Science.gov

Sample records for antimicrobial chemotherapy pact

  1. Development of Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT) for Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Hayley; Kohoutova, Darina; Mosse, Charles A.; Yahioglu, Gokhan; Stamati, Ioanna; Deonarain, Mahendra; Battah, Sinan; Ready, Derren; Allan, Elaine; Mullany, Peter; Lovat, Laurence B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and pseudo membranous colitis in the developed world. The aim of this study was to explore whether Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT) could be used as a novel approach to treating C. difficile infections. Methods PACT utilises the ability of light-activated photosensitisers (PS) to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as free radical species and singlet oxygen, which are lethal to cells. We screened thirteen PS against C. difficile planktonic cells, biofilm and germinating spores in vitro, and cytotoxicity of effective compounds was tested on the colorectal adenocarcinoma cell-line HT-29. Results Three PS were able to kill 99.9% of bacteria in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, both in the planktonic state and in a biofilm, after exposure to red laser light (0.2 J/cm2) without harming model colon cells. The applicability of PACT to eradicate C. difficile germinative spores indirectly was also shown, by first inducing germination with the bile salt taurocholate, followed by PACT. Conclusion This innovative and simple approach offers the prospect of a new antimicrobial therapy using light to treat C. difficile infection of the colon. PMID:26313448

  2. Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT) in osteomyelitis induced by Staphylococcus aureus: Microbiological and histological study.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis, João Alves; Dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Barreto, Brunna Santos; de Assis, Patrícia Nascimento; Almeida, Paulo Fernando; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz Barbosa

    2015-08-01

    Osteomyelitis is an inflammation either of medullar spaces or of the surface of cortical bones, which represents a bacterial infection. Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT) is a treatment based on a cytotoxic photochemical reaction that induces a series of metabolic reactions and culminates in bacterial suppression. Such effect led to the idea that it could be used as a treatment of osteomyelitis. Following approval by the Animal Experimentation Committee of the School of Dentistry of the Federal University of Bahia, the present randomized study used eighty Wistar rats with the aim to evaluate, by microbiological and histological analysis, the effects of Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy - PACT on tibial surgical bone defects in rats infected by Staphylococcus aureus. The animals were divided in groups: Control (non-infected); Control Osteomyelitis Induction; Saline solution; Photosensitizer; Red Laser and PACT - on this group, a diode laser (40mW; λ660nm ∅=0.04cm(2), CW, 10J/cm(2)) was used in combination with 5μg/ml of toluidine blue as the photosensitizer. On the microbiological study, immediately after treatment, the PACT group presented a bacterial reduction of 97.4% (p<0.001). Thirty days after treatment, there was a bacterial reduction of more than 99.9% (p<0.001). In the histological study, it was observed that the PACT group demonstrated an intense presence of osteocytes and absence of bone sequestration and micro-abscesses. The PACT using toluidine blue was effective in reducing the number of S. aureus enabling a better quality bone repair. PMID:26111990

  3. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) using phenothiazines derivatives associated with the red laser against staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Santos, Gustavo M. P.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Miranda, Anderson F. S.; Sampaio, Fernando J. P.; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Zanin, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Marcos A. V.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal effect of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) using phenothiazinium dye (Toluidine blue O and methylene blue) at a low concentration of 1μg/mL irradiated with the red laser at doses of 2.4 e 4.8 J/cm² on strain of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 23529) in vitro. For this research, tests were performed in triplicate and the samples were distributed into six test groups: (L-P-) Negative control (L1+P-) and (L2+P-) bacterial suspensions were irradiated with laser energy 2.4 and 4.8 J/cm2 respectively in the absence of photosensitizer; (L1+P+) and (L2+P+) bacterial suspensions were irradiated with laser in the presence of 1μg/ml of photosensitizer and finally (L-P+) bacterial suspensions only in the presence of phenothiazinium dye. Therefore, were analyzed the potential bactericidal PACT by counting of colony-forming units and analyzed statistically (ANOVA, Tukey test, p<0.05). The results showed that the negative control group when compared with laser group (L2+P-) it was observed a statistically significant increase (p<0.01) which L2+P- showed a higher number of CFU, on the other hand when compared to L1+P- no statistically significant difference was found, relation to the groups submitted to PACT, only showed a statistically significant reduction relative to the group irradiated L2+P+ (p<0.01) that showed a decrease in the number of CFU. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups submitted to PDT (L1+P+ and L2+P+). Although the results of this study have shown a reduction in average number of colony forming units by the appropriate laser-dye treatment combination, it needs further investigation.

  4. Drug and light delivery strategies for photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) of pulmonary pathogens: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Corona M; Tunney, Michael M; Magee, Nicholas D; Elborn, J Stuart; Bell, Steven; Singh, Thakur Raghu Raj; Donnelly, Ryan F

    2011-03-01

    Pulmonary disease is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) suffers, with multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex as problematic pathogens in terms of recurrent and unremitting infections. Novel treatment of pulmonary infection is required to improve the prognosis and quality of life for chronically infected patients. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is a treatment combining exposure to a light reactive drug, with light of a wavelength specific for activation of the drug, in order to induce cell death of bacteria. Previous studies have demonstrated the susceptibility of CF pathogens to PACT in vitro. However, for the treatment to be of clinical use, light and photosensitizer must be able to be delivered successfully to the target tissue. This preliminary study assessed the potential for delivery of 635 nm light and methylene blue to the lung using an ex vivo and in vitro lung model. Using a fibre-optic light delivery device coupled to a helium-neon laser, up to 11% of the total light dose penetrated through full thickness pulmonary parenchymal tissue, which indicates potential for multiple lobe irradiation in vivo. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of particles generated via methylene blue solution nebulisation was 4.40 μm, which is suitable for targeting the site of infection within the CF lung. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of light and methylene blue to be delivered to the site of infection in the CF lung. PACT remains a viable option for selective killing of CF lung pathogens. PMID:21333929

  5. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) against oral microorganisms with the use of blue LED associated to curcumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, Fernando José P.; Pires-Santos, Gustavo M.; de Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2016-03-01

    The use of curcumin as antimicrobial agent has been suggested and this effect may be potentialized by appropriate light. This study evaluated the effect of PACT using blue LED (λ450ηm +/- 5ηm, 220mW and spot of 0.785 cm2) associated to Curcumin at different concentrations (75, 37.5, 18.75, 9.37 and 4.68 μg /mL). Microorganisms from the oral mucosa and the posterior region of the tongue were collected and inoculated into test tubes containing 8mL of TSB medium. For these assays were performed 16 readings. In the assays were used culture plate of 24 wells. To each well was added 400 μL of the suspension containing the microorganisms. Suspensions without curcumin were placed in eight wells. Elsewhere, curcumin was applied varying concentrations with pre-irradiation time of 5 min. After stirring, 200 μL aliquot was taken from each well and the readings were immediately carried out by a spectrophotometer (SPECTRA MAX). Assessments of turbidity were performed following CLSI standard methods. After 1 hour of incubation in a bacteriological oven, 200 μL aliquot was removed from the remaining wells for a second reading. The results showed a decrease of total microorganisms in the most of test groups. The best result of the PACT was with 75 μg/mL, showing 81% of inhibition. It is concluded that PACT with blue LED associated to Curcumin could be a potential mechanism for controlling microorganism proliferation on the oral cavity.

  6. Investigation into the susceptibility of Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates to photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Watters, A. L.; Donnelly, R. F.; Tunney, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    The main cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) sufferers is progressive pulmonary damage caused by recurrent and often unremitting respiratory tract infection. Causative organisms include Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Haemophilus influenzae, but in recent years the Burkholderia cepacia complex has come to the fore. This group of highly drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria are associated with a rapid decline in lung function and the often fatal cepacia syndrome, with treatment limited to patient segregation and marginally effective antibacterial regimens. Thus, development of an effective treatment is of the upmost importance. PACT, a non-target specific therapy, has proven successful in killing both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, planktonic cultures of six strains of the B. cepacia complex were irradiated (635 nm, 200 J cm-2,10 minutes irradiation) following 30 seconds incubation with methylene blue (MB) or meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP). Rates of kill of > 99 % were achieved with MB- and TMP-PACT. A MB concentration of 50 μg ml-1 and TMP concentration of 500 μg ml-1 were associated with highest percentage kills for each photosensitizer. PACT is an attractive option for treatment of B.cepacia complex infection. Further study, involving biofilm culture susceptibility, delivery of light to the target and in vivo testing will be necessary before it PACT becomes a viable treatment option for CF patients who are colonised or infected with B. cepacia complex.

  7. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) using phenothiazines derivatives associated with the red-orange LED against staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Santos, Gustavo M. P.; Miranda, Anderson F. S.; Sampaio, Fernando J. P.; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Zainn, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Marcos A. V.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to contribute to PDT development by researching alternative light sources using redorange LED light at doses of 2.4 e 4.8 J/cm2 to evaluate the bactericidal effect of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) using phenothiazinium dye (Toluidine blue O and methylene blue) at a low concentration of 1μg/mL on strain of Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 23529) in vitro. For this research, tests were performed in triplicate and the samples were distributed into six test groups: (L-P-) Negative control (L1+ P-) and (L2+ P-) bacterial suspensions were irradiated with laser energy 2.4 and 4.8 J/cm2 respectively in the absence of photosensitizer; (L1 + P+) and (L2 + P+) bacterial suspensions were irradiated with laser in the presence of 1μg/ml of photosensitizer and finally (L-P+) bacterial suspensions only in the presence of phenothiazinium dye. Therefore, were analyzed the potential bactericidal PACT by counting of colony-forming units and analyzed statistically (ANOVA, Tukey test, p<0.05). The results demonstrated that comparing the LED group (L2 + P-) with negative control group, LED group (L1+ P-) and photosensitizer group there was a statistically significant (p<0.0001, p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively) that the group treated only with LED (energy density of 4.8J/cm2) increased the average of CFU counts. The negative control group when compared to the groups submitted to PDT only showed a statistically significant reduction (p<0.01) relative to the group (L2+P+) that showed a decrease in the number of CFU. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups submitted to PDT (L1+P+ and L2+P+). Although the results of this study have shown a reduction in average number of colony forming units by the appropriate LED-dye treatment combination, it needs further investigation.

  8. Investigation into the potential of sub-lethal photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) to reduce susceptibility of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Donnelly, R. F.; Tunney, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    In PACT, a combination of a sensitising drug and visible light cause the selective destruction of microbial cells via singlet oxygen production. As singlet oxygen is a non-specific oxidizing agent and is only present during illumination, development of resistance to this treatment is thought to be unlikely. However, in response to oxidative stress, bacteria can up-regulate oxidative stress genes and associated antibiotic resistance genes. The up-regulation of these genes and potential transfer of genetic material may result in a resistant bacterial population. This study determined whether treatment of clinically isolated meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains with sub-lethal doses of methylene blue (MB) and meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP)-PACT resulted in reduced susceptibility to antibiotics and previously lethal PACT. Exposure of strains to sub-lethal doses of photosensitizer in combination with light had no effect on susceptibility to previously lethal photosensitization. Furthermore, exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of both photosensitizers caused no significant changes in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for each strain tested. Any differences in susceptibility were not significant as they did not cross breakpoints between resistant and susceptible for any organism or antibiotic tested. Therefore, PACT remains an attractive alternative option for treatment of MRSA infections.

  9. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy using zinc phthalocyanine derivatives in treatment of bacterial skin infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Yaxin; Wang, Dong; Li, Linsen; Zhou, Shanyong; Huang, Joy H.; Chen, Jincan; Hu, Ping; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is an effective method for killing bacterial cells in view of the increasing problem of multiantibiotic resistance. We herein reported the PACT effect on bacteria involved in skin infections using a zinc phthalocyanine derivative, pentalysine β-carbonylphthalocyanine zinc (ZnPc-Lys). Compared with its anionic ZnPc counterpart, ZnPc-Lys showed an enhanced antibacterial efficacy in vitro and in an animal model of localized infection. Meanwhile, ZnPc-Lys was observed to significantly reduce the wound skin blood flow during wound healing, indicating an anti-inflammation activity. This study provides new insight on the mechanisms of PACT in bacterial skin infection.

  10. Oxidative stress of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy inhibits Candida albicans virulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Ilka Tiemy; Prates, Renato Araujo; Tegos, George P.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Simões Ribeiro, Martha

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is based on the principal that microorganisms will be inactivated using a light source combined to a photosensitizing agent in the presence of oxygen. Oxidative damage of cell components occurs by the action of reactive oxygen species leading to cell death for microbial species. It has been demonstrated that PACT is highly efficient in vitro against a wide range of pathogens, however, there is limited information for its in vivo potential. In addition, it has been demonstrated that sublethal photodynamic inactivation may alter the virulence determinants of microorganisms. In this study, we explored the effect of sublethal photodynamic inactivation to the virulence factors of Candida albicans. Methylene Blue (MB) was used as photosensitizer for sublethal photodynamic challenge on C. albicans associated with a diode laser irradiation (λ=660nm). The parameters of irradiation were selected in causing no reduction of viable cells. The potential effects of PACT on virulence determinants of C. albicans cells were investigated by analysis of germ tube formation and in vivo pathogenicity assays. Systemic infection was induced in mice by the injection of fungal suspension in the lateral caudal vein. C. albicans exposed to sublethal photodynamic inactivation formed significantly less germ tube than untreated cells. In addition, mice infected with C. albicans submitted to sublethal PACT survived for a longer period of time than mice infected with untreated cells. The oxidative damage promoted by sublethal photodynamic inactivation inhibited virulence determinants and reduced in vivo pathogenicity of C. albicans.

  11. Pioneers in Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neha; Rodrigues, Camilla; Soman, Rajeev

    2015-09-01

    "If we are not careful, we soon will be in the post-antibiotic era, and for some patients and some microbes we are already there"- Tom Friedan Antibiotics revolutionized medicine in the 20th century. The era of antibacterial chemotherapy began in 1907 with the discovery of arsphenamine, first synthesized by Alferd Bertheim and Paul Ehrlich in 1907, used to treat syphilis. The first systemically active antibiotic, Prontosil was discovered in 1933 by Gerhard Domagk, for which he was awarded the 1939 Nobel Prize. Fleming's accidental discovery and isolation of penicillin in September 1928 marked the start of modern antibiotics. It was a discovery that changed the course of history and saved millions of lives. PMID:27608881

  12. Photoactivated chemotherapy (PACT): the potential of excited-state d-block metals in medicine

    PubMed Central

    Farrer, Nicola J.; Salassa, Luca; Sadler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The fields of phototherapy and of inorganic chemotherapy both have long histories. Inorganic photoactivated chemotherapy (PACT) offers both temporal and spatial control over drug activation and has remarkable potential for the treatment of cancer. Following photoexcitation, a number of different decay pathways (both photophysical and photochemical) are available to a metal complex. These pathways can result in radiative energy release, loss of ligands or transfer of energy to another species, such as triplet oxygen. We discuss the features which need to be considered when developing a metal-based anticancer drug, and the common mechanisms by which the current complexes are believed to operate. We then provide a comprehensive overview of PACT developments for complexes of the different d-block metals for the treatment of cancer, detailing the more established areas concerning Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Re, Fe, Ru, Os, Co, Rh, Pt, and Cu and also highlighting areas where there is potential for greater exploration. Nanoparticles (Ag, Au) and quantum dots (Cd) are also discussed for their photothermal destructive potential. We also discuss the potential held in particular by mixed-metal systems and Ru complexes. PMID:20023896

  13. Randomized in vivo evaluation of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy on deciduous carious dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner-Oliveira, Carolina; Longo, Priscila Larcher; Aranha, Ana Cecília Corrêa; Ramalho, Karen Müller; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this randomized in vivo study was to compare antimicrobial chemotherapies in primary carious dentin. Thirty-two participants ages 5 to 7 years underwent partial caries removal from deep carious dentin lesions in primary molars and were subsequently divided into three groups: control [chlorhexidine and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC)], LEDTB [photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) with light-emitting diode associated with toluidine blue solution and RMGIC], and LMB [PACT with laser associated with methylene blue solution and RMGIC]. The participants were submitted to initial clinical and radiographic examinations. Demographic features and biofilm, gingival, and DMFT/DMFS indexes were evaluated, in addition to clinical and radiographic followups at 6 and 12 months after treatments. Carious dentin was collected before and after each treatment, and the number of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus casei, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Atopobium rimae, and total bacteria was established by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. No signs of pain or restoration failure were observed. All therapies were effective in reducing the number of microorganisms, except for S. sobrinus. No statistical differences were observed among the protocols used. All therapies may be considered as effective modern approaches to minimal intervention for the management of deep primary caries treatment.

  14. Clinical use of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy for the treatment of deep carious lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, Camila De Almeida B.; Simionato, Maria Regina L.; Ramalho, Karen Müller; Imparato, José Carlos P.; Pinheiro, Sérgio Luiz; Luz, Maria A. A. C.

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) via irradiation, using a low power laser associated with a photosensitization dye, as an alternative to remove cariogenic microorganisms by drilling. Remaining dentinal samples in deep carious lesions on permanent molars (n = 26) were treated with 0.01% methylene blue dye and irradiated with a low power laser (InGaAIP - indium gallium aluminum phosphide; λ = 660 nm; 100 mW; 320 Jcm-2 90 s; 9J). Samples of dentin from the pulpal wall region were collected with a micropunch before and immediately after PACT and kept in a transport medium for microbiological analysis. Samples were cultured in plates of Brucella blood agar, Mitis Salivarius Bacitracin agar and Rogosa SL agar to determine the total viable bacteria, mutans streptococci and Lactobacillus spp. counts, respectively. After incubation, colony-forming units were counted and microbial reduction was calculated for each group of bacteria. PACT led to statistically significant reductions in mutans streptococci (1.38 log), Lactobacillus spp. (0.93 log), and total viable bacteria (0.91 log). This therapy may be an appropriate approach for the treatment of deep carious lesions using minimally invasive procedures.

  15. Effect of non-homogenous thermal stress during sub-lethal photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadura, N.; Kokkinos, D.; Dehipawala, S.; Cheung, E.; Sullivan, R.; Subramaniam, R.; Schneider, P.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Holden, T.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2012-03-01

    Pathogens could be inactivated via a light source coupled with a photosensitizing agent in photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT). This project studied the effect of non-homogenous substrate on cell colony. The non-homogeneity could be controlled by iron oxide nano-particles doping in porous glassy substrates such that each cell would experience tens of hot spots when illuminated with additional light source. The substrate non-homogeneity was characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure at Brookhaven Synchrotron Light Source. Microscopy images of cell motion were used to study the motility. Laboratory cell colonies on non-homogenous substrates exhibit reduced motility similar to those observed with sub-lethal PCAT treatment. Such motility reduction on non-homogenous substrate is interpreted as the presence of thermal stress. The studied pathogens included E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Non-pathogenic microbes Bacillus subtilis was also studied for comparison. The results show that sub-lethal PACT could be effective with additional non-homogenous thermal stress. The use of non-uniform illumination on a homogeneous substrate to create thermal stress in sub-micron length scale is discussed via light correlation in propagation through random medium. Extension to sub-lethal PACT application complemented with thermal stress would be an appropriate application.

  16. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy using zinc phthalocyanine derivative for bacterial skin infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Yaxin; Li, Linsen; Zhou, Shanyong; Chen, Jincan; Hu, Ping; Huang, Mingdong

    2014-09-01

    Folliculitis, furunculosis and acne vulgaris are very common skin disorders of the hair follicles and are associated with large grease-producing (sebaceous) glands. Although the detailed mechanisms involved these skin disorders are not fully understood, it is believed that the bacteria Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus are the key pathogenic factors involved. Conventional treatments targeting the pathogenic factors include a variety of topical and oral medications such as antibiotics. The wide use of antibiotics leads to bacterial resistance, and hence there is a need for new alternatives in above bacterial skin treatment. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is based on an initial photosensitization of the infected area, followed by irradiation with visible light, producing singlet oxygen which is cytotoxic to bacteria. Herein we reported a zinc phthalocyanine derivative, pentalysine β-carbonylphthalocyanine zinc (ZnPc-(Lys)5) and its PACT effect for the bacteria involved in these skin infections. Our results demonstrated strong bactericidal effects of this photosensitizer on both strains of the bacteria, suggesting ZnPc-(Lys)5 as a promising antimicrobial photosensitizer for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by these bacteria.

  17. Susceptibility of Ureaplasma urealyticum to Methylene Blue-Mediated Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy: An in vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tinglu; Chen, Bancheng; Yu, Bo; Zhong, Qili; Huang, Guoxin; Hu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the susceptibility of Ureaplasma urealyticum to methylene blue-mediated photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT). Three U. urealyticum strains including the standard serotype 1 and 5, and a clinically collected strain were used in this study. Strains were first incubated in 96-well culture plates in the presence of methylene blue with decreasing concentrations (from 1 to 0.015625 mg mL(-1)) for 20 or 60 min, and then submitted to irradiation with a light-emitting diode laser with a power density of 100 mW cm(-2) for 8, 17, 34 or 68 min. Regrowth of the strains was performed soon after irradiation. A significant inactivation effect was observed after PACT. Longer incubation time induced more extensive inactivation of U. urealyticum. No difference in response to PACT was observed between the two biovars of U. urealyticum. It was concluded that PACT had a significant inactivation effect on U. urealyticum, and it might be a promising alternative treatment for resistant U. urealyticum infections. PMID:25688579

  18. Inactivation of acyclovir-sensitive and -resistant strains of herpes simplex virus type 1 in vitro by photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Latief, Miftahul Akhyar; Ko, Ji-Ae; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Obana, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) with the new porphyrin derivative TONS 504 and a light-emitting diode (LED) against acyclovir (ACV)-sensitive and -resistant herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Methods Human FL cells infected with the viral strains were subjected to PACT with TONS 504 at various concentrations (0.01 to 10 mg/l) and irradiation at various light energies (10 to 30 J/cm2) and were then incubated for 24 h before analysis. Results Immunocytofluorescence analysis with antibodies to HSV-1 revealed that PACT eliminated HSV-1 and ACV-resistant HSV-1 in a manner dependent on the TONS 504 concentration and light energy. Complete eradication of both viruses was apparent at a TONS 504 concentration of 10 mg/l and light energy of 10 to 30 J/cm2 as well as at a TONS 504 concentration of 1 mg/l and light energy of 20 or 30 J/cm2. No antiviral effect was apparent with TONS 504 in the absence of irradiation or with irradiation in the absence of TONS 504. Staining of cell nuclei with 4′, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole revealed no apparent cytotoxicity of the PACT system, a finding that was confirmed by the system’s failure to induce the release of lactate dehydrogenase from the host cells. Conclusions We conclude that our PACT system based on TONS 504 and an LED is effective for eliminating HSV-1 and ACV-resistant HSV-1 without a harmful effect on host cells. PMID:25999680

  19. Evaluation of Photodynamic Antimicrobial Therapy (PACT) against Trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi: In Vitro Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Artur F. S.; Soares, Luiz G. P.; Aciole, Jouber M. S.; Aciole, Gilberth T. S.; Pitta, Ivan R.; Galdino, Suely L.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2011-08-01

    Policies to combat Chagas disease presents a considerable degree of negligence and is classified at level III by TDR, where the focus of research is based on the improvement and wider dissemination of existing tools and strategies for combating them. The PACT is based on topical or systemic administration of a nontoxic dye sensitive to light, followed by low dose irradiation with visible light of wavelength appropriate. In the presence of oxygen found in the cells, the photosensitizer (FS) enabled may react with molecules in its vicinity by electron transfer or hydrogen, leading to production of free radicals (type I reaction) or by energy transfer to oxygen (type II reaction), leading to production of singlet oxygen. Both paths can lead to cell death and the destruction of diseased tissue. In this work, we verify the effectiveness of PACT associated with a semiconductor laser InGaAlP, a wavelength (λ) equal to 660 nm±10 nm, 30 mW optical power, emitting red light in the visible spectrum, with a dose of 4 J/cm2 in continuous mode, using methylene blue in five differents concentrations on the infective trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. To determine the viability of the parasites, one sample from each treatment group at each concentration was removed and analyzed in a hemocytometer, observing the decrease in the number of live parasites for the solution without treatment. The results demonstrated significant percentage of parasite lysis (up to 86% lethality), what can not be observed in the groups treated with laser or with the FS.

  20. In vitro influence of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy on staphylococcus aureus by using phenothiazines derivatives associated with laser/LED light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Pires-Santos, Gustavo M.; Sampaio, Fernando J. P.; Gomes Júnior, Rafael Araújo; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Brugnera, Aldo; Zanin, Fátima A. A.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz B.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) using phenothiazinium dyes - PTZ irradiated with red laser (λ660nm) or red-orange LED (λ632+/-2nm) on Staphylococcus aureus in vitro. triplicate tests were performed in 10 groups: control, Laser (L1+P- and L2+P-) bacterial suspensions were irradiated only with laser energy 2.4 and 4.8 J/cm2 respectively, (Led1+P- and Led2+P-) irradiated only with LED energy 2.4 and 4.8 J/cm2 respectively, (L1+P+ and L2+P+) irradiated with laser in the presence of 1μg/ml of photosensitizer, (Led1+P+ and Led2+P+) irradiated with LED in the presence of 1μg/ml of photosensitizer and finally (L-P+) only in the presence of PTZ dye. Bactericidal effect of the PACT was assessed by counting colony-forming units. The results showed no significant difference on regards different energy densities on group PACT for both lights. PACT groups (L2+P+ and Led2+P+) compared to the Control showed significant reduction of CFUs. LED/Laser groups (L2+P- and Led2+P-) compared to control and PTZ groups showed also significant differences as groups LED/Laser (4.8J/cm2) increased the average of CFUs. Although the results of this study have shown a reduction in average number of colonyforming units by the appropriate Laser or LED-dye treatment combination, it this topic requires further investigation.

  1. Suicide pacts.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, L; Thilothammal, N

    1993-01-01

    Suicide pacts in an Indian population were studied through police records of the state of Tamul Nadu. A total of 148 suicide pacts, involving 324 persons, were identified. More women died in them than might be expected from general population figures. Social stressors like financial problems and marriage-related issues were the principal causes. The results and their implications are discussed and compared with those obtained in Western and other Eastern countries. PMID:8504674

  2. Evaluation of photodynamic antimicrobial therapy (PACT) against promastigotes form of the Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis: in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Artur F. S.; Sangiorgi, Bruno B.; Galdino, Suely L.; Pitta, Ivan R.; Barral Netto, Manoel; Correia, Neandder A.; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2012-03-01

    Leishmaniasis is a complex disease that affects more than 12 million people in 88 countries worldwide. Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis is the most common species in the Americas and the most important causative agent of cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis in Brazil. The therapeutic arsenal routinely employed to treat patients with leishmaniasis is limited and unsatisfactory. For cutaneous leishmaniasis, pentavalent antimonials are the first line therapeutic scheme recommended by the WHO. These compounds are highly toxic, poorly tolerated and their effectiveness highly variable. In this work, a technique with, so far, an unknown disadvantage is discussed. The aim of this study was to verify the effectiveness of PACT in vitro, as a new technique for the treatment of Leishmaniasis. For this, semiconductor laser (λ = 660nm, 40mW, 4.2J/cm2, CW) associated to phenothiazine's derivatives (5 and 10 μg/ml, TBO, Methylene Blue or Phenothiazine) on the promastigotes form of Leishmania braziliensis in a single session was used. Viability of the parasites was assessed in quadruplicates of each group. The samples were removed and analyzed in a hemocytometer 72h after PACT. We found an important decrease in the number of viable parasites on all treated groups in comparison to their controls. The results of present study showed significant percentage of lethality (above 95%) of the protocol. The 99.23% of lethality was achieved with 10 μg/ml of TBO. No lethality was seen on groups treated neither with laser nor with each compounds separately. The results are promising and indicative that the use of PACT may be a powerful treatment of leishmaniasis when compared to already available ones.

  3. In vitro study of the photodynamic antimicrobial therapy (PACT) against promastigotes form of the leishmania (viannia) braziliensis: in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Artur F. S.; Sangiorgi, Bruno B.; Galdino, Suely L.; Pitta, Ivan R.; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.

    2013-03-01

    Leishmaniasis, a protozoan parasitic disease that remains a major worldwide health problem with high endemicity in developing countries. Treatment of cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) should be decided by the clinical lesions, etiological species and its potential to develop into mucosal Leishmaniasis. High cost, systemic toxicity, and diminished efficacy due to development of parasite resistance are the serious drawbacks of current treatment options. Thus, identifying new, effective, and safer anti-leishmanial drug(s) is of paramount importance. The aim of this study was to verify the effectiveness of PACT in vitro, as a new technique for the treatment of Leishmaniasis. For this, semiconductor laser (λ = 660nm, 40mW, 8.4J/cm2, CW) associated to phenothiazine's derivatives (5 and 10 μg/ml, TBO, Methylene Blue or Phenothiazine) on the promastigotes form of Leishmania braziliensis in a single session was used. Viability of the parasites was assessed in quadruplicates of each group. The samples were removed and analyzed in a hemocytometer 72h after PACT. We found an important decrease in the number of viable parasites on all treated groups in comparison to their controls. The results of present study showed significant percentage of lethality (above 92%) of the protocol. The 98.33% of lethality was achieved with 10 μg/ml of FTZ. No lethality was seen on groups treated neither with laser nor with each compounds separately. The results are promising and indicative that the use of PACT may be a powerful treatment of Leishmaniasis when compared to already available ones.

  4. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy to treat chemotherapy-induced oral lesions: Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Breno Amaral; Melo Filho, Mário Rodrigues; Simões, Alyne

    2016-03-01

    The development of Angular Cheilitis and the reactivation of Herpes Simplex Virus, could be related to a decrease in the resistance of the immune system in the infected host, being common in cancer patients receiving antineoplastic chemotherapy. The objective of the present manuscript is to report Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy as a treatment of infected oral lesions of patients submitted to chemotherapy. PMID:26222604

  5. Methylene Blue-Loaded Dissolving Microneedles: Potential Use in Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy of Infected Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Caffarel-Salvador, Ester; Kearney, Mary-Carmel; Mairs, Rachel; Gallo, Luigi; Stewart, Sarah A.; Brady, Aaron J.; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy involves delivery of a photosensitising drug that is activated by light of a specific wavelength, resulting in generation of highly reactive radicals. This activated species can cause destruction of targeted cells. Application of this process for treatment of microbial infections has been termed “photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy” (PACT). In the treatment of chronic wounds, the delivery of photosensitising agents is often impeded by the presence of a thick hyperkeratotic/necrotic tissue layer, reducing their therapeutic efficacy. Microneedles (MNs) are an emerging drug delivery technology that have been demonstrated to successfully penetrate the outer layers of the skin, whilst minimising damage to skin barrier function. Delivering photosensitising drugs using this platform has been demonstrated to have several advantages over conventional photodynamic therapy, such as, painless application, reduced erythema, enhanced cosmetic results and improved intradermal delivery. The aim of this study was to physically characterise dissolving MNs loaded with the photosensitising agent, methylene blue and assess their photodynamic antimicrobial activity. Dissolving MNs were fabricated from aqueous blends of Gantrez® AN-139 co-polymer containing varying loadings of methylene blue. A height reduction of 29.8% was observed for MNs prepared from blends containing 0.5% w/w methylene blue following application of a total force of 70.56 N/array. A previously validated insertion test was used to assess the effect of drug loading on MN insertion into a wound model. Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans biofilms were incubated with various methylene blue concentrations within the range delivered by MNs in vitro (0.1–2.5 mg/mL) and either irradiated at 635 nm using a Paterson Lamp or subjected to a dark period. Microbial susceptibility to PACT was determined by assessing the total viable count. Kill rates of >96%, were achieved for

  6. Longitudinal effect of curcumin-photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy in adolescents during fixed orthodontic treatment: a single-blind randomized clinical trial study.

    PubMed

    Paschoal, Marco Aurélio; Moura, Cíntia Maria Zanin; Jeremias, Fabiano; Souza, Juliana Feltrin; Bagnato, Vanderlei S; Giusti, Juçaíra S M; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2015-11-01

    White spot lesions are one of the concerns during the fixed orthodontic treatment. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial/anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin-photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (c-PACT) and chlorhexidine varnish on the plaque accumulation and gingival bleeding in adolescents under fixed orthodontic treatment. A randomized clinical trial was performed with an initial number of 45 patients being distributed into three groups: group I-chlorhexidine varnish 2%, group II-placebo varnish, and group III-c-PACT (curcumin at 1.5 mg.mL(-1)) exposed to blue Light-emitting diode (LED) light at 450 nm (power density = 165 mW.cm(-2), fluency = 96 J.cm(-2), total dose = 150.7 J). The treatments were performed for four consecutive times with an interval of 1 week each. After the interventions, two calibrated examiners (Kappa value = 0.75) analyzed the dental plaque accumulation by plaque index (PI) and gingivitis condition by gingival bleeding index (GBI) with 1 and 3 months of follow-up after the treatments comprised a final sample of 35 patients. No significant difference was found to PI between the groups during baseline and 1-month period. Group III (1.52 ± 0.51) presented significance difference from group I (0.91 ± 0.75) and group II (1.03 ± 0.51) at 3 months of follow-up. In this same period, there was more plaque accumulation with significant statistical difference (P ≤ 0.05) in comparison to the other periods to all studied groups. There was a GBI reduction statistically significant to groups I and III at 1-month follow-up in comparison to other periods. No effect was verified to dental plaque accumulation after the photodynamic application mediated with curcumin activated with a blue LED light. PMID:25543296

  7. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Chemotherapy Chemotherapy (chemo) usually refers to the use of ... better sense of control over your cancer treatment. Chemotherapy Basics How Is Chemotherapy Used to Treat Cancer? ...

  8. The 2016 Garrod Lecture: The role of the healthcare epidemiologist in antimicrobial chemotherapy-a view from the USA.

    PubMed

    McGowan, John E

    2016-09-01

    Antimicrobial chemotherapy now spans 80 years and four generations. The healthcare epidemiologist has an important role to play in this field. Efforts focus in three areas: (i) minimizing the transmission of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in healthcare settings (infection control); (ii) optimizing use of currently available antibacterial drugs (antibiotic stewardship); and (iii) recognizing and responding to opportunities for new drug development. For each area, the epidemiologist provides data that address four practical questions-'What is the problem?', 'What should be done?', 'Is it being done?' and 'Is it working?'. A team approach is crucial to acting on the epidemiological data. Examples are presented to illustrate different roles of the epidemiologist, and tools and measures that have been developed to address some problems of current importance. Monitoring of quality, integrity and security of data remains a major focus. The epidemiologist will continue to have a key role in antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:27550989

  9. Factors Determining Staphylococcus aureus Susceptibility to Photoantimicrobial Chemotherapy: RsbU Activity, Staphyloxanthin Level, and Membrane Fluidity

    PubMed Central

    Kossakowska-Zwierucho, Monika; Kaźmierkiewicz, Rajmund; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Nakonieczna, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Photoantimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) constitutes a particular type of stress condition, in which bacterial cells induce a pleiotropic and as yet unexplored effect. In light of this, the key master regulators are of putative significance to the overall phototoxic outcome. In Staphylococcus aureus, the alternative sigma factor σB controls the expression of genes involved in the response to environmental stress. We show that aberration of any sigB operon genes in S. aureus USA300 isogenic mutants causes a pronounced sensitization (>5 log10 reduction in CFU drop) to PACT with selected photosensitizers, namely protoporphyrin diarginate, zinc phthalocyanine and rose bengal. This effect is partly due to aberration-coupled staphyloxanthin synthesis inhibition. We identified frequent mutations in RsbU, a σB activator, in PACT-vulnerable clinical isolates of S. aureus, resulting in σB activity impairment. Locations of significant changes in protein structure (IS256 insertion, early STOP codon occurrence, substitutions A230T and A276D) were shown in a theoretical model of S. aureus RsbU. As a phenotypic hallmark of PACT-vulnerable S. aureus strains, we observed an increased fluidity of bacterial cell membrane, which is a result of staphyloxanthin content and other yet unidentified factors. Our research indicates σB as a promising target of adjunctive antimicrobial therapy and suggests that enhanced cell membrane fluidity may be an adjuvant strategy in PACT. PMID:27486456

  10. Factors Determining Staphylococcus aureus Susceptibility to Photoantimicrobial Chemotherapy: RsbU Activity, Staphyloxanthin Level, and Membrane Fluidity.

    PubMed

    Kossakowska-Zwierucho, Monika; Kaźmierkiewicz, Rajmund; Bielawski, Krzysztof P; Nakonieczna, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Photoantimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) constitutes a particular type of stress condition, in which bacterial cells induce a pleiotropic and as yet unexplored effect. In light of this, the key master regulators are of putative significance to the overall phototoxic outcome. In Staphylococcus aureus, the alternative sigma factor σ(B) controls the expression of genes involved in the response to environmental stress. We show that aberration of any sigB operon genes in S. aureus USA300 isogenic mutants causes a pronounced sensitization (>5 log10 reduction in CFU drop) to PACT with selected photosensitizers, namely protoporphyrin diarginate, zinc phthalocyanine and rose bengal. This effect is partly due to aberration-coupled staphyloxanthin synthesis inhibition. We identified frequent mutations in RsbU, a σ(B) activator, in PACT-vulnerable clinical isolates of S. aureus, resulting in σ(B) activity impairment. Locations of significant changes in protein structure (IS256 insertion, early STOP codon occurrence, substitutions A230T and A276D) were shown in a theoretical model of S. aureus RsbU. As a phenotypic hallmark of PACT-vulnerable S. aureus strains, we observed an increased fluidity of bacterial cell membrane, which is a result of staphyloxanthin content and other yet unidentified factors. Our research indicates σ(B) as a promising target of adjunctive antimicrobial therapy and suggests that enhanced cell membrane fluidity may be an adjuvant strategy in PACT. PMID:27486456

  11. NATO-Warsaw Pact

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    If proposals to reduce conventional forces and equipment in Europe are adopted, how much of a peace dividend will the United States and its NATO allies reap This report discussed how GAO looked at the savings associated with a conventional forces reduction treaty and found that only a limited NATO peace dividend will result directly from the treaty proposals. Further, this dividend will not be shared equally by all NATO allies. Under the treaty, only the United States and the Soviet Union are required to make troop cuts. U.S. savings would result from the DOD decision to reduce the total number of its forces rather than simply relocate personnel from Europe. Implementing a Conventional Armed Forces in Europe treaty will be a complex task that will result in all NATO allies incurring certain costs. For example, verifying compliance with the treaty may require extensive NATO inspection and monitoring of Warsaw Pact force levels and treaty-limited equipment. NATO will incur additional costs in complying with treaty provisions that require the destruction of many conventional weapons.

  12. Final report from the Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing, Japanese Society of Chemotherapy, on the agar dilution method (2007).

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Ariaki; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Watanabe, Kunitomo; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Intetsu; Nagasawa, Zenzo

    2008-10-01

    In 1968, the agar dilution method was developed as an independent Japanese method for measuring the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antimicrobial agents. As this method differed in a few respects from the MIC measurement methods used in other countries, it was revised in 1981, by a committee headed by Susumu Mitsuhashi, and the revised method (Chemotherapy 29:76-79, 1981) has been used since then. In 1979, an agar dilution method for measuring the MIC of anaerobes was developed by a committee chaired by Nozomu Kosakai (Chemotherapy 27:559-561, 1979). In 1990, a committee headed by Sachiko Goto approved a broth microdilution method for nonfastidious bacteria (Chemotherapy 38:102-105, 1990). Later, a committee headed by Atsushi Saito examined media that would be suitable for nonfastidious bacteria and fastidious bacteria, and they endeavored to prepare a broth microdilution method for anaerobic bacteria. In this context, a new broth microdilution method was proposed at the 40th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC) in Nagoya in 1992, and the proposal was adopted as the standard JSC method after some modification (Chemotherapy 41: 183-189, 1993). The agar dilution method has remained unrevised for approximately 20 years. A proposal to review this method was recently made, and the 2007 Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing was formed, comprising the JSC members listed below. Under the auspices of this committee, the method revised in 1981 was reviewed in comparison to the international standard method (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute [CLSI] method). PMID:18936894

  13. Positive Adolescent Choices Training (PACT).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, W. Rodney; And Others

    Positive Adolescent Choices Training (PACT) is a health promotion program providing violence prevention programming targeted at black youth, at high risk for becoming either perpetrators or victims of violence. Conducted by the School of Professional Psychology of Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio, in cooperation with Dayton Public Schools,…

  14. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy activity of gallium tetra-(4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin when conjugated to differently shaped platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Managa, Muthumuni; Nyokong, Tebello

    2015-11-01

    This work reports on the conjugation of differently shaped Pt nanoparticles (PtNPs) with ClGa(III) 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(4-carboxyphenyl) porphyrin (ClGaTCPP). The resulting conjugates were used for photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy against Staphylococcus aureus. The degree of photo-inactivation is dependent on concentration of the conjugates, light dose (fluence) and illumination time. The log reduction obtained for ClGaTCPP when conjugated to cubic PtNPs was 4.64 log (which indicate 99.99% of the bacteria have been killed), which is much higher than 3.94 log unit for ClGaTCPP-Hexagonal PtNPs and 3.31 log units for ClGaTCPP-Unshaped PtNPs. ClGaTCPP alone gave a log unit reduction of less than 3, showing the importance of conjugation to PtNPs.

  15. PACT: Parents and Children Together. Program Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Loralyn; Hager, Elizabeth A.

    The Parent and Children Together (PACT) project, developed by the Arkansas Valley and High Plain Regional Library Services in Colorado, is aimed at promoting lifelong interest in reading among today's children. PACT services include: (1) sponsoring workshops that will train librarians and volunteers to plan and present parents' programs; (2)…

  16. Does High-Dose Antimicrobial Chemotherapy Prevent the Evolution of Resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Day, Troy; Read, Andrew F.

    2016-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy has long been advocated as a means of controlling drug resistance in infectious diseases but recent empirical studies have begun to challenge this view. We develop a very general framework for modeling and understanding resistance emergence based on principles from evolutionary biology. We use this framework to show how high-dose chemotherapy engenders opposing evolutionary processes involving the mutational input of resistant strains and their release from ecological competition. Whether such therapy provides the best approach for controlling resistance therefore depends on the relative strengths of these processes. These opposing processes typically lead to a unimodal relationship between drug pressure and resistance emergence. As a result, the optimal drug dose lies at either end of the therapeutic window of clinically acceptable concentrations. We illustrate our findings with a simple model that shows how a seemingly minor change in parameter values can alter the outcome from one where high-dose chemotherapy is optimal to one where using the smallest clinically effective dose is best. A review of the available empirical evidence provides broad support for these general conclusions. Our analysis opens up treatment options not currently considered as resistance management strategies, and it also simplifies the experiments required to determine the drug doses which best retard resistance emergence in patients. PMID:26820986

  17. Payload crew training scheduler (PACTS) user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of the payload specialist training scheduler (PACTS) is discussed in this user's manual which is used to schedule payload specialists for mission training on the Spacelab experiments. The PACTS program is a fully automated interactive, computerized scheduling program equipped with tutorial displays. The tutorial displays are sufficiently detailed for use by a program analyst having no computer experience. The PACTS program is designed to operate on the UNIVAC 1108 computer system, and has the capability to load output into a PDP 11/45 Interactive Graphics Display System for printing schedules. The program has the capacity to handle up to three overlapping Spacelab missions.

  18. Interference of bacterial cell-to-cell communication: a new concept of antimicrobial chemotherapy breaks antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Hidetada; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria use a cell-to-cell communication activity termed “quorum sensing” to coordinate group behaviors in a cell density dependent manner. Quorum sensing influences the expression profile of diverse genes, including antibiotic tolerance and virulence determinants, via specific chemical compounds called “autoinducers”. During quorum sensing, Gram-negative bacteria typically use an acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) called autoinducer 1. Since the first discovery of quorum sensing in a marine bacterium, it has been recognized that more than 100 species possess this mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. In addition to being of interest from a biological standpoint, quorum sensing is a potential target for antimicrobial chemotherapy. This unique concept of antimicrobial control relies on reducing the burden of virulence rather than killing the bacteria. It is believed that this approach will not only suppress the development of antibiotic resistance, but will also improve the treatment of refractory infections triggered by multi-drug resistant pathogens. In this paper, we review and track recent progress in studies on AHL inhibitors/modulators from a biological standpoint. It has been discovered that both natural and synthetic compounds can disrupt quorum sensing by a variety of means, such as jamming signal transduction, inhibition of signal production and break-down and trapping of signal compounds. We also focus on the regulatory elements that attenuate quorum sensing activities and discuss their unique properties. Understanding the biological roles of regulatory elements might be useful in developing inhibitor applications and understanding how quorum sensing is controlled. PMID:23720655

  19. Bacterial bloodstream infections and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in pediatric hematology/oncology patients after anticancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mulla, Naima A; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; El Shafie, Sittana; Janahi, Mohammed; Al-Nasser, Abdullah A; Chandra, Prem

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bloodstream infections in pediatric hematology and oncology represent a major problem worldwide, but this has not been studied in Qatar. In this study, we investigated the burden of infection and the resistance pattern in the bacterial etiology, in the only tertiary pediatric hematology and oncology center in Qatar. Methods All pediatric cancer patients (n=185) were evaluated retrospectively during the period 2004–2011; a total of 70 (38%) patients were diagnosed with bloodstream infections. Bacterial etiology was determined, along with their susceptibility patterns. Neutropenia, duration of neutropenia, fever, duration of fever, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated throughout the study. Results A total of 70 patients (38%) were diagnosed with acute leukemias, lymphomas, solid tumors, or brain tumors; those patients experienced 111 episodes of bacteremia. The most common Gram-positive (n=64 [55%]) isolates were Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=26), Staphylococcus hominis (n=9), and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=7), and the common Gram-negative (n=52 [45%]) isolates were Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=14), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=10), and Escherichia coli (n=7). There was a significant association observed between fever with positive blood culture and different types of cancer (P=0.035). The majority of bacteremia (n=68 [61.3%]) occurred in nonneutropenic episodes. Elevated values of CRP (≥5 mg/L) were detected in 82 (95.3%) episodes and were negatively correlated with absolute neutrophil count (ANC) (r=−0.18; P=0.248) among all cases. However, the infection-related fatality rate was 2.2% (n=4), with three caused by Gram-negative pathogens. Multidrug resistant organisms were implicated in 33 (28.4%) cases and caused three of the mortality cases. Conclusion Multidrug resistant organisms cause mortality in pediatric cancer patients. Investigation of antimicrobial susceptibility of these organisms may guide successful antimicrobial therapy and improve

  20. NATO-Warsaw Pact. Force mobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent demographic and economic trends present mobilization problems for both the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the Warsaw Pact. When the United States and the Soviet Union agreed to rid Europe of intermediate-range nuclear weapons, their agreement increased the emphasis on conventional force balances-thus creating anew strains within and between the alliances. These developments make the time ripe for a comprehensive study of NATO and Warsaw Pact capabilities to mobilize their conventional forces. This book draws upon essays prepared for the NATO-Warsaw Pact conference. In these essays, Us and European specialists discuss developments and vulnerabilities in the blocs. They address four issues: (1) mobilization and reinforcement, (2) developments in front-line states, (3) communications and transportation problems, and (4) difficulties on the flanks. These individual studies and the book as a whole represent the most current and thorough examination of NATO-Warsaw Pact capabilities available today.

  1. Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy for Root Canal System Asepsis: A Narrative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, P.; Gonçalves, T.; Palma, P.; Santos, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this comprehensive literature review was to address the question: Does photodynamic therapy (PDT) improve root canal disinfection through significant bacterial reduction in the root canal system? Methodology. A comprehensive narrative literature review was performed to compare PDT effect with sodium hypochlorite as the comparative classical irrigant. Two reviewers independently conducted literature searches using a combination of medical subject heading terms and key words to identify relevant studies comparing information found in 7 electronic databases from January 2000 to May 2015. A manual search was performed on bibliography of articles collected on electronic databases. Authors were contacted to ask for references of more research not detected on the prior electronic and manual searches. Results. The literature search provided 62 titles and abstracts, from which 29 studies were related directly to the search theme. Considering all publications, 14 (48%) showed PDT to be more efficient in antimicrobial outcome than NaOCl (0.5–6% concentration) used alone and 2 (7%) revealed similar effects between them. Toluidine blue and methylene blue are the most used photosensitizers and most commonly laser has 660 nm of wavelength with a 400 nm diameter of intracanal fiber. Conclusions. PDT has been used without a well-defined protocol and still remains at an experimental stage waiting for further optimization. The level of evidence available in clinical studies to answer this question is low and at high risk of bias. PMID:26783392

  2. The Possibilities for Activity Scale (PActS): Development, validity, and reliability

    PubMed Central

    Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Cutchin, Malcolm P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Laliberte-Rudman (2005) proposed the concept of occupational possibilities to represent what older adults feel they “should be” and “could be” doing. Purpose This study aimed to develop and validate a measure of perceived occupational possibilities: the Possibilities for Activity Scale (PActS). Method Two factors of the PActS, activity expectations and activity self-efficacy, were operationalized in a 14-item instrument. The instrument was then evaluated with a sample of older adults diagnosed with cancer (n = 179). Findings The PActS demonstrated promising internal consistency reliability (stratified coefficient α =.77) and construct-related (r =. 58; p < .0001), structural (Chi-square, 61.57; CFI, .97; RMSEA, 0.05; TLI, .96; NFI, .91) and known-groups validity. Implications The PActS appears to be a useful measure of internalized occupational possibilities for participation in activity for older adults with cancer. This scale can enhance the measurement of participation in activity by evaluating the perceptions of occupational possibilities. PMID:26281432

  3. Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Eileen F.; Clarke, Siobhan F.; Marques, Tatiana M.; Hill, Colin; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R. Paul; O’Doherty, Robert M.; Shanahan, Fergus; Cotter, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a number of serious health consequences, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and a variety of cancers among others and has been repeatedly shown to be associated with a higher risk of mortality. The relatively recent discovery that the composition and metabolic activity of the gut microbiota may affect the risk of developing obesity and related disorders has led to an explosion of interest in this distinct research field. A corollary of these findings would suggest that modulation of gut microbial populations can have beneficial effects with respect to controlling obesity. In this addendum, we summarize our recent data, showing that therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota using different antimicrobial strategies may be a useful approach for the management of obesity and metabolic conditions. In addition, we will explore some of the mechanisms that may contribute to microbiota-induced susceptibility to obesity and metabolic diseases. PMID:23018760

  4. Differences in antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, isolated from blood cultures, set by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Shimizu, Chihiro; Kasahara, Mayumi; Nakata, Chiyo; Munakata, Machiko; Takahashi, Hakuo

    2007-02-01

    A study was made of the antimicrobial susceptibility to and efficacy of various kinds of antimicrobial agents against 179 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that were isolated from blood cultures at Kansai Medical University Hospital from 1990 through 2004. The annual detection rate was highest in 1994, at 22 strains (6.5%). There were 9 multidrug resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.0%). Among 14 antimicrobial agents tested for measurements, ciprofloxacin (CPFX) showed the best minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 50 value, of 0.25 microg/ml, followed by pazufloxacin (PZFX) and biapenem (BIPM), each at 0.5 microg/ml. When the period of 15 years was divided into three stages, the MIC50 value for each antimicrobial agent was highest in the middle stage (1995 to 1999). Assuming that the percentage of sensitive strains according to the breakpoints set by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) represents the antimicrobial susceptibility rate, amikacin (AMK) showed the best value, of 85.5%. According to the sepsis breakpoint set by the Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), the efficacy of CPFX showed the highest rate (77.1%) of all the antimicrobial agents tested. Among beta-lactams, BIPM showed the highest efficacy rate, of 67.0%. When the efficacy rates were compared with each other, the difference in efficacy rate between the breakpoint set by the CLSI and the sepsis breakpoint set by the JSC was large for beta-lactams. Comparisons made based on the CLSI criteria showed no difference in cross-resistance rates between CPFX, meropenem (MEPM), and BIPM. However, when comparisons were made using the JSC sepsis breakpoint, MEPM showed a cross-resistance rate of 87.8%, while the rate for BIPM was lower, at 56.1%, with the chi2 test showing a significant difference, at P = 0.0014. In accordance with the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics theory that has been advocated, breakpoints which are more suitable for the clinical setting in Japan should

  5. Young Children Create Partner-Specific Referential Pacts with Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Köymen, Bahar; Schmerse, Daniel; Lieven, Elena; Tomasello, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In 2 studies, we investigated how peers establish a "referential pact" to call something, for example, a "cushion" versus a "pillow" (both equally felicitous). In Study 1, pairs of 4-and 6-year-old German-speaking peers established a referential pact for an artifact, for example, a "woman's shoe," in a…

  6. Mechanism and In Vivo Evaluation: Photodynamic Antibacterial Chemotherapy of Lysine-Porphyrin Conjugate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zengping; Gao, Yuxiang; Meng, Shuai; Yang, Baochen; Pang, Liyun; Wang, Chen; Liu, Tianjun

    2016-01-01

    Lysine-porphyrin conjugate 4i has potent photosensitive antibacterial effect on clinical isolated bacterial strains such as Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The mechanism of photodynamic antibacterial chemotherapy of 4i (4i-PACT) in vitro and the treatment effect in vivo was investigated in this paper. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that 4i-PACT can effectively destroy membrane and wall of bacteria, resulting in leakage of its content. This was confirmed by dual fluorescent staining with acridine orange/ethidium bromide and measuring materials absorption at 260 nm. Agarose gel electrophoresis measurement showed that 4i-PACT can damage genomic DNA. Healing of wound in rat infected by mixed bacteria showed that the efficiency of 4i-PACT is dependent on the dose of light. These results showed that 4i-PACT has promising bactericidal effect both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26973620

  7. Mechanism and In Vivo Evaluation: Photodynamic Antibacterial Chemotherapy of Lysine-Porphyrin Conjugate

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zengping; Gao, Yuxiang; Meng, Shuai; Yang, Baochen; Pang, Liyun; Wang, Chen; Liu, Tianjun

    2016-01-01

    Lysine-porphyrin conjugate 4i has potent photosensitive antibacterial effect on clinical isolated bacterial strains such as Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The mechanism of photodynamic antibacterial chemotherapy of 4i (4i-PACT) in vitro and the treatment effect in vivo was investigated in this paper. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that 4i-PACT can effectively destroy membrane and wall of bacteria, resulting in leakage of its content. This was confirmed by dual fluorescent staining with acridine orange/ethidium bromide and measuring materials absorption at 260 nm. Agarose gel electrophoresis measurement showed that 4i-PACT can damage genomic DNA. Healing of wound in rat infected by mixed bacteria showed that the efficiency of 4i-PACT is dependent on the dose of light. These results showed that 4i-PACT has promising bactericidal effect both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26973620

  8. Ten key points for the appropriate use of antibiotics in hospitalised patients: a consensus from the Antimicrobial Stewardship and Resistance Working Groups of the International Society of Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Levy Hara, Gabriel; Kanj, Souha S; Pagani, Leonardo; Abbo, Lilian; Endimiani, Andrea; Wertheim, Heiman F L; Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos; Tattevin, Pierre; Mehtar, Shaheen; Lopes Cardoso, Fernando; Unal, Serhat; Gould, Ian

    2016-09-01

    The Antibiotic Stewardship and Resistance Working Groups of the International Society for Chemotherapy propose ten key points for the appropriate use of antibiotics in hospital settings. (i) Get appropriate microbiological samples before antibiotic administration and carefully interpret the results: in the absence of clinical signs of infection, colonisation rarely requires antimicrobial treatment. (ii) Avoid the use of antibiotics to 'treat' fever: use them to treat infections, and investigate the root cause of fever prior to starting treatment. (iii) Start empirical antibiotic treatment after taking cultures, tailoring it to the site of infection, risk factors for multidrug-resistant bacteria, and the local microbiology and susceptibility patterns. (iv) Prescribe drugs at their optimal dosing and for an appropriate duration, adapted to each clinical situation and patient characteristics. (v) Use antibiotic combinations only where the current evidence suggests some benefit. (vi) When possible, avoid antibiotics with a higher likelihood of promoting drug resistance or hospital-acquired infections, or use them only as a last resort. (vii) Drain the infected foci quickly and remove all potentially or proven infected devices: control the infection source. (viii) Always try to de-escalate/streamline antibiotic treatment according to the clinical situation and the microbiological results. (ix) Stop unnecessarily prescribed antibiotics once the absence of infection is likely. And (x) Do not work alone: set up local teams with an infectious diseases specialist, clinical microbiologist, hospital pharmacist, infection control practitioner or hospital epidemiologist, and comply with hospital antibiotic policies and guidelines. PMID:27502752

  9. [Sociodemographic indicators of the Andean Pact countries].

    PubMed

    1991-12-01

    The Andean Pact, also known as the Cartagena Accord, was signed on May 26, 1969, with the goal of promoting the socioeconomic integration of the countries of the subregion (Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia). 1992 marked a new stage in the Andean Pact by the consolidation of the integration process with the establishment of the Andean Free Trade Zone, allowing the uninhibited flow of goods. The subregion's population was 91.8 million in 1990, the most populous being Colombia with 32.9 million people. 71.5% of the total population (65 million people) live in cities with a high level of urban growth. During the period of 1990-95 the average rate of population growth was the highest in Bolivia with 2.8% and the lowest in Colombia with 1.95%. By comparison, the rate of growth was 0.2% in western Europe and 0.7% in the US. According to projections of the UN, approximately 113 million people will be living in the subregion in the year 2000. The indices of life expectancy and infant mortality have improved in recent decades; however, they are still poor compared to those of developed countries. The highest rate of infant mortality was registered in Bolivia with 93/1000 live births, followed by Peru with 76/1000, Ecuador with 53/1000, Colombia with 37/1000, and Venezuela with 33/1000 live births. The average rate of European countries is 7/1000 live births. Life expectancy increased from an average of 50 years in 1950 to 65.4 years in 1990. In 1990, average life expectancy was 76 years in the US, indicating that there are significant differences in medical care and social security between the countries of the region and developed countries. PMID:12284746

  10. X-Ray Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy (X-PACT).

    PubMed

    Oldham, Mark; Yoon, Paul; Fathi, Zak; Beyer, Wayne F; Adamson, Justus; Liu, Leihua; Alcorta, David; Xia, Wenle; Osada, Takuya; Liu, Congxiao; Yang, Xiao Y; Dodd, Rebecca D; Herndon, James E; Meng, Boyu; Kirsch, David G; Lyerly, H Kim; Dewhirst, Mark W; Fecci, Peter; Walder, Harold; Spector, Neil L

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates X-PACT (X-ray Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy): a new approach for the treatment of solid cancer. X-PACT utilizes psoralen, a potent anti-cancer therapeutic with current application to proliferative disease and extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) of cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma. An immunogenic role for light-activated psoralen has been reported, contributing to long-term clinical responses. Psoralen therapies have to-date been limited to superficial or extracorporeal scenarios due to the requirement for psoralen activation by UVA light, which has limited penetration in tissue. X-PACT solves this challenge by activating psoralen with UV light emitted from novel non-tethered phosphors (co-incubated with psoralen) that absorb x-rays and re-radiate (phosphoresce) at UV wavelengths. The efficacy of X-PACT was evaluated in both in-vitro and in-vivo settings. In-vitro studies utilized breast (4T1), glioma (CT2A) and sarcoma (KP-B) cell lines. Cells were exposed to X-PACT treatments where the concentrations of drug (psoralen and phosphor) and radiation parameters (energy, dose, and dose rate) were varied. Efficacy was evaluated primarily using flow cell cytometry in combination with complimentary assays, and the in-vivo mouse study. In an in-vitro study, we show that X-PACT induces significant tumor cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity, unlike psoralen or phosphor alone (p<0.0001). We also show that apoptosis increases as doses of phosphor, psoralen, or radiation increase. Finally, in an in-vivo pilot study of BALBc mice with syngeneic 4T1 tumors, we show that the rate of tumor growth is slower with X-PACT than with saline or AMT + X-ray (p<0.0001). Overall these studies demonstrate a potential therapeutic effect for X-PACT, and provide a foundation and rationale for future studies. In summary, X-PACT represents a novel treatment approach in which well-tolerated low doses of x-ray radiation are delivered to a specific tumor site to generate UVA light which

  11. (Relatively) Smooth Sailing: How a Large State University Successfully Adopted the PACT Teaching Event

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainsburg, Julie; Ericson, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the PACT Coordinator and former Department Chair of the Department of Secondary Education at a large state university describe how the PACT Teaching Event was introduced, piloted and implemented in their department. Despite the size and complexity of this department, PACT implementation went relatively smoothly, with widespread…

  12. Adolescent Subtest Norms for the ImPACT Neurocognitive Battery.

    PubMed

    Henry, Luke C; Sandel, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    The neurocognitive testing of sports concussion for injury management and return-to-play decisions has long been considered the gold standard in evaluation of the injury. Computerized testing batteries are frequently employed, with the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) being the most used of all the current testing platforms to evaluate concussion. ImPACT's clinical report yields four normed composite scores (Verbal Memory, Visual Memory, Visual Motor Speed, and Reaction Time) and another composite score that is not normed but is used as a validity measure (Impulse Control), as well as their corresponding subtest scores, which are not normed. The current study provides normative data on each of the subtests used to calculate the composite scores. Normative data are separated by gender for athletes aged 13 to 21 years old and are stratified by the norm age brackets already employed by the ImPACT. These norms may be helpful in the interpretation of the ImPACT clinical report and further delineation of areas of neurocognitive dysfunction. PMID:25412432

  13. Quadruple Pact Suicide Attempt Involving a Man and Three Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Siddharth; Srinivas, Balachander; Grover, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Pact suicides involving families have been reported in the scientific literature, but reports have been few from India. We report the case of a family, in which the father and three children had entered into a suicidal pact and executed it due to social reasons. A 41-year-old man, with no past psychiatric or substance use history, had reportedly come to know that his wife had been involved in an extra-marital affair. As expressed by him in a suicide note, he could not bear the humiliation due to this and also did not want his children to face disrespect from the society. He along with his daughter and 2 sons, aged 14, 12 and 11 years respectively, thus entered into a suicide pact to end their lives and wrote a suicide note. Man and two of his children consumed aluminum phosphide. However, the youngest son did not consume the poison and raised alarm, following which they were rushed for medical care. The father died, but the three children recovered completely. The case highlights the rare phenomenon of suicide pacts involving an adult and children. PMID:25336777

  14. Patient's Anastrozole Compliance to Therapy (PACT) Program: Baseline Data and Patient Characteristics from a Population-Based, Randomized Study Evaluating Compliance to Aromatase Inhibitor Therapy in Postmenopausal Women with Hormone-Sensitive Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harbeck, Nadia; Blettner, Maria; Hadji, Peyman; Jackisch, Christian; Lück, Hans-Joachim; Windemuth-Kieselbach, Christine; Zaun, Silke; Haidinger, Renate; Schmitt, Doris; Schulte, Hilde; Nitz, Ulrike; Kreienberg, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The Patient's Anastrozole Compliance to Therapy (PACT) program is a large randomized study designed to assess whether the provision of educational materials (EM) could improve compliance with aromatase inhibitor therapy in postmenopausal women with early, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Patients and Methods The PACT study presented a large, homogeneous dataset. The baseline analysis included patient demographics and initial treatments and patient perceptions about treatment and quality of life. Results Overall, 4,923 patients were enrolled at 109 German breast cancer centers/clinics in cooperation with 1,361 office-based gynecologists/oncologists. 4,844 women were randomized 1:1 to standard therapy (n = 2,402) or standard therapy plus EM (n = 2,442). Prior breast-conserving surgery and mastectomy had been received by 76% and 24% of the patients, respectively. Radiotherapy was scheduled for 85% of the patients, adjuvant chemotherapy for 38%. Reflecting the postmenopausal, hormone-sensitive nature of this population, only 285 patients (7%) had received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions A comparison with epidemiological data from the West German Breast Center suggests that the patients in the PACT study are representative of a general postmenopausal early breast cancer population and that the findings may be applicable to ‘real-world’ Germany and beyond. Compliance data from PACT are eagerly anticipated. PMID:24419247

  15. Methodologies used by Warsaw Pact countries (except USSR) in obtaining US technologies. Student report

    SciTech Connect

    Cheeseman, R.J.

    1987-04-01

    The Warsaw Pact countries obtain U.S. technologies by legal and illegal means. Methods of collection include espionage, overt collection, acquisition by scientific and educational exchange participants, and illegal trade activities. Examples of methods used by the Warsaw Pact countries (except the USSR) are provided. The US faces barriers to preventing loss of its technologies. Among these are resistance from US business interests, insufficient cooperation between US government agencies and overseas allies, lack of US counterintelligence personnel, and the openess of American society. The study concludes that the Warsaw Pact's countries have narrowed NATO's qualitative lead in weaponry as a result of the Warsaw Pact's acquisition effort.

  16. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; Carrasco, Letícia Dias de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:25302615

  17. Why perversion?: 'False love' and the perverse pact.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ruth

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, the author works with the awareness that perversion is a socially, historically and theologically loaded term, at the same time as it may be the latest frontier in psychoanalysis, both clinically, and in relation to contemporary art and culture which emphasize the perverse. Positioning itself against tendencies to deny the existence of a category of 'perversion' or, inversely, to abuse it for the power that accrues from the act of diagnosing, she also points to other liabilities in the history of the treatment of this term, such as the narrowing down of perversion to the exclusively sexual domain, or, alternatively, the overextension of it to polymorphously erotic practices that enhance sexual excitement. The paradoxes of perversion and the difficulties of distinguishing the perverse from the non-perverse are addressed. The case is also made that, in order to understand perversion, one must unlink it from the narrow notion of sexual practice and see what is involved on a deeper level--an approach initiated when psychoanalysis turned to perversion as a defense against psychotic anxieties, and began considering the necessary place of perversion in the transference--countertransference. Two features common to both sexual and non-sexual perverse relations are the seductive and bribing aspects of perversion, and its means-ends reversal. Perversion is a haven for the disguising of hatred and suspicion as excitement and (false) love. Displaced child and beating father, entitled child and seductive mother, are both prototypes of psychoanalytic reflection on parents who excite, deceive and corrupt their children and establish perverse pacts with them. The notion of the perverse pact is foregrounded in Alice's analysis, where first the resurrection and then the dismantling of such a pact were effected through various analytic means. PMID:16096075

  18. Cancer Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells grow and die in a controlled way. Cancer cells keep forming without control. Chemotherapy is drug ... Your course of therapy will depend on the cancer type, the chemotherapy drugs used, the treatment goal ...

  19. Cancer Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... controlled way. Cancer cells keep growing without control. Chemotherapy is drug therapy for cancer. It works by killing the cancer ... It depends on the type and amount of chemotherapy you get and how your body reacts. Some ...

  20. Alternative Antimicrobial Approach: Nano-Antimicrobial Materials

    PubMed Central

    Beyth, Nurit; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Domb, Avi; Khan, Wahid; Hazan, Ronen

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous existing potent antibiotics and other antimicrobial means, bacterial infections are still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the need to develop additional bactericidal means has significantly increased due to the growing concern regarding multidrug-resistant bacterial strains and biofilm associated infections. Consequently, attention has been especially devoted to new and emerging nanoparticle-based materials in the field of antimicrobial chemotherapy. The present review discusses the activities of nanoparticles as an antimicrobial means, their mode of action, nanoparticle effect on drug-resistant bacteria, and the risks attendant on their use as antibacterial agents. Factors contributing to nanoparticle performance in the clinical setting, their unique properties, and mechanism of action as antibacterial agents are discussed in detail. PMID:25861355

  1. PACT is a negative regulator of p53 and essential for cell growth and embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Deng, Binwei; Xing, Guichun; Teng, Yan; Tian, Chunyan; Cheng, Xuan; Yin, Xiushan; Yang, Juntao; Gao, Xue; Zhu, Yunping; Sun, Qihong; Zhang, Lingqiang; Yang, Xiao; He, Fuchu

    2007-05-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 regulates cell cycle progression and apoptosis in response to various types of stress, whereas excess p53 activity creates unwanted effects. Tight regulation of p53 is essential for maintaining normal cell growth. p53-associated cellular protein-testes derived (PACT, also known as P2P-R, RBBP6) is a 250-kDa Ring finger-containing protein that can directly bind to p53. PACT is highly up-regulated in esophageal cancer and may be a promising target for immunotherapy. However, the physiological role of the PACT-p53 interaction remains largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the disruption of PACT in mice leads to early embryonic lethality before embryonic day 7.5 (E7.5), accompanied by an accumulation of p53 and widespread apoptosis. p53-null mutation partially rescues the lethality phenotype and prolonged survival to E11.5. Endogenous PACT can interact with Hdm2 and enhance Hdm2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of p53 as a result of the increase of the p53-Hdm2 affinity. Consequently, PACT represses p53-dependent gene transcription. Knockdown of PACT significantly attenuates the p53-Hdm2 interaction, reduces p53 polyubiquitination, and enhances p53 accumulation, leading to both apoptosis and cell growth retardation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the PACT-p53 interaction plays a critical role in embryonic development and tumorigenesis and identify PACT as a member of negative regulators of p53. PMID:17470788

  2. Tangible Results and Progress in Flood Risks Management with the PACTES Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costes, Murielle; Abadie, Jean-Paul; Ducuing, Jean-Louis; Denier, Jean-Paul; Stéphane

    The PACTES project (Prévention et Anticipation des Crues au moyen des Techniques Spatiales), initiated by CNES and the French Ministry of Research, aims at improving flood risk management, over the following three main phases : - Prevention : support and facilitate the analysis of flood risks and socio-economic impacts (risk - Forecasting and alert : improve the capability to predict and anticipate the flooding event - Crisis management : allow better situation awareness, communication and sharing of In order to achieve its ambitious objectives, PACTES: - integrates state-of-the-art techniques and systems (integration of the overall processing chains, - takes advantage of integrating recent model developments in wheather forecasting, rainfall, In this approach, space technology is thus used in three main ways : - radar and optical earth observation data are used to produce Digital Elevation Maps, land use - earth observation data are also an input to wheather forecasting, together with ground sensors; - satellite-based telecommunication and mobile positioning. Started in December 2000, the approach taken in PACTES is to work closely with users such as civil security and civil protection organisms, fire fighter brigades and city councils for requirements gathering and during the validation phase. It has lead to the development and experimentation of an integrated pre-operational demonstrator, delivered to different types of operational users. Experimentation has taken place in three watersheds representative of different types of floods (flash and plain floods). After a breaf reminder of what the PACTES project organization and aims are, the PACTES integrated pre-operational demonstrator is presented. The main scientific inputs to flood risk management are summarized. Validation studies for the three watersheds covered by PACTES (Moselle, Hérault and Thoré) are detailed. Feedback on the PACTES tangible results on flood risk management from an user point of view

  3. Anticancer chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Despite troubled beginnings, anticancer chemotherapy has made significant contribution to the control of cancer in man, particularly within the last two decades. Early conceptual observations awakened the scientific community to the potentials of cancer chemotherapy. There are now more than 50 agents that are active in causing regression of clinical cancer. Chemotherapy's major conceptual contributions are two-fold. First, there is now proof that patients with overt metastatic disease can be cured, and second, to provide a strategy for control of occult metastases. In man, chemotherapy has resulted in normal life expectancy for some patients who have several types of metastatic cancers, including choriocarcinoma, Burkitt's lymphomas, Wilm's tumor, acute lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkins disease, diffuse histiocytic lymphoma and others. Anticancer chemotherapy in Veterinary medicine has evolved from the use of single agents, which produce only limited remissions, to the concept of combination chemotherapy. Three basic principles underline the design of combination chemotherapy protocols; the fraction of tumor cell killed by one drug is independent of the fraction killed by another drug; drugs with different mechanisms of action should be chosen so that the antitumor effects will be additive; and since different classes of drugs have different toxicities the toxic effects will not be additive.

  4. Chemotherapy and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health > Chemotherapy and Your Mouth Chemotherapy and Your Mouth Main Content Are You Being Treated With Chemotherapy ... Back to Top How Does Chemotherapy Affect the Mouth? Chemotherapy is the use of drugs to treat ...

  5. Physiotherapy informed by Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (PACT): protocol for a randomised controlled trial of PACT versus usual physiotherapy care for adults with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, Emma; Galea Holmes, Melissa; Wileman, Vari; McCracken, Lance; Moss-Morris, Rona; Pallet, John; Sanders, Duncan; Barcellona, Massimo; Critchley, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a common condition and source of significant suffering, disability and healthcare costs. Current physiotherapy treatment is moderately effective. Combining theory-based psychological methods with physiotherapy could improve outcomes for people with CLBP. The primary aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) is to evaluate the efficacy of Physiotherapy informed by Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (PACT) on functioning in patients with CLBP. Methods and analysis The PACT trial is a two-armed, parallel-group, multicentre RCT to assess the efficacy of PACT in comparison with usual physiotherapy care (UC). 240 patients referred to physiotherapy with CLBP will be recruited from three National Health Service (NHS) hospitals trusts. Inclusion criteria are: age ≥18 years, CLBP ≥12-week duration, scoring ≥3 points on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and adequate understanding of spoken and written English to participate. Patients will be randomised to PACT or UC (120 per arm stratified by centre) by an independent randomisation service and followed up at 3 and 12 months post randomisation. The sample size of 240 will provide adequate power to detect a standardised mean difference of 0.40 in the primary outcome (RMDQ; 5% significance, 80% power) assuming attrition of 20%. Analysis will be by intention to treat conducted by the trial statistician, blind to treatment group, following a prespecified analysis plan. Estimates of treatment effect at the follow-up assessments will use an intention-to-treat framework, implemented using a linear mixed-effects model. Ethics and dissemination This trial has full ethical approval (14/SC/0277). It will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. The results will enable clinicians, patients and health service managers to make informed decisions regarding the efficacy of PACT for patients with CLBP. Trial registration number ISRCTN

  6. Antimicrobial Stewardship

    PubMed Central

    Doron, Shira; Davidson, Lisa E.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is increasing; however, antimicrobial drug development is slowing. Now more than ever before, antimicrobial stewardship is of the utmost importance as a way to optimize the use of antimicrobials to prevent the development of resistance and improve patient outcomes. This review describes the why, what, who, how, when, and where of antimicrobial stewardship. Techniques of stewardship are summarized, and a plan for implementation of a stewardship program is outlined. PMID:22033257

  7. PACT/RAX regulates the migration of cerebellar granule neurons in the developing cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yue; Meng, Ya; Ding, Hanqing; Fan, Zhiqin; Tang, Yifen; Zhou, Chenghua; Luo, Jia; Ke, Zun-Ji

    2015-01-01

    PACT and its murine ortholog RAX were originally identified as a protein activator for the dsRNA-dependent, interferon-inducible protein kinase PKR. Recent studies indicated that RAX played a role in embryogenesis and neuronal development. In this study, we investigated the expression of RAX during the postnatal development of the mouse cerebellum and its role in the migration of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). High expression of RAX was observed in the cerebellum from postnatal day (PD) 4 to PD9, a period when the CGNs migrate from the external granule layer (EGL) to the internal granule layer (IGL). The migration of the EGL progenitor cells in vivo was inhibited by RAX knockdown on PD4. This finding was confirmed by in vitro studies showing that RAX knockdown impaired the migration of CGNs in cerebellar microexplants. PACT/RAX-regulated migration required its third motif and was independent of PKR. PACT/RAX interacted with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and PACT/RAX knockdown disturbed the FAK phosphorylation in CGNs. These findings demonstrated a novel function of PACT/RAX in the regulation of neuronal migration. PMID:25609658

  8. Influence of patient age on the frequency of occurrence and antimicrobial resistance patterns of isolates from hematology/oncology patients: report from the Chemotherapy Alliance for Neutropenics and the Control of Emerging Resistance Program (North America).

    PubMed

    Kirby, Jeffrey T; Fritsche, Thomas R; Jones, Ronald N

    2006-09-01

    The Chemotherapy Alliance for Neutropenics and the Control of Emerging Resistance Program (CANCER) monitored the susceptibility of pathogens recovered in hematology/oncology centers from 2000 to 2002. A total of 3970 isolates from 32 hospitals (26 United States, 6 Canada) were analyzed at a central location (JMI Laboratories, North Liberty, IA) for trends in pathogen occurrence and reference antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. The top 5 ranking pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus (19.3%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) (14.1%), Escherichia coli (13.4%), Enterococcus spp. (10.2%), and Klebsiella spp. (9.5%). A total of 35.5% of S. aureus and 78.8% of CoNS were resistant to oxacillin, whereas 22.0% of Enterococcus spp. were resistant to vancomycin. E. coli and Klebsiella spp. were highly susceptible (>90%) to piperacillin/tazobactam, 3rd-generation cephalosporins, and ciprofloxacin, but 3.9% and 2.4% of these species, respectively, met screening criteria for extended spectrum beta-lactamase production. Enterobacter spp. were less susceptible to piperacillin/tazobactam, ceftazidime, and ceftriaxone (83.7-88.2%) because of Amp C production and were most inhibited by cefepime and imipenem. Amikacin and polymyxin B were very active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (97.4-97.7% susceptible). Prevalence of S. aureus, E. coli, Enterobacter spp., and Klebsiella spp. increased significantly (+48% to 98%) with age, whereas CoNS and viridans group streptococci decreased markedly (-62% to 69%) with advancing age. The isolation of Gram-positive pathogens declined (55% to 47%) with age (< or =14 to > or =65 years). Fluoroquinolones generally exhibited decreased susceptibility with increased age against nearly all listed pathogens. Oxacillin resistance rates for S. aureus increased with age (6-46%) as did vancomycin resistance rates for enterococci (nil in < or =14 years group to 18-24% in adults). Pathogens infecting neutropenic patients did not reflect greater

  9. Understanding Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... you may get chemotherapy before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant. Fill this section in with your doctor or nurse. I am getting chemo ... can be given in these forms: An IV (intravenously) A shot (injection) into a muscle or other part of your body A pill ...

  10. WindPACT Turbine Rotor Design Study: June 2000--June 2002 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm, D. J.; Hansen, A. C.

    2006-04-01

    This report presents the results of the turbine rotor study completed by Global Energy Concepts (GEC) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's WindPACT (Wind Partnership for Advanced Component Technologies) project. The purpose of the WindPACT project is to identify technology improvements that will enable the cost of energy from wind turbines to fall to a target of 3.0 cents/kilowatt-hour in low wind speed sites. The study focused on different rotor configurations and the effect of scale on those rotors.

  11. Evaluation of the effect of photodynamic antimicrobial therapy in dentin caries: a pilot in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, F. M. C.; de-Melo, M. A. S.; Lima, J. M. P.; Zanin, I. C. J.; Rodrigues, L. K. A.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.

    2010-02-01

    In vitro and in situ studies have demonstrated that the photodynamic antimicrobial therapy (PACT) is effective in reducing Streptococcus mutans population in artificially carious dentin. This pilot in vivo study evaluated the antimicrobial effect of PACT using toluidine blue O (TBO) and a light-emitting diode (LED) in carious dentin lesions. Five healthy adult volunteers (19-36 yr), with at least 4 active carious cavities each, participated in this study. Teeth of each volunteer were randomly divided into four groups: (1) without TBO and without light (Control); (2) with TBO alone (TBO); (3) with LED at 94/J cm2 alone (LED); and (4) with TBO plus LED at 94 J/cm2 (PACT). Each cavity was divided into two halves. The baseline carious dentin sample was collected from half of each cavity. Following, the treatments were performed using a random distribution of tooth into treatments. Then, the second collection of carious dentin samples was performed. Before and after treatments, dentin samples were analyzed with regard to the counts of total viable microorganisms, total streptococci, mutans streptococci, and lactobacilli. The data were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Student-Newman-Keuls tests (α=5%). Log reductions ranged from -0.12 to 2.68 and significant reductions were observed for PACT (group 4) when compared to the other groups (1, 2, and 3) for total streptococci and mutans streptococci. Concluding, PACT was effective in killing oral microorganisms present in in vivo carious dentin lesions and may be a promising technique for eliminating bacteria from dentin before restoration.

  12. Supporting Positive Parenting for Young Children Experiencing Homelessness: The PACT Therapeutic Nursery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melley, Alison Heinhold; Cosgrove, Kim; Norris-Shortle, Carole; Kiser, Laurel J.; Levey, Eric B.; Coble, Catherine A.; Leviton, Audrey

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive parenting and secure attachment can serve as protective factors against developmental risks associated with high-risk environments such as homelessness and shelter living. This article describes a program for mothers with children from birth to 3 years old whose families are living in shelters and who are enrolled in PACT: Helping…

  13. Probability and Confidence Trade-Space (PACT) Evaluation: Accounting for Uncertainty in Sparing Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Leif; Box, Neil; Carter-Journet, Katrina; DiFilippo, Denise; Harrington, Sean; Jackson, David; Lutomski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of presentation: (1) Status update on the developing methodology to revise sub-system sparing targets. (2) To describe how to incorporate uncertainty into spare assessments and why it is important to do so (3) Demonstrate hardware risk postures through PACT evaluation

  14. 77 FR 50548 - Agency Information Collection: (PACT Qualitative Evaluation: Patient & Caregiver Interviews...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection: (PACT Qualitative Evaluation: Patient & Caregiver Interviews... & Caregiver). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Denise McLamb, Enterprise Records Service (005R1B), Department... or email: denise.mclamb@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-New (Patient &...

  15. 77 FR 50546 - Agency Information Collection: (PACT Patient Experiences Survey); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection: (PACT Patient Experiences Survey); Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans... proposal for the collection of information under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C... patient experiences from this data collection are intended to help form future national VA policy....

  16. 77 FR 51849 - Agency Information Collection: Emergency Submission for OMB Review (PACT Demo Lab, Clinical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection: Emergency Submission for OMB Review (PACT Demo Lab, Clinical... to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) the following emergency proposal for the collection of.... ADDRESSES: Send comments and recommendations concerning any aspect of the information collection to VA's...

  17. FULL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT UTILIZING DU PONT'S PACT (TRADE NAME) PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Operating and cost data on startup and the initial 30 months of operation of a 150,000 cu m/day (40-MGD) industrial wastewater treatment plant using Du Pont's PACT process are reported. The process effectively provides secondary/tertiary treatment by adding powdered activated car...

  18. (PACT) Partners in Augmentative Communication Training: A Resource Guide for Interaction Facilitation Training for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, Delva M.; Carlisle, Margaret

    "Partners in Augmentative Communication Training" (PACT) is a communication interaction facilitation program for child augmentative technique users and their communication partners. The program offers guidelines for use in developing individualized plans for improving conversational interaction. This resource guide addresses priority communication…

  19. The Flexibility of Conceptual Pacts: Referring Expressions Dynamically Shift to Accommodate New Conceptualizations.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Alyssa; Tanenhaus, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    In a classic paper, Brennan and Clark argued that when interlocutors agree on a name for an object, they are forming a temporary agreement on how to conceptualize that object; that is, they are forming a conceptual pact. The literature on conceptual pacts has largely focused on the costs and benefits of breaking and maintaining lexical precedents, and the degree to which they might be partner-specific. The research presented here focuses on a question about conceptual pacts that has been largely neglected in the literature: To what extent are conceptual pacts specific to the local context of the interaction? If conceptual pacts are indeed temporary, then when the local context changes in ways that are accessible to participants, we would expect participants to seamlessly shift to referential expressions that reflect novel conceptualizations. Two experiments examined how referential forms change across context in collaborative, task-oriented dialog between naïve participants. In Experiment 1, names for parts of an unknown object were established in an "item" identification stage (e.g., a shape that looked like a wrench was called "the wrench"). In a second "build" stage, that name was often supplanted by an object-oriented name, e.g., the "leg." These changes happened abruptly and without negotiation. In Experiment 2, interlocutors manipulated clip art and more abstract tangram pictures in a "slider" puzzle to arrange the objects into a target configuration. On some trials moving an object revealed a picture that could be construed as a contrast competitor, e.g., a clip art picture of a camel after "the camel" had been negotiated as a name for a tangram shape, or vice versa. As would be expected, modification rates increased when a potential contrast was revealed. More strikingly, the degree to which a name had been negotiated or the frequency with which it had been used did not affect the likelihood that the revealed shape would be considered as a potential

  20. The Flexibility of Conceptual Pacts: Referring Expressions Dynamically Shift to Accommodate New Conceptualizations

    PubMed Central

    Ibarra, Alyssa; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    In a classic paper, Brennan and Clark argued that when interlocutors agree on a name for an object, they are forming a temporary agreement on how to conceptualize that object; that is, they are forming a conceptual pact. The literature on conceptual pacts has largely focused on the costs and benefits of breaking and maintaining lexical precedents, and the degree to which they might be partner-specific. The research presented here focuses on a question about conceptual pacts that has been largely neglected in the literature: To what extent are conceptual pacts specific to the local context of the interaction? If conceptual pacts are indeed temporary, then when the local context changes in ways that are accessible to participants, we would expect participants to seamlessly shift to referential expressions that reflect novel conceptualizations. Two experiments examined how referential forms change across context in collaborative, task-oriented dialog between naïve participants. In Experiment 1, names for parts of an unknown object were established in an “item” identification stage (e.g., a shape that looked like a wrench was called “the wrench”). In a second “build” stage, that name was often supplanted by an object-oriented name, e.g., the “leg.” These changes happened abruptly and without negotiation. In Experiment 2, interlocutors manipulated clip art and more abstract tangram pictures in a “slider” puzzle to arrange the objects into a target configuration. On some trials moving an object revealed a picture that could be construed as a contrast competitor, e.g., a clip art picture of a camel after “the camel” had been negotiated as a name for a tangram shape, or vice versa. As would be expected, modification rates increased when a potential contrast was revealed. More strikingly, the degree to which a name had been negotiated or the frequency with which it had been used did not affect the likelihood that the revealed shape would be

  1. Electrocardiogram-gated coronary CT angiography dose estimates using ImPACT.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masanao; Asada, Yasuki; Matsubara, Kosuke; Suzuki, Shouichi; Koshida, Kichiro; Matsunaga, Yuta; Haba, Tomonobu; Kawaguchi, Ai; Toyama, Hiroshi; Kato, Ryouichi

    2016-01-01

    The primary study objective was to assess radiation doses using a modified form of the Imaging Performance Assessment of Computed Tomography (CT) scanner (ImPACT) patient dosimetry for cardiac applications on an Aquilion ONE ViSION Edition scanner, including the Ca score, target computed tomography angiography (CTA), prospective CTA, continuous CTA/cardiac function analysis (CFA), and CTA/CFA modulation. Accordingly, we clarified the CT dose index (CTDI) to determine the relationship between heart rate (HR) and X-ray exposure. As a secondary objective, we compared radiation doses using modified ImPACT, a whole-body dosimetry phantom study, and the k-factor method to verify the validity of the dose results obtained with modified ImPACT. The effective dose determined for the reference person (4.66 mSv at 60 beats per minute (bpm) and 33.43 mSv at 90bpm) were approximately 10% less than those determined for the phantom study (5.28 mSv and 36.68 mSv). The effective doses according to the k-factor (0.014 mSv•mGy-1•cm-1; 2.57 mSv and 17.10 mSv) were significantly lower than those obtained with the other two methods. In the present study, we have shown that ImPACT, when modified for cardiac applications, can assess both absorbed and effective doses. The results of our dose comparison indicate that modified ImPACT dose assessment is a promising and practical method for evaluating coronary CTA. PMID:27455500

  2. Automation of PCXMC and ImPACT for NASA Astronaut Medical Imaging Dose and Risk Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, Amir; Picco, Charles; Flores-McLaughlin, John; Shavers, Mark; Semones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    To automate astronaut organ and effective dose calculations from occupational X-ray and computed tomography (CT) examinations incorporating PCXMC and ImPACT tools and to estimate the associated lifetime cancer risk per the National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements (NCRP) using MATLAB(R). Methods: NASA follows guidance from the NCRP on its operational radiation safety program for astronauts. NCRP Report 142 recommends that astronauts be informed of the cancer risks from reported exposures to ionizing radiation from medical imaging. MATLAB(R) code was written to retrieve exam parameters for medical imaging procedures from a NASA database, calculate associated dose and risk, and return results to the database, using the Microsoft .NET Framework. This code interfaces with the PCXMC executable and emulates the ImPACT Excel spreadsheet to calculate organ doses from X-rays and CTs, respectively, eliminating the need to utilize the PCXMC graphical user interface (except for a few special cases) and the ImPACT spreadsheet. Results: Using MATLAB(R) code to interface with PCXMC and replicate ImPACT dose calculation allowed for rapid evaluation of multiple medical imaging exams. The user inputs the exam parameter data into the database and runs the code. Based on the imaging modality and input parameters, the organ doses are calculated. Output files are created for record, and organ doses, effective dose, and cancer risks associated with each exam are written to the database. Annual and post-flight exposure reports, which are used by the flight surgeon to brief the astronaut, are generated from the database. Conclusions: Automating PCXMC and ImPACT for evaluation of NASA astronaut medical imaging radiation procedures allowed for a traceable and rapid method for tracking projected cancer risks associated with over 12,000 exposures. This code will be used to evaluate future medical radiation exposures, and can easily be modified to accommodate changes to the risk

  3. Using antimicrobial adjuvant therapy in cancer treatment: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Recent clinical and pre-clinical data demonstrate that adjuvant antimicrobial therapy is beneficial in cancer treatment. There could be several reasons for this effect, which include treating cancer associated bacteria and viruses, prophylaxis of post-chemotherapy infections due to immunosuppression, and antiproliferative effect of certain antimicrobials. Targeting cancer associated viruses and bacteria with antimicrobial agents is currently used for gastric, cervical, hematopoietic, liver and brain cancer. However this treatment is effective only in combination with conventional therapies. Antimicrobials can also have a direct antiproliferative and cytotoxic effect, and can cause apoptosis. Moreover, some antimicrobials are known to be helpful in overcoming side effects of drugs commonly used in cancer treatment. Chemotherapy related bacteremia and neutropenia can be overcome by the appropriately timed use of antimicrobials. This review summarizes the data on the effects of antivirals and antibiotics on cancer treatment and describes their mechanisms. PMID:23164412

  4. Antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With increasing antibiotics resistance, there is an urgent need for novel infection therapeutics. Since antimicrobial peptides provide opportunities for this, identification and optimization of such peptides have attracted much interest during recent years. Here, a brief overview of antimicrobial peptides is provided, with focus placed on how selected hydrophobic modifications of antimicrobial peptides can be employed to combat also more demanding pathogens, including multi-resistant strains, without conferring unacceptable toxicity. PMID:24758244

  5. Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Next Topic Targeted therapy for thyroid cancer Chemotherapy for thyroid cancer Chemotherapy (chemo) uses anti-cancer drugs that are injected ... vein or muscle, or are taken by mouth. Chemotherapy is systemic therapy, which means that the drug ...

  6. Types of chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    Chemotherapy is the use of medicine to treat cancer. Chemotherapy kills cancer cells. It may be used to ... people are treated with a single type of chemotherapy. But often, people get more than one type ...

  7. UTILIZATION OF ImPACT TESTING TO MEASURE INJURY RISK IN ALPINE SKI AND SNOWBOARD ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Huntimer, Brittney; Kernozek, Thomas; Cole, John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background While studies that have examined the prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries in alpine skiing and snowboarding exist, there has been no discussion of how neurocognitive deficits may influence such injuries. Recent authors have identified a possible link between Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) testing results and the prevalence of musculoskeletal injury in athletic populations. However, no study has specifically examined this in the alpine skiing and snowboard athletes who sustain injury and those that do not. Hypothesis/Purpose The purpose was to review injury data and ImPACT test results within the local ski/snowboard population to determine if there was a difference in components of ImPACT test scores between injured and non-injured athletes. It was hypothesized that differences would exist in component scores on ImPACT testing between injured and non-injured athletes. Study design Retrospective cohort study Methods Injury records and baseline ImPACT testing scores for 93 athletes aged 14-17 participating in a local ski and snowboard club during the 2009-2012 seasons were gathered retrospectively. Injuries documented for the lower and upper extremity included ligament sprains, muscle strains, contusions, dislocation/subluxation, fractures and concussions. Athletes who sustained any of these listed injuries were categorized within the injured athlete group. Each component of ImPACT test scores was compared between gender and for injury status within skiing and snowboarding disciplines using a series of two-way analysis of variance tests. Results There was no difference between non-injured and injured females as well as non-injured and injured males in reaction time and visual motor speed (VMS), however there was an interaction between gender and injury status on composite reaction time and visual motor speed, or VMS. The composite reaction time for females was 4.7% faster with injury while males without injury

  8. DSSD detectors development PACT, a new space Compton telescope at the horizon 2025

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, P.; Khalil, M.; Dolgorouki, Y.; Bertoli, W.; Oger, R.; Bréelle, E.

    2015-07-01

    PACT is a Pair and Compton telescope that aims to make a sensitive survey of the gamma-ray sky between 100 keV and 100 MeV . It will be devoted to the detection of radioactivity lines from present and past supernova explosions, the observation of thousands of new blazars, and the study of polarized radiations from gamma-ray bursts, pulsars and accreting black holes. It will reach a sensitivity of one to two orders of magnitude lower than COMPTEL/CGRO (e.g. about 50 times lower for the broad-band, survey sensitivity at 1 MeV after 5 years). The PACT telescope is based upon three main components: a silicon-based gamma-ray tracker, a crystal-based calorimeter (e.g. CeBr3), and an anticoincidence detector made of plastic scintillator panels. Prototypes of the Silicon detector planes have been optimized and are currently tested in the APC laboratory.

  9. Antimicrobial stewardship

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Gladys W.; Wu, Jia En; Yeo, Chay Leng; Chan, Douglas; Hsu, Li Yang

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship is an emerging field currently defined by a series of strategies and interventions aimed toward improving appropriate prescription of antibiotics in humans in all healthcare settings. The ultimate goal is the preservation of current and future antibiotics against the threat of antimicrobial resistance, although improving patient safety and reducing healthcare costs are important concurrent aims. Prospective audit and feedback interventions are probably the most widely practiced of all antimicrobial stewardship strategies. Although labor-intensive, they are more easily accepted by physicians compared with formulary restriction and preauthorization strategies and have a higher potential for educational opportunities. Objective evaluation of antimicrobial stewardship is critical for determining the success of such programs. Nonetheless, there is controversy over which outcomes to measure and there is a pressing need for novel study designs that can objectively assess antimicrobial stewardship interventions despite the limitations inherent in the structure of most such programs. PMID:23302793

  10. File Structure and Data Base Management of PACT Programs Currently in Use

    PubMed Central

    Speck, Pat K.

    1984-01-01

    Physician Actuated Computerized Treatment (PACT), a total office-automation concept for medical-care delivery, utilizes on-line Medical Office Management (MOM) programs extensively described in national and world computer-in-medicine literature. This paper describes fundamental topics of the MOM system file-structure and database management design. Explanation includes representative menu-screens, examples of source-code program, lists of files, and statistical analysis of program links required to accomplish total office automation.

  11. A psychochemical weapon considered by the Warsaw Pact: a research note.

    PubMed

    Rózsa, Lajos

    2009-01-01

    Contrary to widespread rumours during the Cold War era, little, if any, evidence existed in the scientific literature to support the view that the Soviet Union or its Warsaw Pact allies considered the use of psychochemical weapons militarily. The Hungarian State Archives have recently opened up declassified records of Hungary's State Defence Council meetings held between 1962 and 1978. Materials submitted to the Council include reports about the coordinative meetings of the Warsaw Pact military medical services. Research into possible countermeasures against psychotropic drugs is listed as a research priority assigned to Hungary in 1962. Hungary rejected this task in 1963, but joined the ongoing project again in 1965. Methylamphetamine was produced in Budapest for use as an experimental model of such weapons. Within the context of contemporary western research, this drug was considered to be an effective interrogation tool. Similarly to the CIA, Hungary also failed to develop an antidote against it and the project was terminated, fruitlessly, in 1972. These documents serve as evidence that a Warsaw Pact forum had, in fact, been considering a psychochemical weapon as a "warfare agent." PMID:19142819

  12. Antimicrobial Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotic are known as methicillin-resistant S. aureus or MRSA. Antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs first became widely ... factors for infection are known as community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Recently, several cases overseas and in ...

  13. Antimicrobial Polymer

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Wright, Stacy C.; Taylor, Andrew C.

    2004-09-28

    A polymeric composition having antimicrobial properties and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate antimicrobial are disclosed. The polymeric composition comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, (ii) an antimicrobial agent selected from metals, metal alloys, metal salts, metal complexes and mixtures thereof, and (iii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide formed from a maleic anhydride or maleic acid ester monomer and alkylamines thereby producing a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone; the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl; and the metallic antimicrobial agent is selected from chelated silver ions, silver metal, chelated copper ions, copper metal, chelated zinc ions, zinc metal and mixtures thereof.

  14. Politics of Policy: Assessing the Implementation, Impact, and Evolution of the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) and edTPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reagan, Emilie Mitescu; Schram, Thomas; McCurdy, Kathryn; Chang, Te-Hsin; Evans, Carla M.

    2016-01-01

    Summative performance assessments in teacher education, such as the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) and the edTPA, have been heralded through polices intended to enhance the quality of the teaching profession and raise its stature among other professions. However, the development and implementation of the PACT, and…

  15. The Human dsRNA binding protein PACT is unable to functionally substitute for the Drosophila dsRNA binding protein R2D2

    PubMed Central

    Dickerman, Benjamin K; McDonald, Jocelyn A; Sen, Ganes C

    2014-01-01

    The dsRNA binding protein (dsRBP) PACT was first described as an activator of the dsRNA dependent protein kinase PKR in response to stress signals.  Additionally, it has been identified as a component of the small RNA processing pathway.  A role for PACT in this pathway represents an important interplay between two modes of post-transcriptional gene regulation.  The function of PACT in this context is poorly understood.  Thus, additional approaches are required to clarify the mechanism by which PACT functions.  In this study, the genetic utility of  Drosophila melanogaster was employed to identify dsRNA-binding proteins that are functionally orthologous to PACT.  Transgenic  Drosophila expressing human PACT were generated to determine whether PACT is capable of functionally substituting for the  Drosophila dsRBP R2D2, which has a well-defined role in small RNA biogenesis.  Results presented here indicate that PACT is unable to substitute for R2D2 at the whole organism level. PMID:24715958

  16. WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies: Technical Area 4 -- Balance-of-Station Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, D. A.; Strawmyer, K. R.; Conley, R. M.; Guidinger J. H.; Wilkie, D. C.; Zellman, T. F.

    2001-07-24

    DOE's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program explores the most advanced wind-generating technologies for improving reliability and decreasing energy costs. The first step in the WindPact program is a scaling study to bound the optimum sizes for wind turbines, to define size limits for certain technologies, and to scale new technologies. The program is divided into four projects: Composite Blades for 80-120-meter Rotors; Turbine, Rotor, and Blade Logistics; Self-Erecting Tower and Nacelle Feasibility; and Balance-of-Station Cost. This report discusses balance-of-station costs, which includes the electrical power collector system, wind turbine foundations, communications and controls, meteorological equipment, access roadways, crane pads, and the maintenance building. The report is based on a conceptual 50-megawatt (MW) wind farm site near Mission, South Dakota. Cost comparisons are provided for four sizes of wind turbines: 750 kilowatt (kW), 2.5 MW, 5.0 MW, and 10.0 MW.

  17. WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 2: Turbine, Rotor and Blade Logistics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.

    2001-07-16

    Through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) implemented the Wind Partnership for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program. This program will explore advanced technologies that may reduce the cost of energy (COE) from wind turbines. The initial step in the WindPACT program is a series of preliminary scaling studies intended to determine the optimum sizes for future turbines, help define sizing limits for certain critical technologies, and explore the potential for advanced technologies to contribute to reduced COE as turbine scales increase. This report documents the results of Technical Area 2-Turbine Rotor and Blade Logistics. For this report, we investigated the transportation, assembly, and crane logistics and costs associated with installation of a range of multi-megawatt-scale wind turbines. We focused on using currently available equipment, assembly techniques, and transportation system capabilities and limitations to hypothetically transport and install 50 wind turbines at a facility in south-central South Dakota.

  18. WindPACT Turbine Rotor Design, Specific Rating Study; Period of Performance: June 29, 2000--March 1, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm, D. J.; Hansen, A. C.

    2003-11-01

    In 2000, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) launched the Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program to examine ways in which the cost of wind energy could be reduced a further 30%. One element of the WindPACT program has been a series of design studies aimed at each of the major subsystems of the wind turbine to study the effect of scale and of alternative design approaches. The WindPACT Turbine Rotor Design Study was carried out by Global Energy Concepts, LLC, (GEC) on behalf of NREL, and the final report was delivered in June 2002. The study examined what configuration and design changes in the rotor would reduce the overall cost of energy. The objectives of this report are to use the 1.5-MW baseline configuration from the earlier WindPACT Rotor Design Study to examine the effect of different power ratings and to identify an optimum specific rating; to examine the effect of different maximum tip speeds on overall cost of energy (COE); to examine the role of different wind regimes on the optimum specific rating; and to examine how the optimum specific rating may be affected by introducing more advanced blade designs.

  19. Secondary Students' Understanding of NATO and the Warsaw Pact: The Educational Implications of Research Conducted in Three NATO Nations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galfo, Armand J.

    Three research projects were conducted over a three year period among secondary school students in the United Kingdom, the United States (Virginia), and West Germany in order to determine students' understanding the 40-year confrontation between the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the Warsaw Pact. These studies included 1991 students…

  20. International Psychological Applications Conference and Trends (InPACT) Proceedings (Ljubljana, Slovenia, May 2-4, 2015)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pracana, Clara, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    We are delighted to welcome you to the International Psychological Applications Conference and Trends (InPACT) 2015, taking place in Ljubljana, Slovenia, from 2 to 4 of May. Psychology, nowadays, offers a large range of scientific fields where it can be applied. The goal of understanding individuals and groups (mental functions and behavioral…

  1. PACT Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Peters, Scott H. [D-CA-52

    2014-07-09

    09/08/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights and International Organizations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Multinational development of a questionnaire assessing patient satisfaction with anticoagulant treatment: the 'Perception of Anticoagulant Treatment Questionnaire' (PACT-Q©)

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Martin H; Marrel, Alexia; Carita, Paulo; Anderson, David; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Crijns, Harry; Consoli, Silla; Arnould, Benoit

    2009-01-01

    Background The side effects and burden of anticoagulant treatments may contribute to poor compliance and consequently to treatment failure. A specific questionnaire is necessary to assess patients' needs and their perceptions of anticoagulant treatment. Methods A conceptual model of expectation and satisfaction with anticoagulant treatment was designed by an advisory board and used to guide patient (n = 31) and clinician (n = 17) interviews in French, US English and Dutch. Patients had either atrial fibrillation (AF), deep venous thrombosis (DVT), or pulmonary embolism (PE). Following interviews, three PACT-Q language versions were developed simultaneously and further pilot-tested by 19 patients. Linguistic validations were performed for additional language versions. Results Initial concepts were developed to cover three areas of interest: 'Treatment', 'Disease and Complications' and 'Information about disease and anticoagulant treatment'. After clinician and patient interviews, concepts were further refined into four domains and 17 concepts; test versions of the PACT-Q were then created simultaneously in three languages, each containing 27 items grouped into four domains: "Treatment Expectations" (7 items), "Convenience" (11 items), "Burden of Disease and Treatment" (2 items) and "Anticoagulant Treatment Satisfaction" (7 items). No item was deleted or added after pilot testing as patients found the PACT-Q easy to understand and appropriate in length in all languages. The PACT-Q was divided into two parts: the first part to measure the expectations and the second to measure the convenience, burden and treatment satisfaction, for evaluation prior to and after anticoagulant treatment, respectively. Eleven additional language versions were linguistically validated. Conclusion The PACT-Q has been rigorously developed and linguistically validated. It is available in 14 languages for use with thromboembolic patients, including AF, PE and DVT patients. Its validation and

  3. Chemotherapy in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Michael

    2015-10-01

    For approximately a decade, chemotherapy has been shown to prolong life in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Since that time, however, only two agents have proven to prolong life (docetaxel and cabazitaxel). However, in the last year, the addition of chemotherapy to primary hormonal therapy became a standard of care for high-volume castration-sensitive metastatic disease. Here I will review current prostate cancer chemotherapies, mechanisms of resistance to those therapies, and ongoing clinical studies of chemotherapy combinations and novel chemotherapeutics. PMID:26216506

  4. Probability and Confidence Trade-space (PACT) Evaluation: Accounting for Uncertainty in Sparing Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Leif; Box, Neil; Carter, Katrina; DiFilippo, Denise; Harrington, Sean; Jackson, David; Lutomski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    There are two general shortcomings to the current annual sparing assessment: 1. The vehicle functions are currently assessed according to confidence targets, which can be misleading- overly conservative or optimistic. 2. The current confidence levels are arbitrarily determined and do not account for epistemic uncertainty (lack of knowledge) in the ORU failure rate. There are two major categories of uncertainty that impact Sparing Assessment: (a) Aleatory Uncertainty: Natural variability in distribution of actual failures around an Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) (b) Epistemic Uncertainty : Lack of knowledge about the true value of an Orbital Replacement Unit's (ORU) MTBF We propose an approach to revise confidence targets and account for both categories of uncertainty, an approach we call Probability and Confidence Trade-space (PACT) evaluation.

  5. A Trust-Based Pact in Research Biobanks. From Theory to Practice.

    PubMed

    Sanchini, Virginia; Bonizzi, Giuseppina; Disalvatore, Davide; Monturano, Massimo; Pece, Salvatore; Viale, Giuseppe; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Boniolo, Giovanni

    2016-05-01

    Traditional Informed Consent is becoming increasingly inadequate, especially in the context of research biobanks. How much information is needed by patients for their consent to be truly informed? How does the quality of the information they receive match up to the quality of the information they ought to receive? How can information be conveyed fairly about future, non-predictable lines of research? To circumvent these difficulties, some scholars have proposed that current consent guidelines should be reassessed, with trust being used as a guiding principle instead of information. Here, we analyse one of these proposals, based on a Participation Pact, which is already being offered to patients at the Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, a comprehensive cancer hospital in Milan, Italy. PMID:26307361

  6. The PACT Ambassador Outreach Program: More Than Just a Bunch of "Old White-Haired Scientists"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabo, Mark; Sarquis, Mickey; Ennis, Chris

    1997-04-01

    In a technology-based society, effective science education is important, not only for training a qualified workforce, but also for producing informed citizens capable of understanding the issues and problems facing stimulating interest and deveoping the skills of budding scientists and technicians. The Ambassador Program described in this article provides a mechanism for industrial/academic interaction to take place. The Ambassador Program brings industrial scientists and technicians into high school and two-year college classrooms to expose both students and teachers to issues faced in the industrial workplace and laboratory. The multiphase model program integrates a classroom seminar, a tour of an industrial facility, and a laboratory experience based on industrial technology. This article describes the pilot PACT Ambassador program that was held in partnership with Quantum Chemical Corporation, William Mason High School, and Miami University Middletown.

  7. Regulation of PACT-Mediated Protein Kinase Activation by the OV20.0 Protein of Orf Virus.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yeu-Yang; Liao, Guan-Ru; Sen, Ganes C; Lin, Fong-Yuan; Hsu, Wei-Li

    2015-11-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR), a major component of the cellular antiviral system, is activated by the binding of either dsRNA or the cellular PKR activator, the PACT protein. The suppression of PKR activation is one of the main strategies that viruses employ to circumvent interferon signaling. Orf virus (ORFV), a parapoxvirus from the Poxviridae family, causes contagious pustular dermatitis in small ruminants. Previous studies have demonstrated that various OV20.0 isoforms, encoded by the OV20.0L gene, are able to inhibit PKR activation both by sequestering dsRNA and by physically interacting with PKR in vitro. Thus, this gene acts as a virulence factor of ORFV when tested using a mouse infection model. In the present study, the regions within OV20.0 that interact with dsRNA and with PKR have been mapped. Furthermore, this study demonstrates for the first time that OV20.0 is also able to interact with the dsRNA binding domain of PACT and that the presence of dsRNA strengthened the interaction of these two molecules. The presence of OV20.0 diminishes PKR phosphorylation when this is stimulated by PACT. Nevertheless, the association of OV20.0 with PKR, rather than with PACT, was found to be essential for reducing PACT-mediated PKR phosphorylation. These observations elucidate a new strategy whereby innate immunity can be evaded by ORFV.IMPORTANCE Our previous study indicated that ORFV's two OV20.0 isoforms act as a PKR antagonist via sequestering the PKR activator, dsRNA, and by interacting with PKR, leading to an inhibition of PKR activation (Y. Y. Tseng, F. Y. Lin, S. F. Cheng, D. Tscharke, S. Chulakasian, C. C. Chou, Y. F. Liu, W. S. Chang, M. L. Wong, and W. L. Hsu, J Virol 89:4966-4979, 2015, doi:10.1128/JVI.03714-14). In the current study, the possible mechanisms by which OV20.0 protein counteracts PKR activation were studied in depth. OV20.0 is able to bind PKR and its two activators, dsRNA and PACT. In addition, OV20.0 binds

  8. Regulation of PACT-Mediated Protein Kinase Activation by the OV20.0 Protein of Orf Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yeu-Yang; Liao, Guan-Ru; Sen, Ganes C.; Lin, Fong-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR), a major component of the cellular antiviral system, is activated by the binding of either dsRNA or the cellular PKR activator, the PACT protein. The suppression of PKR activation is one of the main strategies that viruses employ to circumvent interferon signaling. Orf virus (ORFV), a parapoxvirus from the Poxviridae family, causes contagious pustular dermatitis in small ruminants. Previous studies have demonstrated that various OV20.0 isoforms, encoded by the OV20.0L gene, are able to inhibit PKR activation both by sequestering dsRNA and by physically interacting with PKR in vitro. Thus, this gene acts as a virulence factor of ORFV when tested using a mouse infection model. In the present study, the regions within OV20.0 that interact with dsRNA and with PKR have been mapped. Furthermore, this study demonstrates for the first time that OV20.0 is also able to interact with the dsRNA binding domain of PACT and that the presence of dsRNA strengthened the interaction of these two molecules. The presence of OV20.0 diminishes PKR phosphorylation when this is stimulated by PACT. Nevertheless, the association of OV20.0 with PKR, rather than with PACT, was found to be essential for reducing PACT-mediated PKR phosphorylation. These observations elucidate a new strategy whereby innate immunity can be evaded by ORFV. IMPORTANCE Our previous study indicated that ORFV's two OV20.0 isoforms act as a PKR antagonist via sequestering the PKR activator, dsRNA, and by interacting with PKR, leading to an inhibition of PKR activation (Y. Y. Tseng, F. Y. Lin, S. F. Cheng, D. Tscharke, S. Chulakasian, C. C. Chou, Y. F. Liu, W. S. Chang, M. L. Wong, and W. L. Hsu, J Virol 89:4966–4979, 2015, doi:10.1128/JVI.03714-14). In the current study, the possible mechanisms by which OV20.0 protein counteracts PKR activation were studied in depth. OV20.0 is able to bind PKR and its two activators, dsRNA and PACT. In addition, OV20

  9. Chemotherapy-Related Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Taillibert, Sophie; Le Rhun, Emilie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2016-09-01

    Chemotherapy may have detrimental effects on either the central or peripheral nervous system. Central nervous system neurotoxicity resulting from chemotherapy manifests as a wide range of clinical syndromes including acute, subacute, and chronic encephalopathies, posterior reversible encephalopathy, acute cerebellar dysfunction, chronic cognitive impairment, myelopathy, meningitis, and neurovascular syndromes. These clinical entities vary by causative agent, degree of severity, evolution, and timing of occurrence. In the peripheral nervous system, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) and myopathy are the two main complications of chemotherapy. CIPN is the most common complication, and the majority manifest as a dose-dependent length-dependent sensory axonopathy. In severe cases of CIPN, the dose of chemotherapy is reduced, the administration delayed, or the treatment discontinued. Few treatments are available for CIPN and based on meta-analysis, duloxetine is the preferred symptomatic treatment. Myopathy due to corticosteroid use is the most frequent cause of muscle disorders in patients with cancer. PMID:27443648

  10. Food Antimicrobials Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Padilla, Adriana; Soto, Karen M.; Hernández Iturriaga, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Natural food antimicrobials are bioactive compounds that inhibit the growth of microorganisms involved in food spoilage or food-borne illness. However, stability issues result in degradation and loss of antimicrobial activity. Nanoencapsulation allows protection of antimicrobial food agents from unfavorable environmental conditions and incompatibilities. Encapsulation of food antimicrobials control delivery increasing the concentration of the antimicrobials in specific areas and the improvement of passive cellular absorption mechanisms resulted in higher antimicrobial activity. This paper reviews the present state of the art of the nanostructures used as food antimicrobial carriers including nanoemulsions, nanoliposomes, nanoparticles, and nanofibers. PMID:24995363

  11. WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 1-Composite Blades for 80- to 120-Meter Rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, D.A.

    2001-04-30

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) implemented the Wind Partnership for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program. As part of the WindPACT program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC (GEC), was awarded contract number YAM-0-30203-01 to examine Technical Area 1-Blade Scaling, Technical Area 2-Turbine Rotor and Blade Logistics, and Technical Area 3-Self-Erecting Towers. This report documents the results of GEC's Technical Area 1-Blade Scaling. The primary objectives of the Blade-Scaling Study are to assess the scaling of current materials and manufacturing technologies for blades of 40 to 60 meters in length, and to develop scaling curves of estimated cost and mass for rotor blades in that size range.

  12. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling-Juan; Gallo, Richard L

    2016-01-11

    Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are a diverse class of naturally occurring molecules that are produced as a first line of defense by all multicellular organisms. These proteins can have broad activity to directly kill bacteria, yeasts, fungi, viruses and even cancer cells. Insects and plants primarily deploy AMPs as an antibiotic to protect against potential pathogenic microbes, but microbes also produce AMPs to defend their environmental niche. In higher eukaryotic organisms, AMPs can also be referred to as 'host defense peptides', emphasizing their additional immunomodulatory activities. These activities are diverse, specific to the type of AMP, and include a variety of cytokine and growth factor-like effects that are relevant to normal immune homeostasis. In some instances, the inappropriate expression of AMPs can also induce autoimmune diseases, thus further highlighting the importance of understanding these molecules and their complex activities. This Primer will provide an update of our current understanding of AMPs. PMID:26766224

  13. DOE NCSP Review of TRUPACT-II/HalfPACT Fissile Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Goluoglu, S.

    2002-03-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Nuclear Material & Spent Fuel, EM-21, tasked the CSSG to perform a scoping study to determine the feasibility of increasing the fissile mass loading limits for specified TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packages and containers. The results of the scoping study may provide insights and technical guidance for establishing fissile mass loading limits at waste generator sites and at the waste repository. The goal is to reduce costs of transporting fissile material to the WIPP from EM's various closure sites. This report documents the results of the scoping study and demonstrates that it is feasible to significantly increase the fissile mass loading limits in the TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT packages and containers. Depending upon the particular payload containers used, the number of shipments to WIPP could be reduced by at least a factor of 2 and as much as a factor of 16 and the number of total payload containers required ''down-hole'' at WIPP could be reduced by at least a factor of 2 and as much as about 6. These cost savings result simply from applying a more realistic criticality analysis model rather than the very conservative, hypothetical, bounding analysis used to support the existing fissile mass loading limits. However, the applications of existing and developmental computational tools, nuclear data, and experiments from the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program have the potential to further reduce transportation and disposal container costs on the order of 7% to 17%. It is suggested that EM proceed with an effort to do the required formal analyses and pursue SARP supplements to take advantage of these savings. The success of these analyses are dependent upon the availability of the majority of the infrastructure supported by the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program as defined in the Five-Year Plan for the program. Finally, it should be noted that these potential cost savings are based only on

  14. Chemotherapy in metastatic retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kingston, J E; Hungerford, J L; Plowman, P N

    1987-03-01

    Eleven children with metastatic retinoblastoma diagnosed during the period 1970-1984 were treated with chemotherapy. Short-term complete responses were observed in three children treated with a four-drug combination which included cisplatinum, and in one child treated with vincristine and cyclophosphamide. The median duration of survival of the 11 children receiving chemotherapy was nine months, whilst the median survival of 13 children with metastatic retinoblastoma who were not given chemotherapy was only 2.3 months (p = 0.06). This suggests that retinoblastoma is a chemosensitive tumour and therefore adjuvant chemotherapy may have a role in children with retinoblastoma who at diagnosis are thought to be at high risk of developing metastatic disease. PMID:3587892

  15. Chemotherapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... sample before beginning chemotherapy to evaluate kidney function. Giving your child plenty of fluids to drink will ... eating, after using the bathroom, and after touching animals. They shouldn't share cups or utensils with ...

  16. [Efficacy of Levofloxacin Hydrate in Febrile Neutropenia for Outpatient Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Manato; Sato, Junya; Nihei, Satoru; Kashiwaba, Masahiro; Kudo, Kenzo

    2016-05-01

    Management of febrile neutropenia (FN) is important for the safety of patients undergoing outpatient chemotherapy. Oral antimicrobials are usually prescribed as the initial treatment for FN, and outpatients are instructed to begin medication prior to chemotherapy. However, the effectiveness and safety of the use of these oral antibiotics have not yet been established. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness and safety of levofloxacin hydrate (LVFX) for breast cancer patients with FN, and the factors associated with the onset of FN in 134 breast cancer patients who underwent chemotherapy including the anticancer drug anthracycline (total, 513 courses), in an outpatient chemotherapy department. The effectiveness and safety of LVFX were defined respectively as defervescence within 5 days, and the appearance of side effects such as diarrhea and rashes. Fever was observed in 89 (66%) of the 134 patients, and during 164 (32%) of 513 courses. Defervescence was observed with the LVFX medication in 149 (93%) of 160 courses. The primary side effect was the development of rashes, and only 2 (1%) of the 160 courses were discontinued. Onset of stomatitis during chemotherapy was observed as a factor of FN (odds ratio: 1.36, p<0.05). Our results suggest that the use of LVFX according to the patients' discretion might be an effective and safe option for the management of FN during outpatient chemotherapy. PMID:27210089

  17. Too lonely to die alone: internet suicide pacts and existential suffering in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ozawa-de Silva, Chikako

    2008-12-01

    Most striking in the recent rise of suicide in Japan are the increase in suicide among young Japanese and the emergence of Internet suicide pacts. An ethnography of suicide-related Web sites reveals a distinctive kind of existential suffering among visitors that is not reducible to categories of mental illness and raises questions regarding the meaning of an individual "choice" to die, when this occurs in the context of an intersubjective decision by a group of strangers, each of whom is too afraid to die alone. Anthropology's recent turn to subjectivity enables analyses of individual suffering in society that provide a more nuanced approach to the apparent dichotomy between agency and structure and that connect the phenomenon of suicide in Japan to Japanese conceptions of selfhood and the afterlife. The absence of ikigai [the worth of living] among suicide Web site visitors and their view of suicide as a way of healing show, furthermore, that analyses of social suffering must be expanded to include questions of meaning and loss of meaning and, also, draw attention to Japanese conceptions of self in which relationality in all things, including the choice to die, is of utmost importance. PMID:18800195

  18. The Rasch-built Pompe-specific activity (R-PAct) scale.

    PubMed

    van der Beek, N A M E; Hagemans, M L C; van der Ploeg, A T; van Doorn, P A; Merkies, I S J

    2013-03-01

    We constructed a patient-based interval scale using Rasch analysis, specifically suited to quantify the effects of Pompe disease on patient's ability to carry out daily life activities and their social participation: Rasch-built Pompe-specific Activity scale. Between July 2005 and April 2011, 186 patients aged 16 or older, participated to develop this scale. External construct validity was determined through correlations with the MRC sumscore and Rotterdam Handicap Scale. Furthermore, test-retest reliability was determined in a subgroup of 44 patients. Finally, individual person-level responsiveness was used to determine the proportion of patients demonstrating significant improvement or deterioration during their natural disease course, or during treatment with enzyme replacement therapy. Of the original 49 items, 31 were removed after investigation of model fit, internal reliability, threshold examination, item bias, and local dependency. The remaining 18 items were ordered on a linearly weighted scale and demonstrated good discriminative ability (Person Separation Index 0.96), external construct validity (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for MRC sumscore 0.82, and for the Rotterdam handicap scale 0.86), reliability of person's location (ability comparison: ICC 0.95), and responsiveness. We therefore conclude that the R-PAct scale enables us to accurately detect limitations in activities and social participation throughout the entire disease spectrum in patients with Pompe disease. PMID:23273871

  19. [Cancer diagnosis announcement: an act to seal the pact of trust between doctors and patients].

    PubMed

    Reich, Michel; Vennin, Philippe; Belkacémi, Yazid

    2008-09-01

    The announcement of the cancer diagnosis, an important moment in the set up of the doctor/patient relationship, must come together, if possible, with a quality of communication. This announcement is never insignificant, often traumatic both for the one who receives it and sometimes for the person who provides it. It must observe some rules of temporality, in its enunciation and take into account the psychological defences of patient's mechanisms. More accessible, but also more complex medical information is supposed to be more transparent, taking into account the wishes of patients considered as full actors of their health. As such, the announcement of bad news is in a relationship of care, trust represents the start of a full therapeutic act. One of the challenges of the diagnosis announcement remains the education of patients and physicians to encourage better adaptation to the disease and its treatments. This education can only take place in a pluridisciplinarity in order to optimize care. The diagnosis announcement must continuously oscillate between fair distance and proximity while respecting the autonomy, dignity and freedom of patient's choice. The respect of ethical principles will prevent incomprehension phenomena and seal the pact of trust between doctors and patients. PMID:18829417

  20. Bulgarian military neurosurgery: from Warsaw Pact to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

    PubMed

    Enchev, Yavor; Eftimov, Tihomir

    2010-05-01

    After 45 years as a closest ally of the Soviet Union in the Warsaw Pact, founded mainly against the US and the Western Europe countries, and 15 years of democratic changes, since 2004 Bulgaria has been a full member of NATO and an equal and trusted partner of its former enemies. The unprecedented transformation has affected all aspects of the Bulgarian society. As a function of the Bulgarian Armed Forces, Bulgarian military medicine and in particular Bulgarian military neurosurgery is indivisibly connected with their development. The history of Bulgarian military neurosurgery is the history of the transition from the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics military system and military medicine to NATO standards in every aspect. The career of the military neurosurgeon in Bulgaria is in many ways similar to that of the civilian neurosurgeon, but there are also many peculiarities. The purpose of this study was to outline the background and the history of Bulgarian military neurosurgery as well as its future trends in the conditions of world globalization. PMID:20568931

  1. Impact of Maternal HIV Health: A 12-year Study of the PACT Children

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Debra A.; Marelich, William D.; Herbeck, Diane M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this 12-year longitudinal study was to assess the effects of maternal HIV/AIDS on child/adolescent well-being and behavioral outcomes, extending an earlier published account. Methods Interviews were conducted with 66 pairs of healthy children and their mothers living with HIV/AIDS (MLH), who are participants in the Parents And children Coping Together (PACT) project begun in 1997. All study participants were English or Spanish speaking. About half (48.5%) of the youth were female. Maternal health status (e.g., viral load biomedical marker, illness symptoms, physical functioning and depression) and child/adolescent outcomes (e.g., depression, anxiety/worry, aggression, and self-concept) were assessed over 16 time-points. Results Using growth curve modeling, results show a negative effect of maternal health status on child/adolescent outcomes, including child/adolescent depression, anxiety/worry, aggression, and self-concept. Interaction effects within the growth models suggest younger children are more impacted by poor maternal health than are older children/adolescents. Conclusions This is the first study to follow a cohort of children of MLH over such an extended age range, through late adolescence/early adulthood, to determine the impact of maternal health status throughout the entire developmental period. PMID:22999830

  2. Law, bioethics and practice in France: forging a new legislative pact.

    PubMed

    Berthiau, Denis

    2013-02-01

    In France, bioethics norms have emerged in close interaction with medical practices. The first bioethics laws were adopted in 1994, with provisions for updates in 2004 and most recently, in 2011. As in other countries, bioethics laws indirectly refer to certain fundamental values. The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, I shall briefly describe the construction of the French bioethics laws and the values they are meant to protect. Secondly, I will show that the practice of clinical ethics, as reported in a few studies on ART, living organ donation and PGD, challenge the role attributed to doctors as "gatekeepers" of those fundamental values. Thirdly, I will suggest that the quality of medical practices would improve if the law focused on strengthening the tacit pact between doctors and patients, rather than putting doctors in charge of enforcing societal values. Doctors, for their part, would limit their role to what they can do best: provide sufficient patient support and safe care. Against those who argue that we should dispense with bioethics laws altogether, I hold that the laws are useful in order to limit the development of abusive practices. However, a new legislative approach should be adopted which would a positive presumption in favor of patients' requests. PMID:22484728

  3. Minimising post-operative risk using a Post-Anaesthetic Care Tool (PACT): protocol for a prospective observational study and cost-effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Nicole M; Kent, Bridie; Colgan, Stephen; Mohebbi, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction While the risk of adverse events following surgery has been identified, the impact of nursing care on early detection of these events is not well established. A systematic review of the evidence and an expert consensus study in post-anaesthetic care identified essential criteria for nursing assessment of patient readiness for discharge from the post-anaesthetic care unit (PACU). These criteria were included in a new nursing assessment tool, the Post-Anaesthetic Care Tool (PACT), and incorporated into the post-anaesthetic documentation at a large health service. The aim of this study is to test the clinical reliability of the PACT and evaluate whether the use of PACT will (1) enhance the recognition and response to patients at risk of deterioration in PACU; (2) improve documentation for handover from PACU nurse to ward nurse; (3) result in improved patient outcomes and (4) reduce healthcare costs. Methods and analysis A prospective, non-randomised, pre-implementation and post-implementation design comparing: (1) patients (n=750) who have surgery prior to the implementation of the PACT and (2) patients (n=750) who have surgery after PACT. The study will examine the use of the tool through the observation of patient care and nursing handover. Patient outcomes and cost-effectiveness will be determined from health service data and medical record audit. Descriptive statistics will be used to describe the sample and compare the two patient groups (pre-intervention and post-intervention). Differences in patient outcomes between the two groups will be compared using the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test and regression analyses and reported as ORs with the corresponding 95% CIs. Conclusions This study will test the clinical reliability and cost-effectiveness of the PACT. It is hypothesised that the PACT will enable nurses to recognise and respond to patients at risk of deterioration, improve handover to ward nurses, improve patient outcomes, and reduce healthcare

  4. Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC) Methodology, Drugs and Bidirectional Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Valle, S J; Alzahrani, N A; Liauw, W; Sugarbaker, P H; Bhatt, A; Morris, D L

    2016-06-01

    Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) combined have been recognized as standard of care for treatment of a subset of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). The aim of CRS is to eliminate all macroscopic disease through a series of visceral resections followed by targeting any residual microscopic disease with intraperitoneal chemotherapy, exposing the peritoneal surfaces to a high concentration of chemotherapy with a lower systemic toxicity. Different regimes of intraperitoneal chemotherapy include HIPEC, early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) and bidirectional chemotherapy. The efficacy and modality of treatment with intraperitoneal chemotherapy is dependent on multiple factors including the chosen cytotoxic agent and its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. There is no standardized methodology for intraperitoneal chemotherapy administration. This review will discuss the pharmacological principles of the various intraperitoneal chemotherapy techniques. PMID:27065705

  5. Antimicrobial Drugs in Fighting against Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Ahmed, Saeed; Hao, Haihong; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The outbreak of antimicrobial resistance, together with the lack of newly developed antimicrobial drugs, represents an alarming signal for both human and animal healthcare worldwide. Selection of rational dosage regimens for traditional antimicrobial drugs based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles as well as development of novel antimicrobials targeting new bacterial targets or resistance mechanisms are key approaches in tackling AMR. In addition to the cellular level resistance (i.e., mutation and horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants), the community level resistance (i.e., bilofilms and persisters) is also an issue causing antimicrobial therapy difficulties. Therefore, anti-resistance and antibiofilm strategies have currently become research hotspot to combat antimicrobial resistance. Although metallic nanoparticles can both kill bacteria and inhibit biofilm formation, the toxicity is still a big challenge for their clinical applications. In conclusion, rational use of the existing antimicrobials and combinational use of new strategies fighting against antimicrobial resistance are powerful warranties to preserve potent antimicrobial drugs for both humans and animals. PMID:27092125

  6. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... major obstacles to understanding the issue of antimicrobial resistance is that the subject material appears abstract and is complex. This video was designed to make the concept of antimicrobial resistance more real and understandable to veterinarians, livestock producers, ...

  7. Antimicrobial Treatments and Efficacy

    EPA Science Inventory

    To limit exposure to indoor biological contamination a risk-management approach which employs various antimicrobial treatments can effectively control contaminants and reduce exposure. Antimicrobial treatment of biological contaminants, especially mold in buildings, it is often n...

  8. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Infection “I am extra careful to stay away ... doctor or nurse right away. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Infection Take these steps to lower your chances ...

  9. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National ... before taking medicine for diarrhea. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Diarrhea These foods and drinks may help if ...

  10. Stress responses as determinants of antimicrobial resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: multidrug efflux and more.

    PubMed

    Poole, Keith

    2014-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a notoriously antimicrobial-resistant organism that is increasingly refractory to antimicrobial chemotherapy. While the usual array of acquired resistance mechanisms contribute to resistance development in this organism a multitude of endogenous genes also play a role. These include a variety of multidrug efflux loci that contribute to both intrinsic and acquired antimicrobial resistance. Despite their roles in resistance, however, it is clear that these efflux systems function in more than just antimicrobial efflux. Indeed, recent data indicate that they are recruited in response to environmental stress and, therefore, function as components of the organism's stress responses. In fact, a number of endogenous resistance-promoting genes are linked to environmental stress, functioning as part of known stress responses or recruited in response to a variety of environmental stress stimuli. Stress responses are, thus, important determinants of antimicrobial resistance in P. aeruginosa. As such, they represent possible therapeutic targets in countering antimicrobial resistance in this organism. PMID:25388098

  11. Recombinant hTRBP and hPACT Modulate hAgo2-Catalyzed siRNA-Mediated Target RNA Cleavage In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Willkomm, Sarah; Deerberg, Andrea; Heidemann, Johannes; Flügge, Friedemann; Meine, Janica; Hu, Rui; Kretschmer-Kazemi Far, Rosel; Restle, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The human TAR RNA-binding protein (hTRBP) and protein activator of protein kinase R (hPACT) are important players in RNA interference (RNAi). Together with hArgonaute2 (hAgo2) and hDicer they have been reported to form the RISC-loading complex (RLC). Among other functions, hTRBP was suggested to assist the loading of hAgo2 with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) within the RLC. Although several studies have been conducted to evaluate the specific functions of hTRBP and hPACT in RNAi, exact mechanisms and modes of action are still unknown. Here, we present a biochemical study further evaluating the role of hTRBP and hPACT in hAgo2-loading. We found that both proteins enhance hAgo2-mediated RNA cleavage significantly; even a hAgo2 mutant impaired in siRNA binding shows full cleavage activity in the presence of hTRBP or hPACT. Pre-steady state binding studies reveal that the assembly of wildtype-hAgo2 (wt-hAgo2) and siRNAs remains largely unaffected, whereas the binding of mutant hAgo2-PAZ9 to siRNA is restored by adding either hTRBP or hPACT. We conclude that both proteins assist in positioning the siRNA within hAgo2 to ensure optimal binding and cleavage. Overall, our data indicate that hTRBP and hPACT are part of a regulative system of RNAi that is important for efficient target RNA cleavage. PMID:26784517

  12. Recombinant hTRBP and hPACT Modulate hAgo2-Catalyzed siRNA-Mediated Target RNA Cleavage In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Willkomm, Sarah; Deerberg, Andrea; Heidemann, Johannes; Flügge, Friedemann; Meine, Janica; Hu, Rui; Kretschmer-Kazemi Far, Rosel; Restle, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The human TAR RNA-binding protein (hTRBP) and protein activator of protein kinase R (hPACT) are important players in RNA interference (RNAi). Together with hArgonaute2 (hAgo2) and hDicer they have been reported to form the RISC-loading complex (RLC). Among other functions, hTRBP was suggested to assist the loading of hAgo2 with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) within the RLC. Although several studies have been conducted to evaluate the specific functions of hTRBP and hPACT in RNAi, exact mechanisms and modes of action are still unknown. Here, we present a biochemical study further evaluating the role of hTRBP and hPACT in hAgo2-loading. We found that both proteins enhance hAgo2-mediated RNA cleavage significantly; even a hAgo2 mutant impaired in siRNA binding shows full cleavage activity in the presence of hTRBP or hPACT. Pre-steady state binding studies reveal that the assembly of wildtype-hAgo2 (wt-hAgo2) and siRNAs remains largely unaffected, whereas the binding of mutant hAgo2-PAZ9 to siRNA is restored by adding either hTRBP or hPACT. We conclude that both proteins assist in positioning the siRNA within hAgo2 to ensure optimal binding and cleavage. Overall, our data indicate that hTRBP and hPACT are part of a regulative system of RNAi that is important for efficient target RNA cleavage. PMID:26784517

  13. WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 3 -- Self-Erecting Tower and Nacelle Feasibility: March 2000--March 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Global Energy Concepts, LLC

    2001-05-31

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), has implemented the Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program to explore advanced technologies for improving the reliability and cost-effectiveness of wind energy technology. Global Energy Concepts (GEC) prepared this report on self-erecting towers as part of the WindPACT program. The objectives of the work were to identify potential methods for erecting wind turbine towers without the use of large conventional cranes, establish the most promising methods, and compare the costs of the most promising methods to the costs of conventional cranes.

  14. PACT- and RIG-I-Dependent Activation of Type I Interferon Production by a Defective Interfering RNA Derived from Measles Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ting-Hin; Kew, Chun; Lui, Pak-Yin; Chan, Chi-Ping; Satoh, Takashi; Akira, Shizuo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The live attenuated measles virus vaccine is highly immunostimulatory. Identification and characterization of its components that activate the innate immune response might provide new strategies and agents for the rational design and development of chemically defined adjuvants. In this study, we report on the activation of type I interferon (IFN) production by a defective interfering (DI) RNA isolated from the Hu-191 vaccine strain of measles virus. We found that the Hu-191 virus induced IFN-β much more potently than the Edmonston strain. In the search for IFN-inducing species in Hu-191, we identified a DI RNA specifically expressed by this strain. This DI RNA, which was of the copy-back type, was predicted to fold into a hairpin structure with a long double-stranded stem region of 206 bp, and it potently induced the expression of IFN-β. Its IFN-β-inducing activity was further enhanced when both cytoplasmic RNA sensor RIG-I and its partner, PACT, were overexpressed. On the contrary, this activity was abrogated in cells deficient in PACT or RIG-I. The DI RNA was found to be associated with PACT in infected cells. In addition, both the 5′-di/triphosphate end and the double-stranded stem region on the DI RNA were essential for its activation of PACT and RIG-I. Taken together, our findings support a model in which a viral DI RNA is sensed by PACT and RIG-I to initiate an innate antiviral response. Our work might also provide a foundation for identifying physiological PACT ligands and developing novel adjuvants or antivirals. IMPORTANCE The live attenuated measles virus vaccine is one of the most successful human vaccines and has largely contained the devastating impact of a highly contagious virus. Identifying the components in this vaccine that stimulate the host immune response and understanding their mechanism of action might help to design and develop better adjuvants, vaccines, antivirals, and immunotherapeutic agents. We identified and characterized

  15. CLARITY and PACT-based imaging of adult zebrafish and mouse for whole-animal analysis of infections.

    PubMed

    Cronan, Mark R; Rosenberg, Allison F; Oehlers, Stefan H; Saelens, Joseph W; Sisk, Dana M; Jurcic Smith, Kristen L; Lee, Sunhee; Tobin, David M

    2015-12-01

    Visualization of infection and the associated host response has been challenging in adult vertebrates. Owing to their transparency, zebrafish larvae have been used to directly observe infection in vivo; however, such larvae have not yet developed a functional adaptive immune system. Cells involved in adaptive immunity mature later and have therefore been difficult to access optically in intact animals. Thus, the study of many aspects of vertebrate infection requires dissection of adult organs or ex vivo isolation of immune cells. Recently, CLARITY and PACT (passive clarity technique) methodologies have enabled clearing and direct visualization of dissected organs. Here, we show that these techniques can be applied to image host-pathogen interactions directly in whole animals. CLARITY and PACT-based clearing of whole adult zebrafish and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mouse lungs enables imaging of mycobacterial granulomas deep within tissue to a depth of more than 1 mm. Using established transgenic lines, we were able to image normal and pathogenic structures and their surrounding host context at high resolution. We identified the three-dimensional organization of granuloma-associated angiogenesis, an important feature of mycobacterial infection, and characterized the induction of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) within the granuloma using an established fluorescent reporter line. We observed heterogeneity in TNF induction within granuloma macrophages, consistent with an evolving view of the tuberculous granuloma as a non-uniform, heterogeneous structure. Broad application of this technique will enable new understanding of host-pathogen interactions in situ. PMID:26449262

  16. PACT: a sensitive 100 keV-10 MeV all sky pairs and Compton telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, P.; Tatischeff, V.; de Seréville, N.; Limousin, O.; Bertoli, W.; Bréelle, E.; Dolgorouky, Y.; Gostojic, A.; Hamadache, C.; Khalil, M.; Kiener, J.

    2014-07-01

    PACT is a Pair And Compton Telescope that aims to make a sensitive survey of the gamma-ray sky between 100 keV and 100 MeV. It will be devoted to the detection of radioactivity lines from present and past supernova explosions, the observation of thousands of new blazars, and the study of polarized radiations from gamma-ray bursts, pulsars and accreting black holes. It will reach a sensitivity of one to two orders of magnitude lower than COMPTEL/CGRO (e.g. about 50 times lower for the broad-band, survey sensitivity at 1 MeV after 5 years). The concept of PACT will be proposed for the AstroMeV mission in the framework of the M4 ESA Call. It is based upon three main components: a silicon-based gamma-ray tracker, a crystal-based calorimeter (e.g. CeBr3:Sr), and an anticoincidence detector made of plastic scintillator panels. Prototypes of these detector planes are currently tested in the laboratories.

  17. CLARITY and PACT-based imaging of adult zebrafish and mouse for whole-animal analysis of infections

    PubMed Central

    Cronan, Mark R.; Rosenberg, Allison F.; Oehlers, Stefan H.; Saelens, Joseph W.; Sisk, Dana M.; Jurcic Smith, Kristen L.; Lee, Sunhee; Tobin, David M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Visualization of infection and the associated host response has been challenging in adult vertebrates. Owing to their transparency, zebrafish larvae have been used to directly observe infection in vivo; however, such larvae have not yet developed a functional adaptive immune system. Cells involved in adaptive immunity mature later and have therefore been difficult to access optically in intact animals. Thus, the study of many aspects of vertebrate infection requires dissection of adult organs or ex vivo isolation of immune cells. Recently, CLARITY and PACT (passive clarity technique) methodologies have enabled clearing and direct visualization of dissected organs. Here, we show that these techniques can be applied to image host-pathogen interactions directly in whole animals. CLARITY and PACT-based clearing of whole adult zebrafish and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected mouse lungs enables imaging of mycobacterial granulomas deep within tissue to a depth of more than 1 mm. Using established transgenic lines, we were able to image normal and pathogenic structures and their surrounding host context at high resolution. We identified the three-dimensional organization of granuloma-associated angiogenesis, an important feature of mycobacterial infection, and characterized the induction of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) within the granuloma using an established fluorescent reporter line. We observed heterogeneity in TNF induction within granuloma macrophages, consistent with an evolving view of the tuberculous granuloma as a non-uniform, heterogeneous structure. Broad application of this technique will enable new understanding of host-pathogen interactions in situ. PMID:26449262

  18. USDA Data on Antimicrobial Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing remains an important tool as investigators devise ways to arrest the development of antimicrobial resistance, particularly in food borne bacteria. In 1996, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) initiated the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System -...

  19. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance Antibiotic-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Multidrug-Resistant Neisseria ...

  20. The Effects of White Boards on Student Achievement in Fourth Grade Mathematics as Measures on the Palmetto Achievement Test (PACT) at Selected Schools in North Central South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Tanya Lighty

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the use of interactive Whiteboard technology in mathematics class could improve student achievement as measured by scores achieved on the South Carolina State Palmetto Achievement Test (PACT). The study examined fourth grade mathematics achievement test scores for students whose teachers used…

  1. Integrating a Focus on Academic Language, English Learners, and Mathematics: Teacher Candidates' Responses on the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, George C.; Aguirre, Julia M.; Téllez, Kip

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the United States, teacher educators are developing new strategies to improve the preparation of mainstream teachers for linguistic diversity. In this article, we explore teacher candidates' responses to the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT), a preservice assessment required for credentialing that requires…

  2. Evaluation of organ doses and effective dose according to the ICRP Publication 110 reference male/female phantom and the modified ImPACT CT patient dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masanao; Asada, Yasuki; Matsubara, Kosuke; Matsunaga, Yuta; Kawaguchi, Ai; Katada, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Hiroshi; Koshida, Kichiro; Suzuki, Shouichi

    2014-01-01

    We modified the Imaging Performance Assessment of CT scanners (ImPACT) to evaluate the organ doses and the effective dose based on the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 110 reference male/female phantom with the Aquilion ONE ViSION Edition scanner. To select the new CT scanner, the measurement results of the CTDI100,c and CTDI100,p for the 160 (head) and the 320 (body) mm polymethylmethacrylate phantoms, respectively, were entered on the Excel worksheet. To compute the organ doses and effective dose of the ICRP reference male/female phantom, the conversion factors obtained by comparison between the organ doses of different types of phantom were applied. The organ doses and the effective dose were almost identical for the ICRP reference male/female and modified ImPACT. The results of this study showed that, with the dose assessment of the ImPACT, the difference in sex influences only testes and ovaries. Because the MIRD-5 phantom represents a partially hermaphrodite adult, the phantom has the dimensions of the male reference man including testes, ovaries, and uterus but no female breasts, whereas the ICRP male/female phantom includes whole-body male and female anatomies based on high-resolution anatomical datasets. The conversion factors can be used to estimate the doses of a male and a female accurately, and efficient dose assessment can be performed with the modified ImPACT. PMID:25207566

  3. Responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa often are hard to treat; inappropriate chemotherapy readily selects multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa. This organism can be exposed to a wide range of concentrations of antimicrobials during treatment; learning more about the responses of P. aeruginosa to antimicrobials is therefore important. We review here responses of the bacterium P. aeruginosa upon exposure to antimicrobials at levels below the inhibitory concentration. Carbapenems (e.g., imipenem) have been shown to induce the formation of thicker and more robust biofilms, while fluoroquinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin) and aminoglycosides (e.g., tobramycin) have been shown to induce biofilm formation. Ciprofloxacin also has been demonstrated to enhance the frequency of mutation to carbapenem resistance. Conversely, although macrolides (e.g., azithromycin) typically are not effective against P. aeruginosa because of the pseudomonal outer-membrane impermeability and efflux, macrolides do lead to a reduction in virulence factor production. Similarly, tetracycline is not very effective against this organism, but is known to induce the type-III secretion system and consequently enhance cytotoxicity of P. aeruginosa in vivo. Of special note are the effects of antibacterials and disinfectants on pseudomonal efflux systems. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of protein synthesis inhibitors (aminoglycosides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, etc.) induce the MexXY multidrug efflux system. This response is known to be mediated by interference with the translation of the leader peptide PA5471.1, with consequent effects on expression of the PA5471 gene product. Additionally, induction of the MexCD-OprJ multidrug efflux system is observed upon exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of disinfectants such as chlorhexidine and benzalkonium. This response is known to be dependent upon the AlgU stress response factor. Altogether, these biological responses of P. aeruginosa provide useful

  4. Responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuji; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa often are hard to treat; inappropriate chemotherapy readily selects multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa. This organism can be exposed to a wide range of concentrations of antimicrobials during treatment; learning more about the responses of P. aeruginosa to antimicrobials is therefore important. We review here responses of the bacterium P. aeruginosa upon exposure to antimicrobials at levels below the inhibitory concentration. Carbapenems (e.g., imipenem) have been shown to induce the formation of thicker and more robust biofilms, while fluoroquinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin) and aminoglycosides (e.g., tobramycin) have been shown to induce biofilm formation. Ciprofloxacin also has been demonstrated to enhance the frequency of mutation to carbapenem resistance. Conversely, although macrolides (e.g., azithromycin) typically are not effective against P. aeruginosa because of the pseudomonal outer-membrane impermeability and efflux, macrolides do lead to a reduction in virulence factor production. Similarly, tetracycline is not very effective against this organism, but is known to induce the type-III secretion system and consequently enhance cytotoxicity of P. aeruginosa in vivo. Of special note are the effects of antibacterials and disinfectants on pseudomonal efflux systems. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of protein synthesis inhibitors (aminoglycosides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, etc.) induce the MexXY multidrug efflux system. This response is known to be mediated by interference with the translation of the leader peptide PA5471.1, with consequent effects on expression of the PA5471 gene product. Additionally, induction of the MexCD-OprJ multidrug efflux system is observed upon exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of disinfectants such as chlorhexidine and benzalkonium. This response is known to be dependent upon the AlgU stress response factor. Altogether, these biological responses of P. aeruginosa provide useful

  5. Chemotherapy and fertility.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Zeev

    2012-06-01

    The overall increase in cancer prevalence and the significant increase in long-term survival have generated worldwide interest in preserving fertility in young women exposed to gonadotoxic chemo- and radiotherapy. Infertility represents one of the main long-term consequences of combination chemotherapy given for lymphoma, leukaemia and other malignancies in young women. The gonadotoxic effect of various chemotherapeutic agents is diverse, may involve a variety of pathophysiologic mechanisms, and is not unequivocally understood. Proliferating cells, such as in tissues with high turnover (i.e. bone marrow, gastrointestinal tract and growing ovarian follicles) are more vulnerable to the toxic effect of alkylating agents. These agents may also be cytotoxic to cells at rest, as they are not cell-cycle specific. Alkylating agents, the most gonadotoxic chemotherapeutic medications, cause dose-dependent, direct destruction of oocytes and follicular depletion, and may bring about cortical fibrosis and ovarian blood-vessel damage. The reported rate of premature ovarian failure after various diseases and chemotherapeutic protocols differ enormously, and depend mainly on the chemotherapeutic protocol used and age range of the woman. Several options have been proposed for preserving female fertility, despite gonadotoxic chemotherapy: ovarian transposition, cryopreservation of embryos, unfertilised metaphase-II oocytes and ovarian tissue, and administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonistic analogs in an attempt to decrease the gonadotoxic effects of chemotherapy by simulating a prepubertal hormonal milieu. None of these methods is ideal and none guarantees future fertility in all survivors; therefore, a combination of methods is recommended for maximising women's chances of future fertility. PMID:22281514

  6. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  7. Antimicrobial use: Alternatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For over fifty years, antimicrobials have been used in food animal production to maintain animal health and to increase productivity. The resulting increase in antimicrobial resistance among enteric bacteria has created two principal concerns: 1) the prevalence of drug-resistant pathogens leaves th...

  8. Antimicrobial peptides in 2014.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  9. [Prostate cancer and chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gravis, Gwenaelle; Salem, Naji; Bladou, Franck; Viens, Patrice

    2007-07-01

    Androgen deprivation in patients with metastatic prostate cancer produces palliation of symptoms, PSA decrease and tumoral regression in most patients. After a brief period of disease regression lasting 18 to 24 months nearly all pts will progress to androgen independence disease (HRPC) with progressive clinical deterioration and ultimately death. Chemotherapy with mitoxantrone has been shown to palliate symptoms but did not extend survival. Two large randomized trials showed a survival benefit for pts with HRPC treated with docetaxel with a reduction risk of death by 21-24%, and significant improvement in palliation of symptoms and quality of life. New agents targeting angiogenesis, apoptosis, signal transduction pathway, used alone or in combination with docetaxel currently are under trial in an attempt to provide much needed improvements in outcome. Questions remains in suspend when and who need to be treated, earlier, in high risk as in adjuvant setting? Current data have demonstrated that neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy is relatively safe and feasible. Further investigation through prospective randomize trials is critical to define the precise role of this modality in high risk populations. PMID:17845990

  10. [Chemotherapy and the heart].

    PubMed

    Plana, Juan C

    2011-05-01

    The improvements in cancer detection and therapy have created a new cohort of patients who will experience sufficient survival to develop the cardiac complications of the cancer therapy. Three-dimensional echocardiography has been validated as the ultrasound modality with the best accuracy for the calculation of ejection fraction when compared to magnetic resonance imaging, the current gold standard, making it the tool of choice, when available, for the initial evaluation and follow up of the patient receiving chemotherapy. If three-dimensional echocardiography is not available, or if the quality of the images is inadequate, the use of ultrasound contrast can be useful for the definition of the endocardial border and identification of the true apex of the heart, enhancing the ability of the interpreter to accurately calculate volumes and ejection fraction. Two-dimensional strain appears promising as a tool to identify abnormalities in myocardial mechanics very early on during cardiotoxicity, allowing the prediction of later overt systolic dysfunction. This parameter may be useful in the detection of chemotherapy treated patients who could benefit from alternate therapies, thereby decreasing the incidence of cardiotoxicity and its associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:21492985

  11. Antimicrobial therapy of pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Walsh

    1960-01-01

    The discovery, some nine years ago, of the highly specific antituberculous drug, isoniazid, marked an important advance in the antimicrobial therapy of tuberculosis, first practised successfully with streptomycin and p-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) in the late 'forties. Isoniazid is relatively non-toxic and, unlike streptomycin, can be administered orally, so that it is eminently suitable for use, either alone or in combination with PAS, in the domiciliary treatment of tuberculous patients. The wisdom of employing it on a large scale in home-treatment programmes, however, has been questioned on the ground that such wide-spread use might result in a spread of tubercle bacilli resistant to the drug. This controversial subject is discussed in some detail in this general review of the chemotherapy of tuberculosis. The author is convinced that, so far, the benefits of isoniazid therapy have outweighed the disadvantages and, though well aware of the possible consequences in terms of isoniazid-resistance, sees no reason at the present time for not making full use of this valuable weapon in the antituberculosis armamentarium. PMID:20604078

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  13. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  14. Fast Disinfecting Antimicrobial Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Ahmad E.; Dabkowski, Jeffery M.; Nüsslein, Klaus; Tew, Gregory N.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon wafers and glass surfaces were functionalized with facially amphiphilic antimicrobial copolymers using the “grafting from” technique. Surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was used to grow poly(butylmethacrylate)-co-poly(Boc-aminoethyl methacrylate) from the surfaces. Upon Boc-deprotection, these surfaces became highly antimicrobial and killed S. aureus and E. coli 100% in less than 5 min. The molecular weight and grafting density of the polymer were controlled by varying the polymerization time and initiator surface density. Antimicrobial studies showed that the killing efficiency of these surfaces was independent of polymer layer thickness or grafting density within the range of surfaces studied. PMID:19177651

  15. Antimicrobial Properties of Teas and Their Extracts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Md Wasim; Sharangi, A B; Singh, J P; Thakur, Pran K; Ayala-Zavala, J F; Singh, Archana; Dhua, R S

    2016-07-01

    Tea has recently received the attention of pharmaceutical and scientific communities due to the plethora of natural therapeutic compounds. As a result, numerous researches have been published in a bid to validate their biological activity. Moreover, major attention has been drawn to antimicrobial activities of tea. Being rich in phenolic compounds, tea has the preventive potential for colon, esophageal, and lung cancers, as well as urinary infections and dental caries, among others. The venture of this review was to illustrate the emerging findings on the antimicrobial properties of different teas and tea extracts, which have been obtained from several in vitro studies investigating the effects of these extracts against different microorganisms. Resistance to antimicrobial agents has become an increasingly important and urgent global problem. The extracts of tea origin as antimicrobial agents with new mechanisms of resistance would serve an alternative way of antimicrobial chemotherapy targeting the inhibition of microbial growth and the spread of antibiotic resistance with potential use in pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food industries. PMID:25675116

  16. Antimicrobial activity of isopteropodine.

    PubMed

    García, Rubén; Cayunao, Cesia; Bocic, Ronny; Backhouse, Nadine; Delporte, Carle; Zaldivar, Mercedes; Erazo, Silvia

    2005-01-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation for the determination of antimicrobial activity of Uncaria tomentosa, has led to the isolation of isopteropodine (0.3%), a known Uncaria pentacyclic oxindol alkaloid that exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria. PMID:16042336

  17. Novel antimicrobial textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Unchin

    2003-10-01

    Many microorganisms can survive, and perhaps proliferate on textiles, generating adverse effects such as: disease transmission, odor generation, pH changes, staining, discoloration and loss of performance. These adverse effects may threaten users' health, deteriorate textile properties and degrade service quality. It may, therefore, be desirable to incorporate antimicrobials on textiles for controlling the growth of microorganisms. This dissertation focuses on the development of antimicrobial fibers and fabrics by integration of antimicrobials with these textiles. The applications of hydantoin-based halamines were mainly investigated in the research. The typical process is that hydantoin containing compounds are grafted onto textiles and transformed to halamine by chlorination. Hydantoin-based halamines are usually chloramines that release chlorine (Cl+) via cleavage of the -NCl functional group which attacks and kills microbes. The antimicrobial behavior is rechargeable many times by rinsing the fiber or fabric with chlorine-containing solution. Some quaternary ammonium type antimicrobials were also investigated in this research. The choice of integrating techniques is dependant on both the textile and antimicrobial compounds. In this dissertation, the nine approaches were studied for incorporating antimicrobial with various textiles: (1) co-extrusion of fibers with halamine precursor additive; (2) grafting of the quaternary ammonium compounds onto ethylene-co-acrylic acid fiber for creating quaternary ammonium type antimicrobial fiber; (3) entrapment of the additives in thermally bonded bicomponent nonwoven fabrics; (4) attaching antimicrobial additives to surfaces with latex adhesive coating; (5) grafting of antimicrobial compounds onto rubber latex via UV exposure; (6) reaction of halamine with needle-punched melamine formaldehyde nonwoven fabric and laminates; (7) coating melamine resin onto tent fabrics and laminates; (8) synthesis of super absorbent polymer

  18. Antimicrobial Compounds in Tears

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    The tear film coats the cornea and conjunctiva and serves several important functions. It provides lubrication, prevents drying of the ocular surface epithelia, helps provide a smooth surface for refracting light, supplies oxygen and is an important component of the innate defense system of the eye providing protection against a range of potential pathogens. This review describes both classic antimicrobial compounds found in tears such as lysozyme and some more recently identified such as members of the cationic antimicrobial peptide family and surfactant protein-D as well as potential new candidate molecules that may contribute to antimicrobial protection. As is readily evident from the literature review herein, tears, like all mucosal fluids, contain a plethora of molecules with known antimicrobial effects. That all of these are active in vivo is debatable as many are present in low concentrations, may be influenced by other tear components such as the ionic environment, and antimicrobial action may be only one of several activities ascribed to the molecule. However, there are many studies showing synergistic/additive interactions between several of the tear antimicrobials and it is highly likely that cooperativity between molecules is the primary way tears are able to afford significant antimicrobial protection to the ocular surface in vivo. In addition to effects on pathogen growth and survival some tear components prevent epithelial cell invasion and promote the epithelial expression of innate defense molecules. Given the protective role of tears a number of scenarios can be envisaged that may affect the amount and/or activity of tear antimicrobials and hence compromise tear immunity. Two such situations, dry eye disease and contact lens wear, are discussed here. PMID:23880529

  19. Efficacy of the photodynamic antimicrobial therapy (PACT) with the use of methylene blue associated with the λ660nm laser in Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonesis: in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires-Santos, Gustavo M.; Marques, Aparecida M. C.; Alves, Eliomara S. S.; Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Rosa, Cristiane B.; Colombo, Fabio; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.

    2012-03-01

    The present studied evaluated the in vitro effects of PDT on Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis promastigotes. For this examination L. amazonensis promastigotes, stain Josefa, were used and maintained in Warren media supplement with fetal bovine serum at 26°C for 96 hours. A viability curve was accomplished using different concentrations of methylene blue photosensitizer associated to red laser light in order to obtain the most effective interaction to inhibit the parasite's growth. Two pre-irradiation periods, 5 and 30 minutes, were evaluated and the promastigotes were counted by colorimetry. On fluorescence microscopy the autophagic processes and reactive oxygen species were detected. Promastigotes treated with Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) by concentrations of 5 and 0,315ug/mL, presented cellular proliferation inhibition when compared to the control. In the first condition, the cells had structural alterations such as truncated cells, cells with two flagella, bleb formation and cells body deformation, while none of these modifications could be visualized in the control group. When analyzed through fluorescence microscopy, the promastigotes treated were positives for free radicals immediately after light application and also 1 hour after treatment presenting signs of autophagia. PDT on L. (L.) amazonensis is effective causing alterations that can help elucidate the mechanisms of the parasite's death when treated with methilene

  20. MicroRNA-122 Inhibits the Production of Inflammatory Cytokines by Targeting the PKR Activator PACT in Human Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Masato; Kanda, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Reina; Haga, Yuki; Jiang, Xia; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-122 (miR-122) is one of the most abundant miRs in the liver. Previous studies have demonstrated that miR-122 plays a role in inflammation in the liver and functions in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which reside in the space of Disse. Here, we showed that the transient inhibition of PKR-activating protein (PACT) expression, by miR-122 or siRNA targeting of PACT, suppressed the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and IL-1β, in human HSC LX-2. Sequence and functional analyses confirmed that miR-122 directly targeted the 3′-untranslated region of PACT. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that miR-122 blocked NF-κB-nuclear translocation in LX-2 cells. We also showed that conditioned medium from miR-122-transfected LX-2 cells suppressed human monocyte-derived THP-1 cell migration. Taken together, our study indicates that miR-122 may downregulate cytokine production in HSCs and macrophage chemotaxis and that the targeting of miR-122 may have therapeutic potential for preventing the progression of liver diseases. PMID:26636761

  1. Diagnostic efficiency of ImPACT and CogSport in concussed rugby union players who have not undergone baseline neurocognitive testing.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew; Shores, E Arthur; Batchelor, Jennifer; Honan, Cynthia A

    2012-01-01

    The current study endeavored to replicate the approach to sports-related concussion management adopted by some community-based sporting organizations by examining the diagnostic efficiency of CogSport and ImPACT in athletes without baseline test data and assessed only once postinjury. Recently concussed nonelite-level rugby union players (N = 51) were tested within 72 hours of sustaining a concussion and were compared to nonconcussed matched controls (N = 41). Demographic information and history of recent concussion were also collected. Logistic regression analysis and receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis were conducted to evaluate the most accurate scores at identifying group membership. Overall, the classification accuracy of CogSport and ImPACT represented only very minimal improvements over a demographic-only (age, estimated premorbid Full-Scale IQ, and number of previous concussions) model. Positive predictive power and negative predictive power of composite scores were modest. The ImPACT postconcussion symptoms total (severity) score was most accurate at classifying concussed athletes. Where neuropsychological tests are utilized on a single occasion postconcussion and in the absence of baseline testing, postinjury testing does not improve diagnostic utility beyond the demographic model. These results do not validate this approach as a useful method of managing sports-related concussion. PMID:23373575

  2. MicroRNA-122 Inhibits the Production of Inflammatory Cytokines by Targeting the PKR Activator PACT in Human Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masato; Kanda, Tatsuo; Sasaki, Reina; Haga, Yuki; Jiang, Xia; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-122 (miR-122) is one of the most abundant miRs in the liver. Previous studies have demonstrated that miR-122 plays a role in inflammation in the liver and functions in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which reside in the space of Disse. Here, we showed that the transient inhibition of PKR-activating protein (PACT) expression, by miR-122 or siRNA targeting of PACT, suppressed the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and IL-1β, in human HSC LX-2. Sequence and functional analyses confirmed that miR-122 directly targeted the 3'-untranslated region of PACT. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that miR-122 blocked NF-κB-nuclear translocation in LX-2 cells. We also showed that conditioned medium from miR-122-transfected LX-2 cells suppressed human monocyte-derived THP-1 cell migration. Taken together, our study indicates that miR-122 may downregulate cytokine production in HSCs and macrophage chemotaxis and that the targeting of miR-122 may have therapeutic potential for preventing the progression of liver diseases. PMID:26636761

  3. [Role of linezolid in antimicrobial therapy].

    PubMed

    Carmona, Pedro-Manuel; Romá, Eva; Monte, Emilio; García, Javier; Gobernado, Miguel

    2003-01-01

    The progressive emergence of multi-resistant gram-positive strains has prompted the search for new molecules (quinolones, streptogramins, oxazolidinones, ketolides, glycopeptides, daptomycin) to add to the current therapeutic arsenal. Linezolid, the first commercially available member of the oxazolidinone family, has evidenced activity against multi-resistant gram-positive strains (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, S. aureus with decreased glycopeptide sensitivity, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae with decreased sensitivity to penicillin and cephalosporins), thereby providing a new option for treating infections by these microorganisms. This work reviews the microbiologic and pharmacologic aspects of this agent in order to establish its position among the available options for antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:12550042

  4. Chemotherapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs may be used as well, including cisplatin, dacarbazine (DTIC), docetaxel (Taxotere ® ), gemcitabine (Gemzar ® ), methotrexate, oxaliplatin, paclitaxel (Taxol ® ), ... such as: MAID (mesna, Adriamycin [doxorubicin], ifosfamide, and dacarbazine). Chemotherapy drugs kill cancer cells but also damage ...

  5. A bivalent cationic dye enabling selective photo-inactivation against Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Yang-Yang; Jiang, Guo-Yu; Hou, Yuan-Jun; Zhang, Bao-Wen; Zhou, Qian-Xiong; Wang, Xue-Song

    2015-05-01

    A piperazine-modified Crystal Violet was found to be able to selectively inactivate Gram-negative bacteria upon visible light irradiation but left Gram-positive bacteria less damaged, which can serve as a blueprint for the development of novel narrow-spectrum agents to replenish the current arsenal of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT). PMID:25857842

  6. General principles of antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Leekha, Surbhi; Terrell, Christine L; Edson, Randall S

    2011-02-01

    Antimicrobial agents are some of the most widely, and often injudiciously, used therapeutic drugs worldwide. Important considerations when prescribing antimicrobial therapy include obtaining an accurate diagnosis of infection; understanding the difference between empiric and definitive therapy; identifying opportunities to switch to narrow-spectrum, cost-effective oral agents for the shortest duration necessary; understanding drug characteristics that are peculiar to antimicrobial agents (such as pharmacodynamics and efficacy at the site of infection); accounting for host characteristics that influence antimicrobial activity; and in turn, recognizing the adverse effects of antimicrobial agents on the host. It is also important to understand the importance of antimicrobial stewardship, to know when to consult infectious disease specialists for guidance, and to be able to identify situations when antimicrobial therapy is not needed. By following these general principles, all practicing physicians should be able to use antimicrobial agents in a responsible manner that benefits both the individual patient and the community. PMID:21282489

  7. Outpatient management following intensive induction or salvage chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Walter, Roland B; Taylor, Lenise R; Gardner, Kelda M; Dorcy, Kathleen Shannon; Vaughn, Jennifer E; Estey, Elihu H

    2013-01-01

    Adults with newly diagnosed or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) commonly receive intensive chemotherapy to achieve disease remission. In the United States and many other countries, it is standard practice that these patients remain hospitalized "preemptively" until blood count recovery, owing to the risk for overwhelming infections and bleeding during pancytopenia. This care policy requires hospitalization for an average of 3 to 4 weeks after completion of chemotherapy. However, highly effective oral prophylactic antimicrobials are now available, and transfusion support of outpatients has become routine in recent years. As a result, the care of patients with hematologic malignancies treated with intensive modalities is increasingly shifting from inpatient to outpatient settings. Benefits of this shift could include the reduced need for medical resources (eg, transfusions or intravenous antimicrobial therapy), improved quality of life (QOL), decreased rates of nosocomial infections, and lower costs. Increasing evidence indicates that select AML patients undergoing intensive remission induction or salvage chemotherapy can be discharged early after completion of chemotherapy and followed closely in a well-equipped outpatient facility in a safe and costeffective manner. Further demonstration that the current approach of preemptive hospitalization is medically unjustified, economically more burdensome, and adversely affects health-related QOL would very likely change the management of these patients throughout this country and elsewhere, resulting in the establishment of a new standard practice that improves cancer care. PMID:24518520

  8. WindPACT Rotor Design Study: Hybrid Tower Design; Period of Performance: 29 June 2000 -- 28 February 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm, D. J.

    2004-04-01

    The cost of a wind turbine tower can represent as much as 20% of the cost of an entire megawatt-scale horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) and as much as 10% of the total cost of energy. The tower is a major cost component, and its design is important: Its structural properties are key to the response of the rotor; its height determines the wind regime that the rotor experiences; it allows access to the turbine nacelle and rotor; and it houses components of the electrical connection and the control and protection systems. Most large wind turbines installed in the United States use self-supporting steel tubular towers. The diameter of these tubes is limited by the size that can be transported by road (approximately 4.3 m). The base dimensions of a truss tower are not restrained by this limit, but trusses may require more maintenance. Guyed tube towers have been used, but they represent additional foundation costs and inconvenience. Addressing these limitations may lead to an alternative that avoids the problems. For this reason, the WindPACT Rotor Design Study was modified to include a study of a hybrid tower to determine the technical and economic feasibility of such a design.

  9. Mathematical modeling of COD removal via the combined treatment of domestic wastewater and landfill leachate based on the PACT process.

    PubMed

    Fernández Bou, Ángel S; Nascentes, Alexandre Lioi; Costa Pereira, Barbara; Da Silva, Leonardo Duarte Batista; Alberto Ferreira, João; Campos, Juacyara Carbonelli

    2015-01-01

    The experiments performed in this study consisted of 16 batch reactors fed different mixtures of landfill leachate combined with synthetic wastewater treated using the Powdered Activated Carbon Treatment (PACT) process. The objective was to measure the COD mass removal per liter each day for each reactor using two models: the first model combined the variables PAC concentration (0 g·L(-1), 2 g·L(-1), 4 g·L(-1), and 6 g·L(-1)) and leachate rate in the wastewater (0%, 2%, 5%, and 10%), and the second model combined the PAC concentration and the influent COD. The Response Surface Methodology with Central Composite Design was used to describe the response surface of both models considered in this study. Domestic wastewater was produced under controlled conditions in the laboratory where the experiments were performed. The results indicated that the PAC effect was null when the influent did not contain leachate; however, as the concentration of leachate applied to the mixture was increased, the addition of a higher PAC concentration resulted in a better COD mass removal in the reactors. The adjusted R(2) values of the two models were greater than 0.95, and the predicted R(2) values were greater than 0.93. The models may be useful for wastewater treatment companies to calculate PAC requirements in order to meet COD mass removal objectives in combined treatment. PMID:25723064

  10. Global Similarities and Multifaceted Differences in the Production of Partner-Specific Referential Pacts by Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nadig, Aparna; Seth, Shivani; Sasson, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Over repeated reference conversational partners tend to converge on preferred terms or referential pacts. Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by pragmatic difficulties that are best captured by less structured tasks. To this end we tested adults with ASD who did not have language or intellectual impairments, and neurotypical comparison participants in a referential communication task. Participants were directors, describing unlexicalized, complex novel stimuli over repeated rounds of interaction. Group comparisons with respect to referential efficiency showed that directors with ASD demonstrated typical lexical entrainment: they became faster over repeated rounds and used shortened referential forms. ASD and neurotypical groups did not differ with respect to the number of descriptors they provided or the number of exchanges needed for matchers to identify figures. Despite these similarities the ASD group was slightly slower overall. We examined partner-specific effects by manipulating the common ground shared with the matcher. As expected, neurotypical directors maintained referential precedents when speaking to the same matcher but not with a new matcher. Directors with ASD were qualitatively similar but displayed a less pronounced distinction between matchers. However, significant differences and different patterns of reference emerged over time; neurotypical directors incorporated the new matcher's contributions into descriptions, whereas directors with ASD were less likely to do so. PMID:26733897

  11. Global Similarities and Multifaceted Differences in the Production of Partner-Specific Referential Pacts by Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Nadig, Aparna; Seth, Shivani; Sasson, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Over repeated reference conversational partners tend to converge on preferred terms or referential pacts. Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by pragmatic difficulties that are best captured by less structured tasks. To this end we tested adults with ASD who did not have language or intellectual impairments, and neurotypical comparison participants in a referential communication task. Participants were directors, describing unlexicalized, complex novel stimuli over repeated rounds of interaction. Group comparisons with respect to referential efficiency showed that directors with ASD demonstrated typical lexical entrainment: they became faster over repeated rounds and used shortened referential forms. ASD and neurotypical groups did not differ with respect to the number of descriptors they provided or the number of exchanges needed for matchers to identify figures. Despite these similarities the ASD group was slightly slower overall. We examined partner-specific effects by manipulating the common ground shared with the matcher. As expected, neurotypical directors maintained referential precedents when speaking to the same matcher but not with a new matcher. Directors with ASD were qualitatively similar but displayed a less pronounced distinction between matchers. However, significant differences and different patterns of reference emerged over time; neurotypical directors incorporated the new matcher's contributions into descriptions, whereas directors with ASD were less likely to do so. PMID:26733897

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  13. Antimicrobials in periodontal maintenance.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, M G; Slots, J

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical and chemical antimicrobial intervention is the mainstay of preventive periodontal therapy. Successful periodontal maintenance care depends upon the ability of oral health care professionals to combat periodontal infections, and patient compliance with prescribed follow-up care. Since tooth brushing, flossing, and oral rinsing do not reach pathogens present in furcations and at the depths of deep periodontal pockets, adequate oral hygiene should include subgingival treatment with home irrigators or other appropriate self-care remedies in patients with these conditions. Povidone-iodine for professional use and diluted bleach for self-care are inexpensive and valuable antimicrobial agents in periodontal maintenance. The present article outlines the prudent use of antimicrobial therapy in periodontal maintenance. PMID:11603305

  14. PROGRAMS FOR MONITORING ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of antimicrobials has increased in both human and veterinary medicine and the emergence of resistance to antimicrobials has become a global problem. This is due, in part, to the widespread availability of antimicrobials and the efficacy they impart in control of certain infectious diseases. An...

  15. Antimicrobial Graft Copolymer Gels.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Amanda C; Madsen, Jeppe; Douglas, C W Ian; MacNeil, Sheila; Armes, Steven P

    2016-08-01

    In view of the growing worldwide rise in microbial resistance, there is considerable interest in designing new antimicrobial copolymers. The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between antimicrobial activity and copolymer composition/architecture to gain a better understanding of their mechanism of action. Specifically, the antibacterial activity of several copolymers based on 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine [MPC] and 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA) toward Staphylococcus aureus was examined. Both block and graft copolymers were synthesized using either atom transfer radical polymerization or reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization and characterized via (1)H NMR, gel permeation chromatography, rheology, and surface tensiometry. Antimicrobial activity was assessed using a range of well-known assays, including direct contact, live/dead staining, and the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), while transmission electron microscopy was used to study the morphology of the bacteria before and after the addition of various copolymers. As expected, PMPC homopolymer was biocompatible but possessed no discernible antimicrobial activity. PMPC-based graft copolymers comprising PHPMA side chains (i.e. PMPC-g-PHPMA) significantly reduced both bacterial growth and viability. In contrast, a PMPC-PHPMA diblock copolymer comprising a PMPC stabilizer block and a hydrophobic core-forming PHPMA block did not exhibit any antimicrobial activity, although it did form a biocompatible worm gel. Surface tensiometry studies and LDH release assays suggest that the PMPC-g-PHPMA graft copolymer exhibits surfactant-like activity. Thus, the observed antimicrobial activity is likely to be the result of the weakly hydrophobic PHPMA chains penetrating (and hence rupturing) the bacterial membrane. PMID:27409712

  16. Antimicrobial and antiproliferative activity of Athamanta sicula L. (Apiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, Vita Di; Pitonzo, Rosa; Schillaci, Domenico

    2011-01-01

    Background: Athamanta sicula L., a member of Apiaceae, is an annual perennial herb and it is known in Sicilian popular medicine with the name of “spaccapietre” (rock splitters), because fresh roots infusions are indicated as diuretic and used in the treatment of diseases of the urinary tract, and to dissolve kidney stones. Materials and Methods: Acetone extracts of leaves, flowers, and stems of A. sicula L. were investigated in vitro for antibacterial and cytotoxic activities. Antimicrobial activity was carried out against bacterial and fungal strains and antiproliferative activity against a group of human cancer cell lines (K-562, NCI-H460, and MCF-7). Results: All acetone extracts, apiol and myristicin, resulted inactive as antimicrobial agents at the maximum tested concentration of 200 μg/mL, but they induced significant antiproliferative activity on the tested cancer cell lines. Conclusions: Our study show that both apiol and myristicin could be tested as novel treatment in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:21472076

  17. Coping with the rising tide of resistance to antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Hunter, P A

    2001-06-01

    The 11th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases was held in Istanbul, Turkey, from April 2nd to April 4th, 2001. The meeting was attended by approximately 4,500 people. Sessions were well attended and included a number of workshops, keynote lectures, symposia, free papers and posters. As at many chemotherapy meetings in recent years, a major topic was the continuing growth of resistance among all microbes to antimicrobial agents, and this is the topic highlighted in this report. PMID:12813593

  18. [Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery].

    PubMed

    Stastník, Miloslav

    2004-04-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis is an important factor influencing the risk of infection at the spot of surgical interventions (SSI). SSIs are the most important nosocomial infections of hospitalized surgical patients; they are responsible for increases of 10 to 20 % in the total costs of treatment. The efficacy of antimicrobial prophylaxis hinges on four basic factors. The first is a correctly indicated prophylaxis (in surgical operations with a confirmed reduction of SSI risk after prophylaxis and/or in cases of surgical operations, where a possible early or organ SSI could have tragic consequences). The second factor is the choice of the best possible antimicrobial for a specific indication. The third factor is the best possible time for the administration of prophylaxis (in most indications at the beginning of anaesthesia). The fourth factor influencing the efficacy of prophylaxis is its administration for only the absolutely minimum time period necessary (in most indications best is a single administration, possibly including a second peroperative ATB dose). The high rate of errors in the actual practice of prophylaxis and the confirmed efficacy of implementing local recommendations indicate that it is absolutely necessary to define national and local recommendations for antimicrobial prophylaxis, to ensure that surgeons adhere to these recommendations and to initiate SSI surveillance in the Czech Republic. PMID:15146385

  19. Endolysins as antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Daniel C; Schmelcher, Mathias; Rodriguez-Rubio, Lorena; Klumpp, Jochen; Pritchard, David G; Dong, Shengli; Donovan, David M

    2012-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) is the major structural component of the bacterial cell wall. Bacteria have autolytic PG hydrolases that allow the cell to grow and divide. A well-studied group of PG hydrolase enzymes are the bacteriophage endolysins. Endolysins are PG-degrading proteins that allow the phage to escape from the bacterial cell during the phage lytic cycle. The endolysins, when purified and exposed to PG externally, can cause "lysis from without." Numerous publications have described how this phenomenon can be used therapeutically as an effective antimicrobial against certain pathogens. Endolysins have a characteristic modular structure, often with multiple lytic and/or cell wall-binding domains (CBDs). They degrade the PG with glycosidase, amidase, endopeptidase, or lytic transglycosylase activities and have been shown to be synergistic with fellow PG hydrolases or a range of other antimicrobials. Due to the coevolution of phage and host, it is thought they are much less likely to invoke resistance. Endolysin engineering has opened a range of new applications for these proteins from food safety to environmental decontamination to more effective antimicrobials that are believed refractory to resistance development. To put phage endolysin work in a broader context, this chapter includes relevant studies of other well-characterized PG hydrolase antimicrobials. PMID:22748813

  20. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Philip S

    2015-06-01

    The tolerance of microorganisms in biofilms to antimicrobial agents is examined through a meta-analysis of literature data. A numerical tolerance factor comparing the rates of killing in the planktonic and biofilm states is defined to provide a quantitative basis for the analysis. Tolerance factors for biocides and antibiotics range over three orders of magnitude. This variation is not explained by taking into account the molecular weight of the agent, the chemistry of the agent, the substratum material, or the speciation of the microorganisms. Tolerance factors do depend on the areal cell density of the biofilm at the time of treatment and on the age of the biofilm as grown in a particular experimental system. This suggests that there is something that happens during biofilm maturation, either physical or physiological, that is essential for full biofilm tolerance. Experimental measurements of antimicrobial penetration times in biofilms range over orders of magnitude, with slower penetration (>12 min) observed for reactive oxidants and cationic molecules. These agents are retarded through the interaction of reaction, sorption, and diffusion. The specific physiological status of microbial cells in a biofilm contributes to antimicrobial tolerance. A conceptual framework for categorizing physiological cell states is discussed in the context of antimicrobial susceptibility. It is likely that biofilms harbor cells in multiple states simultaneously (e.g., growing, stress-adapted, dormant, inactive) and that this physiological heterogeneity is an important factor in the tolerance of the biofilm state. PMID:26185072

  1. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    The tolerance of microorganisms in biofilms to antimicrobial agents is examined through a meta-analysis of literature data. A numerical tolerance factor comparing the rates of killing in the planktonic and biofilm states is defined to provide a quantitative basis for the analysis. Tolerance factors for biocides and antibiotics range over three orders of magnitude. This variation is not explained by taking into account the molecular weight of the agent, the chemistry of the agent, the substratum material, or the speciation of the microorganisms. Tolerance factors do depend on the areal cell density of the biofilm at the time of treatment and on the age of the biofilm as grown in a particular experimental system. This suggests that there is something that happens during biofilm maturation, either physical or physiological, that is essential for full biofilm tolerance. Experimental measurements of antimicrobial penetration times in biofilms range over orders of magnitude, with slower penetration (>12 min) observed for reactive oxidants and cationic molecules. These agents are retarded through the interaction of reaction, sorption, and diffusion. The specific physiological status of microbial cells in a biofilm contributes to antimicrobial tolerance. A conceptual framework for categorizing physiological cell states is discussed in the context of antimicrobial susceptibility. It is likely that biofilms harbor cells in multiple states simultaneously (e.g., growing, stress-adapted, dormant, inactive) and that this physiological heterogeneity is an important factor in the tolerance of the biofilm state. PMID:26185072

  2. Multidimensional signatures in antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yount, Nannette Y.; Yeaman, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional analyses distinguish between antimicrobial peptides by differences in amino acid sequence. Yet structural paradigms common to broader classes of these molecules have not been established. The current analyses examined the potential conservation of structural themes in antimicrobial peptides from evolutionarily diverse organisms. Using proteomics, an antimicrobial peptide signature was discovered to integrate stereospecific sequence patterns and a hallmark three-dimensional motif. This striking multidimensional signature is conserved among disulfide-containing antimicrobial peptides spanning biological kingdoms, and it transcends motifs previously limited to defined peptide subclasses. Experimental data validating this model enabled the identification of previously unrecognized antimicrobial activity in peptides of known identity. The multidimensional signature model provides a unifying structural theme in broad classes of antimicrobial peptides, will facilitate discovery of antimicrobial peptides as yet unknown, and offers insights into the evolution of molecular determinants in these and related host defense effector molecules. PMID:15118082

  3. Lumbar reservoir for intrathecal chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dyck, P

    1985-06-15

    The Ommaya ventricular reservoir has been the standby of intrathecal chemotherapy for more than a decade, in spite of some specific drawbacks. A general anaesthetic is often required. The scalp must be shaven. Ventricular puncture may not always be easy and keeping the ventricular catheter patent is sometimes difficult. Hence the author has adapted a commercially available lumbar peritoneal shunt system to function as a lumbar intrathecal reservoir. The procedure is simple and can be performed expeditiously under local anaesthesia. To date, eight cases have received intrathecal chemotherapy by this means. PMID:3838918

  4. Triclosan antimicrobial polymers

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan antimicrobial molecular fluctuating energies of nonbonding electron pairs for the oxygen atom by ether bond rotations are reviewed with conformational computational chemistry analyses. Subsequent understanding of triclosan alternating ether bond rotations is able to help explain several material properties in Polymer Science. Unique bond rotation entanglements between triclosan and the polymer chains increase both the mechanical properties of polymer toughness and strength that are enhanced even better through secondary bonding relationships. Further, polymer blend compatibilization is considered due to similar molecular relationships and polarities. With compatibilization of triclosan in polymers a more uniform stability for nonpolar triclosan in the polymer solid state is retained by the antimicrobial for extremely low release with minimum solubility into aqueous solution. As a result, triclosan is projected for long extended lifetimes as an antimicrobial polymer additive. Further, triclosan rapid alternating ether bond rotations disrupt secondary bonding between chain monomers in the resin state to reduce viscosity and enhance polymer blending. Thus, triclosan is considered for a polymer additive with multiple properties to be an antimicrobial with additional benefits as a nonpolar toughening agent and a hydrophobic wetting agent. The triclosan material relationships with alternating ether bond rotations are described through a complete different form of medium by comparisons with known antimicrobial properties that upset bacterial cell membranes through rapid fluctuating mechanomolecular energies. Also, triclosan bond entanglements with secondary bonding can produce structural defects in weak bacterial lipid membranes requiring pliability that can then interfere with cell division. Regarding applications with polymers, triclosan can be incorporated by mixing into a resin system before cure, melt mixed with thermoplastic polymers that set on cooling

  5. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid Retention)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Swelling (Fluid retention) “My hands and feet were swollen and ... at one time. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid retention) Weigh yourself. l Weigh yourself at the ...

  6. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Memory Changes

    MedlinePlus

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Memory Changes What is causing these changes? Your doctor ... thinking or remembering things Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Memory Changes Get help to remember things. Write down ...

  7. Pancreatic cancer: chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer in many cases appears in a non-curatively resectable stage when the diagnosis is made. Palliative treatment become an option in the patients with advanced stage. The present article reviewed chemotherapy and radiotherapy in various advanced stage of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22540056

  8. [REACTIVATION OF TUBERCULOSIS PRESENTING WITH EMPYEMA DUE TO ANTICANCER CHEMOTHERAPY FOR DIFFUSE LARGE B CELL LYMPHOMA].

    PubMed

    Yuba, Tatsuya; Hatsuse, Mayumi; Kodama, Mai; Uda, Sayaka; Yoshimura, Akihiro; Kurisu, Naoko

    2016-04-01

    A 79-year-old man with a history of tuberculosis was found to have chronic empyema in the right lung and was diagnosed with malignant diffuse large-cell lymphoma (Ann Arbor stage IIE). After completion of one course of rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, pirarubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy, the patient developed lung abscess and sepsis caused by Streptococcus intermedius. This condition was treated with antimicrobial agents, and chemotherapy was resumed. After the second course, the chemotherapy regimen was continued without prednisolone, and after administration of the third course, a chest wall mass was found in the right lung. An acid-fast bacillus smear test of the abscess aspirate was positive, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected in a polymerase chain reaction assay, leading to a diagnosis of perithoracic tuberculosis. Chemotherapy for the lymphoma was discontinued, and treatment with four oral antitubercular agents was started. This treatment led to remission of perithoracic tuberculosis. In Japan, tuberculous scar and chronic empyema are relatively common findings, and relapse of tuberculosis should always be considered for patients with these findings during chemotherapy and immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27530021

  9. Efficacy of HPA Lanolin® in treatment of lip alterations related to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    SANTOS, Paulo Sérgio da Silva; TINÔCO-ARAÚJO, José Endrigo; de SOUZA, Lucas Monteiro de Vasconcelos Alves; FERREIRA, Rafael; IKOMA, Maura Rosane Valério; RAZERA, Ana Paula Ribeiro; SANTOS, Márcia Mirolde Magno de Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    The side effects of chemotherapy on the lips may cause esthetic and functional impact and increase the risk of infection. HPA Lanolin® is an option for supportive therapy because it has anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and moisturizing properties. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of this product in the prevention of lip alterations in a population of patients undergoing chemotherapy. Material and Methods: Patients undergoing chemotherapy (n=57) were examined and distributed into two groups: study (used HPA Lanolin®) and control (without supportive therapy on the lips). We evaluated the patients two weeks after chemotherapy, registering oral alterations, symptoms of pain, discomfort, limitation of mouth opening and dehydration, classified according to a visual analogue scale. Results: Patients who used HPA Lanolin® had lower dehydration and experienced improvement of lip dryness (p<0.001). The main symptoms were dehydration, discomfort, limitation of mouth opening, pain. The main clinical signs were dry lips, mucositis, cheilitis, hematoma, swelling and cracking. We found no difference concerning the variables of pain, discomfort, and limitation of mouth opening between the study and control group. Conclusions: We suggest that HPA Lanolin® is effective in reducing the symptoms of dehydration and the signs of lip dryness resulting from toxicity of chemotherapy, proving to be an interesting alternative supportive therapy for cancer patients. PMID:23739860

  10. IN.PACT Amphirion paclitaxel eluting balloon versus standard percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for infrapopliteal revascularization of critical limb ischemia: rationale and protocol for an ongoing randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The effectiveness and durability of endovascular revascularization therapies for chronic critical limb ischemia (CLI) are challenged by the extensive burden of infrapopliteal arterial disease and lesion-related characteristics (e.g., severe calcification, chronic total occlusions), which frequently result in poor clinical outcomes. While infrapopliteal vessel patency directly affects pain relief and wound healing, sustained patency and extravascular care both contribute to the ultimate “patient-centric” outcomes of functional limb preservation, mobility and quality of life (QoL). Methods/Design IN.PACT DEEP is a 2:1 randomized controlled trial designed to assess the efficacy and safety of infrapopliteal arterial revascularization between the IN.PACT Amphirion™ paclitaxel drug-eluting balloon (IA-DEB) and standard balloon angioplasty (PTA) in patients with Rutherford Class 4-5-6 CLI. Discussion This multicenter trial has enrolled 358 patients at 13 European centers with independent angiographic core lab adjudication of the primary efficacy endpoint of target lesion late luminal loss (LLL) and clinically driven target lesion revascularization (TLR) in major amputation-free surviving patients through 12-months. An independent wound core lab will evaluate all ischemic wounds to assess the extent of healing and time to healing at 1, 6, and 12 months. A QoL questionnaire including a pain scale will assess changes from baseline scores through 12 months. A Clinical Events Committee and Data Safety Monitoring Board will adjudicate the composite primary safety endpoints of all-cause death, major amputation, and clinically driven TLR at 6 months and other trial endpoints and supervise patient safety throughout the study. All patients will be followed for 5 years. A literature review is presented of the current status of endovascular treatment of CLI with drug-eluting balloon and standard PTA. The rationale and design of the IN.PACT DEEP Trial are

  11. The Professionalism Assessment of Clinical Teachers (PACT): the reliability and validity of a novel tool to evaluate professional and clinical teaching behaviors.

    PubMed

    Young, Meredith E; Cruess, Sylvia R; Cruess, Richard L; Steinert, Yvonne

    2014-03-01

    Physicians function as clinicians, teachers, and role models within the clinical environment. Negative learning environments have been shown to be due to many factors, including the presence of unprofessional behaviors among clinical teachers. Reliable and valid assessments of clinical teacher performance, including professional behaviors, may provide a foundation for evidence-based feedback to clinical teachers, enable targeted remediation or recognition, and help to improve the learning environment. However, few tools exist for the evaluation of clinical teachers that include a focus on both professional and clinical teaching behaviors. The Professionalism Assessment of Clinical Teachers (PACT) was developed and implemented at one Canadian institution and was assessed for evidence of reliability and validity. Following each clerkship rotation, students in the 2009-2010 third-year undergraduate clerkship cohort (n = 178) anonymously evaluated a minimum of two clinical teachers using the PACT. 4,715 forms on 567 faculty members were completed. Reliability, validity, and free text comments (present in 45 % of the forms) were examined. An average of 8.6 PACT forms were completed per faculty (range 1-60), with a reliability of 0.31 for 2.9 forms (harmonic mean); 12 forms were necessary for a reliability of 0.65. Global evaluations of teachers aligned with ratings of free-text comments (r = 0.77, p < 0.001). Comment length related negatively with overall rating (r = -0.19, p < 0.001). Mean performance related negatively with variability of performance (r = -0.72, p < 0.001), although this may be related to a ceiling effect. Most faculty members were rated highly; however 'provided constructive feedback' was the least well-rated item. Respectful interactions with students appeared to be the most influential item in the global rating of faculty performance. The PACT is a moderately reliable tool for the assessment of professional behaviors of clinical

  12. Can We Prevent Antimicrobial Resistance by Using Antimicrobials Better?

    PubMed Central

    Soothill, Germander; Hu, Yanmin; Coates, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Since their development over 60 years ago, antimicrobials have become an integral part of healthcare practice worldwide. Recently, this has been put in jeopardy by the emergence of widespread antimicrobial resistance, which is one of the major problems facing modern medicine. In the past, the development of new antimicrobials kept us one step ahead of the problem of resistance, but only three new classes of antimicrobials have reached the market in the last thirty years. A time is therefore approaching when we may not have effective treatment against bacterial infections, particularly for those that are caused by Gram-negative organisms. An important strategy to reduce the development of antimicrobial resistance is to use antimicrobials more appropriately, in ways that will prevent resistance. This involves a consideration of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics properties of antimicrobials, the possible use of combinations, and more appropriate choice of antimicrobials, which may include rapid diagnostic testing and antimicrobial cycling. Examples given in this review include Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms. We shall summarise the current evidence for these strategies and outline areas for future development. PMID:25437042

  13. Substandard/Counterfeit Antimicrobial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kelesidis, Theodoros

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs are a growing global problem. The most common substandard/counterfeit antimicrobials include beta-lactams (among antibiotics) and chloroquine and artemisin derivatives (among antimalarials). The most common type of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs have a reduced amount of the active drug, and the majority of them are manufactured in Southeast Asia and Africa. Counterfeit antimicrobial drugs may cause increased mortality and morbidity and pose a danger to patients. Here we review the literature with regard to the issue of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobials and describe the prevalence of this problem, the different types of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs, and the consequences for the individuals and global public health. Local, national, and international initiatives are required to combat this very important public health issue. PMID:25788516

  14. Antimicrobial Resistance in Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Thanner, Sophie; Drissner, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this article, the current knowledge and knowledge gaps in the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in livestock and plants and importance in terms of animal and human health are discussed. Some recommendations are provided for generation of the data required in order to develop risk assessments for AMR within agriculture and for risks through the food chain to animals and humans. PMID:27094336

  15. Antimicrobial polypeptide multilayer nanocoatings.

    PubMed

    Rudra, Jai S; Dave, Komal; Haynie, Donald T

    2006-01-01

    A multilayer coating (or film) of nanometer-thick layers can be made by sequential adsorption of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes on a solid support. The method is known as layer-by-layer assembly (LBL). No special apparatus is required for LBL and nanofilms can be prepared under mild, physiological conditions. A multilayer nanofilm in which at least one of the constituent species is a polypeptide is a polypeptide multilayer nanofilm. The present work was aimed at assessing whether polypeptide multilayer nanofilms with specific antimicrobial properties could be prepared by incorporation of a known antimicrobial agent in the film structure, in this case the edible protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). The chicken enzyme is widely employed as a human food preservative. An advantage of LBL in this context is that the nanofilm is fabricated directly on the surface of interest, eliminating the need to incorporate the antimicrobial in other packaging materials. Here, nanofilms were made of poly(L-glutamic acid) (PLGA), which is highly negatively charged in the mildly acidic pH range, and HEWL, which has a high net positive charge at acidic pH. We show that PLGA/HEWL nanofilms inhibit growth of the model microbe Microccocus luteus in the surrounding liquid medium. The amount of HEWL released from PLGA/HEWL films depends on the number of HEWL layers and therefore on the total quantity of HEWL in the films. This initial study provides a sketch of the scope for further development of LBL in the area of antimicrobial polypeptide multilayer films. Potential applications of such films include strategies for food preservation and coatings for implant devices. PMID:17176751

  16. Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting During Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mustian, Karen M; Devine, Katie; Ryan, Julie L; Janelsins, Michelle C; Sprod, Lisa K; Peppone, Luke J; Candelario, Grace D; Mohile, Supriya G; Morrow, Gary R

    2014-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are two of the most troubling side effects patients experience during chemotherapy. While newly available treatments have improved our ability to manage nausea and vomiting, anticipatory and delayed nausea and vomiting are still a major problem for patients receiving chemotherapy. Many cancer patients will delay or refuse future chemotherapy treatments and contemplate stopping chemotherapy altogether because of their fear of experiencing further nausea and vomiting. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the patho-psychophysiology of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and the recommended guidelines for treatment. PMID:24466408

  17. Cancer cell adaptation to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Mercer, Stuart J; Knight, Louise A; Gabriel, Francis G; Whitehouse, Pauline A; Sharma, Sanjay; Fernando, Augusta; Glaysher, Sharon; Di Palma, Silvana; Johnson, Penny; Somers, Shaw S; Toh, Simon; Higgins, Bernie; Lamont, Alan; Gulliford, Tim; Hurren, Jeremy; Yiangou, Constantinos; Cree, Ian A

    2005-01-01

    Background Tumor resistance to chemotherapy may be present at the beginning of treatment, develop during treatment, or become apparent on re-treatment of the patient. The mechanisms involved are usually inferred from experiments with cell lines, as studies in tumor-derived cells are difficult. Studies of human tumors show that cells adapt to chemotherapy, but it has been largely assumed that clonal selection leads to the resistance of recurrent tumors. Methods Cells derived from 47 tumors of breast, ovarian, esophageal, and colorectal origin and 16 paired esophageal biopsies were exposed to anticancer agents (cisplatin; 5-fluorouracil; epirubicin; doxorubicin; paclitaxel; irinotecan and topotecan) in short-term cell culture (6 days). Real-time quantitative PCR was used to measure up- or down-regulation of 16 different resistance/target genes, and when tissue was available, immunohistochemistry was used to assess the protein levels. Results In 8/16 paired esophageal biopsies, there was an increase in the expression of multi-drug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) following epirubicin + cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil (ECF) chemotherapy and this was accompanied by increased expression of the MDR-1 encoded protein, P-gp. Following exposure to doxorubicin in vitro, 13/14 breast carcinomas and 9/12 ovarian carcinomas showed >2-fold down-regulation of topoisomerase IIα (TOPOIIα). Exposure to topotecan in vitro, resulted in >4-fold down-regulation of TOPOIIα in 6/7 colorectal tumors and 8/10 ovarian tumors. Conclusion This study suggests that up-regulation of resistance genes or down-regulation in target genes may occur rapidly in human solid tumors, within days of the start of treatment, and that similar changes are present in pre- and post-chemotherapy biopsy material. The molecular processes used by each tumor appear to be linked to the drug used, but there is also heterogeneity between individual tumors, even those with the same histological type, in the pattern and magnitude of

  18. ATP Exhibits Antimicrobial Action by Inhibiting Bacterial Utilization of Ferric Ions

    PubMed Central

    Tatano, Yutaka; Kanehiro, Yuichi; Sano, Chiaki; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Tomioka, Haruaki

    2015-01-01

    ATP up-regulates macrophage antimycobacterial activity in a P2X7-dependent manner, but little is known about whether ATP directly exhibits antimicrobial effects against intracellular mycobacteria. In this study, we found that ATP inhibited the growth of various bacteria, including Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, and mycobacteria, without damaging bacterial surface structures. Using gene technology, we newly established an enterobactin-deficient (entB−) mutant from ATP-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, and found the recovery of ATP susceptibility in the enterobactin-deleted mutant. Therefore, ATP's antibacterial activity is attributable to its iron-chelating ability. Since ATP distributed in the cytosol of macrophages at high concentrations, ATP appears to augment macrophage's antimicrobial activity by directly attacking intracytosolic and intra-autophagosomal pathogens. Furthermore, ATP exhibited combined effects with some antimicrobials against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and M. intracellulare, suggesting its usefulness as an adjunctive drug in the chemotherapy of certain intractable infections. PMID:25712807

  19. Engineering Antimicrobials Refractory to Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-drug resistant superbugs are a persistent problem in modern health care, demonstrating the need for a new class of antimicrobials that can address this concern. Triple-acting peptidoglycan hydrolase fusions are a novel class of antimicrobials which have qualities well suited to avoiding resis...

  20. Carboranyl-Chlorin e6 as a Potent Antimicrobial Photosensitizer

    PubMed Central

    Omarova, Elena O.; Nazarov, Pavel A.; Firsov, Alexander M.; Strakhovskaya, Marina G.; Arkhipova, Anastasia Yu.; Moisenovich, Mikhail M.; Agapov, Igor I.; Ol’shevskaya, Valentina A.; Zaitsev, Andrey V.; Kalinin, Valery N.; Kotova, Elena A.; Antonenko, Yuri N.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation is currently being widely considered as alternative to antibiotic chemotherapy of infective diseases, attracting much attention to design of novel effective photosensitizers. Carboranyl-chlorin-e6 (the conjugate of chlorin e6 with carborane), applied here for the first time for antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation, appeared to be much stronger than chlorin e6 against Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, Staphyllococcus aureus and Mycobacterium sp. Confocal fluorescence spectroscopy and membrane leakage experiments indicated that bacteria cell death upon photodynamic treatment with carboranyl-chlorin-e6 is caused by loss of cell membrane integrity. The enhanced photobactericidal activity was attributed to the increased accumulation of the conjugate by bacterial cells, as evaluated both by centrifugation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Gram-negative bacteria were rather resistant to antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation mediated by carboranyl-chlorin-e6. Unlike chlorin e6, the conjugate showed higher (compared to the wild-type strain) dark toxicity with Escherichia coli ΔtolC mutant, deficient in TolC-requiring multidrug efflux transporters. PMID:26535905

  1. Carboranyl-Chlorin e6 as a Potent Antimicrobial Photosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Omarova, Elena O; Nazarov, Pavel A; Firsov, Alexander M; Strakhovskaya, Marina G; Arkhipova, Anastasia Yu; Moisenovich, Mikhail M; Agapov, Igor I; Ol'shevskaya, Valentina A; Zaitsev, Andrey V; Kalinin, Valery N; Kotova, Elena A; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation is currently being widely considered as alternative to antibiotic chemotherapy of infective diseases, attracting much attention to design of novel effective photosensitizers. Carboranyl-chlorin-e6 (the conjugate of chlorin e6 with carborane), applied here for the first time for antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation, appeared to be much stronger than chlorin e6 against Gram-positive bacteria, such as Bacillus subtilis, Staphyllococcus aureus and Mycobacterium sp. Confocal fluorescence spectroscopy and membrane leakage experiments indicated that bacteria cell death upon photodynamic treatment with carboranyl-chlorin-e6 is caused by loss of cell membrane integrity. The enhanced photobactericidal activity was attributed to the increased accumulation of the conjugate by bacterial cells, as evaluated both by centrifugation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Gram-negative bacteria were rather resistant to antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation mediated by carboranyl-chlorin-e6. Unlike chlorin e6, the conjugate showed higher (compared to the wild-type strain) dark toxicity with Escherichia coli ΔtolC mutant, deficient in TolC-requiring multidrug efflux transporters. PMID:26535905

  2. Keep Our PACT Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Van Hollen, Chris [D-MD-8

    2011-03-01

    03/21/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Keep Our PACT Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Van Hollen, Chris [D-MD-8

    2014-09-18

    11/17/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Antimicrobial activity of antiproteinases.

    PubMed

    Sallenave, J M

    2002-04-01

    Low-molecular-mass neutrophil elastase inhibitors have been shown to be important in the control of lung inflammation. In addition to inhibiting the enzyme neutrophil elastase, these low-molecular-mass compounds (10 kDa) have been shown to have other activities. For example, secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) and elastase-specific inhibitor/SKALP (skin-derived antileucoproteinase)/elafin have also been shown to have "defensin"-like antimicrobial activities. Indeed, these inhibitors have antimicrobial properties in vitro against bacteria, fungi and, potentially, HIV. In addition, we have shown, using an adenovirus-mediated gene transfer overexpression strategy, that elafin is also active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in mice in vivo. The mechanism of action is currently under investigation. In addition to these direct or indirect effects on microbes, it has been shown that lipopolysaccharide is able to up-regulate SPLI production in macrophages in vitro, and that the addition of recombinant SLPI to human monocytes or the transfection of macrophages with SPLI can down-regulate pro-inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor, presumably to limit self-damaging excessive inflammation. Using viral gene transfer vectors, we are currently investigating the potential of these inhibitors in various models of inflammation in vivo. PMID:12023836

  5. Antimicrobial Mechanism of Monocaprylate

    PubMed Central

    Hyldgaard, Morten; Sutherland, Duncan S.; Sundh, Maria; Mygind, Tina

    2012-01-01

    Monoglyceride esters of fatty acids occur naturally and encompass a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Monocaprylate is generally regarded as safe (GRAS) and can function both as an emulsifier and as a preservative in food. However, knowledge about its mode of action is lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to elucidate the mechanism behind monocaprylate's antimicrobial effect. The cause of cell death in Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus xylosus, and Zygosaccharomyces bailii was investigated by examining monocaprylate's effect on cell structure, membrane integrity, and its interaction with model membranes. Changes in cell structure were visible by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and propidium iodide staining showed membrane disruption, indicating the membrane as a site of action. This indication was confirmed by measuring calcein leakage from membrane vesicles exposed to monocaprylate. AFM imaging of supported lipid bilayers visualized the integration of monocaprylate into the liquid disordered, and not the solid ordered, phase of the membrane. The integration of monocaprylate was confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance measurements, showing an abrupt increase in mass and hydration of the membrane after exposure to monocaprylate above a threshold concentration. We hypothesize that monocaprylate destabilizes membranes by increasing membrane fluidity and the number of phase boundary defects. The sensitivity of cells to monocaprylate will therefore depend on the lipid composition, fluidity, and curvature of the membrane. PMID:22344642

  6. [Fluoroquinolones to prevent bacterial infection in children with chemotherapy induced neutropenia: is it reasonable?].

    PubMed

    Dubos, F; Delebarre, M; Lagrée, M

    2013-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia is a frequent event in children with cancer, with a high morbidity. Antibiotic prophylaxis has been proposed for many years to prevent infectious diseases in patients with neutropenia. Fluoroquinolone prophylaxis induced a significant reduction of mortality and infectious morbidities in these situations. Less data are available in children with neutropenia. The emergence of antimicrobial resistance involving not only quinolones, but also cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and penems, is the main long term risk. This article summarise the usefulness of the prophylactic antibiotic treatment and its perspective in children with cancer. PMID:24360309

  7. Rates and predictors of invalid baseline test performance in high school and collegiate athletes for three computerized neurocognitive tests (CNTs): ANAM, Axon, and ImPACT

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Lindsay D.; Pfaller, Adam Y.; Rein, Lisa E.; McCrea, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Preseason baseline testing is increasingly performed on athletes using computerized neurocognitive tests (CNTs). Adequate effort is critical to establish valid estimates of ability, yet many users do not evaluate performance validity, and the conditions that impact validity are not well understood across the available CNTs. Purpose We examined the rates and predictors of invalid baseline performance for three popular CNTs: ANAM (Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics), Axon Sports, and ImPACT (Immediate Post-Concussion Cognitive Assessment and Testing). Study Design Cross-sectional study. Methods High school and collegiate athletes (N = 2,063) completed two of three CNTs each during pre-season evaluations. All possible pairings were present across the sample, and order of administration was randomized. Examiners gave one-on-one, scripted pre-test instructions emphasizing the importance of good effort. Profile validity was determined by the manufacturers’ standard criteria. Results The overall percentage of tests flagged as of questionable validity was lowest for ImPACT (2.7%) and higher for ANAM and Axon (10.8% and 11.3%, respectively). The majority of invalid baselines were flagged as such due to failure on only one validity criterion. Several athlete and testing factors (e.g., attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder/ADHD, estimated general intellectual ability, administration order) predicted validity status for one or more CNTs. Considering only first CNT administrations and participants without ADHD and/or learning disability (n = 1,835) brought the rates of invalid baselines to 2.1%, 8.8%, and 7.0%, for ImPACT, ANAM, and Axon, respectively. Invalid profiles on the Medical Symptom Validity Test (MSVT) were rare (1.8% of subjects) and demonstrated poor correspondence to CNT validity outcomes. Conclusion These CNTs’ validity criteria may not identify the same causes of invalidity or be equally sensitive to effort. The validity indicators

  8. The Relationship between Antimicrobial Use and Antimicrobial Resistance in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Cars, Otto; Buchholz, Udo; Mölstad, Sigvard; Goettsch, Wim; Veldhuijzen, Irene K.; Kool, Jacob L.; Sprenger, Marc J.W.; Degener, John E.

    2002-01-01

    In Europe, antimicrobial resistance has been monitored since 1998 by the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS). We examined the relationship between penicillin nonsusceptibility of invasive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae (an indicator organism) and antibiotic sales. Information was collected on 1998-99 resistance data for invasive isolates of S. pneumoniae to penicillin, based on surveillance data from EARSS and on outpatient sales during 1997 for beta-lactam antibiotics and macrolides. Our results show that in Europe antimicrobial resistance is correlated with use of beta-lactam antibiotics and macrolides. PMID:11927025

  9. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side Effects & their Management Support and Resources Caregiver Resource Center Pediatric Caregiver Resource Center About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain Tumor Information ...

  10. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... or get an injection (shot). Another way of giving chemo is through an IV line, which is ... eating, after using the bathroom, and after touching animals. This helps to prevent infection. Do not share ...

  11. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse ... temperature beverages may be easier to drink than hot or cold liquids. Get on a medication schedule. ...

  12. [Chemotherapy for brain tumors in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Weller, M

    2008-02-01

    Chemotherapy has become a third major treatment option for patients with brain tumors, in addition to surgery and radiotherapy. The role of chemotherapy in the treatment of gliomas is no longer limited to recurrent disease. Temozolomide has become the standard of care in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Several ongoing trials seek to define the role of chemotherapy in the primary care of other gliomas. Some of these studies are no longer only based on histological diagnoses, but take into consideration molecular markers such as MGMT promoter methylation and loss of genetic material on chromosomal arms 1p and 19q. Outside such clinical trials chemotherapy is used in addition to radiotherapy, e.g., in anaplastic astrocytoma, medulloblastoma or germ cell tumors, or as an alternative to radiotherapy, e.g., in anaplastic oligodendroglial tumors or low-grade gliomas. In contrast, there is no established role for chemotherapy in other tumors such as ependymomas, meningiomas or neurinomas. Primary cerebral lymphomas are probably the only brain tumors which can be cured by chemotherapy alone and only by chemotherapy. The chemotherapy of brain metastases follows the recommendations for the respective primary tumors. Further, strategies of combined radiochemotherapy using mainly temozolomide or topotecan are currently explored. Leptomeningeal metastases are treated by radiotherapy or systemic or intrathecal chemotherapy depending on their pattern of growth. PMID:18253773

  13. Preliminary Effectiveness of Project ImPACT: A Parent-Mediated Intervention for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Delivered in a Community Program

    PubMed Central

    Stadnick, Nicole A.; Stahmer, Aubyn; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    This is a pilot study of the effectiveness of Project ImPACT, a parent-mediated intervention for ASD delivered in a community program. The primary aim was to compare child and parent outcomes between the intervention group and a community comparison for 30 young children with ASD at baseline and 12 weeks. The secondary aim was to identify parent factors associated with changes in child outcomes. Results indicated significant improvement in child communication skills and a strong trend for parent intervention adherence for the intervention group from baseline to 12 weeks. Higher baseline parenting stress was negatively related to child social gains from baseline to 12 weeks. Findings provide further support for delivering parent-mediated interventions in community settings to children with ASD. PMID:25633920

  14. Preliminary Effectiveness of Project ImPACT: A Parent-Mediated Intervention for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Delivered in a Community Program.

    PubMed

    Stadnick, Nicole A; Stahmer, Aubyn; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren

    2015-07-01

    This is a pilot study of the effectiveness of Project ImPACT, a parent-mediated intervention for ASD delivered in a community program. The primary aim was to compare child and parent outcomes between the intervention group and a community comparison for 30 young children with ASD at baseline and 12 weeks. The secondary aim was to identify parent factors associated with changes in child outcomes. Results indicated significant improvement in child communication skills and a strong trend for parent intervention adherence for the intervention group from baseline to 12 weeks. Higher baseline parenting stress was negatively related to child social gains from baseline to 12 weeks. Findings provide further support for delivering parent-mediated interventions in community settings to children with ASD. PMID:25633920

  15. Chemotherapy and Dietary Phytochemical Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sak, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy has been used for cancer treatment already for almost 70 years by targeting the proliferation potential and metastasising ability of tumour cells. Despite the progress made in the development of potent chemotherapy drugs, their toxicity to normal tissues and adverse side effects in multiple organ systems as well as drug resistance have remained the major obstacles for the successful clinical use. Cytotoxic agents decrease considerably the quality of life of cancer patients manifesting as acute complaints and impacting the life of survivors also for years after the treatment. Toxicity often limits the usefulness of anticancer agents being also the reason why many patients discontinue the treatment. The nutritional approach may be the means of helping to raise cancer therapy to a new level of success as supplementing or supporting the body with natural phytochemicals cannot only reduce adverse side effects but improve also the effectiveness of chemotherapeutics. Various plant-derived compounds improve the efficiency of cytotoxic agents, decrease their resistance, lower and alleviate toxic side effects, reduce the risk of tumour lysis syndrome, and detoxify the body of chemotherapeutics. The personalised approach using various phytochemicals provides thus a new dimension to the standard cancer therapy for improving its outcome in a complex and complementary way. PMID:23320169

  16. Vascular Complications of Cancer Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Alan C; Touyz, Rhian M; Lang, Ninian N

    2016-07-01

    Development of new anticancer drugs has resulted in improved mortality rates and 5-year survival rates in patients with cancer. However, many of the modern chemotherapies are associated with cardiovascular toxicities that increase cardiovascular risk in cancer patients, including hypertension, thrombosis, heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias. These limitations restrict treatment options and might negatively affect the management of cancer. The cardiotoxic effects of older chemotherapeutic drugs such as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, and anticancer antibiotics have been known for a while. The newer agents, such as the antiangiogenic drugs that inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor signalling are also associated with cardiovascular pathology, especially hypertension, thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, and proteinuria. Exact mechanisms by which vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors cause these complications are unclear but impaired endothelial function, vascular and renal damage, oxidative stress, and thrombosis might be important. With increasing use of modern chemotherapies and prolonged survival of cancer patients, the incidence of cardiovascular disease in this patient population will continue to increase. Accordingly, careful assessment and management of cardiovascular risk factors in cancer patients by oncologists and cardiologists working together is essential for optimal care so that prolonged cancer survival is not at the expense of increased cardiovascular events. PMID:26968393

  17. Escalating costs for cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nyman, J V; Dorr, R T; Hall, G R

    1981-08-01

    The annual costs of chemotherapeutic agents from 1975 to 1980 were determined, and the impact on a hospital's budget of new chemotherapeutic agents marketed during this period was evaluated. Pharmacy purchasing records for the antineoplastics were reviewed retrospectively to determine fiscal year (FY) costs. Statistics from the Consumer Price Index report and hospital patient load were used to project an adjusted annual cost for cancer chemotherapy. The annual expenditures for seven agents marketed in the past five years were expressed as a percentage of the pharmacy's budget. In addition, the oncology clinic records for the past four years were reviewed to assess trends in the number of visits and quantity of drugs prescribed. Analysis indicated that the costs of antineoplastic drugs have risen from $10,156 for FY 1973-1974 to $296,914 for FY 1979-1980. Antineoplastic drug costs have risen from 5.74 to 16.74% of the total drug budget during the same period. Only a portion of the increase in costs could be attributed to increased patient load and inflation. The percentage of patients receiving chemotherapy has reached a plateau, and the quantity of agents being prescribed was not found to be increasing. It was concluded that the rise in cost tends to follow the recent commercial availability of several new antineoplastics, especially doxorubicin. Cancer drug costs will continue to represent a large portion of the total hospital budget in the future and budgets must be planned accordingly. PMID:7270558

  18. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is common in patients receiving anticancer treatment and can affect survivability and long-term quality of life of the patient following treatment. The symptoms of CIPN primarily include abnormal sensory discrimination of touch, vibration, thermal information, and pain. There is currently a paucity of pharmacological agents to prevent or treat CIPN. The lack of efficacious therapeutics is due, at least in part, to an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which chemotherapies alter the sensitivity of sensory neurons. Although the clinical presentation of CIPN can be similar with the various classes of chemotherapeutic agents, there are subtle differences, suggesting that each class of drugs might induce neuropathy via different mechanisms. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the development and maintenance of neuropathy; however, most pharmacological agents generated from preclinical experiments have failed to alleviate the symptoms of CIPN in the clinic. Further research is necessary to identify the specific mechanisms by which each class of chemotherapeutics induces neuropathy. PMID:25744683

  19. Use of the ComPact UniLock System for ventral stabilization procedures of the cervical spine: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Voss, K; Steffen, F; Montavon, P M

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluates clinical application of the ComPact UniLock system for ventral stabilization of the cervical spine. Patient material included 13 consecutive cases, 12 dogs and one cat, with cervical spinal instabilities secondary to disc-associated wobbler syndrome (six dogs), traumatic, iatrogenic, and disc-associated cervical spinal instability of small dogs (four cases), cervical spinal fractures (one dog and one cat), and congenital atlantoaxial instability (one dog). The 2.0 system was used in smaller patients and the 2.4 system was applied in large dogs. Implant failure was observed on follow-up radiographs in one dog with a healed C2 fracture and screw pullout occurred in one dog with caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy, necessitating revision surgery. Implants remained stable throughout the follow-up period in the other cases. 'Good' or 'excellent' clinical outcome was achieved in 12 patients, including the dog with revision surgery. One dog had to be euthanatized due to postoperative deterioration of neurological status and development of pneumonia. The ComPact UniLock system was found to be a suitable implant for treating cervical instabilities of different origin in both small and large patients with lesions from C1/C2 to C6/C7. Some problems were encountered in the dogs with disc-associated Wobbler syndrome, such as lack or slow rate of vertebral fusion and partial collapse of the distracted intervertebral space on follow-up radiographs. A lack of adequate fusion was most likely related to grafting techniques used. PMID:16594540

  20. Chemotherapy for intraperitoneal use: a review of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy and early post-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    McPartland, Sarah; Detelich, Danielle; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal spread of tumors is a major problem in cancer management. Patients develop a marked deterioration in quality of life and shortened survival. This is in part due to bowel obstructions, marked ascites, and overall increase debilitation. Standard medical management has shown to be inadequate for the treatment of these problems. Surgery can palliate symptoms, however, it is unable to be complete at the microscopic level by a significant spillage of tumor cells throughout the abdomen. Chemotherapy can have some improvement in symptoms however it is short lived due to poor penetration into the peritoneal cavity. The role of intraperitoneal chemotherapy is to maximize tumor penetration and optimize cell death while minimizing systemic toxicity. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) and early post-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) are two treatment methods that serve this role and have been shown to improve survival. This review will discuss different chemotherapies used for both of these treatment options. PMID:26941983

  1. Chemotherapy for intraperitoneal use: a review of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy and early post-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Martin D; McPartland, Sarah; Detelich, Danielle; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-02-01

    Peritoneal spread of tumors is a major problem in cancer management. Patients develop a marked deterioration in quality of life and shortened survival. This is in part due to bowel obstructions, marked ascites, and overall increase debilitation. Standard medical management has shown to be inadequate for the treatment of these problems. Surgery can palliate symptoms, however, it is unable to be complete at the microscopic level by a significant spillage of tumor cells throughout the abdomen. Chemotherapy can have some improvement in symptoms however it is short lived due to poor penetration into the peritoneal cavity. The role of intraperitoneal chemotherapy is to maximize tumor penetration and optimize cell death while minimizing systemic toxicity. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) and early post-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) are two treatment methods that serve this role and have been shown to improve survival. This review will discuss different chemotherapies used for both of these treatment options. PMID:26941983

  2. Antimicrobial properties of diacetyl.

    PubMed Central

    Jay, J M

    1982-01-01

    Diacetyl preparations from three commercial sources were found to be essentially similar when tested primarily against a set of 40 cultures, including 10 of lactic acid bacteria, 4 of yeasts, 12 of gram-positive non-lactic acid bacteria, and 14 of gram-negative bacteria. The compound was effective at pH less than or equal to 7.0 and progressively ineffective at pH greater than 7.0. The lactic acid bacteria were essentially unaffected by concentrations between 100 and 350 micrograms/ml over the pH range of 5.0 to 7.0. Of the 12 gram-positive non-lactic acid bacteria, 11 were inhibited by 300 micrograms/ml at pH less than or equal to 7.0. The three yeasts and the 13 gram-negative bacteria that grew at pH 5.5 were inhibited by 200 micrograms/ml. Diacetyl was ineffective against four clostridia under anaerobic conditions. It was lethal for gram-negative bacteria and generally inhibitory for gram-positive bacteria. Nongrowing cells were not affected. The effectiveness of diacetyl was considerably less in brain heart infusion broth, Trypticase soy agar, and cooked-meat medium than in nutrient broth or plate count agar. The antimicrobial activity was antagonized by glucose, acetate, and Tween 80 but not by gluconic acid. As an antimicrobial agent, diacetyl was clearly more effective against gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, and molds than against gram-positive bacteria. PMID:7137998

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides and their Pore/Ion Channel Properties in Neutralization of Pathogenic Microbes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shruti; Sahoo, Nirakar; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    The essence of successful antimicrobial chemotherapy lies in selective toxicity of the agent towards the pathogen. An ideal antimicrobial agent should kill pathogens effectively with little or no effect on host cells. There is a dearth of antibiotic and antimicrobial therapies due the rapid development of microbial resistance to these agents, as evidenced by increasing incidences of hospital acquired infections. This challenge necessitates the discovery and development of novel and effective antimicrobial agents. One promising approach is Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs), which are synthesized by a large number of organisms. The presence of AMPs throughout evolution hints at their importance. The first and foremost interaction between AMPs and target cell occurs at the membrane of the pathogen. The details about these interactions will pave way for the development of new synthetic analogues or modified analogues of existing AMPs. Mechanistic insights into adoption of different structures in presence of bacterial membranes (and with their specific targets) will enhance our understanding and knowledge about these agents and their detailed mechanism of action. AMPs interact with lipids and form lipid-AMP complexes that create AMP-lined ion channels, which in turn modulate the membrane potential. This may have an effect on various biological processes leading to arrest of cell growth or cell death. This review summarizes the ion channel formation property of AMPs as an effective approach in dealing with neutralization of pathogenic microbes. PMID:26139119

  4. Antimicrobials therapy of anaerobic infections.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2016-06-01

    Anaerobes predominant in the normal human skin and mucous membranes bacterial flora are often a cause of endogenous infections. Anaerobic bacteria are difficult to isolate from infectious sites, and are often overlooked. Anaerobic infections caused by anaerobes can occur in all body sites, including the central nervous system (CNS), oral cavity, head and neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, skin and soft tissues. The treatment of these infections is complicated by the slow growth of these organisms, their polymicrobial nature and the growing resistance of anaerobes to antimicrobials agents. Antimicrobials are frequently the only form of therapy needed, but in others, they are an important adjunct to surgical drainage and correction of pathology. Because anaerobes are often recovered with aerobic and facultative bacteria, the chosen antimicrobials should cover all pathogens. The antimicrobials effective against anaerobic organisms are metronidazole, carbapenems, combinations of a beta-lactam and a beta-lactamase inhibitor, chloramphenicol, tigecycline and clindamycin. PMID:26365224

  5. Antimicrobial seafood packaging: a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suman; Ho Lee, Myung; Park, Lnsik; Shin, Yangjai; Lee, Youn Suk

    2016-06-01

    Microorganisms are the major cause of spoilage in most seafood products; however, only few microbes, called the specific spoilage organisms (SSOs), contribute to the offensive off-flavors associated with seafood spoilage. In food, microbial degradation manifests itself as spoilage, or changes in the sensory properties of a food product, rendering it unsuitable for human consumption. The use of antimicrobial substances can control the general microflora as well as specific microorganisms related to spoilage to provide products with higher safety and better quality. Many antimicrobial compounds have been evaluated in film structures for use in seafood, especially organic acids and their salts, enzymes, bacteriocins; some studies have considered inorganic compounds such as AgSiO2, zinc oxide, silver zeolite, and titanium oxide. The characteristics of some organic antimicrobial packaging systems for seafood and their antimicrobial efficiency in film structures are reviewed in this article. PMID:27478206

  6. Automation of antimicrobial activity screening.

    PubMed

    Forry, Samuel P; Madonna, Megan C; López-Pérez, Daneli; Lin, Nancy J; Pasco, Madeleine D

    2016-03-01

    Manual and automated methods were compared for routine screening of compounds for antimicrobial activity. Automation generally accelerated assays and required less user intervention while producing comparable results. Automated protocols were validated for planktonic, biofilm, and agar cultures of the oral microbe Streptococcus mutans that is commonly associated with tooth decay. Toxicity assays for the known antimicrobial compound cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) were validated against planktonic, biofilm forming, and 24 h biofilm culture conditions, and several commonly reported toxicity/antimicrobial activity measures were evaluated: the 50 % inhibitory concentration (IC50), the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). Using automated methods, three halide salts of cetylpyridinium (CPC, CPB, CPI) were rapidly screened with no detectable effect of the counter ion on antimicrobial activity. PMID:26970766

  7. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Hair Loss (Alopecia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Hair Loss (Alopecia) “Losing my hair was hard at first. Then I got used ... uncovered.” Questions other people have asked: Why does hair fall out? Chemotherapy can harm the cells that ...

  8. Improving Systemic Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rose, Tracy L; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2016-05-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is integral to the management of muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer (BCa). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been increasingly utilized for muscle-invasive BCa over the past several years, and several options for cisplatin-based regimens have emerged. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be considered for select patients who did not receive neoadjuvant therapy. Systemic chemotherapy added to radiotherapy is a critical component of a bladder-preserving approach and superior to radiotherapy alone. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy has been the mainstay for metastatic BCa for more than three decades. Novel targeted agents are in development fueled by the recent molecular characterization of BCa. Recent trials of immunotherapy have demonstrated the possibility of a less toxic and potentially more effective treatment for metastatic disease. It is an extremely exciting time for BCa research, and much needed improvements in systemic treatment are most certainly on the horizon. PMID:26984414

  9. Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs in Health Care Systems

    PubMed Central

    MacDougall, Conan; Polk, Ron E.

    2005-01-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship programs in hospitals seek to optimize antimicrobial prescribing in order to improve individual patient care as well as reduce hospital costs and slow the spread of antimicrobial resistance. With antimicrobial resistance on the rise worldwide and few new agents in development, antimicrobial stewardship programs are more important than ever in ensuring the continued efficacy of available antimicrobials. The design of antimicrobial management programs should be based on the best current understanding of the relationship between antimicrobial use and resistance. Such programs should be administered by multidisciplinary teams composed of infectious diseases physicians, clinical pharmacists, clinical microbiologists, and infection control practitioners and should be actively supported by hospital administrators. Strategies for changing antimicrobial prescribing behavior include education of prescribers regarding proper antimicrobial usage, creation of an antimicrobial formulary with restricted prescribing of targeted agents, and review of antimicrobial prescribing with feedback to prescribers. Clinical computer systems can aid in the implementation of each of these strategies, especially as expert systems able to provide patient-specific data and suggestions at the point of care. Antibiotic rotation strategies control the prescribing process by scheduled changes of antimicrobial classes used for empirical therapy. When instituting an antimicrobial stewardship program, a hospital should tailor its choice of strategies to its needs and available resources. PMID:16223951

  10. Chemotherapy plus interferon-alpha2b versus chemotherapy in the treatment of follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Neri, N; Avilés, A; Cleto, S; Díaz, N; Talavera, A; García, E L; Díaz-Maqueo, J C

    2001-10-01

    The best treatment of follicular lymphoma remains to be determined because the long natural history of follicular lymphoma requires mature data for accurate analysis. Although the goal of primary treatment remains durable remission, the sequential application of effective treatments may also result in a prolongation of median survival time. The use of interferon (IFN) with doxorubicin-based chemotherapy has demonstrated an increase of event-free survival but not in overall survival; however, its acute and late cardiac toxicity limits its use. For this reason, we began a controlled clinical trial to assess the efficacy and toxicity of chemotherapy: COPP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, and procarbazine) + IFN alternating every month for six cycles compared to six cycles of chemotherapy. In an intent-to treat analysis, 55 patients were enrolled (median age 61 years). Most cases (91%) with advanced disease were randomly assigned to chemotherapy + IFN (28 cases) or chemotherapy (27 cases). Complete remission was observed in 16 patients: 59% (95% CI, 53-70%) in the chemotherapy arm compared to 20 patients 71% (95% CI, 58-79%) in the chemotherapy + IFN arm; total responses were 74% and 86%, respectively. At a median follow-up of 60 months, event-free survival was 100% for patients treated with chemotherapy + IFN, which was statistically different from patients treated with chemotherapy 70%. At 7 years, median survival has not yet been reached; 72% of patients chemotherapy + IFN remain alive without disease (95% CI, 59-81%), which is not statistically different from 72% (95%CI, 50-73%) in the chemotherapy arm. Non-hematological toxicity was most frequent and severe in the chemotherapy arm; hematological toxicity was similar in both groups. Thus, it appears that chemotherapy + IFN, as described herein, improves event-free survival but the overall survival rates remain unchanged. The use of COPP appears to be better that anthracycline-based chemotherapy because

  11. Modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, D.W.

    1984-09-01

    The potentiation of chemotherapeutic agents by radiation sensitizers has been extensively studied for several years. There is little doubt that the effectiveness of certain anti-cancer drugs, primarily alkylating agents, can readily be enhanced both in vitro and in vivo through the addition of a sensitizer. While enhanced effects have been observed in certain critical normal tissues, in general most animal model studies have demonstrated a therapeutic gain at large sensitizer doses. This approach to combination therapies therefore appears promising. Yet many questions concerning the interaction between chemotherapeutic agents and radiosensitizers, particularly in the aspects of modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles are reviewed and discussed. These address the importance in chemopotentiation of (i) hypoxia, (ii) alterations in DNA damage and/or repair, (iii) depletion of intracellular sulfhydryls and (iv) modification of drug pharmacokinetics.

  12. Trace Elements and Chemotherapy Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihui; Yang, Weiping; Long, Gang; Wei, Changyuan

    2016-10-01

    Trace elements might be associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the efficacy of chemotherapy against HCC. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the association between trace elements and efficacy of chemotherapy in patients with HCC. Cancer, cancer-adjacent, and cancer-free tissues were collected intraoperatively from 55 patients with HCC between January 2001 and April 2004 at the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University in Guangxi (China), a high HCC incidence area in the world. Trace element levels were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. In vitro sensitivity of cancer cells to five chemotherapeutic drugs (5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, cisplatin, carboplatin, and mitomycin) was tested using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in cancer cells from 32 patients. Zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium levels had the same gradient distribution in different liver tissues: cancer < cancer-adjacent < cancer-free tissues. Copper levels of cancer tissues were negatively correlated with body weight (r = -0.278, P = 0.027), while manganese and selenium levels were negatively correlated with age (r = -0.297, P = 0.015; r = -0.285, P = 0.018, respectively). Simple correlation analyses revealed that the carboplatin sensitivity was negatively correlated with selenium levels of cancer tissues, while doxorubicin sensitivity was negatively correlated with manganese levels (r = -0.497, P = 0.004). Partial correlation analyses showed that doxorubicin sensitivity only was negatively correlated with manganese levels (r = -0.450, P = 0.014). These results suggest that the selenium and manganese content in primary HCC tissues could influence the response of the HCC cells to carboplatin and doxorubicin. These preliminary results provide a basis for future studies. PMID:26961293

  13. Randomised controlled trial of a supervised exercise rehabilitation program for colorectal cancer survivors immediately after chemotherapy: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Rosalind R; Heesch, Kristiann C; Eakin, Elizabeth G; Brown, Wendy J

    2007-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis and the ensuing treatments can have a substantial impact on the physical and psychological health of survivors. As the number of CRC survivors increases, so too does the need to develop viable rehabilitation programs to help these survivors return to good health as quickly as possible. Exercise has the potential to address many of the adverse effects of CRC treatment; however, to date, the role of exercise in the rehabilitation of cancer patients immediately after the completion of treatment has received limited research attention. This paper presents the design of a randomised controlled trial which will evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a 12-week supervised aerobic exercise program (ImPACT Program) on the physiological and psychological markers of rehabilitation, in addition to biomarkers of standard haematological outcomes and the IGF axis. Methods/Design Forty CRC patients will be recruited through oncology clinics and randomised to an exercise group or a usual care control group. Baseline assessment will take place within 4 weeks of the patient completing adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. The exercise program for patients in the intervention group will commence a week after the baseline assessment. The program consists of three supervised moderate-intensity aerobic exercise sessions per week for 12 weeks. All participants will have assessments at baseline (0 wks), mid-intervention (6 wks), post-intervention (12 wks) and at a 6-week follow-up (18 wks). Outcome measures include cardio-respiratory fitness, biomarkers associated with health and survival, and indices of fatigue and quality of life. Process measures are participants' acceptability of, adherence to, and compliance with the exercise program, in addition to the safety of the program. Discussion The results of this study will provide valuable insight into the role of supervised exercise in improving life after CRC. Additionally, process analyses will

  14. Editorial of the Special Issue Antimicrobial Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Piozzi, Antonella; Francolini, Iolanda

    2013-01-01

    The special issue “Antimicrobial Polymers” includes research and review papers concerning the recent advances on preparation of antimicrobial polymers and their relevance to industrial settings and biomedical field. Antimicrobial polymers have recently emerged as promising candidates to fight microbial contamination onto surfaces thanks to their interesting properties. In this special issue, the main strategies pursued for developing antimicrobial polymers, including polymer impregnation with antimicrobial agents or synthesis of polymers bearing antimicrobial moieties, were discussed. The future application of these polymers either in industrial or healthcare settings could result in an extremely positive impact not only at the economic level but also for the improvement of quality of life. PMID:24005863

  15. Peptides and Peptidomimetics for Antimicrobial Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Mojsoska, Biljana; Jenssen, Håvard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce and highlight a few classes of traditional antimicrobial peptides with a focus on structure-activity relationship studies. After first dissecting the important physiochemical properties that influence the antimicrobial and toxic properties of antimicrobial peptides, the contributions of individual amino acids with respect to the peptides antibacterial properties are presented. A brief discussion of the mechanisms of action of different antimicrobials as well as the development of bacterial resistance towards antimicrobial peptides follows. Finally, current efforts on novel design strategies and peptidomimetics are introduced to illustrate the importance of antimicrobial peptide research in the development of future antibiotics. PMID:26184232

  16. [Treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma: surgery before chemotherapy or chemotherapy before surgery?].

    PubMed

    Piura, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    The standard of care for advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma has been primary surgery aspiring for optimal debulking followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. A significant survival advantage has been demonstrated in women having optimal debulking at primary surgery compared to women having less than optimal debulking at primary surgery. With the advent of efficient chemotherapy for ovarian carcinoma (combination of platinum and taxan), the administration of several courses of chemotherapy before surgery (neoadjuvant chemotherapy) has been established as a method for reducing the intra-abdominal tumor burden and, thereby, increasing the probability of optimal debulking at surgery which is usually performed in the interval between course no. 3 and no. 4 of chemotherapy (interval surgery). Higher rates of optimal debulking, Lower rates of surgical complications, but no differences in survival, have been demonstrated in women having chemotherapy before surgery compared to women having surgery before chemotherapy. Obviously, the method of neoadjuvant chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for women in whom the clinical evaluation indicates that there is no high probability of optimal debulking at primary surgery. Nevertheless, there has been a debate on whether or not the method of neoadjuvant chemotherapy should also be applied for women in whom the clinical evaluation indicates that they are fit for optimal debulking at primary surgery. There is a need for more prospective studies to evaluate the role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of ovarian carcinoma. PMID:25417488

  17. [Treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma: surgery before chemotherapy or chemotherapy before surgery?............... ].

    PubMed

    Piura, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    The standard of care for advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma has been primary surgery aspiring for optimal debulking followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. A significant survival advantage has been demonstrated in women having optimal debulking at primary surgery compared to women having less than optimal debulking at primary surgery. With the advent of efficient chemotherapy for ovarian carcinoma (combination of platinum and taxan), the administration of several courses of chemotherapy before surgery (neoadjuvant chemotherapy) has been established as a method for reducing the intra-abdominal tumor burden and, thereby, increasing the probability of optimal debulking at surgery which is usually performed in the interval between course no. 3 and no. 4 of chemotherapy (interval surgery). Higher rates of optimal debulking, Lower rates of surgical complications, but no differences in survival, have been demonstrated in women having chemotherapy before surgery compared to women having surgery before chemotherapy. Obviously, the method of neoadjuvant chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for women in whom the clinical evaluation indicates that there is no high probability of optimal debulking at primary surgery. Nevertheless, there has been a debate on whether or not the method of neoadjuvant chemotherapy should also be applied for women in whom the clinical evaluation indicates that they are fit for optimal debulking at primary surgery. There is a need for more prospective studies to evaluate the role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of ovarian carcinoma. PMID:25507216

  18. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants.

    PubMed

    Tam, James P; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  19. Antimicrobials in urogenital infections.

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Wullt, Björn; Perletti, Gianpaolo

    2011-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) and male genital infections are amongst the most prevalent infections. A prudent antibiotic policy therefore has a large impact on society. The clinical classification in uncomplicated cystitis, uncomplicated pyelonephritis, complicated UTI and genital infections is useful, also for the right choice of antibiotic treatment. In this regard pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects have to be considered. Nowadays in uncomplicated cystitis antibiotics exclusively reserved for this indication are preferred, such as fosfomycin trometamol, nitrofurantoin and pivmecillinam, in order to reduce antibiotic pressure in this extremely frequent entity. In complicated UTI a broad bacterial spectrum has to be considered. Different antibiotic substances should be used for treatment, such as penicillins, with β-lactamase inhibitors, cephalosporins or carbapenems, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides or cotrimoxazole, if tested susceptible. For genital infections the pharmacokinetic properties of the antibiotics should especially be considered, such as in prostatitis, where mainly fluoroquinolones and macrolides show sufficient pharmacokinetic parameters for treatment of bacterial infections. Furthermore in genital infections fastidious organisms, such as Chlamydia or Mycoplasma spp. have to be considered with respect to their antimicrobial susceptibility. PMID:22019184

  20. Synthetic antimicrobial peptide design.

    PubMed

    Powell, W A; Catranis, C M; Maynard, C A

    1995-01-01

    To guide the design of potential plant pathogen-resistance genes, synthetic variants of naturally occurring antimicrobial gene products were evaluated. Five 20-amino acid (ESF1, ESF4, ESF5, ESF6, ESF13), one 18-amino acid (ESF12), and one 17-amino acid (ESF17) amphipathic peptide sequences were designed, synthesized, and tested with in vitro bioassays. Positive charges on the hydrophilic side of the peptide were shown to be essential for antifungal activity, yet the number of positive charges could be varied with little or no change in activity. The size could be reduced to 18 amino acids, but at 17 amino acids a significant reduction in activity was observed. ESF1, 5, 6, and 12 peptides were inhibitory to the germination of conidia from Cryphonectria parasitica, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, and Septoria musiva but did not inhibit the germination of pollen from Castanea mollissima and Salix lucida. ESF12 also had no effect on the germination of Malus sylvestris and Lycopersicon esculentum pollen, but inhibited the growth of the bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Erwinia amylovora, and Pseudomonas syringae. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of the active ESF peptides were similar to those of the naturally occurring control peptides, magainin II and cecropin B. The significant differential in sensitivity between the microbes and plant cells indicated that the active ESF peptides are potentially useful models for designing plant pathogen-resistance genes. PMID:7579625

  1. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  2. Comparison of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone in advanced non-small-lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ning; Wang, Zhehai

    2016-01-01

    Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a first-line treatment for advanced nonsquamous, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2006. This study retrospectively compared the efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone as the first-line and second-line treatment as well as the maintenance treatment for advanced NSCLC patients. A total of 1,352 patients were included and we analyzed the efficacy evaluation according to the criteria of the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST), survival, and adverse reactions. The data showed that for bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the first-line treatment, the median progression-free survival (mPFS) and median overall survival (mOS) were 11.5 and 17.0 months, respectively, compared to 7.0 and 14 months, respectively, in patients who received chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as maintenance treatment, the mPFS and mOS were 6.0 and 17.4 months, respectively, compared to 3.0 and 15.0 months, respectively, with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the second-line treatment, the mPFS was 3.0 months compared to only 2.0 months with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). The overall responses to the different regimens showed that the remission rate with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was higher than that with chemotherapy alone (31.8% vs 25.5%, P<0.05), although there was no statistical difference in the disease control rate with either first- or second-line treatment. In conclusion, chemotherapy plus bevacizumab as the first-line and maintenance treatment, led to better curative rates and tolerable adverse reactions compared with chemotherapy alone in advanced NSCLC patients. Bevacizumab combined with cytotoxic drugs was suitable as the second-line treatment for such patients. PMID:27536131

  3. Comparison of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone in advanced non-small-lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ning; Wang, Zhehai

    2016-01-01

    Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a first-line treatment for advanced nonsquamous, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2006. This study retrospectively compared the efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone as the first-line and second-line treatment as well as the maintenance treatment for advanced NSCLC patients. A total of 1,352 patients were included and we analyzed the efficacy evaluation according to the criteria of the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST), survival, and adverse reactions. The data showed that for bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the first-line treatment, the median progression-free survival (mPFS) and median overall survival (mOS) were 11.5 and 17.0 months, respectively, compared to 7.0 and 14 months, respectively, in patients who received chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as maintenance treatment, the mPFS and mOS were 6.0 and 17.4 months, respectively, compared to 3.0 and 15.0 months, respectively, with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the second-line treatment, the mPFS was 3.0 months compared to only 2.0 months with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). The overall responses to the different regimens showed that the remission rate with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was higher than that with chemotherapy alone (31.8% vs 25.5%, P<0.05), although there was no statistical difference in the disease control rate with either first- or second-line treatment. In conclusion, chemotherapy plus bevacizumab as the first-line and maintenance treatment, led to better curative rates and tolerable adverse reactions compared with chemotherapy alone in advanced NSCLC patients. Bevacizumab combined with cytotoxic drugs was suitable as the second-line treatment for such patients. PMID:27536131

  4. Virtual Reality: A Distraction Intervention for Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Susan M.; Hood, Linda E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To explore virtual reality (VR) as a distraction intervention to relieve symptom distress in adults receiving chemotherapy treatments for breast, colon, and lung cancer. Design Crossover design in which participants served as their own control. Setting Outpatient clinic at a comprehensive cancer center in the southeastern United States. Sample 123 adults receiving initial chemotherapy treatments. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to receive the VR distraction intervention during one chemotherapy treatment and then received no intervention (control) during an alternate matched chemotherapy treatment. The Adapted Symptom Distress Scale–2, Revised Piper Fatigue Scale, and State Anxiety Inventory were used to measure symptom distress. The Presence Questionnaire and an open-ended questionnaire were used to evaluate the subjects’ VR experience. The influence of type of cancer, age, and gender on symptom outcomes was explored. Mixed models were used to test for differences in levels of symptom distress. Main Research Variables Virtual reality and symptom distress. Findings Patients had an altered perception of time (p < 0.001) when using VR, which validates the distracting capacity of the intervention. Evaluation of the intervention indicated that patients believed the head-mounted device was easy to use, they experienced no cybersickness, and 82% would use VR again. However, analysis demonstrated no significant differences in symptom distress immediately or two days following chemotherapy treatments. Conclusions Patients stated that using VR made the treatment seem shorter and that chemotherapy treatments with VR were better than treatments without the distraction intervention. However, positive experiences did not result in a decrease in symptom distress. The findings support the idea that using VR can help to make chemotherapy treatments more tolerable, but clinicians should not assume that use of VR will improve chemotherapy

  5. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy: Rationale and technique

    PubMed Central

    González-Moreno, Santiago; González-Bayón, Luis A; Ortega-Pérez, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    The combination of complete cytoreductive surgery and perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy provides the only chance for long-term survival for selected patients diagnosed with a variety of peritoneal neoplasms, either primary or secondary to digestive or gynecologic malignancy. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) delivered in the operating room once the cytoreductive surgical procedure is finalized, constitutes the most common form of administration of perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy. This may be complemented in some instances with early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC). HIPEC combines the pharmacokinetic advantage inherent to the intracavitary delivery of certain cytotoxic drugs, which results in regional dose intensification, with the direct cytotoxic effect of hyperthermia. Hyperthermia exhibits a selective cell-killing effect in malignant cells by itself, potentiates the cytotoxic effect of certain chemotherapy agents and enhances the tissue penetration of the administered drug. The chemotherapeutic agents employed in HIPEC need to have a cell cycle nonspecific mechanism of action and should ideally show a heat-synergistic cytotoxic effect. Delivery of HIPEC requires an apparatus that heats and circulates the chemotherapeutic solution so that a stable temperature is maintained in the peritoneal cavity during the procedure. An open abdomen (Coliseum) or closed abdomen technique may be used, with no significant differences in efficacy proven to date. Specific technical training and a solid knowledge of regional chemotherapy management are required. Concerns about safety of the procedure for operating room personnel are expected but are manageable if universal precautions and standard chemotherapy handling procedures are used. Different HIPEC drug regimens and dosages are currently in use. A tendency for concurrent intravenous chemotherapy administration (bidirectional chemotherapy, so-called “HIPEC plus”) has

  6. Overview, prevention and management of chemotherapy extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Kreidieh, Firas Y; Moukadem, Hiba A; El Saghir, Nagi S

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy extravasation remains an accidental complication of chemotherapy administration and may result in serious damage to patients. We review in this article the clinical aspects of chemotherapy extravasation and latest advances in definitions, classification, prevention, management and guidelines. We review the grading of extravasation and tissue damage according to various chemotherapeutic drugs and present an update on treatment and new antidotes including dexrazoxane for anthracyclines extravasation. We highlight the importance of education and training of the oncology team for prevention and prompt pharmacological and non-pharmacological management and stress the availability of new antidotes like dexrazoxane wherever anthracyclines are being infused. PMID:26862492

  7. Prevention of chemotherapy-induced ovarian damage.

    PubMed

    Roness, Hadassa; Kashi, Oren; Meirow, Dror

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the impact of cytotoxic drugs on the ovary have opened up new directions for the protection of the ovary from chemotherapy-induced damage. These advances have spurred the investigation of pharmacological agents to prevent ovarian damage at the time of treatment. Prevention of ovarian damage and follicle loss would provide significant advantages over existing fertility preservation techniques. This manuscript reviews new methods for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced ovarian damage, including agents that act on the PI3K/PTEN/Akt follicle activation pathway, apoptotic pathways, the vascular system, and other potential methods of reducing chemotherapy-induced ovotoxicity. PMID:26677788

  8. Antimicrobial implications of vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Dima A; Miller, Christopher WT; El-Abbassi, Adel M; Cutchins, Della C; Cutchins, Coleman; Grant, William B

    2011-01-01

    Evidence exists that vitamin D has a potential antimicrobial activity and its deficiency has deleterious effects on general well-being and longevity. Vitamin D may reduce the risk of infection through multiple mechanisms. Vitamin D boosts innate immunity by modulating production of anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) and cytokine response. Vitamin D and its analogues via these mechanisms are playing an increasing role in the management of atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, vitiligo, acne and rosacea. Vitamin D may reduce susceptibility to infection in patients with atopic dermatitis and the ability to regulate local immune and inflammatory responses offers exciting potential for understanding and treating chronic inflammatory dermatitides. Moreover, B and T cell activation as well as boosting the activity of monocytes and macrophages also contribute to a potent systemic anti-microbial effect. The direct invasion by pathogenic organisms may be minimized at sites such as the respiratory tract by enhancing clearance of invading organisms. A vitamin D replete state appears to benefit most infections, with the possible noteworthy exception of Leishmaniasis. Antibiotics remain an expensive option and misuse of these agents results in significant antibiotic resistance and contributes to escalating health care costs. Vitamin D constitutes an inexpensive prophylactic option and possibly therapeutic product either by itself or as a synergistic agent to traditional antimicrobial agents. This review outlines the specific antimicrobial properties of vitamin D in combating a wide range of organisms. We discuss the possible mechanisms by which vitamin D may have a therapeutic role in managing a variety of infections. PMID:22259647

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance Mechanisms among Campylobacter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the most common causative agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in the world. Humans most often become infected by ingesting contaminated food, especially undercooked chicken, but also other sources of bacteria have been described. Campylobacteriosis is normally a self-limiting disease. Antimicrobial treatment is needed only in patients with more severe disease and in those who are immunologically compromised. The most common antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections are macrolides, such as erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. Tetracyclines have been suggested as an alternative choice in the treatment of clinical campylobacteriosis but in practice are not often used. However, during the past few decades an increasing number of resistant Campylobacter isolates have developed resistance to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, and beta-lactams. Trends in antimicrobial resistance have shown a clear correlation between use of antibiotics in the veterinary medicine and animal production and resistant isolates of Campylobacter in humans. In this review, the patterns of emerging resistance to the antimicrobial agents useful in treatment of the disease are presented and the mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Campylobacter are discussed. PMID:23865047

  10. Antimicrobial activities of squalamine mimics.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, K; Bernard, E M; Sadownik, A; Regen, S L; Armstrong, D

    1997-07-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial properties of compounds with structural features that were designed to mimic those of squalamine, an antibiotic isolated from the stomach of the dogfish shark. The mimics, like squalamine, are sterol-polyamine conjugates. Unlike squalamine, the mimics were simple to prepare, at high yield, from readily available starting materials. Several squalamine mimics showed activity against gram-negative rods, gram-positive cocci including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, and fungi. Some had little or no hemolytic activity. The hydrophobicity of the sterol backbone and the length and the cationic charge of the side chains appeared to be critical determinants of activity. One of the squalamine mimics, SM-7, was bactericidal against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and S. aureus; its activity was decreased by divalent or monovalent cations and by bovine serum albumin. Subinhibitory concentrations of SM-7 markedly enhanced the antimicrobial activity of rifampin against gram-negative rods. These results suggest that the compounds may disrupt an outer membrane of gram-negative rods. Squalamine mimics are a new class of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. The antagonism of their activity by serum and albumin and their hemolytic properties may limit their use as systemic agents. The squalamine mimics, because of their potencies, broad spectra of antimicrobial activity, and potential for systemic toxicity, appear to be good candidates for development as topical antimicrobial agents. PMID:9210661