the country of Georgia, drug susceptibility testing for second-line drugs (SLDs) was performed at baseline and every third month. Acquired resistance was defined as any SLD whose status changed from susceptible at baseline to resistant at follow-up. Among 141 patients, acquired resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis was observed in 19 (14%); prevalence was 9.1% for ofloxacin and 9.8% for capreomycin or kanamycin. Baseline cavitary disease and resistance to >6 drugs were associated with acquired resistance. Patients with M. tuberculosis that had acquired resistance were at significantly increased risk for poor treatment outcome compared with patients without these isolates (89% vs. 36%; p<0.01). Acquired resistance occurs commonly among patients with MDR TB and impedes successful treatment outcomes. PMID:25993036

  15. Improving Viral Protease Inhibitors to Counter Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kurt Yilmaz, Nese; Swanstrom, Ronald; Schiffer, Celia A

    2016-07-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in health care, undermining therapy outcomes and necessitating novel approaches to drug design. Extensive studies on resistance to viral protease inhibitors, particularly those of HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease, revealed a plethora of information on the structural and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance. These insights led to several strategies to improve viral protease inhibitors to counter resistance, such as exploiting the essential biological function and leveraging evolutionary constraints. Incorporation of these strategies into structure-based drug design can minimize vulnerability to resistance, not only for viral proteases but for other quickly evolving drug targets as well, toward designing inhibitors one step ahead of evolution to counter resistance with more intelligent and rational design. PMID:27090931

  16. Prevalence and patterns of antifolate and chloroquine drug resistance markers in Plasmodium vivax across Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent malaria species in Pakistan, with a distribution that coincides with Plasmodium falciparum in many parts of the country. Both species are likely exposed to drug pressure from a number of anti-malarials including chloroquine, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), and artemisinin combination therapy, yet little is known regarding the effects of drug pressure on parasite genes associated with drug resistance. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of polymorphisms in the SP resistance-associated genes pvdhfr, pvdhps and chloroquine resistance-associated gene pvmdr1 in P. vivax isolates collected from across the country. Methods In 2011, 801 microscopically confirmed malaria-parasite positive filter paper blood samples were collected at 14 sites representing four provinces and the capital city of Islamabad. Species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to identify human Plasmodium species infection. PCR-positive P. vivax isolates were subjected to sequencing of pvdhfr, pvdhps and pvmdr1 and to real-time PCR analysis to assess pvmdr1 copy number variation. Results Of the 801 samples, 536 were determined to be P. vivax, 128 were P. falciparum, 43 were mixed vivax/falciparum infections and 94 were PCR-negative for Plasmodium infection. Of PCR-positive P. vivax samples, 372 were selected for sequence analysis. Seventy-six of the isolates (23%) were double mutant at positions S58R and S117N in pvdhfr. Additionally, two mutations at positions N50I and S93H were observed in 55 (15%) and 24 (7%) of samples, respectively. Three 18 base pair insertion-deletions (indels) were observed in pvdhfr, with two insertions at different nucleotide positions in 36 isolates and deletions in 10. Ninety-two percent of samples contained the pvdhps (S382/A383G/K512/A553/V585) SAKAV wild type haplotype. For pvmdr1, all isolates were wild type at position Y976F and 335 (98%) carried the mutation at codon F1076L. All

  17. In vitro antimalarial activity and chloroquine potentiating action of two bisbenzylisoquinoline enantiomer alkaloids isolated from Strychnopsis thouarsii and Spirospermum penduliflorum.

    PubMed

    Ratsimamanga-Urverg, S; Rasoanaivo, P; Ramiaramanana, L; Milijaona, R; Rafatro, H; Verdier, F; Rakoto-Ratsimamanga, A; Le Bras, J

    1992-12-01

    The bisbenzylisoquinolines 7-O-demethyltetrandrine and limacine, respectively, isolated from Strychnopsis thouarsii Baill. and Spirospermum penduliflorum Thou. were evaluated for their intrinsic antimalarial activity in vitro and chloroquine potentiating action against the chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum FCM 29 originating from Cameroon. They both showed significant antiplasmodial potency in vitro with very similar IC50 values of respectively, 740 nM and 789 nM (IC50 = 214 nM for chloroquine used as standard drug), which demonstrated that the stereochemistry of the C-1 and C-1' configuration likely plays a role in the chloroquine potentiating effect of these drugs. If confirmed in vivo, these results may account for the traditional use of the two plants as antimalarials and adjuvant to chloroquine in Madagascan folklore remedies. PMID:1484894

  18. Quantifying the Determinants of Evolutionary Dynamics Leading to Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chevereau, Guillaume; Dravecká, Marta; Batur, Tugce; Guvenek, Aysegul; Ayhan, Dilay Hazal; Toprak, Erdal; Bollenbach, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistant pathogens is a serious public health problem. It is a long-standing goal to predict rates of resistance evolution and design optimal treatment strategies accordingly. To this end, it is crucial to reveal the underlying causes of drug-specific differences in the evolutionary dynamics leading to resistance. However, it remains largely unknown why the rates of resistance evolution via spontaneous mutations and the diversity of mutational paths vary substantially between drugs. Here we comprehensively quantify the distribution of fitness effects (DFE) of mutations, a key determinant of evolutionary dynamics, in the presence of eight antibiotics representing the main modes of action. Using precise high-throughput fitness measurements for genome-wide Escherichia coli gene deletion strains, we find that the width of the DFE varies dramatically between antibiotics and, contrary to conventional wisdom, for some drugs the DFE width is lower than in the absence of stress. We show that this previously underappreciated divergence in DFE width among antibiotics is largely caused by their distinct drug-specific dose-response characteristics. Unlike the DFE, the magnitude of the changes in tolerated drug concentration resulting from genome-wide mutations is similar for most drugs but exceptionally small for the antibiotic nitrofurantoin, i.e., mutations generally have considerably smaller resistance effects for nitrofurantoin than for other drugs. A population genetics model predicts that resistance evolution for drugs with this property is severely limited and confined to reproducible mutational paths. We tested this prediction in laboratory evolution experiments using the “morbidostat”, a device for evolving bacteria in well-controlled drug environments. Nitrofurantoin resistance indeed evolved extremely slowly via reproducible mutations—an almost paradoxical behavior since this drug causes DNA damage and increases the mutation rate. Overall

  19. Molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and its reversal in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kartal-Yandim, Melis; Adan-Gokbulut, Aysun; Baran, Yusuf

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy is the main strategy for the treatment of cancer. However, the main problem limiting the success of chemotherapy is the development of multidrug resistance. The resistance can be intrinsic or acquired. The resistance phenotype is associated with the tumor cells that gain a cross-resistance to a large range of drugs that are structurally and functionally different. Multidrug resistance arises via many unrelated mechanisms, such as overexpression of energy-dependent efflux proteins, decrease in uptake of the agents, increase or alteration in drug targets, modification of cell cycle checkpoints, inactivation of the agents, compartmentalization of the agents, inhibition of apoptosis and aberrant bioactive sphingolipid metabolism. Exact elucidation of resistance mechanisms and molecular and biochemical approaches to overcome multidrug resistance have been a major goal in cancer research. This review comprises the mechanisms guiding multidrug resistance in cancer chemotherapy and also touches on approaches for reversing the resistance. PMID:25757878

  20. Design, synthesis and antimalarial screening of some hybrid 4-aminoquinoline-triazine derivatives against pf-DHFR-TS.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Supriya; Ghosh, Surajit Kumar; Kalita, Junmoni; Dutta, Mayurakhi; Bhat, Hans Raj

    2016-04-01

    Existing antifolate antimalarial drugs have shown resistance due to the mutations at some amino acid positions of Plasmodium falciparum DHFR-TS. In the present study, to overcome this resistance, a new series of hybrid 4-aminoquinoline-triazine derivatives were designed and docked into the active site of Pf-DHFR-TS (PDB i.d. 1J3K) using validated CDOCKER protocol. Binding energy was calculated by applying CHARMm forcefield. Binding energy and the pattern of interaction of the docked compounds were analysed. Fifteen compounds were selected for synthesis based on their binding energy values and docking poses. Synthesized compounds were characterised by FTIR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, mass spectroscopy and were screened for antimalarial activity against 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:26821296

  1. Efflux-Mediated Drug Resistance in Bacteria: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian-Zhi; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Drug efflux pumps play a key role in drug resistance and also serve other functions in bacteria. There has been a growing list of multidrug and drug-specific efflux pumps characterized from bacteria of human, animal, plant and environmental origins. These pumps are mostly encoded on the chromosome although they can also be plasmid-encoded. A previous article (Li X-Z and Nikaido H, Drugs, 2004; 64[2]: 159–204) had provided a comprehensive review regarding efflux-mediated drug resistance in bacteria. In the past five years, significant progress has been achieved in further understanding of drug resistance-related efflux transporters and this review focuses on the latest studies in this field since 2003. This has been demonstrated in multiple aspects that include but are not limited to: further molecular and biochemical characterization of the known drug efflux pumps and identification of novel drug efflux pumps; structural elucidation of the transport mechanisms of drug transporters; regulatory mechanisms of drug efflux pumps; determining the role of the drug efflux pumps in other functions such as stress responses, virulence and cell communication; and development of efflux pump inhibitors. Overall, the multifaceted implications of drug efflux transporters warrant novel strategies to combat multidrug resistance in bacteria. PMID:19678712

  2. Overcome Cancer Cell Drug Resistance Using Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Yang, Hua Li; Yang, Ying Juan; Wang, Lan; Lee, Shao Chin

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the major treatment methods for cancer. However, failure in chemotherapy is not uncommon, mainly due to dose-limiting toxicity associated with drug resistance. Management of drug resistance is important towards successful chemotherapy. There are many reports in the Chinese literature that natural products can overcome cancer cell drug resistance, which deserve sharing with scientific and industrial communities. We summarized the reports into four categories: (1) in vitro studies using cell line models; (2) serum pharmacology; (3) in vivo studies using animal models; and (4) clinical studies. Fourteen single compounds were reported to have antidrug resistance activity for the first time. In vitro, compounds were able to overcome drug resistance at nontoxic or subtoxic concentrations, in a dose-dependent manner, by inhibiting drug transporters, cell detoxification capacity, or cell apoptosis sensitivity. Studies in vivo showed that single compounds, herbal extract, and formulas had potent antidrug resistance activities. Importantly, many single compounds, herbal extracts, and formulas have been used clinically to treat various diseases including cancer. The review provides comprehensive data on use of natural compounds to overcome cancer cell drug resistance in China, which may facilitate the therapeutic development of natural products for clinical management of cancer drug resistance. PMID:26421052

  3. Shigella Antimicrobial Drug Resistance Mechanisms, 2004-2014.

    PubMed

    Nüesch-Inderbinen, Magdalena; Heini, Nicole; Zurfluh, Katrin; Althaus, Denise; Hächler, Herbert; Stephan, Roger

    2016-06-01

    To determine antimicrobial drug resistance mechanisms of Shigella spp., we analyzed 344 isolates collected in Switzerland during 2004-2014. Overall, 78.5% of isolates were multidrug resistant; 10.5% were ciprofloxacin resistant; and 2% harbored mph(A), a plasmid-mediated gene that confers reduced susceptibility to azithromycin, a last-resort antimicrobial agent for shigellosis. PMID:27191035

  4. Shigella Antimicrobial Drug Resistance Mechanisms, 2004–2014

    PubMed Central

    Nüesch-Inderbinen, Magdalena; Heini, Nicole; Zurfluh, Katrin; Althaus, Denise; Hächler, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    To determine antimicrobial drug resistance mechanisms of Shigella spp., we analyzed 344 isolates collected in Switzerland during 2004–2014. Overall, 78.5% of isolates were multidrug resistant; 10.5% were ciprofloxacin resistant; and 2% harbored mph(A), a plasmid-mediated gene that confers reduced susceptibility to azithromycin, a last-resort antimicrobial agent for shigellosis. PMID:27191035

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs in Mozambique*, **

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Germano Manuel; Folgosa, Elena; Nquobile, Ndlovu; Gitta, Sheba; Cadir, Nureisha

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the drug resistance profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mozambique. METHODS: We analyzed secondary data from the National Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Maputo, Mozambique, and from the Beira Regional Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Beira, Mozambique. The data were based on culture-positive samples submitted to first-line drug susceptibility testing (DST) between January and December of 2011. We attempted to determine whether the frequency of DST positivity was associated with patient type or provenance. RESULTS: During the study period, 641 strains were isolated in culture and submitted to DST. We found that 374 (58.3%) were resistant to at least one antituberculosis drug and 280 (43.7%) were resistant to multiple antituberculosis drugs. Of the 280 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases, 184 (65.7%) were in previously treated patients, most of whom were from southern Mozambique. Two (0.71%) of the cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis were confirmed to be cases of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis was most common in males, particularly those in the 21-40 year age bracket. CONCLUSIONS: M. tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs is high in Mozambique, especially in previously treated patients. The frequency of M. tuberculosis strains that were resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin in combination was found to be high, particularly in samples from previously treated patients. PMID:24831398

  6. Current therapies and future possibilities for drug development against liver-stage malaria.

    PubMed

    Raphemot, Rene; Posfai, Dora; Derbyshire, Emily R

    2016-06-01

    Malaria remains a global public health threat, with half of the world's population at risk. Despite numerous efforts in the past decade to develop new antimalarial drugs to surmount increasing resistance to common therapies, challenges remain in the expansion of the current antimalarial arsenal for the elimination of this disease. The requirement of prophylactic and radical cure activities for the next generation of antimalarial drugs demands that new research models be developed to support the investigation of the elusive liver stage of the malaria parasite. In this Review, we revisit current antimalarial therapies and discuss recent advances for in vitro and in vivo malaria research models of the liver stage and their importance in probing parasite biology and the discovery of novel drug candidates. PMID:27249674

  7. Totally drug-resistant tuberculosis and adjunct therapies.

    PubMed

    Parida, S K; Axelsson-Robertson, R; Rao, M V; Singh, N; Master, I; Lutckii, A; Keshavjee, S; Andersson, J; Zumla, A; Maeurer, M

    2015-04-01

    The first cases of totally drug-resistant (TDR) tuberculosis (TB) were reported in Italy 10 years ago; more recently, cases have also been reported in Iran, India and South Africa. Although there is no consensus on terminology, it is most commonly described as 'resistance to all first- and second-line drugs used to treat TB'. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) acquires drug resistance mutations in a sequential fashion under suboptimal drug pressure due to monotherapy, inadequate dosing, treatment interruptions and drug interactions. The treatment of TDR-TB includes antibiotics with disputed or minimal effectiveness against M.tb, and the fatality rate is high. Comorbidities such as diabetes and infection with human immunodeficiency virus further impact on TB treatment options and survival rates. Several new drug candidates with novel modes of action are under late-stage clinical evaluation (e.g., delamanid, bedaquiline, SQ109 and sutezolid). 'Repurposed' antibiotics have also recently been included in the treatment of extensively drug resistant TB. However, because of mutations in M.tb, drugs will not provide a cure for TB in the long term. Adjunct TB therapies, including therapeutic vaccines, vitamin supplementation and/or repurposing of drugs targeting biologically and clinically relevant molecular pathways, may achieve better clinical outcomes in combination with standard chemotherapy. Here, we review broader perspectives of drug resistance in TB and potential adjunct treatment options. PMID:24809736

  8. Rapid evolution of drug resistance of multiple myeloma in the microenvironment with drug gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Amy; Zhang, Qiucen; Lambert, Guillaume; Khin, Zayar; Silva, Ariosto; Gatenby, Robert; Kim, John; Pourmand, Nader; Austin, Robert; Sturm, James

    2013-03-01

    Drug resistance in cancer is usually caused by the spatial drug gradients in tumor environment. Here, we culture multiple myeloma in a gradient from 0 to 20 nM of doxorubicin (genotoxic drug) across 2 mm wide region for 12 days. The myeloma cells grew rapidly and formed 3D colonies in the regions with less drug concentration. However, we have seen emergent colonies forming in regions with drug concentration above the minimal inhibitory concentration in less than one week. Once the cells have occupied the regions with less drug concentration, they tend to migrate toward the regions with higher drug concentration in a collective behavior. To characterize their resistance, we collect them from this microfluidic system, for further analysis of the dose response. We find that the IC50 (drug concentration that inhibits 50% of controlled population) of the cells, undergone a drug gradient, increase 16-fold of the wildtype cells. We further discover that these resistant cells express more Multidrug Resistance (mdr) protein, which pumps out the drugs and causes drug resistance, than the wildtype. Our current works on RNA-sequencing analysis may discover other biomolecular mechanisms that may confer the drug resistance.

  9. Prevalence of pyrazinamide resistance across the spectrum of drug resistant phenotypes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Michael G; Streicher, Elizabeth M; Dolby, Tania; Simpson, John A; Sampson, Samantha L; Van Helden, Paul D; Van Rie, Annelies; Warren, Robin M

    2016-07-01

    Pyrazinamide resistance is largely unknown in the spectrum of drug resistant phenotypes. We summarize data on PZA resistance in clinical isolates from South Africa. PZA DST should be performed when considering its inclusion in treatment of patients with rifampicin-resistant TB or MDR-TB. PMID:27450014

  10. Drug coverage in treatment of malaria and the consequences for resistance evolution - evidence from the use of sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is argued that, the efficacy of anti-malarials could be prolonged through policy-mediated reductions in drug pressure, but gathering evidence of the relationship between policy, treatment practice, drug pressure and the evolution of resistance in the field is challenging. Mathematical models indicate that drug coverage is the primary determinant of drug pressure and the driving force behind the evolution of drug resistance. These models show that where the basis of resistance is multigenic, the effects of selection can be moderated by high recombination rates, which disrupt the associations between co-selected resistance genes. Methods To test these predictions, dhfr and dhps frequency changes were measured during 2000-2001 while SP was the second-line treatment and contrasted these with changes during 2001-2002 when SP was used for first-line therapy. Annual cross sectional community surveys carried out before, during and after the policy switch in 2001 were used to collect samples. Genetic analysis of SP resistance genes was carried out on 4,950 Plasmodium falciparum infections and the selection pressure under the two policies compared. Results The influence of policy on the parasite reservoir was profound. The frequency of dhfr and dhps resistance alleles did not change significantly while SP was the recommended second-line treatment, but highly significant changes occurred during the subsequent year after the switch to first line SP. The frequency of the triple mutant dhfr (N51I,C59R,S108N) allele (conferring pyrimethamine resistance) increased by 37% - 63% and the frequency of the double A437G, K540E mutant dhps allele (conferring sulphadoxine resistance) increased 200%-300%. A strong association between these unlinked alleles also emerged, confirming that they are co-selected by SP. Conclusion The national policy change brought about a shift in treatment practice and the resulting increase in coverage had a substantial impact on drug pressure

  11. Reemergence of chloroquine (CQ) analogs as multi-targeting antimalarial agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Mushtaque, Md; Shahjahan

    2015-01-27

    Amongst several communicable diseases (CDs), malaria is one of the deadliest parasitic disease all over the world, particularly in African and Asian countries. To curb this menace, numbers of antimalarial agents are being sold as over the counter (OTC) drugs. Chloroquine (CQ) is one of them and is one of the oldest, cheapest, and easily available synthetic agents used to curb malaria. Unfortunately, after the reports of CQ-resistance against different strains of malarial parasite strains worldwide, scientist are continuously modifying the core structure of CQ to get an efficient drug. Interestingly, several new drugs have been emerged in due course having unique and enhanced properties (like dual stage inhibitors, resistance reversing ability etc.) and are ready to enter into the clinical trial. In this course, some new agents have also been discovered which are; though inactive against CQS strain, highly active against CQR strains. The present article describes the role of modification of the core structure of CQ and its effects on the biological activities. Moreover, the attempt has also been made to predict the future prospects of such drugs to reemerge as antimalarial agents. PMID:25461328

  12. Antimalarial activities of medicinal plants and herbal formulations used in Thai traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Thiengsusuk, Artitaya; Chaijaroenkul, Wanna; Na-Bangchang, Kesara

    2013-04-01

    Malaria is one of the world's leading killer infectious diseases with high incidence and morbidity. The problem of multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum has been aggravating particularly in Southeast Asia. Therefore, development of new potential antimalarial drugs is urgently required. The present study aimed to investigate antimalarial activities of a total of 27 medicinal plants and 5 herbal formulations used in Thai traditional medicine against chloroquine-resistant (K1) and chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) P. falciparum clones. Antimalarial activity of the ethanolic extracts of all plants/herbal formulations against K1 and 3D7 P. falciparum clones was assessed using SYBR Green I-based assay. All plants were initially screened at the concentration of 50 μg/ml to select the candidate plants that inhibited malaria growth by ≥50%. Each candidate plant was further assessed for the IC50 value (concentration that inhibits malaria growth by 50%) to select the potential plants. Selectivity index (SI) of each extract was determined from the IC50 ratio obtained from human renal epithelial cell and K1 or 3D7 P. falciparum clone. The ethanolic extracts from 19 medicinal plants/herbal formulation exhibited promising activity against both K1 and 3D7 clones of P. falciparum with survival of less than 50% at the concentration of 50 μg/ml. Among these, the extracts from the eight medicinal plants (Plumbago indica Linn., Garcinia mangostana Linn., Dracaena loureiri Gagnep., Dioscorea membranacea Pierre., Artemisia annua Linn., Piper chaba Hunt., Myristica fragrans Houtt., Kaempferia galanga Linn.) and two herbal formulations (Benjakul Formulation 1 and Pra-Sa-Prao-Yhai Formulation) showed potent antimalarial activity with median range IC50 values of less than 10 μg/ml against K1 or 3D7 P. falciparum clone or both. All except G. mangostana Linn. and A. annua Linn. showed high selective antimalarial activity against both clones with SI>10. Further studies on antimalarial

  13. Drug Resistance among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Calabar, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Otu, Akaninyene; Umoh, Victor; Habib, Abdulrazak; Ameh, Soter; Lawson, Lovett

    2013-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to determine the pattern of drug susceptibility to first-line drugs among pulmonary TB patients in two hospitals in Calabar, Nigeria. Methods. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study carried out between February 2011 and April 2012. Sputum samples from consecutive TB patients in Calabar were subjected to culture on Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) slopes followed by drug susceptibility testing (DST). The DST was performed on LJ medium by the proportion method. Results. Forty-two of the 100 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were found to be resistant to at least one drug. Resistance to only one drug (monoresistance) was found in 17 patients. No strains with monoresistance to rifampicin were found. Resistance to two drugs was found in 22 patients, while one patient was resistant to both three and four drugs. MDR TB was seen in 4% (4/100). The independent variables of HIV serology and sex were not significantly associated with resistance (P > 0.05). Conclusion. There was a high prevalence of anti-TB drug resistance in Calabar. PMID:24078872

  14. Genetic polymorphisms associated with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine drug resistance among Plasmodium falciparum field isolates in malaria endemic areas of Assam

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, J; Dutta, P; Khan, SA; Soni, M; Dey, D; Mahanta, J

    2015-01-01

    Background: The emergence of antimalarial drug resistance malaria parasite is widespread in North eastern region of India. During January 2012-December 2013, we conducted active surveillance for detection of antifolate resistance-associated genetic polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite from different malaria endemic areas of Assam. Materials and Methods: A total of 281 field samples were collected from suspected malaria patients of which 106 malaria P. falciparum positive cases were detected in microscopic slide examination. A nested PCR was done for amplification of a 648 bp portion of the dhfr gene and 710 bp portion of the dhps gene. Results: Mutation analysis revealed existence of three different haplotypes of the P. falciparum dhfr gene of which ANRNI was highly prevalent (90%). Triple mutant haplotypes AIRNI (N51I + C59R + S108N) of the dhfr gene associated with pyrimethamine resistance were prevalent in Chirang district of Assam. Whereas, dhps mutation study revealed that triple mutant haplotype AGEAA (S436A + A437G + K540E) associated with Sulphadoxine resistance was found among 26% of P. falciparum field isolates. However, P. falciparum dhfr-dhps two locus mutation analysis showed that there were a total of nine dhfr-dhps genotypes. Conclusion: It was noticed that 93.62% (88/94) isolates had mutations in the sequences of both enzymes, which is an indication of prevalence of high grade of Sulphadoxine — pyrimethamine resistance in P. falciparum malaria parasites in Assam. PMID:25511211

  15. Screening for antimalarial maculopathy in rheumatology clinics.

    PubMed Central

    Fleck, B W; Bell, A L; Mitchell, J D; Thomson, B J; Hurst, N P; Nuki, G

    1985-01-01

    Ophthalmoscopy and three tests of visual function were undertaken in 39 patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving treatment with antimalarial drugs and in a control group of 16 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were not receiving such treatment. Visual contrast sensitivity, macular threshold to red light, and central visual fields to red targets were not significantly different in treated patients and controls. There were no abnormalities in visual acuity, but 11 of 76 eyes of treated patients showed minor macular abnormalities on ophthalmoscopy that were not seen in control patients, suggesting that ophthalmoscopy may be the most sensitive measure of early drug toxicity. Five rheumatologists were able to identify 52 of 65 minor changes detected by an ophthalmologist. These studies, and a critical review of published reports, suggest that in clinical practice antimalarial drugs can be administered safely to patients with rheumatoid arthritis without the need for repetitive routine examination by an ophthalmologist or the use of complicated physiological tests. Recording of visual acuity in each eye and ophthalmoscopy by the prescribing doctor may be all that are required to detect early antimalarial maculopathy. PMID:3929938

  16. Drug interactions and the evolution of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Pamela J.; Hegreness, Matthew J.; Aiden, Aviva Presser; Kishony, Roy

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale, systems biology approaches now allow us to systematically map synergistic and antagonistic interactions between drugs. Consequently, drug antagonism is emerging as a powerful tool to study biological function and relatedness between cellular components as well as to uncover mechanisms of drug action. Furthermore, theoretical models and new experiments suggest that antagonistic interactions between antibiotics can counteract the evolution of drug resistance. PMID:19444248

  17. Access to Artemisinin-Combination Therapy (ACT) and other Anti-Malarials: National Policy and Markets in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Amuasi, John H.; Diap, Graciela; Nguah, Samuel Blay; Karikari, Patrick; Boakye, Isaac; Jambai, Amara; Lahai, Wani Kumba; Louie, Karly S.; Kiechel, Jean-Rene

    2012-01-01

    Malaria remains the leading burden of disease in post-conflict Sierra Leone. To overcome the challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve effective treatment, Sierra Leone adopted artemisinin-combination therapy artesunate-amodiaquine (AS+AQ) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Other national policy anti-malarials include artemether-lumefantrine (AL) as an alternative to AS+AQ, quinine and artemether for treatment of complicated malaria; and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp). This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. A cross-sectional survey of 127 medicine outlets (public, private and NGO) was conducted in urban and rural areas. The availability on the day of the survey, median prices, and affordability policy and available non-policy anti-malarials were calculated. Anti-malarials were stocked in 79% of all outlets surveyed. AS+AQ was widely available in public medicine outlets; AL was only available in the private and NGO sectors. Quinine was available in nearly two-thirds of public and NGO outlets and over one-third of private outlets. SP was widely available in all outlets. Non-policy anti-malarials were predominantly available in the private outlets. AS+AQ in the public sector was widely offered for free. Among the anti-malarials sold at a cost, the same median price of a course of AS+AQ (US$1.56), quinine tablets (US$0.63), were found in both the public and private sectors. Quinine injection had a median cost of US$0.31 in the public sector and US$0.47 in the private sector, while SP had a median cost of US$0.31 in the public sector compared to US$ 0.63 in the private sector. Non-policy anti-malarials were more affordable than first-line AS+AQ in all sectors. A course of AS+AQ was affordable at nearly two days’ worth of wages in both the public and private sectors. PMID:23133522

  18. Genotypic Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    There are 16 approved human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drugs belonging to three mechanistic classes: protease inhibitors, nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors, and nonnucleoside RT inhibitors. HIV-1 resistance to these drugs is caused by mutations in the protease and RT enzymes, the molecular targets of these drugs. Drug resistance mutations arise most often in treated individuals, resulting from selective drug pressure in the presence of incompletely suppressed virus replication. HIV-1 isolates with drug resistance mutations, however, may also be transmitted to newly infected individuals. Three expert panels have recommended that HIV-1 protease and RT susceptibility testing should be used to help select HIV drug therapy. Although genotypic testing is more complex than typical antimicrobial susceptibility tests, there is a rich literature supporting the prognostic value of HIV-1 protease and RT mutations. This review describes the genetic mechanisms of HIV-1 drug resistance and summarizes published data linking individual RT and protease mutations to in vitro and in vivo resistance to the currently available HIV drugs. PMID:11932232

  19. Drug resistance analysis of bacterial strains isolated from burn patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, L F; Li, J L; Ma, W H; Li, J Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the spectrum and drug resistance of bacteria isolated from burn patients to provide a reference for rational clinical use of antibiotics. Up to 1914 bacterial strain specimens isolated from burn patients admitted to hospital between 2001 and 2010 were subjected to resistance monitoring by using the K-B paper disk method. Retrospective analysis was performed on drug resistance analysis of burn patients. The top eight bacterium strains according to detection rate. A total of 1355 strains of Gram-negative (G(-)) bacteria and 559 strains of Gram-positive (G(+)) bacteria were detected. The top eight bacterium strains, according to detection rate, were Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Enterococcus. Drug resistance rates were higher than 90% in A. baumannii, P. aeruginosa, S. epidermidis, and S. aureus, which accounted for 52.2, 21.7, 27.8, and 33.3%, respectively, of the entire sample. Those with drug resistance rates lower than 30% accounted for 4.3, 30.4, 16.7, and 16.7%, respectively. Multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) accounted for 49.2 and 76.4% of the S. epidermis and S. aureus resistance, respectively. Antibacterial drugs that had drug resistance rates to MRSE and MRSA higher than 90% accounted for 38.9 and 72.2%, respectively, whereas those with lower than 30% drug resistance rates accounted for 11.1 and 16.7%, respectively. The burn patients enrolled in the study were mainly infected with G(-) bacteria. These results strongly suggest that clinicians should practice rational use of antibiotics based on drug susceptibility test results. PMID:24535909

  20. Prediction of Cancer Drug Resistance and Implications for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Volm, Manfred; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance still impedes successful cancer chemotherapy. A major goal of early concepts in individualized therapy was to develop in vitro tests to predict tumors’ drug responsiveness. We have developed an in vitro short-term test based on nucleic acid precursor incorporation to determine clinical drug resistance. This test detects inherent and acquired resistance in vitro and transplantable syngeneic and xenografted tumors in vivo. In several clinical trials, clinical resistance was predictable with more than 90% accuracy, while drug sensitivity was detected with less accuracy (~60%). Remarkably, clinical cross-resistance to numerous drugs (multidrug resistance, broad spectrum resistance) was detectable by a single compound, doxorubicin, due to its multifactorial modes of action. The results of this predictive test were in good agreement with predictive assays of other authors. As no predictive test has been established as yet for clinical diagnostics, the identification of sensitive drugs may not reach sufficiently high reliability for clinical routine. A meta-analysis of the literature published during the past four decades considering test results of more than 15,000 tumor patients unambiguously demonstrated that, in the majority of studies, resistance was correctly predicted with an accuracy between 80 and 100%, while drug sensitivity could only be predicted with an accuracy of 50–80%. This synopsis of the published literature impressively illustrates that prediction of drug resistance could be validated. The determination of drug resistance was reliable independent of tumor type, test assay, and drug used in these in vitro tests. By contrast, chemosensitivity could not be predicted with high reliability. Therefore, we propose a rethinking of the “chemosensitivity” concept. Instead, predictive in vitro tests may reliably identify drug-resistant tumors. The clinical consequence imply to subject resistant tumors not to chemotherapy, but to other new

  1. Drug-Resistant Candida glabrata Infection in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farmakiotis, Dimitrios; Tarrand, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer patients are at risk for candidemia, and increasing Candida spp. resistance poses an emerging threat. We determined rates of antifungal drug resistance, identified factors associated with resistance, and investigated the correlation between resistance and all-cause mortality rates among cancer patients with ≥1 C. glabrata–positive blood culture at MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, during March 2005–September 2013. Of 146 isolates, 30 (20.5%) were resistant to fluconazole, 15 (10.3%) to caspofungin, and 10 (6.8%) to multiple drugs (9 caspofungin-resistant isolates were also resistant to fluconazole, 1 to amphotericin B). Independently associated with fluconazole resistance were azole preexposure, hematologic malignancy, and mechanical ventilation. Independently associated with caspofungin resistance were echinocandin preexposure, monocytopenia, and total parenteral nutrition. Fluconazole resistance was highly associated with caspofungin resistance, independent of prior azole or echinocandin use. Caspofungin resistance was associated with increased 28-day all-cause mortality rates. These findings highlight the need for good stewardship of antifungal drugs. PMID:25340258

  2. Plasmodium Drug Targets Outside the Genetic Control of the Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Drug development often seeks to find “magic bullets” which target microbiologic proteins while not affecting host proteins. Paul Ehrlich tested methylene blue as an antimalarial but this dye was not superior to quinine. Many successful antimalarial therapies are “magic shotguns” which target many Plasmodium pathways with little interference in host metabolism. Two malaria drug classes, the 8-aminoquinolines and the artemisinins interact with cytochrome P450s and host iron protoporphyrin IX or iron, respectively, to generate toxic metabolites and/or radicals, which kill the parasite by interference with many proteins. The non 8-amino antimalarial quinolines like quinine or piperaquine bind heme to inhibit the process of heme crystallization, which results in multiple enzyme inhibition and membrane dysfunction. The quinolines and artemisinins are rapidly parasiticidal in contrast to metal chelators, which have a slower parasite clearance rate with higher drug concentrations. Iron chelators interfere with the artemisinins but otherwise represent a strategy of targeting multiple enzymes containing iron. Interest has been revived in antineoplastic drugs that target DNA metabolism as antimalarials. Specific drug targeting or investigation of the innate immunity directed to the more permeable trophozoite or schizont infected erythrocyte membrane has been under explored. Novel drug classes in the antimalarial development pipeline which either target multiple proteins or unchangeable cellular targets will slow the pace of drug resistance acquisition. PMID:22973888

  3. Injections, Cocktails and Diviners: Therapeutic Flexibility in the Context of Malaria Elimination and Drug Resistance in Northeast Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Gryseels, Charlotte; Uk, Sambunny; Erhart, Annette; Gerrets, René; Sluydts, Vincent; Durnez, Lies; Muela Ribera, Joan; Hausmann Muela, Susanna; Menard, Didier; Heng, Somony; Sochantha, Tho; D’Alessandro, Umberto; Coosemans, Marc; Peeters Grietens, Koen

    2013-01-01

    Background Adherence to effective malaria medication is extremely important in the context of Cambodia’s elimination targets and drug resistance containment. Although the public sector health facilities are accessible to the local ethnic minorities of Ratanakiri province (Northeast Cambodia), their illness itineraries often lead them to private pharmacies selling “cocktails” and artemether injections, or to local diviners prescribing animal sacrifices to appease the spirits. Methods The research design consisted of a mixed methods study, combining qualitative (in-depth interviews and participant observation) and quantitative methods (household and cross-sectional survey). Results Three broad options for malaria treatment were identified: i) the public sector; ii) the private sector; iii) traditional treatment based on divination and ceremonial sacrifice. Treatment choice was influenced by the availability of treatment and provider, perceived side effects and efficacy of treatments, perceived etiology of symptoms, and patient-health provider encounters. Moreover, treatment paths proved to be highly flexible, changing mostly in relation to the perceived efficacy of a chosen treatment. Conclusions Despite good availability of anti-malarial treatment in the public health sector, attendance remained low due to both structural and human behavioral factors. The common use and under-dosage of anti-malaria monotherapy in the private sector (single-dose injections, single-day drug cocktails) represents a threat not only for individual case management, but also for the regional plan of drug resistance containment and malaria elimination. PMID:24244678

  4. Bedaquiline for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bélard, Sabine; Heuvelings, Charlotte C; Janssen, Saskia; Grobusch, Martin P

    2015-05-01

    Bedaquiline is a much-needed novel drug which is highly effective against drug-resistant tuberculosis. While its clinical development has been laudably fast-tracked and the drug is now available for inclusion into treatment regimens when no suitable alternatives exist, clinical experience with bedaquiline is still limited. Phase III trial data and Phase IV studies are needed particularly to study different patient populations and to optimize treatment regimens. Drug resistance to bedaquiline needs to be monitored carefully, and full access to bedaquiline treatment where it is appropriate and needed must be promoted. PMID:25797824

  5. Extensive Drug Resistance Acquired During Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cegielski, J. Peter; Dalton, Tracy; Yagui, Martin; Wattanaamornkiet, Wanpen; Volchenkov, Grigory V.; Via, Laura E.; Van Der Walt, Martie; Tupasi, Thelma; Smith, Sarah E.; Odendaal, Ronel; Leimane, Vaira; Kvasnovsky, Charlotte; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kurbatova, Ekaterina; Kummik, Tiina; Kuksa, Liga; Kliiman, Kai; Kiryanova, Elena V.; Kim, HeeJin; Kim, Chang-ki; Kazennyy, Boris Y.; Jou, Ruwen; Huang, Wei-Lun; Ershova, Julia; Erokhin, Vladislav V.; Diem, Lois; Contreras, Carmen; Cho, Sang Nae; Chernousova, Larisa N.; Chen, Michael P.; Caoili, Janice Campos; Bayona, Jaime; Akksilp, Somsak; Calahuanca, Gloria Yale; Wolfgang, Melanie; Viiklepp, Piret; Vasilieva, Irina A.; Taylor, Allison; Tan, Kathrine; Suarez, Carmen; Sture, Ingrida; Somova, Tatiana; Smirnova, Tatyana G.; Sigman, Erika; Skenders, Girts; Sitti, Wanlaya; Shamputa, Isdore C.; Riekstina, Vija; Pua, Kristine Rose; Therese, M.; Perez, C.; Park, Seungkyu; Norvaisha, Inga; Nemtsova, Evgenia S.; Min, Seonyeong; Metchock, Beverly; Levina, Klavdia; Lei, Yung-Chao; Lee, Jongseok; Larionova, Elena E.; Lancaster, Joey; Jeon, Doosoo; Jave, Oswaldo; Khorosheva, Tatiana; Hwang, Soo Hee; Huang, Angela Song-En; Gler, M. Tarcela; Dravniece, Gunta; Eum, Seokyong; Demikhova, Olga V.; Degtyareva, Irina; Danilovits, Manfred; Cirula, Anda; Cho, Eunjin; Cai, Ying; Brand, Jeanette; Bonilla, Cesar; Barry, Clifton E.; Asencios, Luis; Andreevskaya, Sofia N.; Akksilp, Rattanawadee

    2014-01-01

    Background. Increasing access to drugs for the treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis is crucial but could lead to increasing resistance to these same drugs. In 2000, the international Green Light Committee (GLC) initiative began to increase access while attempting to prevent acquired resistance. Methods. To assess the GLC's impact, we followed adults with pulmonary MDR tuberculosis from the start to the end of treatment with monthly sputum cultures, drug susceptibility testing, and genotyping. We compared the frequency and predictors of acquired resistance to second-line drugs (SLDs) in 9 countries that volunteered to participate, 5 countries that met GLC criteria, and 4 countries that did not apply to the GLC. Results. In total, 832 subjects were enrolled. Of those without baseline resistance to specific SLDs, 68 (8.9%) acquired extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis, 79 (11.2%) acquired fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance, and 56 (7.8%) acquired resistance to second-line injectable drugs (SLIs). The relative risk (95% confidence interval [CI]) of acquired resistance was lower at GLC-approved sites: 0.27 (.16–.47) for XDR tuberculosis, 0.28 (.17–.45) for FQ, and 0.15 (.06–.39) to 0.60 (.34–1.05) for 3 different SLIs. The risk increased as the number of potentially effective drugs decreased. Controlling for baseline drug resistance and differences between sites, the odds ratios (95% CIs) were 0.21 (.07–.62) for acquired XDR tuberculosis and 0.23 (.09–.59) for acquired FQ resistance. Conclusions. Treatment of MDR tuberculosis involves substantial risk of acquired resistance to SLDs, increasing as baseline drug resistance increases. The risk was significantly lower in programs documented by the GLC to meet specific standards. PMID:25057101

  6. [Resistance to antiplatelet drugs in patients with cerebrovascular disorders].

    PubMed

    Suslina, Z A; Tanashian, M M; Domashenko, M A

    2011-01-01

    This review concerns clinical and laboratory resistance to antiplatelet drugs (aspirin and clopidogrel) in patients with cerebrovascular disorders. Results of certain clinical trials showed that laboratory resistance to antiaggregants is associated with recurrent thromboembolic vascular events. The commonest causes of aspirin resistance are production of arachidonic acid metabolites via the lipoxygenase pathway, poor compliance with the treatment, polymorphism of the genes encoding for cyclooxygenase and glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa, endothelial dysfunction. The causes of clopidogrel resistance include inadequate doses of the drug, its low absorption, poor compliance with the treatment, polymorphism of ADP receptors, GP IIb/IIIa and cytochrome P450 genes, acute coronary syndrome and stroke, metabolic syndrome. Therapeutic efficacy of antiaggregants can be improved by increasing their doses, using membranotropic agents, correcting endothelial dysfunction, etc. Because the apparent variability of antiplatelet drug resistance is currently due to the use of different test-systems by different authors, the evaluation of individual sensitivity to a given drug showing laboratory resistance and the choice of alternative therapy are thus far possible only in the framework of clinical studies. Large-scale prospective multicenter trials of antiplatelet drug resistance are needed along with research for better understanding mechanisms of individual platelet sensitivity and resistance to antiaggregants and developing efficacious methods for their correction. PMID:21901881

  7. Using genetic methods to define the targets of compounds with antimalarial activity

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Erika L.; Fidock, David A.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Although phenotypic cellular screening has been used to drive antimalarial drug discovery in recent years, in some cases target-based drug discovery remains more attractive. This is especially true when appropriate high-throughput cellular assays are lacking, as is the case for drug discovery efforts that aim to provide a replacement for primaquine (4-N-(6-methoxyquinolin-8-yl)pentane-1,4-diamine), the only drug that can block Plasmodium transmission to Anopheles mosquitoes and eliminate liver-stage hypnozoites. At present, however, there are no known chemically validated parasite protein targets that are important in all Plasmodium parasite developmental stages and that can be used in traditional biochemical compound screens. We propose that a plethora of novel, chemically validated, cross-stage antimalarial targets still remain to be discovered from the ~5,500 proteins encoded by the Plasmodium genomes. Here we discuss how in vitro evolution of drug-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum and subsequent whole-genome analysis can be used to find the targets of some of the many compounds discovered in whole-cell phenotypic screens. PMID:23927658

  8. Antimalarial properties of imipramine and amitriptyline

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.; Siegel, L.; Pinto, J.; Meshnick, S.

    1986-03-01

    This laboratory has previously demonstrated that imipramine (IM) and amitriptyline (AM), inhibit the conversion of riboflavin to its coenzymic derivatives. Several other laboratories have shown that dietary riboflavin deficiency is protective against malarial infection. In the present investigation, the authors determined whether IM and AM exert antimalarial effects similar to that of riboflavin deficiency, as they have hypothesized. In addition, they evaluated whether these drugs, like other antimalarial agents, increase the hemolytic response to ferriprotoporphyrin IX (FP). The growth of P. falciparum (FCR3) in the absence or presence of these drugs (80 ..mu..M) was measured by incubating parasitized erythrocytes for 48 h in RPMI 1640 medium. Parasitemia was determined by counting erythrocyte smears and monitoring (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine uptake. With no drug, parasitemia was 20.3 +/- 5.3%, whereas in the presence of IM and AM, parasitemia was reduced to 7.3 +/- 0.8% and 13.6 +/- 2.8%, respectively. The uptake of (/sup 3/H)hypoxanthine was reduced to 47 +/- 3.6% and 54 +/- 2.9% of control by IM and AM, respectively. Assays of hemolysis were conducted by incubating 0.5% RBC suspension in NaCl-Tris buffer for 3 h at 37/sup 0/C with variable concentrations of drugs and/or FP (1-7 ..mu..M). Both drugs at 10 to 100 ..mu..M significantly enhanced hemolysis induced by FP. No hemolysis by these drugs was detected in the absence of FP. It is concluded that the tricyclic antidepressants, IM and AM, possess substantial antimalarial properties, thereby supporting the hypothesis that drugs which interfere with riboflavin metabolism should also provide protection against malaria.

  9. Antimicrobial resistance determinant microarray for analysis of multi-drug resistant isolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taitt, Chris Rowe; Leski, Tomasz; Stenger, David; Vora, Gary J.; House, Brent; Nicklasson, Matilda; Pimentel, Guillermo; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Craft, David; Waterman, Paige E.; Lesho, Emil P.; Bangurae, Umaru; Ansumana, Rashid

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections in personnel wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan has made it challenging for physicians to choose effective therapeutics in a timely fashion. To address the challenge of identifying the potential for drug resistance, we have developed the Antimicrobial Resistance Determinant Microarray (ARDM) to provide DNAbased analysis for over 250 resistance genes covering 12 classes of antibiotics. Over 70 drug-resistant bacteria from different geographic regions have been analyzed on ARDM, with significant differences in patterns of resistance identified: genes for resistance to sulfonamides, trimethoprim, chloramphenicol, rifampin, and macrolide-lincosamidesulfonamide drugs were more frequently identified in isolates from sources in Iraq/Afghanistan. Of particular concern was the presence of genes responsible for resistance to many of the last-resort antibiotics used to treat war traumaassociated infections.

  10. A functional variomics tool for discovering drug resistance genes and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhiwei; Chen, Kaifu; Zhang, Jianhuai; Li, Yongxiang; Wang, Hui; Cui, Dandan; Tang, Jiangwu; Liu, Yong; Shi, Xiaomin; Li, Wei; Liu, Dan; Chen, Rui; Sucgang, Richard S.; Pan, Xuewen

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive discovery of genetic mechanisms of drug resistance and identification of in vivo drug targets represent significant challenges. Here we present a functional variomics technology in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This tool analyzes numerous genetic variants and effectively tackles both problems simultaneously. Using this tool, we discovered almost all genes that, due to mutations or modest overexpression, confer resistance to rapamycin, cycloheximide, and amphotericin B. Most significant among the resistance genes were drug targets, including multiple targets of a given drug. With amphotericin B, we discovered the highly conserved membrane protein Pmp3 as a potent resistance factor and a possible novel target. Widespread application of this tool should allow rapid identification of conserved resistance mechanisms and targets of many more compounds. New genes and alleles that confer resistance to other stresses can also be discovered. Similar tools in other systems such as human cell lines will also be useful. PMID:23416056

  11. Synthesis, Antimalarial Activity, and Intracellular Targets of MEFAS, a New Hybrid Compound Derived from Mefloquine and Artesunate▿

    PubMed Central

    de Pilla Varotti, Fernando; Botelho, Ana Cristina C.; Andrade, Anderson Assunção; de Paula, Renata C.; Fagundes, Elaine M. S.; Valverde, Alessandra; Mayer, Lúcia M. U.; Mendonça, Jorge Souza; de Souza, Marcus V. N.; Boechat, Núbia; Krettli, Antoniana Ursine

    2008-01-01

    A new synthetic antimalarial drug, a salt derived from two antimalarial molecules, mefloquine (MQ) and artesunate (AS), here named MEFAS, has been tested for its pharmacological activity. Combinations of AS plus MQ hydrochloride are currently being used in areas with drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum parasites; although AS clears parasitemia in shorter time periods than any other antimalarial drug, it does not cure infected patients; in addition, MQ causes side effects and is rather expensive, important problems considering that malaria affects mostly populations in poor countries. Here, we show that MEFAS is more effective than the combination of AS and MQ, tested in parallel at different mass proportions, against P. falciparum (chloroquine-resistant clone W2 and chloroquine-sensitive clone 3D7) in vitro and in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei, promoting cure of this infection. MEFAS tested against HepG2 hepatoma cells exhibited lower toxicity than the antimalarials AS and MQ alone or combined. Possible targets of MEFAS have been studied by confocal microscopy using fluorescent probes (Fluo-4 AM and BCECF-AM) in P. falciparum synchronous culture of W2-infected red blood cells. Dynamic images show that MEFAS exhibited intracellular action increasing cytoplasmic Ca2+ at 1.0 ng/ml. This effect was also observed in the presence of tapsigargin, an inhibitor of SERCA, suggesting an intracellular target distinct from the endoplasmic reticulum. Trophozoites loaded with BCECF-AM, when treated with MEFAS, were still able to mobilize protons from the digestive vacuole (DV), altering the pH gradient. However, in the presence of bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of the H+ pump from acidic compartments of eukaryotic cells, MEFAS had no action on the DV. In conclusion, the endoplasmic reticulum and DV are intracellular targets for MEFAS in Plasmodium sp., suggesting two modes of action of this new salt. Our data support MEFAS as a candidate for treating human malaria. PMID

  12. New quinoline derivatives demonstrate a promising antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro and Plasmodium berghei in vivo.

    PubMed

    Soares, Roberta Reis; da Silva, José Marcio Fernandes; Carlos, Bianca Cecheto; da Fonseca, Camila Campos; de Souza, Laila Salomé Araújo; Lopes, Fernanda Valério; de Paula Dias, Rafael Mafra; Moreira, Paulo Otávio Lourenço; Abramo, Clarice; Viana, Gustavo Henrique Ribeiro; de Pila Varotti, Fernando; da Silva, Adilson David; Scopel, Kézia Katiani Gorza

    2015-06-01

    Malaria continues to be an important public health problem in the world. Nowadays, the widespread parasite resistance to many drugs used in antimalarial therapy has made the effective treatment of cases and control of the disease a constant challenge. Therefore, the discovery of new molecules with good antimalarial activity and tolerance to human use can be really important in the further treatment of the disease. In this study we have investigated the antiplasmodial activity of 10 synthetic compounds derived from quinoline, five of them combined to sulfonamide and five to the hydrazine or hydrazide group. The compounds were evaluated according to their cytotoxicity against HepG2 and HeLa cell lines, their antimalarial activity against CQ-sensitive and CQ-resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains and, finally, their schizonticide blood action in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65. The compounds exhibited no cytotoxic action in HepG2 and HeLa cell lines when tested up to a concentration of 100 μg/mL. In addition, the hydrazine or hydrazide derivative compounds were less cytotoxic against cell lines and more active against CQ-sensitive and CQ-resistant P. falciparum strains, showing high SI (>1000 when SI was calculated using the CC50 from the 3D7 strain as reference). When tested in vivo, the hydrazine derivative 1f compound showed activity against the development of blood parasites similar to that observed with CQ, the reference drug. Interestingly, the 1f compound demonstrated the best LipE value (4.84) among all those tested in vivo. Considering the in vitro and in vivo activities of the compounds studied here and the LipE values, we believe the 1f compound to be the most promising molecule for further studies in antimalarial chemotherapy. PMID:25920564

  13. Drug resistance in cancer: molecular evolution and compensatory proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Ran

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment. Unfortunately, their success is limited due to the development of drug resistance within the tumor, which is an evolutionary process. Understanding how drug resistance evolves is a prerequisite to a better success of targeted therapies. Resistance is usually explained as a response to evolutionary pressure imposed by treatment. Thus, evolutionary understanding can and should be used in the design and treatment of cancer. In this article, drug-resistance to targeted therapies is reviewed from an evolutionary standpoint. The concept of apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation (AICP) is developed. It is shown that AICP helps to explain some of the phenomena that are observed experimentally in cancers. Finally, potential drug targets are suggested in light of AICP. PMID:26909596

  14. Targeting survivin overcomes drug resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eugene; Gang, Eun Ji; Hsieh, Yao-Te; Schaefer, Paul; Chae, Sanna; Klemm, Lars; Huantes, Sandra; Loh, Mignon; Conway, Edward M.; Kang, Eun-Suk; Hoe Koo, Hong; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Heisterkamp, Nora; Pelus, Louis; Keerthivasan, Ganesan; Crispino, John; Kahn, Michael; Müschen, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Relapse of drug-resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been associated with increased expression of survivin/BIRC5, an inhibitor of apoptosis protein, suggesting a survival advantage for ALL cells. In the present study, we report that inhibition of survivin in patient-derived ALL can eradicate leukemia. Targeting survivin with shRNA in combination with chemotherapy resulted in no detectable minimal residual disease in a xenograft model of primary ALL. Similarly, pharmacologic knock-down of survivin using EZN-3042, a novel locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotide, in combination with chemotherapy eliminated drug-resistant ALL cells. These findings show the importance of survivin expression in drug resistance and demonstrate that survivin inhibition may represent a powerful approach to overcoming drug resistance and preventing relapse in patients with ALL. PMID:21715311

  15. Drug resistance in African trypanosomiasis: the melarsoprol and pentamidine story

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Nicola; de Koning, Harry P.; Mäser, Pascal; Horn, David

    2013-01-01

    Melarsoprol and pentamidine represent the two main classes of drugs, the arsenicals and diamidines, historically used to treat the diseases caused by African trypanosomes: sleeping sickness in humans and Nagana in livestock. Cross-resistance to these drugs was first observed over sixty years ago and remains the only example of cross-resistance among sleeping sickness therapies. A Trypanosoma brucei adenosine transporter is well-known for its role in the uptake of both drugs. More recently, aquaglyceroporin 2 (AQP2) loss-of-function was linked to melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistance. AQP2, a channel that appears to facilitate drug accumulation, may also be linked to clinical cases of resistance. Here, we review these findings and consider some new questions as well as future prospects for tackling the devastating diseases caused by these parasites. PMID:23375541

  16. Drug resistance in cancer: molecular evolution and compensatory proliferation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Ran

    2016-03-15

    Targeted therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment. Unfortunately, their success is limited due to the development of drug resistance within the tumor, which is an evolutionary process. Understanding how drug resistance evolves is a prerequisite to a better success of targeted therapies. Resistance is usually explained as a response to evolutionary pressure imposed by treatment. Thus, evolutionary understanding can and should be used in the design and treatment of cancer. In this article, drug-resistance to targeted therapies is reviewed from an evolutionary standpoint. The concept of apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation (AICP) is developed. It is shown that AICP helps to explain some of the phenomena that are observed experimentally in cancers. Finally, potential drug targets are suggested in light of AICP. PMID:26909596

  17. Drug resistance and biochemical characteristics of Salmonella from turkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Poppe, C; Kolar, J J; Demczuk, W H; Harris, J E

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the antibiotic resistance and biochemical characteristics of 2690 Salmonella strains belonging to 52 serovars and isolated from environmental and feed samples from 270 turkey flocks in Canada. Resistance of the Salmonella strains to the aminoglycoside antibiotics varied widely; none of the strains were resistant to amikacin, 14.2% were resistant to neomycin, 25.8% were resistant to gentamicin, and 27.7% of the strains were resistant to kanamycin. Most strains (97.6%) were resistant to the aminocyclitol, spectinomycin. Regarding resistance to the beta-lactam antibiotics, 14.3% and 14.4% of the strains were resistant to ampicillin and carbenicillin, respectively, whereas only 5 (0.2%) of the strains were resistant to cephalothin. None of the strains were resistant to the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin or to polymyxin B. Resistance to chloramphenicol and nitrofurantoin was found in 2.4% and 7% of the strains, respectively. Only 1.7% of the strains were resistant to the trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole combination, whereas 58.1% were resistant to sulfisoxazole. Thirty-eight percent of the strains were resistant to tetracycline. Salmonella serovars differed markedly in their drug resistance profiles. Biochemical characterization of the Salmonella showed that the S. anatum, S. saintpaul and S. reading serovars could be divided into distinct biotypes. PMID:8548684

  18. Targeting imperfect vaccines against drug-resistance determinants: a strategy for countering the rise of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Joice, Regina; Lipsitch, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The growing prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in major pathogens is outpacing discovery of new antimicrobial classes. Vaccines mitigate the effect of antimicrobial resistance by reducing the need for treatment, but vaccines for many drug-resistant pathogens remain undiscovered or have limited efficacy, in part because some vaccines selectively favor pathogen strains that escape vaccine-induced immunity. A strain with even a modest advantage in vaccinated hosts can have high fitness in a population with high vaccine coverage, which can offset a strong selection pressure such as antimicrobial use that occurs in a small fraction of hosts. We propose a strategy to target vaccines against drug-resistant pathogens, by using resistance-conferring proteins as antigens in multicomponent vaccines. Resistance determinants may be weakly immunogenic, offering only modest specific protection against resistant strains. Therefore, we assess here how varying the specific efficacy of the vaccine against resistant strains would affect the proportion of drug-resistant vs. -sensitive strains population-wide for three pathogens--Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and influenza virus--in which drug resistance is a problem. Notably, if such vaccines confer even slightly higher protection (additional efficacy between 1% and 8%) against resistant variants than sensitive ones, they may be an effective tool in controlling the rise of resistant strains, given current levels of use for many antimicrobial agents. We show that the population-wide impact of such vaccines depends on the additional effect on resistant strains and on the overall effect (against all strains). Resistance-conferring accessory gene products or resistant alleles of essential genes could be valuable as components of vaccines even if their specific protective effect is weak. PMID:23935910

  19. Nanodrug Formed by Coassembly of Dual Anticancer Drugs to Inhibit Cancer Cell Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Chen, Fei; Pan, Yuanming; Li, Zhipeng; Xue, Xiangdong; Okeke, Chukwunweike Ikechukwu; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Chan; Peng, Ling; Wang, Paul C; Ma, Xiaowei; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2015-09-01

    Carrier-free pure nanodrugs (PNDs) that are composed entirely of pharmaceutically active molecules are regarded as promising candidates to be the next generation of drug formulations and are mainly formulated from supramolecular self-assembly of drug molecules. It benefits from the efficient use of drug compounds with poor aqueous solubility and takes advantage of nanoscale drug delivery systems. Here, a type of all-in-one nanoparticle consisting of multiple drugs with enhanced synergistic antiproliferation efficiency against drug-resistant cancer cells has been created. To nanoparticulate the anticancer drugs, 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) and doxorubicin (DOX) were chosen as a typical model. The resulting HD nanoparticles (HD NPs) were formulated by a "green" and convenient self-assembling method, and the water-solubility of 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) was improved 50-fold after nanosizing by coassembly with DOX. The formation process was studied by observing the morphological changes at various reaction times and molar ratios of DOX to HCPT. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed that DOX molecules tend to assemble around HCPT molecules through intermolecular forces. With the advantage of nanosizing, HD NPs could improve the intracellular drug retention of DOX to as much as 2-fold in drug-resistant cancer cells (MCF-7R). As a dual-drug-loaded nanoformulation, HD NPs effectively enhanced drug cytotoxicity to drug-resistant cancer cells. The combination of HCPT and DOX exhibited a synergistic effect as the nanosized HD NPs improved drug retention in drug-resistant cancer cells against P-gp efflux in MCF-7R cells. Furthermore, colony forming assays were applied to evaluate long-term inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, and these assays confirmed the greatly improved cytotoxicity of HD NPs in drug-resistant cells compared to free drugs. PMID:26270258

  20. Nanodrug Formed by Coassembly of Dual Anticancer Drugs to Inhibit Cancer Cell Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Chen, Fei; Pan, Yuanming; Li, Zhipeng; Xue, Xiangdong; Okeke, Chukwunweike Ikechukwu; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Chan; Peng, Ling; Wang, Paul C.; Ma, Xiaowei; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Carrier-free pure nanodrugs (PNDs) that are composed entirely of pharmaceutically active molecules are regarded as promising candidates to be the next generation of drug formulations and are mainly formulated from supramolecular self-assembly of drug molecules. It benefits from the efficient use of drug compounds with poor aqueous solubility and takes advantage of nanoscale drug delivery systems. Here, a type of all-in-one nanoparticle consisting of multiple drugs with enhanced synergistic antiproliferation efficiency against drug-resistant cancer cells has been created. To nanoparticulate the anticancer drugs, 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) and doxorubicin (DOX) were chosen as a typical model. The resulting HD nanoparticles (HD NPs) were formulated by a “green” and convenient self-assembling method, and the water-solubility of 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) was improved 50-fold after nanosizing by coassembly with DOX. The formation process was studied by observing the morphological changes at various reaction times and molar ratios of DOX to HCPT. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed that DOX molecules tend to assemble around HCPT molecules through intermolecular forces. With the advantage of nanosizing, HD NPs could improve the intracellular drug retention of DOX to as much as 2-fold in drug-resistant cancer cells (MCF-7R). As a dual-drug-loaded nanoformulation, HD NPs effectively enhanced drug cytotoxicity to drug-resistant cancer cells. The combination of HCPT and DOX exhibited a synergistic effect as the nanosized HD NPs improved drug retention in drug-resistant cancer cells against P-gp efflux in MCF-7R cells. Furthermore, colony forming assays were applied to evaluate long-term inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, and these assays confirmed the greatly improved cytotoxicity of HD NPs in drug-resistant cells compared to free drugs. PMID:26270258

  1. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post- chemotherapy tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens. PMID:26515599

  2. Sparse Representation for Prediction of HIV-1 Protease Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaxia; Weber, Irene T; Harrison, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    HIV rapidly evolves drug resistance in response to antiviral drugs used in AIDS therapy. Estimating the specific resistance of a given strain of HIV to individual drugs from sequence data has important benefits for both the therapy of individual patients and the development of novel drugs. We have developed an accurate classification method based on the sparse representation theory, and demonstrate that this method is highly effective with HIV-1 protease. The protease structure is represented using our newly proposed encoding method based on Delaunay triangulation, and combined with the mutated amino acid sequences of known drug-resistant strains to train a machine-learning algorithm both for classification and regression of drug-resistant mutations. An overall cross-validated classification accuracy of 97% is obtained when trained on a publically available data base of approximately 1.5×10(4) known sequences (Stanford HIV database http://hivdb.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/GenoPhenoDS.cgi). Resistance to four FDA approved drugs is computed and comparisons with other algorithms demonstrate that our method shows significant improvements in classification accuracy. PMID:24910813

  3. Sparse Representation for Prediction of HIV-1 Protease Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaxia; Weber, Irene T.; Harrison, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV rapidly evolves drug resistance in response to antiviral drugs used in AIDS therapy. Estimating the specific resistance of a given strain of HIV to individual drugs from sequence data has important benefits for both the therapy of individual patients and the development of novel drugs. We have developed an accurate classification method based on the sparse representation theory, and demonstrate that this method is highly effective with HIV-1 protease. The protease structure is represented using our newly proposed encoding method based on Delaunay triangulation, and combined with the mutated amino acid sequences of known drug-resistant strains to train a machine-learning algorithm both for classification and regression of drug-resistant mutations. An overall cross-validated classification accuracy of 97% is obtained when trained on a publically available data base of approximately 1.5×104 known sequences (Stanford HIV database http://hivdb.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/GenoPhenoDS.cgi). Resistance to four FDA approved drugs is computed and comparisons with other algorithms demonstrate that our method shows significant improvements in classification accuracy. PMID:24910813

  4. The multiple facets of drug resistance: one history, different approaches

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Some cancers like melanoma and pancreatic and ovarian cancers, for example, commonly display resistance to chemotherapy, and this is the major obstacle to a better prognosis of patients. Frequently, literature presents studies in monolayer cell cultures, 3D cell cultures or in vivo studies, but rarely the same work compares results of drug resistance in different models. Several of these works are presented in this review and show that usually cells in 3D culture are more resistant to drugs than monolayer cultured cells due to different mechanisms. Searching for new strategies to sensitize different tumors to chemotherapy, many methods have been studied to understand the mechanisms whereby cancer cells acquire drug resistance. These methods have been strongly advanced along the years and therapies using different drugs have been increasingly proposed to induce cell death in resistant cells of different cancers. Recently, cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been extensively studied because they would be the only cells capable of sustaining tumorigenesis. It is believed that the resistance of CSCs to currently used chemotherapeutics is a major contributing factor in cancer recurrence and later metastasis development. This review aims to appraise the experimental progress in the study of acquired drug resistance of cancer cells in different models as well as to understand the role of CSCs as the major contributing factor in cancer recurrence and metastasis development, describing how CSCs can be identified and isolated. PMID:24775603

  5. Synthesis and antimalarial activity of chain substituted pivaloyloxymethyl ester analogues of Fosmidomycin and FR900098.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Thomas; Schlüter, Katrin; Kaula, Uwe; Bergmann, Bärbel; Walter, Rolf D; Geffken, Detlef

    2006-08-01

    Fosmidomycin is a promising antimalarial drug candidate with a unique chemical structure and a novel mode of action. Chain substituted pivaloyloxymethyl ester derivatives of Fosmidomycin and its acetyl analogue FR900098 have been synthesized and their in vitro antimalarial activity versus the Chloroquine sensitive strain 3D7 of Plasmodium falciparum has been determined. PMID:16679022

  6. Phenotypic drug profiling in droplet microfluidics for better targeting of drug-resistant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, S.; Cohen, N.; Sabhachandani, P.; Konry, T.

    2015-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance is a key factor in the failure of chemotherapy. Due to intratumoral heterogeneity, cancer cells depict variations in intracellular drug uptake and efflux at the single cell level, which may not be detectable in bulk assays. In this study we present a droplet microfluidics-based approach to assess the dynamics of drug uptake, efflux and cytotoxicity in drug-sensitive and drug-resistant breast cancer cells. An integrated droplet generation and docking microarray was utilized to encapsulate single cells as well as homotypic cell aggregates. Drug-sensitive cells showed greater death in the presence or absence of Doxorubicin (Dox) compared to the drug-resistant cells. We observed heterogeneous Dox uptake in individual drug-sensitive cells while the drug-resistant cells showed uniformly low uptake and retention. Dox-resistant cells were classified into distinct subsets based on their efflux properties. Cells that showed longer retention of extracellular reagents also demonstrated maximal death. We further observed homotypic fusion of both cell types in droplets, which resulted in increased cell survival in the presence of high doses of Dox. Our results establish the applicability of this microfluidic platform for quantitative drug screening in single cells and multicellular interactions. PMID:26456240

  7. Old Drugs, New Purpose: Retooling Existing Drugs for Optimized Treatment of Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Kelly E.; Mitnick, Carole D.; Ann DeGroote, Mary; Obuku, Ekwaro; Belitsky, Vera; Hamilton, Carol D.; Makhene, Mamodikoe; Shah, Sarita; Brust, James C. M.; Durakovic, Nadza; Nuermberger, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis is hindered by the high toxicity and poor efficacy of second-line drugs. New compounds must be used together with existing drugs, yet clinical trials to optimize combinations of drugs for drug-resistant tuberculosis are lacking. We conducted an extensive review of existing in vitro, animal, and clinical studies involving World Health Organization–defined group 1, 2, and 4 drugs used in drug-resistant tuberculosis regimens to inform clinical trials and identify critical research questions. Results suggest that optimizing the dosing of pyrazinamide, the injectables, and isoniazid for drug-resistant tuberculosis is a high priority. Additional pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and toxicodynamic studies are needed for pyrazinamide and ethionamide. Clinical trials of the comparative efficacy and appropriate treatment duration of injectables are recommended. For isoniazid, rapid genotypic tests for Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutations should be nested in clinical trials. Further research focusing on optimization of dose and duration of drugs with activity against drug-resistant tuberculosis is paramount. PMID:22615332

  8. Phenotypic drug profiling in droplet microfluidics for better targeting of drug-resistant tumors.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, S; Cohen, N; Sabhachandani, P; Konry, T

    2015-12-01

    Acquired drug resistance is a key factor in the failure of chemotherapy. Due to intratumoral heterogeneity, cancer cells depict variations in intracellular drug uptake and efflux at the single cell level, which may not be detectable in bulk assays. In this study we present a droplet microfluidics-based approach to assess the dynamics of drug uptake, efflux and cytotoxicity in drug-sensitive and drug-resistant breast cancer cells. An integrated droplet generation and docking microarray was utilized to encapsulate single cells as well as homotypic cell aggregates. Drug-sensitive cells showed greater death in the presence or absence of Doxorubicin (Dox) compared to the drug-resistant cells. We observed heterogeneous Dox uptake in individual drug-sensitive cells while the drug-resistant cells showed uniformly low uptake and retention. Dox-resistant cells were classified into distinct subsets based on their efflux properties. Cells that showed longer retention of extracellular reagents also demonstrated m